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The Cumberland Islander Dec 29, 1923

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Full Text

 Provincial Library     Jdnili
■A
1-ttJi CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
FORTY-SECOND YEAR—No.
Wit* wklek k em
tbe Cumberland Mews.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 102::.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Successful Concert
Given By Royston
School Children
A very successful concert was given
by the Royston school children which
was thoroughly enjoyed by the parents and many visitors.
The program was varied, consisting |
of songs, dances, recitations, sketches j
and piano selections.
Among the laughter-making Items
was one causing much merriment:
The Visit of Ihe ten Niggers." Hibbert
McLeod's violin playing showed wonderful control over his instrument,
nnd one feels confident, from the talent displayed that evening, that u
Junior Orchestra could be formed at
Royston tit no very distant date, or
maybe even an amateur theatrical
society.
Much of the pleasure of the evening wns contributed by the musical
Items on the piano and drums given
by Mrs. Morton and Mr. Audrey Morton.
After the program Santa surprised
everyone by a kindly visit and proved
very generous in his distribution of
bags of candy, nuts, apples and oranges, and presents of many kinds,
besides 'tis said he even remembered
some ot the bachelors.
When Mr. Dalby. who had kind'.y
consented lo act as chairman of thc
meeting, had called the audience to
order agilu, a vote of appreciation
of Mrs. Kelly's work was moved by
Mr. Slllence and seconded by Major
Hilton.
Mrs. Kelly then thanked the trustees
and parents of the pupils and many
friends throughout the district for
their co-operation and help ln making the evening a pleasant one for the
children, after which the singing cf
the National Anthem brought the
meeting to a close.
"THE RAMBLING KID"
Report Of The
Cumberland
High School
islanding  of   Pupils  (or  Months   of
November mid December
IDS!)
The Prescott Rodeo, the nationally
famous Institution of the modern West
to which cowboys from every stute
come to compete, was the background
for Hoot Gibson's latest Universal
Special Production "The Rambling
Kid," which wlll be at the Ilo-llo
Theatre on Friday and Saturday.
Hoot plays the intrepid cowboy of the
famous novel by Earl Wayland Bowman, who captures an outlaw wild
horse In the hills, entering her ln the
big rodeo.
Thrilling feats of horsemanship
mark every step of the swift-moving
play. Bulldogging and other events
in the big rodeo are used for background In the Btory. The race scene
at the rodeo track, is one of the most
thrilling ever  filmed.
Cumberland Public School
CITY   COUNCIL  MEETING
CRITICS ACCLAIM TOM
MIX AS COMEDIAN IN
NEW FOX PRODUCTION
Tom Mix scores one of the biggest
hits of his Bcreen career In his new
William Fox offering, "Soft Boiled.'
which comes to the Ilo-llo Theatre on
Monday and Tuesday for a 2-day run.
"ThlB ls the best picture Tom Mix
has ever made," enthuses a New York
critic.
"It has everything—fast action,
thrills, romance, pretty girls, fun, and
attractive settings. As for the star,
he shows that he is a real comedian
in addition to being a stunt actor par
excellent."
"Soft Boiled Is really Tom's official
bow as a comedian. Dressed in a
checker suit that isn't too modest to
shriek tor itself, with tortoise glasses,
and a hat balancing periously atop his
head, Tom proves he's 'soft boiled' by
getting a job as a shoe clerk. Then
the tun and the action race along in
full force and he doesn't slacken for
a moment until the final happy close-
up .
"ME AND MY GAL"
Belt? BalfMr, Star Ib English Helve
Highly Praised
Normal Entrance and Junior Matriculation maximum mark, sou.
Margaret McNaughton, Florence
Jones, Fanny Strachan, Edward
Hughes, Howard Carey, Malcolm
Stewart, Keith McLean.
Two pupils In the above class were
unavoidably absent from the examin
ntlnns.
Second Year
Maximum mark !)l)0.
Sushi KaJIJ ama. Sadie Brown, Edward  Bickle,  Nellie  Potter, Chrissie
Sutherland,    Nora Olen,   Some Abe,
Owenneth Emily, Henry Watson.
Preliminary or First Year
Maximum mark 900.
Edna Gear, Soshlko Iwasa, Mary
Walker, OrOBtl Frelone, Jessie McKee,
Edith O'Brien, Willie Brown, Margaret Robinson, liable Joncs.Charlle Bobba, Irene Jones, Arnold McDonald,
Jessie Balrd. Vera Picketti, Robert
Watt, Ella Burns, Albert Gomm,
George Brown, Beth Horbury, Jessie
Brown, Josephine Bono, Marjorie
Grant, Jack Richardson, Leslie Merrilleld, Leland Harrison, Norman Robinson.
"Me and My Gal'' Is the politest bit
of old London humor we have had
here for some time. "Squibs" is a
delight. They say In Loudon thnt
Betty Balfour is ousting Mary Pick-
ford for first place in the hearts of
screen followers. She has a piquant
little face and takes readily to character work.
The piece, which reels with the love
of the little flower girl ("Squibs") for
the London "Bobby," has mostly
slum scenes, but there is a bit of country and Squibs' attempts at cycling
and roller skating are very funny. It
has a touch of pathos, too and the text
is very human.
Not the least appreciated were the
familiar views of old London. "There's
Piccadilly—just like It really Is," you
hear someone say, and the tower of
London and the Zoo and other well
known spots are also seen. "Me and
My Gal" comes to the Ilo-llo Theatre
Friday and Saturday.
INSTALLATION BALL
MARKED SUCCESS
llecemfter Report
Number Present (measles)   430
Total  attendance    6738.G
Percentage attendance       88.9
Lates     XI
Perfect attendance  243
The attendance shield goes to Div.
VI. (Miss Aspesl) with an attendance
of 94.8 per cent.
Albert H. Webb, Supervising Prln.
Dlvhloi I
Etrance 32; perfect attendance 90.1
Lates 1.
Perfect attendance—Isao Abe, Irene
Bates, Evelyn Carey, Mary Conn, Law-
He Dhnde, Archie Dick, Norman
Gomm, Jessie Graut, Beryl Hudson,
May Hughes, Tom Little, Alastalr
MacKinnon, Jean MacNaughton .Helen
Parnham, Kate Robertson, John
Strachan, May Taylor, Robert Yates,
Honor Cards—Helen Parnham,
Kate Robertson, Jessie Grant, Irene
Bates, May Hughes, John Strachan.
For Progress—Robert Yates.
G. E. Apps, Teacher.
Division il
Average attendance 94.18 per cent
Class Leaders—Sam Davis, Andrew
Walker,   F.   Leversedge,   T.   Iwasa,
Yuen Low, Wm, Devoy.
Perfect Attendance—Norman Bateman, Peter Bardessono, Ella Conn,
Sam Davis, Wm. Devoy, Chas. Franc-
iola, John Horbury, Tatsumi Iwasa,
Yuen Low, Low Man, Dorothy Maxwell, George McLellan, Ruth Oyama,
Margaret Richardson, Marguerite
Struthers, Chas, Tobacco, Chas. Walker.
H. E. Murray, Teacher.
Division III
Number of roll for month 37, Percentage 91.09, Number of lates 1.      *
Perfect attendance—Sadakl Asao,
Tsuneto Asao, Eleanor Bergland,
Annie Beveridge, Lena Bogo, Victor
Bono, Andrew Brown, Edna Cawdell,
Mary Clark, Edna Conrad, Harold
Conrad, Eleanor Davis, Tadashl Dol,
Joseph Ducca, Kathleen Emily, Nobui
Hayashl, Low How, Margaret Hughes
Shlger Kawaguckl, Annie Mann Richard Marpole, Sarah Oyamaf, Norman
Parnham, Emma Picketti, Margaret
Shearer, Tusae Sugimorl John Sween
ey, Isabel Yarrow, John Auditor
lonie.
Honor roll—Annie Mann, Low How,
Harold Conrad, Isabel Yarrow, Norman Parnham, Lily Leversedge.
M. Tessie A. Oallivan, Teacher.
Division IV
Number on roll 37, Ateudance 93 90
per cent., Lates 5.
Perfect attendance—BUI Bergland,
Fred Cawdell, Robert Collins, Edna
Davis, Reggie Ravis, ladoa Dol, Norman Frelone, Ella Johnston, Jean
Johnston, Klshio Kaga, Norah Wallace, Sarah Lawrence, Low Long,
Lena Merlettl, Peter Mossey, Alex.
MacDonald, Charles MacDonald, Bert.
McLellan, Mary Sweeney, Willie
Thompson, Annie Walker, Sahayj
Sugimorl.
Honor roll—Edna Davis, Norman
Frelone, Fred Cawdell, ladoa Wallace,
Jean Johnston.
Marjorie Mordy, Teacher
DRAWING TAKES PLACE
ON SATURDAY NIGHT
The winning numbers for the prizes
being raffled by the Rangers' Football
Club ,will be drawn for at the end of
thc first show Saturday night, December 29th.
USUAL RATES
The Installation Ball of the Masonic
Lodge No, 26 A.F.&A.M., which was
held In the Ilo-llo dance ball Thursday night ,was a marked success from
every standpoint. The decorations,
which were iu the lodge colors, blui
and gold, Interspered with Masonic
emblems, were magnificent and the
decoration committee, under the
chairmanship of Wor. Bro. T. II. Carey
is to be congratulated for their splendid work. The refreshments were all
that could be desired as was the music
which was supplied by Plump's Orchestra.
Division VII
Number ou roll 38, Percentage sii.d.
LateB 3.
Perfect attendance—May Beveridge,
Albert Cooper, Edith Cavallero,
Quong Chong, John Cboe, Cyril Davis,
Alden Francescini, Donald Graham,
John Hoffelnz. Cainko Iwasa, Takeru
Kawagauchl, Low Hong, Hatsne Matsukura, Secona Merlettl, Hugh Mac-
Nell Tokla Nakano, Hlsako Vukuno.
Willie Sweeney.
Houor roll, Grade IV Sr.—Nina
Shields, Catherine Brown, Hisakl Nakano, Audrey Povah. Progress-
Qunlce MacKinnon, Quong Chong.
E. Horbury, Teacher.
Division VIII
Number on roll 36, Percentage 89,
LateB 4.
Perfect attendance—John Burgheimer, Chow Chee, Temho Dol, Alfred Jones, Lloyd Kimoto, Jennie
Lawrence, Choo Foo Lung, Mary MacMillan, Robert Marshal, Ellen Morrison, Bennie Nicholas, Hiroshi Ohuda,
Masalu Sora, Bernice Stant, Malta
Tomassi, Joe Whyley, Audrey Gear.
Orade Junior IV Rd. Honor roll-
Jennie Lawrence, Mah Duch Lung,
Hiroshl Ohuda, Muriel Harrison, Mn-
ulbrn Tahara. Audrey Gear, progress.
I. McFadyen, Teacher.
Division IX
Number on roll 35, Percentage 83.7.
Lates 4.
Perfect attendance—Klyoko Abe,
John Bannerman, Enis Bonora, William Brown, Annie Cheug, May Graham, Willie Graham, Mary Hassell,
Harvey Hurd, Shlgeura Kujona, Clyde
Lewis May Mah, David Marshall,
Jackie-Marpole, Jessie Robb, Bryson
Parnham, William Slaughter, Cheyako
Suglmorl, Jackie Wong.
Grade Junior Third Reader. Number in each grade 35. Honor roll—
Chrissie Robertson, Annie Cheung.
Mary Hassell, Audrey Hamilton, Bry-
soa Paiiiham und Fung Him equal.
Jackie Marpole, progress.
Division  X
Number on roll 32. Percentage 85.2.
Lates 2.
Perfect attendance—Akera Herosl,
David Hunden, Masake Kawagauchi,
Don Long, Willie Logan, Insugno Matsukura, Jackie Morrison, Lome Murdock, Heromitsu Salto. Alex Sommerville, Dong Sing, Echinro Shi, Edith
Taylor, Willie Tobacco.
Orade II A. Number ln grade 36.
Honor roll—Don Long, David Hunden, Willie Logan, Arthur Povah,
Akera Herosl and Masahe Kaga equal.
Improvement—Don Long and Masahe
Kaga.
C.  Corey, Teacher.
Division XI
Number on roll 28, Peccntage 86.6C.
Lates Nil.
Perfect attendance—Leland Bannor-
man, Peter Bono, Madge Bryan, Willie
Combs, Gertie Davis, Jean Dunsire,
Mitsuo Hayashl. Marguerite Larlgan,
Robert Logan, sheglma Marlya, Bruno
Merlettl, Mllsno Obara, Yaeko Obara,
Robert Walker, Rhoda Walton, Margaret Williams, Arthur Wong, Josie
Wong, Wong Ylng, Geogie Nunns.
Grade II 1st term.     Honor roll
Rhoda Walton,  Madge    Bryan    and
Josie Wong equal, Johnny Mali, Mar
garet Drummond, Georgie Nunns,
J. E. Robertson, Teacher
FIRST LECTURE
JANUARY 20TH.
Division V
Number on roil 33, Percentage 91.2!,
Lates 3.
Perfect attendance—Hugh Braes,
James Brown, Jean Brown, Robert
Burns, Beatrice Cavallero, Reta Devoy, Harriet Horbury, Sadako Iwasa,
Chiyeko Hajijama, Yoshlo Kawaguchl, Mildred Lockner, George Logan
Margaret McDonald, Kathleen O'Brien
Tasku Oyama, Hetoshl Suglmorl,
Mlnoru Tahara, Victor Tomassi,
Orade V Sr—Number ln grade, 33.iMalpass,  Margaret  Marpole
Honor     roll—Chiyeko    Kajlyama, Matsunaga,
Reta Devoy and James Brown equal,
Beatrice Cavallero, Harriet  Horbury
and Isabel Brown equal, Sadako Iwasa
Robert Brown, progress.
Annie R. Gatz, Teacher.
There wlll be no special tares an
Canadian railway lines for the British
Empire Exhibition to be held ln London, England, next year, according to
tin announcement made by Canadian
National passenger officials at Winnipeg. However, they pointed out that
the usuul low excursion rates from
points in Canada will prevail to Atlantic ports.
The Misses Edith and Etta Hood,
Beatrice Bickle and Christina MacKinnon returned home Saturday from
Normal School, Victoria, to spend the
holidays with fhelr parents.
The first lecture of the season ol
the St John Ambulance Association,
Cumberland Centre, wlll be held in
the First Aid Hall on Sunday, January
20, at 11 a.m.
AMERICAN   CONSULATE
The American Consul and
Mrs, Clinton will be
At Home
from 4 to 6 p.m.
New Year's Day.
Division VI
Number on roll 33, Percentage 94.8,
Lates 3.
Perfect attendance—Matsuyo Abe,
Andrew Bates, Annie Brown, Josie
Burghiner, John Comb, John Dalrs,
Leslie Farmer, Alven Frelone, Klmeyo
Kaga, Tom Mossey, Willie Mcintosh,
Jean McWhlrter, Bessie Nicholas, Low
Ping, Willie Shearer, Edward Stockand, George Strachan, Roslna Thompson, Tom Tobacco, Lena Tomassi,
Nellie Walker. Harry Westfleld.
Honor roll—Oswald Bold, Alven
Frelone, Jean McWhlrter, Thotnos
Robertson, Willie Mcintosh and Low
Ping     equal. Progress—Douglas
Balrd, Leslie Farmer.
Vivian Aspeay, Teacher.
Division XII
Number on roll 27, Percentage 82.78,
Lates Nil.
Perfect attendance—Alice Brown.
Jannney Mah, Rosle Mah, Elizabeth
Shizeo
Matsunaga, Ella McWhlrter, Kujoshi
Okuda, Jean Quinn, Wurdenu Thompson, Tommy Wong, Cheung Wong.
Orade Primary. Number In grade
24. Honor roll—Margaret Marpole.
Harry Mordy, Tommy Wong, Rosle
Mah, Cheung Wong and Alice Brown
equal, Klso Sora and Audrey DeCoeur
improvement.
Pearl  Hunden, Teacher.
Division XIII
Number on roll 36. Percentage 86,
Lates Nil.
Perfect attendance—Arnold Bonora
Cheung Ming, Jimmy Choe, Gee Doon,
Jackie Graham, Mltsuro Hlrose, Hiroshi Kawaguchl, Kehejl Klyonogn,
Stanley Lawrence, Tsuglmatsii Matsunaga, Tommy McMillan, Haruo Nakano, Mabel Sommerville, Dorothy
Sweeney, Quon Jack.
Honor roll—Haruo Nakano, Tommy
McMillan, Dorothy Haworth, Dovld
Davis Cheung Ming, Url Salto.
Eva G. Drader, Tenctie
The regular meeting of the City
Council took place Monday evening,
December 24th, in the Council Chambers with Mayor Parnham and Aldermen A. Maxwell, T. H. Mumford, J. J.
Potter ,J. Ledingham and F. Dallos
present. City Clerk Merry read the
minutes of the last meeting which
were adopted as read. The secretary of the U.M.VV. of A., wrote the
council authorizing It to act as trustees of the Union Hall until a local
representative Is appointed. Communications were nlso received from
F. Porter of Vancouver, notifying thut
he will commence his audit of the
City books as early as possible, and
from the "Western Guide" asking for
particulars of the Civic officers for
tlle city. An application was also received from V. Marlnelll for a club
license for the remainder of the year.
Since placing his original application
some three months ago he had spent
over 8500.00 on the improvement of
the premises to meet the requirements
of the License Inspector in order to
make the premises suitable as club
rooms. It was pointed out thnt
recent legislation had taken from Municipalities the power to issue club
licenses and that the license could
not be granted. The clerk was instructed to notify Mr. Marlnelll to tlut
effect.
Reports
Alderman Maxwell, chairman ot the
finance committee, reported   a bank
balance of $56,16.06  current account
and $58.06 saving account.
After paying all outstanding accounts, It Is anticipated that thc City
Council, for the first time since in corporation, will be In the happy position
of terminating their year of office
with all debts paid and a handsome
balance of some 15000.00 to hand over
to the Incoming council. The exact
figures cannot, of course, be given,
until the audit of the books is completed. The City's share of the Government Liquor profits and the
amount of 81289.33 from the Public
Works Dept., for expenditure ou Secondary highways for 1922, Is expected
to be received before the close of the
year.
The half-yearly report of the Medical officer of health was submitted ami
read as follows:
Dear Sirs;—
The following is the health report
for the last six months of the year
1923:
During the month of September, one
case of small pox developed in the
City. This cose developed through
being In contact with cases which
were prevalent at Union Bay at that
time. This case was quarantined and
all contact cases were vaccinated, and
as a result no further cases developed.
During the months of October, November and December, the City was
visited hy an epidemic or mcasels. So
far, 45 cases have developed within
the City limits. The epidemic Is now
on the wane and should be about over
by tiie time the school re-opens.
So far, no other contagious or Infectious descuses have occurred with,
in the City, but the presence of a few
cases of diphtheria at Puntledge
makes tt very probable that we may
have a few cases during the coming
winter months.
Sincerely yours,
(Signed)  E.  It.  Hicks.
Medical Health Officer
Bills und accounts    amounting    to
3858.26 were refcrrcil to the finance
committee ami If found correct, ordered puld.
It was moved by Alderman Maxwell
seconded by Alderman Mumford nnd
carried unanimously that the City
Council accord a vote of thanks
the Cumberland Electric Lighting Co..
for tlielr donation of a meter for the
electlc heating installation at the
city Arc hall.
The City Clerk, Mr. Albert J. Merry,
was appointed Returning Officer at
the forthcoming municipal election On
the 17th January next.
The License Inspector, was directed to notify all club proprietors thnt
their licenses will expire on the .list
December Inst.
Pupils Make
Presentation
To Mr. Webb
On Thursday evening tho pupils of
the Entrance Class and First Year
High gave a farewell party to Mr.
Webb, the principal of the Public
School, who Is leaving to take a position ns supervisor in the Nanaimo
School. During the evening .Mr. Webb
wus presented with a travelling bag
with his Initials on it. At thc same
time the pupils presented Mrs. Finch
with n teiuils raquet in appreciation
of her services in connection with the
school concert. Mrs. Finch turned
out at all practices to play tbe piano
and assisted tite pupils and teachers
in every way possible. Both <ln
and Mr. Webb thanked those present
iu short speeches.
The remainder of the evening was
of a social nature. Refreshments
were served and dancing was indulged In till nfter 12 o'clock.
RESULTS OF
LOCAL STORES'
VARIOUS CONTESTS
Christmas Day at 3 p.m. the drawing
for the prizes In the Royal Candy Contest took place and resulted as follows :
Mrs. Jack Stant, 1st, Ten Set; Mr.
James Bennie, 2nd, Doll; Mr. William
Stanaway, 3rd, Boat.
In Mr. Steven's .the jeweller, contest. Miss Hannah Harrison won both
first nnd second prize, a wrist watch
and a ring; and Miss L. Shepherd
won third prize, n stick pin.
In Lang's guessing contest no one
guessed the correct amount $13.56, but
seven guessed the amount $13.56 and
$13.57. Mr. Lang la leaving It to
these seven to decide whether they
will divide up the prize or cut the
cards for all of It.
Juniors Take
Revenge On
Union Bay
Jock   Stevenson,   Inside   Left
Juniors, Is Star of Day's Plny-
liets Two Goals
for
TO OUR READERS
A
Bright,  Happy and
Prosperous New Year.
..
The third game of the Junior League
whh played on the Recreation Grounds
at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon between
the Cumberland Juniors and Union
Bay and resulted in a win for the
former team by 4 goals to 2. The
field was iu the best condition it has
ever been in before and quite a crowd
turned out to hog tbe future champions  perform.
Referee Dave Wilson, afler giving
both teams some warnings if they did
not play the game .started the ball
rolling u little after 2 p.m.
"Peanuts" Robertson kicked off for
the Juniors and made straight for the
Bay  goal  where  for a  few  minutes
Jock   Stevenson   gave   Reid.   the   Bay
goalie, all he could handle,     For tbe
first half hour the Juniors had a slight
advantage hut  could  not score  until
Campbell,  full  back  for  Union   Hay.
took a cramp iu bis leg and had to
leave  the  Held.      "Peanuts" and  his
forwards ihen got  working with the
result thai  he and Johnny Robinson,
inside right, both bagged a goal within a few minutes of each other,    The
first half ended With Hie Juniors 2 up.
In  the  second   half Campbell   wits
hack on the field again but (be home
learn  kept   up the pressure and  with
a nice piece of comliinaiaion M. Stewart, on tbe left wing, brought the ball
up and crossed    to    Stevenson    who
made no mistake in putting bis team
I.'! goals  up.      Immediately afler,  the
j same  two  players again  broke away
and Jock shot his second goal aud the
, fourth  for tbe Juniors.      Prom then
t on   they  took   things  easy   witli   the
| result that Union Hay slipped in two
' goals making the score 4-2, the game
; ending with no further scoring.
Jock Stevenson was easily the best
man on the fleld and with Mat. Stewart, made the best wing forwards on
both teams.     Harry Auchinvale shone
for the  visitors.
Tbe teams lined up as follows:
Juniors—Roily;   Mitchell.  H.  Stewart; Wllcock, Farmer, Jones; M. Stew,
art, Stevenson, "Peanuts"  Robertson,
J, Robinson and A. Robinson.
Untott Ray—Reid; Campbell, n,
] Auchlnvole; Marshall, M. Auchlnvole,
i Johnson ; Camp be* II, X.thamura, A.
I Auchlnvole, Glover and McLeod. ■OTHMMM
PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1923.
1—
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
Courtenay
Music Store
Opposite the Presbyterian Church
MASONIC   BLOCK
SJSMMllIEHEE^
RECORDS
Edison and Columbia
LATEST POPULAR MUSIC
AND DANCE FOLIOS
TOY  SALE
25% off all Xmas Goods
W. EMERIC
Phone 177
Til K    SUPREME    ((Mill
llltmsil COLUMBIA
tin lilinice mill Matrimonial CnllSCS)
BETWEEN:
SARAH  MARJORY  RIDEOUT
Petitioner,
—and -
HOY l.e.UESSURIICR ItlDEOl'T,
Hespoiidiint.
TAKE NOTICE thut a citation, bearing (lute the fourth day of December,
l(j23, has issued from the Supreme
Court of British Columbia (Victoria
Registry) citing you to appear and
answer the petition of Sarah Marjory
Hideout praying for a dissolution of
marriage.
IN DEFAULT of your so appearing
you will nol he allowed to address the
Court, and the Court  will proceed to
hear the said petition proved and pronounce sentence in respect thereto.
AND TAKE FURTHER NOTICE tint
ftir   the   purpose   aforesaid,   you   ire
within twenty-one days from the publication   of  this  nol Ice  to   attend   in
person  or  liy your solicitors  at  tlle
Victoria    Registry   of   the   Supreme
Court of British Columbia, und thereto enter an appearance in this cause.
BASS   H.   BULLOCK-WEBSTER,
Law  Chambers,  Bastion  Square,
Victoria, British  Columbia,
Petitioner's Solicitors.
DATED the 4tli day of December,
1!>23.
OSWALD   BARTON,
Deputy District Registrar.
TO:
Hoy LeMessurler Rideout.
IMPRESSIVE SERVICE AT      RESULTS OF
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
The Christmas service at St.
George's Presbyterian Church last
Sunday evening .was very well attended, the large congregation lilting all
the pews. ChlrstmaB hymns such us
"Hark the Herald Angels Slug' and
"Joy to the World" were heartily
sung nnd a spirit of reverent worship provided. Mr. Horace Everett
presided ut the organ. Mr. H. Smith
sang "Nazareth," Misses Williams and
Shannon sang a duet "Silent Night"
nud the choir sung a very fine anthem.
The Rev. W. T. Beattle had as his
subject "Sturs that led to Christ," the
text being from Matt. 2:10, "When
they saw the star they rejoiced." Tho
three stars stressed by the preacher
were "The Christian Home," "The
Sunday School and the Church." Me
urged his hearers to be faithful to
these, as experience and history clearly showed them to be the bulwark of
civilization, and a "shelter ln the time
of storm." The church was beautifully decorated for the service.
GUESSING CONTESTS
The coffee bean sueHsing competition held at Boorh\s store, over the
holiday season created a great deal
of Interest, the result being as follows:
.Mr. Abe Orr. of the firm of Edwards
& Orr, guessed nearest to the number of coffee beans hi the jar with an
j estimate of 88311.     There were 8841.
i Other  prizes   in   order   went   to   Mr.
! Orr, Mrs. Rae Dawson, Mrs. Van Hem-
! ert, J. W. McKenzie, J., K. Cowie, Mrs.
I Shenstone, F, C. Brock, G. 0. Oraham.
M. Moncrieff and A. .McKinnon.
TENNY'S EXPRESS
RESUMES RUN
Mr. Will. Tenny who operates a
motor express between this city and
Nanaimo made his first trip on Thursday since the flood of three weeks
ago. He reports that some of the
bridges have been restored and that
at other places temporary structures
have been erected. About a mile and
a half south of the Dollar camp a temporary suspension bridge has been
thrown across one of the creeks. He
is going to operate regularly after the
first of the year.
At Laver'a Store the competition io
estimate the number of yards of chilli
iu a bolt was won as follows:
K. Evans 1,-65 yards, !i inches, correct; A. S. Henderson,2, 66 yards, 2
inches; Mrs. Hees, II; J. Isenor, 4;
Mrs, L. Thomas, 5; Miss Agnes Williams, 6; Harry Idiens, 7; A. Stewart,
8; M. Finch, 9; F. Finch 10. The last
five were equal with 65 yards, but the
prizes were awarded in the order in
whicli the guesses cumu into tlie store,
DAILY SERVICE
THROUGHOUT WINTER
Some time ago it was rumored' that
the passenger service on the Esquimau and Nanaimo Railway would be
curtailed to three trains a week after
the Christmas holidays. It has now
been definitely announced that there
was no truth in the rumor and that
the company never contemplated such
action. Business lias been and is
now good so that the daily train will
continue to run as usual throughout
the winter.
COMOX VALLEY LOSES
WELL-KNOWN  RESIDENT
Comox Valley lost one of its well
known old residents on Thursday
morning when Mr. John Cowie died
at the family heme, Condensery Road.
The late .Mr. Cowie was born in
Guelpli, Out., in 1S06 and came weal
to British Columbia when a lad of
fifteen with his parents, settling lirst
at Funny Bay. lie made a farm out
of the hush and wus known as one of
'he best logging engineers in this
section of the country. His passing
will be deeply regretted by residents
all over the valley. The bereaved
family consists of Mrs. Cowie, three
sons, Gus„ Robert and Ernest, and two
daughters, Mrs. Thomas McQuillan
and Miss Esther Cowie.
The funeral has been arranged to
tuke place on Sunday afternoon from
the family residence at two o'clock.
All members of the Native Sons arc
notified to attend at the lodge room,
Booth block, at 1.15 o'clock.
*   *   +
Mr. Walter Pearson Is spending a
holiday at Vancouver.
COURTENAY SAW MILL
BOUGHT BY JAPANESE
The plant of the Courtenay Saw Mill
has been purchased by the Jiudo Hanu
itilchi Lumber Company, whose capital is entirely Japanese. It is believed that the sum of forty-two
thousand dollars figured in the transaction. The mill will be taken over
at once by the new owners who contemplate making some alterations
und overhauling the machinery before
operating to capacity, which is about
forty thousand feet per day. This
is tiie second mill In Comox District
to be operated by Japanese. It is
interesting to note In connection with
Ihe sale of this mill thnt it was the
Ilrst saw mill constructed In Comox
Valley, having been built by the late
Reginald Pldcock, futher ot ex-alder-
man George Pldcock and at one time
owner of a large portion of tlle present Courtenay townslte. The late
Mr. Pidcock was one of the progressive pioneers of this district and after
leaving the saw mill business was appointed Indian agent and lived for
many years at Quathlaski Cove. Valdez Island. The mill when first built
wus operated by a water turbine, the
power for which waB secured from
what Is known as Millard's creek.
The water was brought through a
ditch whicli is in existence today,
crossing the Lake Trail road at the
city limits of Courtenay. The dam
ou the Union Buy road opposite Cor-
| field's was built as a part of this first
manufacturing venture. The mill is
on the Courtenay river, and it was
here thut the steamer "Daisy" was
constructed by Mr. Pldcock, who was
assisted in the job by another pioneer
whom many know, Mr. Daniel Stewart, father of Mr. Hugh Stewart, and
a farmer of Comox in the early days.
The bout afterwards passed to thc
1 posesslon of the Chemainus Lumber
; Company. The mill has been successively owned by Messrs. John and
Harry Urquhart, John Bryden, neph-
«jw of the lnte Hon. James Dunsmuir,
\ Bryden und Kilpatrick, Daniel Kllpat-
; rick, by whom it was sold several
! years ago to Messrs Cliffe and Mac-
I donald. It has been idle for over
three years hut will now be run to
capacity onexport orders, much of
. the timber going to Japan for the ro-
i construction of Tokio nnd other places
1 hit by the earthquake of Scplember
last.
ANNUAL CHRISTMAS
TREE AND CONCERT
HELD IN CHURCH
Hotel Douglas
When  hi Victoria, why not make
this hotel your home?   It Is In
every way a strictly modern   fireproof building
and you  will  like
the service.
BATES
Outside   rooms   with   private  bath
—per day $2.00—
-per week $10.00—
Nice airy rooms without bath from
- per day $1.00—
- per week $4.00—
Free Bus meets nil boats and trains
PHONE (WHO
!-,T. II. Kil.I.KK, Proprietor—i
A Bright and Prosperous
New Year is our
Wish to You
McLEOD'S STORE
COURTENAY, B.C.
NATIVE SONS
MAKE PRESENTATION
TO MR. DALBY
The annual Christmas tree enter,
tainment of St. George's Presbyterian
Church Sunday School was held In
the church at eight o'clock on Monday night, Christmas Eve. The
church was filled with children and
their parents and friends. In the
absence of Mr. William Duncan, superintendent of the Sunday School
through sickness, the Rev, W. V.
Beattle presided and aniiunnced the
various Itmes on the following long,
varied and interesting program.
Program
1. Opening Chorus—"Christ Is
Born."
2. Chorus by small boys and girls
—"Little Ones of God Are We."
3. "The Bells 'Message"—by eight
girls.
4. Duet—Kitty Williams and Bor-
nadine Shannon.
nadlne Shaniio—"In the Manger Lowly."
5. Dialogue, by hoys   and   girls
"The Months of the Year."
6. Chorus—"Our King in a Mager."
7. Recitation, Audrey Booth—
"Christening Dolly."
8. Wreath Drill, by eight girls.
(I. Chorus, small hoys and girls—
"Away In a Manger."
It). Duet. Willie Piket nnd Freddy
Stephens—"Acrosss the sea in Bethlehem Town."
11. Chorus, Sunshine girls—"Christ
mas is Here."
12. Dialogue—"For another's sake."
I one girl nnd four boys.
13. "Christmas" by twelve girls.
I    14.   Sleigh Bell Chorus.
I    At the conclusion of the ntertaln-
! ment In the church tlle children pro-
i ceeded to the basement to meet Santa
I Claus, and to receive presents from
the tree.      Santa  was received  with
' shouts of joy and In the course of  '.
; short speech he assured the wondcr-
I Ing little ones that he had come all
: the way from Ottawa and that he had
! had  a  hard  time  getting down  the
j furnace chimney.     However, he was
I here  hale  and  hearty and  had  lots
of presents for everybody.     Tlle program in tiie basement was brought to
a close by distributing bags of candy
and nuts to every child connected witli
the  Sunday   School.      An   enjoyable
evening was   brought  to a  dose  by-
three cheers for Santa.
FOR SALE
HORSEY COW—FRESH  WITH SEC-1
ond calf; gentle and easy to milk;
also young pigs uud gilts.     My pigs [
mature  in   half the time and cost j
less to feed than any other breed.
My  customers  can  proVe   ft.      K.
Waddell, H. It. 1 . DIG |
FOR SALE, CHEAP—EDISON GRAM-
ophone and 75 records.      In use 8 |
months.      Apply    P.  O.  Box    247,
Cumberland,
Just Candy—
OUR STOCK OF CHOCOLATES AND HOLIDAY
MIXTURES,   ETC. IS COMPLETE.
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"IT PAYS TO DEAL AT LANG'S"
Cumberland
Last Saturday Mr. und Mrs. Kenneth 11. Dulby left for Vancouver
where they will make their home.
During their stay of three years In
Courlenay they had made many
friends who regret their departure.
Mr. Dalby was proprietor of the Sun
Drug Store which he has sold to Mr.
Heber Cooke of the Courtenny Drug
Store. Tlle two stores will be kept
open, Mr. Wallis taking over the management of the Sun Drug. Mr. Dalby
was secretary of the Courtenay Badminton Club, and officer In the Retail
Merchants' Association. He had just
been elected president of Courtenay
Assembly No. 3, Native Sons of Canada, nnd on behalf of that organization President Anderton and a committee presented him with a silver
cigarette case suitably engraved.
OLD-TIMERS TO
HOLD REUNION SOON
Sons of Canada are making preparations for tbe holding of tholr annual
reception for the old timers of Comox
Valley. Tlle big event wlll be held
on January Uth, In the Gaiety Theatre
ami un effort Is being made to eclipse
the big lime held last year. Committees are at work on the big affair
ami are continually reporting progress.
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Urquhart
spent thc Christmas holiday at Ladysmlth.
Courtenay
Auto Painters
Bring your cars in for an estimate.
Prices reasonable. Work guaranteed.
Workshop at the Condensary.
C. G. WILSON
DOVE CREEK SCHOOL
TOTALLY DESTROYED
On Saturday morning last, December 22, at one o'clock, the Dove Creel;
school house was totalry destroyed by
tire. A mystery attaches to tlle blaze
as, although there had been a social
in the building the previous evening,
great (-are had been taken to see thnt
everything was safe before the card
players dispersed. People of the
section tried to subdue the flumes but
without effect. The building was of
one room and the damage done, not
exceeding five hundred dollars, is
covered by Insurance.
WHIST DRIVE HELD
AT DOVE CREEK
Last Friday night, the 21st Inst.,
the residents of Dove Creek section
and many visitors, assembled at the
school house to enjoy a whist drive
Ten tables were In the play and u
most enjoyable time was spent nnd
winners of prizes were:
Ladles' first—Miss Williamson, second, Mrs. Mnycock. Gentlemen's
first—Mr. N. McLeod; second, Mr.
Harry Carwlthen. After cards refreshments were served anil songs
were rendered by several of the company. The Dove Creek'people, since
the loss of tlielr school by fire, are
arranging to hold future parties nt
the luriii ot Mrs. Geldt, where a suitable building Is available.
Mr. Lester Clarkson, ot the Farmers'
Produce Store has gone to California
and will be away about three months.
CAIII) OF THANKS
Mr. and Mrs. Robert McQuillan, and
family, of Courtenay, take this means
of thanking their many friends and
acquaintances who extended sympathy and otherwise showed courtesies to them nt the time of the deatli
of the Into Andrew Reginald McQuillan.
Mr. William Campbell, of Cvofton,
is spending the holidays with his
mother, Mrs. Ed. Embleton. ^
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1923.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Fighting   tne   Storm
PAGE THREE
ROD AND GUN
'        4hi„«- -out <il  il,r Hr...  i,HHl„.  jtim. ' viilrv   A tin4* s»lti*»  11, flilinn
llclow—On, ill th, I'insdisn 1'1,-ifli  ruLo  Mluws. at laltsl tteitn
Inurtuin purtiuns of Canuda and the United States, the successful
■m.i regnlat uuiveinent of trains during the winter months often
dcpeudf upon the use uf special equipment, the purpose uf which is to
remove snow and lie from the tracks, and from the direct right of way.
As a uiattet of fact, no railroad in Canada oi in the nurthern parts of
the United States could hope to operate without » complement of snow-
t'iirhting   entailment
In a study of snow-fighting equipment it is interesting io i.vt.e thut
nn development is very largely due to Canadians and to Canadian railways although snow conditions in Canada are no more severe than those
mot with on roads passing over the Rocky oi Cascade Mountains in
be United Stales ,r through the border States The principal types
il snow figlitti.i! .'UjUipniunt may be generally classified u engine and
pilot plows, whirl, nre attached to the engine front or pilot, push plows.
self contained units mounted on trucks and pushed by a locomotive, wine
plows. ipreailrt plows, machine plows which Includes the rotary machine
Hangers, ice .tuners and snow  sweepers
As fat is -an br ascertained, the tint snow plow evei nulll was
ol the push plow type As 'hit plow derailed, frequently, an endeavoi
wa.- made iu tak, advantage if the weight of the locomotive, and thut
th.   jngini plow was evolved
The preseni rotarj plow used or, roads, which have to fight deei
drifts snow slides ui othei conditions beyond the capacity of push plows
is the most effective instrument that hat been developed for that pur
pose These plows ;an work theii way through deep euti and slide,
where il would be impossible for any other type of plow to lift the snow
and, in addition, can throw the snow clear of the track Seen In actior-
these plows preseni s rathei picturesque appearance when viewed fron
he front The rotarj plow, as now used. Is a development of • revolvinn
mow shovel, patented in I8«H by Mr J. W Elliott, t dentist, of Toronto
'Irrt This elementar) device wat modified by Orange Jul), of Orange
Wile Ontario and the lull rotary wat taken up by the Leslie Brothers
ilso of Orangeville who •(instructed • full-sited model which wat tried
ml in the Parkdnle yards of the Canadian Pacific In 1884 The tuccest
if this trial led the Leslie Brothers to have made for them • complete
plow which wa- tried out by the Union Pacific Railroad during the win-
tc, of 1886-87    rhis plow was the forerunner of the modern rotary
For manj real* the Canadian Paclllc Railway hat constructed lti
tlowt of steel II wat the first railway to build and use an all-steel
plow and the service given by thii type hat been mainly responsible
for the all-yeai communication between eastern and western Canada the
heavy mow falls experienced at timet, particularly .In Ontario and
through the Rockies, being now no impediment to traffic,
New Year Cardsj
■ ..»-'ii ■tatl ~~
The Islander can supply that last minute rush.
The story of an eventful canoeing
trip is told ln the January Issue of
Rod and Oun In Canada by Frosty
Snow ln "With Paddle and Fish Pole
ln Quebec." There ls also a good
description of a moose hunt on the
Athabasca river by H. K. Henry, while
F. V. Williams vividly describes a
tragedy ot wild lite as unfolded by
tracks in the snow, In his story "As
Told In the Snow." A. A. Haines who
ls an authority on bunting knives haa
a well Illustrated article dealing with
tbe various makes of hunting knives,
together with his opinion of them.
After trying twenty-three years, Bon-
nycastle Dale has finally taken a splen
did photograph of the Red Breasted
Merganser, and hla good description
ot the life and habits of this bird
is of interest to all . Ouns and Ammunition Is particularly well stocked
with Interesting articles, as well aa
the questions and difficulties of sportsmen, answered by C. S. Landis, while
Fishing Notes, Along the Trapltne,
Outdoor Talk ^nd other departments
are all filled with fine articles by
specialists.
The January Issue opens tho first
number of the new year with articles
on canoeing, fishing .moose bunting,
ski-lng, hunting knives, nature studies
guns and ammunition, trapping, kennel interest and a host of other subjects.
NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that the Esary Timber Company Limited Intend to apply
to the Registrar of Joint Stock Companies, Victoria, B.C., to change lta
name to Thomsen et Clark Timber
Company Limited.
Dated at Vancouver, B.C., this 8th
day of December, A.D. 1923.
LAURA L.  McOHEE.
Assistant-Secretary.
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    •    Cleaning    .    Bestirs
Telephone 1.    •     P. 0. Box II
CUMBERLAND, B. V.
You will be
proud ot a
Gurney. You
will find it
look, batter
and cooka
better.
the old and famous
stove-makers, co-operating with
the Northern Electric Company
Have given housewives the economical
efficient    (Q}00f'
RANGE
All Gurney's famous skill
and integrity, all the Northern
Electric Company's vast
electrical experience—have
gone into each Gurney
Electric Range.
No wonder the Gurney is
perfect in every detail. The
stove-maker's art and modern
electrical science have combined to make it so.
Come see the Gurney in all
its beautiful models. Note the
snowy "White Rock"porcelain
enamel. Discover how the
Gurney is years ahead in the
scientific application of electric
heat to efficient, economical
cooking.
Northern Electric Appliances
Cumberland Electric Light Co.
DUNSMUIR AVE.
LIMITED
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Your Gift Problem Solved
 GIFTS THAT LAST	
IRONS—TOASTERS—GRILLS—WASHERS
Curling Irons With, a Marcell Wave Attachment
BOUDOIR SETS—HEATING PADS
We have a complete line of Silk, Linen,. Parchment and
Glass Shades
Piano and Floor
Lamps
Radio Sets and
Parts
We do not inspect our own wiring, but guarantee it to
be the best at moderate prices.
Piket Electric
Phone
164
COURTENAY
B.C.
There's solid satisfaction in
U.BC.
BEER
It's made right—has the body-
has the strength.
It's pure — contains absolutely
nothing but pure materials.
It refreshes — strengthens
and invigorates as does no
other beverage.
Insist on U. B. C. Beer. Have it
delivered to your home.
On Sale at All Vendors
Vancouver Breweries Limited
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
This advertisement Is not published or displayed by the Liquor Control Board or by
the Government of British Columbia.
COME TO MANN'S
FOR YOUR CHRISTMAS CAKES & SHORTBREAD
all made from the finest ingredients
High Class Cakes at Right Prices
WE AIM TO SATISFY
Orders Promtly Attended to.
Hot Pies, Saturday and Monday
Chirstmas Mince Meat Pies a Specialty.
MANN'S
BAKERY
TIS EITHER RIGHT OR j
IT IS WRONG!
It must be cither one or the other.
ALL  ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS
are governed by the National Electrical Code of Fire
Underwriters and Supplementary Regulations of the
State or Province in which the work is done.
These are plain and explicit and if a job is in accordance
with them no one can find any fault with it—That fact
Cannot be gainsaid.     We periodically request
Provincial Inspection of our Work
and of all inspections made there have been
NO CONDEMNATIONS
That is the record of which we are justly proud and do
not think it can be beaten.
OUR MOTTO
PERMANENCE   and   QUALITY
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
A.  A.  BROWN
Freight removed to any part of the City
ft
COAL AND WOOD DELIVERED TO ANY PART
OF THE CITY OR DISTRICT
General Hauling Business.     Ashes taken
away, and rubbish removed	
Our business is to give Service
PHONE 15, UNION HOTEL, and ask for RROWN,
the General Delivery Man.
For Results Try The Islander PAGE FOUR
IHE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1(123.
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W.' BICKLE
SATURDAY,  DECEMBER 28, 1323.
ONE RESOLUTION
When making your New Year resolutions one of them should be that
for all time in the future you will do
the best you can.
That should be the motto of every
young man who possesses ambition
and the desire to make a name tor
himself in the world of business.
K he does Unit lit all times, he has
put his foot on the first rung of the
ladder that leads lo promotion, and
not before tliat time can he fairly suy
that he has begun to climb upward,
Doing work iu a half-hearted maimer
puts a decided handicap on the young
man's future, for thc moment that he
regards his work as a grind, he is lie-
ginning to walk on (bin ice that will
precipitate him into dismissal from
the service of tho firm for whom he
is working; in truth, lie places an obstacle in his path that cannot be sur-
mountetd.
The difference between doing the
best you can ,and performing your
duties in a half-hearted manner
easily seen, for the latter way of
work cannot be disguised, as it has
a false note that can lie distinguished
by the employer. The young man
must make up his mind to give his
entire attention to his work and not
waver at any moment of the day, if
he hopes to better his condition in tiie
form of promotion. He must make |
it a point to do the best that he can
whether the "old man," as many young
men term their employers, is there or
not, for the "old man" has been
through the mill, as il. were, and he
can easily tell whether all his employees are doing their best work or
not.     He cannot be fooled very long.
ory of thOBe sacred hours ,ot mother's words, her faith and prayers,
saved us, but they have not hidden
from our sight the glory of her pure,
unselfish love.
THIS APPLIES TO ALL OF US
It is a great pity that In this country we cannot grow older a little faster than we ure doing; not in years,
but in the learning of some vital lessons . Point out a national weakness,
such as this riotous extravagance
which possesses so many of us, and
we quickly reply, "Well, we're -young
as a nation you know. We'll learn
better as wc grow older." But how
much longer arc we to remain young?
How much farther can we safely go
In teaching by example and precept
that money is an article which must
bo spent and never saved? Because
thill is what we ure doing, nnd nothing else. "Hut we don't want our
children to be stingy," is the universal excuse. Certainly not. But do
we want our children to be spendthrifts? With our keen preceptions
more alive to all points in human life
titan  is customary  with  nations, are
we so blind that we cannot see that a
happy mean exists between extravagance and miserliness? Are we always to cling to extremes, refusing
to recognize a safer middle ground in
this matter? It Is not a pleasant
thing to contemplate, II we will sit
down and quietly do so. the effect this
extravagance will have upon future
generations. Already the results are
noticeable . The girls are few nowadays who have any true conception of
the value of money; the vnst majority
of them are improvident. The same
is true of our young men, three-
fourths of whom live ln these days
ajireast of their incomes, if not in.excess of them . The fact is, that very
few men ,old or young, especially the
young, make more money than they
spend . Habits of Improvidence have
not alone taken root among the vast
majority of our young men, but they
are taking firmer root all the lime,
lt makes not an lota of difference
what the Income Is, the result at the
end of the year Is the same. This
is what Improvidence does; lt finds
one at the end In precisely the same
condition as ut the start, If not in a
worse one.
AN OLD-FASHIONED
MOTHER
Thank God, some of uk have, and
others   have   hail,   an   ohl-faHhioned
mother.      Not a woman of the period, enameled and painted, an expert
hridfie player,  whose white jewelled
hands never  have  felt the  clasp ol
her  hahy's   lingers,  hut  a dear  old-
fashioned, sweet-voiced mother,  with
eyes  in   which   the   love-light   shone
and hrown hair threaded with silver,
lying smooth upon  her faded cheek.
Those dear hands  worn    with    toil,
gently guided our tottering steps to
childhood and smoothed our pillow iu
sickness, even reaching out to us in
yearning tenderness when her sweet
spirit was passing through the cold,
dark river.     Blessed is the memory
of an old-fashioned mother.     It iloats
to us now like the heautiful perfume
of   some   woodland   blossoms.      Tho
music  of other  voices  may  be  lost,
hut the entrancing memory of her's
will echo in our souls forever.   Olhor
faces will fade away and be forgotten,
hut her's will shine on until the light
from heaven's portals   shall   glorify
our own.     When in the fitful pause;
of busy life our feet wander back to
the old homestead, and crossing the
well-worn threshold,    standing   once
more in the low, quaint room,    hallowed hy her presence ,how the feel-
ol childish  innocence  and  independence   comes   over   us   aud   i#e   kneel
down in the mottled sunshine streaming through the window—just where,
long years ago, we knelt hy mother's
knee, lisping, "Now I lay me down to
sleep."      How many times  when  the
tempter lured us on  have the mem-
MenWanted
NEW YEAR
GIFT SUGGESTIONS
AT   CAMPBELLS
DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT
Handkerchiefs, in fancy boxes; Plain Linen and Fancy Embroidered Handkerchiefs;
Camisoles; Boudoir Caps; Silk Nightgowns; Silk'and Crepe Step-ins; Envelope Chemise;
Silk Underskirts; Silk and Crepe Blouses; Fancy Sweaters; Ladies' Leather and Beaded
Bags; Fancy Towels; Ladies', Misses' and Children's Kimonas; Bathrobes and Boudoir
Slippers.
THE BALANCE OF OUR LADIES' TRIMMED AND READY-TO-WEAR HATS AT
GREATLY REDUCED PRICES TO CLEAR.
GENTS. DEPARTMENT
Fancy Suspenders; Armbands and Garters, in fancy boxes and combination sets;
Fancy Christmas Neckwear and Mufflers; Shaving Sets; Military Brushes; Safety
Razors; Fancy Sweaters and Knitted Vests; Smoking Jackets; Dressing Gowns; House
Slippers; Club Bags and Suit Cases.
GROCERY DEPARTMENT SPECIALTIES
cherries, Marachtno style  _ iiOc.
Preserved Ginger, bulk, per lb He.
Preserved Ginger, in Syrup, Jars  45c.
Cal. Layer Figs, per lb.    85c.
Syrmna Layer Figs, per lb  4l)c.
Symrna Layer Figs, in glove boxes   80c.
New Season's Bulk Dates, 2 lbs ...:'.:..,  25c.
New Seasons Dromedary Dates, 2 pkgs. for 55c.
A. D. Cluster Raisins, cartons  80c.
Spanish Cluster Balsins, cartons   4,'ic
Queen Olives, 25c and   40c.
Stuffed Olives, 80c. and  50c.
Ripe Olives, Tins   60c.
Heluze Sweet Ghirklns, Bts   65c.
C..& B. Chutney  *Me.
C. &. B. Bloater, Shrimp and Anchovle Paste 80c.
French Anchovies, In oil   50c.
Coxes and Knoxes Gelatine, Pkts. 20c. and .... 25c.
Jelly Powders, assorted flavors, Pkts  10c
Mince Mont In Tins, 2s 50c, 4s  »1.0fl
Mince Meat, Wethcys, tn Pkts, 2 for   45c
Mixed Peel, in 1-lb. cartons  50c
Orange and Lemon Peel, per lb 40c
Sultana Raisins, Pkgs, 2 for  85c
Seeded Raisins, Pkgs, 2 for 25c
Currants, New Seasons, Cleaned, Pkgs, 2 for 45c
Bulk Cocoanut, per lb 2,1c
Popping Corn,-Pkgs   10c
Jelly, in 1-lb Jars—Black Currant, Red Currant, Bramble and Crabapple, per jar .... 40c
Baker's Eating and Cooking Chocolate 25c .... 80c
Xmas Bon lions and Stockings; Xmas Puddings;
Xmas Candles; Shelled Almonds; Shelled Walnuts; Ground Almonds; Almond Paste; Glace
CherrleB; Crystallzed Cherries and Assorted
Fruits; Chestnuts; Walnuts; Filberts, Etc.
Cranberries; Jap Oranges; New Naval Oranges;
Pears; Apples; Grapes; Head Lettuce; Sweet
Potatoes;  Ilrusscl Sprouts.
laaeasiaaiaaicMasMaEisiaaraasE^
CAMPBELL BROS. TAKE THIS MEANS OF EXTENDING TO
YOU THEIR SINCERE GOOD WISHES FOR YOUR HAPPINESS AND PROSPERITY THROUGHOUT THE NEW YEAR.
"Over a pathway bright with happiness,
may it be yours to journey."
to learn—
AUTOS, Electrical, Oil En-
itineering. The demand in
fir iTH'iit' r than we enn
■lipply. $6.00 tu $10.00 per dity
offered everywhere for well
trained mechanics. Don't remain idle thin Winter, net in
lhe hilt money class. A frw
weeks' training with tool* at
the Hemphill Practical Trade
Schools, the Million Dollar
Trade School System, will fit
you for any of these Ink pay
johfl. Get nway from hard
work and low pay. Hemphill
Trade Schools are located at
1311 Granville St., Vancouver,
B.C.; 828 Ninth Ave., E„ Calgary, Altu.; Cor. Tike and Melrose, Seattle, Wash., and many
other cities in Canada and
U.S.A. Write nearest Branch
to you.
Mail this Coupon
: HEMPHILL TRADE SCHOOLS,  LTD.
S Headquarters:
. 580   MAIN   STREET,   WINNIPEG
j Please tend me  free   information  of
J how    you    teach    Auto    Tractor,    Gas
• Engineering    and    Electrical     Ignition
; Work.
NAME
A Happy New Year
Start the New Year right and
leave your Grocery Order
with us.
The place where everyone gets a
square deal
Mumford's Grocery
T. H. Mumford J. Walton
THE SUPERIOR GROCERY
DR.  R.  B.   DIER  AND  DR.
W  .BRUCE  GORDON
Dental Surgeons
Office:  Cor..of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUN EB
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co.
Cumberland and Courtenay.
Car  For  Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phillies:   From   9 a.m. to 11 p.m.   2.",
'   From 11 p.m. to   9 a.m.   HI!
Ask for Geo. Mason.
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND
W&&&8k^^
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND • ■ B. C.
Marocchi Bros.
' Grocers and
Bakers
PHONE 11       CUMBERLAND
STEAMSHIP
TICKET AGENCY
TICKETS TO ALL PARTS
OF THE WORLD
AtJENT FOR ALL STEAMSHIP
COMPANIES
Drop tn and let us talk It over.
E. W. BICKLE
Agent, Cumberland, B.C.
Canadian National Railways
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
(MM n.C. Permanent Loan Bldg
PHONE 2818      VICTORIA, B.I.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, ft C.
Comfort and Homelike service.
20  rooms,  electrically  heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone 15.
ft YATES, Manager.
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.M BR KI FI KLD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
«    ——
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland %
<d
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29. 1923.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE FIVE
BR. HARVESTERS
GOOD SETTLERS
That the harvesters brought to Cau-
aila by the railways this year are a
desirable type of immigrant, waa thc
opinion expressed by Melvll Jones, of
the Soldiners' Settlement Board, in
Toronto this week. Inspectors through
out the west had paid particular attention lu their trips this fall to the
work of the Britishers ill the harvest Ileitis and in practically all cases
hail found it satisfacory to the farmers and agreeable to the men.
RECORD COAL OUTPUT
The year 1923 will see a new record
ln Alberta coal production. * It is expected the total production tor the
year will reach 7,000,000 tons, In com.,
parlson with less than 6,000,OOOJast
year. The production up to November 1 was 1,500,000 tons greater than
the production during the same period
last year. The record production
previously was In 1920, when 6,400,-
000 tons was produced.
A Happy New Year To
You All
v
LOCAL TURKEYS, GEESE, DUCKS AND FOWLS
THE BEST IN TOWN OF NO. 1 QUALITY
THE BEST IS CHEAPEST
CHRISTMAS AMID OLD HOMELAND SCENES
-AT THE	
City Meat Market
CUMBERLAND
«B*t*t«««««et©e«*««P^^
"How wonderful Is the human voice.     It Is Indeed,
the organ of the soul."
—Longfellow.
"It is indeed the organ of the soul." Each inflection of your voice has a meaning for those who
know you. Nothing may substitute for it, Your
voice is you!
When you have news for a friend—when a business matter needs attention—when you wish to bring
joy to those at home—send your voice—yourself—on ,
the errand.
All this company's telephones are available day
and night.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Royal Candy Store
WEEK  END   SPECIALS
SNOWBALLS AND WALNUT CROQUETS 60c. lb.
TURKISH DELIGHT 35c lb.
NEW HOT DRINKS COCA-COLA SPICED
MALTED MILK     —     TOMATO BISQUE
HOT LEMONADE
Box 606 Tel: 25
1
H
EALTH, HAPPINESS AND GOOD LUCK TO
ALL THROUGHOUT THE COMING YEAR.
the earnest wish of
Cavin's Shoe Store
THE second Canadian National, Western Canadians took advantage, ber 11 and  yet  reach   Britain in
, Railways train leaving Win- of the  special  rates  and  special; time for Christmas.      Inset is a
nipeg for Halifax.to connect' trains arranged by the Canadian  group of Edmonton people aboard
with steamships sailing for United: National, whieh*allowed   them to  the second tourist special
Kingdom ports.     Several hundred I leave Winnipeg as late as Decern-!
DEAFNESS CAN
BE CURED
DEAFNESS, NOISES IN THE HEAD,
AND NASAL CATARRH.
Thc new Continental remedy called
"LARMALENE"   (Regd.)
Is a simple harmless home-treatment
which absolutely cores deafness, noises In the head, etc. No Expensive Appliances Needed for this new Ointment, Instantly operates upon the affected parts with complete and permanent success. Scores of Wonderful
Cures Reported.
RELIABLE TESTIMONY
Mrs. K. Wilkinson, of Slad Road,
Stroud, writes:—"Please could 1
trouble you to send me another box of
the Ointment. It Is not for myself, bul
for n friend of mine who is as bad as
I was, and cannot get any rest for tae
noises in the head. I feel a new woman, and can go to bed now and get a
good night's rest, which I had not
been able to do for many months. It
Is a woiderful remedy and au most
delighted to recommende It."
Mrs. E. Crowe, of Whllehorse Road,
Croydon, wrltes:—"l am pleased to
tell you thut the small tin of ointment
you sent to me st Ventnur, bas proved
a complete success, my hearing ls
now quite normal, and the horrible
head noises have ceased. The action
of this new remedy must be very remarkable, for I have been troubled
with these complaints for nearly ten
years, and have had some of the very best medical advice together with
other expensive ear instruments all
to no purpose. 1 need hardly say how
very grateful I am, for my life has
undergone an entire change."
Try ope box to-day, which can be
forwarded to any address on receipt
of money order for 11.00. There Is
Nothing Better at any Price-
Address orders to:—
"LARMALENE" CO.  (If. Thomas)
"Wooolands"
Bean Hartford,
Kent, England.
(The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, O. D.
Graduate Aptometrist and Optician.   Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tuesday
MEDICAL FUND BUILDING
Hours: 1.80 to 5.30—7 to 9p.m.
s     FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO,, LTD.
Office t«H) Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
SAWING   WOOD
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office and  Residence:   Willard
Block.   -   'Phone 116.
The buck-saw, like the grain cradle,
ls practically an instiution of tho
past. A necessary evil once, it should
now be regarded as an antiquated Invention for driving boys oft' the farm,
and relegated to the museum lor
curiosities.
The one-man cross-cut is a little
better, while the two-man cross-cut
is a distinct step in thc evolution of
sociability. It has its place in tlle
bush ,of course, and even tlle other
Instruments of torture aforementioned find occasional employment, Just
as the old grain cradle is resurrected
now and then for some special purpose; . ,
As a regular means of working up
the winter wood pile, however, these
are only to be advocated for one who
ahsoltuely has not and cannot get the
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Connecting ivith Boat at Union Bay
every Sunduy Morning. Leave Cumberland Hotel, 8 o'clock.
cash'to hire a buzz-saw outfit. Mod
ei n life Is too busy und full of interest
to spend unnecessarily iu back-testing
mechanical routine which machine!-
enables us to dispense with. Most
of ub can find enough manual-labor
jobs after we have substituted as
much gasoline for muscle as we have
wit to use.
We have heard arguments that
buzz-sawing wood is more expeusi
! than buck-sawing.     Uut these calculations are  generally  based on  old
! time conditions. As it works oul
in these times, most of us find that
gasoline beats elbow grease hy a sul
stantlal margin. There Is this, too.
that buzz-sawing is a more or les:
sociable job which goes with a vim
and men quite properly prefer It to
the tedium of band-sawing,
Again, it will be noticed that the
farmer who buzzes his supply get
the job over with and goes on to
something else, while the buck-saw
adherent Is hardly ever out of a job.
The wood pile .stares him In the face
until he hates to go past it.
What a comfort there is in looking
at a big heap of sawed lire-wood in
the yard when a cold snap comes ou
and the snow piles deep around the
buildings.
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladles' and tlents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. I imp lu and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent In Cumberland, who
wlll advise you on nny work you wish
lo have done.
Our   Work   anil   Service
Will Please Tim : :     : :
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, II.C.      -      Plume IWltt
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
I'nion Bay Road
NEW LAMP
BURNS 94% AIR
Heals Electric or (his
A new oil lamp that gives au amazingly brilliant, soft white light, even
better than gas or electricity, has
been tested by the U. S. Government
and 35 leading universities and found
to be superior tn HI ordinary oil lamps.
11 burns without odor, smoke or noise
—no pumping up, Is simple, clean,
safe. Hums 049! air and 11',', common kerosene (conl oil.)
The Inventor, J. II. Johnson, 57!) Mo-
Dermot Ave., Winnipeg, Is offering io
send a lamp on lo days' KREE trial,
or even to give one FREE to the first
user In each locality who will help
him Introduce It. Write him to-day
for particulars, Also ask him to explain how you can get the agency, and
without experience or money make
(250 to $r,nii per month. —30-47.-1628.
SECOND-HAND
FURNITURE
Comox Exchange
Ceurtenay, B.C.
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL   DELIVERY
Delivered to All Ports of DlstrleU
Coal, Wood and (Ioods of An; Kind
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
SLATS' DIARY
TELEPHONE
53
TELEPHONE
By ROSS FARQtJHAB
Friday—well pa and ma thinks they
have got a good joak on me. but I tale
to  see  wherebouts  the 	
fun comes in on it. It
mite of skared me ia
to spazems or fits or
sum thing of the sort
or other If [ wood not
of had a very strong
mind ami etc. This
evning when I arrived
hack home frum skool
ma she meets me al the
door and yells Hun and
gel a Pastor quick yure
pa wants him rite Immediate, Well I rim
ut tiie rate of about 20
miles a hr. and wandered what cud he I lie
matter with pn weather the (Mamas
shopping was to much for him or
weather he hud had sum apploxy or
etc. Wtell I found the pastor and we
runs hack and when we cuius in pa
was a holding up the sealing In the
kichen and very scorniahly Informed
me he wanted a Plasterer. I cant
repeat the grammar he used for 1 cant
spell it uud wood get lammed if I
did.
Saterdny—Have got a' still' neck today and ma is disable to flggcr it out
and I dldent tell her that Ive ben
looking up here of lately on acct.
ther emite he sum misseltoe around
I mite miss.
Sunday—1 of pa's fellow associates
witch went on a trip a cupple weens
ago has returned back marryed. Pa
sed to liim. Hows cum you went &
got marryed so suddenly I thot you
was only Hurting. He lull's silly and
i'oplyed.     Yes He 1 thot so to.
Monday—A man cum to skool aud
give us kids a tawk today and sed how
wanderfiil it was lo go to skool and a
lot of similar junk. Personly the
best part of going to skool Is the comeing home.
Teusday—Are basketball team Is
skediilled to ploy with the Alumiia
team this wk. and Jake has hen in-
qutreing around and trying to Hnd
out where Alumna Is and is It in this
country.
Wenesday—ma wns at afair well
party tonite for a lady witch is a going on a trip out to Reno to get her
husband exchanged. Pa and me had
a very pleasant evning with Pop corn
and teaching me a new Clilnesiau
game inlltled Mn Junk.
Tliirsday—They nre 2 girls got to
xplane sum tiling to me when I gel
a chance to ast them about it. They
kep looking at me all the p.m. & I
cuddent tell weather they was admiring me or slandering me behind
my face.
MILLION DOLLAR PLANT
FOR CHILLIWACK
It is reported that the Mainland
Portland Cement Co., will build a
million dollar plant at Cilliwack, B.C.,
east of Vancouver, on the Canadian
.National  Hallways.
The busiest doctors nnw-a-days are
automobile doctors." judging from a
recent remark made by nn M.I), "(f
men took as good care of themselves
is they do of their automobiles tliis
would be a generation of athletes."
Willard or Not
—Come to Us
The man who has in
hit car some other battery than a Willard, ia no
lesa welcome here on
that account.
We are always glad to
consult with you about
any battery problem, regardless of the make
you own.
SPARKS CO.
Courlenay—Phone 9!)
Willard
of Canada PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1023.
*******************—<»———
The New ffincto* Sedan
In the New Fordor Sedan the well-known Ford sturdiness,
dependability and economy have been combined with a
degree of convenience and refinement that makes this the
most remarkable closed car value ever offered.
The front seat in this new model is of the full-width
stationary type. Four doors are provided, affording easy
access to front or rear from either side.
Upholstery and appointments are of a quality and completeness hitherto obtainable only in cars of much higher price.
You are cordially favited to inspect this remarkable new car
at the neares! Ford dealer's showroom.
New Ford Prices
Coupe, $665 Fordor Sedan, $895
Electric Staring and Lighting Equipment Standard on these models.
Touring Car, $445        Runabout, $405        Truck, $495
Electric i tafti.:a ui.J Lighting Equipment $85.00 extta.
Prices I p. b. Kurd, Ontario     Government Taxes exira
All Ford models may be obtained through
the Ford Weekly Purchase Plan
•CARS•TRUCKS <TRACTORS-
Corfield Motors Ltd.
Courtenay, B. C.
I FORD    MOTOR    COMPANY    OF    CANADA,    LIMITED.    FORD.   ONTARIO
I    '•        ~,TI—> -snsvsjaMn	
p.r.^^-^v^ss»v»»m -■-x-r#r<i*ma.mBMB*mt**m
TAX ON FUEL OIL
IS OPPOSED BY
CONSERVATIVES
No Politics ill Levy on American Fuel
Sloan Declares—Americans Dump
Here, He Charges
Taxation of imported American fuel
oil, as provided for in legislation Introduced by the Government, was approved by the Legislature Wednesday
by 20 votes to 12. W. J. Dowser,
leader of the Opposition, in opposing
Lhe tax, was unable to rally even the
BUpport of his own followers, W. A.
.McKenzie and John McRae votitig
with the Government, Thomas I'p-
hlll. Samuel Guthrie and R. II. Nee-
lands. Labor, and George Unties and
Thomas Menzies. Independent, nlso
voted for the fuel tax, which received
Ihe support of ull Liberals. Kenneth
Duncan, Independent, joined with \V
J, Dowser, Opposition lender, and
most of thc Conservatives In opposing the tax.
Passage ol the Government's Fuel
V>'
BUCKLEYS
BRONCHITIS
MIXTURE
COUGHS
AT ALL DRUGGISTS «
Sold in Cumberland by
LANG'S DRUG STORE
Tax through Its second reading followed a vigorous speech by Hon. William Sloan Minister of Mines who answered Mr. Dowser's charge that he
was playing politics in proposing a
tax on Imported oil.
"The charge that I am trying to
gain political strength in my own riding by this tax is very amusing," Mr.
Sloan remarked. "The Idea that the
imposition of taxation will please the
public at this time is an entirely new
theory in political economy.
"If any politics are being played
they are being played by the Leader of the Opposition. He knows that
he cannot get support In any of the
mining constituencies "of the Province
so be is willing to sacrifice them In
the hope of gaining strength elsewhere."
Mr. Sloan remarked that Mr. Dowser was advocating the abolition ot
the personal property tax but so far
hnd suggested no substitute to raise
necessary revenue. The fuel oil tax,
the Minister explained, would help to
make up the revenue lost through a
llfty per cent reduction In thc personal property tax as provided for in
the Government's annual budget. The
Asscociuted Hoards of Trade of British Columbia, Mr. Sloan recalled, had
endorsed a tax on imported fuel oil.
Tho idea that a tax of half a cent
a gallon on Imported fuel oil would
make the price of this commodity prohibitive and thus cripple industry was
absurd, Mr. Sloan declared. He
pointed out that a tax of this kind
had been louicd hy tho Federal Government since 1916.
American fuel oil, the Minister
stated, is replacing 1,000,000 tons of
coal in this province annually. This,
lie said, caused the government a loss
of $100,000 a year In coal royalties.
In ten years the Provinclnl Government had lost $2,900,000 In this way.
It wns time, he declared that British
Columbia took measures to recoup
herself and prevent the Federal Government grabbing all the money.
Fuel oil importations arc hitting
the coal industry in this Province
hard, Mr. Sloan warned tbe House.
Coal production, he sold, had dropped
WITHOUT MEDICAL EXAMINATION
Highest Quality Job Printing at The Islander Office
from 2,800,000 tons ln 1910 to 1,600,000
tons ln 1916 . The sum of $50,000,000
had been sent out of British Columbia
in the last ten years, to purchase American fuel oil, he stated. If that
money were in circulation here now,
business conditions would be much
better than at present
Mr. Dowser, he said, had always
been antagonistic to the coal Industry and the former Conservative Government had even arranged, when
building the wing of the Parliament
Duildlngs which Includes the Assembly Chamber to have it heated with
oil.
The Conservative Party Is not a
unit in opposing a fuel oil tax, Mr.
Sloan remarked, as Hon. H. H. Stevens, when Minister of Trade and
Commerce, had premised the people
of Nanaimo to Increase the present
Federal Government levy on Imported oil.
"I hnve reliable Information to the
effect that American fuel oil ls being
dumped In this province," the Minister
dcclnred. Price of oil here is so
low, In fact, that the new tax could
not possibly prohibit Ub use here.
While coal prices are high here now
tbey are high everywhere, he pointed
out. He had urged coal companies
he stated, to build coal bunkers ln
Vancouver and Victoria to reduce the
price of coal at these ports.
Mr. Dowser explained that the former Conservative Government had first
arranged to heat the Parliament Dullil
Ings with fuel oil but had changed
this plan without outside pressure.
He added that the old government had
opposed the plan of the Railway Commission to make the use of fuel oil
In Esquimau and Nanaimo Railway
locomotives compulsory.
Tho government won out by a hnnd-
Bome majority on the timber export
question, and by a vote ln the House
the Legislature decided to ask Ottawa
to have tho whole matter referred to
the royal commission at present Investigating the export of Canadian
pulpwood. Hon T. D. Pattullo, minister of lands, persisted in his de.
fence that the best Interests of the
industry and of the public were being
Berved by permitting export In a limited manner, and he again warned of
the probable retaliation of the United
States It an embargo were placed. He
showed that folly ot Interfering wilh
a market at present absorbing two-
thirds of the manufactured tlmher of
British Columbia.
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTMNDINTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens on declaring Intention
tu become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and Improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regu-
.atiuiiH regarding pre-emptions Is
given lu Bulletin No. 1, Lund Series.
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which tran be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Gov-
-'.-nment Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, und which ls not timber-
land. I.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions aro
lo be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the land applied for
Is situated, und are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five years and Improvements made
tu value of $10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivating at least Ave
acres, before u Crown Grant can be
rect'I\ ed.
For more detailed Information see
the tiulietlii "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received fur purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, nut being tlmburland,
fur agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) landis 15
per acre, and second-class (grating)
land |2.50 per ucre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown in mis is given in Bulletin
No. 10, Laud Series, "Purchase and
Lease or Crown Lands."
Milt, factory, or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 aores,
may he purchased or leased, the conditions including payment of
si it it ■page.
HOMESITE LEASES
Tnsurveyed areas, not exceeding SO
aires.' may he teased as homesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
elected in 'the first your, title being
obtainable after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For giazlug and Industrial purposes areas not exceeding 540 aores
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province Ib divided Into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing Commissioner. Annua]
grazing permits are Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers  and   travellers,  up  to  ten
a* 1?
as
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1923.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE SEVEN
siiiifflaHiaisKEiBiBja
s
The Craig Piano
" An Instrument You'll
Be Proud To Own."
Here is an instrument, low in price, yet possessed
of all the qualities of a piano of the highest grade.
Its smooth, sensitive touch, the rich brilliant singing tone, the exquisite cabinet work, each in their way
delight the most critical tastes.
The cabinets are executed in rich Mahogany,
Walnut and Fumed Oak finishes, and the new models,
embracing as they do, every latest feature of workmanship and finish, are striking examples of Craig
worth.
We sell the Craig Piano on the most liberal terms,
and will be delightetd to demonstrate it to you at your
convenience.
G. A. Fletcher Music Co.
LIMITED
"Nanaimo's Music House"
22 COMMERCIAL STREET
NANAIMO, B.C.
PROTECT THE LAWN
DURING THE WINTER
During the winter the area which
In summer is a lush green carpet in
front of the house is often abused.
Frequently It is not only neglected,
but maltreated. Occupants of the
house during sessions ot cold weather
are prone to remind themselves that
"a straight line is the shortest distance between two points and often
they economize In distance travelled
at the expense ot the lawn.
A well-beaten path made across the
lawn in winter will probably work
permanent damage. The grass may
be killed and the soil so compactetd
that grass seed sown thereon the next
season will not thrive. Such a path
will generally be obvious for a number of years. A "cow path" Ib distinctly an unattractive feature on a
lawn. The lawn sign of summer.
"Keep off the Paths that are Making"
may well be heeded throughout thc
year.
Another sin against a lawn is to
flood It for the purpose of making a
skating rink. A body of ice over
the lawn tn winter is almost certain
to completely kill the grass. The
grass will not tolerate for a long time
a covering which precludes movement
ot air.
Young lawns should have a cover
ing of snow. A windswept lawn.
blown free of snow In winter, is likely to lose much of its young clover.
Brush spread about tends to deflect
the wind and holds the snow.
PRUNING OF TREES
It Is generally conceded by both
scientific investigators and commercial growers that fruit trees should he
pruned during the Ilrst two or three
years of their life. Tliis pruning is
designed to produce a well balanced
tree with a strong framework capable
of carrying heavy crops as the tree
grows older. Experiments have
shown that as a rule unpruned trees
come into hearing earlier than those
which are pruned. Failure to prune
trees when they are small; however,
commonly results In serious trouble
ln later years. Such trees frequently
develop too many main branches, bad
crotches are formed, and the percentage of breakage is heavy.
When the tree has passed the formative period the necessity for pruning Is not quite so obvious, but most
authorities are agreed that even after
the tree reaches bearing age it is
still advisable to pay It an annual
visit with the pruning sheers. The
object of this is to remove all interfering branches and to open out the
tree so that the sunlight can pene
trate to each fruit spur. The labor
thus expended is fully paid for by the
improvement in the grade of fruit
produced.
The dormant season is tiie logical
time for pruning although when the
wood is frozen the work may not be
very agreebale to the grower.   Where
young trees or stone fruits are concerned It is probably advisable to delay the pruning until late winter or
early spring, but bearing apple trees
: can be pruned in zero weather without-apparent Injury.     Pruning Is one
major orchard  operation  which  can
be performed to advantage during the
winter months.     At this time there
are  no  leaves  to Interfere  with   the
I vision of the primer and consequently
: he is  better able    to    judge    which
| branches  should be  removed.      Fur-
' thermore, it is only during the winter
to this work.
Consistent and systematic annual
pruning niil in producing more extra
fancy fruit.
appetite of Christinas and New Year
travellers along the National Way.
Elaborate preparations were made by
the department to give those who
were unfortunate enough to be away
from home for the holidays, as many
of the comforts and pleasures of the
season as possible if they happen to
be travelling on the Canadian National.
A LUCKY CATCH
TWO TONS OF
CHRISTMAS PUDDINGS
The week before Christmas was
spent by the Canadian National Railways dining car department In the
preparation of two tons of Christmas
pudding, half a ton of turkeys with the
proper ratio of "flxlns", to whet the
J. WESTOVER,     MARYPORT AVENUE
District Representative
HBiaiEMaiEiaisjaiaii^^
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
Try our 100 P.C. Whole Wheat Bread, made by special
process which enables the body to assimilate the full
nutrition of the Wheat Berry. Our local doctor eats
no other and highly recommends it.
Firit Clatf Certificate (Upper Grade) for
Bread   Making   guarantees   the   quality.
The Courtenay Tea Room
A Rare Bargain
By special arrangement with the Family Herald
and Weekly Star of Montreal, we are able to offer that
great family and farmpaper at a very attractive price.
The Family Herald * Weekly Star cost $2.00 per year
The Islander costs $2.00 per year
We now offer both papers for $2.50 and you save $1.90
In addition, each subscriber receives a Beautiful
picture entitled
"The Wonderful Heroine"
This beautiful work of art, in ten colors, is 18 x  4
inches in size, on a rich, heavy paper, ready for framing
Orders for this Club must be sent to
THE ISLANDER
P.O. Drawer 430 Cumberland, B. C.
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite  llo-Ilo Theatre
(TMhuki.anh, b.c.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical  Barber,  and  Hairdresser, Shampooing, Singeing,
Massaging,    Scalp    Treatment.
BUFFALO FOR
NEW ZEALAND
The one time king of the Western
Canadian plains will shortly be represented ln New Zealand by three members of the Walnwright herd, which
are leaving shortly via the Canadian
National for Vancouver and thence to
their destination ln charge of thc Government Merchant Marine.
I have met many, many men who
are always Ilrst in the line when
brains were being distributed,
Ho-Ho Theatre
CUMBERLAND
FRIDAY and SATURDAY, Dec. 28 & 29
2 'THE    ENGLISH   COMEDY   SENSATION f       2
BIG ME AND MY GAL i big
p BY WBLSH.PBAIION                                        r            f1
_ With Betty Balfour England's Foremost Comedienne     ?        _,
C (      Characters ihat Made England Roar with Laughter      .         C
BLIMEY!
IT'S A HIT!—IT'S A  SCREAM!
More English Than Piccadilla Circus, More Fun Than A Picnic.
Hoot Gibson EXiRA     "The Rambling Kid"
6 Reels Of Action, And Oh Boy! The Horse Race In This Picture Is A Knockout.
MATINEE
SATURDAY
2.30 p.m.
2.30 p.m.
MATINEE
SATURDAY
DANCE SATURDAY NIGHT 9.30 P.M.
 MONDAY AND TUESDAY	
Specially selected for the holidays   The greaest picture Mix ever mnde.
TOM MIX IN HIS FIRST BIG SPECIAL
8 Reels-'SOFT BOILED"-8 Reels
He didn't believe in women or jazz, as he had to be soft boiled to win an inheritance, but
before the end he becomes the two-fisted Mix of old.    There are pretty girls, anil snappy
cabaret scenes and the picture is full of com cdy.
Children 25c.
Adults 50c.
Children
15c.
SPECIAL MATINEE NEW YEARS DAY
AT 2.30 l\M.
Adults
35c.
Big New Year's Dance Ilo-llo Hall
Prizes for Novelty Dances                                           Free Drawing for 2 big Turkeys
 The Junior's Football Club Drawing for 100-lb Pig	
Dancing 9.30 P.M. to 2.30 a.m.
A team of horses, sleigh, double set
of harness, enough provisions for the
winter, and $50 in cash was what an
Indian received for the catoh thai disappointed his ten-year-old sun. Little
Boulder, who set his trap to catch
weasels and regarded with disgust
the snarling little black animals he
found therein Inter. The catch proved
to be n beautiful specimen of silver
black fox ,which was duly appreciated
at thc Hudson's Uay Company trading post nt Green Lake, where the
young trapper's father traded it In,
H.
ere a
nd There
In appreciation of its wonderful
exhibit at the Toronto Exhibition
this year, the Canadian Pacific Kail-
way has been awarded a special
medal.
The Prince cf Wales' Ranch at
High River, Alberta, contributed
the highest priced bull at a recent
fall sale in Calgary, Princeton Crusader, whi h fetched $245.
Canadian wheat exports for the
twelve months ending September
80th, 1923, amo intcd to 226,747,861
bushels, valued at $2611,445,816,
while for the twelve months ending
September, 1:12:1, they were 100,687,-
898 bushels, valued at $104,677,125,
according to a report of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
Exports of bacon from Canada to
Great Britain increased almost 3,-
000,000 pounds during the first
nine months of the current calendar
year. For this period, during 1922,
there were 70,988,000 pounds of
Canadian bacon shipped to the
British market, while this year th.
corresponding figure rose to 73,-
934,000 pounds.
The value of the asbestos exports
of Canada for the 12 months ended
i August, 1923, according to the Do-
I minion Bureau of Statistics, exceeded the value of those of the previous year by nearly $3,000,000. These
exports for the last year amounted
to 202,018 tons, valued at $8,375,-
249, compared with 122,785 tons,
valued at $5,604,551 in 1922.
The first consignment of 1,000
' pounds of British Columbia Douglas
fir seeds has been shipped to the
British Forestry Commission, London, by the Dominion Forestry
Branch, from its plant at New Westminster, British Columbia. The
seeds were extracted from the cones
recently gathered in the Fraser Valley districts.
The year 1923 will see a new re-
J cord in Alberta coal production.    It
is expected the total production for
the year will reach  7,000,000 tons,
in comparison with less than 6,000,-
000 last year.    The  production up
to  November 1st is   1,500,000 tons
j greater than the production for the
' same period last year.    The record
production  previously  was in 1920,
when 6,400,000 tons were produced.
The pay-roll this year is expected
to exceed $18,000,000.
Great interest is being manifested
in the International Dog Derby to
be run at Quebec during thc Winter
Carnival on February 21st, 22nd and
23rd, 1924. The race is for teams
of huskies driven by Indians, trappers, traders, mail carriers and others. At present ten entries have
been received and others are expected from thc north shore of the
St. Lawrence and from the Abilihi
mining district. As navigation will
soon close, it will be necessary for
entries from the latter district to
mush 400 miles to reach Quebec.
About five American teams will
probably take part, their object being to regain the gold cup for the
United  States.
m
What might have resulted in a
very serious train wreck was avoided
in the nick of time on the Canadian
Pacific Itailway Parry Sound subdivision, by section foreman Con-
zani, who while patrolling the track
near Brignall recently discovered
two large iron nuts on lop of the
rails, securely fastened with hay
wire. The foreman had just time
to unfasten the wire and remove
the nuts to clear the track for u
train wos due in five minutes. Two
boys in the vicinity admitted, after
questioning, that they wired the
nuts to tbe rails. They were sentenced to the local shelter for one
month and their fathers were required to give bond and report to
the authorities for two years,
Evidence given by farmers before the U.S. Tariff Commission
showed that under American railway rates a bushel uf wheat could
be hauled only 35 miles for one
cent, while under Canadian ratci
the same amount of money would
move the same amount of grain Oil
miles. American farmers claim that
this is a saving in favor nf the
Canadian producer of 44 per cent,
or nbout 8 cents a bushel. The reason given for the difference is that
in the United States grain rates are
based on cost of moving it to-day,
while in Canada they nre based on
1H97 costs, when the Crow's Nest
Pass agreement was made between
the Government and the Canadian
Pacific ?^:?^
EIGHT
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1923.
I
Wishing You The Compliments
Of The Season
And Prosperity Through
The Coming Year
DRYGOODS
& GENTS FURNISHINGS
PRIZE WORTH WINNING
That her trip aorosH Canada over
the Canadian National Railways en
route to Los Angeles is a prize woll
worth winning, was conceded this
week by Miss Ethel Redman, of Mon
tieal, winner of the recent content
field by thc Elks of that city. The
competition look (he form of a fancy
dress carnival and .Miss Redman, costumed as Miss Life-Saver, was chosen
as the prettiest girl In tbe immense
ball room of the Mount Royal Hotel,
where the big carnival was held. Tho
prize consists of the trip to Hollywood, where the winner plays a leading role in the picture "The Elk's
Tooth," which will be produced there
for tho Lodge.
WITH THE CHURCHES
HOLY  TKIMTY  ANGLICAN
Sunday, December 30, 1923.
Holy Communion 11 a.m.
Sunday School 2.30 p.m.
Evensong 7 p.m.
—Rev.  W. Leversedge
UJIACE METHODIST CJIVKCJI
Sunday, December 30, 1923.
Morning Service I la.m. Subject--
"Opportunity."
Sabbath School 11:45 a.m.
Eevening Service 7 p.m. A New
Year Message. Subject—"The Strange
and Untried Pathway,"
Remember the children's Christmas
Tree Aid Concert to-night 8 p.m.
Everybody  welcome.
Rev. J. R, Rutler, Pastor.
A MODERN SANTA CLAUS
Local Briefs
The dunce nt the Ilo-llo Hall on
New Year's Night will be a Leap Yenr
Dance. There will be a tree drawing tor two fat turkeys; also novelty
dances for which prizes will be given.
Thc Juniors are also holding their
drawing for the 100-lb. pig at this
dance.
* *   *
Douglas Partridge, who lias been
attending the University ot B.C., is
spending the holidays with his parents, Mr, and Mrs. P. Partridge.
* *   *
Mr. T. Jackson, inspector of mines,
arrived in town Wednesday on his
usual tour of inspection.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Thompson
arrived back in town on Wednesday,
after spending Christinas holidays in
Nanaimo witli relatives.
* *   .
Cyril Michell arrived In thc oily
Saturday night to spend the Christmas
and New Year holidays with his
father and sister.
* *   *
Ile sure and ask for "Flnx-o-lenc '
at Lang's Drug Store.
* *   *
Frank Potter, who lias been attending U.B.C., is spending the holidays
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James
Potter.
* *   *
Commit this to memory "Flax-o-
lcne" will relieve my cough."
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. T. Lewis lett Friday
morning last to spend the holidays in
Seattle.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. J. Bond left this morning to spend the New Year's holiday
In Nanaimo.
* *   *
Results count. Hundreds of lhe
people in this vicinity depend on
"Flax-o-lene" for colds and coughs.
* *   *
Hawthorne and Thomas Graham, of
the University school, Victoria, are
spending the holidays with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Graham.
* *   •
Dr. Bruce Gordon is leaving for
Vancouver Monday morning to spent
New Year's Day with friends ill that
city.
Morton, Tom and Pierce Graham are
spending the holidays in Cumberland
with their parents, Mr. and Mrs, Thos.
Graham.
WEDDING BELLS
On Christmas Eve. iu the Presbyterian Manse Cumberland. Miss Donella
May Hindi ,of Bowser, B.C., was united in marriage to Mr. Joseph George
Davis of Union Bay. A brother of the
bride and a sister of tbe groom acted
as groomsmanand bridesmaid. Ths
bride was beautifully gowned in blue
silk and silver lace, while the brido
made wore Jadd silk, trimmed witn
fawn.
After the cermony the happy couple
left for Union Bay whore the wedding
supper was partaken and a good time
enjoyed by all.
Hev. James Hood performed the
ceremony.
She   called   him   skunk   In   wrathful
tone,
But he made her repent;
She said, "you're right, you're not u
skunk,
You never had a (s)cent."
CUMBERLAND 3
LADYSMITH 1
CAHP OK THANKS
Mr. and Mrs. P, Horwood and family
of Minto, tender sincere thanks to
those who so kindly assisted them
and for tbe many expressions of sympathy received, at the loss of their
dear turn and brother, Raymond.
A minister who was a good sinner
for ten years before beginning to
preach, usually knows how to preach
against sin.
Sunday, December 23, Cumberland
United journeyed to Ladysmith to try
conclusions with that fast-stepping
soccer team in an upper-Island league
fixture, and came out on the big end
of a 3-1 score.
Graham kicked oh" for Cumberland
aud inside of ten minutes of hard
pressing he managed to shoot his
team's first goal. Not long after this
reverse, Ladysmith returned the attack with the result that Gough, who
was hard pressed, handled tbe ball in
the penalty area. MeCormick took
the kick and scored ou Blair with a
shot that gave the Cumberland goalie
absolutely no chance to save, although he made a great effort to do
so. This goal, which put the teams
on even terms, was incidentally Ladysmith's only tolly in the game. Play
continued fairly even until half time
with both teams taking turns at pressing.
For a few minutes in the second
half, Ladysmith pressed very hard but
Blair was equal to the occasion and
saved time and again by a brilliant
display of goaltending. Graham and
Co. then got going and made straight
for Boyd who came out to meet them;
the first shot struck the up-right aud
rebounded to Turner's foot with the
result that this player put Cumberland one up with a hard drive. For
the remainder of the time it was Cumberland's game and about three minutes from time Bannerman scored the
third gonl by rushing past the fullbacks and kicking hard into tiie
corner, giving Boyd no chance. This
ended the scoring for the game, making Cumberland 3 and Ladysmith 1.
Graham and Turner wero the stars
of the forwards while both half-backs
lines were very good. Matt. Guineas
refereed the game to the satisfaction
of everyone.
New Year, 1924
In sincere appreciation of your valued patronage and our pleasant business relationship during
this closing year, we extend to our esteemed patrons and friends our hear tiest wishes for a Bright
and Happy New Year.
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. Grocery
SERVICE QUALITY
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
KKCOKD   EXCHANGE,   tVINMPEft.
lised records exchanged twenty for
dollar also new records for old. Bur-
gain catalogue free. Krcords lu
twenty foreign languages.
PUBLIC NOTICE
Make up
beat It.
your mind to be "it" or
THE world is getting so big and J
there are BO many little folks
and big folks in it who look!
forward to n visit from Santa
Clnus, all rfn the same day, that
the genial old gentleman is forced
by the pressure of his duties to
discard his reindeer and his sleigh
«»n occasions and to travel on the
fast passenger trains that arc
speeding people home for Christmas Day. ' Nothing but the very
best will do Santa Claus, und that
is why, as you see here, he has
chosen as his steed one of thc huge
locomotives of the Canadian National Railways. These locomotives, known as tho 0000 type, are
the biggest passenger locomotives
In Canada. Santa Clnus posed for
this picture when he was Inspect*
ing tne engine so that all thc boys
and girls, and grown-Ups, ton.
could be sure that he would reach
thom on Christmas Eve.
The  Gift Shop
Did you forget to send any of
your friends a gift at ChristmasP
Start thc New Year Right!
Send A New Year Gift
Don't forget anyone for old-times sake!
We can assist you in chosing the right gift.
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"IT PAYS TO DEAL AT LANG'S"
PUBLIC    NOTICE    IS    HEREBY
GIVEN to the Selectors of the Municl-
pulfty of the Corporation of the City
of   Cumberland   that   I   require   the'
presence of the unit! Electors ut the i
Municipal  Coucil  Chambers  oil   the
11th Day of January 1924, at 12 o'clock j
noon, for the purpose of electing persons to represent them ln the Munlcl-
pal Council us .Mayor and Aldermen
(Six),   Police   Commissioner    (One)t)
und School Trustees (Two).
The mode of nomination of canili-.
dales shall be as follows:—The can-'
dldates shall be nominated in  writing; the writing shall be subscribed,
by two voters cf the Municipality as
proposer and seconder, and shall be
delivered to the Returning Officer at |
any  time  between  the date of  this
notice and 2 p.m., of the day of the
Nomination; the said writing may be |
In the form numbered 5 in thc Schud- i
uie of this Act, and shall state the .
names, residences and occupation or i
description of each person proposed,.
In such   manner   as   sufficiently   to,
; identify such candidate;  and, in thc
j event of a Poll being necessary, such
Poll will be opened on the 17th day of
' January, 1924, at the Municipal Coun-
' cil Chambers, of which each and every
I person   Is   hereby   required   to   take'■
notice and govern himself according-:
iy.
■ The Qualifications necessary fnr
Mayor, ure; (1) Must be of Ihe full
age of 21 years and a British subject,
and have been for Ihe six months next
preceding the dale of nomination, the
! owner of lnnd and Improvements within the City of the value, as assessed
j on the lust assessment roll, of one
thousand dollars or more over and
above all registered Judgments and
charges.
!    The   Qualifications   necessary   for
! Alderman, Police Commissioner and
School Trustee, nre; Must he of the
full age of 21 years and a British subject, and who have been for the six
months next preceding the date of
nomination and are registered In the
I,and Registry office as owners of land
or land and Improvements .within the
City, of the value as assessed on the
last assessment roll, of five hundred
dollars or more over and above all
registered judgements and charges.
Given under my hand at Cumberland this Twenty-seventh day of Dei-ember  1923.
(Signed) ALBERT J. MERRY,
Returning Officer.
Why
does ihe0
wind blow?
—because air becomes lighter
sad rises is it grows warmer,
sad heavier cold air rushes lo
to displace it. When winds bells to blow rough tad rtw, use
ftrtZteaT
Glycerin and Rose Water
lor quick tad gentle healing of
sore, chipped skin. It is also
fragrantly soothing on the ftct
after shaving.
PURETEST GLYCERIN
"clevis t crystal" is the first
real improvement io glycerin
it many feus. The "best fly.
oft""-"  " —
I prepera-
l hygiene.
ceria of til" made better
Two of 200 Puretest i
ttoas for health tod I
Every Item the best tha? skill
sod conscleace can produce.
LANG'S
The $9*atl Prut Man
Mbir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections trrlvt tvery
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
til the time.
Henderson's
Courtenay
Billiard
Parlor
Every employer ia looking for men
who know how to do a thing and
then put their foot on the starter.
Billiard and Pool Tables
McPHEE BLOCK (Downstairs).
COOL - LIGHT — CLEAN
COME IN—
LOOK AROUND
BE SOCIABLE
I

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