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The Cumberland Islander Apr 29, 1927

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 FORTY-SIXTH* YEAR—No. 17.
.AND ISLANDER
i
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland Hews.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 1927.
.SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
t)aily Boat Service
To Powell River
Nears Consummation
j COURTENAY, April 23.—Following
the meeting to consider tbe proposed
by-laws on Tuesday nigbt, the subject of a dally boat service between
this point and Powell River was discussed. Mayor McKenzie gave a
brief summary of the boat proposition
up to date. Mr. Eccles, owner of tho
Ruth B, and Captain Butler, wero
both present, lt was proposed to
form a company to operate the boat
on a dally schedule. The owner Intimated hla willingness to take stock
to the extent of $3,0(11), Capt. Butler
was reardy to operate tbe boat and
put up $1,000 cash, and to make further Investment. Several of those lu
attendance were called upon to express their views. Mr. Jos. McPhee
aald the district needed connection
With Powell River. The present time
eeemed the most favorable, as there
was now someone with an Interest in
the boat, willing to run it. He was
etrongly in favor of the scheme. Mr.
Eccles explained that he was willing
to either charter or sell the boat
which had cost about $42,000 to build.
He thought that if Ottawa and the
local member were approached, a
mail contract could be secured. It
would cost about $1,400 to put the
boat In shape and meet the requirements of the inspector for the Powell
River run. This Included new life
boats. He thought the boat would be
a paying proposition. Capt. Butler
had been- into figures as to the prospects of making the boat pay, and
was very, optimistic.
Aldermen Pearse, MacDonald, and
Douglas were in favor of engaging
the services of a man to sell stock lu
the proposed company, as was the
mayor. Aid. MacDonald, as president
of the Board of Trade, would call a
meeting of the council of the Board
and felt confident that the money
could be raised in two or three days.
Rate By-Laws Given
Initial Readings
Monday Evening
First, second and third reading of
General Rate by-laws number 72 and
School Rate by-laws numbers 73 and
74 occupied more time at Monday's
council meeting than all the remaining Items of business on the evening's
agenda. All three by-laws passed
their readings with little or no discussion and will come up at the next
meeting for final adoption. By-law
number 72 sets the general rate at 9
mills, while by-law 73 (inside) and
by-law 74 (outside) set the school
rate at 18 mills.
$150 for .Hay 21th
Before submitting the bills and
accounts to the finance committee,
Aid. Parnham asked the council for a
donation towards the forthcoming
24th of May celebration. Amounts of
$100 aiid $200 were suggested, but
finally an average was struck and the
sum of $150 went down on the record
book as this year's donation. This
increased the total of bills nnd accounts to $809.50.
Aid. Henderson reported the activities of the Works Department, and
Aid. Williams reported three new-
cases of measles. The Fire Department had been called out only once
during the past two weeks, and this
to a small blaze at Chinatown.
Mr. Theed Pearse
Elected President
Of Canadian Club
Public Meeting
Heard Aldermen
On Improvements
COURTENAY, April 25.—A public
meeting was called on Friday night
for the purpose of giving members of
the city council an opportunity of
explaining the various by-laws on
which the ratepayers are being asked
to vote on Tuesday. Mayor McKenzie
called the meeting to order and outlined the object of the meeting. He
called on the chairmen of the different committees ln turn.
* Aid. Douglas, sponsoring the cement sidewalk by-law, described how
this permanent Improvement would
enhance the appearance of the town
He compared the cost of cement and
. board walks, showing that the former
were the cheaper by far ln the long
ran. He assured the ratepayers that
a competent Inspector would be employed on the construction work and
that a first class job would be done.
1
Opposed Cement Sidewalks
Aid. Fielder was the next to speak.
He opposed the construction of the
cement walks but waB in favor of
the school by-law and the electric
by-laws. Aid. Macdonald explained
the two electrical by-laws at some
length, giving an outline of the substantial growth of the light and power
system since its commencement. It
was now necessary to enlarge the
system. The transformers were at
' times overloaded and the margin of
safety had been reached. Without
this public utility the millage rate
would be forty Instead of twenty-five,
'he said. The profit from the electric
.department was therefore saving the
•ratepayers fifteen mills. With the
more favorable agreement which has
now been arranged with the Canadian
Collieries and an Improved system of
distribution, it would be possible ln
five ysars to pay all taxes, except the
school levy, out of the revenue from
this department.
Aid. Pearse, chairman of the finance
committee, gave a short history ol
tbe annual mill rate of the city since
Its Incorporation. He did not want
to see the rate increased and favored
keeping it at a stable figure, around
twenty-five mills. A low mill rate
(Continued on Page Five)
BASEBALL CLUB
ORGANIZED
Manslaughter Case
Again Remanded
The preliminary hearing of thc
manslaughter charge against 17-year-
old Tadao Dol, which was to have
taken place last Tuesday afternoon,
has been further remanded until 10
o'clock in the forenoon of Tuesday,
May 3rd, to the Court House, Cumberland. On behalf of the prosecution,
Constable Condon asked tor the remand when court opened at 4 o clock
on Tuesday of this week.
Dol was out on ball of $5,000, his
bondsmen being Messrs. K. Nakanishi
and O. K. Uchlyama. ThiB, however,
expired on Tuesday last, and Magistrate T. H. Carey again fixed ball al
the same sum, Mr! Nakanishi and Mr.
Klnosuke Mlnato signing the bonds.
"If at first you don't succeed, try.
try again," and when baseball enthusiasts tried unsuccessfully on two
different occasions to hold an organization meeting, you can bet they
didn't give up in despair. They "tried
again," and the third time brought
success.
It was a bumper meeting held in the
Athletic Club last Sunday evening.
H. Stewart was asked to take the
chair and after a formal motion to
the effect that "baseball he played In
Cumberland this year," the election
of officers was proceeded with. Mr.
T. D. Robertson heads the club as
president, and has Matt Stewart and
Walter Hudson supporting him as
vice-president and secretary-treasurer
respectively. These gentlemen, together with Messrs. T. Armstrong, H.
Bates, H. Martin, J. Millar and J.
Damonte, make up an executive committee which ls pledged to keep
things humming In baseball this year.
Henry "Toots" Plump will guide the
destinies of the team ln a managing
capacity, while H. Jackson and H.
Waterfleld were appointed trainers.
Honorary officers are Lt.-Col. C. W.
Villiers, president; nnd Mr. Thomas
Graham, vlco-presldent.
No doubt there will be little difficulty In forming a league, for the
meeting was Informed that Bevan,
Courtenay and Camp 3 were already
preparing for thc season nnd would
be willing to send representatives to
a joint meeting for the purpose of
discussing such a proposal. At any
rate, the secretary was instructed to
get in touch with these clubs with thc
object of forming a district league.
The president and secretary were
delegated to interview business men
and others In the city, and, If possible,
have them subscribe financially In
order to tide the team over the various difficulties met with at the beginning of a season. An inventory will
also be taken of uniforms nnd other
equipment on hand. Altogether, base-
ball in Cumberland apparently is due
for a successful year.
A large number of the members of
the Comox District Canadian Club
met In the Anglican hall on Wednesday evening last, the occasion being
the annual general meeting and
election of olllcers for the ensuing
year.
The report of the secretary-treasurer wan read by Mr. Thos. Carey,
who has acted In that capacity with
honor and distinction throughout the
past year, his services during the
term being greatly appreciated by the
members. The president, Dr. Geo. K.
MacNaughton, read his report, which
out lined very fully the activities of
the club during the year just ended.
The retiring president, In his report,
paid a glowing tribute to the work of
the secretary-treasurer, and also
thanked the executive for the very
able assistance rendered. He had
enjoyed his term as president very
much indeed, and sincerely hoped that
the incoming president would derivt
as much pleasure from the work aB
he had. On motion, both reports were
adopted as read.
The election of offlcerB took up
some considerable time, a great deal
of discussion arising over the Idea
formulated some time ago to change
the secretary each year, the same as
the office of president. It was felt
by some of the members that having
the president and secretary residing
in the same town would facilitate
matters and the work of the club
proceed without any undue delay. On
the other hand, a large number of
members felt that so long as the secretary was giving satisfaction to the
executive and willing to continue as
secretary, his services should by all
means be retained. Mr. P. L. Anderton and Mr. Ben Hughes, both nominated for the position of secretary,
asked that their names be withdrawn.
The election of officers was then proceeded with.
Lt.-Col. Chas. W. Villiers was the
unanimous choice for Honorary president. Mr. Theed Pearse, of Courte-
I nay, was chosen president, with Mr.
E. T. Searle, of Union Bay, as vice-
president. T. H. Carey continues as
secretary-treasurer, whilst B. Hughes
of Courtenay, remains as literary
correspondent. Nine were nominated
for the seven positions on the executive committee, A. R. Stacey and D. R.
I MacDonald, both of Cumberland, being tied for seventh position. Mr.
j Stacey withdrew In favor of Mr. MacDonald. The executive for the ensuing year will be Messrs. W. Eadle
and'J. H. Mclntyre, Courtenay; R. C.
Lang, J. Sutherland and D. R. MacDonald, Cumberland; A. Auchlnvole,
Union Bay; F. J. Stoghnll, Comox.
A general discussion followed the
election of officers, and on motion of
.Mr. Thos. Graham (Cumberland) the
maximum number of members was
placed at 200. A drive for additional
members will probably be undertaken
In the near future. Canadian Club
nctlvlties for the Diamond Jubilee
celebration to be held July 1st and
2nd was also discussed, the members
present being assured Ihat a general
meeting of delegates from all clubs
and lodges In the district would be
held In the nenr future, when the
matter would be thoroughly discussed.
On the conclusion of the business,
To wish her farewell on the eve of
her departure for Nanaimo, a number
of friends of Mrs. E. Stewnrt paid a
surprise visit to her home last Saturday evening. A Jolly time wns
spent at cards, games and dancing.
After a delicious supper, Mrs. S. Miller, on behalf of those present, called
upon Mrs. Stewart tb accept n pretty
silver cake busket and pencil as e
token of their esteem nnd best wishes,
and expressed their regret at her departure. Mrs. Stewart feelingly replied.
Those presert were Mesdames E.
Stewart..A. Stewart, 11. Fanner, J.
Davis, Eccleston, Monks, lt. I). Brown.
K. Ilrown. B, Brown, Covert. McNeil,
S. Miller, Somerville, Jan. Potter. S.
Davis, Hudson, Quinn. Stant, Genr.
II. Jackson and Mrs. Smith of Bowser.
Fire Superintendent
Addressed Local
High School Pupils
Thursday last Mr. Byers, the Firs !
Superintendent of Vancouver Island,
addressed the pupils of the Cumber- j
land High School on the lire problem. I
Mr. Byers told how despite the cam-1
palgn carried on against fire and the j
observance of Fire Week, the efforts
of the patrols, etc., fires In B. C. have
not decreased appreciably because the !
people of B. C. apparently do not seem I
to realize the astounding loss Incurred each year by lire, nor that valuable lesson, "Be sure your fire ls out."
There is a high percentage ot our
forests burned each year, yet only
five percent of this is used by industries. B. C. cuts several million feet
a year. How many millions, then, are
burned by fire? The very prosperity
of B. C. is wrapped up in Its dense
forests, but no forest, no matter how
dense or rapid Its growth, can withstand the ravages made by lire on our
foreBts today. Mr. Citizen of B. C. is
uninterested and apparently indifferent, but one of these days in the near
future he Is going to sit up and howl
about Forest Preservation when it is
too late. The legislature at Victoria
has passed a law requiring ALL persons who go out camping ln the woods
to get a written permit—lt costs
nothing. Some people may kick at
such curtailment of their freedom in
the woods, but In Europe the forests
are protected by strict laws and are
cared for as lf they were a garden.
In fact, in Europe one has to get a
permit to cut a tree ln their own
yards. We are fortunate but do not
realize it. But that day Ib not far off.
if Mr. Camper doesn't watch his step
ln the woods.
Mr. Byers then dealt with fires on
Vancouver Island. In the Interior
many fires are due to lightning, but
out of a total of some 231 fires on
Vancouver Island, one was caused by
lightning, the rest by human agency.
Fire ls dangerous in the summer
woods at any time, but when thc
humidity is low, It Is like playing with
dynamite. Fire, when the humidity is
low, starts almost spontaneously. A
spark falling from a cigarette at such
times will start a fire, when at other
times it would not.
A small fire is usually easy to put
out. A fire of ten acres is very difficult to put out; It Is usually guard.*d
and kept from spreading or backfired, but a fire of several hundred
acres is an impossibility to put out—
the only way ls to cut fire trails and
keep lt back. Rain only dampens
such fires—it does not always pu:
them out, far from tt.
The northern part of Vancouver
Island seems to have quite a reputation for big bush fires. One of these
I fires cost almost $35,000 to fight.
'Remember, tbat is only one fire, and
we pay for lt in taxes.
If people can be taught to be careful with fires in the woods, be positive
I their camp-fires are out, lf they report
every Sre tbey see to a fire warden if
they cannot put It out themselves.
then and then only can we hope for
fewer fires.
FREE VACCINATION
AT DOCTORS' OFFICE
refreshments were served and a general talk amongst the members did
more to Introduce the gct-acqualnted
Idea than any previous meeting of
the club.
Owing to tlie prevalence of
small pox In neighboring communities and the desirability of
all persons being vaccinated as
a precaution against this disease, arrangements have been
made whereby alt persons so
desiring will be vaccinated free
of charge, at the doctors' office
during regular office hours, 9 to
10 a.m. and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
MEDICAL BOARD.
I.O.O.F. Celebrate
105th Anniversary
The local branch of the I. O. O. F.
held a whist drive and dance in the
Memorial hall, Cumberland, on Tuesday evening last, in commemoration
of the 105th anniversary of the Independent Order of Oddfellows. Twenty-
three tables were required to accommodate the whist players, Miss Josie
Balagno being successful in obtaining
the ladles' lirst prize, Mrs. Charles
Grant receiving the second. Mrs.
McLaughlin, of Fanny Bay, playing a
gentleman's hand, captured the flrst
prize, whilst the second was a tie
between Mrs. Morgan, Mrs. Bogo, Mr.
Irvine Morgan and Mr. J. S. Brown,
the latter winning on the cut of the
cards.
Dainty refreshments were served
on the conclusion of the whist, after
which dancing was indulged in until
1 a.nr?, to music supplied by the Byng
Boys' orchestra. Mr. Wm. McLellan
Sr.. made an efficient master of ceremonies for both whist and dance.
Capt.GeorgeAshTo
Display Skill With
Weapon and Lassoo
Among men, only the very young
or the very old, do not feel a
quickening of the blood as tales ol
skill with gun or rope are unfolded.
Lovers of the skillful and the quick
on the trigger, are to have an exceptional treat for Captain Georgo
Ash is in the city and has been
booked by the management of the Hollo and Gaiety theatres to appear in
Cumberland on Monday and Tuesday
and in Courtenay on Wednesday and
Thursday of next week.
Capt. Ash Is no stage performer,
he is a performer on tiie stage of
life, and by accuracy with his weapons has won his way to the forefront in many a noted action. He
has visited all parts of the world
where adventure lures and in addition to doing things, has prepared
a marvellous record thereof. His
latest notable exploit was to bring
in single handed Nelson Johnson, the
Prince Rupert slayer, a receipt for
whose delivery into custody he proudly exhibits. Capt. Ash will give
exhibitions of target shooting with
one and two revolvers.
Capt. Ash does not displace tbe
pictures booked for the days of his
visit, his display is an added attraction.
St. George's Day
Celebrated At The
Elk Hotel, Comox
VOTE $10,000 FOR ELECTRIC
LIGHT AND POWER EXTENSION
COURTENAY, April 27.—Three out
of the four proposed by-laws voted
on by the ratepayers here on Tuesday
were passed by substantial majorities
i The measure to authorize thc building
and equipment of a new four-roomed
high school was sanctioned by 86
votes to 26. Clearing the site for this
building, whicli will stand nt the
Cumberland road end of Warren Ave,
will doubtless be taken In hand ln the
very near future, as It Is hoped that
[the new high school will be completed
j and ready for occupation following
I the summer holidays.
j Tho light and power by-law which
I authorizes an expenditure of a sum
i not exceeding S10.000 for the con-
1 slructlon of a new pole line, lnstalla-
I tlou    of    transformers     etc.,     was
approved  with  90 votes  to  16.   The
ratepayers are evidently convinced
j that their electric light and power
j utility system is a decidedly paying
! proposition.
I    The  by-law   to  allow   the city  to
I enter Into n new agreement with the
Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir) Ltd..
for the  supply  of electrical  energy
.was   passed  by  90  votes  for,  to   17
1 against.
Disapprove Cement Sidewalks
I Tho voters Bhowed a very decided
j disapproval of thc proposal to 0011-
I struct cement sidewalks for the dls-
! lance of two blocks on each side of
! Union street. This would have cost
: about $5,000, but the measure was
j rejected by 72 votes against and 80
I votes for. A number ot tho ratepayers
j consider that tbls expense should be
I borne by the owners of thc adjoining
j property.
A total of 112 ballotB wore cast. Tho
majority required to pass tbe measures was three-fifths.
OLD   FAVORITES   ENJOYED
Everyone certainly enjoyed that
! French Minuet and other old favorites
jat last Saturday night's dance In Ibe
I Ilo-llo. This Saturday a similar
! dance wlll be held nnd it promises to
Ibe Just as enjoyable. Gents., 511c;
' ladies, 25c.   Dancing from 9 to 12.
COURTENAY, April 26.—Thc fourth
annual    celebration   of   St.   George's
Day and Shakespeare's birthday was
celebrated at  the Elk  Hotel, Comox,
on  Monday  evening.     An    excellent
dinner   including   typically    English
dishes wus provided by the management and was greatly enjoyed by the
large    number   present,   us    was    n
capital   programme   of   toasts   and
musical selections.   Lt.-Col. (.'has. W
Villiers was chairman on ibis occasion, which was perhaps the most enjoyable St. George's Hay anniversary
1 yet celebrated In the district.
I    Tbo   programme   was   as   follows:
The King, Lt.-Col. 0. W. Villiers; the
1 Empire,   Mr.   Den   Hughes;   Canada,
! Major A. M.  Hilton and responded  In
I by Mr. Hugh BtOWarl  und Mr. 1).  R.
I Macllolinld.     The   toast   to   England
was ably proposed by Mr. ti. Stubbs,
Mr.  Sidney   D'Estorre  replying.   The
Ladles  was  proposed  by  Mr.  S.  Abrams and responded to by Mrs. Thoed
Pearse.
Thc musical programme included
"Song of the Open Air" by Mr. G. A.
Kirk; Shawl dance by Miss Slielln
Ailard; "Devonshire Dialect" by Mr.
II. S. Uaker; "Cherry Ripe" by Mrs.
lien Hughes; "() Canada" by the
assembly; "My Old Dutch" by Mr.
O. P, Osier; "Larboard Watch" duet
by Rev. 3. Hobblns and Mr. tl. liar-
wood; "Land of Hope anil Glory" by
Mrs. II.  Harvey.
District 6 Oratorical
Contest At Victoria
On Saturday Night
Upon the shoulders of Archie Dick,
Cumberland High School youth, rests
the responsibility of upholding Comox
District In the oratorical competition
whicli takes place in Victoria Satur-,
day (tomorrow) evening. The competition is in District 0 which includes
all high schools on Vancouver Island. It wlll commence nt 8 o'clock
in the Victoria High auditorium.
Other contestants are: John Guthrie, Cassidy High School; Algoma
Ironside, Nanaimo High School; and
James Gibson, Victoria High Scliool.
Orations are limited to ten minutes.
Subject: "Canada's Progress Since
Confederation." Judges are: Rev. W.
G. Wilson, minister of First United
Church; Major I.. Ilullock-Wobster,
director Britisli Columbia Dramatic
Scliool; Mr. Albert Sullivan, Provincial Inspector of High Schools.
Archie leaves for Victoria this
evening witli his parents, and goes
with the best wishes for success from
all residents of the Comox District.
All parts of Canada are taking part
in the oratorical contest and the
eventual Dominion champion will be
rewarded with 11 trip to Europe, and
next year represent Canada at the
Washington competition for the
championship of the world.
Miss C. Harrison
Honored For Prize
Winning Essay
Last Wednesday Mr. MacDonald,
Fire Marshall from Vancouver, was
in Cumberland and presented to Miss
Claudia Harrison tlie medal given by
tho Ancient and Honorable Order of
the Blue Goose for her essay on "Fire
Prevention." The School Board and
the P. T. A., represented respectively
by Mrs. Banks and Mrs. Clinton, also
presented her with a gold chain. In
concluding his address, .Mr. MacDonald remarked that Cumberland warf
the only town in B. C. where this
medal had been won three times in
succession. It lms' been won once by
Miss K. Emily and twice by Miss Harrison.
In speaking of lire prevention itself, .Mr. MacDonald emphasized the
great danger resulting from the careless handling of (ire. The greatest
menace to B. C's great forests is man.
Mr. MacDonald spoke very highly
of Fire Chief Parnham, who has given
Cumberland one of the lowest lire
records in B. <'. Chief Parnham'.-!
method is to take measures to prevent
the possibility of fire ever starting,
such as very frequent visits by the
Fire Inspector, Inspection of defective
wiring, and the immediate clearing
out of all fire traps in the cky. The
result is a very efficient fire brigade,
an efficient chief, and an extraordinary low fire record, a record which
many towns in B. C. come far from
equaling.
I'ntil further notice there will be
no meetings held for tlie Scouts and
Cubs, but the following Scouts will
meet every Friday at tlie usual hour
of (J:3n p.m.: Troop Leader Andrew
Brown, Patrol Leaders Alex MacDonald, Robbie ('idlings nud Douglas
Itaird; Seconds Tom Itobertson. Dick
Marpole aud Isao Nakano. These
boys will undergo a course of .-.pedal
training during the next few weeks
to fit them for their positions of
leadership.
Tiie Linger-Longer club will hold a
meeting in the I'nion Hotel at 7 p.m.
on  Tuesday,   May  8rd.
Pioneer Resident Of
Valley Passes Away
In Vancouver City
Mrs. Lucy Jones, aged !>7, resident
of Vancouver Island for more than
half a century, passed away at :i a.m.
Thursday, at I tie residence of her
daughter, Mrs. W. C. Scott, 3419 Stevens street, Vnncouver.
A native of North Wales, Mrs, Jones
migrated to California when she was
a child. Fifty-six years ago she moved to Comox Valley. V. I., and had
resided there until seventeen years
ago. when she went  to Vancouver .
She is survived by a son. Councillor David A. Jones, of Langley, and
three daughters. Mrs. F. W. Gilbert of
046 Thirteenth avenue west. Miss S.
H.  Jones  and   Mrs.   Scott.
JK& Colleen Moore in "TWINKLETOES"   Adlfferent
sort of picture PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, APRIL tt, 1»».
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT CUMBERLAND, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY,  APRIL  29,  1327.
What is this thing we call success, anyhow? We
know a man who died not long ago and did not
leave enough actual money to pay his funeral
expenses. Yet in our
WHAT IS SUCCESS?   judgment he was a big
success. He had been a
good husband and father. He had raised two
sons, put them through high school and placed
them both in honest trades where they were assured good wages. All his life he had been a
good citizen, a Christian und a gentleman. Yet
when he died his sons had to help to pay the expenses of burial.
We know another man who is easily rated a
millionaire. He has a magnificent home and a
wide fame. One daughter died in disgrace. His
only son is a drunkard and a libertine. His very
beautiful home is only a dreary mausoleum. Is
a man a success if he gets money and raises sons
to be loafers and daughters to be fools ?
In our humble opinion to keep clean, to do
good work, earn friends, to be happy and bestow
happiness, to develop opportunity, to serve where
possible and learn not to whine—this is success.
There is no greater.   There is no other.
Another thing that is as inevitable as death and
taxes is the increase in the expense account. As
your income grows your expenditures amount.
You often hear people say "I
MAKING BOTH    was better contented and had
ENDS  MEET      more  when   my   salary  was
$100 a month than now when
it is twice that amount." The real fact of the
matter is that the more we get tho more we want.
It does cost a lot more to live now than it used
to and it is worth more, too. Where do all the
expenses come from? No sooner do you get a
raise than expenses take a jump. The chances
are expenses will jump higher than the raise and
that you will really be worse off than before.
Modes of living change. The family automobile
is a big item in the expense account, yet everybody manages somehow to maintain a car. We
are all stepping on the gas, but most of us are
not getting anywhere. The old lessons of thrift
are more needed today than ever before. You
can't live happily on an income of $1.00 and an
outgo of $1.10 today any more than our ancestors
could a hundred years ago. Making both ends
meet still continues to be the biggest job in life
for most of us.
Burning the candle at both ends has sent many
a man or woman to an early grave.   In a world
filled with fool automobile drivers, disease germs
and  menaces  to  life,  no
WHICH WAY man knows when his end
ARE YOU GOING? may come, but barring an
accident and assuming you
have normal health, determining the number of
your days is largely a matter of the table figured
out by the life insurance companies. The average man gives his automobile better care and
attention than he gives himself. If the engine
knocks he has the carbon removed. He watches
the oil guage and he sees that the batteries are
covered with distilled water. If his heart throbs
he turns over on the other side and forgets it.
Your physician will tell you that an increased
pulse rate means you are wearing out faster than
you should. He will tell you, also, that the rate
at which you live determines in large measure
the length of time you will live. Heart throbs
are the same as engine knocks. Batteries without water are the same as weakened kidneys. But
the internal machinery under your vest does not
get the same attention as the mechanism under
the hood of your automobile. You can generally
trade a used car on a new one but there is only
one place for a dead body and that is a hole in the
ground.
We are all traveling toward the tomb. The
faster we travel the sooner we will get there.
Heredity has much to do with the length of life,
but simple fare, freedom from vice, periods of
rest and relaxation and a lack of acquaintance
with softening luxuries are important factors.
An automobile driven at even speed will last
longer than a racing car. You will probably live
longer if you live slowly. This is the thing you
must decide for yourself. Is it better to run
swiftly until your throbbing heart stops at forty,
or to saunter along the way, with no anxious
thought for the morrow, and lie clown to rest at
four score and ten?
Some joy riders deliberately choose "a short
life and a merry one." Well, let them. To us it
seems there are rich compensations in the ripe
old age which follows a well-spent life.
*-*>**<>****>***->*-->-'>--*>*'^^
Think, and your work will be a thousand times
easier, no matter what kind of a job you have.
* *   «   *
The man who attends strictly to his own business has plenty of business to attend to.
* *   »   *
It's better to keep your mouth closed and let
others think you are a fool than to keep talking
and make them positive of it.
JUBILEE SHOWS
WILL BE FEATURE
OF ELKS' CIRCUS
The second annual circus of Courtenay Lodge B.P.O. Elks Xo. 60 will
be held In Courtenay on May 5. C nnd
7.   A  big feature this year  will  be
Conklin and Garrett's Diamond Jubilee shows, Canada's premier tented
attraction, which has grown from a
small two-car show carrying two
rides and five small shows to the
present day when it travels in its own
privitie train of 15 cars, each car being Tu feet in length and carrying 7
major   riding  devices,  12  big circus
n
I
Essex   Super- Six
PROVING VERY POPULAR
FOURTEEN CARS DELIVERED IN COMOX
DISTRICT DURING APRIL
A Six at the price
of a Four
COACH — — — — — $1195
SEDAN _____ $1295
COUPE _____ $1195
side-shows. One hundred and seventy
five people are employed during the
season.
The show covers the same route
every year. This fact, in itself,
speaks well for the show. The first
year or so the usual difficulties were
encountered such as exhorbitant license foes, objections by the local
merchants, etc. Today everything ls
changed and every year citizens
eagerly await thc annual visit of this
vast amusement organization as they
have come to realize the great good
to all alike it affords, carrying as it
does, features and attractions that
most children never would have the
opportunity of visiting.
SU.
SEE ONE
RIDE IN ONE
Be Convinced
DRIVE ONE
PIDCOCK & McKENZIE
Phone 25 Agents Phone 25
DIPPING
Builds ExiraMiles
Healthful Bread!   Tasty Bread!
Mt*-*Mtti*aae3W*ctt=<tat3
Use Comox
Whole Wheat
Flour
OBTAINABLE AT ALL GROCERY STORES
THROUGHOUT THE DISTRICT
ALSO COMOX CREAMERY BUTTER, EGGS AND
POTATOES
ftMBEa-aauia-a-iLa-iLiuiuui wnaaaeitrii-ii it*__e__t__aa iwrtwm*;
Comox Creamery
Association
Crartenajr.
agagggaiaiawgagasBaaaB^
m
i^MMSSMWSS^lSS 5? i&MSS !:JSB 5J %£$$ 5J SJ -V- 'WBi^MSS^MMI'.
SOMETIMES THE
INFORMALITY OF THE
SPOKEN WORD IS
MORE EFFECTIVE
THAN A LETTER.
"LONG DISTANCE, PLEASE"
B. C. TELEPHONE COMPANY
^^^L^^^^^L^^^^^L^t^g^
THE Fireatone process
* cf Gum-Dipping it
one of the most important
of the many Firestone
contribution! to more
economical highway transportation.
By this process, every fiber
of every cord is thoroughly
saturated and insulated with
rubber, minimizing friction
and heat so destructive to tiro
life.
On the can of hundreds of
thousands of motorists, in tha
day-in and day-out service of
the largest truck, bus and taxi-
cab fleets, in the battle of tirea
on race tracks, Firestone Gum-
Dipped Tires, because of their
greater stamina, are delivering
longer mileage with added
safety and comfort.
The Firestone dealer in
your locality sells and services
these extra quality tires. Let
him tell you of the trouble-
free service that the Gum-
Dipping process insures and
bow he can serve you better
and save you money. See
him to-day.
FIRESTONE TIRE & RUBBER CO.
OF CANADA, LIMITED
Hamilton. Ont.
MOST MILES PER DOLLAR
Tirestone
Itmtoo-B Build* tbe Only Gum-Dipped Tim
CANADIAN NATIONAL
EUROPEAN TOURS
A maximum of travel through particularly interesting countries at a
minimum ot expense Is provided lu
the Canadian National Educational
Tours this summer through Scotland,
England, France, Belgium, Switzerland and Italy.
Two tours have been arranged and
sailing will be made from Montreal,
July 8, on the S.S. "Andania," direct
to Glasgow. Very careful attention
has been given to Itineraries Involved.
Tour No. 1 Is a 37-day trip on sea
and land, visiting Important cities ln
Scotland, England, France, Belgium,
Switzerland. All expenses, (372.60,
Montreal to Great Britain and the
Continent and return to Montreal.
Tour No. 2 ls a Sl-day trip on sea
and land, visiting ln Scotland, England, France, Belgium, Switzerland
and Italy. All expenses, (501.01),
.Montreal to Great Britain and the
Continent and return to Montreal.
There will be low excursion fares
to the seaboard from points ln the
Prairie Provinces.
These tours will be personally conducted from Western Canada, and
while overseas will be under the
direct care and supervision of thoroughly responsible and reliable
organization, fully qualified tn every
particular to successfully look after
the interests of our patrons.
The sight-seeing program Is very
complete and generous. Automobiles
and motor coaches are freely used.
All sight-seeing ls well planned to
save unnecessary fatigue and to see
tho worth-while places within the
time at our disposal. Competent lecturers will reveal to our patrons the
outstanding features, literary, historic,
' artistic or scenic of the Old World
, centres visited.
Edward W. Bickle, local agent for
the Canadian National Railways, will
he glad to discuss these tours and
arrange all details. 14-21
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND   FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
phones (r:cai"
134X Courtenay
1(1 Cumberland.
P. P. Harrison, M. LA.
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Ofllce
Courtenay            Phone 2SS
Local Offlce
Cumberland Hotel ln Evenings.
Telephone   115R or  24
JOHN INGLIS
The Practical White.Tailor
COURTENAY, B. O. FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 1927.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
4
i!
A collosal collection of
all that is new
and novel in the
amusement field
Courtenay  Lodge
B.P.O. Elks No. 60 J
present their second '
ANNUAL   CIRCUS
■■■■■■■■■■■■■■il
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
May 5, 6 and 7
featuring
tes=
Conklin and Garrett's
Diamond  Jubilee
■■^W^-^iA'Aie***!"***^^
J g* J  g
i
j       Double Length
j     Railway Cars of
Shows
*
Fun, Mirth, Frolic
and Joy    -
ti
15
 1
Courtenay, May 5,6,7
7 Major H
Riding  Devices  ■
The Season's Newest Sensational
Riding Device Thrillers
Canada's Premier Tented Attraction
12
12
Big Mammoth Awe   {
i
Inspiring Circus      ,
Side  ShoWS  I
12'
12
..- i
1   DROSS
FROM THE MELTINO POT
MPmtyi*iiW&^$^&fi£Bt&\
Cumberland school teacher to the
"terror" of the class: "Jimmy, your
home lessons are terrible. I'd just
like to be in your mother's place for
a week."
"Oetcberllfe so'd our old man like
It," came the retort.
*****
"Plenty of hard work, mixed with
a little champagne and whiskey" wan
the recipe for long life given by Mr.
Harry Seddon, a well known London
business man who recently celebrated
his golden wedding.
The Islander cub reporter asks, why
drag in the hard work?
* *   *
Must Have Been n Conrtcnny Youth
"What sort of a chap ls Jack, dear?"
"Well, when we were together last
night,   the   lights   went  out,   nnd   bc
spent the rest of the evening repairing the fuse!"
* •   *
It Is no good trying to meet a
cheque or a woman, unless you are
In funds. '
* *   *
FABLE—Once upon a time a man
went Into a pub to have just one
drink—and had It.
* •   *
ON I.OIM. TO THE 1)068
My granddad,  viewing earth's  worn
cogs,
Said things  were going to the dogs.
His granddad In his house of logs
Said things were going to the dogs.
His granddad In the Flemish bogs
Said things were going to the dogs.
His granddad in his old sllk togs
Said things were going to the dogs.
There's one thing that I have to state.
The dogs have had a good long wait!
* *   *
There was a landlubber with the
shipwrecked crew that had been aorltt
for two days, with hope at low ebb.
"What's that?" exclaimed the landsman, pointing into the distance. "That
Is land, Isn't lt?"
"I see nothing but the horizon,"
replied the flrst mate.
"Well, hang lt, that's better than
nothing.   Let's pull for It."
* *   •
An officer on board a training ship
was drilling his recruits.
"Now, every, man must lie on hi;-
back, and move his legs In the air as
though he Is riding a bicycle," he
said. After a few moments he saw
that one man had stopped.
"Why have you stopped, Jones?", he
asKcda
"Please, sir," answered Jones, "I'm
coasting."
FOREST FIRES HIT
HOME INDUSTRY
MONTREAL. April 27.—"Thousands
of river drivers have been working a
month earlier than usual on the
spring drives; thousands more have
just returned with a good stake from
a big harvest of pulpwood; thousands
more from the logging camps—150,-
000 workers coming and going all the
time. Inevitably we find woods, man,
labor, Industry, forming one family
compact, with bread and butter In the
larder; while on the other hand fire
barrens. Idleness, desertion of industry, hunger and emigration are a
synonym. Forest fires decide the destiny of thousands of Canadians," says
the Canadian Forestry Association In
a statement today.
"In 1923 we had 5,000,000 acres
burned. What will It be In 1927? Do
not let us do as the ostrich, bury our
heads for safety. The public are responsible for 90 per cent of the fires
caused. It is then high time the publlc took a hand, for until the individual realizes he ls responsible, forest
flres will tSke their annual toll of
wages. The Protection Services arc
doing wonderful work, improving
tlielr efficiency by leaps and bounds.
Are you behind them? Aro you trying
to cut down that 90 per cent human
lire hazard? An awakening of Individual responsibility will strengthen
the Ranger's hand 90 per cent. Will
you lend a hand and help the Ranger,
—help the breadwinners conserve the
public owned resources?"
A MODEL OF CLEANLINESS.
If the housewife could visit a
modern milk condensary, where pure
country milk Is put in tins Ior her
convenience, she would be as delighted with Its cleanliness as she would
be amazed at the ingenuity of thc
process. In Borden condensates,
where Eagle Brand or St. Charles
Milk Is packed, the entiro plant Is
subjected to a rigid cleansing every
day. Every container and every piece
of piping through which the milk
passes is scalded with live steam.
St. Charles milk, whwlch Ib evaporated, has nothing added to il, and
nothing is taken away, except a portion of the natural moisture of the
country milk. After being tinned It
Is sterilized, so it will keep perfectly
in the unopened tin. Eagle Brand,
which Is condensed milk, ls preserved
by the addition of pure cane sugar,
but nothing else is added to the fresh
country milk. The condensed milk is
called "sweetened" and the evaporated "unsweetened" milk.
The accident survey now being conducted by the Automobile Club oi
I Britisli Columbia is being watched
with nation-wide interest. The Montreal Herald, in a recent issue, prints
I a full account of the work undertaken
| by the provincial body In its investigation of Compulsory Liability Insurance proposals.
A striking feature lu the development of national forests ln Canada
has been their use as recreational
areas. Tlle public have eagerly
grasped the possibilities for holidaying and recreation which arc afforded.
On a number of national forests In
the four Western Provinces Summer
resorts have been laid out In which
citizens have erected cottages.
Provision has also been made for
campers, especially in the way of
preparing suitable camp sites' along
motor highways whicli pass through
the forest.
By protection and proper management the accessible forest land of
Canada could be made to produce in
perpetuity several times thc present
annual cut. It will, at best, take
many years to bring about this adjustment. On the other hand. If the
present methods and losses continue
the annual cut wlll have to be reduced.
Announcement was made nt Victoria last week tbe engineers of the
Provincial Public Works Department
would commence Immediate surveys
to Ilnd a 'satisfactory route for a roiul
from Campbell River north Into the
Sayward district of Vancouver Island.
BLUE FUNNEL SHIPS
TO USE ISLAND COAL
Canada Is the principal source of
soft-wood supplies In the British Empire. Only by curtailing losses and
Increasing productivity can she hope
!o discharge faithfully hor responsibilities in this direction; she must
conserve her forest wealth and bring
ibout a more healthy relationship
between depletion and annual growth.
After taking on fuel coal at Seattle
for the last year, vessels of the Blue
Funnel Line which run betwoen tho
Orient and Vancouver and Seattle,
j will henceforth bunker at Vancouver
In resumption of a previous custom.
It has been announced at the company's offices.
The system of bunkering deep sen
ships In the port of Vancouver, which
has been followed by the Canadian
Pacific steamships for years, has been
[adopted by the Blue Funnel Line. The
I fuel is brought from Vancouver Island mines hy barge, anil ls loaded
on thu ships from alongside. This
method is said to be more economical
than that of loading from bunkers on
shore.
LITTLE WHITE HEN IS
BIG MONEY MAKER
One of the biggest money-makers of
her size In the world Is none other
than a humble little white hen at the
University of British Columbia farm,
Point Grey.
Known only as Hen No. 6, she not
only presides over the world's record
pen, but with her eggs ls bringing
into the treasury of the University
$2,900.
"We have actually sold $1,625 worth
of stock from Hen No. 6, and have
reservations for $1,275 worth, which
will bring the total up to $2,900,"
Prof. E. A. Lloyd, head of the department of field husbandry, says. *
"Hen No. 6 ls a member of the
world's record pen from which we
are selling a considerable number of
hatching eggs, particularly from the
other four 300-egg members ot this
CUNARD
ANCHOR
ANCHOR-DONALDSON
CANADIAN SERVICE
FROM  MONTREAL
To Plymouth-CheibourgaLondon
Ausonla May 6 Ascanin Mny 2n
To llell'ast-Llverptiiil-I'liisgnw
Letitla May 0 Athenla  May 20
FROM NEW IOIIK
To Qiirfiistnvt ■■ and Liverpool
Laconia May 7 Scythla  May  14
To Cherbourg and Southampton
Aqultanla May 11. 31, June 22
llerengaria Mny 17, June 8, 29
♦Mauretanla May 25. June 15, July 0
To Londonderry and Glasgow
Cameronla May 7     Caledonia May 21
To Plymouth-Hnvre-London
Tuscanla May 14, June 11
FROM BOSTON
To Queenstown and LlTCi-peel
Scythla May 15 Auranla May 29
* Calls at Plymouth, Eastbound
TOURIST THIRD CABIN
Sailings from MONTREAL
To Belfast-Llverpool-Glasgow
Letitla May 6. June 3, July 1
Athonia May 20, June 17, July 16
To Glasgow and Liverpool
Auranla June 24     Andania July 3
To  l'lpnoutii-Chcrbourg-Lnndon
Ausonla June 10    Ascanla June 24
Alaunia July 1. July 29, Aug. 26
Money orders, drafts and Travellers'
Cheques at lowest ratoa. Full Information from local agents or Company'! Offlcei, m Haitlng« St. W.,
Vancouver, B. C.
pen, at $5.00 to $10.00 per egg."
Eggs and progeny from this pen
have found a market In all parts of
Canada and the United States and ns
far away as Australia.
The city council of Nanaimo has
under consideratio na proposal to
prohibit the sale of Imported Ice
cream in that city. Companies desiring to sell their product In Nanaimo
may therefore lie required lo erect a
local plant, so that their milk nnd Ice
cream will come under city inspect inn
ns required by the Milk By-law.
24 TELEPHONE 100
TAXI
ASK FOR CHARLIE  DALTON
Licensed Taxi Driver
"Provincial Elections Act"
finally. Electoral District
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
I shall, no MONDAY thc 16th day ol
Mny, 1927, at the hour of ten o'clock
in the forenoon, at the Court House,
Cumberland, hold a sitting of the
Court of Revision for the purpose of
revising lhe list of voters for the said
electoral district, and of hearing and
determining any and ull objections
to the retention of any name on the
said list, or to the registration as a
voter of any applicant for registration; mid for the other purposes set
forth In the "Provlnclal Elections
Act."
Dated at Cumberland, B.C. ibis 4th
day of April, 1927.
JOHN CONWAY,
Registrar of Voters,
14-17 Comox Electoral District.
"SERVICE"
Business goes where it 1h Invited and
stays when.' it Ih well treated. Perhaps this explains why we have so
many loyal friends in the printing
field. Certainly those who know ns.
our courteous service, dependable
products, and a desire to give value
received, can unhesitatingly vouch
for our business Integrity
We   desire   to   increase   our   Oeld   of
usefulness—perhaps  we  ran  he  of
service to you.
The Cumberland Islander
CUMBERLAND
!    !
I    i
I   I
i I PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 1927.
Ilo-llo Theatre
THIS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
(jaSTTK**^
ICtnntth Htyfut
HBIBIEiaJiiH^
Monday, May 2nd
I     "Brown Of Harvard"
iBEiBiaiaiB/a'E'HaiEiaiaissiaEia^
Tuesday, May 3rd
gSTS ap ft - gt        /
%*K J-'J  >..-:'***v    :,':a !:*«
J\,-&y     /t*»a«i.nna«;B.:3 m ii.,
•SHsieHaK*-^^
Wednesday-Thursday, May 4-5
Rex Beach's
"PADLOCKED"
with Lois Moran
Louise Dresser and Noah Beery
Friday - Saturday, May 6 - 7
F
KING VIDOIpS
H"BiO*p*» U C/T I CTIV_,
BARDELK^
<3he ^Aagnifh
Starring.
JOHSGffiBERT
(~)NE moment — the power
behind the state; thc next
—shorn of his r,lory, a traitor
about to pay for his folly.
And all for the lore of a girl
he had seen but once!
What a gorgeous romance thit ill
And what ■ tremendous triumph
for John Gilbert ai Bardelyt, a
great lighter but a greater lover I
Gilbert and King Vidor, Mar and
director of "The Big Parade" and
"Iji Bolwme," in a story by S.ibia-
tini, author of "Scaramouche" nnd
"The Soak Hawlc"! 7>y to brat
thai jot tntertainmentl
*•*.
with
ELEANOR  BOARDMAN
ROY D'ARCY
KARL DANE
GEORGE K. ARTHUR
ARTHUR LUBIN
Sremorh by Dorothy _
tnd Kint FMor from tilt atorf
by Rafael Stbatin>~-DiTact*4 bf
King  Vidor
, favtqtfolchtiyn \\tyc
T picture
Attractions for the
Coming Week
LIMEHOUSE LIVES
ON ILO-ILO SCREEN
Colleen Moore Has Title Role in
Thomas Burke's Classic
Tale      .
Colleen Moore brings to life one of
Thomas Burke's most famous Lime-
house characters, "Twinkletoes," In
John McCormick's latest production
for First National, at the Ilo-llo this
Friday and Saturday. The little star
has abandoned her dark Dutch bob
and donned golden curls in order to
visualize correctly the Burke heroine
for those who see "Twinkletoes."
Other Burke characters are depleted
by Kenneth Harlan (who plays opposite Miss Moore), Gladys Brockwell.
Warner Oland, Tully Marshall, Julan
Johnston  nnd John Philip Kolb.
The background of the story Is that
world famous waterfront slum, tlle
London Llmehouse district, where the
derelicts of the earth from city and
ocean meet in narrow, crooked streets
that run down to the great wharves.
Charles Brabin directed the picture,
which was adapted from Burke's tale
by Wlnnifred Dunn. Colleen, In her
blonde curls, appears as a noted little
dancer of a Llmehouse music hall.
The story is tense, but spiced with
sparkling comedy, and it has a happy
satisfying ending that rounds out an
excellent evening's entertainment for
the whole family. Colleen will recruit
new thousands to her army of followers In this role.
AT LAST!   A MAN
GIRLS MAY TRUST
King Vidor, famous director, had
just arranged a mob of several thousand extras for a big shot in
"Bardelys the Magnificent," his Metro-
Goldwyn-Mayer production starring
John Gilbert, which shows at the Ilo-
llo theatre next Friday and Saturday.
Everything was set and ready for the
whistle that was to be the signal for
the spectacular action. He was raising his megaphone to his lips to cry
"camera" when	
A little extra girl, very young, very
unsophisticated, aiid obviously a beginner In pictures, stepped out of the
crowd and walked up to the platform
where Vidor and his assistants sat.
She gave them all a quizzical, appraising look and then her eye rested
on Vidor.
"Here," she said, "I think I can
trust you. Hold my make-up box
until I get back.' And she handed it
to King and darted back into the mob.
And King very solemnly guarded
the make-up box until she returned.
Gaiety Theatre
THE GREATEST
jFOOTBALL
| PICTURE
[ever
MADE
ALEC FRANCIS SUCCESS IN
PETER GRIMM WINS TITLE
ROLE IN "MUSIC MASTER"
FAMOUS CHARACTER
ACTORS IN PICTURE
"BROWN OF HARVARD"
Three of the screen's most famous
character actors augment the cast of
"Brown of Harvard," the great
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer picture whicli
Is playing at the Ilo-llo theatre next
Monday and at the Gaiety on Tuesday.
They are Mary Alden, David Torrence
and Edward Connelly.
It is Mary Aldcn's lirst appearance
In a Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer picture
since she made lhe memorable "The
Old Nest" for Goldwyn. Mr. Torrence recently played an important
role in "The Auction Block" under
the direction of Hobart Henley, aud
Edward Connelly is under long-term
contract to M-G-M.
Jack Pickford plays the role of
Doollttle ln "Brown of Harvard,"
and William Haines ls seen In the
title role. Tlle production was directed by Jack Conway.
PICKED BEAUTIES GLORIFY
GARDEN PARTY ON SCREEN
—
"Get mc the forty prettiest girls in
Hollywood for the Burden party In
'Padlocked.'"
This was the order given the casting department at the Paramount
studio hy Allan Dwiin, the director.
How well the casting department
functioned mny be gathered from tho
tact that the forty were Anally picked
from u select list of 400.
An elaborate garden party at a
magnificent Long bland home of :.
New York millionaire is ono of the
features of the picture. This spacious garden selling is part of a vaBt
set that Includes an enormous drawing room, dining room and several
anterooms. There nre two Immense
Gothic fireplaces, and the entire set
Is decorated with rare old Belgian
tapestries. The latter form thc moBt
beautiful drapes ever used in motion
pictures, and because of their value
were guarded day and ulght by six
watchmen.
"Padlocked", is based on the Rex
Bench story which appeared serially
In the Cosmopolitan Magazine a few
mouths ago. It is u strong drama of
modern life, picturing the bitter clash
between the older gencrntlon and tho
younger generation.
Lois Moran, Loulso Dresser and
Noah Beery head a powerful cast of
competent playors. The plcturo wlll
be shown at the Ilo-llo Theatre next
Wednesday nnd Thursday.
If the English friends of Alec B.
Francis ever have doubted that he
has made good in America their
doubts have been dispelled with the
release of "The Return of Peter
Grimm" in London.
Fox Films cast Mr. Francis in another big title role, as a result of his
excellent portrayal of the lovable old
Dutchman. The new picture, "The
Music Master," was directed by Allan
Dwan, and is a revival of the Belasco
play which was famous twenty years
ago.
In his long career on both stage
and screen Alec Francis has played
only two "heavy" roles. His face is
too kind, and his manner too gentle
for a convincing villain. He has always been much ln demand for clergyman parts, and has been, at one time
or another, the screen father to almost every well known actress on
the screen. His screen daughter in
"The Music Master," which Is to be
shown at the Gaiety Theatre this Friday and Saturday, is the winsome
Lois Moran. Nell Hamilton plays the
part of the lover and Norman Trevor
is In the role of the "heavy."
"THE THIRD DEGREE"
"The Third Degree," the Warner
Bros, production, starring Dolores
Costello, which comes to the Gaiety
Theatre next Friday and Saturday, is
as gripping a police melodrama as its
name suggests.
"The Third Degree!" Words that
carry a connotation of horror and
miserable injustlse; nagging, bullying, brow-boating, torture, forced
confession: tho modern version of
Inquisitions.
Happily, tllc "third degree" In this
country has. to a large extent, given
way to more scientific, less painful,
and Infinitely more accurate methods
in police departments. Bewildered
prisoners no longer writhe on a stooi
of agony, a blinding light flooding
their weary eyes, with harsh voices
in tho darkness beyond threatening,
cajoling, insisting, demanding, questioning them until their senses reel
and the earth seems to be staggering
crazlly through trackless space. Thoy
are no longer Blnpped awake or
roughly shaken hy manicured paws
,out of the darkness, tempted with
food, with drink, tempted with promises of freedom nnd leniency and rest
to confess a terrible crime of whicli
they are guiltless.
Woven around this barbarous institution, with the gay background of
a circus, "The Third Degree," reveals
In a startllngly realistic manner the
endless romance, adventure, sacrifice
and heartbreak for which It has been
responsible.
CHE Inn her heart to bim
13 whan he won the great college 1'uotball game! Scenes
never equaled for screen thrills!
A stirring story of youth and
romance you'll lovel
with
JACK PICKFORD
MARY BRIAN
MARY ALDEN
FRANCI9 X.
BUSHMAN, JR.
and
WILLIAM HAINIiS
Tuesday
May 3rd
••MHBIfilEia^^
• A whirlwind
film drama
of strife
and
romance
inside the
walls of a
great university
also
chapter 8
of The
Silent Flyer
Wednesday-Thursday, May 4-5
SPECIAL ADDED ATTRACTION
Captain George Ash
(In Person)
WORLD FAMOUS SOLDIER, COWBOY, AUTHOR
Marvellous feats of sharp-shooting and rope-spinning.
Nothing like this has been seen here before.
EHEH'S''^^
Friday and
Saturday
May 6 - 7
5gaaBH^Mar(3iai3iBEia/aEMai3
Under the glare of a merciless
spotlight, young Jeffries sat
i'or forty-eight hours, while
relays of detectives pounded
into his consciousness the belief that he had killed Underwood. They kept flashing in
front of him the pistol with
which the murder had been
committed, the victim's clothing, a replica of the dead
man's face. At length,
battered, bruised and bleeding
the innocent youth cried out,
"I killed him! I killed liim!"
—"The Third Degree."
You can't afford
to miss it!
Costello
U'lth.:    ..
Louise Dresser
Rockli lie Fell owes
'   Jason Robartis
TirtitM k
,,-i   .* .NiCHttir'eil'A.T/z  -:■;
■WARNI.iriU',09 P5%)l*ll.!(->W FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 1927.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
ft
News of Courtenay and District
OLD RATEPAYERS'
ASSOCIATION REVIVED
COURTENAY, April 26.—The old
ratepayers aasoeiation revived on
Monday night when a meeting was
called ln the Agricultural small hall
to discuss the by-laws coming before
the citizens in the form of plebescites.
Mr. Alex. Cleland was elected chairman, which position he tilled efficiently. The proposed by-laws which
would make it possible to erect the
new high school buildnlg on Warren
Avenue: were approved of by the meeting, as were the measures that will
enable the city to carry out the construction of the new pole line from
the Canadian Collieries power plant,
tbe Installation of ne wtransformers.
etc. The by-law which would authorize the construction of cement sidewalks on each side of Union street
tor two blocks ln the business section
was left ln abeyance as no delluite
recommendation was made for or
agalnst this proposed permanent improvement. The meeting freely discussed the several proposed measures
and adjourned at eleven o'clock.
GENERAL STORE AT
UNION BAY FALLS
PREY TO FLAMES
An outbreak of fire took place at
Union Bay about 12 o'clock last Monday night, when the premises occupied
and owned by Messrs. Dale and Reid
as a general store, burned to the
ground, becoming a total loss. In
spite of all efforts the Are spread to
the neighboring Willis Hotel and this
-was badly damaged. The prompt arrival of the Courtenay Fire Brigade
which came on the scene just as the
Canadian Collieries hose was being
connected, saved the hotel from being
completely gutted. No one was on
the premises when the fire was observed In the Btore.
Dale and Reld's loss was practically
covered by Insurance, but Mrs. I. C.
Willis, owner of the Willis Hotel, had
no Insurance, lt Is stated.
PUBLIC MEETING
HEARD ALDERMEN
ON IMPROVEMENTS
(Continued (rom Page One)
was a fine advertisement, but it woulti
not do to stagnate in order to keep
the rate down. It waa better to loo*
ahead. The electric light and powei
system was represented as being
worth $65,000, whereas in reality it
was probably worth nearer $-uu,uuu
and would show a good rate ot interest at that valuation. Regarding the
richool by-law, Aid. Pearse said the
ratepayers had got to recognize that
the fact that a new school had to be
iupplietl. He considered that the city
was getting out of the problem very
well, thanks to the efforts of the
mayor and others, the Government
putting up $10,000 towards the cost,
if the citizens of Courtenay did not
take advantage of this offer now it
might not be repeated. Aid. Pearse
thought the time for the construction
jf cement walks had hardly arrived.
Luck of Progress Manifested
Mayor McKenzie gave a resume of
he progress of the city during tin.
.ast two years. He said It was quit*,
tecessary for the electric by-laws to
ie passed as the system was at pres
2nt loaded to capacity. School maters had taken up a good deal of time,
lecessltating trips to Victoria. Hc
described how eleven classes in the
present 8-roomed school caused overcrowding, which resulted in an unhealthy state of affairs. The city, lit
explained, really had no option In the
matter, but had to provide the school.
He made a special plea for the construction of the small cement side-
watts programme. He could not
understand the lack of progress manifested by some. The proposed 1300
feet of cement sidewalk would certainly not hurt the town financially,
and would be the commencement of
sood walks. He paid a high tribute
to Aid. Douglas and considered the
citizens were fortunate in having such
m energetic chairman of the public
works.
Several questions were asked by
tho ratepayers. Mr. Heber Cooke
asked If it was possible to lay thc
cement sidewalks over a new fill, Mr.
J. H. Macintyre hoped that the matter of ventilation would be considered
in the new school building.
t CAMPBELL RIVER NEWS [
:■ a
Messrs. Peter and Herbert Barclay
returned to school Tuesday, after
spending the holidays here.
Mr. L. C. Waddington was a visitor
here during the Easter holidays.
Mrs. H, 'Furnlss returned recently
from a short visit to Nanaimo.
Mr. and Mrs. E. Plsto are receiving
congratulations on tlie birth of a son.
Air. James Cross paid a short visit
here on his way to Buttle Lake.
Mrs. D. McDonald and son Leslie
were visitors here during the Easter
holidays.
Mr. and Mrs. Ramsay and sons returned to Victoria on Saturday last.
Mr. and Mrs. R. Yeatman of Go-wand Harbor were visitors here on
Thursday.
Mrs.  Mort  arrived  Saturday from
Archie Dick, Comox District's representative ln the forthcoming oratorical contest, was heard by a large
crowd between shows at the llo-Ilo
theatre last Saturday evening. Archie
has a pleasing style of delivery, his
enunciation is very good, and certainly be does not suffer from nervousness. From his ten-minute address
we learned many things about our
native land of which we had hitherto
been singularly Ignorant.
1 EL SAUNDERS
§jj UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
m It pays to have yeur shoes repaired as they wear
gj longer after repairing than when new.
s| I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
as Service at—
j| THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
=*** Note address—                  Opposite the Drug Store.
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B. C.
New Westminster and wlll reside at
Campbelton.
Mr. and Mrs. Lanshlre and family,
of Vancouver, are living in the Strathcona Apartments.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cross, of the
Campbell River Trading, are at present visiting at Vancouver.
Mrs. W. A. Richardson and son, of
Nelson, are at present guests of Dr.
W. A. Richardson.
Miss E. McQuillan, of Vancouver,
was a guest of Mr. and Mrs. Robert
McCualg during Easter week-end.
Mrs. V. Palmer left Tuesday for a
short visit to Vancouver.
Mr. Cecil Fitzgerald and Dr. Watson, of the Columbia Coast Mission
boat, paid a short visit here Saturday.
Mrs. C. H. Fitzgerald entertained a
tew friends Saturday evening and a
most enjoyable time was had.
Miss Mayne Feeney returned from
her home here on Sunday.
UsedTruck Bargains
For Sale Cheap—One almost
new G.M.C. Truck, li/2 to 2
tons. t Pneumatic Tires. First
class condition.
Also one slightly used G.M.C.
Truck 2i/o to 3 tons. Pneumatic tires.   Good condition.
EASY TERMS
may be arranged on both of the
above and for full particulars
apply to
Blunt & Passie, Ltd.
Phone 61
Courtenay,  B.C.
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladies' hair cut, any style 50c
Children's hair cut any style 35c
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Av*.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS    I
SPECIALLY CATERED TOI
Our Motto:
"QUALITY  AND  SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
AUTO LIMERICKS
Have you heard of Nathaniel New—
And the story of how his wealth grew?
He never was rash
When spending his cash
If Nathan can save, so can you.
BUY WITH CARE
Buy a rebuilt car of auto
folks who know cars. We
are auto-experts who have
a reputation for fair dealing. Here you can buy a
good car at a bargain. Our
guarantee' means safety
for your money.
Blunt & Passie, Ltd.
USED AND THOROUGHLY REBUILT CARS
P. O. Box 190 Telephone 61
ten t\ tr*iri*r<e-«-i>!a*^i^^
s*a=
Canadian National
EUROPEAN
EDUCATIONAL
TOURS
PER
0    N    A    I   I.    V
CONDUCTED
SAIL FROM MONTREAL, JULY 8, OJf THE
S.S.   "ANDANIA"   DIRECT   TO   GU8G0W
37-DAY TOUR
On Sea and Land
$372.
CA   CHEST BRITAIN
""  Prance,   Belgium
SWITZERLAND
All expense Montreal to Great
Britain and tho Continent and
return to Montreal.
51-DAY TOUR
On Sea and Land
nn GRBHT   BRITAIN
""   Prance. Belgium
Switzerland,  Italy
All expense Montreal to Great
Britain and the Continent and
return to Montreal.
$501.
Cost of Tour Number One from Victoria or
Nanaimo to Europe and Return, exclusive ol
meals and sleepers en routo between Victoria
or Nanaimo and Montreal, Is $510.95. Tour
Number Two wlll cost $039.45.
EDWARD W. RICKI.E
Cumberland, B. C. Telephone 35
Or Write C. P. Earle, D.P.A., Victoria, B.C.
Cumberland Supply—
The Cash Store
Rickson's Old Stand Dunsmuir Avenue
Our new system of Cash, and lowest possible Prices
has been a huge success.    We are giving you flrst
class Goods, at a cost that will save you money.   Come
in and try us.
 LOOK THESE PRICES OVER	
Sesqui Matches, per package    40c
4-oz Toilet Paper, 6 rolls lor   25c
Keliogg's Corn Flakes, 4 for  45c
Quaker Corn Flakes, per package  1  12c
Sugar-Crisp Corn Flakes, per pkg  12c
Quick* Quaker (China) Oats, per pkg  43c
Rye Krisp, per package   39c
Red Arrow Soda Biscuits, per pkg  23c
Brunswick Sardines, per tin     9c
Heinz Tomato Soup, small, 2 for  23c
Heinz Pork and Beans, flats, 2 for   23c
St. Charles and Carnation Milk (tails) per can... 12c
St. Charles and Carnation Milk (baby) 3 for  20c
Sunlight Soap, per package   25c
Ammonia, quart bottles   19c
Rinso (large) per package   28c
White Swan Soap, 6 for   25c
Post Bran Flakes, per package  17e
Del Monte Fruit Salads, 35c and   45c
Del Monte Yellow Cling Peaches, 2s,   30c
Del Monte Sliced Pineapple, 2s,   30c
Del Monte Apricots, 2s,   30c
Del Monte Crushed Pineapple, 2 for 35c and  30c
Blue* Ribbon Coffee, per tb tin   70c
Fresh Ground Coffee, per Ib   55c
*~*MM»*""M:--:i":o3C*iC8^
THE CUMBERLAND SUPPLY—THE CASH STORE
Telephone 155
WASHER
It's Wringerless
It
Phone for a demonstration in your home.
For sale on easy terms b.-i>
»     Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each .%
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN" %
This is a '/j-in. valve for use on domestic hot water IS
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused By
by ranges and tank heaters. fe
APPROVED '■■!
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Un- W,
derwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Muni- W
cipal Bureaus of Waer and Boiler Inspection. ffi
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO. If
Limited. ;-**■:
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director. i[
PPJ*3pp|o^^
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND Phone 150
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description    W$
At Reasonable Prices
Orders left with Mr. Potter at the Jay-Jay Cafe will
receive prompt attention.
I PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDEB, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY. APRIL 29, 1927.
A PRIVATE LETTER
Dear Mary:
Since you left yesterday I have been on the lookout
for something smart in a new frock, and Edith, who
was over at our home last night, mentioned the fact
that Sutherland had a lot of new and chic Dresses
which he had just received by Express from Montreal,
and from which I would no doubt be able to get something to meet my requirements. So on Friday evening
I wound my way over to Sutherland's, and sure enough
there was a splendid assortment of Dresses in the
many new styles, from which 1 had no difficulty in
securing just what 1 wanted, knowing as you do, that
I did not wish to pay a lot for a Frock, as I wanted
something that was smart as well as reasonable in
price, and when you see me next you will be able to
judge my taste. 1 am sure you will be surprised to
know that I was able to get a really nice Frock for
$12.95, and 1 might mention that he had a good assortment of Dresses in sizes from 10 to 40, that should
meet the taste as well as the purse of anyone needing
a New Dress. The colors were very good, especially
the blending of the new colorings; you would be surprised to see how smart they were. If you want a
smart Tailored Dress i'or the summer in white, you
should come over and see a few of the new ones, made
of real heavy silk, and beautifully tailored, at $12.50
and $15.00. For a little Dance Frock I saw quite an
array of smart styles and all about $10.00 to $15.00
each.
In Silk Hose too, he sure seemed to be able to match
any color, and the great array of colors shown at $1,00
a pair were a revelation to me. The Circle Bar line
with the pointed heel at $1.50, made pf pure silk, is
certainly a good line and can be recommended for
wear.
Expecting to see you over soon, when I will go
around to Sutherland's and have a look over some of
those Dresses with you, as well as some of the Novelties always on view there.
Your sincere friend,
Ethel.
f
Personal Mention
••--I*-
gpppppp
HONORED ON EVE
OF DEPARTURE FOR
On   Ilic  eve   of  her departure,   Mra.
Williams  was  honored  at a  supriso
pany held at the home o£ Mr. and
VISIT TO OLD LAND 1Mrs. J. Williams.   Singing, cards and
  games  rounded  out a very pleasant
Mr. "Watty" Williams returned to I evening, and during the course of the
Cumberland on Sunday last after! festivities a halt was called, when
accompanying Mrs. Williams as far j Mrs. D. Morgan, on behalf ot the
as Vancouver, from where she took local Welsh Society, presented Mrs.
the trans-continental on the lirst part! Williams with a handsome leather
of a long trip to England and Wales.j handbag.
DEAFNESS, Head -Noises Catarrh.
Simple treatments which gave permanent relief gladly explained free
to uny sufferer writing Henry
Thomas, Andrew's Road, Deal, Kent,
England. It
Amongst those present were noticed
Mr. and Mrs. 0. Morgan, Mr. and Mrs.
II. Jackson. Mr. and Mrs. J. Davis.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Williams, Mr. anil
Mrs. K. Coe, Mr. Owen Roberta and
Mesdames Jones, McMillan, T. Williams, J. Lewis and S. Williams.
SYNOPSIS Qt
LANDACTAMENDMENTS
1'KE-E.timO.NS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lauds may be pre-empted by
llritish subjects over ls yeurs ot age,
aud by aliens on declaring intention
to become llritish subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and Improvement for agricultural
purposes.
lull lutoruiatiun concerning regulations regarding 1're-emplions is
giveu iu bulletin .No. 1, Laud Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land,' copies of
which can be obtained tree uf charge
by addressing thu Uepui'luicul uf
Lauds, Victoria, U.C, or to uny Uov-
eriiment Agent.
llecorda will be granted covering
only laud suitable lur agricultural
purposes, and which is not tiwuer-
laiid, i.e., carrying over S.uuo board
feet per acre west uf fbe Coast Hauge
and s.ouu feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications tor pre-emptions are
lo be uddiessud to tne Laud Commissioner uf the Laud Recording Division, in which the land applied for
is situated, ami ure uiuUe uu printed
forms, cuples ut which cau ue ob- ,
tamed from the Laud Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for j
live yeurs and improvements made
to value uf $11) per acre, including
cleariug and cultivating ut least live
acres, before a crown Cram can be
received.
for more detailed luturmation see
the Uulletin "How lo Pre-empt
Laud."
PURCHASE
Applications are  received  for purchase    uf    vacant    und    unreserved
-k-twii   lauds,  nut   being   tiiuberlund,
kr agricultural purposes;  minimum
price of lirst-cluss (arable) land is $i
per acre, and second class  (grazing)
land  ViM  per acre.   Further  infor- j
mation   regarding  purchase  or  lease 1
ot Crown lauds in given in  Uullut'u j
No.   10,  Land  Series, "Purchase  aud
Lease of Crown Lands.*'
Mill, factory, or industrial sites ou '
timber laud, not exceeding 10 acres,;
may be purchased or leased, the cou-!
dutons      Including      paymint      of
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD  LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20 ,
asres,  may   be   leased  as  homesites,
conditional   upon   a   dwelling   being
erected In the lirst year, title being
obtained   alter   residence   and   im-
proveinent. conditions are tulllllcd nnd
land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For   grazing   and   industrial   pur-,
poses areas not exceeding 010 acres!
may be  leased  by one  person  or a ]
* company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province ls divided Into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing      Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free
permits are available
campers and
bead.
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. McCulloch left
Wednesday last to take up their
residence in Vancouver. Mr. McCulloch having been transferred to th'.*
Customs service in the terminal city.
At a recent meeting of the N'stnaimo
city council, it was decided to ask for
a vote on the New Hospital By-law
on May 7th.
Mrs. Mary Brown paid a short visit
to Nanaimo during the week.
* *   a>
Mrs. E. R. Hicks returned Saturday
last from a week's holiday spent ln
Vancouver.
• •   *
Mr. and Mrs. W. Prior and family
spent a portion of Easter holidays in
Port Alberni.
* #   •
Mr. Lewis, of Vancouver, was a
business visitor to Cumberland on
Thursday last.
...
Mr. and Mrs. Ceo. J. Richardson
motored to Nanaimo on Saturday last,
returning Sunday.
...
Mrs. Robert Hornal, of Courtenay,
Is a guest of Mr, and Mrs. G. Richardson, Fourth street.
...
Miss T. A. Calllvan returned to the
city on Saturday after spending the
Easter week in Vancouver*
...
Mrs. G. K. MacNaughton and Miss
Jean MacNaughton returned Saturday
from a visit to Vancouver.
* •   •
Mrs. Erin Stewart and Mrs. Andrew
Stewart left Monday for Nanaimo,
where they will reside in future.
• *   *
Mr. and Mrs. James Dick and son
Archie left this evening by motor for
Victoria.   They  will  return  Sunday.
• *   *
Miss Mary Picketti has returned
from a week's visit to Vancouver and
Seattle and other Sound cities during
tlle Easter holidays.
• *   *
Ben   H.   Gowen,   of   Vancouver,   a
former member of the staff of the
Cumberland Islander, was a visitor to
Cumberland last week-end.
* *   *
Lt.-Col. Chas. W. Villiers, General
Manager Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd., motored to Cumberland
from Victoria on Sunday last.
...
Mr. and Mrs. H. Warren Cooper and
Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. Bickle were
visitors to Victoria during the week,
returning to Cumberland on Tuesday.
Mr. W. (Billy) Milligan, of Regina,
a former playing member of the famous Cumberland United football
team, is a visitor in town prior to
leaving for New Zealand as a member
of the All-Canada football team which
is scheduled to leave Vancouver on
the fourth of next month.
• •   *
Mrs. J. T. Brown and family, after
spending the past ten days in Cumberland the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Jas.'
Smith, returned to their home in Van-1
couver on Tuesday last.
... I
Mr. John C. Brown motored to.Victoria on Saturday last. He returned
the following day, accompanied by
Mrs. Brown and the Misses Edith and
Etta Hood.
* •   •
Miss Florence Landry, of the nursing staff of tho Cumberland Hospital,
returned Wednesday from Victoria
where she spent a live days' visit.
Miss Louise Plronl, who has been
tlle guest of Miss Mary Picketti for
the past week, returned to her home
In  Vancouver Thursday morning.
EXCHANGE PULPITS FOR
SUNDAY NIGHT SERVICE
WhiteTeeth,Healthy Gums,
a Clean Mouth
THAT la what you should seek In a
dentifrice. And it is easily found,
If you will care for your teeth raijularly
with Klenzo Dental Creme. And the
delightful after-taste of Klenzo—that
Cool, Clean, Klenzo Feeling-Is satisfying evidence 'it the good it does.
Sup ia and (tt a tube today.
Rev. W. A. Alexander, B.A., of St.
George's United Church, Courtenay,
will preach in Cumberland United
Church on Sunday evening, May 1st, I \&
at 7 p.m. Rev. John R. Hewitt, local | Jj
pastor, will take tlle place of Rev.
Alexander at Courtenay oi*. the same
occasion.
SAVE YOUR CASH DISCOUNT BONDS
ISSUED ONLY AT THIS STORE
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It Pays to Deal at Lane's"
ua*HMBa,3w**,Ba50oaj«Hniaa3a^
Miss Till, home economics instructor for tlle local schools, returned to
Cumberland on Sunday last after
visiting In Vancouver and Powell
River.
*    *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Brown, of Union
Bay, have purchased the house on
Pendrlth Avenue, formerly the property of Mr. J. A. McCulloch. Mr. and
Mrs. Brown will make their future
home In Cumberland.
...
Jlr. Alfred Maxwell returned from
Vancouver on Monday last.
UNION   HOTEL
Cumberland! B. C.
First-class throughout
Excellent Cuisine
Electrically Heated
Phone 15 Phone 15
DINING ROOM
Our Dining Room offers good food,
good  service,  reasonable  charges.
King George Hotel
faMSEEIBIBEiaiSIBI
^lV!:'",*'*!'*'",-*l'',"/l=o*'l".-v*i,-IJi.>l'V*'le,ds
7^' ... ■':;."- '\*- -T" •7777-JJM/3l^SKisSi
SATURDAY SPECIALS
MEAT PIES — ASSORTED PASTRY
TEA BUNS
APPLE, LEMON AND RAISIN PIES
Marocchi Bros.
Phone 11 Cumberlan
Try our Cracked Wheat Loaf
ON THE TABLE
TH* B-H Dealer everywhere la
tha on* palm man who ean taU
you all you ought to know about
tha palm you buy. Ho lays tha
cards right on lha table. 70JO-
ha says _ an unbeatable hand.
90-jo Is tho karat aaark on paint-.
It maans 70 parts of Puro Wblto
Laad* and so parts ol Puro Wblto
Zlne. B-H "English" Paint carries
tha 70-jo mark with our guar*
antra behind It.
Tha B-H Dealer will tall you how
to use thla puro paint to gat tha
best results lor the least money.
To bank hla experience he haa,
the co-operation and support ol
uorutar'nmiy Brandram • Henderson expert*.
Myu"* The low cost ot palming with pure
palm will amaxa you.
MBBAMEBAMMSNSSHtfiM
■Uaarn el WtriH Iwt-Mw-faHl^   fenwrs
'English' PAINT   e^5^
1*7071 ^IIEBE««twnirill«™«ail»reihtWh.MP^mtnt»*~atl»dftB'»
I ' V* *   OtMfatt B B. Whit Uad tnd h"nch Pious* Pur* Otid« at
Tip wi"*' ■■'-"■«■    Comliintd *" lh* U"' p",f»rt-°" <"* 7° '• 3°.i •"lio*
7™* of ittst ittrnnh is fcftnfd, ptodutin| ■ Paial Film -ti tht umtM
K XT'I 1"J"'c "I1""' l:,d "■",'">t*' ,0 *«'h" «™J **•**■
ississi „
WHITE. BLACK AND 35 POPULAR COLORS
•Bwidrom'i
Genuine ll B
While Uad.
in} tht
■iaavJagiBasaaiifflffl::
1 A FINE WHISKY COCKTAIL
CAN BE MADE ONLY WITH
FINE WHISKY
THE BEST WHISKY COCKTAILS
ARE   MADE   WITH
^Whisky
SEND FOR OUR COCKTAIL BOOKLET
HIRAM WALKER » SONS LIMITED, WALKERVILLE, ONTARIO
[mm&Mi
This advertisement is not published or displayed by, the
l.fminr Control Hoard nr by the Government of British Columbia.
■/■T^"
m&
FOKEST    F I IV E
&
for   settlers,
travellers,   up   to   tep I
For Sale by
Alex. MacKinnon
Wm. H. McLellan, Jr.
3br Sixty If ears
THE FORESThas played a major part in Canada's development The stability
of our forest industries is threatened by forest fires which have destroyed five
times the quantity of timber used. Carelessness with fire in the woods has
been mainly responsible. Will YOU help to stop thit wanton waste and
ensure Canada's continuing prosperity?
CHARLES STEWART
Minister of the Inttrior
Save%rl0iests
Canadian Forest Week, April 24th to 30th, 1927

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