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The Cumberland Islander Mar 24, 1923

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Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
ji
With which it consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-SECOND YEAR—NO.
m
&.*«/.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUM     BIA, SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 1923.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
A Review Of
The Industrial
Conditions In B.C.
Victoria, March.—A review of Industrial conditions In British Columbia, by Hon. John Hart, Minister ot
Finance and of Industries, has resulted In the statement that never for many years bos the province been ln such
splendid condition. Despite the doubts
of the pessimist, hard times are a
thing of the past, speaking generally
and the province Is undoubtedly on the
eve of an era of unprecedented prosperity.
The minister visited Industrial
plants ln Vancouver and New Westminster, especially those which have
received leans from the department
of Industries. In nearly every Instance the concerns are operating full
time and are hard pressed to meet the
demand for their products. British Columbia manufacturers, through the
"Made In B.C." sampalgn, have sue-
reeded In proving that their goods are
the equal of, or superior to, those Imported from other provinces and countries, and already there haa been a
marked decrease In Imports.
Hon. Mr. Hart said that this revival
of business was being felt ln every
purt of the province, and If the people
as a whole could grasp the true situation there should be nothing but prosperity. A campaign of Industrial encouragement Is being carried on by the
industries department and numerous
requests for Information regarding
manufacturing opportunities, sites, and
the like, are being answered every
week.
Vancouver Is tbe coming city ot tbe
West, Is the prophecy of tbe minister
of finance, and the entire province
must profit by the progress of that
city. Usually conservative and reticent In making such statements, this
report of Hon. Mr. Hart is being received with marked Interest.
PUBLIC MEETING HELD
IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS
LAST TUESDAY
Second   Proposition ef Trustees   of
Cumberland Relief Fund
Adopted.
A Public Meeting was held In the
Council Chambers last Tuesday evening for the purpose of considering the
report ot the Board of Trustees ot the
Cumberland Relief Fund, as to the distribution ot tbe monies subscribed.
There were present, C. J. Parnham,
President, A. J. Fouracre, Secretary,
W. Leversedge, O. K. McNaughton, 0.
O'Brien, J. 0. Quinn, E. Hughes, ot the
Board of Trustees.
Hon No. i Aadopted.
The two plans as published ln last
week's Islander were submitted to tbe
meeting. The details of Plan No. 1
were explained by Rev. Leversedge,
and of No. 2 by Mr. 0. O'Brien. After
a thorough discussion by those present, Plan No. 2 as explained by Mr. G.
O'Brien was adopted. Tbe payments to
commence almost Immediately as of
February 1st.
SHIPPING AT UNION BAY
Week Ending March ttrd.
Point Hope
Norvan
Beatrice
Princess Royal
Proteellaus
Chemainus
Canadian  Britisher
Swan
Shamrock
Oduna
Wireless
Olenboro
Dauntless
Vancouver
Coastwise
Vancouver
Vancouver
"JOLLY BACHELORS"
FIRST DANCE A
GLORIOUS SUCCESS
The "Jolly Bachelors" Club of
Courtenay held their first dance in
tbe Oalety Theatre last Tuesday evening, about two hundred guests being
present from Courtenay and the surrounding district. The hall was
tastefully decorated with evergreens,
and colored streamers. Music was
supplied by Austin's Orchestra and
was greatly appreciated by the dancers. Refreshments were served at
midnight, after which dancing continued until 2:30 a.m. Those responsible deserve great credit for the
splendid way In which the affair was
managed.
CUMBERLAND LOST
RUGBY GAME TO
NATIVE SONS
Death Claims One
More Old Timer
Mrs. Mary Jane Turnbull, relict of
the late Mr. Thomas Turnbull, passed
away at her home at Grantham on
Wednesday morning at eight o'clock
after an illness that has kept her In
bed for some time. Tbe late Mrs.
Turnbull, was born at Stellarton, Pic-
tou County, Nova Scotia, eighty two
years ago and came to Comox District
In 1891, living first at Cumberland
where her late husband, Mr. Thomas
Turnbull was employed at the mines.
After nine yearB at the coal mining
town Mr. and MrB. Turnbull removed
to the farm which has been the family
home ever since 1900. The late Mrs.
Turnbull waB one of those kindly persons whose serviecB were always
gratefully rendered to anyone ln distress, especially was this so In her
home in Nova Scotia where her late
husband was manager for some years
at the Vale Mines. She brought that
characteristic with her to British Columbia and many a person in years
past has accepted her hospitality and
generosity. Her son James was with
his mother at the time of her passing
as was her brother, Mr. J. W. Coghlll
of Boaton wbo bad come out to the
coast to spend tbe summer with his
siBter. Thro daughters and sisters
are also numbers of the lamily these
being Mrs. Henry Campbell, of Fraser
Mills; Mra. Francis Hanley and Mrs
Bert Moore ol Vancouver, Mrs. Conway, of Sprliifchil! MineB, Nova Scotia
being the aiater, now aged eighty-
four. Mrs. Geo. Plercy, Sandwlck, Is
a Grand-daughter. The late Mrs.
Turnbull was a passenger on the same
train coming west as Mr. W. J. Bowser,
and the latter never came to Comox
Valley without calling to visit at the
Turnbull home.
The funeral took place on Friday
from the family home to the Sandwlck
Presbyterian cemetery, the services
being conducted by the Rev. W. T.
Beattle. Many beautiful floral tributes were sent by friends, notable
among which was a wreath from Courtenay Assembly No. 3, Native Sons of
Canada, many of the members also attending the obsequies of one of the
pioneers of the Valley.
The Child And
Its Environment
Vancouver.—Before a disappointingly small attendance, a fifteen wearing
Manilla the co,or" °' the Native 8on"' DUt
Coastwise' composed largely of Vancouver repre-
Australla sentatlve players defeated the Cumberland Tigers 22-0, at Brockton Point
Saturday, In an exhibition rugby game
Coastwise
Coastwise
Juneau, Alaaka sU*ed 'or tn« beneat of the Cumber
Coastwise
Coastwise
Coastwise
JOLLY ST. PATRICK'S PARTY
A very enjoyable Ume waa spent
lost Saturday evening at the home of
Mrs. O. K. McNaughton when Bhe entertained at a St. Patrick's party tn
honor of her daughter, Jean. About
fourteen of the young folks were present. Tbe evening pleasantly passed
in games and dancing, and a very Jolly time was enjoyed by all.
REV. GEORGE KNOX
MEETS WITH MOST
PAINFUL ACCIDENT
J. H. LePAGE TO VISIT HERE.
A DELIGHTFUL
SOCIAL AT BEVAN
A very delightful Social and Dance
was held by the Bevan Burns Committee at the home of Mr. and Mrs. S.
Cameron on Saturday, March 17th,
1923. After sitting down to a nice
Bupper not forgetting tbe "Scones" the
rest of the evening was spent In
Bongs and dancing until the "Wee
Hours of the Morning." Those present were, Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Quinn,
Mr. and Mrs. W. Weir, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Buchanan, Mr. and Mrs, James
Irvine, Mrs. A. Aitken, Mr. Robert Alt-
ken, Mr. Leslie Palmer of Vancouver,
B. C. Messrs. James and Thomas Weir,
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Cameron, MIbs Elizabeth Henderson of Cumberland, Miss
Jean Cameron, Miss Nellie Cameron,
Mr. James Walker, Mr. J. Hastings,
Mr. and Mrs. J. Miller, Mr. and Mrs.
D. Aitken, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Robertson.
The following gave vocal selections
which was very much appreciated by
all those present. Mr. J. T. Quinn
giving a few comic songs which
caused much enjoyment, also Mr. Harry Buchanan, Miss Elisabeth Hender
eon, being called on, received a good
hearty en core each time. One song
by ber "My Ain Folks," an old Scotch
song, was greatly appreciated. Mr.
Leslie Palmer was also called on for
a song and responded.
Mr. Sam Robertson furnished the
music for Uie dancing
land mine disaster fund. Pitted against
a strong combination In tbe pink of
condition the Islanders put up a bet
ter battle than the score would Indicate. In the first half, although the
Sons scored 11 points against them,
they had a good share of the play, and
after the interval, showing obvious
lack of condition, they put up a stubborn and skilful defensive game.
The game was not uninteresting,
especially in the first half, when the
Cumberland forwards had an even
share of the exchanges, dribbling well
and feeding tbe ball cleanly to their
backs. The latter, however, showed
too great a tendency to kick and might
have gained much ground by handling
and running.
Lou Hunter started the scoring tor
the Native Sons when he went over
for a try which Conn converted. Stewart and Decker alBo got over before
the Interval, but tbe goal glck failed
ln each instance.
Mr. J. H. LePage, the well-known
Optician will be visiting In Cumberland on April 3rd and 4th and will be
registered at the Cumberland Hotel.
Mr. LePage will be pleased to meet
any of his old friends and customers
on these dates. Make a note of tbe
dates-April 3rd and 4th at the Cumberland Hotel. If you are having
trouble with your sight make an appointment with Mr. LePage. Expert
Eye Examination.
ERRATA
A very interesting lecture was given
by Mr. J. W. Gibson, of Victoria, Director ot Elementary Agricultural E-
ducatlon of B. C, at the local Parent-Teachers' meeting on Monday
evening. Mr. Gibson demonstrated,
by means of some excellent slides, the
differences, both physical and mental,
that can be produced by gardens,
either at home or at school.
"Too much education" is the cry going across the countlnent at the present time. There can, of coarse, be too
much education of a certain kind, but
agriculture Ib a subject no one can
Btudy too much. Scientists have obtained some remarkable results In this
line, and, as Mr. Gibson pointed out,
not only the subject Improved, but the
Improver also, Ib benefited thereby.
School children, as well as scientists, are benefited by this work. Any
supplementary education ls good, but
while gardening, the child uses more
of Ub faculties than in any other work.
The planning of the garden, alone,
necessitates drawing and mathematics,
which ln the actual gardening, biology, horticulture and such subjects,
are Introduced. With the knowledge
of how to do this work comes, gradually at firBt, an inborn appreciation of
the wonders of nature; and finally a
skill in obtaining the best results
from her. The latter phase brings ln
a quality most needed among the
young people of today, namely, stability—that "stlck-to-lteveness" which
always brings results. Merely to
grow things, the child, boy or girl, has
to care, watch, wait, and above all
"stick to" hla or her garden. In this
work girls have made even better success than have boys.
Considering then, the aesthetic and
educational value of this work, It ls
very Important that schools should
have "gardens and beautiful school
grounds." "No province ln the Dominion," said Mr. Gibson, "has such
splendid schools, but there Is not one
Bchool In British Columbia that has
grounds suitable for the up-bringing
of young children." It would be an
excellent plan, be thought, to reserve
at least 50% of the total cost of building for the preparation and main
tenance of school grounds.
When Mr. Gibson bad closed his
address Mr. Webb, speaking for the
schools, informed the meeting that a
number of plants had been ordered
which were to be planted in tbe school
grounds soon. Moreover, a special
"Home Improvement" campaign Is being organized, In which It ia expected,
prizes will be offered to the boy or
girl showing the most marked Improvement around their homes. It Ib
to be boped that every boy and girl
will work hard, to the end of obtain
ing, not only a pretty garden, but a
clean and beautiful town.
M.
Well-Known    Methodist    Minister
Fractured Jaw In Three Places,
In Critical Condition
Firemens' Annual
Masquerade Was
A Huge Success
The twenty-seventh Annual    Masquerade Ball of the Cumberland Volunteer Fire Department held last Fri-
Rev. Geo. Knox who left the Grace  day evening in the Ilo-llo Hall was a
splendid success from start to finish.
Methodist Church, Cumberland ln
1920, and who made hosts of friends
during his term of olllce here, met
with a most painful accident, and lies
In a critical condition at Creston, B.C.
Mr. Knox was engaged in straightening out a clothes line which had become entangled at the pulleys, and
bad climbed up on several boxes. The
whole thing toppled over and he landed with great force on hla chin
against the hard earth. Dr. Henderson, who attended him, stated that
had he landed directly on his head, it
would ln all likelihood, have killed
him. Hopes are entertained tor a
speedy recovery.
CUMBERLAND
DEFEATED BY
MERCHANTS UNITED
SALE OF WORK
A Sale of Work will be held ln the
schoolroom of the Grace Methodist
Church on March 28th. There will
be plain sewing, home cooking, and
candy stalls, also a fish pond.
Tea will be served from 3 to 6 In
tbe afternoon.
In last week's Issue of the Islander,
the house owned by Mr. T. Treloar
was reported sold to Mr. J. Haworth.
We regret that this was an Incorrect
report, and ls denied by both parties.
The Merchants United were success
ful yesterday In their game in the
Davenport Shield series, when they
put Cumberland out of tbe running
by a score of one goal to nil. The only
goal of the game was scored about
twenty minutes after the start, Campbell in clearing a shot, mlsklcked, the
ball bounding towards Watson, who
lost no time In netting the ball. Shortly after this reserve, Cumberland was
given a free glck Just outside the penalty area, and Conti sent ln a shot
which bounded off Uie upright, only
missing the net by IncbeB.
In the second half Cumberland took
the aggressive and had most of the
play during his half, and time after
time It looked as though they were
bound to score, but luck was against
them and they were forced to accept
defeat by a score of 1 to 0.
The game, on the whole, was very
clean, although several of the players
were laid out through accidents, but
none were seriously Injured.
LADY FORRESTERS'
SALE OF WORK
Court Cumberland No. 9831 A. O. F.
will hold a Sale of Work on Wednesday, April tbe 25th in the G. W. V. A.
Hall, to be followed in the evening by
a Whist Drive and Dance. At the Sale
of Work in the afternoon, tea will be
served at a charge of 25c. The price
of admission for the Whist Drive and
Dance has been placed at 50c. Whlst
8—10. Dancing 10—12.
The hall was filled to Its utmost capacity, very many maskers and spectators attending from outside points.
A five piece orchestra consisting of
Messrs. Pilling, Walker, Ingham,
Plump, and Mrs. W. Hudson supplied
splendid music throughout the evening. The prize winning list for tbe
evening was as follows:
Best dressed lady, $20.00—MrB. Mc
Rae, Union Bay, (Japanese Costume).
Beat dressed gentleman, $15.00—Mr.
P. McNIven.
Best National Lady, $12.50.—Mra.
Christie (representing Ireland).
Best National Gentleman, $12.50—
Dr. Shaw, Campbell River, (Rajah).
Best sustained lady, $10.00.—Mrs.
Shaw, Campbell River.
Best Comis Lady, $10.00, Mrs. J. Pinfold, (Black Cat).
Best Comic Gentleman, $10.00—E.
Marshall, Campbell River ((Good
Night).
Best Advertising Character, $10.00.
—Dlmm, Campbell River. (Pat
Burns).
Best Clown, $8.60.—Frank DeConlnk.
Best Flower Girl, $8.50.—Miss Greta Ray, Union Bay.
Best Hobo, $8.00.—Donald Watson.
Best Comic Group, $20.00.—Messrs.
Slaughter, Brown, Watson & Hutchinson, (Jazz Band).
Special Prize $7.00.—Mr. Bell-Irving, Denman Island, ((Rooster).
Prize Waltz, $10.00— Mr. Plercy,
Miss Gray.
Prize Waltz, Second, $7.00.—Mr. F.
Slaughter, MIbs J. Balagno.
Tombola Prizes for spectators were
won as follows:
First prize, Sweater Coat: J. Bar-
tholdl.
Second prize, Ham: Miss Orant, Comox.
Third prize, Goods, $5.00: Mrs. Farmer.
Fourth prize, Goods, $5.00: Mrs. S.
Marocchi.
Fifth prize, Goods, $5.00; Bill Bergland.
Sixth prize, Goods, $3.00: Mrs. J.
Haworth.
The Judges for the evening were:
Mra. H. Tappen, Union Bay, Mrs. Mc
Qualg, Courtenay, Mr. D. Roy, Royston, and Mr. Westover, City. The
proceeds amounted to $243.00. This
will go to the funds of the Volunteer
Fire Department of the City.
Much regret Is felt for Mrs. J. Wallace of Bevau, ln her loss of a loving
sister, Mrs. John Stewart of Cumberland, who died March 21st, 1923.
G. W. V. A. NOTES
MRS. JOHN STEWART
PASSES AWAY
The death occurred last Wednesday
morning at family residence, Windermere Avenue, of Elizabeth A. Stewart, beloved wife of John Stewart, a
prominent member of the local football team. Mrs. Stewart succumbed
after a short Illness, and leaves an Infant, one week old. She leaves to
mourn her loss, her husband, her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. McConnell,
three sisters and two brothers, all of
Ireland; also a slater, Mrs. Wallace
of Bevan. The funeral will take place
from the family residence, this afternoon (Friday) at 5.00 p.m. Rev. W.
Leversedge, officiating.
The Cumberland Branch meet every Tuesday at 7.30 P.M. Visiting Comrades are welcome.
G. W. V. A. Club and reading room
is open every evening from 7. P.M. to
11. P.M.
*     *     *
Members ere requested to attend a
special meeting on Sunday, March
25th at 8. P.M. very important busl-
Attention of members and ex-service
men In general Is called to the Civil
Service vacancies—lists are posted on
G. W. V. A. notice board—application
forms can be had trom the local secretary.
• *     *
The executive respectfully submit
the following to the earnest consideration of all thinking ex-servtce men.
If you as sn ex-service man expect
service from the O. W. V. A. you must
support the Secretary of your branch
by paying your dues.
• .    .
If you expect service from the Pre-
sdlent of your branch, you must support him as your representative ln his
work on your behalf.
• •     *
If you never come near the G. W. V.
A. unless you get Into trouble and then
you fly for Its assistance; you cannot
expect to head the list of claimants.
EASTER TREAT
FOR THE KIDDIES
The Ladies Auxiliary ot the G. W.
V. A. are holding their annual Easter
Treat for children of ex-service men
only on Easter Monday from 3 to 6.
Friends who would like to donate
cakes are asked to leave them at the
G. W. V. A. Hall on Easter Monday
after 8 p.m.
If you expect service of any kind
from any source whatever you figure
on paying for It. Then why expect it
from the O. W. V. A. for nothing.
* *     *
If you honestly want to help your
organization, do your part and help
others to do theirs by giving them
your best support ln the positions of
responsibility in which you placed
them.
• *     *
If you believe In the O. W. V. A. and
want to see It live, stick to It and get
other men to come in and help It and
you. If you don't bellee In It you have
no business In remaining as a member. Loyalty Is the backbone of any organization.
.     .     .
If you feel Nervous about Joining
the O. W, V. A. because you bear some
individual—wbo possibly holds a
straw-bosses Job etc.—apeak wltb eon
tempt of the association—forget U,
and remember the comrades you left
over there, they expect you to still
carry on, for their dependants are
still with us, and need your help.
DANCE IN AID OF CUMBERLAND RELIEF FUND
The Courtenay Orchestra will hold
a dance in the Gaiety Theatre, Courtenay on the evening of Tuesday, March
27th commencing at 9:00 p.m. Gentlemen, $1.00, Ladles, 25 cents. The proceeds will go to the Cumberland Relief
Fund.
"STAINER'S CRUCIFIXION
ON MARCH 25TH
"Stainer's" Crucifixion will be rendered by the joint choirs In town at St.
George's Presbyterian Cburch next
Sunday evening, March 25th at 8:15
p.m. The choir Is under the able leadership of Mr. C. W. Sillence of Royston.
WILL HOLD WHIST
DRIVE AND DANCE
NEW ORGAN IN
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Mr. Jack Weber la home from the
Hospital and says he Is glad to got
I back to Bevan again.
Another step towards the advancement of good music In Cumberland
has been made with the Installation
of a two manual pedal base reed organ ln St. George's Presbyterian
Church. The organ is built by tho
Thomas Co., St. Catherine's, Ontario.
It Is equipped with an electric blowing
apparatus which gives the player the
full opportunities of developing variations which Is Impossible with onll
nary reed organ. There are four stops
on the swell manual, tour on the great
manual, a 16' bourdon base attached
to the pedals, full couplers for both
manuals and box swell for both manuals. The Presbyterian Church Is
to be congratulated In their desire for
furtherance of good church music ln
Installing an organ of this description.
The women's Auxiliary of Holy Trinity Church held a special meeUng at
the home ot MrB. H. Bryan last Monday evening. It was decided by the
ladies to hold a whlst drive and dance
on Friday, April 13th. Particulars will
be announced later.
OH DEATH WHERE
IS THY STING
Sailor Gets Three Months Hard Labor
-Sting of Okallhna Might Change
His Views.
Sidney Hughes, a fireman of the S.S.
Canadian Investor pleaded guilty lost
week to a charge of refusing to obey
the lawful commands of the ships
master and was sentenced to three
mouths In Jail with hard labor.
Officers sold drink had Inspired
Hughes' revolutionary proceedings.
Capt. Roberts said that last Saturday
when the vessel was leaving Vancouver for Victoria, Hughes appeared on
the bridge, at a critical moment of navigation, and announced he was the
only sober man aboard, doing all the
work. The aerond engineer said
Hughes persisted In following him
about the engine room and aaylng.
"Oh death where ts thy eUng." TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MARCH, 24th 1923
NEWS  OF  COURTENAY AND  DISTRICT ■
BY OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
that is not "earning its keep"?
If you have, why not exchange it for a
Player Piano
or
Phonograph and Records
Then you could have any kind of music you might
desire at any time.
—Then you would get real Service, and Satisfaction out of your instrument.
—The exchange may mean very little outlay for
you.
—Let us know what you have to exchange and we
will furnish full particulars.
J     Heintzman & Co., Ltd.
1113 Govt. Street Victoria, B. C.
New Store New Arcade Building.
NATIVE SONS HEAR
INSPIRING ADDRESS BY
THOMAS MENZIES, M.P.P.
MR. HARRY RODIES
RESIDENCE DESTROYED
The residence ot Mr. and Mra. Harry Rodie, .Merville, was completely destroyed by lire on Tuesday afternoon
about two-thirty o'clock. The origin
oi the blaze Is not known but the Iobs i
will probably run to three thousand
dollars, partly covered by insurance.!
Mr. and Mrs. Rodie have been at Mer-1
villc almost since the inception of the
soldier settlement and aside from the
household goods there was lost a great
deal ot material which carried a sentimental value and which can never
be replaced, among which were Mr.
Rodie's war medals and souvenirs
from the fields of Flanders and
France. Mr. Rodie was in Courtenay
at tbe time of the lire and desired to
thank those who assisted Mrs. Rodie
on Tuesday, some of the men engaged
on the reassessment of the Merville
area being close at hand. Other residents of Merville also came to the
assistance of the victim of the Are.
The steam freighter "Trader" was in
port on Sunday, having come up the
river with a cargo of hay and grain
for the farmers ot the valley.
On Monday evening last, Courtenay!
Assembly, No. 3, Native Sons of Can-|
ada met in regular session. After tbe j
opening ceremony and the Initiation
of seven new members the meeting
resolved itself into a social session,
when the members, about ninety of
whom were present enjoyed themHelves i
with music and other forms of amuse-
ment. Mayor Charles Slmms and the
City Council had accepted an Invitation to be present and listened attentively to an Inspiring adddress on the
alms and objects ot the Native Sons of
Canada, delivered by the Rev. Thomas
Menziea, M.P.P., Grand Chaplain, ln
lucid terms Mr. .Menzles told his audience that the object of the order was
the fostering of a truly Canadian national spirit in an endeavor to make
Canada, already recognized as a great
country, greater still and a better
place, If possible In which to live. He
spoke of the great place that Canada
had earned in the eyes of the nations
of the world by the part she had played
ln the great war and said,because of
the achievements of her sons in the
great conflict she had been placed on
a very high pedestal among the other
nations of the earth. Her boundless
natural resources, including the greatest grain growing area in the world,
the largest nickel production in the
world, her vast timber areas and the
achievements of her sous In the realm
of art. At the conclusion of Mr. Menzles' addresB Mr. Charles Slmms,
mayor of the City was asked to address
the meeting, which be did ln a neat
way, saying that although he la an
Englishman, he was glad to have had
the opportunity of attending the social, and congratulated the members of
the ABBembly of Native Sons on their
efforts to create a strong national
spirit. He thought it was a good
move and judged by the energy shown
would prove of Immense benefit to the
country. An Institution of the kind,
untrammelled by political affiliations
must ln the future be a strong factor
In building up the Dominion. He said
ln closing that he was heartily in accord with the movement and would do
whatever he could to help it along. His;
address was greatly applauded. Alderman Bramley was glad to have had
the opportunity of meeting the Native
Sons in this way and was sorry that
he could not be a member, because
like the Mayor, ho came from England. However he was always pleased
to he among boosters and he wished
the organization every success. Other
Aldermen were present but only
Messrs. Hagarty and Booth responded,
each telling a witty story. Mr. Stewart also spoke and declared that
Canada's place was within the Empire
with the other Anglo-Saxon nations.
He was as good a Canadian as anybody, his Great Grand father having
been born in the small Province of
Prince Edward Island and he was pra-
pared to help the organization of the
Native Sons to do Its share in the upbuilding of a strong national spirit,
aud this could best be done by cooperation with the other units of the
British Empire. During the evening a
musical programme wns rendered
those taking part being Messrs. Anderton, Hames, Robinson, Martinich,
Beasley, with instrumental numbers
and songs; and Messrs. Spence Teed
and Harry Blackhall Btepdanclng, the
programme closing with the singing of
"The Maple Leaf Forever."
SIGNS OF SPRING
Sole Agent for
TIP-TOP
TAILORS
in this Dittrict
Our New
Spring Patterns
Have arrived.   Make your selection early and avoid
disappointment.
Ladies' Suede and Satin Shoes in brown, black or grey.
Everything for the rainy days in the woods.
Two of Courtenay's reputable citizens were going home one night recently when one remarked. "I guess
spring lias come, I bsw a swallow today." His companion's reply was:
"You're  eleven  minutes  late,  I  had
CASE WITHDRAWN
In the city police court on Wednesday night the case against Mr. Roy
Brown of stealing a radio outfit valued at live hundred dollars, laid by
Mr. F. A. Sills was withdrawn.
The Prairie and Coast Elevator
company, Vancouver, B. C, has been
Incorporated with an authorized capital of $1,000,000. It Is understood the
company will erect a large elevator at
Vancouver to handle grain for export.
J. McLEOD
Courtenay, B.C.
NATIVE SONS HAD EN-
JOYABLE WHIST DRIVE
The Native Sons fortnightly whlst
drive was held on Wednesday night
In Booths' Hall twelve tables being necessary to accommodate the players.
During the evening Miss Dauncey delighted the party with selections on
the piano. Winners at the tables were;
Ladies first, Miss Hlllman; second Mrs.
L. Roberts and consolation Mrs.
Bramley. Gentlemen first Mr. W. W.
Moore; second Mr. McKlnnon and con-
Blatlon Mr. J. W. McKenzie, Sr.
WAS FINED FIVE
DOLLARS AND COSTS
Mr. R. Creech of Courtenay appeared
before Magistrate Baird on March
17th, charged with driving a truck
without a 1923 licence and was fined
five dollars and costs.
A little less than six million tons
of coal were mined in Alberta last
year. This Is an increase over the
output ot 1921, in spite of strikes and
a comparatively mild winter.
The Buying Chance
of a Lifetime - _-
ACT NOW
We must reduce our Shoe Stock during the next Fifteen days.       Below are some
of the lines we are slaughtering at a reduction of from 25 to SO per cent.
Men's Fine Dress Shoes, Reg. $8.50, now-   - $5.50
Men's Strong Work Boots, $5.50, now    -   • $3.95
Ladies Brown Calf Lace Shoes. All
sizes. Regular $7.50 (fiA 4 P
On Sale      $<*.f4tl
.... Boys Strong School Shoes, sizes
1 to 5'.s. Leckies, Weston and other
well known makes to (fin QP
dear        «DO.«/D
Ladies Straps, Oxfords, and Pumps
Reg. $7.50. (50 pairs) (fin Hf?
On Sale at     «PO. I O
Mens 6 Eyelet Rubber (fiA AP
Shoes. On Sale     v'xta/U
Misses Black and Brown Calf Bals
all marked down to Cost to Clear.
CLOTHING DEPARFTMENT
Now is the time to buy your Spring Suit.
MENS TIP TOP SUITS
Made to measure. Nothing but British Woollens used. Fit and Workmanship guaranteed. One price all over (fin n AA
Canada        $£ I .\j\)
Men'sLeckie Red Stitch WorkBoot, reg. $8.50 - $5.90
Men's Mailed Pit Shoes on Sale at   -   -   -   - $4.95
Another Line of Boys Shoes, 1 to Another   Line   of   Ladies   Strap
5's. (Am. Herst make)   (fiA  PA Slippers in Brown and Black.   Calf
At      «P*.tlU Regular $7.50                  d»P PA
50 pairs   Mens   Dress   Working On Sale                            tpOatJU
Shoes on Sale at Cost. See our Counter for Bargains. M gt fa ,„ GirU B,ack   Ribbed
Ladies Hose in Black and Brown.
Lisle 3 pairs                    d»-|   AA OP,,         9Ep
for    tDl.UU Hose at «wt and OOK, a pair.
FOR THE MEN
We carry a Stock of Mens Ready Made      (fi-t P AA     (fi-t rj PA
Su'tsat $25.00 and $35.00 '
A Large Range of Boys Suits in All Sizes, also Odd Pants, straight
or Bloomer Style at Right Prices;-.
Model Clothing & Shoe Store
F. PARTRIDGE — Box 343, Cumberland, B. C. SATURDAY, MARCH, 24th 1023
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
THREE
f
DUNLOP
TIRES
Master Mileage  Makers
"TMCIIOI." "RIMED." "CUPPER''
AMI
Festival Committee Outlines
Plans For Coming Competition
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B. C.
Royal Candy Co.
Give Us a Trial.
ICE COLD DRINKS OF ALL KINDS.
HOME-MADE CANDIES AND CHOCOLATES.
LUNCHEONS SERVED.  SERVICE THE BEST.
PHONE 25.
CAR FOR HIRE.
PHONE 25
NEW GOODS
Mens Work Socks @ 30—40—50— and 60c per
pair.
Black Cashmere Hose special @ 70c—90c. per pair.
Fancy Wove Silk Hose @ $1.50 per pair.
Pennmans Underwear, per garment, $1.25
Cotton goods are all advancing in prices, now is
the time to buy.
Fine Madopolin, India Linen, Cambric and Longe-
worth ranging from 25c. to 50c. per yard.
Sheeting 90 in. wide, extra heavy @ $1.25 per yard.
Our mattresses are still selling at the old prices all
replacements will be at the new prices.
We have a fine line of Brass and Steel Beds at a
full range of prices.
Aerate of dishes opened out this week. White and
gold, good clean stock.
Cups per doz   $3.00
Plates, all sizes from $2.00 to $4.00 per doz.
A good range of furniture on display.
The Furniture Store
A. MacKinnon
HIGH GRADES AT LOWEST PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone 159 Night—134-X Courtenay
LUMBER
ALL BUILDING  MATERIALS,  MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES, WINDOWS  AND DOORS,
He
Syllabuses ot the British Columbia
Musical Festival, organized by the
Knights ot Pythias, can now be obtained trom the Festival offices at 101
Carter-Cotton building. The total proceeds o fthe festival will be donated
to the Children's Aid Society.
The noble work of this Institution
Ib handicapped by financial difficulties and Its Important service to the
community deserves the practical sym
pathy and co-operation of citizens
throughout the province. This should
assure the festival of a financial success.
The festival will be held iu St. Andrews Presbyterian Church from May
29 to June 1. Adjudications will be
made In the afternoons and evenings
and the adjudicators will be the distinguished BritlBh muaicians, Dr.
Granville Bantock and Plunkett
Oreene, and for the first time singers
of this province will be Judged by
world standards.
On June 2 there will be a final
grand concert held in the Arena. Winners of the various contests will be
asked to donate their services and vocal music will be rendered by massed
choirs. Competitors are expected
from every town of Importance ln the
province and enthusiastic committees
are strenuously working to make the
festival a financial and artistic suc-
cesB.
An advisory board Is being organized, consisting qf teachers' associations, musical clubs and the professional and amateur organizations of
Vancouver and the province.
The British Columbia Musical Festival committees are actively co-operating with the musical societies of the
province, who are engaged In the preparatory work of training competitors for entering the festival. Although
competitors must be bone fide residents of British Columbia, exception
has been made ln classes one, three
and four, which are open to entrlea
from competitors in the States of
Washington and Oregon. These classes are choral societies, ladies' choirs
(twelve to twenty voices) and male
voice choirs.
The famous choir of Welsh miners
from Nanaimo are included among the
present entrants and enquiries have
been received from Portland, Oregon,
Seattle, Tacoma, Belllngham, in Washington.
These festivals have been for many
years a feature In other provinces. Alberta ls celebrating its sixteenth anniversary and Manitoba will hold a
fifth annual festival. For many years
Saskatchewan and Ontario have made
these festivals a permanent Institution of community life, and It is hoped
that British Columbia's first effort to
organize a musical festival on an ambitious scale will receive the wholehearted patronage of the province and
make it possible to have festivals every year ln future.
March 6th, 1923.
The Vancouver Teachers Association at their general meeting on Monday, decided to actively co-operate
with the British Columbia Musical
Festival, In the preparation of candidates for the Festival to be held in
May, 1923. They appointed their President, M. J. A. D. Tripp, to represent
them on the Musical Festival Advisory Board.
The Womens Musical Club of Vancouver, the donors of a shlld for male
voices, are enthusiastically co-operating to make the Festival n succeBs and
have appointed their President, Mrs.
A. Z. DeLong to act on the Advisory
Board. Great Interest Ib being manifested In all towns and cities of the
Province, and the Festival secretary
has received a large number of enquiries concerning all classes of tho
competition, particularly the choral
section, which includes a number ot
entries from outBide the Province.
Music dealers report an active sale
of the various musical numbers in the
Syllabus. They urge upon prospective candidates the importance of
promptly placing orders, to avoid delay in securing copies, as repeat orders are taking time to fill.
Entries to the Festival close April
14th, and candidates are requested to
assist the organizers by filing at earliest date.
Entry forms are contained In Syllabus, which can be obtained at the
Festival office, 101 Carter Cotton Bldg.
Switzer Bros. Ltd., 310 Hastings St.
West, Fletcher BroB. Ltd., 633 Granville St., W. F. Evans, Ltd., 667 Granville St. and The Weaver Music &
Supply Co., Robson St.
The work of organization proceeds
smoothly and effectively, and evidence points to a very successful Issue.
Schools are taking an active interest
ln the Festival, and the Aberdeen
School, Vancouver, Is already practicing for the choral contest.
The Festival secretary has received
an interesting letter from Mr. Plunkett Greene, one of the adjudicators,
congratulating the enterprise of British Columbia in organizing their first
Festival.
The great English baritone states he
is pleasantly looking forward to meeting the musical representatives of
Vancouver and the Province. It ls expected that a suitable reception will
be given to the distinguished adjudicators, Dr. Granville Bantock and Mr.
Plunkett Greene. Their position ln
the muBlcal world, warranta a recognition suitable to their honorable calling and distinguished achievements.
It is hoped that members of all classes and professions in Vancouver and
the province will poin In giving them
as warm an enthusiastic a reception,
as that which Is already promised
them by other provinces.
Bulletin No. 4.
By a fortunate circumstance, May
30th Is Decoration Day, an American
Holiday, thus enabling a number of
Choirs from the neighboring States of
Washington and Oregon to compete at
the forthcoming Musical Festival in
Vancouver, this date has been set
aside hy the committee as "American
Day" and arrangements are In hand
to provide adequate accommodation
for the visitors as well as special railway and boat rates.
Among those with whom arrangements ore under way are the Amphlon
Male Choir of Seattle, Orpheus Male
Choir of Tacoma, the St. Cecelia and
Ladies Choir of the same City, the
Apollo Male Choir of Portland as well
as mixed Choirs from Belllngham and
Everett.
This will give the Competition an international zest and affords an interesting comparison of the relative merits of the Choir work North and South
of the Boundary. Our American cousins appear confident of their ability
to secure the Womens Musical Club
Shield and It remains with our Can
adian Organizations to demonstrate to
the satisfaction of the eminent adjudicators that our local standards
reach a higher plane than those
reached by the American participants.
The personnel of the Advisory Com
mlttee, in whose hands well rest the
responsibility ot dealing with the technical and musical details of the Festival, Is neaiing completion and will be
announced shortly. This Committee
is made up of appointees from the following bodies: Vancouver Mens Musical Club, Vancouver Womens Musical
Club, Vancouver llpusic Teachers
Assn., Masonic Choir, Vancouver
School Commissioners, Parent Teachers Assn., Musicians Union, Central
Music Committee. Victoria Music
Teachers Assn., New Westminster
Operatic Society, North Shore Choral
Society, West Vancouver Choral Society, Nanaimo Choral Society, B. C.
Representative Associated Boards
(Royal Academy and Royal College),
London College ot Music, Toronto
Conservatory, Columbian College and
tbe Press,
Competition among the Schools is
becoming keen and practices are already well under way in several; entries in this class should be made early as a careful arrangement of the
program Is necessary to take care of
the large number of children forming
the choruses. Aberdeen and Florence
Nightingale are the first in the field
with formal entries. Out of town entries are being looked forward to.
While the entries close on April
14th, those who have decided to participate should send In their entries
at earliest date possible to enable the
committee to proceed with the prepa
ration of the programmes.
The Sylabus will be furnished on
application to the Festival Office, 101
Carter Cotton Bldg., Vancouver, B. C.
iliRAMEU
LIMITJED
Let Us Help You
Plan Your Old
Home Visit or
Holiday Trip Now
Full Information as lo fares,
reservations, Transatlantic and
Transpacific Bookings. Call or write
E. Vi. BICKLE
Agent, Cumberland, B. C.
or C. F. Earle, District Passenger
Agent, Victoria, B. C.
Canadian National Railwaus
LIMITING TAXATION
The Associated Boards of Trade, at
their meeting ln Owen Sound, Ont.
will ask the Provincial Government to
limit the amount of taxation imposed
by municipalities. They also ask for
a standardization and uniformity of
business assessments, and uniformity of taxation in Ontario.
A MUNICIPAL GOLF COURSE
Winnipeg, Man., leads the procession In having a municipal golf course,
and It Is a paying Investment. Up to
August 31, an average of 290 games
dally were played, while there was
a surplus of $4,086, the expenditures
being $23,162, with receipts ot (24,606.
Nanaimo. B.C.—A gymnasium will
be erected on the School Grounds,
nearly $11,000 having been already
collected.
i
Cascade
OR
U.B.C. Beer
PURE    FULL-STRENGTH    BEERS
They Wear Well
On the market as long as the oldest
inhabitants remember and still
the most
Popular Beers
Sold in British Columbia
OLD  FRIENDS  ARE  BEST
Leave Your Order at any Government
Store-WE DO THE REST
I
Why Send to Vancouver
for Groceries
When We Can Sell You the Highest Class Groceries
at the Lowest Cash Prices.
The Courtenay Cash Store
COURTENAY, H.C.
Phone 56—We Deliver. FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MARCH, 24th 1928
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY,  MARCH,  24th  1923
WE STRIVE TO PLEASE
Occasionally we have printed little
essays on the country editor and have
found some of them reprinted in exchanges. We happen to know a few
tilings about the daily grind of a coun-
try editor und a fellow can write best
about the thing he knows. Editing a
country newspaper is not always as
easy as it looks, and the editor naturally makes many mistakes. The most
frequent cause of regret to the editor
does not come from the things he
prints in liis columns, but from the
things he leaves out. We know by
experience that more readers of the
paper are offended because something
in which they are interested is left out
than because something they do not
endorse ls printed. To miss your personal item is taken as a direct slap
from the editor.
A worthwhile country editor or reporter never lets his personal animosities creep into the columns of his
newspaper or play any favorities in
giving his readers the news of the
community, We try very hard ln this
office to avoid any appearance of playing up Hems regarding any set of
people. But we just can't make some
people believe this. We would not
intentionally hurt the feelings of the
most sensitive reader of The Islander
Sometimes the compositor skips an
item or turn two pages of copy instead
of one. The proof-reader works under
pressure just before going to press
and fails to notice the oversight. The
item is left out and the person to
whom it referred looks in vain for if
when the paper conies. The disap
pointed subscriber immediately charges the editor with purposely cutting
out the paragraph, when the editor, In
fact, never knew it had been written.
Another great cause of regret ln the
newspaper office is the last moment
ruthless kinlling ot good news items
to make room for an advertisement
that was received too late to give time
for extra pages to take care of it. The
business man rushes in at the eleventh
hour with his copy for a big advertise
ment, begs for space and threatens to
boycott the paper if he doesn't get it.
We yield to the jingle of the dollar
and in the rush to make a place for
the store's announcement tlle item
about you or your family is omitted,
fiut to the average person who knows
nothing about the limits of a newspaper chase, the editor Is charged with
a personal spite against you and purposely leaving out the very item in
which you were most interested. And
so it goes. We seldom hear of the
nice things we say about people, but
let something be overlooked or lost ln
the shuffle anil we are roasted to a
finish.
Through some reason or other the
article appearing in last weeks' Issue,
entitled .Manual Training and Domestic Science, the first line of the article was omitted, it should have read:
"Assuming Unit the School Trustees."
Had this line appeared at the commencement of the article, It would
have been complete.
HK.iL FELLOWS
ed bo/ as day ls trom night. We can
remember when there were a lot of
oldfashloncd boys ln this vicinity.
They swam ln Comox Lake and down
at Royston Beach and they played tbe
Innocent pranks of boyhood. Not always gentle, but always respectful.
They called the older men Mr. So-and
So, and they touched their caps in an
emberrassed manner when they passed the ladles. They worked tor their
spending money and generality helped
mother with a contribution toward thr
household expenses on Suturday night.
We just don't seem to get used to
this fox-trotting, slangy, lack of respect for anybody or anything era. If
we were a girl we would tie a can to
some of the nincompoops that come
sneaking around. We'd be a bachelor
maid for a thousand years before we
would tie up with the average no-account youth that clutters the earth today.
We do not mean to say that there
are no clean, earnest, Industrious
young men ln Cumberland. There are
a few and /ou know them as well as
we do. It isn't necessary to publish a
list of their names. There are not so
many.
STOP,  LOOK,  LISTEN!
What lias become of the oldfashln-
cd boy who loved his mother, was polite to liis sisters and respected all
womanhood? We mean the hoy who
got up and gave his mother the easy
clialr when she come into the room,
the boy who refused to laugh when a
dirty story was told, and who looked
upon his sister as his special charge
when they were out In company. The
young fellows who wear monkeys
caps on the side of their heads and
stand about on the street corners talking of somebody's sister, and puffing
cigarette smoke through their noses,
nre as different from our old-fashlon-L
Crossing a railroad track Just ahead
of a flying locomotive saves a tew
seconds, which are very valuable in
your business. Furthermore It demon
strates to gaping spectators the speed
of your automobile. It Is a favorite
amusement and helps break the monotony of rural life. The tendency to
miscalculate the swift advance of an
approaching engine is so common an
incident that it gets only a very modest publicity.
One suspects that the reason why
deaths on grade crossings are numerous, is the fear of seeming over-cautious to one's companions or to onlookers. Prudence ls considered a more
or less latent human quality. An
enormous amount of money ls being
spent by railroads and municipalities
to abolish grade crossings. Costly
fills of earth are made, stone and cement are hauled long distances, and
the bill appears In the railroad fares.
It never occurred to our grandfathers that this was necessary. When
crossing a track, they pulled up with
a gentle "Whoa, Dobbin." The driver
looked both ways and listened anxiously.   Dobbin also always looked and
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
Nsw shipments ot toss* hlgh-
grads confections arrlTt every
two weeks, ensuring trash goods
all tha tlmt.
Henderson's
Rough Boys Well
Leathered
istened. If there was a train a halt- t
mile away the driver might proceed,
ihough ready to jump at any minute if
it approched at any unexpected speed.
Overhead bridges and underpasses
.vere not required in those times. If
the present day temperament were not
so goaded on by the Hurry Spirit, the
locomotive engineer would lose his
present involuntary task as a public
executioner.
SLATS' DIARY
By Boss Farquhar
S. DAVIS, DA-r„u.ir
FAMILY SHOE REPAIREK
COMOX
The Golf Links at Comox are now under construction, you had better pick your location now for a good
summmer home as the best sites will soon be all taken.
For full particulars, apply
P. Leo. Anderton
Friday—Wlmmen is the most Un-
conslstent kind of people in the human langwage, for Instants ma bot me a
pare of gloves last
weak and I was a setting pritty and con-
grachllatetng myself.
But tonite just because
we was a going out she
Insisted that I shud
ought to wash my
hands just the same as
I did before I got the
gloves. We had a few
wlrds. Very few as fur
as I was personly concerned. I went and
washed my hands.
Saturday—went to a Concert tonite j
and It was a flzzel for pa and me as
are taste ln music is very simular to
each another. They was a man cum
out and played on a fiddle and he was
bragged up as being a famus musichln.
But we cud tell he was okairt the way
his hand shuk evry time he cum to a
certin place in 1 of his peaces. Ma
tried to give us the laff and sed that
was the way he showed that he had
what they call Tekneek.
Sunday—I gess pa was In a bad yu-
mor this afternoon because when I
ast him a question he called me a dum
bell. I ast him if a man got marryed
to a lady and then later on in the
future he seen a nother girl and got
stuck on her if you wood say that he
had ben Revamped. He never even an-
serred the question.
Monday—Jake fell (down on hla
langwage today because he anserred
a kuestlon rong. Teecher ast him to
give a Xample of a concrete Noun and
he sed PAVEMENT.
Tuesday—Mr. Gillem is away to the
city and he rote home and told Mrs.
Gillem that he had the hotel fokes laf-
flng at him all the time be does such
comikal things. On Saturday nite he
went and ast how soon he cud have
the use of the kitchen as he wanted to
take bis bath.
■j|jp=--=w
fli EKW lHIEi&
hh
117)
im\
luiTOPij!
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1 rz/ nJL]    LM
0   1 /    1 Lr
P     •     JI    /"'
W         H      U  -     ' " -
•          tf     '* ■    -..               _
Easter
Opening
Saturday, March 25th
MILLINERY      SPRING and SUMMER COATS
SILK & CREPE-DRESSES
RADIUM LACE and CANTON CREPE-WAISTS
SILK and CREPE FRENCH LINGERIE
NEWEST EASTER NOVELTIES IN LADIES
NECKWEAR
SPECIAL EASTER SALE OF MENS' AND ROYS' CLOTHING
Mens' Spring and Summer Suits, now$15.00 to $35.00.
Boys 2 piece Suits from $5.75 to $13.50.
Special Easter Showing Mens Hats, Caps, Shirts and Neckwear.
GROCERY   DEPARTMENT
Oranges, extra large Navels 2 doz. 1.35
Oranges, large Navels, 2 doz  1.10
Oranges, small Navels, 4 doz  1.00
Ginger Snaps, per lb  0.20
Table Salt, 7 lb. sack, each  0.35
Hawaiian Pineapple, 2\4 tins
broken slices, each  0.40
Shelled Walnuts, broken, per lb  0.35
Bulk Currants, 2'/2 lb. for  0.50
Pearl Barley, 3 lb. for  0.25
Empress Strawberry Jam, 4s .... 1.10
Magic Baking   Powder,   2V- lb.
tins    .".  0.95
Fancy Mixed Biscuits, Wood Box
Each   1.75
Head Lettuce, Rhubarb, Celery, Cabbage, Sweet Potatoes, Grape Fruit,
Bananas.
AFTER-EATING DISTRESS
And all forms of stomach trouble such
as gas, pains, avid, sour, burning stomach are all relieved In two minutes by
taking Jo-To. Jo-To sold by all druggists.
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
My endeavor ia to please my
customers, and that with beat
"Service," reasonable prices,
and best and freshest quality of
goods.
Fresh and Cured Meats, Vegetables and Fruits
D. CAMPBELL
Cumberland. B O.
BROKEN TEETH
can be mended or replaced, broken
gears fixed, cracked or split metal
parts of all kinds filled up and rein-,
forced—in fact, moBt any kind of
fracture or weakness in iron, steel,
brass, bronze or other hard metal can
be-quickly and effectively closed and
made as good as new with our welding process.
CUMBERLAND  GRAGEi
A. R. Kierstead, 1'rop.
Third Street Cumberland
T.WHERRY
rAXIDERMISMANNER
Band (or nice list oi
wor %—m uunitnt
heads, otc
€29 Pandora Ave.,
Victoria, B. C. /
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS  !
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest and MoBt Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or!
Dye all kinds of Ladles' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop in and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent In Cumberland, who
will advise you nn any work you wish
to have done.
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PURLIC
I 'nion Bay Road
COURTENAY, B. C.
BREAD!
Do you eat it for lunch with
fresh fruit and milk?
Or do you e ••: other less nour
ishing foods ?
The way you feel is a matter
of the kind of food you eat.
Natural foods are the best.
Bread is nourishing.
Bread with milk and fruit is
delicious.
Eat right and feel right.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
HALLWAY'S BREAD
—is the Bread that Builds
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
CORPORATION OF THE
CITY OF CUMBERLAND
Dog Taxes
Our   Work   and   Service
Will  Please  You   t:   ::
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTOBIA, 11. C.      :      Phone 83(12
All persons keeping or harbouring
dogs within the City are hereby notified that Dog Taxes for the current
year are now overdue and must be
paid to the City Clerk forthwith.
The Chief of Police has been Instructed to prosecute all persons keeping or harbouring dogs for which the
tax haa not been paid, after the 17th
.March lnst.
A. J. FOURACRE, .
M31 City Clerk.
Constlpatlon'sRemedy
must come from nature. Calory
King Is a miztor* of medicinal
herbs and roots that rids the system of Impurities io a gentle,
natural way. An old and wall tried
remedy—80c and 60c packages.
A Salesman's Cough
irritates bia customers—and makes
him inefficient and miserable.
Shiloh is the Ideal remedy-it is
not a bulky cough mixture
but a special formula proven successful for many years. A few
drops brings immediate relief.
30c, SOc and $1.20. All druggists.
r FOR
COUGHS
TAX NOTICE
Notice is hereby given In accordance
with the Statutes that all assessed
taxes Including School Taxes assessed
and levied under the "Taxation Act"
and "Public School Act" and amendments, are due and payable on the
16th day of February, 1923.
All taxes due and collectable tor
the Comox Assessment District are
due and payable at the Government
Office, Cumberland, B. C.
This notice in terms of law is
equivalent to a personal demand by
me on all persons liable for taxes.
Dated at Cumberland, B. ft, this
20th day of February. 1923.
WM. W. MOORE,
Collector,
Comox Assessment District.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
SHILOH
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office  and  Residence:   vVillard
Block.   -   'Phone 116. SATURDAY, MARCH. 24th 1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
FIVE
fi
ti
)t
The Superior Grocers
Where  Most  People Trade
SPECIAL
Beach-Eakin's Red  Plum Jam
41b Tins
50c.
Mumford's Grocery
THE SUPERIOR GROCERY
T. H. Mumford J. Walton
Health - Peace
Plenty
Recovery of Ancient Eastern charm pronto an Inestimable-
boon to mankind la bestowing Power and Success upon all
wearers.
Evil Influences are removed, aocldents warded off, planetary
malignance overcome. Its touch betokens the dawn of a new
existence. Its wear Immediately releases all the powers for goor?
and brings that Joy and bliss, love and plenty, which you have
long hoped for and struggled to obtain.
"Trilokbejoy" or The Mystic
Charm
(Conqueror of the Universe)
A Divine Gift! Sought after for centuries! Recovered by mere
accident from the disciple of a Hindu Sage, dweller of the sane-
titled, mysterious, snowy heights of the Himalayas. Confirmed
sceptics testify to Its miraculous powers. Men and women everywhere acclaim its potentiality in realising material expectations
bringing ln prosperity and securing a lovers affection. To be
worn as a pendant or on the inn. Write Mine and Address
legibly, (toting SEX of Uie Intending wearer when ordering.
Health and Good Fortune Go Hand in Hand
PRICE:—Encased ln copper, inclnilve postage, packing and
Registration Costs, etc, ILWl Dot, 110. Silver, Hi dot, »15,
Gold, HSOf dot, NS.  CASH WITH ORDER.
Complete Instructions on how to get best results with each Charm
THE MYSTIC CHARM COMPANY
At the Hindu Talisman Cottage,
123, Lower Circular Rd., Calcutta (India)
See our
Special Counter
for
EASTER TOYS
Sure To Please The Youngsters
On display now.  Visit us early
to get a good choice
Courtenay, B. C
The Junior Red
Cross Society
The Junior Red Cross has been organizing in this province only since
December last, yet it already numbers
more than three thousand members,
and new branches are formed every
week.
Throughout the Dominion, more
than 70,000 school children have
joined the Junior Red Cross, the three
main objects of which are the promotion of health, of mumanitarlan Ideals
and of good citizenship.
The development of a "health conscience" ln the child Is a work of far
reaching Importance, for when all
children leave school with proper bodily carriage and posture, with a
practical knowledge of what costitu-
tes a wholesome diet, with habits of
personal cleanliness, and with the
realization of the danger of spitting
and other anti-social practises; when
they know how to avoid communicable
diseases, and have a sufficiently Intelligent knowledge of the human mechanism to allow of their taking proper care of their bodies, then we shall
have gone far toward the elimination
of many diseases which are now only
too common.
A great part of the energies of the
Junior Red Cross are directed toward
providing physically defective children
with the necessary corrective treatment for which their parents cannot
afford to pay, and the members, while
engaged in this work, unconsciously
develop the sympathies and kindly
tendencies which are latent in all
children.
The Junior Red Cross hospital at
Calgary, which is maintained by the
Juniors of Alberta, contains forty
beds, all of which are occupied continuously. The Hospital was opened
in April 1922, and by October the first
had provided free treatment for 153
cases, most ot which would undoubtedly have gone on suffering had It not
been for the Junior Red Cross service.
The fees paid for membership, and all
other monies collected by the Juniors, are devoted entirely to this work,
without any deductions for administration or other purposes.
Good citizenship training follows as
a natural result of Junior Red Cross
teaching. The officers of the Branches are elected by the children themselves from among their own number
so that they learn what qualities to appreciate ln a leader, how to speak in
public, how to manage their meetings
efficiently, and how to develop resourcefulness In a good cause.
The Junior Red Cross ls not confined to any one country, but is a
world-wide organisation, and for this
reason its members acquire an unusual
understanding of the Ideals ot other
nations. Through the medium of its
national magazine, or by means of
correspondence with Red Cross units
abroad, Canadian members of the Junior Red CrosB come to know of, and
sympathise with, the work that It being done In other lands, and while the
organisation fosters the truest spirit
of patriotism it also Implants and encourages feelings of toleration and
universal sympathy. This fact makes
the Junior Red Cross one of the most
important factors ln maintaining a
future world peace.
ROD AND GUN
The March issue of "Rod and Gun
ln Canada," the well known Canadian
sportsmen's magazine of the out ot
doors, contains many attractive features and abounds In stories and articles that are sure to please. "In the
Canadian Alps" by Campbell J. Lewis
Is a breezy, Interesting article, while
Bonnycastle Dale's article, "Spudg-
Ing the Lumpsucker" is worthy of special mention. Harry M. Moore, whose
work Is popular with "Rod and Gun"
readers, is among the writers who contribute red-blooded stories. H. Mortimer Datten ls another. C. H. Landls
and Robert Page Lincoln are at their
best In their departments, Guns and
Ammunition and Fishing Notes, respectively, while the other departments and features contain splendid
features of outstanding quality. The
magazine Is illustrated profusely
throughout, and ln every way, the
March Issue ls one that no one will
want to miss.
"Rod and Gun In Canada" is published monthly at Woodstock, Ontario, by W. J. Taylor, Limited.
BANFF-WINDERMERE
ROAD OPENS IN JUNE
Ottawa, Ont.—Tho Minister ot the
Interior has set the date tor tbe opening of the HanfT-Wlndcrmcre motor
highway through the Canadian Rockies for traffic for Saturday, June 30.
The official ceremony will take place
about noon at Vermilion Crossing, a
point midway between Banff, Alberta,
and Windermere, British Columbia. It
Is proposed that motorists from the
cast of Banff end of the road and from
j the west or Windermere end should
I leave their   respective   points   early
Ho=Ho Theatre
Friday and Saturday, March 23rd and 24th
Big Double Feature Attraction
The Lad who makes the whole world lough!
Harold Lloyd in "Dr. Jack"
Warning to Patrons!
For your health and happiness, see
the comedy that is rocking the world
from the North Pole to the South.
If your heart is wobbly, or you get
high blood pressure from laughing, kindly consult your Family physician after
you see HAROLD LLOYD the Laughter
Specialist.
=1?
Frank Mayo in "The Flaming Hour''
Explosions, Fire, thrills, rescue—a story that will make you stand up and cheer
by its sheer realism.
SNUB POLLARD COMEDY
MATINEE SATURDAY 2.30 P.M.
Monday and Tuesday
Thomas Meighan in the best picture he ever made
"BACK HOME AND BROKE"
More Laughs to the reel than any comedy ever produced, and a real Home town romance
WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY
Reginald Denny in the "Kentucky Derby"
Watch for Constance Talmadge in "EAST IS WEST" coming Monday (EASTER) and
Tuesday April 2—3rd.
Matinee Easter Monday, 2.30 P.M.
enough in the morning of that date to
meet at the Crossing at noon in time
for the ceremony.
The new highway, which forms the
connecting link In the 6.0000 mile
"Grand Circle Tour," through Western
Canada and the United States, was
completed last fall and the engineers
expect that by the end of June everything will be In readiness for the
opening and the summer traffic.
The new road Is built through the
heart of some of the finest scenery ln
the Rockies, seventy-three miles ot It
being through virgin mountain and
forest country where many of the
peaks as yet bear no name. One of
the unique features of the road is that
it crosses two mountain passes. The
main range of the Rocky Mountain! ls
traversed via the Vermilion pass at
an altitude of 5,600 feet and later the
road is carried over the Brisco range
through the Sinclair pass at an elevation ot 4,950 feet. The grades, however, are easy, the average being 3 per
cent. A grade of 9 per cent ls the
maximum and this occurs only at one
point over a stretch of about 400 feet.
A Safety-First Invention
The Santa Fe Magazine has an Idea
for an Invention which should attract
the best efforts of railroad men the
world over.   Here It Is:
"Automotive talent ls being directed
to the perfection ot a device that may
he attached to the speedometer of an
automobile and register In this manner:
"At 20 miles an hour a green light
flashes,
"At 30, a yellow light flashes.
"At 40, a red light flashes.
"At 50, a gong rings and a phonograph starts playing, 'Nearer My God,
to Thee.'".
Premier Oliver announces that a redistribution bill wilt be Introduced at
the next session of the Legislature.
He cannot announce what changes in
the provincial electoral districts may
be made but docs point out that voters
should get their names in the lists
an booh as possible, because the registration iu any district will have
a direct bearing upon the redistribution of seals. Voters may register
at any time, their names being record-
deil on the voters' list when the next
court of revision nits.
the
"Lie a little farther back in
choir, sir," urged the barber.
"No, thanks. The last time I lay
back I fell asleep, and when I woke
up I owed the barber my next week's
wages."
Spring Time Is Electric
Stove and Plate Time
We have Them At Reasonable Price*
OUR  RADIO  DEPARTMENT   IS   OPEN   FOR
INSPECTION   DAY  AND  NIGHT
Call and Inspect Our Stock
THE PIKET
ELECTRIC
Phone 164
Courtenay
LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE SERVICE A REAL
ASSET TO THE EXACTING BUSINESS MAN
There are few advantages in modern business to
be compared in actual value with the service your own
office telephone is prepared at any moment of the day
or night to supply you with.
At a minimum.outlay in minutes you can get in
direct touch with your desired party possibly hundreds
of miles away where postal or other delay would be
a decided drawback. Correspondence cannot compete
with the speed of telephone service, besides which consider carefully the undoubted advantages of a personal
talk.
British Columbia Telephone Co. SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MARCH, 21th  1923
E£
Campbell River, B.C.
FREE   DRAWING
Saturday, March 31st
Complete   Long  Distance   Radio   Set |
One Ticket  FREE with every  $2.00 Cash purchase (30 days  equals  cash)
ASK   FOR   YOUR   TICKETS   AND   KEEP   THEM
Campbell River Trading Co.
Listen to our FREE CONCERTS Wednesday and Saturday Evenings from 8 to 9.30
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
TRY McBRYDE'S QUALITY BREAD.
THE PREMIER LOAF
OF
COMOX DISTRICT
HAROLD LLOYD SCORES
ANOTHER KNOCK OUT
COURTENAY
PHONE 154
TEA ROOMS
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR  TIRES,    GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS       ....       Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION
Firm Class Accommodation.    Heate,
throughout hy electricity.
WILLIAM   JONES,  Proprietor
SECOND-HAND
FURNITURE
Comox Exchange
Cturtenay, B.C.
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Office 2*20 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
A Woman's Pride
The useful pride which
makes woman careful of
her appearance and complexion finds a help in the
purity and delicate clinging
fragrance of
MISS BIRD
Ladles' Tailor and Dressmaker
Telephone 123 27 Camp
Cumberland, B. C.
Stat
jfiSaSy
"If a comparison is to be made of
the funny business of the screen for
the last year, honors must go to Mr.
Lloyd."
"Dr. Jack" ls a delicious conglomeration of everything one could hope
for In a super-comedy. And everything seems entirely new. Lloyd's box
of tricks seems everlasting and one
never knows what to expect, except
that the next laugh will be louder
than the first. As a fun-maker Mr.
Lloyd has reached the pinnacle, but
ln "Dr. Jack" he has also established
himself as a runner-up for honors
with the screen's greatest lovers, as
his love scene with Mildred Davis
seemer to us to be one of the most delightful we have ever witnessed.
Besides all this, "Dr. Jack" contains
a real story—a story with n serious
undertone of a girl's struggle for
health. The girl Is played, of course,
by Mildred Davis, and she aids Lloyd
charmingly in the sentimental vein of
the comedy. The uproarious part of
the offering comes when Lloyd, ns the
young doctor, begins his campaign to
oust the eminent, but unscrupulous
physician from the girl's household.
Then the fun is fast and furious with 1
laughter piling up faster every moment.
A splendid cast of players, far above
the average for a comedy, arc seen in
support of Mr. Lloyd. Uric Mayne Is
seen as the rival physician, aud John
T. Prince ls the girl's father. Norman
Hammond is excellent as the family
lawyer, Anna Townsend, seen In
"Grandma's Boy," appears to advantage, and other roles are capably
handled by Florence Mayon, Joy Wln-
throp, Oscar Morgan and "Auntlo"
Mackay. Tho comedy comes to the
Ilo-llo Theatre Friday and Saturday.
Ferguson opposite him, belongs to the
second class. It combines Interesting
action with a theme that Is full of
meaning for two out of three men.
The hero suffers from the fault of
a hot temper and goes steadily downhill until he learns the lesson of self-
control. This ls something that nearly
everyone knows about from close observation and personal experience.
Besides Miss Ferguson, the supporting cast Includes Chas. Clary, Melbourne McDowell, Tom Kennedy and
Albert McQuarrle. Edward Sedgwick,
director of many previous productions
at Universal City, guided the filming.
RAILWAY AND
LOSS OF FOREST
THOMAS MEIGHAN
TRIUMPHS AGAIN
IN ADE PICTURE
"Bark   Home and Broke"   Excellent
Vehicle For Popular Paramount
Star.
"FLAMING HOUR"
COMING TO STAR
Alitor  IOAPI  LIMITED
"What's the story about?" Is the
usual question of a theatre patron before going to see a new production.
Sometimes the stories are simply adventure plots, fascinating but meaningless, and sometimes they are stories of real life with a genuine human
Interest and a meaning that appeals
to everyone.
"The Flaming Hour," the Universal
attraction coming to the Ilo-llo theatre
Friday and Saturday with Frank
Mayo ln tho starring role and Helen
Fresh from his triumph In "Manslaughter," Thomas Melghan adding to
his laurels everywhere with "Back
Homo and Broke," which Is billed for
Monday and Tuesday at the Ilo-llo
theatre, This new Paramount production Is the second by George Ade for
the screen. Mr. Ade wrote "Our Lead-
ilig Citizen" and tbe present story specifically for Mr. Melghan.
'"Back Home aud Broke" Is rich In
humor, with delightful dashes of
thrills, suspense and heart lugs. The
story deals with the problems of a
young man, who upon the death of his
father is left penniless. Made to feel
that lie occupies un humble position
lu the town, he leaves to seek successs
elsewhere. Eventually he returns to
the old towii_J>ul not as a conquering
hero. Apparently he Is broke and ridicule is heaped upon him. The rest
of the story travels in a swift cycle of
excitement punctuated by humor
which is sure material for laughter.
Mr. .Melghan's leading woman in this
picture Is Llla Lee. Alfred Green, who
handled three former Melghan successes, was the director.
"Every forest fire that broke out
within fifty miles ot the Canadian National lines last summmer stole away
some of the Immediate or potential
traffic and delayed to that degree the
financial buoyancy of the public-
owned system," states C. Price Green,
Chief Commissioner of Industries and
Resources of the Canadian National
Railways.
"A large mileage of the Canadian
National runs through natural timber growing lands which can never
produce any other marketable crop
than timber. At the same time, these
wooded regions are generators of
tourist traffic and account for the rapidly expanding number of visitors
from the United States travelling on
our lines, as well as for ths great val-
ume of recreational travel on the part
of Canadians. The security of the
forests, therefore, ls absolutely vital
to the solvency of any railway system
In this Dominion,
"The destruction of forests by Are
last year was not the work of the rall-
ua,s, as Government reports will
prove, but of fishermen, campers, settlers, and woods travellers generally.
It Is the careless citizen, himself a
shareholder In the Canadian National,
who can wreck or maintain these forest resources bo essential to our national prosperity and tbe successful
operation of the public-owned railway
system."
FIRE PROTECTION
IN NOVA SCOTIA
Major S. A. lturland, Fire Marshal.
surely a matter for the grave consideration of every thinking person in
the Province. There were 974 fires
during the year, the most disastrous
being In Halifax, where the damage
was (912,138.
Overheated of defective chimneys
caused 118 fires; sparks 224.
The insurance companies paid $2,-
458,021, besides which uninsured losses were $1,087,797.
Meetings were addressed ln many
places and every Fire Chief or Mayor
visited.
Legislation was passed at the recent
session making cvedy Councillor of
the Municipal District an Assistant
Fire Marshal.
I Many theatres have been altered after visits and in some places dangerous buildings have been torn down.
During the year, 5 men, 1 woman
and 6 children were killed by Are.
TORONTO'S STREET
IMPROVEMENT
That re-planning Is very expensive
is being seen In Toronto, where the
wonderful growth of the city necessitates Improving the avenues ot transportation between the heart of the business part of the city and the residential districts.
Commissioner Harris reports that
widening the pavement of only a part
of Blmir street to make It uniform
with the other part, will cost $87,000.
The extension of Lyall Avenue will
cost $30,000, nnd the grading of Heather St., $5,500, and of Briar Hill
Road $27,000. This shows that Town
Planning is less expensive than re-
planning.
A good woodsman always puts out
The statistics for   the   past   year'his camp-fire and cleans up his camp
show a Are loss of $6.75 per capita— before he leaves.
tdded reach
mean
te5v
PARIS INAUGURATES
BIG STREET PROGRAM
The municipal authorities of Paris,
France, have begun carrying about a
vast, programme of street Improvement authorized some time ago. The
sum ot 11,500,000 francs Is being spent
for the transformation of stone paving
Into asphalt paving, with more money
to be expended later.
The added length of MAPLE
LEAF MATCHES means greater safety
when lighting ranges, stoves or lanterns.
They wl| not glow after use. They are
' not poisonous.   Rats won't gnaw them,
"^^-a   ( They withstand more moisture.
^MlworthljraboX     They are Different and Better.
MAPLE LEAF-J^t,
THE CANADIAN A/ATCH C<? M/llYTHlCS
rf   UMITED.MONTREAL        .iTlCiUa. \t* Malta* SATURDAY, MARCH, 24th 1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SEVEN
«f
SHOE SALE AT GORDON'S
K
300 Pain of the celebrated K Shoes for men in Eaton and Balmoral
lasts in Black and Tan, these are priced at $13.00 a pair. For one week
only we will reduce this line to $10.00 a pair.
ALL
BRITISH
MADE
HAS
NO
EQUAL
This is another high class shoe for men who desire
. snappy footwear.   You will need no coaxing to buy,
when you have seen this new line.
Special
Price$6
In 4
Different
Styles
Our shoe business haa increased enormously during the last year, the result of satisfied customers, which has always been our policy.
GORDON'S
Phone 133.
I
Nervousness     JOS.   DAMONTE
REMOVED BY   CHIROPRACTIC
At Clarke's Residence.
Hours I Any Day Between 4 oad t pja.
E. O. HAVKEDAL, Chiropractor.
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for Charlie Dalton
Making connections with Charmer every Sunday morning, leav-
ing Cumberland at 8 a-m.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load) $4.50
RHEUMATISM
BANISHED RY CHIROPRACTIC
See Me at CUrte's Residence, Near
Union Hall, Any Day Between
4 and & pjn.
E. 0. HAVKEDAL, Chiropractor.
GENERAL DELIVERY
CeaL Wee* and Goodi of lay Kind
DoUveree to All Parts el District
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE EO TELEPHONE
er Lean Order* at Vendome Hotel.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MKRRIFIELD,   Proprietor.
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Are.       Cumberland. B. C.
Wood for Sale
DOUBLE LOAD     d»/» AA
Any Length Requited
W. C. WHITE & SON
Happy Valley Phone 92R
Car  For  Hire
at Reasonable Prices
Phone the Cumberland Poolroom
i Phone 141
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and    '     Ask for Geo-Mmm'
Bakers
PHONE 11       CUMBERLAND
£Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orderi at
Tommy's Hardware. Store.
"A Mass of Sores
-No Sleep-
Unhappy Days"
OOTBETTIR. I«^lair»bottl.Mlr,
tod ban bMi eotlt»lr well ««r .Inc.."
Why »<* "• l» aalf»•»«"• will nllV W5
cut.ttkl. dlMM, too-na on innate, thai
thTlnt bottl. will .how mult, or four oner
btckl  ItcMni itw on Mf *ulant. tl.W a
ftrSMnDtwaae
SOLD AT LANG'S DRUG STORK
SURSCRIPTIONS TO CUM-
RERLAND RELIEF FUND
Previously  acknowledged,
Nanaimo                               4.762.15
Western Fuel Corp. of Can
ada, Ltd.                                 1.000.00
Charles Lowe, Nanaimo
2.60
Mrs. C. Lowe, Nanaimo
2.50
Gordon Lowe, Nanaimo
0.60
William Lowe, Nanaimo
0.50
J. L. Ward, All
1.00
A friend, Nanaimo
1.00
W. W. Gray, Nanaimo
5.00
Henry Jones, Nanaimo
1.00
Joe Firmer, Nanaimo
5.00
Mrs. E. Wright, Nanaimo
1.00
J. T. Neen, Nanaimo
1.00
W. L. Heynen, Nanaimo
2.00
Malkin Pearson Ltd., Nanaimo
25.00
MalpasB & Wilson, Nanaimo
10.00
A. K. Lowe, Nanaimo
3.00
Mrs. M. A. Rowe, Nanaimo
10.00
Mrs. Harry McRae, Nanaimo
2.00
W. Akenhead, Nanaimo
5.00
W. H. Wall, Nanaimo
10.00
Silver Coronet Band, Nanaimo
221,01
F. A. Busby, Nanaimo
10.00
Novelty Five Orchestra,
Nanaimo
10.00
Staff Royal Bank ot
Canada, Nanaimo
17.00
Mrs. J. Haworth, City
15.00
W. H. O. Club, City
5.00
City of Nanaimo
600.00
Can. Collieries (D( Ltd.
Wellington, Ladysmlth, Empl
925.00
Athletic Club, City
600.00
Gutta Percha & Rubber Co.
Vancouver
50.00
Imp. Daughters of the Empire,
Vancouver
140.00
Pythian Sisters, Cumberland
Total to date                       1
50.00
8,293.16
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF NANAL
MO HOLDEN AT CUMBERLAND,
B. C.
Take notice that by the order of his
Honor, Judge Barker made the 14th
day of March, 1923, I was appointed
administrator of the estate of Jung
Wah deceased and all parties having
claims against the said estate are
hereby required to furnish same, verified, on or before the first day of May,
A.D. and all parties Indebted to the
said estate are required to pay the
amount of their Indebtedness to me
forthwith.
WESLEY,  WILLARD,
Official Administrator.
AUa's Hung Jung, Jung Wah.
Jung Ding, alla's Joung Ding, Sick
Quee, alla's Jung Quee, Jung Wah,
alla's Chung Wah.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    .    Cleaning    •    Repairs
Telephone 1.    •    F. 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Oo.
Cumberland and Courtenay.
This Is to certify tbat Lee Chun,
Gardener, of Chinatown, Cumberland,
B. C. has transferred his share in the
Kwong on Jan Company to Hop Sing
Fong.
If any person have accounts against
Lee Chun's share In the Kwong On
Jan Company they are notified to
bring their accounts to the Chinese
Freemason's Hall on the afternoon ot
April 1st, at one o'clock.
No accounts rendered after April
first, 1923 will be recognized by the
Kwong On Jan Co.
(Signed)       KWONG ON JAN CO.
March 19th, 1923.
ANACONDA COPPER CO.
PURCHASES RICH MINE
PROPERTY ON TEXADA
Courtenay
Auto Painters
Bring your cars in tor an estimate.
Prices reasonable. Work guaranteed.
Workshop at the Condenaary.
C. G. WILSON
House For Sale
New house, recently built, containing four rooms and pantry.
No reasonable offer refused. For
further information apply to
P. O. BOX 430, ISLANDER
Car  For Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Conrtenay
British Columbia
Phone the Cumberland Poolroom
Phone 141
Ask for Geo. Mason.
Puchase of the old Marble Bay mine,
on Texada Island, by tbe Anaconda
Copper Co., marks the entrance Into
British Columbia of the most power
ful mining corporation on the continent. Rise ln the price of copper, and
evidences that the price will be maintained a considerable time, haB re
newed the demand for this metal.
Marble Bay, until 1921 when the copper depression and other circumstances caused a cessation of work, was a
steady producer of copper-gold ore of
better value than the average of the
Coast range. It Is the deepest mine ou
the coast and part of the workings are
under the sea.
The late Harry Whitney Treat of
Seattle, who was killed In an automobile accident a few months ago a
short distance from Vancouver, was
heavily Interested In Marble Bay and
founded a fortune on his dividends
from this property. During Its many
years of operation the mine produced
some (8,000,000 according to report.
The ore is bornlte In a limestone formation and Is an attractive smeltering
proposition from the treatment stand
point.
Big Ore Body Exposed In 1I»0.
Prospecting work by diamond drill
during 1920 below the 1000 ft. level
exposed an ore body at a lower level
than had heretofore been prospected.
At the time of closing down the work
arrangements had been made to con
tlnue sinking the winze from tho 1600
ft. level and to drift on tho newly discovered ore body to determine its extent preliminary to sloping. Tho
slump ln the price of copper   came
"IT PAYS TO DEAL AT LANG'S"
SATURDAY
DRUG SPECIALS
$1.00 Knos Fruit Salts, Saturday special,   84c.
$0.60 White Liniment (Large Size) Saturday special  46c.
$1.00 Gibson's Dyspepsia Remedy, Saturday special   58c.
$1.00 Extract Sarsparilla Compound. (A fine Spring Tonic 88c.
$1.00 Beef Iron & Wine, Saturday special  89c.
CANDY  SPECIAL
See our windows for a large assortment of Candles at
EXTRA   SPECIAL
PRICES FOR SATURDAY
.Lang's Drug Store
"IT PAYS TO DEAL AT LANG'S"
Send Us Your Mail Orders.
HEN FRUIT
A rooster had been born and brought up entirely
within his own chicken yard. Surrounded with more
wives than the ex-Sultan of Turkey, he felt no inclination to explore the outside world until one day a dog
got into the chicken yard and chased him.
He dived into a clump of weeds and unexpectedly
hit a hole in the fence and was free in a great open lot
that happened to be an ostrich farm.
Rooster-like, he strutted about the place until quite
by accident he discovered an ostrich egg.
To him it was a great revelation!
He rolled it back into his own yard and called his
harem about him.
"Girls," said he, "I do not wish to be unkind. I
do not wish to cast any aspersions on the wonderful
work you have done, but I would like to call your attention to what they are doing in other places."
Now we claim to make Al electrical installations.
We adopt and adhere to the latest regulations, use only
the highest class materiaLand make every endeavor to
give you the safest and best class of work known. Rut
there is the possibility that we are overlooking some
late improvement, some safer device, some new method
or device; you draw our attention to same and should
your suggestion be feasible we will in the interests of
high class work adopt it without delay.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
NOTICE
WHEREAS certain mischievously Inclined persona have tampered with the valves ot the mains ot this Company, thereby
allowing a considerable amount of water to run to waste, we
therefore wish to point out that It is a serious offence to tamper
with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended, they will be prosecuted to the very fullest extent ot
the law.
CUMRERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,  POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETAHLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
about the same time so the management decided to close until the copper
market could guarantee profitable mln-
inng.
Another Important transaction
whereby the big corporation will take
over British Columbia properties Is
said to be pending.
STOMACH SUFFERING
Disappears as if by magic when Jo-To
■ used. Qss pains, acid stomach, sour
stomach, burning and all after-eating
distress relieved in two minutes. All
Drug Stores.
British Columbia coast lumber companies report that they are flooded
with orders from overseas, and a brisk
trade is being anticipated for this season. EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY. MARCH. 24th 1923
NEW COATS
All Wool Velour Sports Coat's in Fawn and Gray, smart
style and good service are combined in this coats' and
the price is moderate when you com- (fi~t A CA
pare the quality. Price     «P-a-^.OU
All Wood Tweed Coats in Green, Gray and Brown %
length, particularly attractive and (fi~t A PA
serviceable. Price    «P-*-«/.*Jv
New mannish tailored coats have been added to our
stock, and style, material and price are (fi-t Q rTJT
within the reach of all. Price    tpi-Oe I D
NEW FLANNELS
A part shipment of our order placed last December has
just arrived and comprises 4 shades only, Navy, Copen,
Cardinal and Light Rose, the width i* 54 to 56 inches
wide, the price is $2.25 per yard, and really superfine
quality.
NEW DRESSES
We have invoiced our first shipment of Ladies Dresses
in Serge, Silks and Flannels and expect to have them on
view in a few days. Inspection invited.
NAVY SERGES
Another shipment of our already well known Serges,
we specially invite you to compare our two leading lines.
No. 1.—Good quality all wool Navy Serge, 52 inches
wide $1.25 yard.
NO. 2. This Serge is really exceptional value made of
of a very heavy wool, suitable for Ladies'
Suits, Dresses and Skirts. Width, 54 inches.
Price $1.95 yard.
SPRING MILLINERY
Quite a number of new Hats are on view, and we
invite your inspection, new lines and models willl be
added as the season advances.
DRYGOODS
& GENT'S FURNISHINGS
AUCTION SALE
AT AGRICULTURAL HALL COURTENAY
Having already received instructions to sell a considerable quantity of goods, it will be necessary to hold
another sale in the near future.
WHAT HAVE YOU TO SELL?
I aim to give the best service and shall continue
to do so.
E. FELIX THOMAS
Auctioneer :: All Kinds of Insurance :: Notary Public
Office: Booth Block :    COURTENAY   :   Phone 151
House Phone: 24-L
Veteran's Wood
Supply
$6.00
DOUBLE 10.11)
for 	
Any length required.
PHONE rout oiiiikhs to s-a.
A. A. BROWN,
Royston Road
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
OflO Il.C. Permanent Loan Bldg
PHONE 21113     VICTORIA, B.C.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE:—Heintzman Piano, upright Grand, and Singer Sewing Machine, ln lirst class condition. For
further particulars apply to Mrs. F.
Jones, or P. 0. Box 439, Cumberland,
B. C.
FOR SALE:—Model 90, Overland touring car, in good running order. For
particulars apply to Wm. Kennan,
City.
F^/R SALE:—6 rooms house, with
bath-room and flush toilet, and three
room cabin on same lot.—Cheap for
cash, or part cash and terms.—Apply W. Fouracre, 301B Third Street.
FOR SALE—Furniture and Effects of
tte Farmer Boarding House for
Sale aB a going concern. For further Information, apply to
Mrs. Harry Farmer, Dunsmuir
Avenue, Cumberland.
FOR SALE — THOROUGHBRED
Cocker Spaniel Pups from splendid
retrievers. C. B. Sturrup, Courtenay
Road, Arden. (Opposite Erquhart
Mill). M10
Mr. J. B. Clearlhue was a week-end
visitor In Courtenay and other portions
of the district.
Mrs. E. L. Macdonald returned on
Monday from Victoria where she has
been spending the last mouths visiting relatives.
Mr. James M. Savage, General Manager, Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd. accompanied by Mrs. Savage arrived ln town on Friday las.t
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hitchens returned from Vancouver on Tuesday.
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Flummerfelt of
Victoria arrived in town last Friday,
and are guests at Beaufort House.
Mr. John Dando left for Vancouver
on Thursday morning.
Mrs. J. Freanerr of Wilson Creek,
B. C. has been visiting her father Mr.
Thomas Horbury, Sr. and relatives ln
town, and returned to her home on
Tuesday morning.
JERSEY COW, IN GOOD CONDITION.
Price and particulars on application; also Ford car in firBt class
shape, tor $200; terms can be arranged. For further Information apply
P. O. Drawer 430 Islander. tf
FOR SALE:—BEAUTIFUL JERSEY
Cow, due 1st week of April, 2nd
calf. Heavy milker and very gentle.
R. Waddell, R. R. 1. M 31
WANTED:—TO     RENT   A     TYPE-
Writer. Apply to P.O. Box 531.
FOR SALE:—FOUR ROOMED HOUSE
with pantry. For particulars apply
to James Haworth.
FOR SALE.—1 DINING ROOM SUITE
(Fumed Oak, $80.00; 1 Cabinet VIc-
trola with forty records, $100.00; 1
Small Table (Fumed Oak(. $2.00;
1 Heater 'IBelle Oak", $10.00; 1 Heater "Fairy Queen' (Open Front),
$8.00.—Apply John Dando, City.
ENGLISH BABY BUGGY—GOOD AS
new. Apply J. A. Brownsey, 216
Third Street.
FOR SALE:—FAWCETT KITCHEN
Range, good as new, $35; old style
Singer Sewing Machine, $10; Oak
Bedstead, Matress and Springs complete, all ln good shape, $10. Apply
Cumberland Motor Works. tf
INDIGESTION
Relieved In Two Minutes With
JO-TO
Gas, add, sour, burning stomach, all
quickly relieved with Jo-To. Drug
stores.     	
Mr. R. O'Brien left for Seattle   on
Wednesday morning.
Mr. Thomas Pearse left for Seattle
Monday rooming.
Mr. J. Walton returned from Victoria Thursday evening.
Mr. Ben Pearse went   to   Seattle
Monday morning.
Mr. Leslie Pflmer, of Vancouver,
B. C. arrived ln Bevan last Saturday
and Ib the guest of his sister, Mrs.
David Aitken. He Is very busy meeting old chums after being absent from
Cumberland for nearly 8 years.
The old saying goes that no one
believes a fish story, but I must say
that a lot of nice trout are being
caught In the Bevan river this week.
WHO TOOK THE
WRONG OVERCOAT?
It has been reported to us that an
overcoat, In good condition, was taken
from the Ilo-llo Theatre on Friday
evening last, and an old one left In It's
place. If the reader who made this
"unfortunate" mistake will return the
overcoat to the llo-Ilo Theatre, or to
the Islander office, he will save himself further trouble.
May 16th has been the date set by
the Women's Auxiliary of Holy Trl
nlty Church for a sale ot work to be
held in the Anglican Hall.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies' and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 • Cumberland
P. P. HARRISON
Harristei and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND  • •  B. C.
BURNING STOMACH
Relieved In Two Minutes With
JO-TO
Jo-To relieves gas pains, acid stomach, heartburn, after-eating distress
and all forms of indigestion quickly
without harm.   All drug stores.
Tillman A. Briggs, M.D.C.M., of
Courtenay has been appointed Medical
Inspector of Schools for Courtenay
and surrounding District.
FARM  WANTED
WANTED—TO   HEAR  FROM OWN-
ers of good farm for sale. State
cash price, full particulars. D. F.
Bush, Minneapolis, Minn.
LOST
LOST:—On Dunsmuir Avenue, City,
one ladlos' Spanish Comb, set In
Sapphires. Finder please return to
MrB. O, Cavln, City.
Boxing
Boxing
Boxing
Anyone wishing to enter a
BOXING
TOURNAMENT
to be held by the Courtenay Athletic
Club on or about the 14th of April
please give their name and weight to
M. Blunt, Secretary, not later than
Monday
March 26th
Contests to be 3—2 minute rounds,
open to any resident of the Comix District.
THE COURTENAY ATHLETIC CLUB
Miss Kate Richardson who Is ln
training at the Jubilee Hospital, Victoria, arrived ln town on Thursday on
a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G.
J. Richardson.
BIRTHS
Born:—On Monday, at the Cumberland General Hospital, to Mr. and
Mrs. J. Hill, a daughter.
VALUE
When buying a car you want the
best value for your money, so don't
fall to see the new SUPERIOR Chevrolet;
It ts manufactured In Canada by The
General Motors Ltd., the world's largest automobile manufacturers, and
has proved itself to be the most reliable, economical, fully equipped light
car on the market. Call, or phone for
a demonstration and be convinced.
Easy terms arranged, and highest
market price allowed on your old
car.
WE GIVE SERVICE
We aim to give our customers the
very best service, whether you are
Just calling for gas, getting your car
washed and pollBhed, or having it overhauled. Our Repair Shop Ib up to
date and lu charge of experienced mechanics, who can save you money on
your repair work, no matter what
make of car you own. Let us know
your trouble, and get a price on the
Job.
WE GIVE SATISFACTION
Blunt & Ewart
Limited
The Courtenay Garage
Chevrolet, Dodge Bros, and
Studebaker.
SPECIAL
Bulk Ginger Snaps, 2 lbs. for 35c
Bulk Graham Wafers, 2 lbs. for 45c
Fancy Mixed Buns 1% lb. tins  75c @ tin
Fresh Ground Coffee 50 @ 60c per lb.
B. & B. Choice Tea 50c lb.
B. &. B. Ceylon Tea  60c lb.
Jelly Powder and Jello, 10c package
Vegetable
Head Lettuce, Celery, Green Cabbage (Hard Heads),
Rhubarb, Onions, Parsnips, Turnips, Carrots and
Potatoes.
Fruits
Juicy Oranges, 3 doz. for $1.00.
Eating and Cooking Apples, Lemons, California Grape
Fruit, Florida Grape Fruit, Bananas.
Fish
Haddie, Kippers, Kippered Salmon, Kippered Black Cod
Dry Salt Cod and Smoked Cod.
Full Stock of Garden and Flower Seeds, Grass and
Lawn Seed, Bulbs and Shilott
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. Grocery
STYLE!
In women's Footwear is essential. Women pride
themselves upon smartly gowned figures, and their millinery creations, and their trim hosiery, of course
their shoes must harmonize.
See The New Models
We have just received a shipment of the new "Colonial Pumps, with Spanish Heels". Patent leather with
Grey insertion.
They are asking $11.00 and $12.00 for this same
pump in the cities.  Our price is only
$8.00
Cavin's Shoe Store
"Shoes of Quality at a Fair Price."
WANTED!
Information that will lead to the conviction of one
or more doubtful persons, that the F O R D Car is today the best value in the world.
Apply
Corfield Motors Ltd.
FORD DEALERS
COURTENAY
Phone 46
All stores will be closed on Good
Friday, March 30th, and on Easter
Monday, April 2nd.
Mr. A. S. Klllam, representing Fleck
Bros, ot Vancouver, visited Cumberland on Thursday.
Phone 61
Mr. Boucher, Income Tax Collector,
who haa been ln town (or the past ten
days  left for Vancouver,    Thursday
morning.
Mr. J. Walton of Mumford & Walton visited Victoria this week.
Mount Robson, scaled for the first
time by the Rev. G. B. Kinney, ls the
highest peak In the Canadian Rockies,
attaining an altitude ot 13,069 feet.

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