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The Cumberland Islander Sep 30, 1922

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ti
W' CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
'Mi , _        	
Wltk which U consolidated tke Cumberland News.
FORTY-FIRST YKAR—No. 39.
CUMBERLAND, .BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, SEPT. 30th, 1922.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:   TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Sun Shines On Fine
Program Of Sports
Representative Crowd from all
Parts of District Attend Gala
Day of Children's Sports at
Cumberland.
After several days of rain, Jupitor
gained the ascendant for about twenty
hours ou Saturday last and the sun
shone brightly for the postponed
Labor Day sports. A good crowd trow
all over the district attended throughout the day, and the refreshment
booths conducted hy the 0. W. V. A.
were kept busy.
FIve-Aslde Junior Football Competition: Ut, No. 1 High School tGuni:
2nd, No. 2 High School team.
Boys' race, 6 years: Charlfes Goinin;
2nd, John Bannerman.
Girls' face, 6 years: 1st, Francis
Morgan; 2nd, Helen McWhirter.
Boys' race, 7 years: 1st, E. James;
2nd, Charles Gomm.
Girls' race, 7 years: 1st, Agnes McKinnon ; 2nd, Alma Waterfield.
Boys' race, 8 years: 1st, Hurry
Westfleld; 2nd, Fred Bolontiner.
Girls' race, 8 years: 1st, Murle.
Partridge; 2nd, Kathleen Brown.
Boys' race, 9 years: 1st, John
Davis; 2nd, Alex. McDonald.
Girls' race, 9 years: 1st, Annie
Brown; 2nd, Agnes Bruce.
Boys' race,. 10 years: 1st, Tadasl;
2nd, W. Lyle.
Girls', race, 10 years: 1st, Edith
Conrod; 2nd, Edith Cameron.
Boys' race, 11 years: 1st, Joe Stuva-
" way; 2nd, Victor Bono.
Girls' race, 11 years:, 1st, Annie
Walker; 2nd, Annie Beveridge.
1 mile bicycle race, 10 years: 1st,
Tom Kabe; 2nd, Douglas Sutherland
Boys' novelty boat race, 14 years-
1st, Tobacco, McLean, Waddell and
Fraser; 2nd, Dando, Gomm, Brown
and Dick.
Girls' skipping race, 12 and 13 yrs :
1st, Edna Codell; 2nd, Mabel Jones.
V
Relay race, under 15 yearB, 4 to a
team: 1st, Mabel Jones, Margery
Grant, Gordon Kelnar, Sam Stanclvy;
2nd, Prlcllla Clouthler, Mary Conn,
Leslie Dando, Albert Gomm.
Eleven.Aslde Juvenile football competition: 1st, Cumberland Juniors;
2nd, Union Bay Juniors.
Boys' novelty race, under 12 years,
molasses and bun-eating contest: 1st.
E. Boffy; 2nd, G. Rega.
Girls' three-legged race, under 12
years: 1st, Emma Davidson and Edith
Campbell; 2nd, Edna Smith and Prlseilla Clouthler. •
Boys' 1 mile bicycle raco, 20 years:
1st, Leslie Merrilleld; 2nd, Ian
Waddell.
High School girls' race: 1st, Edna
Co'dell; 2nd, Martha Boyd.
Mounted pillow light: 1st, U. Riga
and C. Walker r 2nd, W. Thompson and
W. Shurle.
Special novelty feature—flve-asidJ
football exhibition, live lady footballers vs. five gentlemen comic footbal-
els: Special prize to best comic in the
exhibition: rjhlnnman and Irish Colleen.
Girls' relay race, under 13 years:
1st, Annie and Nellie Walker; 2nd.
Ethel and Mary Hunt.
Juvenile footballers' race, 100 yds.:
1st, Henry Watson; 2nd, Tmo Little;
3rd, William McNeil.
Thread and needle raco: 1st, Mabel
Jones and Mao Grant; 2nd, Lina Bogo
and Vera Pickett.
Boys' wheelbarrow ruce: 1st, Tokio
Yamura and Isao Cobo; 2nd, Walter
Waugh and Willie Waugh.
Slow bicycle race: 1st, Tom Abe;
2nd, Tadaski Due.
SOCIAL & PRESENTATION
JUNIORS GO TO BEVAN
FOR GAME ON SUNDAY
The Cumberland Juniors travel to
Bevan on Sunday, Oct. lBt, to play
the Bevan Juniors In a Cumberland
and District Junior League game. The
Cumberland boys are taklnt out a
strong team with the intention of
lowering the laurels of the Bevan
boys; as they defeated the Union Bay
Juniors by 4 goals to nil last Sunday.
This Sunday's game should prove to
be a great contest and a hard struggle
for supremacy,. All those wishing to
see this game should take the advantage of the special train which is
being run for the game; the train will
leave the water tank at 11.16 a.m. on
Sunday morning, returning at 2 p.m
Kick-off at 12 o'clock prompt. Sir.
Jones, of Bevan, will act ns referee
The Cumberland Juniors will be
chosen from tlle following: Boffy, G.
Hunden, L. Scavardl, R. ' Bennie.
Farmer, Mitchell, Taylor, Tarlzan,
Bond, SomervlUe, D. Stevenson, W.
Walker, Frelonl. All players aro re
quested to be at the train at 11 a.m
prompt.
A very delightful social was held
in tiie baBement of the Presbyterian
Church on Wednesday evening, when
the Ladles' Aid, managers and choir
met to do honor to one, or rather two.
ot their members.
There were over sixty friends present, "and a lengthy program was presented, consisting of songs, recitations
und games. Miss Beckwith, the Misses
Mood and. Mrs. Ledlngham gave
solos; while MrB. Perezlnnl «ave two
it citations, all of which were greatly
appreciated,
The more-: serious, event of the evening wus the "Trial of a young man by
tlio name of Mr. Chas. Nash," who was
brought up before Acting Judge Sut
herland, with a jury of two ladles and
nno gentleman:Mrs. John Fraser, Mrs.
Wm. Gordon and Mr. D. McLean
Mr. L. It. Steven presented the case
against said Mr. Nash. Several witnesses were brought forward, all who
testified against the accused; not the
least of what seemed a very serious
charge was pilfering from the Manse
pantry; as witness Miss Hood affirmed
that quite a number of dough-nuts
were missing from the pantry after
the Bald Mr. Nash had been there.
When all the evidence had been presented, Mr. Nash was found guilty of
wooing, winning, and marrying one of
the fairest young ladies of the congregation, and the judge, addressing
tiie jury, asked for clemency In this
case, as the young man was of tender
years, and under a severe strain, com-
blned with other extenuating circumstances.
The jury adjourned, and in the
meantime Mrs. Chas. Nash was called
to the Bar as being also implicated in
this serious charge, and a party to the
crime.
The jury returned with an addition
to their number in the person of Mrs.
Halllday, President of the Ladles'
Aid, who brought in a beautiful silver
tea set, and although the jury all
agreed that the prisoner was guilty
on some of the charges, they were
willing that under the circumstances
Mrs. Halllday should present them
With this beautiful tea set. Mr. Nash
responded ln a suitable manner.
The Ladles' Aid had an abundance
of good ihings for the pleasure of the
guests In the way of eatable dainties
which appealed very much to all.
Contributed.
COMOX AGRICULTURAL
AND INDUSTRIAL ASS'N.
HOLD ANNUAL MEETING
MUCH IMPORTANT BUSINESS TRANSACTED-WILL
ENDEAVOR TO PURCHASE PERMANENT GROUNDS
HEAR FAVORABLE REPORT OF DISTRICT EXHIBIT-OFFICERS ARE ELECTED.
The dining room of the Agricultural. DISBMWEJIESTS.
Hall  at  Courtenay  held a capacity Moody's Orchestra $   62.00
audience on  Thursday night,  when  Royal Candy Co      27.46
the members of the Comox Agrlcul-  Sun.Drug Co	
tural and Industrial Association held  Comox Creamery 	
their   annual   general   meeting, and  Telegrams & express 	
election of officers.   In the temporary, J. Mitchell, labor	
absence of the president, Wm. Urqu-! Postage stamps
hart, the vice-president, Jno. Crockett | Post cards
acted as chairman and opened the
meeting. The minutes of tbe last annual meeting, were read and adopted
on motion of Thorold Smith, seconded
by W. J. Gunn. At this point President Urquhart arrived and took the
chair. He called upon Mr. Hope
Herd, acting secretary, to read a report regarding the late (air. The
secretary submitted the following:
Courtenay Golf
Club Organized
A. B. Dundas, President, and
Chas. Graham, Cumberland,
Vice-President.
Courtenay Is to have a real golf
club. A meeting of enthusiasts held
Wednesday evening having decided
In favor of organization. There were
twenty persons present, all enthusiastic golfers 'or" prospective players.
The following officers were elected:
President, A. B. Dundas; Vive-president, Chas. Graham, -Cumberland;
Secretary-treasurer, F. C. Brock:
ground committee, A. B. Dundas, W.
Shilcock, M. Moncrteff. Executive
committee to act with the officers:
II. Cooke, J. Dick, Mr. Osier, P. L.
Anderton,  Dr. E.  L. Potttnger.
The club has taken a lease on the
Wcstwood property on the Island
Highway in the Sandwlck district.
There aro at present six holes ready
for play", and the remaining three
Will be put Into shape shortly. It
is n good course,. but a tentative
igreement has been made with the
Comox Golf Club that If they should
have their course ln playing condition
within a year the two clubs will amalgamate and carry on at Comox. -The
meeting was hold In tiie office of
Frederick Field.
Any Cumberland people wishing to
loin Hie club should give their names
to Mr. Charles Graham.
REBEKAHS HOLD
WHIST DRIVE & DANCE
On Monday evening last the local
ltcbckahs held a whist drive and
dunce ln the G. W. V. A. Hall. On
account of the weather, tho crowd was
not large, although a very pleasant
time was spent. The ladles' prizes
weue won by MIsb Josie Balango, 1st
and Mrs. Whitehouse, 2nd; and the
gentlemen's by Mrs. R. Brown, 1st,
nnd Mr. G. Rickson, 2nd. Following
refreshments, dancing was enjoyed
Ull midnight. The committee responsible tor the success of the evening
Included: Mrs. Totter, Mrs. Parkinson, Mrs. McNeil, Mrs. Marshall and
Mrs. Smith.
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
FALL FAIR—1922.
Courtenay, Sept. 28th, 1922.
President and Members
Comox Agricultural and
Industrial Association:
It is my duty as secretary of your
association from the 22nd ot August
to the present time, to submit to you
a report on the .financial condition of
the association, more particularly in
regard to the Annual Fall Fair held
on Tuesday%nd Wednesday, September 6th and 6th.
I desire to express my thanks to the
ladles and gentlemen who, voluntarily,
came to the assistance ot the association and through whose efforts the
fair apparently has been a successful
one. The success ot future fairs depends entirely upon the co-operation
you are willing to extend to your
secretary, not only at tke time of
holding the fair but throughout the
whole year.
In order to stimulate entries ln the
live stock classes It Is desirable that
permanent housing accommodation be
erected, but before this can be done
1 would suggest that a serious effort
be made towards securing possession
ot the grounds, which have been
leased trom year to year.
A display of district exhibits has
been suggested. This is not a new
idea, having been advocated here before. It has been a part of lairs held
at other points and has proven one ot
the popular attractions.
I herewith submit my financial report:
September 23rd. 1922.
RECEIPTS.
To Advertising ln catalogue..)  140.00
Gate  receipts     482.76
Candy stall         67.30
Shooting gallery        8.86
Concessions—
Comox Creamery 116.00
Blunt & Ewart  10.00
Marshall Music Co. ..   6.00
B. Galloway  80.00
W. Oglivie     2.60     67.00
Dance receipts     173.76
Cash donations—.
J. Fraser  f 6.00
Silver Spring Co 26.00
Vancouver Breweries.. 10.00
Comox Creamery  30.00     70,00
Entry Fees, Fall Fair         8.06
Membership fees      241.00
Protest tee, H. Morrison        2.6n
Total 1,261.70
CUMBERLAND DEFEATS
NANAIMO MERCHANTS
Cumberland took the big end of a
3-2 score from the Nana'mo Merchants
on Sunday last when the regular
Upper Island League fixture was
played at Nanaimo. A large and enthusiastic crowd attended and went
home well pleased with the splendid
showing made by the cellar team.
At all times during the game, play-
was practically even and at periods
Nanaimo seemed to take the lead.
Had It not been for the Cumberland
forwards snapping up every least opportunity, the home team would have
probably won the fixture. /
Without doubt th* Nanaimo Merchants are picking-up and will have
to be reckoned with before the season
is over.
P. Dunne, Hemming sign	
H. Bramley, sports .?...
Labor—
W. M. Dauncey  $6.00
Miss Williamson   6.00
H. Bramley  5,00
A.  Beaton   6.00
McKenzie's Dry Goods Store..
J. Stevenson, painting 	
Bill posting	
Whistle Co	
Lunches, Fair Day 	
.70
2.20
5.33
5.00
3.00
2.90
1.50
.50
20.00
2.00
2.00
2.75
5.S0
8.50
. Total    $  151.61
RECEIVABLE.
Ada. In catalogue  $ 60.00
Royal Bank   10.00
Government Grant  421.00
City of Courtenay   50.00
Ladles' Auxiliary  130.00
Grant to Boys' and Girls' Pig
Club  _  36.66
Total  $  697.66
Receipts  .,..$1,251.70
Bills receivable .'.     697.60
$1,949.35
1,490.78
 $ 468.58
PAIABLE.
Prize List ._	
 $ 973.26
     344.00
Cumberland "Islander"
10.76
       11.15
Total	
$1,339.15
Disbursements 	
Bills payable 	
 $  151.63
...      1,339.15
Total	
.    $1,490.78
A. Hope Herd, Secretary.
At the conclusion of the presentation of the report, the president, in a
eulogistic vein, congratulated Mr.
Herd on the success of the fair, and
H. Bramley voiced the pleasure It
gave him to move that such a'favorable report ito adopted. This was seconded by Merle Halllday, and on being put to the meeting, was passed
amid hearty applause. The auditing
committee, composed of R. IX. Hur-
tord and W. T .Wain, who have been
looking over the past secretary's
books, reported progress, and asked
that the time limit for receiving their
report be extended to the next meeting of the directors. On motion of
Mr. Bramley and Mr. Crockett, this
request was granted.
The treasurer, Merle Halllday, real
his financial report for the past year
On motion of Mr. England and llev.
Mr, Fllnton, tt was received and accepted.
The District Exhibit
G. W. Edwards was asked for a re
port re the District   exhibit   at   the
Victoria  Fair.   He went  thoroughly
(Continued on page two)
Children's Rain Capes at McLeod's
Courtenay. >
PUBLIC SCHOOL NOTES.
MUSICAL NOTES
After a lengthy period of hibernation, there is every probability that
the Cumberland Choral Society may
now arise, Phoenlx-llke, and under a
business-like organization, become u
very real asset to the city, as well a-
n Bource of pleasure and gratification
alike to the members and the citizens
It has already been Been how deeo
Is the love of good music by the ap
'prociative way In whicli the Aral
sacred concert ot the C. A. O. S. win
received, and it now appears probablt
Ihat we can expect occasional per
fdrmances ol vocal and Instrumentn
music during the long winter even
lugs.
A week ago the C. A. O. S. invite-
those interested in vocal music to as
sist 111 rendering the "Hallelujal
Chorus," with instrumental accom
panlment, at the next Sunday even
Ing concert on Oct. 8th. The response
una splendid. On Thursday night thi
conductor was gratified by the attea
dunce of over forty vocalists at tin
Ilrst rehearsal, while a number sen'
apologicB for absence owing to otlioi
engagements. It seems probable Ilia
ii chorus of sixty or seventy will tak.
part in the tine old chorus. So thai
(here is now a splendid opportunity
tor tiie organization of a choral so
cicty with a membership open to al-
independent of class or creed.
The next rehearsal of the "Hallelu
Jah Chorus" will take place at tin
Methodist Church at 8.15 p.m. on Sunday next with full orchestra and
chorus. This will be followed wlti
another full rehearsal on Monday al
8 p.m.
The conductor will be glad to wei
come additional vocalists, particularly
tenor and contralto voices, on either
of these nights.
Mayor McDonald
Decides Tie Vote
Believes School Board Working
in Best Interests of Citizens
and Will Use Money Wisely—
Aldermen Beveridge, Pickard
and Bannerman Vote Against
Amendment.
At a special meeting of the Cumberland City Council.ou Monday evening
last, Ills Worship Mayor McDonald
was called upon lo cast the deciding
.uie on two questions of Importance
upon whicli the Council was evenly
divided; Hint of giving the School
itonnl the balance of revenue from
tuxes due (hem and the repairing of
Ouusniuir Avenue.
The tueellng wus called,for the pur-'
pose ot considering an additional estimate put In by the School Board for
the following items:
'ost of grading and building
retaining wall along Dunsmuir Avenue  $  674.92
.Csllinnted cost of new fire escape     200.00
Installation of tire alarm bolls    100.00
Installation of tour chemical
fire extinguishers        74.00
Estimated cost of two sheds
30 x lit) feet   1,000.00
GAME STARTS ON
SUNDAY AT 3 P.M.
Cumberland United meet the Merchants United ot Nanaimo in an Upper Island League game, when the
following will do duty tor the locals.
Goal, Wilson; backs, Stewart and
Campbelt; half-backs, Brewster,
Kenny, Conti; forwards, Bannerman,
Milligan, Plump, Hitchens and Home.
The classes making perfect attendance    at   the   Cumberland    Public
School for the week ending Sept. 22,!
were: Div. I and Div. III.
The boys are quite "set up" over
their success against Union Bay on
Saturday last, and are planning great
things for tbe future.
May their dreams come true
The girls are picking inter-class
teams tor a small school league In
basketball, and are looking forward
tc lots ot fun during the coming
season.
LEAGUE SCHEDULE.
p.w.
Ladysmlth  3   2
Nanaimo City  3   1
Cumberland    3   1
Nan. Merchants . 3   0
Goals
D. F. A. 1
1 8   1
2 7 3
1 4 4
0   3 14
Comox Sends Good
District Exhibit
The Best Arranged Exhibit at
Victoria Fair, but Lacked
Certain Vegetables to
Qualify.
Messrs. Tom Booth and George Edwards returned on Tuesday night
from Victoria, where they had spent
a week staging the Comox District
exhibit at the Victoria Exhibition.
They are enthusiastic in their pralBe
of the treatment accorded them at
the Capital city, and have given to
the Agricultural Association some of
their impressions of tiie Fair and the
reasons why the Comox exhibit did
not win a prize, although making thi
requisite forty per cent In points for
the hundred and fifty dollar grant.
It was readily conceded, Mr. Ed
wards said, that the Comox exhibit
was by far the most pleasingly displayed of any of the entries', but because there was lacking certain pro
duce to fill the various classes, Como*
fell olf In the number of points scored
Cowichan hud twenly-eight varieties of forage crops, while Comox hail
three. The time at tite disposal ot
lhe committee having charge of tin
withering of the exhibit was so llniile
that all the necessary produce couh
not be gnltcn together. Competitor!
acknowledge that Comox, given s
proper opportunity, should and could
carry off first prize. This encourage
nent should add strength to the arm
ol those who Will undertake the task
if going lo Victoria next year.
The Interest shown by the pulili-
was centered on the Coniox exhibit,
and the guardians of the display wen
plied with questions continuous!,
during the Pair. Many people though
the exhibit marvellous, especially li
view ot the fact that It had been take;
so far, and also for the excellent ar
rangement.
Both gentlemen feel certain that n
an advertisement the exhibit was tit
best the district ever had, and If It
had cost many limes what it did. thi
money would  have  been  well  spent
Many people from Coniox visited Hi
Fair, drawn thither by the local ex-
dents culled and   expressed   surpruv
hllilt, and many triads of local  resl-
ami    satisfaction,   and    hoped    thai
Coniox would exhibit again next year
The   reply  to  tlveso  people   was  in-
variahly, "We will be hero again  to
chow that we can produce the goods.'
Total  $2,058.92
Aid. Maxwell suggested that the
city charge the School Board all that
rightfully belongs to that department
mil then give the board .their share
if the tax revenue. Following a motion by Aid. Beveridge, tliat the School
lioard be given $1,374, the amount of
ihe estimate less $674.92, for the grading on Dunsmuir Avenue, seconded by
Aid. Bannerniau, Aid. Maxwell moved
an amendment that the School Board
be given what is coming to them out
of the taxes, to use as they Bee lit.
This amounts to about $2,000, not Including last year's poll tax.
The amendment was put first, resulting lu Aid. Maxwell, Parnham and
Thomson for, and Aid. Bannerman,
Pickard and Beveridge against. Mayor
McDonald cast his deciding vote In
fnvor of the amendment.
Discussion Over Road.
A somewhat heated discussion took
place over the item of $674.92 tor tha
grading and building of the retaining
wall along Dunsmuir Avenue ln front
of the schools. Aid. Pickard, Banner-
man and Thomson did not think that
the city should be billed for this expense as the work had been dona
without the sanction ot the city. Aid.
Parnham was of the opinion that $601)
for this would be well spent no matter who spent it or who paid for It,
as it had Improved the city Immensely
and Increased the value of the city
property accordingly.
Aid. Beveridge moved, and Aid.
Pickard seconded, that this amount bo
cut out of the school estimate and not
.laid tbls year. All voted in favor ot .
lie motion except Aid. Maxwell. Tho
mover pointed out that the people
bat did this work without being asked
to do It, were now being begged to put
lown a few boards In the sidewalk
down lii the camp, but this wasn't
leing done.
Considerable discussion followed,
csiiltlng in the above amendment bang passed, giving the School Board
ts share of Ihe city revenue over and
above what they have already received this year.
Repairs tu Avenue.
On the question of repairing Duns-
imlr Avenue, Hie Council was divided
io Biiuie way. Aid. Pickard, Banner-
:an and Beveridge being firmly of
he opinion that the city finances
vould not stand the expense. Aid.
laxwell, Parnham and Thomson eon-
ildered the work absolutely necessary,
is did also Mayor McDonald, who
•ast the deciding vote In favor of gong ahead with the work.
Five thousand gallons of tarvia are
ixpected to arrive this week, and
work will be sjkrted as soon as tho
i-eathcr  pcrml*
CHILD RUN OVER
About 3 o'clock Friday afternoon
the little daughter of il. Q. McKinnon
Vas knocked down by an automobile
on Dunsmuir Ave. near the school.
Ihe child was taken to the General
Hospital, but on examination it was
found that she was not seriously injured and was taken bohie.
ADDS ANOTHER LINE
Mr. A. McKlnnon. furniture merchant, of Cumberland, has added a
Hue of staple dry goods and notions
to his large stock of up-to-date furii-
ture and house furnishings. TWO
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th, 1922
Plant Home Grown Fruit
Trees, Shrubs, Roses
and place your order with
The British Columbia Nurseries
Company Limited
who have a large lot of splendid Fruit Trees and other
Nursery Stock coming on for Fall Delivery.
OUR ROSES are especially good this year, and are
sure to bloom with you first year.
WRITE US FOR ADVICE on what you want to plant.
All our Trees and Plants are the finest in the land, and
are sure to please you.   Write us to-day.
Address:
British Columbia Nurseries Co.,
Limited
SARDIS, B. C.
Blankets
Comforters
White Blankets, pure.wool, ranging in   <?"|£i QC
prices up to per pair  «J)AU*Olr
Grey Blankets, per pair ranging from   (j»/» /»A
fit            ^^
Large size Flannelette Sheets, per pair   (J»0 OC
COMFORTERS in a good range of Colors and Prices.
COMPLETE STOCK OF HEATERS NOW SHOWING
A SPECIAL LINE OF CARPETS ON  SALE THIS
WEEK, SIZE 2'/< x 3 YARDS, EACH
$15.65
The Furniture Store
A. MacKinnon
DO YOU
KNOW
THAT WE ARE NOW CALRYING THE MOST UP-
TO-DATE AND COMPLETE LINE OF
SHOES IN THE CITY?
Shoes to fit both the Feet and the Pocket.   We guarantee satisfaction with every pair we sell.   Only the
most Reliable Brands of Footwear carried is the reason
we are able to do that.
Leckie's are just the thing for SCHOOL WEAR.  We
can supply you with either the " Red Stitch " or the
"Skookum."
Weston's for Fine Footwear in Ladies and Childrens.
Boys' Shoes, sizes 11 to 13, Priced at
$3.25, $3.50, $3.90andup
Boys' Shoes, sizes 1 to 5, at
$3.90, $4.50, $4.90
Ladies' Strap Slippers and Oxfords from $3.50 and up.
Men's 6-eyelet White Rubber Boots at <IM OA a pair
A COMPLETE LINE OF MEN'S & BOYS' CLOTHING
The Model
Clothing and Shoe Store
F. Partridge CUMBERLAND
P.O. Box 152
Bevan Notes
Mr.  and  Mrs.  H.  Stant are  again
residents of Bevan.
.Mr. Beattie motored to Duncan on
Sunday and returned Monday.
Mr. J. L. Brown left on Monday's
train to spend two weeks at Nelson.
Mr.  and  Mrs.   Ells   returned  from
their honeymoon on Friday night last.
Mr. W. Palmer, of Victoria, left on
Thursday's train after spending a few
days with his sister, Mrs. ShleldB.
Bevan and Union Bay played a fool-
ball game on Sunday last, with the
score resulting 4-0 ln favor of Bevau.
GIRLS' HIGH SCHOOL CLUB
The regular meeting of the Oirls'
High School Club was held In the
schoolroom, Thursday last, Sept. 21,
at 7 o'clock.
It was proposed that the three
members of the Literary committee
should each appoint an assistant and
that they should In turn arrange the
program for the meetings. Further
plans were made concerning basketball practices, and the membership
fee was fixed.
Comox Agricultural and Industrial Association.
(Continued from page 1).
Into the subject and made some sug-
Kcstlnns that would be of benefit to
the exhibit III future years. On motion of Theed Pearse and Ben Hughes,
a unanimous vote of thanks was
passed, and the secretary was liistriir
ted to write Messrs. Edwards and
Booth, extending the thanks of the
association to them for their work in
connection with the Victoria display.
Ben Hughes speaking on one of the
suggestions contained In the acting
secretary's report, offered a donation
■if fifty dollars towards a cup or cash
prize for district exhibits. He he
lieved such a display would lend great
impetus to the activities of exhibitors
and be of immense value in helping
to stage a better district exhibit at
any of the big fairs. Others thought
It would he a good thing to Inaugural-.-
a district exhibit section at the Comox
Fall Fair. This matter was left to
the directors to deal with. Mr. Edwards moved and the Rev. Mr. Flliv
ton seconded, a motion extending
thanks to P. L. Anderton, Hope Herd,
A. W. Rigler and H. Bramley for their
assistance In collecting the produce
taken to Victoria. A letter was read
from H. V. Collins, local representative of the Laqrltz Nurseries, Victoria,
stating that his Arm had offered a
handsome cup for presentation In the
rruit division. The secretary was instructed to write Mr. Collins and the
Nursery Co. accepting the offer with
thanks.
Permanent Grounds.
The other suggestion contained in
tlle secretary's report, that of the
purchase of grounds for the society,
was taken up by Felix Thomas, who
asked if anything had been done In
this regard. The committee reported
ihat the grounds, comprising" slightly
more than two acres, had been offered
'iy Mrs. Win. Lewis for $800 an acre.
Il was decHed to endeavor to purchase this hind, and the matter will
lie gone ahead with immediately.
General  Meeting.
A. W. Hlgler moved and Mr. Lecd-
liiim seconded, a motion to hold a
general meeting In March, to begl.i
preparations for the next fair. It was
necessary that action should be taken
!n the Spring and continued up to the
time of holding the fair.
During tiie counting of ballots, Mr.
Crockett, Wm. Duncan and Mr. Wain
told of their visit, in conjunction with
representatives of tiie Board of Trade.
In the Comox Logging Co. re the seeding down of their logged-off lnnds.
Mr. Marshall also, on behalf of the
Courtenay Board of Trade, asked the
association of what assistance the
Board of Trade could be to the Agricultural Association. It was suggested that the Board finance next year's
district exhibit to Victoria.
The delegates from the city organization were warmly welcomed.
New Officers.
The election of officers resulted its
follows:
President—John Crockett.
First Vice-president—T. D. Smith.
2nd Vice-president—W. Duncan.
Secretary—Hope Herd.
Treasurer—Merle Halllday.
Directors— Wrs. Walter McPheo,
Mrs. W. T. Wain, Rev. Mr. Flinton,
H. P. Allberry, R. u. Hurford, Beii
Hughes, P. L. Anderton, <0. W. Edwards, A. R. England, Jack McKenzie
of Comox, W. O. Marshall, w. J.
Dunn.
Honorary presidents — Mrs. Wm.
Lewis, Mr. Wm. Urquhart.
In addition to these, the Ladles'
Auxiliary is entitled to representation
by two members.
Ho=Ilo Theatre
FRIDAY and SATURDAY, SEPT 29th and 30th
William Farnum
in his Latest Special
"Shackles of Gold"
He  raised  himself from  Dock  Laborer   to   a   Wizard   of   Finance.
He   was   married   but   not   mated.
He broke the Stock Market and Himself ln order to ruin the Man who
Loved his Wife.
She Sold Herself for Gold to Satisfy
Her Parents Ambition.
■■-,. "SHACKLES OF GOLD"
fjM   Wiluam aox pftOPucnoM.
&T-
HATE Anally turns to love at tbe end
Extra—Thomas Santschi in a Two-part Western
Drama, and Al St. John in a two-reel Fox Comedy
MATINEE—Saturday, 2.30 p.m. USUAL SATURDAY NIGHT DANCE—9.30 P.M.
Monday and Tuesday Hoot Gibson in " Step on It"
and TOM MIX in "THE FIGHTING STREAK"
Wed., Thurs., Dustin Farnum in "The Devil Within"
FOR SALE
TWO H.P. MOTOR (NEARLY NEW)
220-110 Volt, single phase, 25 Cycle,
14160 R.T.M., Repulsion starter.
MODERN CHOE CO.,
21 COURTENAY
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, .. FIRST
class condition. On view after
October 3rd. Forsyth Range,
Heater, 4-plece Parlor Set of
Mahogany, Bedroom Set, Etc. Apply
MRS. J. BOYD,
i Wlndemere Ave.
GRAY DORT SPECIAL, IN FIRST-
class condition, with good tires, and
new spare.   Cash or terms.
J. DANDO.
CECELIAN" PIANO FOR SALE, IN
perfect   condition, practically new.
Apply to
30 BOX 123, THE ISLANDER.
LOST
A SMALL PEARL BROOCH, (Family
Heirloom). Reward. Finder please
return to
30 THE ISLANDER OFFICE
These cool evenings the cosy open
fireplace is a great attraction at
The *
Maples Tea House
Royston Beach
CHOCOLATES
ICE CREAM
TOBACCO, ETC.
LIGHT LUNCHES
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
PHONE 11      CUMBERLAND
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERHIF1EU),   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Av*.
Cumberland. B.C.
Jersey Ice Cream
Are You a Real Judge of Food?
Can you tell by the taste of Ice Cream for instance whether the sugar
ia sugar or glucose?
Can you estimate fairly accurately the percentage of real cream used?
If you are a real connoisseur you will appreciate the JERSEY ICE
CREAM — If you are not its trade mark will protect you.
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay
\^n It
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th, 1922
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
THREE
Government   Agent  Endorses
BEER
THE BEER WITHOUT A PEER
Vancouver-made Product is put to acid test on most difficult
foreign markets in the world, and comes off with flying colors^
Cascade Beer has made good
in India. This is the most trying climate in the world, and yet
Cascade Beer kept there for
more than a year had the same
pleasant tang and was just as
fresh and pleasing to the taste
as when it left the Vancouver
Breweries.
There is no less an authority
for this than H. A. Chisholm,
trade commissioner for the Dominion Government. Writing
to the Commercial Intelligence
Journal, published by the Canadian Government, under date
of May 13, this year, Mr. Chisholm says in part:
"The last consignment reaching Calcutta is said to have been
a shipment of 'Cascade' from
Vancouver, landed in March,
1921.
"It speaks well of this brand
of Canadian Beer that, although
* it has been in store for over a
year in one of the most trying
climates in the world, its quality
has not deteriorated and none ot
it has gone bad. Its 'crown
caps' seem to have protected the
contents better than corks have
the German lagers. The writer
was informed that this brand of
Canadian Beer, although not as
heavy as English Ale, produced
a pleasant stimulating effect on
the stomach that German lagers
could not produce. According to
many informants, this particular quality in Canadian Beer is
just what is demanded in the
tropics."
Can there be a better endorsement than this for a hot-
weather drink? Here is Cascade—a Vancouver-made product—that can be shipped to
India, held for more than a year,
and when opened prove to be
more palatable and better adapted for a tropical beverage than
beer manufactured right in
India or imported from other
famous breweries of the world.
Stick to "Cascade" this hot
weather.
fygfo*
THE BEER WITHOUT A PEER
For more than Thirty Years Cascade has been the Favorite Beer
of Western Canada.
FOR SALE BY ALL GOVERNMENT VENDORS.
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of thai* high-
grade confections arrive ivarr
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all tha time.
Henderson's
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load) $4.50
Wood for Sale
DOUBLE LOAD     On /\A
FRED McKENZIE
Phone 92L Happy Valley
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS,
CANADA.
SEALED TENDERS, addressed to
the undersigned, will be received
at this office until 12 noon, Thursdaj,
September 28th, 1022, for the construction of Boat Landing at Fanny
Bay, Comox-Alberni District, B. C.
Plan may be seen and specification
obtained on application to the Postmaster at Courtenay, B. C.
J. P. FORDE,
District Engineer.
District Engineer's Office,
Victoria, B. C,
September 18th, 1922.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor    .
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
write for prices to •
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Office, 2620 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
Plans for a pensfdn system for all
City employees are being discussed.
What they need Is a burial system for
the deud ones on the City payroll.
A Woman's Pride
The useful pride which
makes woman cateful of
her appearance and complexion finds a help in the
purity and delicate clinging
fragrance of
BABY'S OWN
SOAP
J3tk
I j^you,
/■sSaiy
ALBERT  SOAPS  LIMITED
MONTREAL
m±*mmmmmmW
Wood for Sale
$6.00
DOUBLE LOAD
FOR	
Any Length Required
W. C. WHITE & SON
Happy Valley Phone 92R
Use PURITY
FLOUR
P.N.A. Official Speaks On The
Benefits Of Tourist Business
Executive Secretary Reports a
Most Successful Season.—
Great   Builder   of
Transportation
Facilities.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office  and  Residence:   Willard
Block.   -   'Phone 116.
"There have been more visitors to
the Pacific Northwest this summer,
both by rail and by automobile and by
steamship than In any previous year,"
said Herbert Cuthbert, executive secretary, Pacific Northwest TouriBt Association. "Just how many people
have been here, I do not know yet,
but I do know, from all the reports
that havo come to me trom various
sections of Oregon, Washington and
British Columbia, that these people
have been of a better class than ln
past years. There has been a greater
tendency on the part of automobile
tourists to patronize hotels and restaurants, and they have spent their
money more freely.
"In some of the cities 1 have visited,
the business men have frankly stated
that they did not know how they
would have tided over the summer
months had it not been tor this tourist travel. It is a little early yet to
estimate how much money has been
spent in the aggregate by visitors, yet,
I think it Is sate to say that it is between forty-five and fifty million dollars."
In response to the query as to what
other benefits the Pacific Northwest
received trom these visitors, other
than the cash revenue, Mr. Cuthbert
made some very Interesting statements. He pointed out that the tourist
was responsible for the high-class nature of some of our transportation
facilities. He pointed to the ferry service between Victoria, Seattle, Vancouver and. Victoria.
In winter these splendid steamships
have often carried as low aB between
sixty and seventy passengers. Anyone knows that If tbat were the normal travel, they could not be maintained on the run for two months. It
is the tourist in summer tbat swells
the business to such an extent as to
make it possible to maintain this high
class service the year round, because
it is no unusual thing for each steamship to carry from seven to nine hundred passengers on a single trip in
the summer.
The tourist travel In the future la
going to Improve many other lines of
transportation and to cause other
transportation' enterprises to be
started. Take, for instance, the Ana-
cortes ferry which was Inaugurated
this year. It was an experiment with
nothing to show what Its prospects
were, and yet all who are familiar
with the results know that -It has been
so successful as to very largely increase the number of automobillsts
that have visited Vancouver Island.
In fact, the city of Victoria claims a
benefit of not less than $250,000 to
its business men through Ita operation, and It has been a profitable venture for those engaged in It.
In the future It will be found In
the Pacific northwest that a large
amount of local capital will be Invested in new transportation routes,
either by automobile, by train, or by
ferry. And this opens up all the
prospects for new capital that can be
employed lu catering to the tourist
travel.
"I found," said Mr. Cuthbert, "in
visiting Portland ln June last, that
Mr. Sam Lancaster, one ot Oregon's
leading citizens, who waB the engineer ot the great Columbia River
highway, had opened up three most
beautifully located, elegantly equipped
camps for tourists where there were
no hotels. One of them Is on the Columbia River highway; one, I believe,
at Lost Lake, and I forget where the
other one Is; but the point Is, that
this is a new employment for capital.
It is providing a new business enterprise for Mr. Lancaster. It 1b employing a large number of people;
but above all, it Is purchasing large
supplies of furniture, beds, camp
equipment, supplies and products of
the Boil, and other things that would
not have been purchased but for the
establishment of these camps, and but
for the increase, in the tourist travel.
This is one of the great benefits of
the tourist business which has been
overlooked by the people of this Pacific northwest.
"Many people look only at the dollars which are spent by travellers for
meals or at hotels, and forget that
every dollar spent for meals is to the
benefit of the grower and producer
and the laboring man, and every dollar spent In the hotels Is for the benefit of the merchant, producer, caterer
and manufacturer who would not
have this business but for the tourist.
"In the near future we are going to
nee millions of dollars spent In new
hotels, new accommodations at lake
and mountain resorts where not a dollar has   been   speut  so far, and In
cities where the hotel accommodation at present is not either sufficient
or satisfactory. And in the expenditure of these millions of dollars, the
general public Is going to be benefitted. This Is ln addition to the or
(Hilary expenditure by the tourist.
"If the plans of the association for
next year, which are now being matured, are carried oul, I believe 192}
will soo the greacst tourist year w.j
have ever had and probably we will
have more visitors than any other resort section ever had in a single
year. This will be ln spile of the
tact that this season we had many
large national conventions which we
will not have next year.
"The point I want to make, however," said Cuthbert, "Is not. that tht
benefits derived from the tourist business ure solely In catering to th-'
visitors while here, nor ln their expenditure with stores, automobile
dealers, garages, etc., but ln the employment of capital and labor, In new
iranMiurtatioii enterprises, in new
building operations for hotels and
camps, and other accommodation at
new or existing resorts, and ln the ln«
creased business which is given to
manufacturers of blankets, linens,
furniture, crockery and all the other
things that go Into the equipment ot
lintels and camp Bites, and in the em
ployment of more labor and ln the
general Increase of business amongst
those who handle In a wholesale or
retail way the articles just referred to."
NO BOBBED HAIR AT
AT UNIVERSAL CITY
Now that bobbed hair Is getting Its
lust desserts and a lot of frivolous
flappers are wondering what kind of
an accelerator they can find to assist
Nature's natural process, a newspaper
feature writer bethought herself to
make a check-up of bobbed and un-
bobbed heads ln the movies.
Many of her film admirers must
have thought at various times that
Gladys Walton, for instance, had bobbed her hair. How could Gladys have
secured such a reputation as a flapper
without bobbed hair? But Qladys Is
ah actress as well as a flapper and
her wig maker can keep a secret. So,
if bobbed heads Indicate frivolous,
flighty and carefree owners, then
there isn't a more serious-minded.
level-headed group of girls anywhere
than at Universal City. For there
Isn't a bobbed head within the walls
of Carl Laemnle's film city.
(Whatever the next hirsute fashion
may be, .the Universal beauties are
ready for tt, with the crowning glory
of woman unimpaired. Among those
who have escaped are: Prlseilla Dean,
Virginia Valll, Gladys Walton, Louise
Lorraine, Mary Phllbln, Gertrude
Olmstead. Laura LaPlante, Lillian
Rich, Edna Murphy, Barbara. Bedford,
Andree Tournler, Una Trevclyn, and
Marjarie Daw. Going over to the
Century lot, however, we find one
bobbed head. Tbat belongs to Baby
Poggy, three yearB old! She Is expected to outgrow It.
The Major has no belief In the
proverb: "Be sure your sins will find
you out."
He says one of bis sins called at
the house the other night and found
him In.
BREAD!
Do you eat it for lunch with
iresh fruit and milk?
Or do you e •', other less nourishing foods?
The' way you feel is a matter
of the kind of food you eat.
Natural foods are the best.
Bread is nourishing.
Bread with milk and fruit is
delicious.
Eat right and feel right.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
HALLIQAYS BREAD
—is the Bread that Builds
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A
Rattling Good Car
CUT OUT THE RATTLE—
Or rather let us do It.   We know how to make your car behave,
and will give you a lot of free advice on tbe subject if you ask ua.
Harling & Ledingham
Telephone 8 Cumberland P.O. Box 349
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Ptpprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal an< 1 Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B. C.
ill!
GENERAL AGENT.
COURTENAY, B. C.
P. O. Box 253
McCLARY'S
Electric Ranges
Women's burdens for centuries past were heavy
because the human race did not know how to lighten
them. An enlightened age has gradually brought now
labor-saving devices to assist her—the greatest of
which is the Electic Range.
McCLARY'S ELECTRIC RANGE
has exclusive features that further reduce women's
burdens, saving time, labor and anxiety.
There is the Protected Element—the Element is
the burner, where the heat comes from. Like other
Electric Appliances, the heat is radiated from wire
coils, but the Protected Element snugly encloses these
coils in porcelain to save them from carelessness or accidental upsets. Therefore, McCLARY'S Protected
Element lasts longer, as acids, moisture and grease
cannot harm it. It heats quickly and holds the heat
long after the power is turned off.
The wonderful seamless, round-cornered Oven—
not a nick or crevice in its smooth, even, impenetrable,
glassy enamelled interior. lAs sanitary as any enameled
interior. As sanitary as any enameled utensil, rust resisting, cleanly. Racks,and rack holders removable.
Elements swing on hinges, so that entire surface of
oven is clear for cleaning.
The Oven has a 1% in. insulation around the side
and a l'/i in. magnesia block insulation in the door—
this holds the heat in oven. Roasts and baked foods
retain their full flavor. The result in better baked
foods with minimum shrinkage.
Warming Oven with small element inside.
Signal lights to show whether current for Oven
is on or off.
Switches for elements plainly marked.
Extra plug for other Electric Appliances.
Mercury or Compensating Thermometer.  .
Fuses easily accessible.
FOUR TYPES OF McCLARY'S RANGES
E. S.—E. S. C.—D.—and E.—supplied in the immaculately clean battleship grey enameled finish, also black
japan—see all these features—have them
demonstrate"! to you at
Cumberland Eiectrie Lighting
Co., Ltd.
WHEREAS certain mischlevuu: ly inclined persons have tampered with the valves of the mains of this Company, thereby
allowing a considerable annum of water to run to waste, we
therefore wish to point out that it In a serious offence to tamper
with such valves, and should (lie offending parties be apprehended, they will he prosecuted t" the very fullest extent of
the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
m
ROYSTON I
LOTS |
FOR CHOICE LOCATIONS, INCLUDING j§j
BEACH FRONTAGES, SEE J
FREDERICK FIELD I
Phone 53    H fc-tft
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th, 1922
McLaughlin
Garage
Courtenay
World Famed
McLaughlin Cars
15 MODELS TO CHOOSE FROM FOR 1923 SERIES.
PRICES AWAY DOWN.
Call or Phone for Your Requirements and Prices.
GENERAL REPAIRS TO ALL CARS
BY AN EXPERT MECHANIC.
ALSO EXPERT WELDING
AND GENERAL ACCESSORIES.
Phone 25.
Geo. H. Pidcock
Proprietor.
To most people, the connecting or disconnecting of a Telephone seems a simple
operation of installing or removing the
instrument. As a matter of fact, in every
case it necessitates changes in the cables
and wires overhead or underground. It also necessitates changes in Central Office wires and switchboard
fro mopen wires or cables. The problems of station
connections; in subscribers' accounts and directory
listings; and frequent requires new "drop" lines
from open wires or cables. The problems of station
movement are among the large problems of telephone
service. Because of the double operation of disconnecting and reconnecting, the work involved is often
twice as great as in the case of new subscribers.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
SLATS DIARY
Friday—Went to the opry house to
lissen to a lecaure on Ekonomy and
Afishlency. The speeker tawked for
a hr. and a H and
amidst other things he
sed that Order was the
main thing tor to hava
in a Institution of enny kind. All I got to
say is this Wether are
house is a Institution
or not we have got a.
plenty ot orders. Ma
attends to glveing them
to I and pa and etc.
Saturday— Bllsterses
ma .and 1 ot her Sisters cum up to are
house tonite and beet
us out ot going to a
swell pitcher show. They waa a taw
king about Love and other commodt-
tys and the strange woman sed she
was disappointed in love. Pa up and
managed to get in a word sideways
and sed Why I thot you was marryed
and she replyed and answered Yea I
am.
Sunday—Enny time I dont no how
to get In good with the Ladys and
Jane and etc. She told me she had
to read a paper before the Campfln
girlB lntltled Modern. Beauty. I sed
to her all she wood halt to do Is to
seand up and let them take a good
look at her. That made me solid as
a chunk of lead.
Monday—School begun. I went and
made up a good pome on It.
The skool bell it has rang agen.
We get .our pencil, book & pen.
Vacation time has went so quick.
We got to study lnsted of go a
swimming ln the crick.
Tuesday—Pa says he has got to
bony sum money before he can finish
are new house. He sed he was going
to ask Mr. Benson. I diddent think
they hardly new each another but ma
Hays they sleep iu adjoining Pews at
chlrch.
Wednesday—The preacher was here
tor dinner and waa jokelng pa and
ma about being married 14 yrs. And
he sed to pa Do you love her still.
I'a looked out In the kitchen and let
his voice down and sed. I believe I
cud love her better that a way than
any other way. Ma tuk It good na-
turcd.   As she diddent hear It.      *
AUCTION
SALES
E. FELIX THOMAS, AUCTIONEER
NOTARY PUBLIC
INSURANCE
Address: Box 53, Courtenay. ■ 'Phone 51-R Courtenay
Full Particular on Application
SALES SOLICITED
Through Service to Europe or Eastern Canada
ou the
CONTINENTAL
LIMITED
Alternate Route via tirand Trunk Pacific Steamships
to Prince Rupesrt and Rail Line
BOOKINGS ON ALL ATLANTIC SAILINGS
Comportment Ulisovntlnn Cars, Standard and Tourtat Sleepers.
Leaving Vancouver 7.45 p.m. dally
For Full information, Apply to E. W. Bickle, Agent
Cumberland, B, C.
Canadian National Railwaus
IN THE 8UPREME COURT
OF BRITISH^ COLUMBIA
In Divorce and Matrimonial
Causes
BETWEEN
SARAH INTRIERI
PETITIONER
AND '
PIETRO INTRIERI
RESPONDENT
GEORGE THE FIFTH, by the
Grace of God, of the United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Ireland and of
the British' Dominions beyond the
Seas, King, Defender of the Faith,
Etc.,
To:—
PIETRO INTRIERI (Seal)
WHEREAS SARAH INTRIERI of
R. R. No. 1, Vernon, In the Province
of British Columbia, claiming to have
been lawfully married to you, has
filed her petition against you In our
said Court, praying for (1) Dissolution of her said marriage, (2) Such
further and other relief as this Court
shall deem meet. WHEREIN she alleges that you have been guilty of
adultery, cruelty and desertion.
NOW THIS IS TO COMMAND YOU
that within 21 days of the service on
you, Inclusive of the day of such service, you do appear in Our said Court
then and there to make answer to tho
said Petition, a copy whereof sealed
with the seal of Our said Court hi
herewith served upon you;
AND TAKE NOTICE that In default
of your so doing, a Judge of Our said
Court will proceed to hear the charge
proved in due course of law and to
sentence thereon, your absence not
withstanding.
"A. J. BRINE,"
Deputy District Registrar.
IN THE SUPREME COURT
OF BRITI8H COLUMBIA
In Divorce and Matrimonial
Causes
New Westminster, B. C,
September 21st, 1922.
REGISTRY
BETWEEN
SARAH INTRIERI
PETITIONER
AND
PIETRO INTRIERI
RESPONDENT
BEFORE  THE   HONOURABLE   MR.
JUSTICE MORRISON,
IN CHAMBERS,
SATURDAY, TIIE llltli DAT OF
SEPTEMBER, A.I). 1828
UPON the application of the Petitioner, and upon reading the affidavit
ot the Petition, sworn the 14th day of
August, A.D. 1922, and UPON HEARING Mr. W. M. Gilchrist, of Counsel
for the Petitioner,
IT IS ORDERED that service upon
the Respondent, Pletro Intrieri, of the
Citation and Petition filed herein, by
publishing this order together with
the Citation herein, in one issue of
The Islander," a newspaper having
a circulation ln Cumberland; and by
posting a copy of the Citation and
Petition under registered post addressed to the Respondent at his last
:nown address of Cumberland, B. C.;
ind by serving a copy of this order,
together with a copy of the Citation
iml Petition upon the Brother ot the
-.aid Respondent at 4C3 Elgin Street,
South Vancouver, B. C, or elsewhere
In the said Province of British Columbia, be good aud sufficient service;
AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED
that the Respondent do appear and
make answer In this Honourable
Court at New Westminster, B. C, to
the said Petition within 21 daye from
ihe date of the said publication;
AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED
that the costs ot and incidental to this
application be costs in the cause.
"AULAY MORRISON, J."
Entered this 21st day of September,
1922.
A. J. BRINE,
Dep. Dist. Reg.
MRS. SMITH, M.L.A.,
ADVOCATES INTERNATIONAL BOARD
At a luncheon held a tew days ago
In Vancouver for Mrs. Mary Ellen
Smith, M.L.A., the guest of honor drew
attention to the lack of definite effort
on behalf of peace, which accounted
for the present state of ferment and
semi-war even in the so-called civilized countries. As a solution of this
problem, Mrs. Smith suggested an International board of conciliation and
arbitration and emphasized the fact
tliat the continued efforts of the people all over the world to end war for
ull time before plunging the world
Into another war.
The application of the money spent
on the Great War towards child welfare ,the establishment of industries
and bettering educaUon and Improving conditions generally, would go far
towards  bringing  the  "Kingdom  of
Shoes
OUR FALL FOOTWEAR HAS NOW ARRIVED AND
WE CAN GIVE YOU VALUES THAT WILL
SURPRISE   YOU.    PRICES ARE AWAY
DOWN, AND WE WILL GUARANTEE
SATISFACTION.
Doctor's Special, Goodyear double stitched $8.50
Split Miner, good strong leather,' with counter and
nailed soles.  Very special at $5.50
Miners' 10-in. High Top, all leather and nailed, .with
counter   $8.75
Ladies' Black Oxford, wide fitting ..' ...$5.00
Ladies' 2-strap Slippers, in brown ..$6.25
Ladies' Fine Calf, high top Shoe, in brown $8.25
Ladies' Leather High Top Shoe, in black $3.90
Children's Gum Boots, 8 to 10y>, at $2.25
11 to 2, at .....$2.60
WE SELL FOR LESS
GORDON'S
Phone 133
Heaven" upon earth, of which the
world has heard so much and seen
so little practised.
When a man begins to pay aa much
attention to a dime as he formerly did
to a dollar, lt'a a sign he's getting
rich.
Heard at the Ilo-llo Dance Hall:
First Girl.—"I overheard that nice
young man telling you that I danced
like a zepher."
Second Girl.—"Zepher, nothing,—he
said 'heifer'."
ADVERTISE  IN  VIE    ISLANDER.
Comox
Valley
20 Acres, 4 Acres Cleared, 3 Acres Partly Cleared.
Small 2-roomed Cabin, Good Well and Barn.   Price
$650.00
20 Acres, partly cleared, Close to Courtenay, on Main
Road, Good Land, no stones, Electric Light.  Price
$2,000.00
Over 200 Listings of Improved Farms, Bush Land
and Small Holdings.
INSURANCE:
Fire - Life - Accident - Automobile - Plate Glass
P. Leo Anderton
NOTARY PUBLIC    •        ■    COURTENAY, B. C.
Phone 22.    -    Res. Phone 15-X. itf
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th, 1922
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
FIVE
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
.SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th, 1922
Co-Operation
"Operating jointly to the same end"
—This is the dictionary's definition of
the word "co-operative." is not every
one operaUng to the same end? And
are there not Instances on every hand
proving how much Booner numbers of
persons operating to tlio same ond
reach their objective by operating
Jointly? One might almost say that
co-operation Is the bye-word of the
twentieth century. It Is the slogan of
the greatest business establishment
on the continent to-day. Co-operation
is the foundation of the world's greatest Institutions. From the time the
world began, people have beeu cooperating to obtain the necessities of
life—and the luxuries. To-day, cooperation is the most approved
method of "carrying on."
Bringing this theory to bear on this
locality and its problems, with sufficient co-operation, Cumberland and
Courtenay might form the nucleus foi
one big district. Cumberland Is essentially and solely a mining town,
producing fuel for Courtenay and the
outside world. Courtenay is the centre
of a fertile agricultural area, producing food stuffs for the use of Cumberland residents among others.
The fact that the two places form
the business aud social centre for
such widely diversified districts and
yet are only a few niileB apart, is only
f. greater reason why there should bn
the utmost co-operation to form one
big district with harmonizing community Interests. The Comox District. Teachers' Institute, just organized, is a move ln this direction and
should create a greater co-ordination
of educational interests. There Is no
apparent reason why there should not
be many more such organizations. It
is hoped that this is only a beginuing
to bring about the most harmonious
feelings possible between Courtenay
and Cumberland, nnd thus make ono
big district supported by two ot tha
greatest industries in the world:
agriculture and mining. •
Root For Your Home Team
It Is a fine thing to give the visiting team a good hand—in fact, it is
the only right thing to do—BUT root
for your home team. When the outsiders make a good play, show your
appreciation, BUT don't get peeved if
your home team makes a poor play,
and "bawl them out," as It were.   A
wise parent doesn't punish a child before company. Neither does a good
sportsman crab a game because the
home team makes a slip and loses a
coal.
Oh! could some power the gifty gle us
To see oursel's as others Bee us.
Oh! could some power the glfty gle us
to let .
some of these pseudo-sportsmen of
Cumberland hear themselves- at a
base or football game when the home
team makes a slip-up, and read the
opinion of themselves in the minds
of real sportsmen at their " line,
they would just like to be able to
make a quick "fade-out" as ln the
movies.
Lot's us all turn over a new leaf
at tbe next game and see how much
better results we will get from the
Cumberland team by persistent and
consistent  rooting for them.
dies and   fought   bumble   beea,xwhoj
I
MAKING THE TEAM.
Use PURITY
FLOUR
The season of the year Is again at
hand when the timid mother and the
cautious father must reach a decision
regarding the young hopeful's desire
to play on the football team. In many
localities where High School football
teams are encouraged by the faculty
aud the Board of Education, tt Is ne
cessary to secure the written consent
of the parents before boys may make
application for a place on the team.
This requirement just now is causing
a situation in many homes that is as
serious as the one raised when sister
sought permission to bob her hair.
course, it is none of our business,
but we would like to take the mother
aside and whisper a few words in behalf of that growing boy who wants
lo get on the team. It Is hardly necessary to talk to Dad, for in ninety
per cent, of the homes where this
issue is now at stake, it will be
Mother's decision that rules. Listen,
Mother! That youngster of yours is
no longer the curly-headed baby that
you rocked to sleep not so very long
ago. You may not realize it, but he
Is growing up fast and he is tugging
mighty hard to get away from your
apron strings. One of these days or
nights he will loose the bonds in spite
of all you can do. Wouldn't It be
better to untie them yourself and let
him Join the football team? It Isn't
so very far from the first year in High
School to fhe senior year In college,
if your boy is fortunate enough to go
to college, and these are the most important years ln that boy's life. It
Is between fourteen and twenty-one
that your boy will lay the foundation
of that character which Is to be his
through life. Football is a great
moulder of character. If it were not,
the lending educators would not put
il in the list of school athletics. "But
It Is so brutal," says the timid mother. Ah, isn't life at best, brutal and
of times cruel? Have you watched the
boys who succeed and fill useful
places in life? They weren't the little
Lord Fauntleroys of yesterday, were
they? They weren't the lads who
wore curls and captured all the prizes
for committing to memory the golden
texts ln Sunday school. They were
the boys who dived the deepest' in the
old swimming hole, made shingle pad-
"Say—That's
Some Cake!
Who Made It?"
And then mother speaks up with
well deserved pride and says, "I
did," and tomorrow she will get
out her Dr. Price's Cook Book and
the can of Dr. Price's Cream
Baking Powder and bake another
masterpiece just for the sake of
true appreciation.
Words of praise always follow the
use of Dr. Price's.
For perfect results in baking
always use—
DnPRICrS
CREAM
Baking powder
MADE IN CANADA
The para, wholesome Cream of Tartar Baking Powder.
Send (or FREE Cook Book- "Table and Kitchen"
149 Notre Dame East, Winnipeg, Can.
swung from a trapete in the old apple
tree, and skated on the first thin Ice
of the winter. No, Mother, boys have
got to learn to take the bumps and
push their way to the front. Football
teaches endurance, aggressiveness,
self-control and makes for physical
development. If your boy is strong
enough to make the team let him go
lo It. Once in a while a player on the
football team gets a broken collar
hone or a twisted arm, but some times
a nice quiet boy gets hurt by having
the plastering fall on him while asleep
In the pretty bed Into which his mother has tucked him. We are for the
boy who wants to get on the football
team and we hope Mother will Bee V
our way and say "Go to it, Johnny,
but play the game iike a real sportsman and don't come running to me
when Jtirry biffs you in the nose."
WHIST DRIVE AND DANCE
What promises to be a most enjoyable event 1b the annual whist drive
and dance of the St. John's Ambulance
Association, Cumberland Center, to be
held In the Ilo-llo Hall on Friday
evening, October 13th. The whist
drive will start at 7.30, after which
refreshments will be served and the
dancing commence. A good orchestra
has been engaged for the evening to
ensure a delightful program.
Principal Webb, of the Cumberland
Public School, la trying to organize a
night school in book-keeping, and
would be pleased if prospective students would give ln their names as
soon as possible, so that a start can
be made early In October.
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
the undersigned, and endorsed
"Tender for repairs to wharf at
Davis Bay, B. C," will be received at
this office until 12 o'clock noon, Wednesday, October 11,1082, for the construction of a pile bent and Umber
decking wharf at Davis Bay, District
of Comoz-Albernt, B. C.
Plana and forms of contract can be
seen and specification and forms of
tender obtained at thla Department, at
the offices of the District Engineers,
Post Office Building, New Westminster,
Post Office Building, Victoria, B. C,
and at the Post Offices, Vancouver,
Wilson Creek, Sechelt, Gibson Landing, and Squamlsh, B. C.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on printed forms aupplted
by the Department and in accordance
with conditions contained therein.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank payable to the  order   of   the
New Fall Lines Showing
This Week
The Newest Exclusive Styles in Ladies'
Georgette, Crepe and Crepe
De Chene Waists
The Newest Creations in Fall Millinery
THE NEWEST CREATIONS IN FALL MILLINERY
EIDERDOWN COMFORTERS : COTTON-FILLED QUILTS
ALL-WOOL BLANKETS IN WHITE, GREY AND RED
FLANNELETTE SHEETS : : BED SPREADS
SHEETINGS : PILLOW COTTONS : PILLOWS
MEN'S DEPARTMENT-
The Newest Fall Styles in Men's Soft Felt Hats in all the Leading Shades.
Men's Regal Brand Dress Shirts in Newest Fabrics and Colorings, at Popular Prices.
New Fall Lines of Slater Shoes in the Newest Lasts.  Black and Tan.   Popular Prices.
Special Values in Boys' Sweaters and Sweater Coats.   These are a lot of Traveller'
Samples Marked at Bargain Prices.
Special Values in Boys' Blue Serge School Suits.   Sizes 26 to 35.   At
$7.75
CAMPBELLS'
CUMBERLAND
Minister of Public Works, equal to
10 p.c. of the amount of the tender.
War Loan Bonds of the Dominion will
also be accepted as security, or War
Bonda and cheques If required to
make up an odd amount.
Note.—Blue prints can be obtained
at tills Department by depositing an
accepted liauli cheque for the sum of
$10, payable to tlio order of the
Minister of Public Works, which will
be  returned  If the  intending  bidder
submit a regular bid. ,
By order, ?'",
It. C. DESROCIIKRS,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, September 12, 1922.
Still Going Strong
Our  Stock Is Getting Low   But  We Have  Some
BIG   BARGAINS   YET
Newly    Arrived    Flannelettes,   grey
Striped and White.   3 yds. for Wc
Girls' Bain Capo.    Splendid valueH.
JIK.VH Hi: \ I'HKIII'imOK SI ITS
36 inches in width.
Pants,          $4.80
NEW ARRIVALS
Large Shipment of Ladles' and Girls'
Sweaters at Greatly Reduced Prices.
Flannelette Sheets, price per pair $8.80
Crepes  ln  all  shades.    Exceptional
White Blankets, full size.   8 pounds.
100 % pure wool.   Per pair ....(9.75
Men's   Pure   Wool   Socks.     Medium
Weight.    English make.    Pair. 55c
Those aro just tha right garments for
the wet weather.
C. KENT AND COMPANY
Courtenay's Leading Dry Goods Merchants set
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
-SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th, 1922
EIGHT DOLLARS
will place this Phonograph in your home, and
you can arrange to pay the balance at the
rate of Seven Dollars and Fifty Cents every  -
month.
This is a Full Cabinet Phonograph, exactly as shown
in the illustration. Three-spring motor, ■ automatic
stop, and Full Price, $95.
Marshall MusicCo
CUMBERLAND and COURTENAY
When you drink—
DRINK THE BEST
* WATAGOOD "
BRAND
TEA and COFFEE
SPECIALS IN CUPS AND SAUCERS
Plain White, per dozen  $1.40
Plain Heavy, per dozen  $2.50
White and Gold, per dozen   $2.75
Flower Design, per dozen  $4.75
Plain White Dinner Set, 97 pieces $16.50
OTHER .SPECIALS
White Wonder Soap 4 for 25c
Marmalade, 12 oz. bottle  25c
Finn;', 41) lb. sack $1.95
Castile Soap, per cake 5c
St. Charles and Pacific Cream, 3 tins for 50c
Fer case of 48 tins $7.00
All Kinds of Fresh Fruit and Vegetables.    •
T.  BOOTH  &  SONS
Courtenay, B.C.
News Of Courtenay District
RATEPAYERS' ASSN. IS
ANXIOUS TO HELP
There was a meeting of the Ratepayers' Association on Monday evening at wlilch the chief subject discussed was " How the Association
could be most useful to the City
Council." It was decided to appoint
members from each ward to act on
a committee whose duties it will be
lo make a tour of the city where It
Is desirable to have certain improvements made and confer with the members of the City Council on the results
of the Inspection. The association Is
very anxious concerning the welfare
of the city and Is trying to help the
Council to see that absolutely necessary Improvements receive first con
iilderatlon.
C. L. & R. CO. ASKED
TO SEED BURNED AREA
I
Messrs. Hugh Stewart, R. U. Hur-
ford, Wm. Wain, Wm. Duncan and
John Crockett, representing the
('ourtenay-Comox Board ot Trade and
the Comox Agricultural & Industrial
Association, paid a visit to Headquarters on Tuesday night their purpose being to interview Mr. Robt.
I'llberg superintendent of the Comox
Logging & Railway Company ln regard to the seeding down of the portion of the company's holdings that
was burned over during the past
summer.
Resolutions have been passed by
i lie Boards of Trade of the district,
and also by the recent convention of
lhe Associated Boards of Trade of
Vancouver Island in regard to this
subject, and representations have
been made to members of the Provincial Legislature in an effort to bave
them support an Act requiring the
various logging companies to seed
down their logged-off areas.
Mr. Filberg gave the deputation a
very attentive hearing, and while he
left the Impression that he was not
unsympathetic to the object that had
brought the delegation to Interview
lilm, he could only promise that he
would put the propostal before his
lompany.
MEETING OF DIRECTORS
AGRICULTURAL ASSN.
Meeting in their own hall on Monday night, the directors of the Comox
Agricultural Association furthered
preparations for the annual general
meeting on Thursday night. There
was not a large attendance, no doubt
many having been kept home by the
inclement weather. Mr. John Crockett, vice-president, was chairman
The report of the committee that had
been appointed to audit the secretary's booka for 1921 and up until the
time he left office in August, was sub
mitted and showed that according to
the books there was cash on hand with
Mr. Hardy the aum of one hundred and
sixty-seven dollars. They were also
instructed to audit the books of the
treasurer before the annual meeting.
The present secretary reported that
as he had heard nothing from the
auditing committee, he had taken
steps to have his books audited so tha'.
a statement could be submitted to the
annual general meeting. His action
in this regard was endorsed, and the
auditing committee asked also to look
over the booka.
Tbe committee that was appointed
at the last meeting of the directors to
interview Mr. Hugh Morrison in regard to the protest he had entered on
Fair Day regarding awards In the
division in which he showed hla
horses, reported that they had Interviewed, him and that as the protest
had not been settled on Fair Day it
was useless to proceed. He therefore
withdrew his protest, and the tee of
12.60 which he had deposited, will be
refunded.
Verbal reports were also received
from those who had been at Victoria
during the exhibition. They told of
the excellence of the display put up
by the Comox district, and gave some
pointers as to how to make it better.
It certainly had been a good advertisement for the district, and well worth
the money that had been expended on
it. It had been a centre of great attraction.
E. T. THOMAS OPENS
OFFICE AT COURTENAY
E. Felix Thomas, formerly of Merville, has just returned from a business, trip to Vancouver and Victoria,
and is opening an office in the new,
up-to-date building of T. Booth &
Sons, Courtenay, where he will be
pleased to give prompt and efficient
service to all his old friends, and
hopes to make many new friends.
E. T. THOMAS, AUCTIONEER
Anyone contemplating the   sale  of
stock   or   household   furniture,   etc
would do well to get particulars from
Mr. Thomas, as his clients' Interests
are his first consideration.
COURTENAY POLICE
COURT HAPPENINGS
The charge of drinking beer in a
liquor warehouse, laid against young
Cleland, of Courtenay, was dismissed
last Friday by Magistrate Hames. P.
P. Harrison prosecuted, and Theed
Pearse defended.
In the case ot Rex vs. R. Aske,
wherein the defendant was charged
with purchasing beer from a person
other than a Government vendor, Aske
pleaded guilty and was fined (60 and
costs.
UNION BAY MAN
SAYS "NOT GUILTY"
Personal Mention
Mr. F. S. Racher has left for Cal
gary ou a business trip.
Mr. M. B. Tribe returned on Tues
day from a business trip to Vancouver.
Mr. A. Cleland has gone to Nelson
to attend the big Liberal convention.
Mr. Alex. Nelson left on Monday
for Nelson, where he Is attending the
Liberal convention this week.
Messrs. Jas. and E. S. Talt, of Victoria, spent part of this week hunting
in the district.
Mr. R. Thwaltes, Parksville, paid
Courtenay a business visit on Wed
nesday.
Mr, H. P. Allberry left on Tuesday
tor Mission, where he will act as one
ot the judges at the annual Fall Fair.
Mr. and Mrs. Hodgson, of Parksville, were in Courtenay on Wednesday to attend the stock sale at the
Hardy ranch.
Sometimes all tho early bird gets i
for breakfast Is hungry. i
Never try to step on a man who is
live wire.
Difference   between   hugging
dancing is some cannot dunce.
and'    The trouble with being lazy Is It
1 tequires so much time.
On Saturday last, George Nell, of
Union Buy, appeared before Magistrate Baird, charged with an Infraction of the Liquor Act. He entered a
plea of not guilty, and the case was
remanded until the end of this week,
P. P. Harrison Is prosecuting.
Mr. O. H. Pidcock, proprietor of the
McLaughlin Oarage, left on Wednesday for a week's hunting along the
Campbell river.
LADIES—You can more than sava
the price of your gasoline when out
driving by making Layer's Store at
Courtenay your destination. Something new all the time.
Mr. and Mrs. Stan. Cameron, Mr.
Roy Ooodncre, Mr. Gib. MacKay and
Mr. J. Goodrich, of Victoria, were in
the city on Tuesday, passing through
to Forbes Landing and Buttles Lake
to Bpend a few days fishing and hunting.
Why Send to Vancouver?
When You Can Get Goods Delivered at These Prices ?
J. B. Coffee, per lb 65=
Granulated Sugar, 20 lb, bags  $1.80
Icing Sugar, per lb 10c
Shredded   Cocoanut,   per   lb 25c
Roman Meal, per package  35c
Mayola Oil, 1 lb. tin  40c
Rogers Golden Syrup, 5 lb, tin, !>0c, 10 lb. tin  95c
St. Charles Milk, large tin 16c
Carnation Milk, large tin .: 16c
Braid's Best Tea, per lb 76c
Rldgcway's Old Country Ten, per lb 75c
M.
Deckajulla Tea, per lb : 6Sc
Fry's Cocoa, Breakfast, % lb. tin  'Oo
Magic Baking Powder, per tin  3"o
Royal Yeast Cakes, 2 for  16c
Shredded Wheat, per packet  16c
Green Gage Pure Jam, 4 lb. tin 60c
Empress Strawberry Jam, 4 lb. tin  96c
Llbby's Hawaiian Pineapple, 2 lb. tin  30c
Our Motto: "Quality and Service."
Courtenay Cash Store
Pigott Block    -   Phone 56
McLEOD'S
GREAT SALE
Of Surplus Stock
Men's Boots, Raincoats, Hats and jj
Caps, Kiddies' Waterproof Capes j|
Misses' and Ladies' Raincoats J
Shoes, etc. j§
EXCEPTIONAL VALUES IN HOSIERY 8
DONT MISS THIS GREAT OPPORTUNITY 8
TO SAVE MONEY B
J. McLEOD
Courtenay, B.C.
IMPORTANT—The Parking By-law is revoked—Stay
as long as you require.
BLANKETS
Full Size Pure Wool English Blankets, d»Q ff A
per pair    tJJt/»t)U
Full Size Flannelette Sheets, reduced to d»Q OP
per pair    ipO.uO
Boys' All-wool Hoze, per pair 55c
BUY FOR CASH AND SAVE MONEY
Laver's Store
CUMBERLAND AND COURTENAY
WITH THE GAS TANK ON THE REAR
NO INCONVENIENCE IS EXPERIENCED
WHILE TAKING ON GAS     :: ::
This new closed Model marks a distinct advance in
Closed Car Designs., Four Doors provide easy access
to both front and rear compartments. Five passengers
are comfortably accommodated in the roomy interior.
The doors are secured by Yale latches. New springs
make this Model extremely easy riding. An electric
dome light, upholstery of the best qualify cloth, and
other interior appointments, add to the refinement of
this   exclusive "FOUR-NINETY" Four-door   Sedan.
 "COMPARISONS SELL CHEVROLETS"	
" Four-Ninety " Four-door Sedan $1,460
"Four-Ninety" Utility Coupe      $1,245
SOLD BY
THE
COURTENAY
GARAGE
Phone 61
BLUNT & EWART, LTD.
Phone 61
Commencing October 2nd, this Garage will be open
from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Every Day Except Saturday.
Saturday: 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday: 9 a.m.
to 6 p.m.
1
CHEVROLET
THE   FOUR-NINETY   FOUR-DOOR   SEDAN
O
Simplicity of Design and Construction makes possible
every Modern Feature of a Closed Car in this Model.
Exceptional economy of operation makes this Car at
once attractive. The body lines satisfy the most exacting tastes. Stability of the body is insured by the
solid post construction.
.   !] (lf>
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th, 1922
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SEVEN
Comox Assessment District
I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE that, on Thursday, the 12th day of October, next, at the hour
of 10.00 a.m., at the Court House, Cumberland, I will sell at Public Auction the lands in the list
hereinfater set out, of the persons in said list hereinafter set out, for delinquent taxes, unpaid by said persons on the 30th day of June, 1922, and for interest, costs, and expenses, including the costs for advertising said sale, if the total amount due for the period ending December 31st, 1920, is not sooner paid.
The Collector will be pleased to receive any information respecting the following list where
the owner is a member of the Allied Forces and is entitled to the benefits of Section 29, of the
" Taxation Act Amendment Act, 1918."
LIST OF PROPERTIES
NAME OF PERSONS ASSESSED.
SHORT DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY.
COMOX DISTRICT.
Sub-dlvIslon of Parcel B, Section 89, and Part
I   Marcel A, of Section 64, Hap 8801.
Machln, R. H., ft Soldiers' S. Board....    Lot 1  ' 104.33
t Sub-dlvIslon of Sections 88 * 89, Hap  8115.
Yockney, C. E„ & Soldiers' S. Board... Lot 1 ..
Treherne, H. R., £ Soldiers' S. Board..  Lot 2
'49.31
39.47
6.94
3.23
2.60
Sub-dlvlslon of Part Section 68 and Part Lot 811, Map 8817.
Ault, T., ft Soldiers' S. Board   Lot A :....-.
.  West, W„ & Soldiers' S. Board <..... Lot C of Section 77	
Wright, Tom, & Soldiers' S. Board .... Lot A & B of Section 77	
Carter,  R  Lot A of Lot" 250, Map 2119	
Carter, R.  Lot 16, Blk. 2, of Lots 82 & 86, Map
, j 1878 _	
Mllla, W. O     Lots 94 ft 95, of Lot 110,' Map 410 ....
Weir, F. P., ft Soldiers' S.' Board .... Lota 5 & 6, Lot 119, Map 1409 	
Towler, Bruce  Lots 19 & 20, of Lot 134, Map 1705 ....
Baker, W. T., ft Soldiers' S. Board, .... Lot 137 "C"  .1. :...„	
Lot 166, Map 1845.
^ North American Loan Co  Lots 1, 2 3 of Block C ...:	
Butonen, Artu   Lot 11, of Block H 	
Lot 194, Hap 448.
Creech, Harry   S.W. 14 ot N. W. 14 Block E	
Jones, Mra. Edith M   Lou 2 to 7, of Lot 221, Map 2547	
Wagstatt, George, Earlswood John ft 1
Mace, John   E % of Lot 7 of Lot 227, Map 1289...
Pigott, Charles H   ....'. N % A of Lot 8 of Lot 227, Map 1289
Greenwood, Job, P.
Hagstrom, Mrs. Francis .
Township 1.
S. E. 14 of S. W. 14 Section 4 ....
Township 8.
N. % of N. W. 14 Section 25	
73.01
43.07
118.32
8.40
5.10
28.00
19.40
94.37
11.18
6.07
17.09
227.50
21.00
21.00
60.00
120.00
Powell, R. H,_
Powell, R. H.
Carlln, M. B. .
I Township 4.
  Fr. N. W. 14 Section 8	
I Township 6.
  Fr. N.W. 14 of Section 33 	
  E. 14 ot S.W. %, iW. V, of S.E. 14 of
|        Section 34	
j Township 9.
Haughton, P. O  W. 14 of N. 14 of N.E. 14, Section 17...
McKenzie, John W., Smith Percy, b !
Eustace Smith   W. 14 of W. pt. of N.E. 14 Section 20™
'                                               | Township 11, Nelson District
Adventlst Church   N. pt. of N.W. 14, Section 30 i	
48.00        3.20
4.50
.30
240.00 16.00
60.00 4,00
140.00 12.95
8.00 .20
Sub-division of Section 7, Dunsmuir Townslte, Hap 418.
Carson, Jos. H.  „  Lota 12 ft 13, Block 42 ~ 18.99 .93 '
Halllday, James B  Lot 4, Block 44   7.38 .47
Eccleston, Tom   Lot 10 of Lot 20, Map 1841   31.50 2.10
I
Newcastle District.
Booth, George   10 acres of Lot 49	
| Denman Island.
White, Samuel  30 acrea of N.W. 14 Section 12	
Denman Island Mutual  Improvement I
Co  Pt. of N.W. corner of Section 17	
Chalmers, Mrs. A. E  pt. S. 14 of N.E. 14 Section 18, 3.72
i        acres  ...	
Group 1, N. W. D.
Turnbull, W. D  Lot 1214 	
Stolterfoht, Ed  Lot 1420 ..-..-:.-.:.:..	
Stolterfoht, Ed. ...:.  Lot 1421	
Stolterfoht, Ed  Lot 1422 	
McKlnnon, John, McL  Lot 1481, Mink Island	
; Sub-division of Lot 8, of Lot 1587.
Christie, John    Lot 4 	
Kermond, John D.  Lot 1073 	
Osborne, F. P   Part of Lot 1612, .302 acres	
Korpl, John   Lot 1640  	
Cook, Clarence    Lot 1978 	
Somerton, George ,   Lot 3039 	
Slater, B.    Lot 4186 	
Wasp, Geo. F .'.  Lot 4906 	
17.00
26.85
6.33
7.00
28.50
79.00
116.00
87.00.
561.25
66.24
144.00
84.36
38.20
12.00
22.50
18.00
24.00
1.09
1.72
.34
1.69
9.33
13.48
10.11
36.73
3.74
9.60
6.41
2.32
.80
1.60
i 1.20
1.60
Sayward District.
Mackenzie ft Mann, Limited    Lot 2, Duncan Bay	
Mackenzie ft Mann, Limited   Lot 26, Duncan Bay 	
Bull, Wm. P., ft Helm, Robt.M. ........   10 acres of Lot 66	
Fusahlchl, Ito	
Fusahlchl, Ito	
Paterson, Alexr	
Shouldice, George	
Renberg, V. ft Ostermark, Ole .
Hardy, George J	
Mackenzie ft Mann, Limited ....
Mackenzie ft Mann, Limited ....
Davis, Fred 	
Teeter, Warren
Jones, Ella	
Heath, Andrew .
Cook, Chas. E. ...
Busby, Andrew .
Sub-division of Lot 69, Hap 1070.
Lots 11 to 26, Block 1 ...'	
Lots 14 to 26, Block 8 	
Lots 4 and 6, Block 17 	
'Lot 17, Block 23	
Lota 6 and 7, Block 24	
Lot 20, Block 24	
Lot 109 	
Lot 120, Map 507-A, except Blocks 17
and 24 	
6.02 acres of Lot 132 	
N.  14 of Lot 217 	
Lot 672 	
Lot 730	
Lot  779    .«.	
Lot 1089 	
Hernando Island.
McKlnnon, N. A    Part of Section 3, 172 acres 	
McKlnnon, N. A   N.E. 14, Section 5 	
McKlnnon, N. A    Fr. N.E. 14 Section 7, N.W. 14 Sec. 8.
3.75
3.75
8.75
4.28 3.75
2.88 3.75
10.98 3.75
.61 3.75
.53 3.75
.29 2.75
1:78 3.75
1.29 3.75
6.17 3.75
.47        2.76
.88        2.76
.98        3.75
18.49        3.75
1.14        3.75
1.14        3.76
3.60        3.75
7.20        3.76
3.75
3.76
3.76
3.75
3.76
3.75
2.75
2.76
3.75
9.75
3.75'
3.75
3.76
3.76
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.76
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.76
3.76
3.76
3.75
3.76
676.00
46.00
3.75
2,790.00
186.00
3.75
34.72
2.20
8.75
12.29
.80
2.75
12.29
.80
2.75
6.17
.30
2.76
6.10
.30
2.75
5.17
.30
2.76
5.10
.30
2.75
750.00
60.00
3.75
802.50
64.60
3.75
15.00
1.00
3.75
60.80
3.88
3.75
120.00
8.00
3.75
60.00
4.00
3.75
27.00
1.80
3.76
15.00
1.00
3.75
129.00
8.60
8.75
120.00
8.00
3.75
81.00
5.40
3.75
114.02
56.29
46.83
81.04
49.70
133.05
14.16
12.63
8.14
33.53
24.44
104.29
14.40
9.15
I
21.82
249.74
j
25.89
25.89
67.35
130.911
64.95
8.56
259.75
87.75
156.70
6.95
17.67
•    10.56
37.35
21.84
32.32
9.33
11.09
33.94
92.08
133.23
100.86
691.73
73.73
167.35
93.62
44.27
16.6!
27.76
22.96
29.36
mnmtr   j
723.76
2,979.75
40.67
16.84
16.84
8.22
8.15
8.22
8.16
803.75
I
860.75
19.75
68.43
131.75
67.75
32.55
19.75
141.36
131.75
90.16
NAME OF PERSON ASSESSED.
SHORT DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY.
£ =
o H
I*.
Cortes Island.
Moore, J. H   Fr. S.W. H. Section 12	
Smith, Marlon E    Lot 8* 	
Meredith, Gwynne,  Lot 672 	
Murphy, Rowland' .'.  N.E. 14, Section 49, 	
Rupert District
Anderson, Sir. Robert ft McLaughlin,
Wm    10 acres ol Section 2 	
Anderson, Sir Robert ft McLaughlin,
Wm  U)t 360	
Hammond, Clifford O  (j. 80 acres of Section 27 	
Napier, Robert Ross  N.E. 14 ft N E. 14 of S.E. 14. Lot 928..
Brown, Ernest  Lot 1313 	
Norton, Albert E.,   Lot 1445 	
Robertson, Emily J  Lot 1692	
• Township 4.
JoneB, MrB. Emma,       pr, s.w. 14. Section 20	
Williams, Mrs. Margaret    n. ii, of S. 14 of Section 22 .
Kenyon, Floyd,
Township 6.
Lot 6 of Block 112, Map 1667
Townslte of Hardy Bay, Map 810.
Knowles, Robt. E    Lot 6, Block 6 	
Currle, C, Ernest    Lot 6, Block 16, 	
I Townslte of Port Hardy, Map 700.
Lewis, Henry      Lots 2 and 4, Block 6 	
Williams, Mrs. Emma   Lots 1 and 2, Block 26,	
Burchell, Ada K    Lot 8, Block 26	
Williams, Mra. Emma    Lots 11 and 12, Block 26	
Williams, Mrs. Emma, :....   Lots 6, 8, 12, 14, 16, Block 33	
Dunn, George I., Estate    Lot 3, Block 37, 	
Williams, Mrs. Emma    Lot 2, Block 38	
Dunn, George I., Estate	
Charles, Mrs. M. A	
Denyer, Herbert, ft Barclay, Wm.,
Hulke, W. B	
Harper, John M.,	
Bayliss, Arthur W., ~.
Jacobson, Victor,	
Dunn, George I., Estate,	
Hulke, Ethel G	
Berryman, MrB. Hannah M	
Czak, John	
Harper, John M	
Jacobson, MrB. Minnie	
Pettlgrew, F. P	
Port Hardy Addition, Map 1829.
Lot 7, Block 18	
Lots 5 and 7, Block 23	
Lot 11, Block 23	
Lot 16, Block 23	
Lot 2, Block 28	
Lot 8, Block 28	
Lot 15, Block 29	
Lots 1 to 16, Block 30	
Lot 13, Block 32, 	
Lots 2, of Block 37,	
Lot 15, Block 37 -	
Lot 16, Block 39	
Lot 1, Block 48 ■-	
Lot 16,. Block 50	
Township 7.
Raines, F. N „    Fr. S.E. li, Section 5	
Township 8.
   N.W. 14 Section 6,	
Rye, Lewis M	
Township 9.
Summerscales, H    Lot 20, Block 62, Map 810-A,
Markley, Colin H„ „    400 acres ot Section 16	
Skinner, Jephtha J„    Fr. S.W.
Russell, Robt. G    Lot ;
Township 88.
14. Section 20	
Township 28, Hap 8006.
Township 88.
Brassard, MrB. M.,  S. 14 ft N.W. 14 Section 20	
Wilson, Arthur H.,   S.E. 14, Section 21	
Sorge, Francis Pallant  S.E. Ii of N.E. 14, Section 28,
Moran, Thomas  S.W. 14, Section 31	
Adam, Sidney H  S.W.,,14, Section 32	
Holmes, Joseph  N. 14 of N.W. 14, Section 16, ...
Calhoun, Robt, ft Gelletley, Robert  W. H of N.W. Ii, Section 33,...
Township 84.
S.E. 14 Section 16 ..*	
Trust Company ot Scotland	
| Township 85.
Hoyem, Ole ft John   N.W. 14, Section 4,	
Orskog, Andrew   S.E. 14 of S.E. 14, Section 9	
Larson, Annie A.,     N.W. 14 of S.E. 14, Section 9 	
Herchllk, Alfred    S.E. 14. Section 15	
Carlln, Joseph D.,   S. V, of S.E. 14, & N.E. 14 ol N.E. 14.
Sec. 11	
Robertson, Mary O .'  Fracn. Section 16 	
North-West Canadian Investment Co.
Limited, ln liquidation,	
Beech, Joseph,
Southgate Logging Co.,
Southgate Logging Co.,
Southgate Logging Co.,
Southgate Logging Co.,
Southgate Logging Co.,
Southgate Logging Co.,
Township 86.
N.E. 14 of N.W. 14, N. 14 ft S.E. 14 of
N.E. 14, E. 14 ft S.W. >4 of S.E. Ii
ft N.E. 14 of S.W. 14, N. 14 of S.W.
Ii of N.W. Ii of Section 20	
N.E. 14 & E. 14 of N.W. 14, Sec. 28	
Coast District, Range 1.
Lot 97, 	
Lot 98 _ :	
Lot 99	
Lot 100	
Lot 101	
Lot 102	
Slater, John	
Walker, Wm. J.,
Townslte of Shoal Bay, Map 645.
Part of Block 1	
Lot 955. 1487-A, 1488	
Stephen, John, Estate, .
Malcolm Island.
..,...«,...   w  V4 of S.E. 14 of Sec. 16, ft W. 25
acres of Fr. N.E. 14 Sec. 13	
,       Solntula Townslte, Map 816-A.
Stephen, John    Block 70	
23.84
42.57
32.66
128.58
7.50
97.50
25.80
300,00
24.00
13.00
388.50
97.50
100.00
3.00
1.14
2.58
3.03
8.55
.42
6.50
1.47
42.60
1.60
.65
53.51
6.30
5 80
.20
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.76
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
8:75
3.75
2.76
1.00
.20
720.00     106.80
18.00 1.20
30.00
13.00
13.00
60.00
120.00
2.00
.65
.65
2.90
17.80
200.00       26.40
48.00
30.00
30.00
13.00
180.00
270.00
3.20
2.00
2.00
.65
26.70
40.05
2.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.76
8.76
3.75
3.75
3.76
631.15     120.78
360.00       53.40
111.30
222.60
516.46
243.15
428.25
242.25
3.00
25.00
7.41
14.83
34.40
16.20
28.54
16.14
.20
1.45
3.75
3.76
3.75
3.75
3.76
3.75
3.75
3.75
2.75
3.75
49.76        3.25        3.75
749 .60 2.75
28.73
48.90
39.44
140.88
11.67
1
107.75
31.02
346.25
29.35
17.40
445.76
107.55
109.55
6.95
3.00
.20
2.75
5.95
3.00
.20
2.75
6.95
6.00
.34
2.75
9.09
5.00
.29
2.75
8.04
5.00
.29
2.76
8.04
3.00   •
.20
2.75
5.95
7.50
.50
2.75
10.75
5.00
.29
2.75
8.01
3.00
.20
2.75
6.95
3.00
.20
2.75
6.95
4.50
.23
2.75
7.48
5.00
.29
2.76
8.04
6.00
.29
2.75
8.04
6.00
.29
2.75
8.04
5.00
.29
• 2.75
8.04
5.00
.29
2.75
8.04
24.00
1.60
2.75
28.35
6.00
.29
2.75
8.04
6.00
.29
2.75
8.04
6.00
.29
2.76
8.04
6.00
.29
2.75
8.04
6.00
.29
2.75
8.64
5.00
.29.
2.75
8.04
112.60
7.40
3.76
123.65
12.00
.88
3:75
16.63
3.00
.20
2.76
5.95
300.00
20.00
3.76
323.75
112.60
7.40
3.75
123.65
5 95
830.55
22.95
85.75
17.40
17.40
56.65
141.55
230.15
64.96
35.76
35.75
17.40
210.45
313.80
755.68
417.15
122.46
241.18
664.60
263.10
460.54
262.14
5.96
30.20
56.74
10.74
Dated at Cumberland, B. C, this 20th day of September, 1922.
JOHN BAIRD,
Collector, Comox Assessment   District.
PRINCE OF WALES
GOOD HORSE JUDGE
The Prince of Wales has been considered a good horseman for several
years, but not until his return from
his world tour did It become known
that he was a good Judge ot values.
His alertness for prices came as a
considerable surprise to dealers and
buyers in the horse market at liar-
boro, where the Prince nonchalantly
strolled ln to set If he could pick up
a couple of horses.
His eye almost Immediately tell up
nn one of the choicest animals of the
lot and he quickly made an offer
which old-time dealers considered
very fair hut not at all exhorbltant.
Now, this market is hardly an auction
affair, but there Is competitive bidding
tn an extent tliat a dealer with a good
animal will not accept the first offer
even if It was from the Prince ot
Wales. After stating his price the
Prince seemed anxious and was heard
to remark "If no one offers a higher
price that horse is mine," indicating
that he did not intend to go one sovereign higher.   He got the Horse.
The Prince is preparing to do considerable hunting this year, and it Is
reported he wants to resume steeple
chasing. Last year the royal family
mill n goodly part of the English public were nervous over the dangerous
sport, anil after the Prince had had
a couple of dangerous falls he heeded
Queen Mary's admonitions to atop It EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 90th, 1922
To Holders of Five Year
51 per cent Canada's
Victory Bonds
Issued in 1917 and Maturing 1st December, 1922.
CONVERSION   PROPOSALS
THE MINISTER OF FINANCE offers to holders
of these bonds who desire to continue their
investment in Dominion of Canada securities the
privilege of exchanging the maturing bonds for new
bonds bearing 5} per cent interest, payable half yearly,
of either of the following classes:—
(a) Five year bonds, dated 1st November,
.1922, to mature 1st November, 1927.
(b) Ten year bonds, dated 1st November,
1922, to mature 1st November, 1932.
While the maturing bonds' will carry interest to 1st
December, 1922, the new bonds will commence to earn
interest from 1st November, 1922, GIVING A BONUS
OF A FULL MONTH'S INTEREST TO THOSE
AVAILING THEMSELVES OF THE CONVERSION
PRIVILEGE.
This offer is made to holders of the maturing bonds
and is not open to other investors. The bonds to be
issued under this proposal will be substantially of the
same character as those which are maturing, except
that the exemption from taxation does not apply to the
new issue.
Dated at Ottawa, 8th August, 1922.
Holders of the maturing bonds who wish to avail
themselves of this conversion privilege should take
their bonds AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE, BUT NOT
LATER THAN SEPTEMBER 30th, to a Branch of
any Chartered Bank in Canada and receive in exchange
an official receipt for the bonds surrendered, containing
an undertaking to deliver the corresponding bonds of
the new issue.
Holders of maturing fully registered bonds, interest
payable by cheque from Ottawa, will receive their
December 1 interest cheque as usual. Holders of
coupon bonds will detach and retain the last unmatured
coupon before surrendering the bond itself for conversion
purposes.
The surrendered bonds will be forwarded by banks
to the Minister of Finance at Ottawa, where they will
be exchanged for bonds of the new issue, in fully
registered, or coupon registered or coupon bearer form
carrying interest payable 1st May and 1st November
of each year of the duration of the loan, the first interest
payment accruing and payable 1st May, 1923. Bonds
of the new issue will be sent to the banks for
delivery immediately after the receipt of the surrendered
bonds.
The bonds of the maturing issue which are not
converted under this proposal will be paid off in cash on
the 1st December, 1922.
W. S. FIELDING,
Minister of Finance.
0BUiir3Jiir^lrSJWr5Ii^^
NOTICE
S. SMITH (LATE OF ROYSTON GARAGE) BEGS
TO  ANNOUNCE  THAT  HE  HAS  DECIDED
TO DEVOTE THE WHOLE OF HIS TIME TO
WELDING and BRAZING
(14 Years' Experience in England)
ANY  METAL,  AND  ANY  ARTICLE,  FROM  AN
ALUMINUM PAN TO A DONKEY FRAME
If It's Broken—Send it to Royston,—or a Phone Message will Bring Me to the Job.
A Good Job at a Price as Low as is Consistent with
Good Workmanship.
WELDING IS A TRADE, NOT A SIDE-LINE
and can be either good or ! ad.   For the former, try
S. SMITH, Royston
Temporary Phone 134-M.
ST. JOHN AMBULANCE ASSOCIATION
(Cumberland Centre).
ANNUAL
WHIST   DRIVE
AND   DANCE
WILL BE HELD IN THE
IIo-IIo Hall, Friday, October 13
Whist D»ive to Commence Promptly at  7.30 p.m.
Refreshments will be Served.
First-class Orchestra Will be in Attendance.
Admission:   Gentlemen,   $1.00 j   Ladies,   50   cents
COMOX DISTRICT LEADS B.
C. FOR LARGEST ACREAGE  IN  CERTIFIED
SEED POTATOES.
The popularity und the steady development of the Provincial Govern
ment's plan to encourage the growing
ol certified seed potatoes waa shown
In information which was made available at the New Westminster Exhibition recently by Mr. C. Tlce, who had
, charge of the Government potato ex-
I hlblt ot that fair. It may be stated,
too, that the almost absolute necessity
ot getting pure seed wus also pretty
' clearly demonstrated by comparisons
which were made In the exhibit. For
instance, it was shown that a certain
number of hills of potatoes affected
with a "disease called "leaf roll" only
produced 3.7 pounds of potatoes, while
the same number of hills Immediately
adjoining, not affected by the disease,
had produced 15.4 pounds. Similar
striking comparisons with reference
to other diseases were also made.
The campaign for the encouragement of growing of certified seed potatoes was started three years ago,
but Utile progress wus made until last
year, when S9 growers were Induced
to go into tho business and have tlielr
potato patches inspected. This year,
no less than 125 growers have taken
li up, and In addition, two or three
districts which had applied for inspectors had to be turned down because of the shortage of inspectors
Among the growers who are making
u success iu the business is Mr. Geo,
Clarke, of chilllwack, who has dona
particularly well, and had a line display of tubers In the general exhibition this year, winning a number of
prizes.
Among the districts which have
gone Into the business In earnest, are
the following:
District. Growers. Acres
POPULAR CAMPBELL
RIVER PAIR MARRIED
For Results Advertise in The Islander
Fairfield Is., Chilllwack   20
Comox     30
Errlngton       6
Windermere     13
Kelowna     10
Cowichan     12
Victoria & Heatings      6
Grand Forks    16
Malakwa       8
In addition, there are a few individual growers In other districts, such
as Kamloops, Vernon and Abbotts-
ford.
15
25
5
10
10
10
16
15
7
Gentleman to lady whom he has not
seen for years: "Are you still a
widow."   "Oh, no, I take In lodgers."
Man is made of dust; along comes
the water-cart of fate and Ills nam?
Is mud,
A popular event took place at
Campbell River on Wednesday evening, Sept. 22nd, when Miss Anna
Timlin, eldest daughter of Mr. and
MrB. Charles Thulin, of Campbell
River, became the bride of Mr. Jas.
McNeil, of the Dominion Government
Telegraph staff there; Rev. R. C.
Scott, of Valdez Island, officiating.
The bride, who was dressed ln cream
charmeuse satin with cream silk lace
and silver trimmings, and veil caught
with orange blossoms, carrying a
bouquet of bridal roses, was given
away by her father and attended by
her sister, Miss Llllie Thulin, and
Miss Hllma Swanson, her cousin.
Miss Thulin wore mauve charmeuse
aatln, and Miss Swanson nile taffeta
trimmed with silver. Both wore black
picture hats and carried pink carnations. The bride's mother wore navy
trlcolette, and Mrs. A. McNeil, mother
ol the groom, black French lace over
satin. The groom was attemnded by
Mr. Geo. Moore, jr., of Duncan Bay,
and Mr. Carl Thulin, brother of the
bride. Mrs. II. C. Scott played the wedding march, and accompanied Mrs. J.
Granville who Bang " I Love You
Truly" during the signing of«the register. .
Following the ceremony, which was
witnessed by a large number of
friends and relatives, a reception was
held In the Lllelanda Pavilion, after
which Mr. and Mrs. Nell left for the
Southern States, where their honeymoon will be spent.
Japan Is the latest country to get
the radio habit. '
This Is the season of the year when
the head of the house gives the empty
coal bin a vacant stare.
Nation-wide Sale of
Poppies on Armistice
Day for War Veterans
OTTAWA.—.With a view to relieving distress among returned men during the winter, the Great War Veterans' Association will again this
year hold a nation-wide poppy sale
on Armistice Day. The flowers of
remembrance will be sold through
the G. W. V. A. branches in cities and
towns from. coast to coast. The
poppies are being made by disabled
men ln Canadian hospitals, ,and all
the money derived from their sale
will be kept In Canada.
The girl at our left asks us If men
like talkative women as well as the
others ?
What others ?
News Of British Columbia
Kamloops Gets
Two Conventions
Good Roads League Meeting on
Oct.  2  and   3.—Union  of
B. C. Municipalities on
j        Oct. 3 to 6.
Following is the program for th«
Sixth Annual Convention ot B. C.
Good Roads League to be held at
Kamloops on October 2 and 3:
Monday, October 2.
1J a.m.—Opening session. President
R H, Uale presiding. Address of welcome by Mayor Burton, of Kamloops.
and reply by President Gale.
10.30. — President's address and
routine business.
12 30.—Annual .Good Roads luncheon. ,
2 p.m—Report of Credentials Committee; add i ess by Minister of Public
vVorks, Hon. W. H. Sutherland, M.D.;
address by League's guests.
3.30 p.m.—Address by P. Philip,
Provincial Government Public Worka
engineer; delegates heard.
Tuesday, October 3.
9.30—Auditing Committee reports:
Resolution Committee reports; address by Herbert Cuthbert, executive
secretary, Pacific Northwest Tourist
Association; Nominating Committee
reports; election of officers.
2 p.m.—Motor excursion to Tran-
qullle Sanatarlum.
II. OF B. C. M. MEETIXOS.
On Tuesday the annual convention
of the Union of B. C. Municipalities
will open and continue for four days,
ivlib the following program:
October S.
8 p.m.—Meeting of Resolutions committee.
October 4.
10 a.m.—Convention opening; address of welcome, His Worship Mayor
Burton; reply, Alderman Woodslde,
Vancouver; report of representative.)
B. C. Anti-Tuberculosis Society; president's address; parliamentary agent's
report; secretary and treasurer's report.
2 p.m.—Report of representatives of
Council of Western Canadian Municipalities; report of Resolutions committee. ,
4 p.m.—Address, G. E. Martin, ou
" Municipal Procedure."
October 6.
10 a.m.—Address by representative
of Provincial Council for Social Hy-
gleue; unfinished business; new business.
2 p.m.—Address.
2.30.—Unfinished business; presentation of Good Roads resolutions;
presentation of Municipal Officers Association; banquet.
October 8.
10 a.m.—Unfinished business; election of officers; selection of next convention city.
You-ve seen him—You could not
help but notice him—He looks so different from the rest—He's the man
with the tailor-made Astoria Shoes-
He bought them from Cavin's Shoe
Store.
OLD COUNTRY WELDER
LOCATES AT ROYSTON
Mr. S. Smith, lata, ot the Royston
Garage, haB opened up a welding shop
at Royston, and has decided to devote
the whole of his time to welding and
brazing. Mr. Smith has had 14 years'
experience In the welding business In
England, prior .to coming to Canada.
He started ln 1908 with Wardens, in
London, and ln 1912 commenced business tor himself at York. and Scarborough. On the outbreak of war ln
1914, he Immediately joined up, serving some considerable time ln France.
He was eventually returned from the
army lu France to carry on welding
for war purposes, being stationed at
the R. N. A. S., Howden, on airship
work; also at Blackburn aeroplane
works, and has also executed work
for H. M. dockyards, the War Office,
Ihe Admiralty, aud for such large
concerns as the N. E. Ry„ Anchor
Worka, Wakefield, and Oban Electric
Works. Mr. Smith's varied experience
Is placed at the disposal'-of the whole
district. •   J
SCENIC HIGHWAY
IS COMPLETED
Chief Engineer Takes Car Over
Full Length of Banff to
Windemere Road.
Invermere, B. C—A very happy end
was consummated by tbe completion
of the Banff-Windemere highway at
the end of last week. The road Is
passable now, but much work still Is
required to be done on it before it can
be considered open for traffic. It will
not be officially opened and permission given for the ordinary traffic until some time about the 1st of July,
1923. The first car to pass over the
completed work arrived here on Sunday, having started from Banff ln tho
morning. It was driven by Mr. J. M.
Wardele, the chief engineer In charge
of construction. He was accompanied
on this trip by Mrs. Wardele. The
actual running time from the crossing
of the Bow River bridge at Banff until the car pulled up In front pt the
hotel here was seven hours, and the
distance covered wns 104 miles. The
distance from Banff to the Sinclair
Hot Springs was computed to be 91
miles.
When the road Is in good condition
It Is thought that the run for this distance can be made ln, say, Ave hours,
whicli would mean then that it would
be possible to breakfast here, have
lunch at Banff, and dine at Calgary, or
the other way on. The importance of
this Is realized, possibly, only by those
who through long weary years have
waited to see the work completed in»
order that they might enjoy the wonderful scenery which the trip over this
scenic route affords. — Cranbrook
Herald.
"Well, my little man," said the
kindly old lady to a lonesome youngster, "and who Is your father?"
"Ain't got none."
"Poor boy! And who Is your
mother?"
"Never had any."
"Bless my soul, who are you^any-
how?"
"Oh, I'm a mean trick that was
played on Auntie."
TLEE
It Can't Leak.
Because It's Made
in One Piece
EVER been scalded by a leaking hot-water bottle?   This
can't happen with a Kantlcek.
Kantleek Hot-Water Bags
can't leak. They are "one-
piece" water bags—moulded
from pure 'soft rubber into •
single piece—no joints or seams.
Most hot-water bottles are made
In sections and cemented.
Cement cracks—bag leaks!
Wc guarantee a Kantleek lot
two years—or a new bag free.
Atk to see the Kantleek.
You may need it tonight
m
Frost's Pharmacy
The Rexall Store fi
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th, 1922
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
NINE
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
isslng    •    Cleaning    -    Repairs
Telephone 1.    •    P. 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, B. 0.
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co.,
Cumberland and Courtenay.
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Ceil, Wood and Goods of Any Kind
Delivered to All Farts of District.
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE M TELEPHONE
or Leave Orders at Vendome HoteL
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - • B. C.
BROWN'S
TOBACCO, CIGAR AND
CONFECTIONERY STORE
Good Selection of Pipes, Cigar and
Cigarette Holders.
OLD COUNTRY 80CCER
RESULT8, SATURDAY
James Brown
Cumberland
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
the undersigned, and endorsed
"Tender for repairs to wharf at
Quatslno, B. C," will be received at
this office until 12 o'clock noon, Tuesday, October 10, 1922, fur repairs to
wharf and renewal of float at Quatslno, District of Comox-Alberni, B. C.
Plans and forms of contract can be
seen and specification and forms of
lender obtained at this Department, a!
lhe offices of the District Engineers,
Post Office Building, Victoria, B. C..I
and at the Post Offices, Vancouver,
Quatslno, Holberg, Cape Scott, Uclue-
lot, Port Alberni, Alberni and Campbell River, B. C.
Tenders will not be considered unions made on printed forms supplied
by the Department and In accordance
with conditions contained therein.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank payable to the order of the
Mlulster of Public Works, equal to
10 p.c. of the amount of the tender.
War Loan Bonds of the Dominion will
also be accepted as security, or War
Bonds and cheques it required to
make up an odd amount.
Note.—Blue prints can be obtained
at this Department by depositing an
accepted bank cheque for the sum of
$10, payable to the order of the
Minister of Public Works, which will
be returned if the intending bidder
submit a regular bid.
By order,
R. C. DESROCHERS,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, September IL 1922.
WM. FARNUM COMING IN
ANOTHER BIG PICTURE
/William Farnum, blue-shirted and
ever ready to fight tor the things that
mean happiness to others, will open
at the Ilo-llo Theatre on Friday and
Saturday ln his latest big William
Fox production, "Shackles of Gold," a
stirring play based on the splendid
drama, " Samson," by Henri Bernstein.
This picture, which tells the story
of a man who comes up from the
docks, makes a fortune in oil, and
marries a woman.who hates him, was
directed by Herbert Brenon, and Is
said to be another picture In which
Farnum thrills with his superb act-,
ing. One scene In particular la said
to be a continuous thrill. It Is that ln
which the New York Stock Exchange
Is shown. Here Farnum breaks the
market, breaks his enemy—the man
who has been trying to steal his wife's
love—and Incidentally breaks himself
ln doing It.
Myrta Bonlllas, the girl who jumped
from an extra to a leading woman ln
one day, is Farnum's leading lady
In "Shackles of Gold."
PLENTY OF PUNCH
IN "STEP ON IT"
New Gibson Film Lively.
Ladies' and
Gent's  Tailoring
Alterations, Repairs, Finishing
and Pressing
EDWARD ROBINSON
Phone 121 Bos 33
Maryport Avenue, Cumberland.
Repairing
willard
Batteries
SPARKS CO.
Auto Electricians
COURTENAY
NANAIMO DUNCAN
IF YOUR BATTERY
FAILS TO FUNCTION
It may need repairing or perhaps
only He-charging. In either case let
us have a look at It and see what is
to be done to make it efficient. Our
Battery Repairing embraces overy
possible emergency of this nature.
New Batteries for sale also.
CUMBERLAND GARAGE
A. R. Kleratead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
Mystery, romance, typically West
em action and the punch of'a plot
from the pen of Courtney Rytey
Cooper are promised In the Universal
special attraction, "Step On It," ln
which Hoot Gibson will be seen in o
starring performance at tbe Ilo-llo
Theatre next Monday and Tuesday.
Jack Conway directed the filming of
the Cooper story, which was adapted
by Arthur Statter, now editor of the
Short Reel and Serial Scenario De
partment at Universal City.
Barbara Bedford, a charming and
capable actress, will be seen In the
feminine leading role opposite Gibson. Others in support are: Joseph
Girard, Vic Potel, L. C. Shumway,
Edith Yorke, Frank Lannlng and
Gloria Davenport.
The story is laid ln "The Land of
the Lost," a section of unmapped,
barren territory in the state of Colorado, a paradise for horse and cattle,]
thieves. In this locale action of a
mystery nature takes place.
An element of the weird and uncanny is Injected into the story
through the disappearance of large
hordes of cattle, driven to the edge
of a deep sluiseway and absolutely
untraceable from there on.
TOM MIXCOMING
" The Fighting Streak," which was
advertised for last week and did not
arrive, will be screened Monday and
Tuesday with "Step On It," making
a double feature show of ten reels.
JUNIOR FOOTBALL DANCE
DELIGHTFUL AFFAIR
TheTance held hut Friday evening
in the Ilo-llo Theatre by the Junior
Football Club, attracted a jolly crowd
and the club was well pleased with
the success of the event. Among those
present were: Mr. and Mrs. J. W.
Tremlett, Mr. and Mrs. Quinn, Mr. and
Msb. Joe Damonte, Mrs. Bergland,
Mrs. Potter, Mrs. Lewis, Mrs. Arthur
Gatz, Mrs. L. Francescini, Mrs. Hatfield, Mrs. Boyd, Mrs. McNeill of
Courtenay, Mrs. Grieves of Courtenay.
Miss Irene Batcman, Miss Jessie
Stevenson, Miss Dora Hutchinson.
Miss Orpha Lewis, Miss Hannah Abbott, Miss Josie Balagrio, Miss Margaret Bannerman, Misses Bird, Miss
Nellie Potior, Miss Lilllas Glen, Miss
isle Baker, Miss Margery Beck-
wlth, Miss Margery Mordie, Miss Ida
McFayden, Miss Dcllna Wilson, Misses
Marsh, Miss Decl Graham, Miss Mc-
Ginnis, Miss Ryoch, Miss Delia Balrd,
Miss Tana Damonte, Miss Nora Peacock, Miss Beatrice Mitchell, Alias
Martha Boyd, Miss Grieves of Courtenay, . Miss . Fanny Strachan, Miss
Stella Berkley, Miss Teed, Messrs.
J. Kent, Lefty Larson, J. Campbell,
W. Hutchinson, Colvllle Graham,
Matt Stewart, Mickey Mitchell, John
Marochl, Bill Woods, Roddy Tolman
Billy Faulds, Dick Damonte, Rob
Benny, Mr. Merrilleld, Mr. Mortimer,
Jack Campbell, Herb Roy, Val Dalby,
Dan Stewart, John Haman and Mr,
.Hannay of Courtenay, Donald Watson
Heginaid O'Brien, Bob Robertson,
Keith McLean, Jim Walker of Bevan,
Ernie Collins, Walter Hudson, Dave
Stevenson, Hector Stewart, Alex Den-
holm, Duncan Benny, Jimmy Danger-
field, Mr. Rose, John Bond, Amos
Farmer, Dave RlchardB, Billy Marsh,
Bob Strachan of Courtenay, and many
others.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
COMOX
TAILOR
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
 1
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
SEE
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
Also
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
CUMBERLAND MEN
HAVE INTERESTING
TRIP TO DIVIDE
Corfield Motors Ltd., of Courtenay,
bave just unloaded a car-load of 1923
Model Fords. Three of them are already sold, and the balance will be
on'view In their showrooms at the
end of this week. Considering the reduction in price of all models, and
the 1923 Improvements, Corfield
Motors Ltd. anticipate a big rush of
business during the next few weeks.
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland. B C
INSPECTORS HERE.
The Cumberland branch of the
Royal Bank of Canada was visited
for a couple ot days this week by Inspectors H. P. Wilson and F. B.
Urquhart, of Vancouver.
Brass Tacks about
Threaded Rubber
Insulation
The Wlllard Threaded Rubber Battery is the only battery with Threaded
Rubber Insulation between the plates.
The Thread-Rubber Trade-Mark on
the battery .case Is your Insurance
against all the bothersome, expensive
wood-separator troubles.
Threaded Rubber Insulation outlasts the battery plates. It will not
check, warp, crack or carbonise. It
permits "bone-dry" shipment and
stocking of batteries so that the battery reaches you In brand new condition.
Ask about Wlllard Threaded Rubber
Particulars are given by Messrs.
A. C. Lynn, A. MacKenzie, Murray
MacKenzie, Duncan McNIven and J,
Brown of an Interesting ten days
spent travelling from Comox Lake
along the north fork ot the Crulk-
shank river to its source, crossing
Oyster river and Brown's river divides
and down Boston Creek to Bevan,
■ The party attained an attitude of
5,000 feet on the Cruikshank divide,
and they report that there are thous-l
ands of acres of rich grass lands and
Innumerable lakes of great beauty ln
this range. Many wonderful, views
were to be seen, and a trip through
the Beaufort range would be a real
trip to geological students.
One feature of particular Interest
was a waterfall on the north fork of
the Cruikshank, where conglomerate
debris had choked the stream between
immense Igneous rocks aud had practically become solid rock itself. The
water could not be seen above the
falls, but ran underneath the debris,
forcing Itself out In three separate
holes at the top of the falls and
seemed a very curious freak of nature.
Further north towards the source was
a mountain of conglomerate, several
hundred feet high, with practically
vertical walls. To a geological stu
dent this sight alone is worth a visit,
It bolng one of the finest examples of
mountain erosion that can be seen.
Blocks of conglomerate some 30,'000
tons ln weight have fallen down from
the top and can be seen en bloc.
On the Cruikshank divide the strata
changes from igneous to sedimentary
and thence again to igneous on tiie
Oyster and Brown river divides,
which go beyond the timber line. A
■rood view of the coaBt line can be
feen from any of these points. In the
evening the dew is very thick and
settles like vapour ou the ground,
coming very quickly, particularly In
the grass lands, and any Intending
travellers in this vicinity would do
well to take a waterproof sheet for
protection.
None of the lakes referred to con-
VICTORY BONDS.
Commenting on the. proposals of
the Minister ot Finance for the conversion of 1922 Victory Bonds into
new bonds carrying the same rate of
Interest and maturing In five or ten
years, aa desired, the Monetary Times
says:
"One point which should be borne
In mind by investors in considering
the new issue ot Dominion Government bonds is that the time is rapidly
approaching when good securities will
be scarce Instead of plentiful. Up to
the present year, since the beginning
of the war, the Investment market has
been a buyers' market, interest rates
being high and money scarce. Looking back to a time several years before the war, however, Investors will
recall tbat It was then quite a prob
lem to find a reasonably good Investment which would yield 5% per cent.
"The opportunities to Invest ln ten-
year bonds at 6% per cent is therefore a good one. The loan will unquestionably be a success and security
prices will, judging by prospects, be
carried to still higher levels."
The Minister's offer Is open until
September 30th; sea the official advertisement for details.
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
My endeavor is to please my
customers, and that with best
"Service," reasonable prices,
and best and freshest quality of
goods.
Fresh and Cured Meats, Vegetables and Fruits
D. CAMPBELL
DYE WORKS
CEKANING
PKESSIMl
T. YONEDA
(MHTKNAY
Phone 64
Box 123
Rough Boys Well
Leathered
S. D WIS, °=f
FAMILY  SHOE
Avenue
REPAIRER
Car   For  Hire
DAY OR NIGHT
PRICES REASONABLE
From 8 a.m. to 12 Midnight, Phone 24.
From 12 Midnight to 8 a.m., Phone 22.
Geo. Mason
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
We are complete House Furnishers.
No matter what-you want in the Furniture Line,
come to us.  We have it. ,
You will find that we sell SUPERIOR things at'
PRICES that will delight you.
Jeune's Furniture Store
PHONE 144 COURTENAY, B.C.
SPECIAL PRIZE
WON BY FINCH
Tiie special prize of a pair of shoes,
offered by Cavin's Shoe Store, for the
player having the best batting average for tbe season, was won by Finch
of the Senior baseball team of Cum
berland.
SHOWER FOR BRIDE-ELECT
Miss Margery Mordy will be hostess
it a miscellaneous shower this (Frl-
ilny) afternoon at 4 o'clock, in honor
of Miss Lorna Dalby, whose marriage
inkes place next week.
Harsytu Muuutlim or Neuritis,
Sciatica, Lambaio ? New Is tke
I Urn* to get (Idol It. Naturel»
i dolif all she eta tor you. Just
Mr thiols aloif. ast • box ol
Tsmplstoi's Rksiatlle Capsalst
l yonr Drufflit aid yon will
i be lit aid well afalo.
i. IR.Cs
Sold by FROSTS DRUG STORE
tain any fish. No finer panoramic
view of greater beauty Is obtainable
than from the Glacier along Hi'
mountain chain to Buttles Lake.
SOAP
SPECIAL
TOILET SOAP
Easter Lily and Carnation
3 cakes to a box, 35c per box
WHITE WONDER SOAP
7 cakes for 50c
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON TEN
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th, 1922
New Arrivals
ANOTHER SHIPMENT OF NEW SNAPPY COATS
ARE EXPECTED ON HAND FOii SATURDAY.
LATEST STYLES AND MATERIALS. PRICES
ACCORDING TO MATERIALS.
WAISTS.—A Special Lot of 12 Waists in Tricolette.
Nicoly trimmed and very smart.   Price :..$2.95
LADIES' SILK UNDERSKIRTS in good colorings and
well  made.    Silk  will  give  good .satisfaction.
Price $4.95
LADIES' FLANNELETTE BLOOMERS—White only.
Lace trimmed.   Very good value at 90c.
LADIES' WHITE FLANNELETTE UNDERSKIRTS-
Different sizes.   Prices, each 85c
KIDDIES' BLACK SATEEN COVERALLS—Trimmed
with red, yellow and blue.   Made of a heavy twill
sateen.   Price $1.75
FOOTBALLS FOR THE BOYS.
A. specially hard-wearing hide, with good rubber bladders.   Just what you want for the boys. ..$2.50
Regulation Football, all hand sewn. Will give every
satisfaction.   Price $4.75
REEFERS FOR BOYS AND GIRLS.—Made of heavy
navy, Government serge.  Well lined, with emblem
on sleeve.   Prices $6.75 to $9.50
.No better or smarter Coat could be desired.
BABIES' RUBBER PANTS.   Large size.   Pair ....45c.
DRYGOODS
GENTS FtJRNISHfrfGS
SONG POEMS
WANTED
It you have a Song or Song Poem,
Words or Music, which you have
written, let us hear trom you.
YOU CAN MAKE GOOD MONEY
We will Publish and Market
Them  for  you :
DO NOT DELAY
WRITE NOW
The Mosher System
OF CANADA
MUSIC PUBLISHERS
Box 616 WESTVILLE,«4 S.
Courtenay Locals.
Cliiel Dawley, of the Esquimau police force, at one time a Provincial
police officer at Courtenay, is In the
district to enjoy a few days' hunting.
Mr. Harry Maynard, of Victoria, is
In the district on a business trip.
Mr. Eddie Whelan returned on Wednesday from the Prairies, where he
had been doing harvest duty.
A general exodus of police, magistrate and brewery inspector took
place from Courtenay on Thursday,
the case of the Phoenix Brewery's
confiscated beer coming up at Nanaimo on Friday.
1923
Model
Fords
We are expecting a Carload of 1SSS
Model Fords this week, and also an.
nonnee a Substantial Reduction ln
Price of aU Models.
$733.00
1923 Model Five-passenger Touring,
fully equipped, with self-starter, demountable rims, one-man top, Bide
curtains, spare rim, electric lights,
electric "horn, etc., etc. Price $733.00
delivered to your door, and we teacn
you to drive free ot charge.
Men's    Rain    Coats    at    McLeod's,
Courtenay.
ill
SHOES
"AMES-H0I.D2N ia the big Name in Rubbers to-day.
We buy to sell "Ames-Holden Rubbers" because we
know tliat they are the Bes Rubber on the Market today. They cost no more and wear longer.
WEEK-END SPECIALS:
Gutta Percha, Maltese Cr iss, Children's
Gum Shoes, sizes 8 to lO'/a 	
Gutta Percha, Maltese Croi i, Misses' City
Gum Shoos, sizes 11 t: 2 	
$1.85
$2.00
$6.00
Gutta Percha, Maltese Crojs, Ladies' Rub- »7rCTS
bes, to clear al per pair  ' **
Luok-Maltese Cross Men's Hip Gum Shoes
To clear at pur pair	
COMPARE 'ii.ESE PRICES
Ladies' Black  Ox lords,  v. do fitting,  to &A   f?A
clear at   yHtoUU
Ladies' 2-srtap Slippers, Brown Kid, to
clear at..
$4 25
Amherst 10 in. High Top, All  Leather  Miner d»r7
Solid Counters inside and out, nailed  *P ■
A Line of Ladies' High Top Shoes, Louis
or Cuban Heels	
$375
Black, Split Leather, Miner Shoe, Ames- &P A A
Holder, Make. ..A good shoe for  «PO«UU
Look-,-" Doctor Specials," Brown or Black (J»Q AA
Special Price to clear   «PO«VV
Cavin's Shoe Store
SERVICE
BULLETIN
Why go around with a dirty car, when
you can get It washed and polished
by an experienced man at Corfield
Motors Ltd. for $1.00.
KORII8  $1.0(1
OTHER MAKES   .IM
Keep your Car clean—It lasts longer,
and Is worth more when you want
to sell.
Personal Mention
' Mr. C. H. Macintosh returned from
Victoria on Friday.
Mrs. J. Bruce has returned from a
visit In Vancouver.
Miss Laura M. Robertson returned
from Victoria Tuesday.
Mrs. D. O. Alexander left tor Seattle, Wash., on Sunday last.
For Bargains ln Children's Shoes,
see McLeod at Courtenay.
Mrs. Thos. Oraham and MIsb Janet
E. Graham left for Seattle, Wash., on
Sunday.
Mrs. Annie Gordon has returned to
Nanaimo after several days' visit with
friends In Cumberland.
MrB. John Gillespie, of Telkwa, B.
C„ arrived in town Tuesday, and Is the
guest of Mrs. R. H. Robertson.
Mr, Alex. Denholm Is spending the
week ln Victoria, visiting friends,
having motored down last Saturday
Mrs. Wm. Lodley and little daughter, who were visiting relatives here,
have returned to their home in Nanaimo,
Mr. Herbert Ingham has returned
from Nanaimo, where he spent a few
days visiting his mother, Mrs. A
Ingham.
Mr. P. S. Fagan, asst. secretary,
Canadian Collieries (D) Ltd., Victoria,
arrived ln town Monday and, returned
Wednesday.
Mr. G. C. Baker, of the Canadian
Collieries (D) Ltd., Victoria, arrived
in town Saturday and returned on
.Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Ellis returned
a few days ago from Bellingham,
Wash., where they motored tor their
honeymoon,
Mr. Thos. Graham, general superintendent Canadian Collieries (D)
Ltd., returned from Victoria on Wednesday. /
Mr. and Mrs. J. W, Parry, of Vancouver, left for their home on Friday
morning, after spending two weeks
with relatives in the city.
Mr. and Mra. Geo. O'Brien spent a
couple of days ln Ladysmith this
week.
Harvest Festival Service will be
held by the Rev. W. Leversedge at
Denman Island on Sunday evening,
Oct. 1st, when the Anglican Church
choir will make the trip to help out
the 8ervlae with an anthem, etc.
Church Notices
HOLY TRINITY.
Rev. W. Leversedge, Vicar.
SERVICES.
Morning Service  11 a.m.
Sunday School  2.30 p.m,
BATTERIES
We will give you a Two-year Uncon
ditional Guarantee on all Batteries
purchased from us. Batteries ot all
sizes to suit all makes of cars, in stock
" Not How Much, Uut How Good."
Agent for Astoria Tailor-made Shoes.
)   m
III!!
Corfield Motors Ltd
FORD DEALERS
FOR COURTESY—PHONE 46.
COURTENAY, B. C.
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH.
Rev. Geo. R. B. Kinney, Minister,
SERVICES.
Junior Congregation    11 a.m
Sunday School  2.S0 p.m.
Evening Service  7 p.m.
81.   George's   Presbyterian   Church.
Morning Services   11 o'clock
Evening Services , 7 o'clock
The Sacrament of the Lord's Supper
will be dispensed in St. George's Pros
byterian Church on Sunday morning
at 11 o'clock.
Preparatory services will be held
on Friday (this evening), at 7.30.
At the sermon in the evening, an
anthem  will  be aung by the choir,
My Recompense"; the solo part will
he taken by Mrs. Colin Campbell,
A aolo, " Hold Thou My Hand," by
Miss Beckwlth.
A welcome Is extended to all to
come and worship God In thiB church.
WEDNESDAY HIKES
BY RAMBLERS' CLUB
Wednesday . afternoon has been
chosen hy the new Ramblers' Club of
Cumberland as the hiking day, and
Ihelr first ramble was a week ago
when they took the Sutton trail to
Trent river, spending a very pleasant
afternoon. While In camp for tea,
tho hikers formally banded together
under the title of "The Ramblers'
Club," Mrs. L. R. Stevens being electeH
president, Donald McLean vice-president, Mr. Splttal secretary, and Mr.
Stevens treasurer. The other members are: Rev. and Mrs. Hood, Mrs.
Spittall, Mrs. Harllng, MrB. Ledlng
ham, Mrs. Alex. King, and the latter's
dog "Kenzle."
A new member was added this week
In the person of Mrs. Campbell, when
the club rambled about Ave miles to
Allan's Lake, In spite of the rain, and
thoroughly enjoyed the trip, particularly the wonderful echo they discovered coming over the lake.
FOR SALE OR RENT.
THOMSON'S HOUSE, ON DUNSMUIR
Avenue. Furnished complete, containing 16 Bedrooms, Dining and
Sitting Room, Kitchen, Pantry and
Closets. Also Out-building, Garagi
Wood, Coal and Store Room,
Apply: p. THOMSON, _
Cumberland, B. C lj|
S
l\
This Damp Cold
Climate Requires
Food Full of Energy and Vitality-producing
Elements Especially at the Mid-day Luncheon
A Good Dish of any of the Following Lines
Van Camps' Pork & Beans, 15 c. tin; 7 for $1
Heinz Spaghetti 20c. Un; 2 for 35c.
Followed by a Steaming Cup of
B. & B. No. 1 or No. 2 Fresh Ground Coffee
at 60c. and 70c.
Will Supply the Necessary  Quantity and Quality.
B. & B. Tea at  50c. and 60c. lb.
Bulk Cocoa, extra special at 25c. per lb.
We ca<ry a Full Stock of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
in Season.   See Window.
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY TRY
Burns & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
For Power and Economy
HAVE YOUR
FORD
CYLINDERS RE-BORED
Bring in Your Block and We will Re-bore and
fit Light-weight Pistons and High-grade
Rings for    (1*1 Q A A-    This includes 12
Rings or
4 Pistons.
We have in stock a full line of Ford Tops and Top
Dressings.   Costs nothing to ask.
Cumberland Motor Works
Phone 77 P. O. Box 595
Royal Candy Co.
Comox Creamery Ice Cream.
Ice-Cold Drinks of all Kinds.
Home-Made Candies, Fresh Daily
Luncheons Served.   Open Day and Night.
CAR FOR HIRE
Canning Pears
For Sale
Three cents per 'pound
Phone 86Y Comox
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