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The Cumberland Islander Apr 17, 1925

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Array fMm CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
:\T    v
iy
With which ls consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-FOURTH YEAR—No. 10.
CUMBERLAND,  BRITISH  COLUMBIA FRIDAY,   APRIL   17,   1925
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Eminent Lecturer
Dr. T. H. Boggs
Wa* Visitor Here
DELIGHTFUL PARTY
AT COMOX LAKE
Mrs. Amos Lobley, ot Comox Lake,
entertained nt a children's party on
the afternoon of Easter Monday In
honor of her daughter Dorothy's
sixth birthday. Those invited wero
Miss Audrey Gear. Miss Betty O'Brieu,
Miss Irene O'Brien, Miss Dorothy
Smith, Miss Joan Quinn, Miss Ethel
i Shellato. Hiss Daphne Lobley and
[ Masters Milford Devlin, George
! Shellato, Alvln Davles, Talbert Davies
! Jack Devlin, Malcolm Stewart, and
James Ellis of Nunalnio. Mrs. J.
I Gear, Mrs. H. Devlin, .Mrs. J. Ellis,
| Mrs. Jl. Brown, Mra. M, Stewart, Miss
Jean Smith and Miss Edna Gear were
also present, the latter two assisting
Mrs. Lobley with the refreshments.
Very few people took advantage of
the opportunity on Saturday evening j
last to hear the eminent lecturer, Dr. |
T. H. Boggs, PhD., who was lecturing i
in the Athletic Hull on the subject
"Periods of Business Depression. Can
they be avoided?' The lecture was
an extremely good one, and would
have proved of great Interest to residents of the city, had they been present, but such was not the cose, only
about twelve being sufficiently Interested to attend. It Is regrettable
that a mnn of Dr. Bogg's calibre
should travel from Vancouver to Cumberland to deliver a lecture and then
Hnd that his audience was a meagre
dozen. lt is unfair to the lecturer,
to the management of the Literary Association tbat brought him here, and
above all. It shows, better than words
can tell, the true character of the citizens of this city who were too tired "The Sea Hawk" is the crowning
or were not sufficiently interested to < achievement of a season of brilliant
attend. j screen dramas, a play that  registers
In spite of this, however, Dr. Boggs , Its magnitude In every scene and with
enjoyed his visit to Cumberland very j such force that it is not likely that
much   for he  found   that  Dr.   E.   R.! local  screen  followers  will cease  to
Hicks was a chum of his when both i talk about it very soon,
were at college, nnd they opeui a mostj Gigantic I'ndrrtnkiiitr
enjoyable evening at the home of D. R. |    To visualize Sabntinl's vivid drama
ALD. Ma4XWELL'S BYLAW SETS GENERAL
RATE AT 15 MILLS
"Sea Hawk" Is
Spectacular And
Thrilling Story
MacDonald   recalling   their   old   college days.
KEEP THIS DATE OPEN
The Ladies' Aid of the Grace Methodist Church will hold a Home Cook-
.ng Stall on Saturday, May
keep this date open.
has been a gigantic undertaking, yet
Mr. Lloyd has delivered a photoplay
which allows little room for criticism
and which establishes    its    producer
firmly   in   the  front  rank  of  screen
masters.     "The Sea Hawk" is a masterpiece of cinema art dramatically,
Please   pictorially and technically.      Seldom
1 have there been so muny massive settings In one picture before, especially
TO HOLD DAFFODIL TEA    [ so mon,* big sea scenes with ship of
  ; such dimensions employed.     To the
Tlle Ladles' Aid of the Presbyterian ; picture fan who judges big pictures
Church will hold a Daffodil Tea at; merely hy big settings and number ol
thc home of Mrs. Hurling. 303 Wind- j people employed In them "The Sea
ermere Avenue on Wednesday, the I Hawk" should be unusually attractive
22nd, from 3 30 to ti o'clock. Sliver j to the student of the* screen and the
collection. I critic the massive sets, tlie gorgeous
j wardrobe and the more than a thous-
i aim people employed in u are merely incidental ln comparison to the action of the story, for the "Sea Hawk"
is the fastest moving big picture ever
reflected on tlie silver sheet.
Milton Sills plays the title role, or
rather the dual priclpal character
in a most appealing manner. Mr. Sills'
Lxcellent Service,
At St. George's
The Easter services in St. George's
Presbyterian Church on Sunday night
were indeed worthy of the occasion.
For many weeks the choir, under thc ! characters represent the most dom
leadership of Mr. Parnham, had been
busy preparing for the event, and the
quartettes,  duets  and  several  unth-
innnt Individuals ever brought before
a camera and he mukes the most of
every     scene,     reaching     dramatic
ems showed the result of the care that  heights which should elevate him to a
position few others might occupy. In
all of his many Interesting screen
plays Sills has never had a role which
demanded so much of his histrionic
ml
had been taken. The Pastor. Rev.
James Hood, had a sermon that was
very appropriate for the service.
St. George's Church  has been adding considerably lo the musical pa't I and so much of his physical self.
of the  evening service  of  late, and  he rises to every occasion,
the results nre being shown  by the j Work Is Refreshing
Increased attendance, the majority, Enid Bennett ns Rosamund is a
of whom are music lovers who go to i charming heroine and her grnce Is
enjoy that part of the service. Par-' refreshing. Lloyd Hughes docs
etits should notice that Sunday School} splendidly with the dillicult character
now commences al 10 o'clock In the ! of Lionel. Wallace Decry is. as nl-
mornlng. and that morning and even- ways, a perfect rogue, and Frank Curing service are nt 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. ■ Her us the nged Asad. basha of Al-
respectively.
Personal Mention
\ giers, gives the old sultan    a    deep
sincerity  which  is one of the finest
bits of masculine emotion we have ha 1
j the  pleasure  to  witness.      Wallace
  : MacDonald   makes    Peter   genuinely
To Vancouver. j contemptible  and  Marc   MacDermott
Alderman John J. Potter, chalrmau : „„ sir John gives the character an air
! of  dignity  ami   true  knightliuess   in
of the Board of Works, and Mrs. Pot
ter left for Vancouver on Tuesday last   hie* portrayal
Holidaying ui Minto.
Miss Mildred Calnnn and Mr. Clifford Horwood. wiio have been attend
I'.b Normal   School   in   Victoria,   are
spending the Muster holiday with Ihelr : youthful   ngg
Mme Medea Rad/.ina.
a newcomer to the screen, plays Fen-
ileh with marked understanding, and
William Collier Jr.. as her son impersonates his character with typical
ressiveness.      Others  in
parents In Minto.
Visits Piircnts.
Mr.  Pierce D. Graham    lii>«    been!
spending the Eastertide with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Graham,
of this city.     Ho returns to Victoria
tomorrow   morning   to   resume
school studies.
the cast acquit themselves commend-
ably,
Judged as a whole it does not seem
amiss to place "Tbe Sen Hawk" among
the six best pictures of the screen for,
for general entertainment quality,
. . genuine bigness and deep rooted sincerity ami achievement it surpasses
anything that It might be compared
Holidaying In Xwialmo. I wltn   ,„  a  considerable    length    of
The Misses Olive Richardson, Beth time.
Horbury and Harriet Horbury went j prank uoy(1.s P|r8t National plc-
to Nanaimo on Saturday last to spend t„rei "The Sen Hawk." adapted trom
the holiday week. [ Rafael Sabatlnl's stirring novel of
Visited Seattle. ' Barbary (•oralis, will be shown at the
Miss Laura Robertson was n visitor Ho-Ilo Theatre. Monday, Tuesday and
to Seattle on Thursday last, return-. Wednesday. April 20. 21 and 22, and
ing to Cumberland Monday evening. '• *' »lc Ga'ot>* Theatre, Thursday, Fi-I-
,.„..,„,, day and Saturday, April 23, 21 and 2",.
Home from Morula] School. 	
Miss Margaret MacXaughton. n pupil of the Victoria Normal School, bus
been spending the Ens', or week with
her parents In .Minto.
Ylsl'lug Parents,
Miss Florence .lores returned from
Victoria on Friday last to spend Iho
Easter vacation with her parents, Mr,
and Mrs. A, S. Jones, of I'nlon Bay.
The regular meeting of the Cumberland City Council was held in tlie
Council Chambers, Dunsmuir Avenue
this week as usual with only two
Aldermen, 'Messrs Mumford and Mullen, absent. Nevertheless the evening's business went on as usual under
tlie capable hands of Mayor Charles
Parnham and the remaining aldermen, Messrs J. J. Potter, A. E. Jeffrey. J. Ledlngham. A. Maxwell, and
W. II. Cope, clerk of the municipality.
Much time was used up in dealing
with three communications from the
local Fire Department, the local
School Board, and from Premier John
Oliver, respectively. The first of
these was from Secretary A. MacKinnon, asking the council to accept the
custody of the new Chemical truck, as
has been done with the h°se truck,
and to insure same for a suitable
amount. This the meeting decided
to do, and the clerk was instructed to
call for tenders on the Insurance of
the truck to the amount of $2,000,
tenders to be il*. the hands of the
council by Monday, April 27. The
same communication also stated that
a committee of -firemen would meet a
committee from the council for the
purpose of defining a restricted area,
outside of which the twfc trucks would
not be called upon to fight fires. This
matter was left in the hands of the
Are wardens.
The letter from the scliool trustees
wus more or less In the nature of a
complaint. They claimed that the
number of loads of ashes reported delivered to the school grounds, and
the number actually delivered, did not
tally, but as the chairman of the
Board of Works had a suitable explan
ation, he was Instructed to interview
the trustees and clear up the difficulty.     In the case of the communi
cation from the Premier, re changing the municipal election dates trom
January to December, the council seem
ed wholly In favor of the change, but
a very easy way to dispense with the
question was suggested by Alderman
Maxwell—that this council endorse
the action of the majority of the councils throughout the province. The
clerk was therefore instructed to
write the Premier to this effect.
Bills and accounts to the amount of
$47.55 were referred to the finance
committee for payment. Alderman
Potter reported that his staff of workmen had been busy throughout the
week cleaning up the various alleys
in the city, and that all were now in
first class condition. Alderman Jeffrey reported a clean bill of health.
and as chairman of the water committee stated that the leak tn the main
at Maryport and Third had been repaired, but another leak had occurred
at Penrith and Third. He had called
the attention of the Water Company
to this latter.
Alderman Maxwell then introduced
his "General Rate By-Law,*' No. 68",
which Bets the taxation rate at 15
mills on the dollar. This passed its
three readings and will come up tor
final revision and adoption at the next
meeting. School Rate By-Laws, Nos.
67 and 68, introduced by Alderman
Jeffrey, also passed their first, second
and third readings, and will be adopted at the next meeting. Assessments
under this heading will be 9 mills on
the dollar.
Before adjournment, the question
of a celebration on May 24th came up
for discussion and it was decided to
call a public meeting for 7:30 o'clock
Friday evening, in order to feel the
public's pulse In this respect.
SAVE THE FOREST
WEEK IN CANADA;
APRIL 19 TO 25
A press despatch from Ottawa says
that a Canada-wide organization in
connection with the observance of
"Save-the-Forest" Week from April
19 to 25 has been formed.
The objective outlined is to inform
the public, industries and governments thoroughly regarding the Importance of the forests to the national existence and the serious state of
depletion to which this indispensable
resource has been brought.
A conference called by the Hon.
Charles Stewart, Minister of the Interior, was held In the federal capital
one day last week*.
Cumberland United Tries
Tomorrow For Soccer
Championship Of B.C.
BASEBALLERS WILL
MEET ON SUNDAY
A meeting nf tbe Cumberland Baseball Club will be held In the Athletic
Cub on Sunday next, April loth, nt
S:15 pm. Iniportniit business; a full
attendance Is  requested.
A. s. Denholme, Sectv.
• The Cumberland United Soccer
Team, Island finalists for the championship of British Columbia, leave this
evening for Vancouver where they
will meet St. Andrew's ln the final
game for possession of the Province
Cup. Both teams have been playing
a first class brand of football in the
past nnd it would take an excellent
judge to prophecy the result; far be
it from us to attempt to do so; at any
rate the meeting of the two teams will
be well worth watching and the winners will nt least know that they have
been in a game. Cumberland will
employ tlic r.ame team that has been
so successful iu the B. & K. series and
the Davenport Shield series—Blair.
Mortimer, Stewart; Brake, Conti.
Monohan; Bannerman, Heyland, Fowler Plump and Hitchens; with Ferguson and Marshall as reserves. Manager Bill Walker, Secretary R. Strachan, and Trainers Taylor and Jackson
will accompany the players, as well
as many local fans who are making
tlie trip in order to cheer their favorites on to victory.
The semi-final gunie of the series,
in wliieh Cumberland downed Esquimalt hy the score of 2 goals lo 1, was
played In Nanaimo lust Saturday. It
was a great surprise to all fans from
Ibis part of Ibe Island, not because
tlie local team played poor football
but because they took the Esquimalt I
boys too lightly, never thinking that
thoy might bo serious contenders for
the cup. But we all must learn our
lessons, and the Cumberland tieam i
certainly learned theirs on Saturday,
almost to their sorrow, the game going Into thc overtime "period before
Contl scored the winning goal by head
lug In a beautiful corner from Bannerman. Thirty minutes after the
start of the game Fowler scored the {
opener for lhe up-Island team by
slamming in one of Hltchen's crosses,
the ball travelling so fast that no one
know a goal hod been scored until
they saw the plg-skln reposing safely
In the net. This was the only counter in this period but there should have j
bceM ninny more for the Cumberland j
forwards missed chance nfter chance
through Inability to shoot straight.
Bsqulinalt evened the count in the i?c
ond  half when Warren    slammed    a
the ball glancing off that worthy's
foot a"d l"t0 'I"' net. with Blair stand
ing helplessly by, and all the while
casting reproachful glances at his
horse shoe. With the score tied at
the end of full time a half hour extra
was ordered to be played and lt was
in the first period of this that Conti
clinched the game for his team.
The showing of the Cumberland
team was rather disappointing and the
Nanaimo Herald Is probably right in
saying: "If a word of comment is
not out of order, it might be said that
Cumberland will play a better game
than they did yesterday, if they put
the Saints out of the running."
Native -Sons Held
Regular Meeting
Install Officers
The regular meeting of Courtenay
Assembly No. 3 Native Sons of Canada was held on Thursday night, thc
chief business being installation of
officers. There was an extremely
large attendance oud the coming year
holds every prospect of being the best
the Sons have experienced since organization. Organized three years
ago at Victoria there are now thirty-
one assemblies In British Columbia
and Alberta with a membership of
many thousand Canadian-horn persons. The latest district to organize
ia Sayward and the national organizer Is now at Toronto where great
results are being achieved. President, Bro. Harry Radford; 1st Vice
President, Bro. H. G. Blackhall; 2nd
Vice President, Bro. Walter Pritchard
Secretary, Bro. Wilfred Smith; Sergt-
At-Arms. Bro. George Piercy; Inner
Guard, Bro. John Murray; Outer
Guard. Bro. Jas. Turnbull; Pianist,
Bro. John Carwithea. Three others
are to be Installed at the next regulur meeting on May 5.
At the close of the lodge meeting
a social and dance was held, members of Courtenay Assembly No. 6
Canadian Daughters League being
present. .Music was provided by the
Native Sons Orchestra and Hlbbert,
Raymond and Annie McLeod. children of Mr. and Mrs. S. D. McLeod, of
Royston. During the social, presentation were made on behalf of Assembly No. 3 by Past President Anderton to retiring President Alexander Cleland and retiring Secretary
Charles Beosly. These olllcers were
the recipients of stick pins as a mark
of appreciation for the services rendered the assembly during the past
fifteen months. Brother Harry Black-
hall contributed n recitation and
dance to the program. At the next
meeting a debate on "Prohlbiion" will
be held and the High School Concert
Troupe will perform.
C. G. I. T. Groups
Feted Mothers At
Grand Banquet
On Good Friday morning, the two
C.G.I.T. groups of the Presbyterian
(hureh left for their hike up to the
dam. Clad in bloomers and sweaters,
with their lunch, aud kodaks, they
were a merry crowd of girls, as accompanied by .Mrs. Hood and Miss
.Mann, they started down the railway
track to China Town, through the
main street there, where many curious people came out to see them, and
thence up the trail to the first dam.
By the time their objective had been
reached there had been many slips,
many an "oh dear," and many rosy
cheeks caused by tlie exertion of
climbing. On reaching the dam the
girls found the Hoys' Club, accompanied by Mr. J. C. Brown and Mr.
Donald MacLean, there before them.
After lunch and a rest, a start was
made for the third dam, but after another climb through beautiful green
park-like spaces, they had to turn
back as there was still about three
feet of soft snow there. Retracing
their steps part of the way, they went
to the second dam where a beautiful
view was obtained of ihe surrounding
country. Returning to the first dam,
.i rest was made and then all started
down the hill and, arriving safely,
wended their way homeward, tired,
but happy and looking forward to
their next hike.
These same two groups entertained
their mothers at a Mother and Daughter Banquet on Wednesday evening
in the basement of tbe church. It
was nicely decorated with evergreens
and blue and white crepe paper. The
tables were in th,. form of a square
and decorated with daffodils and
curly lillies, and with the dainty food
made a very pretty picture. The
(Continued on Page Two)
Tennis Members
Elect President
A meeting of the Cumberland Teu-
' nis Club  was held In    the    Council
Chambers on Wednesday evening for
the purpose of electing a new presl-
; dent. Mr. A. T. Heyland finding tllat
' business affairs necessitated tlle tend-
ering of bis resignation as that official.      Several other  minor  changes
1 were made, the complete list of ofli-
! cluls  now   being as  follows:      Hon.
I President.  .Mr.  Thomas   Graham  Sr.,
President,    Mr.    George W. Clinton;
Vice President, Dr. E. R. Hicks; Secretary.  Mi*.   W.  II.  Cope;  Treasurer.
I Dr. George K. MacNaughton; and an
[ executive committee comprised of the
j foregoing and Miss M. Brown. Mr. A.
III. Stacey and Mr. T. Graham Jr. Dr.
MacNaughton  was also appointed as
trustee in place of Mr. Heyland.
TWO CABS CRASH;
OCCUPANTS ARE
SLIGHTLY HURT
CONDITIONS IN CITY ARE VERY
FAVORABLE AT PRESENT TIME
On Friday evening last, about 7:30
O'clock, a Ford truck and a Ford touring cur. driven respectively by Dick
Leighton of Royston Road and Mr. j
Leighton of Union Bay, met in a
head-on crash at the corner Just beyond the Company's Farm on the Royston Road. Thc corner In a dangerous
one, ns all motorists In the district
know, and It ls Indeed surprising that
more accidents hove not happened
there.
The occupants of both cars wcre
severely shaken up, more especially
Mrs. J. E. Spicer and samll daughter
Linda, who were travelling to Cumberland In the truck. The former
wns badly bruised about thc head and
has been undergoing medical treatment for the past week but Is at present completely recovered. Both cars
were badly damaged.
ERRATUM
In our last week's Issue it was stat
ed thai the farewell party for Mrs. C.
Oraham, which was held at the home j
of Mrs. H. Parkinson, was given by
the members of the Maccabee Lodge.
This was an error as Mrs. Parkinson |
wns herself the hostess and not th
Macabee Lodge.
FASCINATING SCREEN
STORY MAY BE FILMED
ON VANCOUVER ISLAND
There ls a possibility thot a party
of First National Film Company motion picture stnrs may come to Vancouver Island to shoot scenes In the
Rex Bench film, "Winds of Chance,"
it wns stated by Mr. B. G. Taylor, general agent of the Southern Pacific
Railway, of Seattle, who was ln Victoria Tuesday, on a short Jnelness
trip, nnd who has beeu making arrangements for the theatrical company's trip through British Columbia.
The party includes Miss Anna Q.
Nilsson, Mr. Ben Lyon. Mr. Victoria
McLaglen, all starring in the production; Mr. Frank Lloyd, producer, who
also produced "The Sea Hawk" for
Firts National Pictures, and many
other notable people of fllmdnm.
"Over $150,000 Is being spent on
this picture, " Mr. Taylor stated. "Wc
have carried on quite an advertising
campaign for British Columbia at
Los Angeles, pointing out the splendid locations for motion picture productions here."
hard
one   straight   at  Jock   Stewart.
Don't forget the Scotch Concert In
the St. George's Presbyterian Church
Cumberland,   Wednesday,   April   20th
Return*, to Cumberland.
Miss Josie Balagno returned to
Cumberland on Monday evening from
Ladysmith. where she had been spending the Easter week-end.
The condition of business in general
and tllc mining industry in particular
Is very favorable in Cumberland nl
the present time; much better than
It has been for the past few months.
No, I Mine Is working every day In
order to fulfill the numerous orders
and the prospects of such conditions
continuing are exceedingly bright.
Local business men as well, are optimistic of the future, knowing full
well thai it win not be long before tha
city will be once ngaln known as the
"premier coal mining center of Vancouver  Island."
FIBST All) CLASSES
Sunday. April 19th, Is the last
chance for anyone wishing to Join the
Men's First Aid Classes. Lectures
start promptly at 11 a.m. in the First
Aiil Hall.
There is absolutely no charge for
tuition nnd a prize will be given to the
pupil making the highest marks for
the fir * year's examinations.
MACCABEES CHANGE
DATE OF MEETING
The next regular meeting of tbe
Maccabee Lodge will be held on April
80th instead of the 33rd as previously
arranged. The "meeting will be followed by a whist drive
Don't forget the Scotch Concert In
the St. George's Presbyterian Church
Cumberland,   Wednesday.   April   until
mm PAGE TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY,   APRIL   17,   1925
The Cumberland Islander
, PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY.   APRIL   17,   1925
WHAT MAKES A TOWN?
What makes a town anyway? Is it tha
wealth evidenced by the homes and splendid store
buildings? These may attest the stability and
thrift of certain people, but they offer no great
inducements to commercial and moral progress.
Is it the spirit of good order and law observance?
That is a factor only. The sleepiest old hamlets
that dot the map have this spirit in rank abundance. It is the schools and churches? ** May
their number ever increase, but they don't make
a town—they only culture it. Is it the geographical location, the character of the country
surrounding, the shipping facilities, the natural
advantages ?
None of these are essentials. Well, what is
it that makes a town, anyway? Just one thing
—the unity of the people, the existence of a common bond which causes business and social antagonists to put aside all differences when it
comes to boosting the town. No town ever made
real progress in the way to substantial success
without the get-together spirit, unanimously
adopted. It has rejuvenated old hulks of towns
that were yawning their way into endless sleep.
It has infused new life blood into the heart of
commercial life and made thriving cities out of
paralytic villages.
Natural advantages count for much and prosperity cannot be built upon shifting sand, but any
town with half a chance can be made to grow and
expand and thrive when its citizens join with one
accord in the boosting program.
TIVE^NOTICE?
Did you ever notice that a boy or girl can sii
on a stone four inches square for half a day, waiting for the fish to bite, but can't sit. on a sofa five
minutes for a dollar ? A man can sit on an inch
board and talk politics for three hours, but put
him into a comfortable church pew for forty
minutes and he gets nervous, twists and turns and
goes to sleep. A man can pouch his cheeks with
tobacco and the juice running down his chin feels
good; but a hair in the butter simply knocks him
out completely.
WHO IS THE HOME MERCHANT?
The home merchant, who is he? He is thc
chap who gives you credit when you are financially broke, and carries your account until you are
able to pay.
He is the chap who gives you back your
money or makes exchanges when you are not satisfied with what you have bought.
He is the chap who meets you at the door
with a handshake and lets you out with a message to the "kids" and a real "come again, goodbye."
He is the chap whose clerks live in the home
town and spend their money with you and other
local people.
He is the chap who helps support our churches and charitable organizations and talks for Cum
berland and boosts for it every day in the year.
He is the home merchant—your neighbor—
your friend—your helper in time of need.
Don't you think you ought to trade with him
and be his friend and his helper in time of need?
Don't you know that every dollar you send
out of Cumberland for merchandise is sent to
strangers—to men who never spend a dollar here ?
You don't save much, usually nothing, when you
send your money out of town. And don't you
know that the growth and prosperity of Cumberland depends very largely upon the success and
prosperity of the home merchant ? Out of town
people judge our cities and towns by the appearance of our stores and the degree of enterprise
shown by our merchants. And our Cumberland
merchants cannot succeed unless home folks give
them loyal support.
WATCH 'EM
We wonder how many of our readers have
noticed the difference between the man who has
been married but a short time and one who has
been married for several years?
You can always tell a young husband from an
old one.
When a man has been married a few months,
you will generally see him working in the garden
or fixing up about the house, and while he works,
he whistles or sings, or occasionally looks up toward the window to see if anybody is watching
him. A year later he is still working in the garden but the smile has been exchanged for a frown
and he occasionally looks up toward the house
wondering why in thunder breakfast is not ready.
Another year rolls by and his looks would sour
milk, but he is still at work, stopping occasionally
to kick the dog or throw a brick at the cat. The
next year we find him sitting on the front porch
smoking a pipe, while his wife does the digging in
the garden. Now, just watch our young men,
as one by one, they are caught in Cupid's net, and
see if this rule does not work out the problem
correctly.
THE DECLINE OF NEIGHBORLINESS
The woman of today has forgotten, in the
hurry and turmoil of city life, the art of being
neighborly; the art that distinguished her kindly, hustling grandmother. It is to be regretted
that this is so, for society, to be permanent, and
certainly to be progressive, has to be linked together. We must have points of contact with
our fellows. The more there are of these, the
more substantial is the general condition.
The mothers of yesterday were less hurried
than those of today, and consequently were less
selfish. They had time for the simpler pleasures which gave them as much enjoyment as
the complex, strenuous, businesslike affairs of
today. They could be interested in the peopl-j
whose lives touched their own through propinquity, and without any sacrifice of their own more
immediate home duties. They could loan and
borrow; they could render loving assistance in
times of joy and sorrow.
These acts made them more kindly and more
tolerant as well. They hod a chance to get behind the scenes of life, to see their fellows when
they were not playing parts, and when the paint
and the powder were washed off. They got at
the mysteries of existence; the love of a good
I wife for a bad husband, the forgiveness of fond
parents for frailties of sons and daughters. They
jwent out of themselves to get their knowledge,
i and when it was theirs it broadened them.
Little of the sort rewards the aloofness of
jthe present day. To meet at party or at formal
idinner; to know people by their gowns and to
'make their parties social clearing nouses doesn\
.put any man or woman into the warm, instructive, self-developing relations which followed up-
lon the old big-hearted neighborliness.
This is a pity. A greater pity lurks behind
j in the knowledge that nothing can improve affairs
The world is too busy to go backward, and so it
I grows colder every day.
GRAIN IS THRESHED
ON PRAIRIE FARMS
BRANDON.—Harvesting operations
commenced last week in the Brandon
district when J. fouling started
threshing oats. He will Inter put
some barely through the separator
Another  farmer   Is    also    threshing
sweet clover. This grain all remained In the stocks in the fields through-
j out the winter aiid farmers are great-
' ly Interested In the outcome of the
threshing operations, which are very
! unusual here at this season.
I Ploughing weather holds. Seeding
' of wheat has started In the Douglas
' and Carroll districts, but will not be
' general for another week.
C. G. I. T. GROUPS
FETED MOTHERS
AT BANQUET
(Continued From Page One)
stands Economy
See the New
Ford for
BEAUTY
Lower Top, Longer Lines, Balloon Tires, 4 Speed Forward, Silent Gear Change, More Miles to the Gallon,
More Speed—
SAFETY—DEPENDABILITY—ECONOMY
Corfield Motors, Limited
FORD DEALER
Phone 16
 *-
Courtenay
work was all done by the girls and
it is hoped that by next year tbey will
be able to do the cooking as well.
Miss Alma Conrad, president of the
senior group acted es toast mistress
in  a  very  efficient  manner.       The
toast list and program consisted of the
following:
"Welcome" by the girls.
"The King", proposed by Gwen Emily and responded to by Miss Brown.
Quartette—Alma Conrod, Katie Bartoldi,    Helen    Parnham    and    Llllle
Banks.
"Our Sister Groups," proposed by
Jessie Baird and responded to by
Edna Gear, representing the C.G.I.T.
groups of thc Methodist Church.
Exhibition of Dumbcll Swinging,
Prlssllla Cloutler.
"Our Mothers," proposed by Jean
MacNaughton and responded to hy
Mrs. Bnnks.
Solo—Alma Conrad.
"Sunday School," proposed by Barbara Grant and responded to by Mrs.
MacNaughton.
Duet—Katie Bartoldi and Llllle
Banks.
"Girls of Other Lands," proposed by
Beryl Hudson nnd responded to by-
Mrs. Hood.
Candle Lighting Ceremony—This
was a quite Interesting part. All
mothers nnd daughters having a
candle, which was lighted by the
spirits of Love, Comradshlp, Patience,
Confidence, Trust and Sympathy. The
mothers repeated a pledge together,
followed by one by lhe daughters.
After a social chat together the
mothers and daughters left for home,
all reeling that they bad had a splendid time together at the second ban-
i|itet of the C.G.I.T.
PELAGIC SEALING TREATY
TO BE STRONGLY OPPOSED
BY PROVINCE AT OTTAWA
VICTORIA, April 13.—That strong
opposition will be made by British
Columbia at Ottawa against any renewal of the Pelagic Sealing Treaty
is contained in the announcement that
Premier Oliver will support the Victoria Chamber of Commerce and City
Council in opposition against any renewal of the treaty.
Premier Oliver has announced that
it is bin intention when be visits
Ottawa shortly to urge strongly that
it be not renewed. He will be backed
up by all old-time sealers of this city
and other British Columbia Coast
ports, and In fact by sealers all along
the Pacific seaboard.
A mass-meeting will be called
shortly of all old-time sealers to discuss this question and representatives
from us far south as San Francisco
are expected to attend.
Club will hold a Sale of Work and
Lantern Lecture in the school house
on Monday evening, April 20th, at 8
o'clock.     There will be a work stall,
home cooking stall, candy stall, bran
tub dip, and plant stall. Dont forget
to get a ticket (25 cents each) for tho
raffle of the doll and bed.
ROYSTON GIRLS WILL
HOLD SALE OF WORK
AND LANTERN LECTURE
The Royston  School Girls' Sewing
MANN'S BAKERY
FOR QUALITY BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRIES
Delicious Cream Cakes, Cream Rolls, Etc.
APPETIZING FRUIT PIES
Our Famed Scotch Oat Cakes Need no Recommending
# and our
Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls Are Sure to Please
WEDDING, CHRISTENING & BIRTHDAY CAKES
MADE TO ORDER
at
MANN'S — CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 18 Phone IS
THURSDAY, FRIDAY and
SATURDAY
APRIL  23—24—25
SEE—
A 3ittt national Pictun
MILTON SILLS
Supported by
Enid Bennett,
Lloyd Hughes
Wallace Beery
and a cast of
3,000 players.
Produced by
FRANK LLOYD PRODUCTIONS, INC.
Adults, 50c.
Children, 25c.
SATURDAY MATINEE AT 2.30  P.M.
ADULTS 35*f> CHILDREN 15*r>
ijajaiEiaiBMasrsiBiBjaiKHSKrafflEi^^
Gaiety Theatre
Courtenay
■ FRIDAY,   APRIL  17,   1925
iThe Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite  Ilo-llo  Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
ALBERT  EVANS
Practical   Berber,  and   Hairdresser,  Shampooing,  Singeing.
Massaging.    Scalp    Treatment.
ave
on your
Groceries
One way to save on your
groceries without reducing
your menu Is to order them
from Frelone's. We guarantee our quolltyas well as
price.
FRELONE'S
Grocery Store
Cor. Sib and Bunsmulr.
Merchant
TAILOR
CLEANING  AND  PRESSING
SUITS MADE TO ORDER
Lad.**' & Gent's Tailoring
E. Aida
CUMBERLAND TAILOR
Dunsmuir Avenue
MINERAL ACT
(FORM F.)
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE
Teal Fractional, Robin, Red Bird, Canary, Black Bird, Blue Jay, Lark, Wren
Snow Bird, Birch No. 2, Hemlock No.
2, Cedar No. 2, Spruce No. 2, Tamarack No. 2, Swan No. 2, Raven No. 2,
Pine No. 2, Fir No. 2, Maple No. 2,
Oak Fractional, Locust, Long Fractional, Loon, Hawk Fractional, Mink.
Martin, Eagle No. 11, Eagle No. 12 and
Eagle No. 13 Mineral Claims, situate
in the Quatslno Mining Division of
Rupert District.
Where located:—Near Old Sport
Mine, Elk Lake.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Frank C.
Green, acting as agentI0r Coast Copper Company, Limited, Free Miner's
Certificate No. 75.895C, intend, sixty
days from the date hereof, to apply to
the Mining Recorder for Certificates
of Improvements, for the purpose of
obtaining Crown Grants of the above
claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 85, must be commenced
before the Issuance of such Certificates ot Improvements.
Dated this 28th day of October, A.D.,
1924.
F. C. GREEN,
221 Pemberton llldg..
lt-24 Victoria, B.C.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C
Comfort  aud  Homelike  service.
II  rooms, electrical*  hMt«4.
Ixcellont cuisine—
For reservations Fbrac II.
B. IATH, Muaaer.
P. P. HARRISON
BARRISTER   end   SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
CUMBERLAND - • - B.C.
DR
W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
.0
C.P.R. Annual Report, Guide to
Canadian Development
Is clearly understandable presentation of conditions since it affects
all phases Canada's industrial and commercial life
Ea very year the
j people of Can-
: ada   have placed
before them two
j documents  which
E.  W.  Bnrtr,
Chairman and
('resident
in a different way
present the facts
regarding conditions prevailing
throughout the
country. One of
these is the budget of the Minister of Finance
and the other is
the annual report
of the Canadian
Pacific Railway.
The latter being
a business document and necessarily entirely free
from any touch of political influence
is tho more clearly understandable
presentment of conditions and it is
an equally reliable guide because
there exists no phase of Canada's industrial and commercial life which is
not touched upon and affected by the
truly national institution of which it
is an annual record.
The company's report for the year
just issued, reflects the marked contraction the nation's business has experienced. Gross earnings for the
year totalled $182,502,150, a decline
ef $13,334,933 from those of the previous year. Freight earnings alone
decreased by $10,7114.410. Working
expenses, including all taxes totalled
$145,274,914, a decrease of $13,083,-
105. Net earnings totalled $37,227,-
241, a decrease for the year of $251,-
708. The working expenses for the
year, including all taxes, amount to
79.60 per cent, of the gross earnings,
and the net earnings to 20.40 per
cent., as compared with 80.80 per
cent, and 19.14 per cent, respectively
In 1923.
In his summary to the annual re-
gDrt Chairman and President E. W.
eatty points out that the decrease
in freight earnings, which alone
amounted to $10,794,410, is largely
accounted for by the much smaller
movement of grain and flour, particularly the former, owing to the
smaller crop in Western Canada. He
instances also a substantial decrease
in the movement of manufactured
articles as a result of the general
business situation. Notwithstanding
this, he says, the result of the company's operations must be considered satisfactory.
Mr. Beatty pointed out that the
company's land sales for the year
totalled 96,755 acres, of which 6,741
acres were of irrigated land selling at
$53.20 per acre, the average for the
balance being $15.90 per acre. The
land sales were in excess of last
year, but were still of moderate proportions, due partly to the fact that
immigration was not extensive, especially of those financially able to
immediately purchase land holdings.
The wide-spread character of the
company's operations, said the report, makes it necessary that substantial cash balances should be
maintained and for that purpose the
directors had authorized and main,
tnined thc creation and sale of
securities totalling $52,000,000.
Special attention was drawn to decreases in the company's income
from subsidiary companies, particularly the Canadian Pacific steamships operating on the Atlantic
where continued light freight business and smaller passenger traffic
cut into earnings. Results in this
connection were disappointing, says
the report. In anticipation of a considerable increase in passenger and
freight traffic the schedules for the
seuson were arranged to provide for
ten additional sailings during the
St. Lawrence season. The schedules
of sailings of other companies were
also enlarged with the result that
competition was increased, and this
and the drastic immigration laws of
the United States, together with the
failure of Canadian immigration to
reach the proportions expected by
the Government and the transportation companies, were the principal
causes of the unsatisfactory showing. The steamship companies, in
order to assist in making effective
the immigration policy of the country, allowed a rebate of fifteen dollars in the fare of each immigrant,
but, notwithstanding this concession,
the decrease in third-class westbound
passengers was 15,000 and the cost
to the Company of the rebates is
$325,000, with a corresponding reduction in its net earnings. The total
earnings westbound were $1,743,000
less than in 1923 The eastbound
passenger carryings were somewhat
greater than in 1923, owing largely
to the attraction of the Wembley Exhibition. Freight traffic showed a
very moderate increase, amounting
in earnings to $503,000 and in tonnage to 125,000 tons. In the result,
the operations of the Atlantic fleet
showed a decrease in revenue from
all sources of $1,979,000 under 1923
and an increase of $017,000 in expenses owing to the increased number of voyages. An improvement
in business to and from the Orient
is expected because of the more
stable commercial and political con
ditions now existing in these countries.
The report drew attention to the
two fine new steamers, the "Princess
Kathleen" and the "Princess Marguerite" which have been built for
the British Columbia Coast steamship service, both of which will be
operating in a few weeks and to the
satisfactory progress on the work of
building the new Lake Louise Chalet
which will open in June as one of
America's finest hotels.
During the year the company proposes to spend a total of $4,858,900
on improvement to plant connected
with railroad and telegraph services.
It was pointed out that during 1924
branch line construction in the Western provinces wns proceeded with,
227 miles of railway being graded
and 214 miles of track being laid.
Moderate extensions will be built
during the coming year, a total of
176 miles of branch lines being proposed.
The report concludes with an important observation on the freight
rate situation in which it is pointed
out that the recent decision of the
courts naturally creates violent inequalities and discriminations between communities. Undoubtedly intervention by Parliament will be
necessary in order that a scale of
rates may be evolved which will be
free from such discrimination, even
though legal in character. The remedies which are suggested are for the
most part artificial and of doubtful soundness. A general lower scale
of rates is not possible without
grave unfairness to the transportation companies unless brought about
through increase of traffic in consequence of greater population and
development in the country itself.
Two factors, however, appear to be
reasonably certain, namely, that an
independent tribunal free from political influence should determine the
reasonableness of Canadian railway
rates and that the Companies should
receive adequate revenues for the
vitally important services they render. The complicated question of
freight schedules is one which can
only be dealt with by a dispassionate tribunal with the aid of experts
and having in view the interests of
the shippers and consumers, and of
the transportation agencies of the
country. In public discussions of the
subject the value of the work of thc
transportation companies and in particular of your Company is frankly
recognized, but the fact that that
work can only be oarricd un tmuceas-1
fully under a fair scale of rates li
sometimes overlooked. I
The Short Route Between Pacific Coast
and the
OLD COUNTRY
Continental Limited
9.50 P.M., Daily, From Vancouver
All Steel Equipment        Radio        Unexcelled Service
Bookings on Any Transatlantic Steamers
Reservations   and   Full   Information   From
E. W. BICKLE
Dunsmuir Ave. — CUMBERLAND —    Telephone 35
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
"The Most of the Best for the Least"
Marocchi  Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
• and Grocers	
 BREAD IS YOUR BEST FOOD	
 EAT MORE OF IT	
Camp Craft and Wood Lore
Dedicated by The Canadian Nat ional  Railways  to  Those  Who
Would Answer the Call of the Open
Out   of   Door   appeals   to
every  normal,  healthy   individ-
Posslbly It's the blood of our
cause
lo  thrill  at
npHB
ual.
i ancestors that
.the thought of a holiday spent in the
open, away from all the artificialities
of modern life. But, whatever the
cause, we revel In the   bigness,   the
; freshness and the wholesomeuess of
It all.     And it ia wholesome.     The
: lungB expand to Inhale the pure clean
air. The muscles harden under the
unwonted exercise of paddle and portage, It'c au education, too, to view
at close range the marvels of nature
aud to learn .something of the won-
droUH ways of the wild.
In this article will be found man.,
helpful hints gleuned from the experience and learning of years iu the
Out of Door, and related in the hope
! that their telling may widen the appeal of Canada's great natural playgrounds aud add to the numbers who
| have discovered their charm and de-
I light.
| WHAT TO WEAR
For   summer   camping   or   hiking.
I elaborate clothing supply is an encumbrance.     For a short trip, special
J clothing is unnecessary.     Old things
I will do.     If outing clothes are bought
(they should be of rain-shedding duck,
khaki or forestry cloth. Better travel in light-weight things, with extra
garments to put on when renting or
I in camp.
I A sweater is invaluable and may
take the place of a coat if something
j waterproof is  provided against rain.
I This may be an army poncho, or a
waterproof silk cape about 4x" with
: a slash  in the centre for the head,
I either also serving as bedding. A
cruisers' shirt of close-woven wool
serves as well as both coat and water-
j proof.
lien should wear leggings or high
: boots. Womeu usually wear knickers and high boots, but bloomers and
■short skirts will do.     An outing shirt
I is better than ll niiddy blouse. Woolen shirts are better than cotton, except in vory hot weather. Underwear
| should usually be medium-weight cot-
' ton or light-weight wool.
Felt *iata fi've ^est all-round service.
Buckskin gloves, without cutis, are
good for working around camp and to
keep off mosquitoes. Mop pickers'
canvas gloves will do. Take a yard
or two of mosquito bar, especially in
the mountains.
Footwear is most important of all.
Comfortable shoes and wool socks are
absolutely essential. L'ppers of shoes
need not be of the heaviest weight but
soles should be thick. They keep
the feet from tiring and hold hobnails,
important because solos become slippery on forest trails. Xew shoes
should he broken in before starting--
blisters are dangerous and painful.
Avoid narrow heels. If your ankle-
turn in or out, running your shoes
over, buy side plates that screw to
the heels aud stiffen counters. Instep and ankle straps buckled outside the shoes, are excellent in steep
country to prevent jamming the toes
and blistering the heels. Always
have insteps tightly laced. If after
all. heels slip and blister, ram with a
stick as much cloth or moss as you
Dabiesheahh
and Strength.
FIIKK BABY HOOKS
Write to the Borden Co., Ltd.. Vancouver for two Baby Welfare Hooka
/ Will Call
at your house In time to take you to
the train or boat.
Car  For Hire
DAY OR NIGHT
At Reasonable Prices
Special Rates for Long Trips
PHONE 2t (III 22   ASK FOR
Geo.  Mason
can force in between ankle and heels
Ion both sides. This prevents slip-
j Ping.
|    Moccasins ?.ve restful after a hard
I day's hike.
In the mountain areas of British
Columbia, woolen underwear is essential. It absorbs perspiration and
prevents colds. It is often wise to
change into a dry suit as soon as you
make camp in the evening. The other
suit can then be dried before the fire
ready for the morning. two-piece
suits are better than combinations
for wading.
.Medium-weight woolen shirt ami
trousers with windprobf canvas shirt
and trousers to pull ou over them are
useful aud they can be worn separately as conditions demand. Mackinaw clothing is heavy and hard to
dry.
Wheu travelling on foot in the
mountains avoid leggings and high
boots. They cramp the legs. A
ourteeu-inch top, coming to just below the calf, or ordinary length stout
boots give satisfaction. The soles
should be studded with hungarian
nails. Four or five short loggers'
caulks fn the instep are invaluable for
travelling through small down timber.
Puttees, except in dense brush, are
good if properly put on. They absorb perspiration and do not bind.
Hiding breeches are not good for
climbing, Tbey prevent freedom of
the legs. Ordinary stout trousers
.tagged off at the boot tops are good.
Don't r°H or 'K'm them. They may
irip you in a dangerous place.
Don't let your boots get hard and
out of, shape. But don't oil them so
much that they become soft and too
pliable.
DUFFLE BAGS
Trunks, suit cases, grips, or satch-
3ls should never be taken on extend-
•d camping trips; the rough usage
incident to packing or to other forms
jf transportation will soon destroy
them and call for the purchase of new
irticles. Aside from this fact they
-ire very inconvenient to handle, especially if packing is to be the means
if transportation,
Extra clothing and other personal
equipment can best be carried in a
heavy canvas bag known as a 'duffle'
bag, which can be purchased from any
iiiii handling sporting goods. Such
i bag is fitted with a canvas loop or
handle at one end and with another
at the side; the top has an inside hood
mpposed to be waterproof, and the
bag is fastened shut with a drawstring or bar lock through the eyelets
,tt the open ond,
TARPAULINS
A trapaulin is used ns protection to
bedding when the latter is rolled into
a pack or made down on the ground.
The best size is It hy la feet, or the
same size as a regulation wagon
"Sheet" or "cover." It should be of
not less than eight-ounce duck, and
should weigh approximately ten
pounds. No water proof blanket
need be Included in the bedding if a
good grade of tarpaulin is used. A
80-fool U.-inch manlla rope is long
enough to tie lhe bed for packing.
HOW TO CARRY  EQUIPMENT
Amateurs  cannot   use  or  care  for
(Continued on Page Seven)
"Once   in   awhile   between   friends-
Long-Distance."
When You Are
Ushered In
To-night, when thc hands ol' the
clock have passed 8:'?0, set out upon
a trip. No need of hat or coat; just
take the telephone receiver oil' the
hook and give "Long-Distance" the
name and address of a friend in some
place miles away. Vou can imagine
the delight in the distant home when
the operator ushers you in—tin unexpected guest. Letters cannot equal
the pleasures of a talk-trip.
Hates art*
between S:;'"
specially low
p.m. and 7 a.m.
imiTISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
*a%m+ PAGE FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY,  APRIL   17,   1925
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
The White Store
The White Bakery
In our Whole Wheat Bread we claim we are offer-
ing to the community the most health giving and nu-
tritous loaf manufactured in B. C. today Our quality
goods bear the full meaning of the word Purity antl
in the near future we hope to place on the market a
purer loaf of white bread than has yet been offered to
the citizens of British Columbia.
The cost of production will be greater, but the
price will remain unchanged.
THI COURTENAY TIA ROOM
ST. GEORGE'S DAY
GENERAL COMMITTEE
MET ON THURSDAY
COUKTENAY,—The St. George's
Day general cammlttee met at the ofllce of the Comox Creamery Association on Thursday afternoon to further discuss the celebrating of the English patron saints day. Those present on this occasion were Mrs. Ring-
rose, Mrs. T. J. Meredith, Mrs. B.
Harvey and Messrs H. S. Baker, G. R.
Bates, J. W. Flinton, Ben Hughes. R.
I*. Hurford T. Pearse, E. F. Thomas
and F. W. Tull. The ladies auxiliary
of the Comox Agricultural and Industrial Association having offered to
lake charge of the serving ot the roast
beef and plum pudding on St. George's
Day, their offer was gratefully accepted.
the Agricultural auxiliary In the work
lug out of the details of the repast.
The program committee is composed
of Messrs B. Hughes, W. G. Stubbs.
H. S. Baker and C. W. Slllence. The
decorating of the Agricultural Hall
will be in the hands of Messrs Baker
and Stubbs who have power to add to
their numbers. It is probable that the
services of some well known lecturer
may be engaged for this occasion.
AWAY FOR EASTER
COURTENAY, April 17.—The Misses Duncan and Smith and Mr. G. W.
Stubbs of the Courtenay Public school
stall have left for Victoria to spend
the Easter vacation. Miss Clendener
of the High School staff has left for
Vancouver. Mr. J. W. Young, Miss
Hildebrand and Miss Ault arc spending the holidays in the Comox district.
A   small   committee   consisting   of
Mrs. T. J. Meredith, Mrs. A. Bell-Ir- [    Don't forget the Scotch Concert In
vlng and Messrs A. M. Hilton and R. | tlie St. George's Presbyterian Church
U.  Hurford  was  appointed  to assist Cumberland,  Wednesday,   April   29th
Overland
PRICE
Reductions
RANGING AS HIGH AS
$105
now establish Overland
as the World's Lowest
Priced Car with sliding-
gear transmission*
Overland's high quality
and the same complete
equipment are continued.
Investigate these outstanding values to-day.
Easy payments-long
terms.
Touring, $910 Coupe, $1175 Sedan, $1375
Six Cylinder Standard Sedan $1690
Six Cylinder Sedan De Luxe $1990
Sparks Co. (Courtenay), Ltd.
Phone 99 COURTENAY Phone 99
ANOTHER WHIST DRIVE
AND DANCE AT GRANTHAM
COURTENAY, April 16—Grantham
Community Hall was the scene of an
enjoyable whist drive and dnace on
Wednesday evening. Sixteen card
tables were occupied with enthusiastic players, and the winners were as
follows: Ladles' first Miss Violet
Curry, second Mrs. Fred Paquette,
third Miss Irene Perkins. The gentlemen's prizes were won by Mr. Glen
Emythe, Mr. Ernest Grant, second and
Mr. Herbert Bridges secured the
booby. After some delightful refreshments dancing was enjoyed to
music supplied hy an orchestra composed of Miss J. Williamson, aud
.Messrs N. Smith, B. McLennan, S.
Venables, C. Berklnstock and P. Mclaughlin.
FATHER BEATON
IS PRESENTED WITH
GOLD WATCH
COURTENAY, April 15.—A pleasing ceremony occurred on Easter
Sunday at the Catholic Church at
Comox, when Father Beaton was presented with a suitably inscribed gold
watch. The presentation was made
by Mr. Paul owney. one of the oldest
residents of Comox, on behalf of the
parishoners of the Courtenay-Comox
as a slight token of the love and esteem in which Father Beaton is held
by his flock.
MR. G. 0. GRAHAM
DIES SUDDENLY
COURTENAY, April 13.—The sudden death of Mr. Garnet Osborne
Graham occurred at his home here to
day at two p.m. Mr. Graham had
been gardening during the morning
but was seized with pain and retiring
to bed death soon resulting from heart
failure.
The late Mr. Graham who was forty
eight years of age was a well known
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAMFMFNTC
PUE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crowu lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and a, aliene on declaring intention
to become British subjects, oomll-
tlonal upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purpose-*,
Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emption* is
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
'How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department ot
Lends, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Recorda will be granted eoverlng
only land suitable tor agricultural
purposes, and which Is not timber-
land, l.e, carrying over 6,000 board
feet per acre west ot the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications tor pre-emptions are
to oe addressed to th* Land Commissioner ot the Land Recording Division, ln which the land applied for
ls situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied tor
five years and improvements made
to value of J10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivating at least flv*
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed lnfoimatton tee
th* Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received lor purchase ot vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being tlmberlaud,
tor agricultural purposes; minimum
price ot Arst-class (arable) land Is lb
per acre, and second-class (graiing)
land 12.60 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
ot Crown lands Is given in Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease ot Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the condition* Including payment ot
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding DO
acres, may be leased as homesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected in the first year, title being
obtainable after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company,
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province Is divided Into graiing districts
and the range administered under •
Grazing Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations tor range
management. Free, or partially tree,
permits are available for settlers,
camper* and travellers, up to ten
head.
resident ot Courtenay, a prominent
mason being Master of Courtenay
Lodge and an enthusiastic golfer. He
was a member ot the hardware firm
of Graham and Moncrleff. He was
born at Winnipeg and at the age of
nineteen joined the Royal North West
Mounted Police with which famous
force he saw service during the gold
rush ln the Yukon.
He leaves a widow and one daughter, both living In Coutrenay, a mother
and si. ter In Vancouver, a brottHr
who is Indian Agent at Regina, Sask.,
nnd another brother of the freight department of the C.P.R. at Winnipeg.
The funeral which Is likely to be held
on Wednesday at the Anglican cemetery at Sandwick will probably oe
with masonic honors.
MANY ATTEND
FUNERAL OF LATE
MR. G. O. GRAHAM
COURTENAY, April 16.—An unusually large number of people attended the funeral of the late Mr.
Garnet Osborne Graham which was
held at the Sandwick cemetery today.
Mr. Graham was a son of the late Mr.
James F. Graham of Winnipeg, and
brother of Mr. William M. Graham, 1.1
dian Commissioner for the Dominion,
of Regina, Sask. His mother is a
resident of Vancouver. Two aunts.
Mrs. Steele and Mrs. Morris both of
Vancouver were among the mourners, chief among whom was the widow
and daughter, both of Courtenay. The
late Mr. G. O. Crah*im was a prominent Mason and was master of the
Courtenay Lodge for.the current year.
Tlie funeral was therefore a Masonic
ceremony and the body was bourne
to its last resting place by brother
Masons. These wcre Messrs F.
Brock, Fred Field, M. Concrleff, R.
Moncrleff, W. R. Richardson and
Searle. The floral tributes were exceptionally line and extra cars were
requlrd to accommodate them. Mr.
John Sutton of Courtenay was In
charge of the undertaking arrangements.
DENMAN ISLAND NEWS
Mrs. I. Piercy and Mrs. T. Plkct
have returned home after visiting
friends in Ladysmith.
Mrs. Preston, of Victoria, is spending Easter week with her daughter,
Mrs. John Corrigal.
Mrs. Sinky Swan has returned to
the Island from Coalmont.
Miss Fisher, of Vancouver, Is visiting Mrs. MacMillan.
Miss Rose Baikie and Mr. Wallace
Baikle are home for the holidays.
The local school teachers, Misses
Mason and Patterson, are spending
thc holidays in Victoria.
Service was conducted by the Rev.
W. Leversedge, of Cumberland, in the
Anglican Church last Thursday evening.
On Friday, April 17th there will be
a whist drive and dance in aid of the
Fall Fair. All Interested should attend.
The monthly meeting of the Wo
men's Institute was held on April 9
In the D.I.A.C. Hall, when Mrs. 8.
Swan was appointed secretary In
place of Mrs. F. Piercy, who has resigned. Mr. R. Swan gave an Interesting health lecture, after which th.)
meeting adjourned for tea.
Easter service was held in the Presbyterian Church last Sunday morning by Rev. A. Walker, of Union Bay.
Beautiful decorations had been arranged by members ot the Ladles' Aid
and special music was provided, a
sarred song being sung by Miss M.
Robertson and a duet by Miss Robertson and Mrs. T. Cessford. The church
was crowded.
BILL-BARBER
SAYS
/PRACTICALiy]
:the whole.
1M)RID IS
INTERESTED
1 IN BUSINESS
-GENERALLY1
|0MRPMPI['<!
lBUSINESS.
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay, B.C. -W!
FRIDAY,   APRIL   17,   1925
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
tf
Friday and Saturday
April 17th OF THIS WEEK April 18th
NORMA
THE
iivi\Jiin m
TALMADGE Only Woman
Also 2-reel Comedy and News Reel
ADULTS 50c CHILDREN 25c
MONDAY   -
April 20th, 21st, and 22nd
MILTON       il
sills     Sine
TUESDAY
Saturday Matinee at 2.30 p.m.
ADULTS 35*r> CHILDREN 15<r>
WEDNESDAY
Adults 50c,   Children 25c
HAWK
Supported by
Enid Bennett,
Lloyd Hughes
Wallace Beery
and a cast of
3,000 players.
To Our Patrons
Each year brings to tbe screen oik*
or two great motion pictures that because of their magnificence, their
wonderful human appeal, their spectacular splendor, stand out as giganlic
and notable successes.
Frank Lloyd has produced just such
a success in "The Sea Hawk."
Because of Rafael Sabatini's unique
und powerful story—
Because of its marvelous love
theme—
Because of its irresistible appeal to
men aud women, young and old.
alike—
Because of its massiveness iu production treatment—
Because of the performance of Milton Sills and an exceptional supporting cast—
A mammoth production costing
around $1,000,000.
The llo-Ilo Theatre feels that you
will agree that this picture Is the ultimate in romance and amazing adventure, and we are proud to present
it to our patrons.
14 big stars in leading roles.
3.001' players take part.
Four great galley ships and galleons specially constructed at a cost
of $276,000.
Costumes specially made at a cost
of $86,000.
An entire .Moorish village of the
type of the lfith century built.
Seve.i sea captains assisted in
maneuvering the ships.
Seventy expert gunners in battle
scenes.
And a score of other points of tremendous interest to make this the
most amazing spectacle and dramatic
story of love and adventure ever presented.
H
"You are now my slave, my property, and beloi.g to
me,  body and  soul."
TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY,   6:45—9:00
E-SSE
You'll be thrilled by the valorous
exploits or thiH intrepid youth, pictured in a romance which Ih one of
the screen's most admirable achievements.
Thursday -- Friday - Saturday
April 23rd, 24th, and 25th
Adults 50c,       Children 25c
RICHARD BARTHELMESS, in
"The FIGHTING BLADE"
Saturday Night
DANCE
9.30 to  12
Ilo=IIo Theatre
i
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Two Shows
NIGHTLY
7  and  8.45 p
PAGE SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY.   APRIL   17.   1!>25
"The Town was Burned Three Days Later"
Every Painting Job
Whatever tlie painting Job, you want to
be sure of immaculate, lasting beauty without using excessive quantities of paint and
extra hours of labor to achieve it. The
name "Brandram - Henderson" is your
safeguard.
It stands for paints nnd varnishes of thc
very highest quality, There is a B-H product lor every purpose — for painting thc
llOUSe itself, inside or out; ior refinishing
furniture ci in'.n:ior woodwork; for the
verandah, for staining floors; for wall and
ceiling dccor.ition or for any of thc numerous outdoor jobs.
B-H English Paint
lhe paint for ilie home, i lakes the dullest surface
bright and colorful.   You use leu of it pet square
■     foct of surface    li protect! and preiervei and its
beauty lasts and lasts.
.* iind
Smooth and opaque, it flows Irom the brush like
a healing balm on the ailing wood, beautifyfr
and reviving it and adding >-ear3 to i*.5 Itfe at
uiefulneis.
For Sale  By
AU;X MmKINNOX
WM II. HcLEXNAN, >HU
Painter & Decorator
Cumberland, IU'.
RRANDBA^^ENDEHSOH
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOOK.-i.
SHINGLES,
KILN  DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND     FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHAROBS.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PHONFS (NI«htc*1I,: 1«X Courtenay
MUINU.B iom„. 16!) cumborland
(1)   Tha  Wolf*  Hradqailiart,  which  ■orvlvrd  thc  bnrnlnl
•f St. Joachim, prior to the taking of QurLor. P Q.
(I) Tha flacond nauaa to lurrlvt tho burning by Wolfe.
<S) An old chorch with very beautiful ind rare Interior at
St. Joachim, P.Q.
Some parts of the world seem to have been created
merely as slates for the pencil of history. On
some of these slates the copy once written has been
allowed to stand for a little, and then expunged to
make room for fresh text. On others the original text
haa been of such import that Time has only served to
fix the text more indelibly, the "scene" more vividly,
>b when painters of old varnished their pictures to
bring out the colors and "fix" them.
| Now there is not a reader but can bring to mind
without the slightest effort on his part dozens of such
"slates" in Canada. A million romances ... to run
serially, or each an entity in itself ... might be swept
from these earth-slates of the Dominion on to the
printed page, and still leave a million more untold.
And so it is that we learn to come back to the
original slate, the land itself, with its endless tales.
The best short stories of this year and every year.
past, present and to come.
Such a tiny slate is the little village of Saint
Joachim, a few miles from Quebec city. It begins in
water-reeds, lush from the toying waters of the St.
Lawrence takes a couple of steps upward and spreads
out into a plain on which some scattered farmhouses
of ancient habitant type and a church have been flung
as if by way of illustration. Then the plain steps up
suddenly into a low bench and the bench in turn
spreads out levelly for a little way and then suddenly
leaps with vim into giant Cap Tormente, two thousand
feet high, its head in the clouds and its feet eternally
•bathe in the mighty river.
History had a mind to write a little six hundred
word story here at the time she made up her mind to
compose that greater romance in which she changed
the text, on a slate of continental magnitude, from
French to English. So she set to work at once. And
being herself all absorbed, like any modern business
man by the larger work in hand, she dictated her
St. Joachim communique to her secretary, General
James Wolfe. Now the Wolfe pen was in the beginning a clean-CM* sword that grew in passion as the
tale unfolded to a torch, ns military romances in olden
time almost everywhere did. In order that there may
be no comeback irom the rear that might spell disaster to the larger work when the sword had put to
route the villagers, the match was laid to tlie scattered
farmhouses, and when the smoke cleared two only
remained. And they remain to this day. Brought
Into greater prominence by their age and the fact
that they survived "when Wolfe burnt the place."
Thus do present day disasters, rubbed and polished by
the friction of the years, often change into assets of
inestimable value. ■
So it falls out that Time, the great proof-reader,
when be came to the manuscript written by Wolf* and
his troops at Saint Joachim, approved of it in the
main, but thought that he himself might add a line
here and there which would add to the picture as a
whole.
And though you may not think it. the touches that
Time has added are the human interest touches. He
tells that one of the houses, the low white one with
the tall and stately Lombard}* poplars, resembling
Greek columns, in front, was "Wolfe's headquarters."
He leaves it to us to screen in its doorway the
scarlet-coated, lace-ruffled, powdered and bewigged
soldier of that day, who for all "The pomp of power,"
which he knew by heart, had heart no doubt to regret
war's necessity for the torch, watching the then even
more than hundred-year-old farmhouses at his feet,
going up in flames.
So, too, here at Saint Joachim, Time brings out a
French oil painting of Saint Louis de Gonzaque and
pointing to the eyes, says, "Tears were seen to fall
from these eyes three days before the burning of Saint
Joachim." The picture then hung in the workroom of
Monsignor Laval. Saint Joachim at that time being
part of the vast seigneurie belonging to the eminent
Laval. "On ftpping those falling tears." Time savp.
"The people were deeply troubled, wringing their
hands and saying that something terrible was going
to happen to them." And, there on the margin of the
old manuscript in Time's own handwriting is tho
Illuminating line, "And tho town waa burned thres
days later."
Quick Delivery
Wilcock Bros. Meat Market
KEEP ONLY THE BEST
BEEF — MUTTON — I'ORK — VEAL
BACON        HAMS
PRODUCE
PICKLES
(Heinz Sweet Mustard)
(Heinz   Sweet   Mixed)
For Result*, Advertise in "The Islander"
ANIMALS IN ISLAND
COAL MINES ABE
WELL CARED FOR
Inspector George T.  Maurice, S.l*.
C.A., has just returned from an lu-
SUCH  A RELIEF
At such a little cost
FOR SATISFACTION
and economy send your laundry to us.   Our long experience safeguards  your  interests  and guarantees
100 per cent, satisfaction.
GIVE US A TRIAL
and we shall prove it.
Free  Patches   —   Clean Work   —   Free Mending
Cumberland Laundry
P.O. Box 39*1
spection of animals in Vancouver Inland coal mines, ami reports a healthy
condition prevailing in this regard.
Horses and mules are used to haul
coal trucks In the underground workings of the mines. Many of the animals work at a depth of 700 feel and
are not brought to the surface unless
it he for a rest or treatment when
ailing.
At the Western Fuel Company mines
at Nanaimo, Inspector Maurice found
ninety head ln underground service,
ull of which were in first class condition.
At Extension, the Ladysmith mine
ol the Dunsmuir Collieries Limited,
the animals have a two-mile walk to
and Irom work along the slope into
the workings. The animals throughout were well cared for and in good
condition. Inspector Maurice, completing Ills first trip down a coal
mine, was much Impressed.
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Cumberland, B.C.
ANCHOR
FRESH  AM* SMOKED FISH — FARM
CHEESE      BUTTER AMI EGGS
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND ««ONE ■M
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
CANADIAN SERVICE
FHO.H MONTREAL
Tu Plymouth-'licrlHiuig-Loiidoii
Antonta, May 9,  June   19,  July   IS;
Ausonla, May 23,  June   27,   Aug.   1;
Ascanla, June C, July 11, Aug. 15.
To Liverpool
Aurnnla.  May  2, 20, June  96;   Lnn-
castria, May 16.
To GlttKirow
Saturnla, Mav 1. 29. June 2f>; Letllln.
May 8. Athenla, Mny 22.
FROM NEW YORK
To Qiit»?nstuwn and l.licrp'"'l
Laconla, Apr. 25; Cnrninnln. Mny 2;
Samaria. May 0; Camilla, May 16.
To (lierhiiiinr and Southampton
Mnurctnni'i, Apr. 22, May 13. June :'.;
Aqtlltanla  Apr. 29. May 2(1. June 9;
llerengnrln, May 6, 27, June 17.
To Londonderry and Glasgow
Cameronia. Apr. 25. Tuscanta, May 2;
Assyria. May 9; Columbia. May 16.
Tn I'l'iiiioiilli-rherliiitirir-l.iiiiilun
Alhnnin. June 13, July IS.
To Plymouth-! liirlmurir-lliiniliurir
Andnuln. Mny 23, Juno 27. Aug. 1.
Money orders   nnd   drnfts   nt   lowest
rates.     Full information from Agents
or Company's Olllces, (122 Hastings St.
w., Vancouver, B.C,
; VIVID SEA WRECK
> IN "ONLY WOMAN"
There Is a shipwreck scene in Norma Talmadge's new picture ''The
Only Woman," which, to our way of
thinking, is one of the moat vivid and
I itol bits of action ever brought to
the screen.
| As a rule such scenes are done, for
t the most part, ln mlniaiure, necessitating long dlstauce photography
which dilutes the leallsm of Ihe effect Here, howo\er, iy staged a real
shipwreck on a real ocenn. A beau-
titul yacht ls *borne down upon by a
tliiee-masled schoo:*.er on the storm-
tossed deep and Norma and Eugene
O Diieti, her lending man, as well as
a crow of minor pla ers. are seen
battling for their very existence.
Seated in tlie Ilo-llo Theatre next
Friday and Saturday, one will be almost able to hoar the crash as the
big vessel smashes into the yacht,
catching it amidships and lending it
into splinters. And the cries of the
perishing sailors seems to rise above
the roar of lhe sea as they fight each
other for seats in tlie lifeboats.
There is no minnture work in the
scene. It is all real, so vividly real
that Iho audience will gasp as lhe
thrilling climax is reached.
Norma, always an actress par ex-
! ccllence, is seen at her best aB a
young woman who sacrifices herself
on the marriage altar to save her
father from disgrace. She hates her
husband, oven as she marches up the
Church aisle to become his bride, and
she vows to herself that she will
never really love him.
It is on their honeymoon oh his private yacht that the shipwreck occur**,
and this mutual danger brings the
couple together in true love.
Both Norma and Eugene obviously
endured unusual hardships ln the
filming of this action. As a rule,
where there is danger to life or limb,
ati expert is employed to substitute
for a motion picture star. In this
picluie, however, both Norma and
Eugene stick through it to the end,
battling tbe mountainous waves which
wash over them, knocking them ol,
their feet, and climbing desperately
to the rail of the tossing yacht. Their
acting is truly remarkable.
Others ln the cast include Matthew
Betz. Edwards Davies, Winter Hah.
Percy Williams, Stella di Lanti, Murdock MacHuarrie, Louis Dumar and
Meal Dodd.
..fa...   o—a,,   w.——.. ,— j™.. j
iy Joseph M. Schenck for First National release. It was directed by
Sidney Olcott from an original story
by C. Gardner Sullivan.
DICK BURDE, M.L.A., IS
MAN OF MANY OFFICES
NANAIMO. April tl.—Mayor DICK
Hurtle, M.L.A., for Alberni, Ib spending the day here, and according to his
own admission is a busy man of many
offices. The fact was revealed while
talking to a Nanaimo man here, when
the wind disturbed the lapel of his
coat and displayed a bright star
wliieh he has worn since 1918. Then
he admitted he was chief of the Port
Alberni police force, mayor of the
town, and police magistrate, and sine*
regulations were promulgated by thc
provincial board of health, he has had
the office of chairman of the health
board assigned to liim. He also rep- -
resents the good folk of Port Alberni
111 the Provincial Legislature.
T. Malpass
GENERAL   IIAII.IM*
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leave your orders at offlce
Mrs. King's Stationery Store
SERVICE 18 Ol'R MOTTO
OR PHONE IS UNION HOTEL
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER
T. Malpass
When you are In need of a
Plumbing * Hearing Engineer, See
R. RUSHTON
Phone 124
Courtenay
Phone 1(7
Cumberland
Your  needs   wlll  receive  Immediate
attention. FRIDAY,  APRIL   17,   1925
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE SEVEN
W
The
"Judge"
Special to
The
Islander
every
week
THE JUDGE* Why Not Put Stop and Go Lights On the Bridle MB-
THEN HEMUST BE BAlKV
Of? HE WOULDN'T STOP
EVERY FEW MINUTES AND
V^ STANDSTILL J
HE AINT BALM
CONSCIENTIOUS
Camp Craft and Wood Lore
(Continued From Pnge Three)
pack animals and should never attempt such a trip without employing
an expert packer as well as outfit.
Auto equipment may be had on any
scale up to ruimlngboard kitchens and
trailers, special beds and tenr*.   Oas-
i   . ollne or kerosene' stoves  are  labor-
I   saving and practical except for heavy
cooking and baking, obviating wood-
rustling and trouble with lire wardens.     Thc prime requisite of all auto
,'     equipment  in  connection  with    food
1     supply In that it can be dustproof. All
>     covers should overlap and close down
on   felt   straps.      Plenty   of   canvas
covering ls useful.
For back packing In the woods
there are four standard devices, relative superiority being much a matter of opinion. The canvas pack-
sack with straps is simple, easy to
load, and can be bought In any size
or quality.
Its chief defect is being rather in-
adjustable to shape and weight of load
which ls therefore likely to rest too
low on the back. Packs should "ride
high."
The Yukon pack board is also much
used In British Columbia and can be
bought anywhere on the Pacific Coajt.
Do not build the pack so high or so
wl.ln   ,K»»   1,   ,.,111   n„.n*.  .....I   ,iru  vnll     A
flat pack Is best. Get the heavier
nrticles nearest your back where they
will get the least purchase against
you.     (Secure the load tightly.
In the mountains a light fall may
be disastrous when you have a pack
on your hack. Be ready to slip your
pack in bad places. A ring and
» harness snap at the bottom of each
shoulder strop will help you to get
rid of your load quickly. It ls often
harder to come safely down a mountain with a pack than to go up. Remember that two nhort steps are better than one long one In either ascending or descending.
Pack as much of your food as possible ill small cotton sacks. Don't
wrap food In paper.
The packboard is a flat wooden
frame with shoulder straps. The load
Is lashed to it or suspended in a sack
into which tlie frame is built. A var-
ation to provide ventilation is of hollow tubing bent so only connecting
webbing bauds rest against the body.
One of the commonest and best de-
vices, If employed with some skill, is
the old-timber's bedroll and straps.
The blanket is folded lengthwise
about 2 feet wide with tlle edges
lapping over the food nnd small nrticles first laid compactly In the centre nearest to one end. The roll is
is begun at this end producing a cylindrical bundle with all hard articles
in the centre. Straps or cords around
each end hold this firm, nnd to these
the shoulder straps ore attached, together at the top and separated a foot
or more at tho bottom to prevent sway
Ing. Sometimes the roll is put in a
sack before strapping.
Gunnysack and overalls furnish a
variant of tlie above system actually
preferred by many. Tiie leg-bottoms
of a pair of old soft overalls are tied
to the bottom corners of a gunnysack
with a chip or pebble in each corner
so the string will not slip oil*. The
load Is placed In the sac',,, tlie top of
which is then gathered down as close
to Ihe load as possible and there lashed with a string Lo tlie overalls gathered exactly at the crotch. The legs
form the shoulder straps; the waist
is spread back over lhe pack to shed
rain.
Always use some method of suspending even a light pack from both
shoulders. Anything on one shoulder even a long slender blanket roll
ls utterly bad. But sec that shoulder straps are not too wide, narrow,
tight, loose or hard Keep pack a*.
high us you can without binding arms
or chest, else lt wlll tip back and
punch the small of the back, also tire
you by  swaying.      Next  to a badly
ulimiT  nnolr   tha. nnminmipst  orrnrs are
Too much load—Avoid non-essentials and duplicate articles in the
party. Anything above 35 or 40 lbs.
Is too much. A 4-day trip can ho
made comfortable witli less than 3D
pounds.
Too much speed—Travel slowly.
Rest often.
A contiuntion of Cnniping, dealing
with location of camp sites, what to
ent, field cooking, etc., will be published next week.
CONTRACT LET FOR
NANAIMO C.P.R. WHARF
A contract has been awarded for
an extension of the Canadian Pacific.
Railway wharf ot Nanaimo to Mc-
j Donald. Watso„ & Wither, local contractors. The object Is to provide
additional facilities i'or motor cars
on the ferry service between Vancouver und Nanaimo. As part of
the Georgian clrcuii, the portion on
the Island between Nanaimo and
Victoria of this tour Is expected to
see an increasing automobile traffic
during the coming summer.
The Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway Company has awarded a' contract for renewing a five-deck timber trestle at Cameron Lake, on the
Port Alberni branch.
Mr. H. E. Beasley. general superintendent of the E. & N. Railway,
announces good progress on the conditioning of the Great Central Lake
branch, and Indicates that It will be
possible to ship machinery to the
sawmill to he built at Boat Lagoon In
the first week In May. Clearing operations are already in hand at the
sawmill and townsite by the lumber
company.
Bobbed heads
may be washed
It's easy to wash and dry tlie
bobhcrl heads—A free lather of
Baby's Own Soap in a basin of
hot water is a simple and inexpensive shanipooand the lingering fragrance as of roses iii the
hair is very appealing.
Baby's Own Soap ts sold in
individual cartons 10c—Everywhere
" Best for you and Baby too"    „.
E
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
3"
Marcel Waver
Nine Reasons Why You Should Buy This Wav«r
1. Assures a beautiful  Marcel   Wave  in  five   (5)
minutes.
2. It will not burn or singe your hair.
3. It will save its cost many times in the first month.
4. A wave when you want it—No waiting for the hair
dresser.
5. After the swim, put a quick wave in.
6. Costs practically nothing to operate—Fits in any
socket.
7. A quicker and better wave tharf is possible with
any other appliance.
8. Your appearance depends   on   your  hair   dress.
Here is quick beauty.
9. Absolutely guaranteed.
PRICE $3.50
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
iSE-ESSSE
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons      •    Proprietor \
3^
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a Vi-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Rsd Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
8
ARE you USING COMOX
WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR?
TRY THE DIFFERENCE.     Substitute Whole Wheat Bread for White Bread and notice
how much better you feel.    If you want the best, get "COMOX" Whole Wheat Flour.
It's ground fresh each week from dry-belt wheat.     "Ask those who have used it."
At your grocer's in 10-lb., 24-lb.,  and  49-lb.  sacks
"COMOX   WHOLE   WHEAT   FLOUR"
Comox Creamery Association
New
Chevrolet
The NEW Chevrolet has been improved from radiator to rear axle—A new chassis with a longer,
stronger frame, new semi-elliptic chrome vanadium
steel springs, new and stronger front axle, completely
new rear axle of finest construction—banjo type, with
one-piece pressed steel housing, and greatly strengthened gears, improved, fully enclosed, dry plate disc
clutch, which requires no lubrication, extra brakt*
bands on 11-inch brake drums, a single automatic
brake equalizer, a new and easier steering mechanism,
with fore and aft control, and many improvements on
the famous Chevrolet motor.
The NEW Chevrolet has
ALL MOVING PARTS FULLY ENCLOSED,
affording protection from dirt and water under all
road conditions.
>tMn^rh^Min.
Blunt & Ewart, Ltd.
The Courtenay Garage
Phone  61
K
ere an
dTK
ere
During 1924 the Canadian Cooperative Weol Growers' Association
sold 2.600,000 pounds of wool, making a total of 26,343,504 pounds
handled since its organization seven
years ago. Wool was first exported
in 1922.
Filings en oil land in South Alberta are drawing near the E.P.
ranch, owned by the Prince of Wales.
The ranch is said to lie on a Benton
outcrop and portions of it may have
been staked out by oil seekers before the spring is far advanced.
Caribou are coining kack to New
Brunswick, says the Chief Gam*
Warden of that province. This Is
regarded as a testimony to the protective methods employed by the
guides who are fully aware that the
best means of protecting their livelihoods is to see that hunting of big
game is not carried to excess.
"Relations between France and
England were never more cordial
than they are to-day," said Hon. W.
C. Nichol, Lieut.-Governor of British
Columbia, interviewed on his return
to Canada from a visit to France.
Referring to his own province His
Honor said there was every indication of British Columbia being
swamped with tourists this year.
Lauchlan McLachlan, of Toronto,
after serving nearly fifty years on
the employ of the Canadian Pacific
Railway has been retired on pension
at his own request. He was pre-
j sented at leaving with an embossed
address and gold watch and chain,
which were handed to him by B. W.
Scott, superintendent of Toronto Terminals, on behalf of his friends and
associates. PAGE EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FttlDAY,   APRIL
New
Spring
Goods
Ladies' House Dresses, about 30 in
the lot, six different styles to chooso
from. They are made from a good
quality Gingham, two pockets and
smart collar.     Price, each   $2,50
Smart Voile Dresses in assorted
stripes, very new, Price   $5*96
New Coats for tlie Spring, quite a
variety of styles, mostly made from
Velours, real smart.     Prices from $15
New Belts in Patent Leather, in colors Black. White, Red and Brown.
Price, each    35c
Gingham Collar Sets, in an assortment of shades. Prices per set,
from    #1.00
Ladies' New Ties, made of Crepe de
Chene In the latest colorings, a good
selection to choose from. Prices,
each   76c and 95c
White Voile Dresses, just received,
a splendid assortment of White Voile
Dresses for the little tots, ages to -
years.     Prices $1.26, $1.75 and $2,50
Children's Black Sateen Rompers,
trimmed with an assortment of harmonizing colors, ages 2 to 6 years.
Price   $1.75
Ladies' Flannel Dresses in some at
the newest shades, smartly made and
priced reasonable.      See them.
New Curtain Nets in a splendid variety of designs just what you would
desire for Spring Cleaning.
New Cretonnes in a splendid array
of colorings, adds attraction to your
room and freshens things up.
New Linoleums, for the floor. We
also carry a 4 yard wide design suitable for large rooms.
Sutherland's
Social and Personal
Returns From Alherni.
Miss Edith  Hood, who
has    been
spending  the  past  week  in  Alberni
I with her sisler, Etta, will return  to
] Cumberland tomorrow.
, To ('liilli-vack.
! Mrs. W. It. Theal, of Chllllwack, has
j returned to her home after spending
I lie Easter holiday In Cumberland
I with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John
i J. Wier, and other relatives.
Holidaying In Alberni.
Miss Margaret Redford, of the staff
of the Cumberland General Hospital,
is holidaying In Alberni with her parents,
Holidaying With Relatives.
Mrs. T. H. Weston is in the city on
a short visit to relatives.
It-turn From Victoria.
Mr. aud   Mrs,   John   Walton,   who
spent tlie Eastertide ln Victoria, returned to the city on Tuesday.
*VIII Return Tomorrow.
Mrs. John C. Ilrown will return
from Victoria tomorrow evening. She
will be accompanied by Miss Rhoda
Walton and Miss Madge Bryan, who
have been spending the holiday week
In Victoria and .N'anaimo respectively.
New Druggist Arrives.
Mr. E. Coulthard, of Vancouver, arrived in the city on Wednesday even- j
ing to take up a position with Lang's
Drug Store.
Stork Pays Yisitl
On  Thursday morning, at 6:15, at
the  Cumberland  General  Hospital, a
daughter was  born  to Mr. and  Mrs.
William H. Cope.
Underwent Operation.
Miss Janet E. Robertson, who has
been spending the Easter week In
Vancouver, was seized with an attack of appendicitis while in the terminal city, necessitating an immediate
operation.
Wus llrhlge Hostess.
•Mrs. John Shortt, Pendrlth Avenue,
entertained at five tables of bridge on
Wednesday evening, firBt and second
prizes being won by Mrs. J. H. Cam
eron and Mrs. E. R. Hicks.
Entertains nt Bridge.
Dr. and Mr-,. George K. MacNaughton last ulght entertained at thirteen
tables of bridge at their home on
Windermere Avenue. Mrs. A. E. Jeffrey and Mrs. James carried off lirst
and second prizes for the ladies while
Mr. T. H. Mumford ana Mr. A. T. Heyland captured similar gentlemen's
honors.
Don't forget the Scotch Concert in
the St. George's Presbyterian Church
Cumberland.   Wednesday,   April   2ilth
Visited Vancouver.
Dr. W. Urucc    Gordon    spent   tho
Easter week-end in Vancouver, combining business witli pleasure.
Motored to Nannlnin,
Mr. C. Dando, Sr., and Mr. and Mrs.
C. Dando Jr., motored to Nanaimo op
Tuesday last, returning on Thursday.
They were accompanied on the retiirn
trip by Mrs. Dando's sister, Miss Margaret Mitchell, who will holiday in
Cumberland for a few days before returning to Seattle.
Is Visiting Parents.
Miss Marjorie Mordy, of the teaching staff of the New Westminster public schools, has been spending the
Easter holiday week with her parents
Mr, and Mrs. T. Mordy of this city.
Here for F.nsterllde.
The Misses Annie and Grace Watson
spent the Eastertide iu Cumberland,
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Nash.
From Vancouver.
Miss Agnes Potter, of Vancouver,
spent the Past week with her parents,  Mr. and  Mrs. James   Potter
Visitors for Holiday.
.Miss Grace and Miss Frances Barclay arrived in the city on Friday last
nml were the guests of Mr. and Mrs.
John Sutherland and daughter, Chrissle, for the Easter holiday.
Ibis city.
Visllur From Seattle,
Miss Marion McKay arrived in the
illy  nn  Thursday  last  from   Seattle.
She  is  visiting  witli  her  parents  in
Minto.
From Nnnnlnio.
Mr. Cyril Michell, of the teaching
staff of tlie Nanaimo Public Schools,
spent the Eastertide in Cumberland
with his sister, Miss Marjorie Michell.
0^"
Quick attention to bronchitis will
usually ward oft its serious complications. Shiloh reduces inflama-.
tion in the tube?, eases the dry,
painful cough and heals the raw
Oiroat titBuii     At your drugfrigt,   SOc,
fidr ami SI .20.
MIME
r POR.
COUGHS
Extra Specials for the
Week-End
3 to 1 Milk, 2 for 25c.
Davies Corned Beef. 2 tins for 55c.
Davies Potted Meats, 3 tins for 25c.
Quaker Pork and Beans, 3 tins for 25c.
Shaker Salt, per pkt 15c. 7 tins for $1.00
Canned Pears, 2-lb. tin 35c 3 tins for $1.00
Kippered Herring in Tomato Sauce, 2 for 35c.
and 3 for 25c.
Kippered Snacks, 3 for 25c.
New Brunswick Sardines, 3 for 25c.
Fancy Orange Marmalade, 1-lb tins 30c.
or 2 for 55c.
Full Stock of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables in Season,
always on hand.
Matt Brown's Grocery
PHONE 38
"PROVINCIAL ELECTION  ACT"
(A111) OF THANKS
Mr. and Mrs. Victor Fouracre and
family desire to express their heartfelt thanks to the Women's Auxiliary
of the Great War Veterans Assoc!**,-
tion for the monetary assistance rendered them from proceeds ot the bene- '
fit whist drive and dance and raffle I
which was held by the Auxiliary Ih I
the Veterans' Hall recently.     Special
thanks are also due Mrs. Harling for
donating the cushion  for  the  raffle, i
and to Mrs. Lockhart and Mrs. J. Pot-1
,ter, and others, for their willingly ex- |
! pended   time  and   energy   in   selling
' tickets for same.
Use Celery King
a gentle laxative"Tea"
relieves sick headaches
At your druggist 30c and 60c.
FOU SALE I acres land, good fencing. I room modern house with
pantry and wash house. 2 large up-
to-date chicken coops, 125 laying^
pullets, null Leghorn chicks, outbuildings. This place is making a
return or about $40.00 per month.
Cash payment with balance as rent
Snap. For particulars apply Alex
Brown, Trent Road, near Cumberland. Hi.
New Car Service
CAIt FOR HIRE UAY OR NIGHT
Don't forget the Scotch Concert in
the St. George's Presbyterian Church
Cumberland,   Wednesday,   April   29th
24—TELEPIION E 100
Cumberland Hotel
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel at
8 o'clock every Sunday morning
and meets boat at Union Bay.
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Portland Canal Mining District fl
Our statistical department b.is
cotnpll id,  and   we   will   mall
FREE ON REQUEST
A LARGE COLORED MAP
ami other valuable Information
rogiu'iljiiu recent important ills.
coverles ami activities In this.
Hrllisli Columbia's richest, gold
and silver producing district.
GRANT MAHOOD & CO. LTD.
Members Vancouver stuck
Exchange
522-525 Rogera Bulletin!
VANCOUVER.  B. C.
■    Active In All .Mining Stock."
We Buy anil Sill All Shares
m
Comox Electoral District
Notice ls hereby given that I shall,
on Monday, the 18th day May, 192.**,,
at the hour of 10 o'clock In the forenoon, at the Court-house Cumberland,
B.C.. hold a sitting of the Court of
Revision for the purpose of revising
thc list ot voters for said electoral
district, and hearing and determining
any and all objections to the retention
of any name on the-said list, or to the
registration as a voteor of any applicant for registration, and for tlie
other purposes set forth In the "Provincial Elections Act."
Dated at Cumberland, fi.C, this 1 Till
day of April, 1925.
CHAS. H. GRANT.
Deputy Registrar of Voters.
16-19. Comox Electoral District.
Under the Auspices of the St. Andrew's Society of the
Comox District a Public
Lecture and Concert
Will be held in
BOOTH'S HALL, COURTENAY
on
FRIDAY EVENING, APRIL 24, AT 8:00 O'CLOCK
Lecturer^—Mr. P. McA. Carrick, Vancouver
Subject—"Why we should honor the memory of
Robert Burns."
Admission 50 cents Everybody Welcome
jr
%
They w>rk
naturally
andfonn
no habit*
©
They wife
naturally
and form
no: habit*
TheyTNodc
naturally'
and fbtm
nohabis
1
M for IM.
forontOc-
PROVINCIAL PUHLIC ffOUKS
I»KI»T.
Krldw 108 Royston Rood.
During reconstruction of the above
bridge on the road between  Royston
nnd   Cumberland,   work   commencing
Monday.  April   tbe   20lh,   it   will   be
i necessary to close the road to traffic
'for  two or  three  days   between   tbo
i hourH of y a.m. and" 4 p.m.      During
j the tlmo the bridge crossing inn  be
I used,   drivers   are   requested   to   ap-
1 pronch and cross carefully.
I*. PHILLIP,
Deputy Minister and
16. Public Works Engineer
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
vVM.MERIUFIKU),    lY,,pii. t.ir
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
Lang's Drug Store
-THE REXALL KODAK STORE-
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S'
NOTICE
Wood for sale $5.50 per load
(Also any other hauling)
Telephone 92R Happy Valley
W. C. White
S
MERCANTILE STORE CO.
READ & OSBORNE    Cumberland, b.c.
TELEPHONE 133
A LITTLE MONEY Makes BIG MONEY For YOU
AT THE MERCANTILE WHO'S SELLING POLICY IS STRICTLY CASH.  OUR CASH
PRICES WILL ALWAYS
LEAVE YOU A LITTLE
OVER FOR SOME OTHER
THINGS. HAVING PURCHASED THIS BANKRUPT STOCK AT A BIG
DISCCUNT WE ARE IN
THE HAPPY POSITION OF
BEING ABLE TO GIVE
YOU THE LOWEST PRICE
POSSIBLE. THIS IS TO
BE OUR CONSTANT AIM.
Dry Goods
.11 KMKHIZKII   HI I.l.
Mercerized .Mull for I.miles' Lingerie,
'it* Inches wide. Pink, Mauve, sky and
Marge.    Reg. 560.  8 yds, for ... 11,0(1
AMERICAN CREPES
American Crepes, in large variety of
nosv patterns, make nice waists, ll.iiO
anil 19,00 values for       9Sc and 11.10
IIOUSERRKSSES
(8.26   Housedresses   in   line  quality
Ginghams   and   some   Crepes.      Reg.
18.60 and (3.96  $1.95
SII.K HOSE
Silk Hose, in wanted Hhades, $1.25 and
$1.50 values   9Sc
Art Silk Hose, moat shades. Q5c values for   4"c
FLANNELETTE S1IKKTS
$2.95 Flannelette Sheets for $1.05
A few iralrs only left now of this big
bargain
SPRING (OATS
$35.00 Spring Coats for $18.50
About a dozen of them left now clearing at 112.60. 3 or 4 reg. $10 for $0,96
LADIES' SPRING Sl'lTS
In Gabardine nnd Trlcntlne, Blues,
Pawns, etc. Reg. values to $15.00
Clearing at   W-UO
Pay Cash And Save
GROCERIES
fur
SATURDAY
20 lbs. Sugar $1.65
ltosedale Tea, Ib  00c
Quaker I'eas, 4's !l 50c
Squirrel     Brand     Pea
Nttt Uutter   25c
GlngerSnans, 2 lbs llilc
Home    Shoe    Salmon.
%'a   15e
Van   Camp   I'ork   and
Deans, l's   10c
(junker    llrnnd    Sweet
Corn   2/»5c
Nestle Milk, large He
Flour, all brands, 49's
sacks   $2.00
Sunlight Soap pkt 2!lc
White   Swan   Washing
Powder   25c
Empress Jams, Gooseberry, Peach, Cherry,
Loganberry, Aprloot 4
Greengage   ?*>c
Macaroni, l's .... 2/25c
Malkin's  Baking  Pwd„
12 oz  _  15c
Okanagan     Tomatoes,
2's  25c
Campbell Tomato Soup
Per tin   He
Malkin's or Nabob Coffee, per lb  60c
Nabob Tomato Ketchup   8/66(3
P. & O. Naptha Soap.
4 bars for 26c
WE DELIVER
Men's Wear
HEN'S SILK SUSPENDERS
$150 values for   95c
HEN'S HATS
lu   Grey   Camel.   Blacks,   Velour  o«d
Felts.     ltcg. $7.00 for     «5.50
Reg. $0.50 for   $4.50
$8.00 tit $3.50 Men's Caps for .... #1.95
MBN'S  IIOOL SOCKS
Men's 100'* Wool Sox—Still some
left   nt   our   "Wonderful   Value".
.-I Paint for $1.00
MEN'S SUITS
In One Serges, Blue and Brown. Reg.
$35.00 for  $24.50
Blue Suit Special. Rough Government
Serge. Keg. $19.50 for   $14.50
MEN'S PANTS
.Men's Tweed Pants at 1/4 & 1/3 OFF
REGULAR PRICES
MEN'S SHIRTS
$2.!I5 Negligee Shins for   $1.95
MEN'S SHOES
Men's "Astoria" Oxfords.     Reg. $8.50
Cleaiing at  $0.50
Men's Astoria Boots, lu 2 or 3 different styles. Reg. $9.50     $7.15
Men's Dress Shoes, In Brown or Black
Reg. $6.50 for   $4.95
"Astoria" Oxfords. This well known
make of shoe at this bargain price.
Reg. $9.50 for  .^$0.1)5
Pay Cash And Save

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