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The Cumberland Islander Oct 29, 1921

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THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER <"
With which Ii consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTIETH YEAR—No. 44
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1821.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
New Agreement Endorsed by
Mass Meeting of Employees
Practically Same as Previous One, With Minor Changes Which
Favor Men—Amicable Negotiotions Proof of Pleasant Relations Existing Between Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd
and its Thirteen Hundred Employees.
At a mass meeting of the employees of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd. held Sunday night in the Athletic Hall, tht
agreement which has existed between the employees and thi*
company for the past two years was renewed for* a similar period
The only changes in the agreement were minor alterations in the
men's favor.
The scale of wages has been regulated by the Cost of Living*
Commission, which is composed of a representative of the em
ployess, a representative of the company, and the Fair Wagt
Officer, who acts as chairman. The commission investigates thc
cost of living in the district every three months and regulates
wages accordingly.   This provision is in the new agreement.
The negotiations for the new agreement, which involves about one thousand three hundred men, have been
under way for some time, and that
these proceedings were carried on
without any friction whatever arising
speaks volumes for the harmonious
relations existing between the men
and the management of the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited. Great
credit is due the management of Ihe
company for the eminently fair manner in which they deal with the large
number of men whom thoy employ.
The negotiating ot new agreements
between a large body ot workmen and
a company Is always attended with an
element of anxiety on both sides, but
this element was reduced to the minimum In the present instance. Remembering the unhappy state tn which the
labor markets of the world are today,
with living cost falling and wages being radically reduced by some corporations, the pleasant manner In which
the new working agreement was consummated ls a cause of thankfulness
on the part of all concerned.   Follow
ing his broadmiuded and far-seeing
policy of dealing with tlie employees
as 'fellow workers," to use his own expression, Mr. Thomas Graham, the
General Superintendent, has forged
another strong link in the chain of
pleasant relations binding thc company and men together.
Both he and Mr. Charles Graham,
District Superintendent, arc the gentlemen with whom the employees come
Into Immediate contact, hut behind
these men there stands Mr. James M.
Savuge, General Manager, than whom,
probably no large body of employees
have a warmer-hearted friend, who ls
always willing to do bis utmost for the
men's welfare and the betterment of
working conditions.
Previous to tiie mass meeting thc
negotiations were carried on by the
Agreement Committee, comprising R.
Walker, chairman; John Horbury, secretary; A. J. Taylor, R. H. Robertson,
D. Stewart and J. Davis. This committee remains in existence during the
life of the agreement, to negotiate
with the management over conditions
that may arise from time to time.
Public Lecture
Sunday Night
"Thousands   Now   Living  Will
Never Die" Subject of Mr.
W. L. Jones' Discourse.
On Sunday night in tho llo-Ilo
Theatre, a free public lecture will be
given by Mr. Wm. L. Jones ot Vancouver, under auspices of the International Bible Students Association.
"Millions Now Living Will Never
Die" is the subject of the address,
which commences at 8 o'clock. Seats
are free and no collection.
OPENS REAL ESTATE
AND INSURANCE AGENCY
Mr. Thos. E. Bate, who recently disposed of his hardware business to
Hargreaves & Smith, has opened temporary quarters In Maxwell's office,
where he will conduct a general
agency business, giving particular attention to real estate, insurance and
collections. Mr. Bate represents some
strong non-board English insurance
companies, who have cut tlie Cumberland rates very materially.
FINED $300 FOR HAVING
OPIUM IN POSSESSION
Another Case of Alleged Violation of Drug Act Remanded
to Wednesday Next
Before Magistrate J. Baird, on Tuesday, Mah Boo, a son of the Celestial
republic, was charged with having ln
bis possession a number of tins of
opium. Defendant was arrested by
constables of the R. C. M. P. on Monday and released on $500 bail. He
pleaded guilty to Ihe offence nnd was
fined $1100 and costs, with the alternative of three months' imprisonment.
Accused elected to remuin at liberty
and the fine was paid.
Sergt. Bryan prosecuted and Mr. P.
P. Harrison appeared for the defence.
Charge  Against  Charlie  Sing  Cluing
llemniiileil lo Wednesday.
Charlie Sing Chong, who appeared
on a similar charge, pleaded not
guilty. Sergt. Bryan, who prosecuted,
asked for an adjournment, us the two
principal witnesses had been called to
Vuncouver. Mr. Harrison, who np-
peured for defendant, offered no objection und the case was adjourned un
til 11 a.m. on Wednesday next, tbe
bail being' fixed at $750.
Council Voted $120 Towards
Transportation of School Children
Big Deputation Waited on City
Council Monday Seeking
Monetary Assistance.
A large delegation comprising the
three members of the Board of Scliool
Trustees and officers and members of
the Parent-Teacher Association, waited on the City Council Mondoy evening with a view to soliciting their cooperation In providing transportation
for the school children who live on
the Koyston Road, and also in providing equipment for the school grounds,
especially an open shed for shelter iu
the wet weather. t
Mrs. T. E. Banks, chairman of the
School Trustees, Introduced the dele-
gallon and stated the purpose of the
visit, asking If it was at all possible
that the council vote a sum towards
transportation.
The Hon. Dr. J. D. McLean, Minister
of Education, informed the Parent-
Teacher Association by telegraph last
week that the Education Department
would pay halt the cost of transportation.
Mr. C. Campbell, who acted as
spokesman for tbe Parent-Teacher
Association, spoke at length on the
urgent necessity ot something being
done ln regard to the children. They
bad to walk two and three miles to
school ln the winter months in wet and
snow, or either remain away, either
course of which was injurious to them.
Other speakers who made strong
appeals In this direction included Mrs.
Jas. Hood, president ot the association, Dr. E. R. Hicks, secretary, Mr.
J. Sutherland and Mrs. E. Eccleston.
The matter was very fully and freely
discussed from all angles by both the
visitors and mayor and aldermen.
The council was reluctant at first to
.vote any money for this purpose,
saying It was a bad precedent, but after earnest appeals and assurances
that this was of a temporary nature
and not to be taken as a precedent,
the council voted to pay half the cost
of four months' service, quoted at $60
a month, which will only involve the
expenditure of $120 by the council.
TWO PRESENT AT
INDEPENDENT MEETING
Had Given Open Invitation to
All Opponents of Union
Government
Early iu the week posters were distributed around town calling for an
organization meeting of "ull voters
opposed to the Union Government."
Delegates were lo be appointed to attend tiie convention to nominate an
Independent candidate at Courtenay
on Saturday.
Thc G.W.V.A. hall had been engaged
for the occasion, and besides the large
number of local voters expected, a
number of big wigs from Courtenay
were coming up to tell the Cumberland folks what's what, or maybe
who's who, or who aint! However,
the hall was duly opened at 7.30 and
ln it was a nice lire. But all those
opposed to the Meighen Government—
well, there does not seem to be enough
ln this city to cause the Hon! Arthur
Meighen much anxiety. After waiting
45 minutes the total number of ar-
rivals was two, not including a press
representative. The gentleman who
had been requested to arrange for the
meeting was present, as well as another. In all fairness it must be mentioned that another man would have
been present but he was working on
the night shift!
Hallowe'n Frolic
Brilliant Success
Women's  Auxiliary Hold  Best
Celebration of Kind Ever
Given in the City
The Anglican Church Hall was the
scene of an elaborate Hallowe'en
Frolic on Thursday night. The large
ball had been beautifully decorated,
the predominant colors being the well
known Hallowe'en colors, orange anil
black. Six large panels adorned the
walls, each hearing a different design
and surmounted with a profuse arrui
of autumn leaves. The large uunibei
of extra lights that hud been Installed
were covered with lamp shades symbolic of Hallowe'en. Monster pump
kins adorned the corners, mounted on
brackets. Some of the designs on*
these were certainly ghost-like iu appearance--especially one—but as they
used to say In .the Army, no names, no
pack-drill.
One comer had been set aside for a
Witch's Cave, where fortunes were
told, and judging hy the fun some of
the local football team got out of n
visit, tbey must have beeu well satis-
lied.
Dancing commenced shortly after
8.30, with Mrs. Ralph E. Frost at tbe
piano, and Mr. W. A. Owen, violin.
The dance programme was interspersed with songs, instrumental
trios and monologue. Tlle first to be
called on for a song was Mr. W. Carr,
of Union Bay, who sang admirably
"Give Me the Open Road," and in re
spouse to repeated encores sang the
well-known song, "Smiling Thru."
Miss Crawford, also of Union Bay,
sang with great feeling, "Your England and Mine." Miss Crawford took
Ihe hall by storm with her admiral)!*
rendering of this difficult song. For
an encore she sang. "Just A-Wearylng
for You."
Mr. Splttall, on being called on for
a contribution to the programme, responded with an Impersonation of a
little girl, suffering from nervousness,
reciting "The Village Blacksmith."
For an encore Mr. Splttall recited a
comedy poem.
An instrumental trio by the well-
known local artistes, Mrs. R. E. Frost.
Mr. W. A. Owen and Mr. Colvllle
Graham, who played a selection from
"H. M. S. Pinafore," was so well rendered and so well received that they
Iiad to respond again. For their
second selection they played "Humor-
esnuo," which was much appreciated.
Dancing was kept up until 1 a.m..
everyone voting it n most excellent
evening. A good deal of credit for
the success of the evening is due to
Mr. G. Tarbell. In addition to being
the convener of the Dance and Decoration Committee, he was chairman of
the Reception Committee. To Mrs.
Pickard as convener of the Refreshment Committee and to Mr. Tom Scott
as convener of the Programme Committee, credit is also due. Tbey were
ably assisled by the members of the
different committees. Mrs. Pinfold
very ably lilled the hard task of por-
trayiug the character of the witch.
Opening Game of
Second Division
Lantzville and Cumberland City
Teams Open New League on
Sunduy at Athletic Park
CUSTER'S LAST STAND
BIG MOMENT IN FILM
$283.53 REALIZED AT
HOSPITAL W.A. TAG DAY
Thrilling Moments and Charming Love Story in Picture
Showing Tonight.
"Hob Hampton of Placer," the greatest, most fascinating and stirring motion picture ever made hy that master
director Marshall Neilan. wlll be the
attraction-extraordinary at the Ilo-llu
.Theatre this evening. Strong though
this statement may be. It is nevertheless true. But it could be still
stronger. We might add that It Is one
of the finest motion pictures ever
made by anyone. "Bob Hniiipton of
Placer" Is adapted from the Randal!
Parrlsli story of tlie same name. It
presents on the screen an absorbing
story of romance and adventure In tbe
thrilling days of American frontier
history, and as a gripping climax Genera! Custer's famous last stand against
Silting Bull and bis Indian hordes Is
reproduced.
The ride of the Ku Klux Klan in II
Vi. Grlltltli'8 masterful production.
"The Birth of a Nation." curries uo
greater thrill thun the savage ohargo
of the Sioux against Custer aiid bis
gallant little band In "Bob Hampton of
Placer."
And back of it all Is a charming
love story, and a roguish waif who
will make you laugh and perhaps shed
a tear.
A splendid cast has been chosen by
Marshall Neilan to interpret "Boh
Hampton of Placer," which is tt First
National attraction. David Klrkwood
has the title role. Featured players
are Wesley Barry, Marjorie Daw, Pat
0'iYlalley, Noah Beery and Dwlglit
Crittenden, who portrays General Cu -
ter. You simply can't afford to miss
this production.
A funny two-reel comedy, "Torchy,"
will be screened with this feature.
"Tbe Home Stretch" Will Bo Shown
on Mondiiyi
On Monday Douglas McLean will be
seen in "The Home Stretch," nnd in
this feature will be seen one of tl c
best horse races ever shown in pi- -'
tures.   Don't miss it.
The officers nnd members of the
Women's Auxiliary of tlie General
Hospital are very well satisfied with
the results of their labors on Saturday
last, on the occasion of the annual
tag day. to provide funds for working
expenses. A total of $283.53 was collected, made up of $265.33 111 Cumberland and $18.20 from Union Bay. Mrs.
A. Auchlnvole had charge of the Union
Bay collections.
The opening game of tho lippor Island Second Division Football League
will take place on tlie Recreation
Grounds, ('umberlaiid, mi Sunday,
when the newly-organized Cumberland
City team will have as their opponents
"the Lantzville team. The game is advertised to commence at 3 o'clock.
The local executive bus selected a
strong contingent to oppose the visitors, as they do uot intend to take
any chances of losing points. It is
rumored that tin- Lantzville team is a
strong combination and will have In
bo reckoned with. Good football
should he the result of the game. The
Cumberland City team intends to go
right after the bacon in tlie Second
Division League anil Willi tiie line-up
tbey have they should be able lo make
a name for themselves. They have
got youth along with other abilities
on their side, am! onco they get playing together will be a hard team lo
beat. All followers of football should
turn out to see tlie opening game.
Tlle following players have been
selected to play for tlic ('umberlaiid
City team: Foster, Bennle, A. Me-
Wliirter, ft. Brown leapt.), Courtenay,
Slaughter, D. Hunden, Kerr, West-
wood, J. McWbirter, Seott. Reserves,
Fyvie and Toman.
All players and reserves aro requested to be at the Waverley Hotel
dressing room at 2.30 prompt.
ARMISTICE DAY
MASQUERADE   BALI
Prize List Issued for G. W. V. A.
Third Annual Fancy Dress
Ballon Nov. lllh
The prize list for the third annual
masquerade ball lo be held on the
night of Armistice Day, November 11,
under the auspices of the Great War
Veterans' Association is published below. Valuable prizes are offered in
the -different classes, which will undoubtedly draw big entries. This is
always the biggest event of the year
ln fancy costume balls, aud as ou
previous occasions there Is every reason to believe that tlie hall will bo
packed.
Daucing commences at 0 o'clock,
Mid the grand inarch at tl.
Tlic Prizo Lis!.
Best dressed lady, value $6 and $15
cash.
Besl dressed gent, value $5 nnd $15
cash.
Best national lady, value $7.75 and
$2.50 cash.
Best national gent, value $8 and
$2.50 cash.-
Best sustained lady, $5.75 value and
$2,511 cash.
Best sustained gent, value $5 and
$2.50 cash.
Best group representing Allies (four
or more), cash $2n.
Best comic group (three or mure),
$15 cash.
Best comic lady, value $7.50.
Best comic gent, value $7.
Best Red Cross ni'lrse, value $7.50.
Best hobo, value $5.50.
Best clown, value $8.
Best local -advertising character,
value $7.50.
Besl (lower girl, value $-1.
Prize waltz, $10. Entrance fee 50c
per couple.
JUNIOR LEAGUE GAME
ON SUNDAY MORNING
Cumberland and Bevan Juniors
Meet at 11 O'clock on
Home Grounds
The Cumberland Juniors have the
lievan Juulol's as their opponents In
Ihe Cumberland ami District Junior
Leugue game en Sunday next. The
game starts at 11 a,in. on tie* local
grounds. This will he the llrsl time
these (wo tenuis have inel Ibis season.
and as tbey have both been eagerly
awaiting tbe opportunity, and Ibey
are evenly malclied, n good game Is
expeeled.
The Cumberland Junior team: fluffy,
Strachan, Walker, Lockhart, Mitchell,
Farmer, McNeil, Robertson, Bond,
Stewart and Freloni.
Reserves, Stevenson and Gibson.
All players and reserves meet at tlie
Waverley Hotel dressing room at
10.30 a.m. sharp.
G.W.V.A. Notes
The Third Annual Masquerade Ball
to be held In the Ilo-llo nance Hall
on November 11 will be the best yet.
Over $250 In prizes.    -
Champions Defeat Nanaimo
In Strenuous Game Sunday
Great Interest Taken in Game, Several Hundred Fans Motoring
Up From Nanaimo to Boost for Their Boys—Play Was Fast
and Clean, and Refereeing Very Satisfactory—Cumberland
Has Good Lead for Upper Island Championship Again.
A football game tliat created a very great amount of interest
nn tho Island took place Sunday afternoon on the local grounds
when the Nanaimo City team wont on the field to try conclusions
with their rivals of many a soccer battle, the Cumberland United.
Both loams had prepared well for the contest, especially the Hub
City one, who were at greatest strength and had practised hard
the week previous. In fact the enthusiasm shown by the Nanaimo
fans in the game was intense, and they had not only convinced
themselves that the game was iheir's, but their loud advertising
had given a few of Cumberland folks an impression that the
visiting learn might be in it at the finish! However, the Cumber-1
land United, saw lo that, as is tlieir usual custom.
owing to Brewster being offside; a
minute later Sutherland tested Routledge but the latter was right on tbe
spot and saved easily; a free kick was
then granted to Nanaimo against
O'Donnell for a foul throw. Ogle took
the kick and let his side away; matters looked dangerous tor Cumberland
but Campbell came to tbe rescue and
the Cumberland boys pressed hard for
the next few minutes.
I'lie main street of Cumberland had
a lively appearance during the afternoon—except during the progress of
.he game, when it was deserted—as
Nanalmoltes to the estimated number
ol* 5011 came up from Ihe Hub City to
beer their boys on lo victory Automobiles of all shapes und sizes' were
in service, there being a continuous
stream of them coming into town in
Ihe early hours of Ihe afternoon. As
the round-trip is about 150 miles the
large number of visitors indicates the
keen interest taken ill the game.
The weather was Ideal for the players hut rather chilly for spectators;
tlic ground was In llrsl-class condition
and the game hotly contested from
start to finish.
Referee Jones of Vancouver called
tho teanis together promptly at 3
o'clock, tbe personnel of tlie opposing
sides being:
NANAIMO CITY—Routledge, Ogle,
Dickinson, Scott, McDougall, Graham.
O'Brien, Thomas, Redfern, Grelg and
Husband.
CUMIlklKLAND UNITED — Boyd,
Stewart, Campbell, Irvine, Conti,
O'Donnell, Milligan, Brewsler, Sulher-
and, Hitchens und Harrison.
Nanaimo won the toss aud decided
o defend tho east goal. Sutherland
kicked off. Hitchens got possession
from  Sutherland  but was  pulled  up
Cumberland Scores.
Dickinson was playing a sterling
game and kept the home team from
getting too near Nanaimo's goal, and"
for a short-time the game was ot »
give-and-take nature. Conti tstvt*
away a foul by jumping and Dickinson
took the kick. Husband then took tbe
ball right along the field but waa
checked by Stewart. Milligan got
away on the right, beat Dickinson and
sent in a perfect cross, Sutherland
heading it right into the corner of the
net, entirely out of reach of Routledge, thus scoring the first goal for
Cumberland in thirteen minutes from
the start.
Excitement now ran high among the
Cumberland supporters and the game
increased ln speed. Cumberland made
another determined attack on Nanaimo's goal and would have counted a
(Continued on Page Four)
Voters' List
Monday, October 31, la the last day
'.or the registration of householders,
boarders, roomers and holders of
-raiU'ii licences to get on, the 1922
Voters' List. The list closes £1 the
City Hall at 5 fun. on Monday.
Road tiie announcement of the City
Cleric on page four of this issue.
A holder of an agreement of sale
lias until tho -30th day of November
in wliieh (o register.
CUMBERLAND PLAYS
AT LADYSMITH SUNDAY
A general meeting of Cumberland
Lodge Nn. IIIG2. L. O. O. M., will be
held on  Thursday next, November 3,
n Ihe Fraternity Hull, commencing at
7 o'clock.   A largo number of candi-
lates will be initiated ou this occasion.
Winning of Game Will Practically Put League Championship on Ice for United
Cumberland. United journey to Lady-
smith on Sunday to play a return '
league game with the crack Ladysmith
bunch. This game is of vital Interest
to Cumberland, as a win should about
cinch the league championship once
again.
The actual team to make the journey will not be selected until tonight,
but the following are asked to hold
themselves In readiness: Boyd, Campbell, Mortimer, Stewart, Irvine, Conti,
O'Donnell. Bannerman, Milligan, Sutherland, Brewster, Hitchens and Harrison.
Poppy Lady of France Brings Flowers
From Flanders Field for Armistice Day
ORGANIZER THOMPSON
WITH NANAIMO LODGIS
Mr, W. F. II. Thompson, who so
successfully organized the Cumberland Moose Lodge, is now working in
conjunction witb the Nanaimo Lodge,
No. 1052, L.O.O.M. They are out to
make the Hub City lodge the strongest on Vancouver Island, and are meeting with much encouragement so far.
The comrades' attention is drawn to
the "Poppy Day" announcement in un
other part of Ibis issue.
All information re Ihe "Wear a
Flanders Poppy" campaign on Armistice Duy can be obtained Irom Comrades J. C. Hrown and A. .1. Fouracro,
who are In charge of Hie arrangements.
Don't forget the Women's Auxiliary
wills! drive and dance tonight (Friday) in the Memorial Hall. Come ami
have n good time.
Anyone Wishing to rent the Memorial Hail for dances, socials, etc., should
apply lo the G.W.V.A. secretary, 202
Derwent Avenue, or Phono 1D5.
Cumberland G.W.V.A. Arranging l'or Sale of Poppies on
Armistice Day.
"Thu Poppy Lady of France" has
cuino lo Canada with her inspiring
message, "We shall nol torg-jLV
She lias brought with her two millions ot* red poppies, reproductions of
those growing in Flanders Fields between the crosses, row on row, made
by tin; women und children of devastated France.
Sbe Is going to help ruuadu unite
witli France on Armistice Day-in having Hie two countries honor the brave
dead who sleep in French soli.
On tiiis side ot" tlle ueean the Poppy
of Flanders lias been adop'led by the
Greal War Veterans Association ot
Canada and the American Legion, and
will l.u adopted by all the veterans of
die Greal War. in nil Allied countries,
as Hie Flower ol* Remembrance, or
Memorial Flower.
'"tlie Poppy Lady," originator of
tbls splendid idea, Is going from one
allied -country to another lo assist iu
having endorsed this rapidly growing
movement, which seeks not only to aid
Hie children of devastated France and
the wounded veterans of each Allied
country, but, more important, will
leach the children of the Allied
nations to remember and to foster the
old friendships which gained new Impetus upon the battlefields of Europe.
This blood red blossom, immortalized by the poem of Colonel McCrae,
ol the Canadian Army, has come to
symbolize the graves lying Ovei
There, and ls a token of the love and
gratitude France feels for Canada,
'Tiie headquarters of the movement
in Fiance Is the Children's Legion, of
which Madame A. Millernnd, wife of
the President of France, ls the honorary president, and Madame Andre
'.ebon, active president.
On Armistice Day the women and
children of the devastated regions will
decorate thu graves of the Canadian
soldiers, while every patriotic man.
woman and child over here will wear
the poppy to show that the deeds of
the brave have not been forgotten.
•flic local branch of the G. W. V. A.
has received a* shipment of 100 small
and inn large red popples, which of
course are artificial, but very striking
and effective reproductions of (his
lovely Dower, These will be sold on
Armistice Day.
LADIES' FORESTERS
LODGE INSTITUTED
First    Anniversary   of   Court
Bevan Was Celebrated at
Social Gathering
On Snlurday last the first annual
celebration of Court Bevan, No. 9830,
Ancient Order of Foresters,'was held
In the Fraternity Hall, when there was
a large number of members present.
The district olllcers from Victoria
oame up for the oeenslon. ns well as
i iurge delegation of members from
Ibe male and female lodges of Ladysmith.
The feature of the evening was the
Institution, of n Female Lodge In Cumberland, which slnrls off wilh a hig
list of members. The following ofll-
'•ers were elected:
Past Chief Ranger. Mrs. II. Brown.
Chief Hanger. Mrs. T. Clark.
Sub-Chief Hanger. Mrs. J. Derbyshire.
Secretory, Mrs. G. Yarrow.
Treasurer, Mrs. Vi. Beveridge.
Senior Woodward, Mrs. P. Myers.
Junior Woodward, Mrs. It. Smith.
Senior Beadle. Mrs. F. Slaughter.
Junior Beadle, Mrs. A. Waddington.
HALLOWE'EN CARNIVAL
BY LIDDELL ORCHESTRA
On Monday night In the Uo-llo
Dance Hall a Hallowe'en Carnival and
Dance will be held under the auspices
of Liddell's Orchestra. Dancing is
from 9.30 to 2. A novelty in providing
refreshments Is being provided, ns
each person entering will be given a
ticket good for refreshments at the
refreshment stull.
COURTENAY BRIDGE
WILL  BE  CLOSED
CourMiay Bridge is to he closed
from Sunday mnrniiijr till Tuesday at
six o'clock, and the very extensive
truffle which uses the Island HiKh-
way nt this point will have to go
round hy tho Condensnry Road on
leaving Courtenay and turn off the
Lower Road coming from Sandwick
way ln order to get over the river,   . Two
THE  CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
October 29, 1921.
For Quality
and Service
Try
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF THE FINEST
QUALITY GROCERIES
FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES IN
SEASON
SPECIAL AGENCIES:
GREAT WEST TEA PERRIN'S BISCUITS
CRYSTAL WHITE SOAP
THE  REDUCTION  IN  PRICE
HAS CONSIDERABLY
INCREASED THE SALES
FORD TOURING
CARS
NOW SELL AT
$782.09
IN CUMBERLAND
GET   ONE   •
Corfield Motors
FORD GARAGE
COURTENAY
JUST ARRIVED AND ON DISPLAY A BIG SHIP-
MENT OF
Crockery Ware and
Sybil Pattern China
In stock patterns. We can supply one piece or a full
Dinner Set. The Sybil pattern is a very captivating
one and is having tremendous sales in the cities.
ALSO A NICE DISPLAY OF
Hand-Painted Nippon Ware
These comprise some beautiful specimens of Japanese
high-class painting, and are very suitable for presents.
Come in and view these goods at your leisure.
Kitchen Chair Special
 $2.25
Good strong, solid chairs,
at a special price, each	
We have on display some nice Cut Glass Water Sets.
FURNITURE — RANGES — HEATERS „
Hargreaves & Smith
Successors to T. E. Bate Hardware Co.   '
Dunsmuir Avenue Cumberland
THE VALUE OF A TOOTH
Values Natural Trclli ut u Thousand
Hollars Eacli—Dentistry Itolibcd
of lerrors by Modern Skill.
By Peter MacQueen In Dental Hygiene,
There is reliable evidence that the
ancients put great value on their
teeth. The earliest law was "a tooth
for a tooth." "Thou shalt break the
teeth of tho wicket," exclaims the
Psalmist.
In the Doulnk Mountains, at Cairo,
Egypt, I have seen the mummy of the
great Pharoah, Ramcses II., with his
teeth still showing iu a state of perfect preservation, proving that the
Egyptians and the Assyrians had
brought dentistry up to an art, even
ill those remote times.
Jinn, In his most primitive state,
soon saw the value and importance of
bis teeth In the preservation of his
health and comfort. The close connection between good molars and
good digestion was ensily perceived,
although the scientific data of digestion might not have boen known.
Among the lirst navigators tho teetli
were often usod in untying ropes, and
hence came the expression "In the
teeth of the tempest."
Men tore raw meat from the bodies
of the wild beasts tbey slew; and later,
unhappily, learned to bite one another
ln the savage frenzy of the light. Thus
they found that their teeth wore not
only a means of livelihood, but also a
means of defence In battle.
I have seen the Arabs in Africa, and
the wild savages of Uganda, rub their
teeth with sticks of wood and take
care to kep them clean and white.
Among the Moros of the Philippine
Islands, on tho other hand, the teetli
are blackened with the betel-nut; this
they do ln the effort, supposedly, to
make themselves beautiful.
Some tribes in the South Sea Islands
file their teetli and make them look
like saws—thinking thus to make
themselves attractive.
But for whatever reason, whether
for supposed reasons of health or comfort or beauty, man, universally, is
Interested lu his teeth. As tlle ages
came and wont, the Americans with
their great intuition for invention,
emerged upon tlie scene.
They, the most practical people of
history, quickly saw that the terrors
of toothache, the horrors of toothless
old age, the deformity of wrinkles
about a mouth lacking thc natural
outlines produced by regular rows of
teeth, could all he eliminated by scientific dentistry.
I have often said I would not lose a
tooth for live hundred dollars. But
that ls a very low value lo put upon a
tooth.
After the Battle of tho Marne, I saw
an American dentist, at the American
Ambulance Corps, In Paris, restore the
entire jaw of a young English soldier,
by taking the man's own rib and making a jaw out of that.
Early ln the Groat War American
dentists were acclaimed thc leaders.
Miracles of dentistry were performed.
An American dentist gave professional service to the former Kaiser
before the war, and. In a brilliant
book, has given the world perhaps the
best portrait it has yet had of that
Ill-omened man.
The American dentists in the hospitals In France told me that tlic
Arabs had the best teeth and of all
the soldiers of the Allies, the English
had the worst.
Today the Americans are a people
of destiny. Nowhere else ill the world
do people do so much to make childhood happy. In the schools many of
the children have regular dental examinations free. Among all the well-to-
do classes of our land, the lirst parental care Is to look out for the teeth
ol the rising generation. As a result
we have many young men and women
who have never lost a tooth, who
have never lost a night's sleep as a
result of toothache.
The American girl is often acclaimed
the world's most beautiful woman.
And one of her greatest charms usually is a set of almost perfectly preserved white teetli.
At a casual glance, the teeth are
the main feature of the face we see;
hence the Immense importance of having good looking teeth. There is little excuse for anyone having poor
teeth. The dental profession is today
the best developed of any lu tho country. There nre all sorts of crowns,
bridges, Inlays, platos and so forth-
all sorts of scientific dentifrices,
Shrinking gums are now easily prevented. . The pleasing taste of most
dentifrices makes the care of the teeth
not only valuable, but a positive
pleasure.
Novoealne and skillful work by our
dentists make a visit to Ibe dentist's
ofiice no longer a trial but a pleasure.
Anyone who neglects his teeth is
digging his own grave.
I always pay my dentist first—because he makes life worth living.
I was wrong; a good tooth is worth
a thousand dollars.
Big Attendance
At Masquerade
Junior Football Annual Fancy
Dress Dance Was Very
Enjoyable Affair.
Monday night the annual masduer-
e.ie dance given by the Cumberland
lud Division and Junior Football Club
vas held ill tlle Ilo-Llo Dance Hall,
\ lion there was a good attendance of
spectators, though the number of
lancers in costume was not up to exudations. Comic dresses were pre-
loininant. and there were some very
pretty and elaborate costumes to be
teen.
The masked dancers had the floor
rom 9.30 to 11.30. when the difficult
task of judging the 18 classes was
indertaken by Mrs. M. DeCoeur, Mrs.
I'. Reid of Union Bay, Mr. C. Pearce,
Mr. II. Tappin of Union Bay, and Mr.
Cleo. Barton. The judges g»ve every
satisfaction in their awards. Following is a list of winners:
Rest dressed lndy, Miss Jessie Smith.
Best dressed gent, Mr. R. O'Brien, as
"Lord Nelson."
nest sustained character, lady, Mrs.
Fraser, of Union Bay, In an elaborate
Turkish costume.
Best sustained character, gent, Mr.
Fraser Watson, who gave a splendid
Impersonation of a well known char-
icier, "Huckleberry Billy."
Best national couple, lady, Mrs.
Charles Pearce, In Oriental costume;
gent, Mr. Matt Brown, in Indian costume, especially the paint.
Best flower girl, Miss Lottie Lewis.
Rest hobo, Mr. L. Scavardi.
Best comic lady, Mrs. Broder, Union
Bay.
Best comic gent, Mr. Arthur Boyd.
Best advertising character, Misses
Keenan and McLellan, representing
Cumberland Junior Football Club.
Rest clown, Mr. F. Slaughter .
Rest old-fnsliloned couple, Mrs.
Covert and Mr. Cordon Moore of Union
Bay.
Best comic group, Miss C. Hagan,
Miss Vi. Wllcock alld Mrs. J. Pinfold.
Best hard-times costume, Mrs. Sam
Davis.
Best original lady character, Miss
Mitchell.
Rest original character, gent, Miss
Bannerman,
Best artistic costume. Mrs. N. Bevis.
Gent's consolation prize, Mr. Newman.
After a short interval dancing was
indulged In by the spectators ss well
as those in costume until about 2 a.m.
Very line music was provided by
Liddell'B Orchestra.
PRIZE DRAWING
MURDERER KILLS HIMSELF
The Indian, Ernest Taylor, who
murdered three other Indians at Kyuquot and then fled to the woods where
he was hunted by a band of police,
was found dead near the village. Tho
body, with a bullet wound in it, was
reclining against ii tree, and there was
sufficient evidence to satisfy the constables that the fugitive bad taken his
own life.
Following the awarding of prizes
In the masquerade, the prize drawing
was held. A large number of tickets
iiad been sold for this, the successful
holders being;
1st. morocco leather suitcase, Mr.
Hobby Brown, ticket No. 1298.
2nd, ten set, won by ticket No. 528.
3rd. value $3. Mr. Sara Boothman,
ticket No. 974.
4th, sugar and cream dishes, Mrs.
\V. Little, ticket No. 1011.
6th, $2 value, Chow Lee, No. 1324.
6th. flashlight, Mr. R. Bryce, No.
1081.
DONATIONS ACKNOWLEDGED
Acknowledgment   of   further   dona-
ions to the Cumberland Second Dlvl-
•ion  and Junior Football Club masquerade prize list:
Cumberland   &   Union   Waterworks, Ltd $10.00
Dr. G. K. MacNaughton     5.00
\.  Maxwell      2.50
Fletcher Music Co., Ltd. value....   3.00
NAT BEVIS,
For   Executive,   Cumberland   Second
Division and Junior Football Club.
DUNCAN'S WAR CROSS
The handsome memorial cross
which, with tlie cairn ou Mount Pret-
eost, forms the tribute of the people
of the Cowlchan district to their
fallen, will be completed and erected
in Duncan by the end of this month.
The height of politeness ls to get
off a Fourth nvenuo car and give a
iady your standing room.—Kitsilano
rimes.
It Can't Leak,
Because It's Made
in One Piece
A KANTLEEK Is built like ■
bottle—all in one piece.
Most hot-water bottles are
mode in sections, then cemented
toL ether. When cement dries
and cracks, the bottle leaks.
Every Kantleek Hot-Water
Vln?, Is moulded of pure soft
rubber—one continuous piece.
No parts, patches, cement. Even
it*, ppcr socket is moulded in.
And guaranteed for a full two
•years' service—or a new Kantleek free.
Don't wait until your old bag
halts. Get a Kantleek. Your old
one muy Lreak open tonight.
\^
A New Line of Popular
Novels  at   $1.50   each.
BOYS' AND GIRLS' BOOKS, from 20c to $1.00 each
PICTURE BOOKS FOR THE BABIES
JIGGS* BOOKS MUTT AND JEFF
KEEPING UP WITH THE JONESES
BOOKS FOR ALL THE FAMILY
Frost's Pharmacy
THE REXALL STORE
OLD   COUNTRY
A WORD
TO
THE  WISE
FALL AND CHRISTMAS
SAILINGS FOR ALL
STEAMSHIP LINES
ARE AVAILABLE —IF
YOU   ARE   PLANNING
MAKE
Reservations
EARLY
A TRIP TO THE OLD COUNTRY THIS WINTER SEE OR
WRITE
E. W. BICKLE
Agent Cumberland, It. C.
Passports Arranged
BOOKINGS
Canadian National Railways
COMMUNITY  HALL
PROPOSED AT ALBERNI
A movement Is under way In Alberni
to establish a community hall. It Is
proposed to have a reading room, circulating library, a room for games,
committee rooms, etc. A committee
has been appointed to go thoroughly
into the scheme.
BIGGEST COAL CENTRE
More coal is mined annually In
Scranton, Pa., than In any other city
In the world. Within the city limits
there aro about thirty-live mines In
operation, with u yearly output of over ILH
|six million tons, IRS1
ft
Extraordinary Values  in
Men's Suits and Overcoats
We have a large selection of the very beat imported
cloths. Our prices are right—workmanship and fit
guranteed.
WE ALSO CARRY A STOCK OF
Ready-to-Wear Clothing
MADE OF THE BEST SERGES, WORSTEDS AND
TWEEDS OBTAINABLE
Prices from $25.00
CLEANING, PRESSING, REPAIRING and DYEING
at City Prices
James   Gardner
ILO-ILO BLOCK
CUMBERLAND uw-^tMp,^
■October 29, Mi.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
-fta*
(If
BREAD OF HEALTH
BREAD that will keep you, your husband and the children well, day after
day, is the home-made loaf made with the
famous
ROYAL STANDARD FLOUR
so easy to    Its gluten content surpasses that of ordin-
bak„e with. ary flours and therefore gives you maximum nourishment   in   the   most   easily
digestible form.   Eating  plenty  of  this
wonderfully fine flavored bread
KEEPS   YOU   FIT.
MADE IN B.C.
VANCOUVER MILLING AND
GRAIN CO., LIMITED
Campbell Highet, Local Manager
Courtenay, B. C. Telephone 33
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAl
AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed While II Walt
PHILLIPS' MILITAIIY
SOLES AND HEELS.
Duntmuir
S. DAVIS, ■bet
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing ■ Specialty.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
FAMOUS WYANDOTTE
DEAD AT SIDNEY
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.00
Rheumatism?
Jr Neuralgia, Sciatica, Lumbago?
The remedy it simple, inexpen-
live, ea»Uy taken and harmleei.
Templeton's
Rheumatic Capsules
56 	
  176
78 ....
  254
80
  260
54 	
  187
57 ....
  227
73   .
  232
46
  218
88 	
  278
78
...:  257*
77 	
  289
36 ...
  190
74 	
  223
Thos. H. Carey
FIRE AND LIFE  INSURANCE
Cumberland. B. C.
Wood for Sale
i
,4.50 per Single Load.
8.50 per Double Load.
Any Length Required.
W. C. WHITE
Happy Valley Phone 9211
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Phone ISO
Cumberland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Hare yun tried our Pickled Pork
and Corned lteef I It Is delicious.
Your dru'ggUt will supply you.
Write tor free trial to Temple-
toa'*, 86 Colborne St., Toronto
Sold by R. E. FROST.
"CHEER-UP WEEK" IS
PLANNED FOR NOVEMBER
The "Made-in-B. C." campaign will
hold a special meeting on Monday
next in Vancouver for the arrangement ot a "Cheer Up Week," to be
held ln November. Tbls is to be held
for the purpose of dispelling the
gloom nnd pessimism which has permeated some businesses for months
past The Made-in-B.C. campaign Is
endeavoring to keep all Industries operating during the winter months and
ease up the unemployment problem.
Laid 257 Eggs in Pullet Year-
Offspring Has Similar Egg-
Laying Qualities.
A few weeks ago we announced tbo
death of our White Wyundotte No.
B162. Since this hen has had so much
to do with the high production in our
strain of White Wyandottes now kept
at the Sidney Experimental Station,
her nnme deserves a place In the hall
of fame of the poultry world, und her
achievement told iu story.
This hon wus hutched May 1, 1917,
and laid her flint egg on October 30,
1917, being 182 days old. Sho had no
outstanding character in size, shape or
color. At time of laying her first egg
her body weight wns live und one-
yuurter pounds. Her eggs averaged
25 ounces per doz., and there were 257
of them during her pullet year. Of
these 85 were laid during tlie four
winter months, November 1 to February 28, 1918.
Progeny Also Hoary  Producer*.
That she was nble to transmit her
high production to her offspring mny
be seen by reference to the following
tuble, showing the achievement of her
female progeny retched in 1919:
Winter      Pullet Year
No. of Bird.       Record.        Record.
321 	
322 	
325 	
327 	
339 	
347 	
420 	
481 	
505 	
511 	
514 	
525 	
During 1920 a few pullets hutched
from her eggs were outstanding in
egg production. Tbe more noted of
'hese were as follows:
Winter     Pullet Year
Xo. of Bird.       Record.        Record.
638   85   288
702   72   243
913  61  Died Mny 4
It muy be noted that pullet 702 laid
243 eggs to September 30. but her year
is not complete until November 28,
1921.
Pullets' Outstanding Records.
It is of Bome interest to follow a
few of these outstunding pullets during the second year:
No. of Bird.   Winter Record      Year.
322   32   196
325   62   203
481   66  Died June 11
There are many other partial records concerning her progeny, full of
Interest, but the record is not yet complete. The poultry world will probably
hear more of these records after the
end of the year, for though B 162 la
dead her work still follows her.
Km is Hen Was Non-Slttcr.
B162 was never broody. She was
attending so strictly to her business,
that of egg production, that she had
no time. It would seem that this
character was also transmitted,, for
only three of her daughters have ever
lost time because ot broodiness.
Much has been said nnd written concerning the Importance of the male
In the flock from the standpoint of
high production. No doubt he does
occupy an important place, but we are
more and more convinced with thc
years thut if we nre to obtain high
production, and to hold it, Jhat the
trait must be inbred with the mother
as well as the male.
E. M. STRAIGHT,
Superintendent.
CAR GONE BAD?
Leave it to us and come back
when it's ready for you to take
the wheel. Stop worrying about
it and let us do that for you—
that's our business. No matter
what the trouble is we'll make it
right and keep it right. Anything from a loose nut to a
broken axle.
CUMBERLAND  GARAGE
A. R. Kierstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL  FACTORY WORK
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Ofiice \W\m Bridge Street, Victoria B.C.
JUNIOR SOCCER GAME
ENDED IN A DRAW
Cumberland  Juniors  and   High
School Rattle Ended in Score
Of One Geol Each
The Cumberland High School boys
ami   Cumberland   Juniors * played   a
(9raw game iu the Junior League last
aturday.   Follow tug wore tb^ teams:
HIGH SCHOOL—Fouracre, Steven-
sou, Hood, Reid, WUcqck, Stewart.
Poller, Junes, Michell, Watson, Partridge.
CUMBERLAND JUNIORS - Molly,
Stewart, Walker, Lockhart, Mitchell,
Farmer, Stevenson, Robertson, Bond,
Brown, Freloni.
Mr. D. Wilson was referee and Mr.
P. O'Donnell ami j. Irvine, linesmen.
Both teams started oir with the rush
ami pick nature, shooting being wide
hy Iniili sets of forwards. After 15
minutes play Bond received a nice
pass from Freloni and opened (he
seining for tiie Juniors. After the
kick-off, Stevenson got away on his
own on the right, sent over a good
cross but Bond ami his partners nil
missed a good opportunity.
Cumberland were doing most, of (he
pressing now. and Stevenson scut in
a hard drive, but Was unfortunate in
not scoring, tlie ball hitting the upright. Boffy wan then tested by Partridge and Reid, hut he cleared bis
lines well; Fouracre was then called
on to handle the ball with a stinging
shot from ^Robertson. Half-time was
called with one goal registered in favor
of the Juniors.
The second half started off with the
High School boys malting for Holly,
and he bad to run out of his goal to
clear. The High School boys, playing
nice combination, looked dangerous,
ami results were bound to come.* A
few moments later Walker netted tiie
ball, equalizing tlie score.
The game was now very fast aud
good football was shown by both sides
but both seemed lo be too anxious in
front of goal, as their shooting was
none too accurate. Bond sent in a
good one, but Fouracre brought off a
good save by turning the ball over tbe
crossbar, giving away a corner. Offside aud fouls slowed up the game a
little, although both teanis tried to
increase their score. Thc whistle blew
with one goal being registered by each
team.
Mr. Wilson refereed the game to the
entire satisfaction of all.
You'll Laugh
At The Rain
We have a complete line
of new Rubber Goods in
stock, including—
LADIES' RAIN COATS
MEN'S RAIN COATS
CHILDREN'S RAIN COATS
CHILDREN'S  RAIN  CAPES
MEN'S HIP BOOTS
MEN'S KNEE-HIGH BOOTS
BOYS'  KNEE-HIGH  BOOTS
Men's Mackinaw Coats
Men's Mackinaw Shirts
10
Per  Cent.   Discount
on   all   Merchandise.
W. Gordon
Phone 133        Cumberland
SECOND DIVISION
LEAGUE SCHEDULE
At a meeting held In Soutli Wellington recently a Second Division Football League was formed, with Mr. W.
McDonald president, Mr. P. Mafl'eo
vice-president, and Mr. C. IS. Bowlsby
secretary-treasurer.
Eight teams  were  represented and
the   following   schedule   was   drafted
and adopted:
October 80—
Cumberland vs. Lantzville.
Souili Wellington vs. Davenport
Ladysmith vs. Nortblicld.
Celtics vs. N. Wellington.
November B—
N. Wellington vs. Cumberland.
Lantzville vs. S. Wellington.
Davenport vs. Ladysmith.
Norlli field vs. Ce*ltics.
November 18—
Cumberland vs. Davenport.
S. Wellington vs. Norllilteld.
Ladysmith vs. N. Wellington.
Celtics vs. Lantzville.
November 80—
Norlhlield vs. Cumberland.
Davenport vs. Celtics.
.N. Wellington vs. S. Wellington.
Lantzville vs. Ladysmith.
November !!J—
Cumberland vs. S. Wellington.
Lantzville vs. Davenport.
Nnrlhfiehl vs. N. Wellington.
Ladysmith vs. Celtics.
December 4—
Celtics vs. Cumberland.
Davenport vs. Norlhlield.
S. Wellington vs. Ladysmith.
N. Wellington vs. Lantzville.
December II—
Ladysmith vs. Cumberland.
N. Wellington  vs. Davenport.
Norlhlield vs. Lantzville.
Celtics vs. s. Wellington.
December IS —
Lantzville vs. Cumberland.
Davenport vs. S. Wellington.
Norlhlield vs. Ladysmith.
N. Wellington vs. Celtics.
December 26—
S. Wellington vs. Lantzville.
Ladysmith vs. Davenport.
Cellics vs. Noilhdeld.
Cumberland vs. N. Wellington.
January I—
Davenport vs. Cumberland.
Norlhlield vs. S. Wellington.
N, Wellington vs. LadyBmlth,
Lantzville vs. Celtics.
Innunrj 8—
Cumberland vs. Norlhlield.
Celtics vs. Davenport.
S. Wellington vs. N. Wellington.
Ladysmith vs. LantavlUe,
lanuarj 15—.   "
S. Wellington vs. Cumberland.
Davenport vs. Lantzville.
N. Wellington vs. Norlhlield.
Celtics vs. Ladysmith.
lanuiii'}' 82—
Cumberland vs. Celtics.
Northlield vs. Davenport.
Ladysmith vs. S. Wellington.
Lantzville vs. N. Wellington.
lanuarj 20—
Cumberland vs. Ladysmith,
Davenport vs. N. Wellington.
Lantzville vs. North liehl.
S. Wellington vs. Cellics.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
i
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C
•^ssnisimSssSinnmtsmbMBBI
SAVE BEFORE YOU SPEND
Let your Baak Account be your
first concern.
It will more than repay yon In
later years.
A Savings Department
at every branch of
(H   THE BOYAL BANK
W       OF CANADA
F. A. MCCARTHY, Manager Cumberland Branch.
MILLION-DOLLAR ELKS'
TEMPLE AT PORTLAND
A contract has been awarded lo a
.Seattle Iirm for the erection'of thc
new Ellis' Temple In Portland, at a
cost in excess of one million dollars.
The proposed structure will be the
lineal Elks' Temple In Ihe west. It
will he of steel construction, six
tories high basement, with polished
granite base and brick aud terra cotla
exterior walls. Because of the height
of each story, the structure will ho as
j'high us an ordinary Ill-storey hulding.
Victoria's   Famous   Beer
NOW ON SALE AT
The Local Government
Vendor's Office
SILVER SPRING
BEER
AND
XXX STOUT
Even better than in pre-war days, and brewed on
Vancouver Island.   Made from malt and hops only.
Demand Silver Spring
ABSOLUTELY PURE
The most wholesome Beer brewed in B. C.   Try it and
you will use no other.
WM. DOUGLAS, DISTRIBUTING AGENT
Cumberland and Courtenay, B. C. Phone 66L
SILVER SPRING
BREWERY, Ltd.
^=^--
1850—Ye Olde Firmc—1921
MADAME MELBA!
MADAME TETRAZZINI
> These two great artists have purchased HEINTZMAN & CO. Grands; Mme. Melba for her home in
Australia antl Mme'. Tetrazzini for her castle in
Rome.
HEINTZMAN & CO. PIANOS ARE SOLD ON EASY
TERMS
Heintzman & Co.
GIDEON HICKS, Manager—Box 233, Victoria
Cumberland VICTORIA Nanaimo Pour
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
October 29, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN _ Editor.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1921.
In the midst of Federal and Provincial political excitement, the good citizens of Ladysmith are busying themselves with probabilities for the civic election in January!
NEW PARTY IDEALS
The main respect ln which the extreme Farmer movement differs from a similar movement ln the United States
is that while the Progressives in this country are all for
Free Trade, the Farmers ln the American West are all
for protection against the products of their Canadian
brethren. In both cases the motive is selfish and dictated
by "class" consciousness. If the principle in either case
ls sound for either country it ought to be sound for both
countries. Yet Mr. Crerar, with a voice that could be
heard from Victoria to Halifax, declared that "the same
selfish game Is being played by the same selfish Interest
which are seeking to preserve Canada for their own exploitation." The difference between the farmers and ]t *9 intended to add another tax on the shoulders of the
those who seek protection for Industry ia that in one case|peopie 0j British Columbia and in addition to remove the
SAME AS QUARTER OF A CENTURY AGO
The New York Times reproduces part of the front page
of its issue of 25 years ago. One of tlie leading articles is
headed: "Fierce Riots in Belfast." It takes an optimist to
talk of settling the Irish question.
"Ned" Sheppard, one of the brightest young newspaper
men who ever sat in an editorial chair in British Columbia, has passed away. At the'age of 24 he was managing
editor of a Vancouver daily. He left the position to serve
overseas, where ho contracted tuberculosis. He died a'
Kamloops.  <
In a single day recently more than 90,000 tons of ship
ping took place in the port of Vancouver. The export
trade of B. C. is increasing, but at home people still give
preference to goods imported from a distance.
it is "all for the farmer" and in the other case it is for all
classes—the man who invests his money in business, the
working man who gets employment, the merchant and
other agencies who distribute these goods, and the community as a whole which Increases tn wealth as the result
of industry
exemptions on Income taxes. The easiest way to lighten
the burden of taxation Is to develop Ihe Industries of the
country.   B. C. products pay B. C. workers and R C. taxes.
A BIG CAUSE OF UNEMPLOYMENT IN B.C.
A British Columbia merchant the other day complained
that business prospects were bad. He feared an era of
unemployment. A friend asked him what he was doing
towards the prosperity of the province and Canada, and
pointed out to him that his shoes were made in New England, that he was wearing hose knit in New York, his
suit was tailored in England, his necktie Imported from
Chicago, his shirt from across the line, his hat was
made in the United States, and his handkerchief was the
product of Japan! These articles of clothing represented
$44.25 ln wages paid to workers living outside of the
province.
Now the stores are being flooded with German and
Japanese-made goods, while thousands of workers of the
province and Dominion are workless.
TWO DEAD HORSES
Hon. W. L. Mackenzie King has apparently decided to
adopt "reciprocity" as the basis for his tariff reduction
programme. He Is flogging a dead horse, says the Nelson
News. Reciprocity was voted upon by the people of Canada in 1911 and they voted It down by a great majority.
In 1921, with world competition greater than it ever was,
an unemployment situation which taxes the best efforts of
our country and our great neighbor ln the south more
strongly entrenched ln Its battle for trade ln this and
other countries, It Is, to say the least, improbable that the
people of Canada would adopt a course which could not
tail to throw our Industries Into the hands of a foreign
nation and make the unemployment situation worse.
Mr. King himself is also flogging a dead horse. He says
that the War Times Elections Act was iniquitous in that
it deprived some residents ot Canada of their votes. This
act Is no longer In force, hut the only people it deprived
ot their votes were Oermans and Austrians. Instead of
being "iniquitous" to deprive them of their votes when
this country was at war with their nations, most people
will agree with the view that it would have been Iniquitous
to have allowed them ln 1917 to use their votes against the
interests of the Empire.
Fighting Joo Martin, coal-mine operator, lawyer, real
estate magnate and politician, may not be in the election
fight after all. He has not yet been successful in obtaining
nomination from any party.
The election date will suit Mayor "Harry" Gale of Vancouver admirably. After his defeat by Hon. H. H. Stevens
he will have time to secure the nomination for the mayoralty again and proceed to emulate Mayor "Tommy" Church
of Toronto in the.civic race for long service in the chief
executive position.
Gold has been flowing to this country from all over the
world, until it is now estimated that we have one-third of
the world's supply, and one-third of this, or a total of one-
ninth of the world's gold supply, has found lodgement In
the New York Federal Reserve district," said Walter B.
Brown, editor of The New York Commercial, a few days
ago.
Dry   Goods   Department
NEW ARRIVALS THIS WEEK IN LADIES' GABARDINE TRENCH COATS—Priced
from $19.50 to $37.50.
MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S RAIN CAPES—From $4.75 to $7.50.
RAIN HATS—RUBBERS—GAITERS.
That Italian professor who said he could prove that the
world was flat, probably meant flat broke.
A meeting was called for Wednesday night last to elect
delegates to attend the Independent Convention at Courtenay on Saturday. The posters invited "all opposed to
the Union Government to attend." After the hall had been
open 45 miuutes after time, the total number of arrivals
was three, Including a press representative. There ls another man here who ls opposed to the government, but he
happened to be working on the night shift!
It takes one woman 20 years to bring up her son—and
another woman all the real of his lite to bring him down
a little.
Merry Widows.—Too many widows act like they are
relieved instead of bereaved.—Kitchener Record.
Saved Their Worry.—Some of these people who are
always so hitter in denouncing uplifters are heading for a
place where there won't be any.—Toronto Star.
Dry Measure.—Rye is reported twenty-nine inches high
in Manitoba. But the trouble is they will be selling it by
the bushel Instead of by the quart.—Manitoba Free Press.
The Open Sesame.—To be* popular, all in the world you
need to remember is that every woman loves to be looked
at, and every man loves to be listened to.—Border Cities
Star.
■ Achievement.—"Every normal boy of the 80's wished to
be a pirate," says a writer. The record of war profiteering
indicates that many of them achieved their ambition.—
Kingston British Whig.
That Sort ot MlndB.—Senators who say It is "rot" to call
Canada a nation, no doubt express what is in their minds.
—Toronto Globe.
Privileged Information.—When the magistrate asks the
Intoxicated Individual where he got it, tlie question always
has a wistful sound.
Hot Far Enough.—When Britain meditates concerning
her far-flung Empire, she doubtless wishes tliat portions
of it had been flung a little farther.
Methods.—Some insects use their legs to catch prey, and
the cynic observes modern styles and reflects that the
Insects have no monopoly of the plan.
Taboo.—Home brew will often cure the drinking habit
when nothing else short of wood alcohol will do the trick
Brockvllle Recorder-Times.
A Far Country.—We had some eggs the other day wliieh
the waitress said were from the country. Next time we
see that girl we're going to ask what country?— Sydney
Record.
Bat to Glory.—There are about forty-seven things to
think of before you try to pass the car ahead. If you forget
one you may find yourself all speeded up with no place to
go.—Cobalt Nugget.
Signs and Portens.—When a man's wife says, "Now vou
listen to me!" the proverb is about to be exemplified that
'listeners never hear any good of themselves."—Saskatoon
star.
SPECIAL SALE SATURDAY
OF FLANNELETTE WEAR FOR LADIES, MISSES AND CHILDREN
Reductions of from 25 to 35 per cent, on all Flannelette Underwear and Nightgowns.
Men's Department
SPECIAL SHOWING THIS WEEK OF MEN'S SHIRTS
Shown in neat stripe and novelty patterns, in best
quality Percales, with soft detachable collars. d»rt ryp
Extra special value at	
INVICTUS SHOES—Just received, another large consignment of INVICTUS SHOES, "The Best Good Shoe
for Men."
SUITS AND OVERCOATS—New Fall Samples, "PROGRESS" Brand Made-to-Measure Suits and Overcoats.
GROCERY  DEPARTMENT
WEEK END SPECIALS
Toilet Paper, rolls 4 for 25c
Canned Corn, 2's 5 tins for $1.00
Lard, 3's tins 65c
Lard, 5*s tins  $1.10
Sultanas, "Banner," pkts 25c
Lard, 10's tins  $2.20
Oranges, juicy and sweet ..     3 doz. $1.00
Gipsy Stove Polish, per tin 10c
Cheese, finest Canadian, per lb 30c
IT'S TUFF, SISTER, IT'S TUFF
CHAMPIONS DEFEATED
NANAIMO IN STRENUOUS GAME SUNDAY
(Continued from Page One)
second goal had Sutherland not been
pulled up for being offside. Husband
spoiled a good opportunity by kicking
wide. This was the first time that
Boyd, Cumberland's goalkeeper, had
handled the ball ln the quarter-hour's
play, hut lie had a busy time ln the
next five minutes. He saved a good
shot from O'Brien under difficulties.
At this stage of the game Brewster
met with a slight acldent through a
block from Dickinson, but quickly recovered after a little first-aid attention. Thomas then just missed the
goal by a few Inches. Nanaimo was
trying hard for the equalizer and the
Cumberland defence was kept busy
shaking them off. The game was now
very fast and luckily for Cumberland
the Nanaimo forwards were shooting
wide. Cumberland lost many chances
owing to Sutherland being called offside on many occasions. Half-time
arrived with one goal ln favor of Cumberland.
The second period started off at as
: fast a clip as the first, Nanaimo being
. the first to press,   but   Redfern was
, called up for being offside.   Through
good  combination  by   Brewster   and
Milligan the ball was worked to Nanaimo's   end,   but  Dickinson  forced
Milligan to kick past.   A foul outside
the penalty corner against O'Donnell
looked   dangerous   but   Thomas   waa
called up for offside and spoiled Nanaimo's chance.
Milligan  pressed  Graham  and  the
latter waB forced to concede a corner,
which was the first In tbe game. Milligan took the kick but failed to get
results, Ogle clearing his  line  with
ease, letting Husband away.   Stewart
was forced to give away  a  corner,
closely followed by another, and with
the fracas In front of the goal Campbell gave away another corner, but
the kick proved fruitless.   Sutherland
once more appeared In tbe limelight,
giving Routledge a hard shot to hold,
but he saved at the expense of a corner, but with no results.
The   ball   then   travelled   towards
Boyd's goal and he bad difficulty In
disposing of a hard grounder from
Thomas, having to stretch himself
in order to get the ball; a minute later
Husband tried a pot shot, the ball hitting the top bar and running along Its
full length. Nanaimo now did most
of the pressing, and a foul off Campbell outside the penalty area looked
dangerous. Dickinson took the kick
but kicked wide, and give-and-take
play then followed until Referee Jones
called time, with the score still standing 1 goal to Cumberland.
To Mr. Jones, the referee, must be
given all credit for the manner in
which he performed his duties, at all
times having the players well under
control and thus preventing any unnecessary rough play. None of his
decisions were questioned; he even
went to the extent of Illustrating in
pantomime the reason for each decision ln a manner plainly to be understood by the spectators. Dickinson, captain of Nanaimo, was the star
of the visiting team, ,whlle Sutherland
excelled In the home team, Campbell
being a close second.
The game throughout, though hotly
contested, was played in a clean and
sportsmanlike manner, not one single
instance spoiling the pleasure of the
day, and the spirit of friendliness was
most apparent among the spectators,
some fifteen hundred of whom were
present. The visitors returned home
with many loudly-expressed opinions
of the good time they had enjoyed,
declaring their intention of reciprocating when Cumberland next visited
Nanaimo.
(umberlaiid Has Good Lead.
This win gives Cumberland a good
lead over all other teams competing in
the Upper Island League, and with a
fair run they should have little difficulty In again annexing the championship, for the third time in succession
Thos. E. Bate
REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE
COLLECTIONS
GENERAL AGENCY
Persons having property for sale are
asked to list same with us. Our clients'
Interests will have our besl attention.
Insurance at Low Rates
The good sound, non-board English
Insurance companies which we represent recognize Ihat Ihe rates charged
in Cumberland have been far in excess of what they should he. taking
into consideration the splendid fire
protection which the city has. and
have consequently cut the rales very
materially*. In some instances they
are over a third less than prevailing
rates.
Thos. E. Bate
NOTARY PUBLIC
Maxwell's Offlco     Dunsmuir Avenue
When the daisies start to daze
And the lilies start to 111,
When the rose rise in winter,
And the daffodils are dll;
When the kettle starts to ket,
A sittin' on the stove,
And the kitten then is kitting,
And old Rover starts to rove;
When the sparrows start to spar,
And the seagulls start to see,
When the moonshine still ls mooning.
It often gets the best of me.
HELP WANTED—FEMALE
HELP    WANTED,    DAILY —APPLY
Mrs. A. C. Lymn, Derwent Avenue.
FOR SALE
USED "FORD" TOURING CAR IN
splendid condition. Has recently
been overhauled. A real good buy.
If you are looking for a used car,
here is your opportunity. Don't delay.    The Ford Garage, Courtenay.
TEN-ACRE FARM, HAPPY VALLEY,
2 miles from Cumberland; C acres
pasture laud, 3 acres good timber;
4-room house and barn; 1000 tons of
liny cropped off this land. For sale
cheap; half cash, balance arranged.
Chiu Yeuk, Happy Valley, or c|o Box
322, Post Office, Cumberland.      3-45
SECOND-HAND "FORD" TOURING
cur at a sacrifice price to make room
for other cars. Overhauled recently
and lu good running order. Price
during this week only $19j. Apply
to Corfleld Motors, The Ford Garage, Courtenay, B. C.
FOUND
AUTO   TIRE   AND    INNER   TUBE.
Apply Ed. White, Company Farm.
LOST
SPARE TIRE FOR CADILLAC CAR,
between Courtenay and Cumberland; size 36x4%; belonging to
Peggy's Pierrots. Finder please
notify The Islander.
CHILD'S SILVER MUG, INSCRIBED
R. T. B. Return to 303 Wlndemere
Avenue.   Suitable reward.
Church Notices
Holy Trinity Church
Rev. W. Leversedge.
Twenty-Third Sunday after Trinity.
Litany and Holy Communion, 11 a.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Evensong, 7 p.m.
Roman Catholic Church
Rev. Father Beaton.
28rd Sunday after Pentecost.
Mass at 11 a.m.
Dr. Plllem: "I had a great many
more patients this time last year, my
dear. I wonder where they can all
have gone?"
His Wife: "We can only hope for
the best, John."
Ireland Is fighting for home rule—
and so are a good many husbands.
DAMONTE &
MARCHETTI
GENERAL   DELIVERY
Coal, Wood and Goods of Any Kind
Delivered to All Parts of District.
Rubbish and Ashes Cleared Away.
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE  M TELEPHONE
or Leave Orders at Vendome Hotel.
11100 MOTOR WASHER;
Screen.   Apply Mrs. E.
ALSO FIRE
W. Bickle.
FRESH VEGETABLES DELIVERED
to your door every Tuesday and
Saturday. Ripe Tomatoes, Pot .toes,
Brussels Sprouts, Carrots, Turnips,
Cabbage, etc. E. C. Eddlngton, Cal-
hound Ranch, Sandwick P.O.      2-44
WINDSHIELD CLEANERS FOR
automobiles. The very thing for a
wet day. Makes driving easier.
Price $2 at Corfleld Motors, The Ford
Garage, Courtenay, B. C.
St. George's Presbyterian
Rev. Jas. Hood.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir practice, 7.30 Friday evening.
City of Cumberland
MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS
ACT
Grace Methodist Church
Rev. G. B. Kinney.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
Regular Evening Service, 7 p.m.
3=
FOOT ACCELERATORS FOR FORD
cars fitted complete, price, $4.50.
Once tried and you will never be
without one. Corfleld Motors, The
Ford Garage, Courtenay, B.C.
3. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
The meetings of the Great War
I Veterans Association are held every
Tuesday at 7 o'clock ln tho Memorial
Hall.
MIGHT SO APPEAR
Dressed-to-the-minute Maid: "I came
down to see you so hurriedly that I
think I forgot something."
Country Visitor:  "It-it wasn't your
I dress, waa It?"
HOUSE AND LOT ON ALLEN AVE.,
now occupied by Mr. Prior. For
further particulars apply A. MacKinnon, Furniture; Store, Cumberland, or Mrs. Simms, Galarno Ranch,
Campbell  River,  B.C. 4-43
PIGS AND POULTRY
HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR PIGS
and Poultry. Kwong Yick, Chinatown, Cumberland.    Telephone 6-F. •
P.O. Box 282.      ^ 13-5,21 Baijber
Lidd ell's Orchestra
— is —
OPEN FOR ENGAGEMENT
for D-ancee and Social Functions
of '4II kinds. Any number of
pifjees supplied.   Apply
<G. LIDDELL
Shop .. ..Dunsmuir Ave,
Registration of Voters for the ensuing Municipal Elections closes on
the 30th day of November, 1921.
1. The names of registered holders
of titles, where known, will be placed
In the Voters' List without personal
registration. A list of same may be
seen nt the City Hall, but it Is recommended that registered owners
make sure that their name Is on the
said list.
2. Agreement holders must have
registered their agreements in the
Land Registry Ofllce and all such are
required to produce proof of such registration to the undersigned on or before the 30th day of November.
3. A duly authorized agent of a corporation whose name ls on the assessment roll, may vote for said corporation upon filing with the City
Clerk on or before 30th November a
declaration to the effect that he ls a
resident of the Province of British
Columbia, and a British subject of the
full age of 21 years. Authority for
voting must also be filed with the City
Clerk on or before the 30th day of
November, which authority stands
good from year to year until the City
Clerk has notice ot cancellation of
same.
4. Licence holders, the animal fee
for which Is not less than $5.00, and
in the ense of a partnership $5.00 for
each partner, must file the necessary
declaration with the City Clerk on or
before the 31st day of October.
5. Householders must have resided
in the Municipality since the 1st day
of January, 1921, must have paid their
road tax and must file the necessary
declaration with the City Clerk on or
before the 31st day of October.
6. All voters must be of the full age
of 21 years and British subjects.
7. Residents and property-holders
in the extended school district are
entitled to be put on the School Election List—under - the above regulations—but wlll have no vote ln city
elections.
All declarations must be made In
the presence of either the City Clerk,
a Notary Public or a Justice of the
Pence.
Severe penalties may be imposed
upon any person becoming a party to
an agreement Improperly entered Into to procure a vote.
THOS. MORDY,
City Clerk.
Cumberland, B. C.
A SAVING CLAUSE
Pa, why Is a wife called the better
half?"
"In order, my son, that she may not
get the Impression that she's the
whole thing." *m--~ v^^
7^^^^^^^^^^^^?^*^^^^S>^^e^^^s^T^
&.m$.
m
mkmfm^*mmmm
<t
(
October Hi, Mi.
Iftfi CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Five
i*W REMEMBER—IT'S A SLATER.
Winter Walking Shoes
Worth While
HERE is a shoe with "lines" and smartness, a shoe
for winter wearing that meets every good
dresser's demand for style and quality in a high shoe.
Moreover, it has that comfortable, easy-fltting feeling
and will give the best of service. In black, tan, russet.
Call in and look over these "high grade shoes, which
are priced very moderate for such Al goods.
MOTHERS
We have in stock just the thing you have been
looking for for that growing girl who takes a large
size. They are "CHUMS," in sizes from 2'/2 to 7.
These are very smart shoes—low heels and high cut—
just the shoe the girl needs. They are made in calf
leather, both tan and black, at $8.50 for the black and
$8.75 for the tan.
Don't forget that "Chums" for the
Children are cheapest in .the long run
Cavin's Shoe Store
FOOTWEAR ONLY
CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DUNSMUIR) LIMITED
St. John's First Aid and Mine
Rescue Association
The Regular Monthly Meeting wlll he held ln the Lecture Room
ol the Athletic Hall on
Sunday, Nov. 6th, at 10.30 a.m.
A PAPER WILL BE READ BY MR. CHAS. GRAHAM
A. J. TAYLOR, Publicity Agent.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERRIFIELD,    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.        Cumberland. B. C.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
Illlll!1
NOTICE
On and after May 27th all services and meter loops
installed must be in conduit with externally operated
switch, all to be grounded and installed in accordance
with Underwriters' Regulations.
This applies to meter loops moved from one location
to another in the same building.
All wiring must be strictly in accordance with the
Rules and Regulations of the Inspector of Electrical
Energy for British Columbia, and also the National
Electric Code.
Any person moving meters belonging to this Company, altering, disconnecting or connecting service
wires will be immediately prosecuted, according to law.
Special attention is drawn to the fact that porcelain
sockets and switches are required in certain locations,
and new installations will not be connected without
them. Old installations in which brass or other metal
sockets are installed in prohibited locations after this
date will be disconnected. And further be warned that
the secondary circuits on the distribution system of
this Company are now grounded, and we strongly urge
all our customers to see that only porcelain sockets
and switches are used when same are within reach of
any grounded pipes, concrete floors, etc., and we will
not be responsible for any hazards incurred unless such
fittings are used.
Our authority for above regulations is written instructions from the Provincial Inspector of Electricity,
which instructions may be seen at our office by interested parties.
Proceedings of
City Council
There was a full attendance of
aldermen at the council meeting Monday night, with Mayor MacDonald in
the chair, when the usual routine
business wns dealt with, in addition to
which a large delegation from the
School Hoard and Parent-Teacher Association waited on the council seeking assistance in providing trnnspor-
ta for thc Koyston scliool children, etc.
A communication from Mr. H. E
Beasley, General Superintendent of
Ihe Esquimau and Nanaimo Railway
Company, was read in reference to
tlie proposed curtailment of the daily
train service. Mr. Betigjey's reply waB
similar to that sent to thc Board of
Trade, und held out little hope for
I tlie dally service being retained, as
I the number of passengers carried had
fallen below the previous year.
An account was received from tlie
Department of Public Works for the
big sum uf $1.25, for labor in helping
to get the road roller here from Courtenay. Tlie aldermen thought the
finances would stand the strain and it
might help thc government out of their
difficulties.
Capt. Richardson, district engineer,
wrote thanking the council for three
blue-prints supplied, and asked for
five more. The council decided to supply them, but the department will be
charged the cost.
The Bevan Lumber and Shingle Co.
forwarded a draft for $1000 for lumber, etc., supplied to the new houses.
The city clerk reported he had accepted the draft ln due course, which action was endorsed by the council.
A communication was received from
the B. C. Telephone Company stating
that the mileage of their wires coming under the jurisdiction of the council is 2.97 miles. However, the city
clerk reported that the company had
two miles in the city limits and four
miles outside. The matter was left in
the hands of the city clerk to take up
with the company's engineer, who Is
expected here this week.
Bills and Accounts.
The following bills and accounts
were received and referred to the
Finance Committee:
Labor on roads, houses, etc $554.45
Road roller       1,1
Evans, Coleman & Evans,' bends     9.69
Burns & Brown, supplies       4.60
Damonte and Machettl      2.00
Canadian Collieries   343.74
Campbell Bros      4.50
Royston Lumber Co    13.05
Cumberland Motor Works—
Road roller       1.90
Fire Dept     3.40
Electric Light Co-
Light  *....   47.36
Repairs     M.55
Police         6.11
Committee Reports.
The finance committee reported that
the finances were running low and
the council would have to go without
all work possible until end of the year.
Aid. Bannerman reported that the
road in front of the new houses was
in good shape, with sidewalks made.
Electric light poles and wires were
expected to be put in shortly. Some
of the owners will be moving in very
soon.
His worship reported that trees for
the boulevard are expected in a few
days.
City Dump Up Again.
Aid. Francescini, of the Board of
Health, reported the unsanitary condition of tlie City Park, which is now-
used as a dump for rubbish. Some of
the people who use It for tliat purpose dump the rubbish promiscuously
He advocated paying someone a small
sum monthly to keep the place in or
der.
After some discussion a motion was
carried to the effect that storekeepers
be notified that the dump will be open
three days each week for dumping,
and the police commissioners be asked
to have the policeman there to supervise. It was said some of the storekeepers were responsible for the untidy conditions.
Aid. Brown asked that permission
be granted tlie G. W. V. A. to sell
popples on Armistice Day, which Is
being done all over Canada. The request was granted.
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiB
I   IL0=IL0 THEATRE
1 FRIDAY and SATURDAY, Oct. 28 & 29
1 Ride back today to the Frontier days—
—with Mob Hampton, the two-listed
gambler,
—with Ruddy, the freckle-faced cyclone
in chaps,
—with the Kid, the white-girl snatched
front the Indians and transplanted into
the hearts of two men.
Kee hundreds ol' Indians and scouts in
prairie conflict.
Sec great scenes of frontier strife directed
and photographed from the air.
See the scenic grandeum of Glacier National Park. /
See the story of a gambler's love for a boy
and a girl.
See such heart-touches as only Neilan can
achieve.
See such humor as only Wesley Barry can
bring to the screen.
MARSHALL NEILAN
presents Randall Parrish's
BOB
OF
HAMPTON
PLACER
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. O. 314
Whereas certain mischievously Inclined persons have tampered
with the valves of the mains of this company, thereby allowing
a considerably amount of water to run to waste, we therefore
wish to point out that it ls a serious offence to tampe- with such
valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will
be prosecuted to the very fullest extent of the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED    -
Jim & Sacki's
POOLROOM
Headquarters for
Footballers, Baseballers
and other Sportsmen
Watch our
BULLETIN  BOARD
for the Latest Sport News
Jim English     Sacki Conti
Proprietors.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Day and Night
Extra 2-Reel Comedy Knockout
TOUCHY
I  Children. 25c.
Adults, 50c.
I    MATINEE   SATURDAY   AT   2.30
B      Children, 15c. Adults, 35c.
I Coming Monday-THE HOME STRETCH
m CONTAINING ONE OP THE BEST HORSE RACES EVER SEEN IN PICTURES
NO OTHER FOOD HAS THE
NOURISHMENT  OF   BREAD
No other food at any price
:an compare with Bread—
In sustaining and up-building
qualities.
A loaf of good bread is food
md tonic in one.
In itself il contains all Ihe
essential food elements — food
'or bone, food for muscle, food
'or brain.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
uoreof it.
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
s always pure.
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
J. II. HALLIDAY
lunsiiiiiir  Avenue      -      (umbel hind
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND  - -  B. C.
IN THK POWCE ((II HT.
"You have a very bard-looking lol
of prisoners to dispose of, haven't
you?" remarked tho fashionable social
..orker to the magistrate.
"Oh. you are looking ai the wrong
lot," remarked the magistrate. "Those
are the lawyers."
BOARD APPOINTED TO
EXAMINE REFEREES
Messrs, Adam and Macdonald comprise the hoard newly appointed by
the British Columbia Football Association to examine men to handle all
tooths II games in this district. Men
desjrous of taking thc examination
and il* successful being placed on the
ollicial list, should communicate witb
Wm. Macdonald, Ilox 553 or Phone
843L, Nanaimo.
WEST AUSTRALIA'S
WONDERFUL CAVES
More extensive than the labyrinths
Of Ihe Mammoth Caves of Kentucky
ami richer in stalactites than tbe
Bombay Caves of Blephanta, are the
.Tenolan Caves of West Australia, pronounced tbo lineal underground wonderland of Hie world.
ONE-ROOM  ADDITION
TO UNION BAY SCHOOL
Tlie Minister of Public Works is
calling for tenders for the erection
and completion of *i one-room addition
to tbo existing school-house at Union
Bay. Plans, BpeclflcAtlns, etc., can be
Been al the office ut Mr. John Baird.
Qovernhienl Agent, Cumberland, nnd
I'lMin Ho1 secretary of Hit* school hoard
al Union Hay, Mr, Horner! (Hover.
HIGH KATES "STRANGLE"
BUSINESS OF ISLAND
Associated Boards of Trade Are
Fighting for Reduced Rates
Excessive rales on Canadian rnll-
i ouds are "strangling" business on
Vancouver Island, causing loss to
cnpltal nnd throwing laboring men nut
ot work, tho Dominion Hoard of Bail-
way Commissioners, Bitting In Victoria
Ibis week, were told by representa-
lives ot Ihe Associated Boards of Trade
of Vancouver Island.
The Associated Boards of Trade
placed before Ihe Railway Board an
applico-tioit "for a reduction iu rates
on lumber ironi coast and interior
mills to si aliens In Western Cunada."
It was explained, however, that this
application wns intended simply ns
an endorsalion of the fight which the
British Colnmibia government has been
waging to bring about a general reduction lu itreigUt rates eastward.
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAY8
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all the time.
Henderson's
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
I'lrst Glass Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland. B. C.
SPECIAL
ANNOUNCEMENT
Owing to limited space wc are unable to carry as complete a stock as
we would otherwise do.    We wisli to
advise our patrons to shop early and
bus avoid ilisappoinuicnt.
Every  attention   given    to   special
orders.
Watch Ibis Space for f hrl-dmas Suggestions In Watches, Rings. I nr fihisi,
Flue China, Etc.
To Carpenters
TENDERS   WANTED  for  Building
s an addition, room 21 feet by 21 feet.
Apply for further particulars to
P.O. Box* Hlit, Cumberland,
Louis R. Stevens
Optometrist       Jeweler
Engraver
Tlu* grand old k*iiik* of bringing In
ihe coal and shaking the lire will soon
be tlie popular pastime. She
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
October 29, 1921.
FREE PUBLIC LECTURE
  ———
"Millions Now Living Will
Never Die"
SPEAKER: MR. WM. F. JONES, VANCOUVER.
Hollo Theatre,   Sunday, October 30th, at 8   p.m.
AUSPICES OF INTERNATIONAL BIBLE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
SEATS FREE NO COLLECTION
Premier Meighen's Manifesto
The Vital Issue
"What we have to decide is this—Are we going to continue the protective
system of this country or are we not T That is the question and that is
the whole question. And the great, big, necessary thing is that every voter
in this country from the Yukon to Halifax knows that this is the question
he or she is deciding when he or she votes in this great contest."
—ARTHUR MEIGHEN
THE vital issue in the coming election—
in fact, the only issue—is the Tariff,
and to every clear thinking Canadian
it should be readily apparent that a Protective Fiscal Policy is absolutely essential
to stability, progress and development.
Every important country in the world
upholds Protection as an essential economic principle. Even Great Britain-—so
long the stronghold of Free Trade—has
now adopted laws that constitute Protection of the most effective kind. In fact,
the present policy among most nations is
towards raising their tariff walls, not lowering them. In the face of these facts it
would be suicidal for Canada to do exactly
the reverse and discard the fiscal system
which has been responsible for its progress
during the past forty-three years.
Free Trade would mean death to. Canadian Industry. It would also result in
the immediate closing down of Canadian
plants of foreign firms, with 'consequent
additional unemployment. There are to-day
650 American factories alone in Canada.
Similar proposed ventures would be abandoned.   New capital would refuse to come
to a Country lacking adequate protection
and present industrial enterprise would be
promptly strangled by foreign competition.
.The preservation of the home market by a
Reasonable Protective Tariff is vital to
both city dweller and agrarian alike—now
as never before. More capital is urgently
needed for the development of Canada's
enormous resources, which will result in
a lessening of unemployment and an increased population. More work and more
workers will produce an enlarged home
market for products of both city and farm,
and the exodus of Canadian men and
women—and the dollars they earn—will
be precluded.
The United States has slammed her trade
door in the face of Canadian farmers by
adopting the Fordney Bill, and the farmer
is consequently now even more dependent
upon the home market than in the past.
Yet Crerar asks you to destroy that home
market by voting for Free Trade.
King's policy—if he has one—will result
in the destruction of the Tariff.
Meighen standi four square for Reasonable Protection—Protection for all
the people—and asks for an overwhelming mandate to give both industry
and agriculture that assurance which will spell prosperity for all.   Individual prosperity depends upon National prosperity. Your personal interests '
and Canada's very existence hang upon your vote.
The National Liberal and Conservative Party Publicity Committee
CASCADE and
U. B. C.
BRILLIANTLY clear and sparkling, with a flavor that satisfies,
CASCADE BEER is just what you want. There is no purer beer
made. It is brewed with all the care and experience of a
great plant, the culmination of thirty years' progress in brewing British
Columbia's favorite beer.
Union Brewing Co., Ltd.
Distributors
Nanaimo, - - B. C.
To tlie People of Canada.
"Parliament haB been dissolved.
The people ot Canada, its men, and,
;*or the lirst time, its women, are called
upon to determine, in what will inevit-
ilily be a contest tar-reaching and
momentous in its outcome, what shall
bo, through tlie strenuous journey that
very plainly lies ahead ot us, the
character and direction of our polimy.
"I have ben a member ot tho Government through eight eventful years,
and its leader for something more
Mian one. The Government has conducted Canada's affairs through a
devastating war. It has met and surmounted unprecedented difficulties
and survived tho crises tliat such a
war brings ln its train. It has formulated policies hy means of which the
sufferings of tlie conflict have been and
are being ameliorated and its loss and
tt reckago repaired. To tlie demands
of thoso trying years it has devoted all
iis energies, and is prepared now with
vigor undiminished to lead tlie way
through the dangers and unsettlement
which, in common with other coun
I:les, we are passing through. ,
What (lunula lias Achieved.
"What Canada has achieved both In
war effort and its many fields, nnd in
our more domestic after-war activities
designed lo steady and direct the transition from belligerency to peace, is a
total so vast when related to our population that even yet we cannot adequately measure Its merits or Its proportions. We are still too close to the
events. A useful standard, indeed
t.ia only useful standard by which to
gauge the efficiency of Canada's
performance Is a comparison with the
corresponding achievements of any
other nation. By such standard neither tills nor any future generation of
Canadians need ever fear to have their
country judged.
"If the leadership of the ,Govern-
nient in all this work Is subjected to
attack, we are prepared to meet that
attack. But neither the Government
nor tlie National Liberal and Conservative Party that supports it seeks to
monopolize or to turn to partisan ad-
\ Ullages credit that belongs to the
Whole nation, aud tliat constitutes now
lis richest legacy and asset for the
lature; much less would we take to
ourselves any part of the glory that
belongs alone to those who braved the
foe In battle. History will, with the
utmost impartiality, separate the per-
manent from the transient and distinguish big things from small; will
condemn whore there hns been mistake, nnd will do full justice to plans
boldly conceived and unflinchingly
carried through.
Liberals  Pledged to a Platform
Heath to Protection.
"For some years past, and very
emphatically in recent years, a determined movement lias been on foot
seeking to reverse the tariff policy of
Hie Dominion. The ollicial Opposition
in the House of Commons, now led by
lion. Mackenzie King, has made
repeated and varied demands In Par
I lament for the wiping out of tariff
schedules. Finally, that party was
ailed into convention ill August, 1919,
which convention unanimously passed
ihe following resolution:
" 'That the best Interests of Canada
demand that substantial reductions in
Hie burden of customs taxation be
made witli a view to the accomplishing of two purposes of the highest Importance.
" 'First—Diminishing the very high
cost of living, which presses so
severely on the masses of the people.
" 'Second—Reducing the costs of
i ho instruments of production in the
industries based on the natural resources of the Dominion, the vigorous
development of which is essential to
the progress and prosperity of our
country.
" 'That to these ends, wheat, wheat
Hour and all products of wheat; the
principal articles of food; farm implements and machinery; farm tractors;
mining aud saw mill machinery and
repair parts thereof; rough and
dressed lumber; gasoline, Uluminat
ing, lubricating and fuel oils; net
twines and fishermen's equpiments;
cements and fertilizers, should be
tree from customs duties, as well as
the raw materials entering Into same.
" 'That revision downward of the
tariff should be made whereby sub-
; tantial reductions should be effected
in the cost of wearing apparel, foot
wear, and other articles of general
consumption, other than luxuries, as
well ns on raw materials entering Into
ihe manufacture of the samo.
" 'That the Britisli preference be
increased to 50 per cent, of the gen
eral tariff.
" 'And the Liberal party hereby
pledges itself to implement by legislation the provisions of this resolution
when returned to power,'
"This resolution, though frequently
evaded, and more often avoided,
sometimes paraded to entice allies,
sometimes entombed to conciliate
friends, nevertheless stands as the
solemnly recorded unanimous pledge
of the Hon. Mackenzie King and his
parts*. It is not a declaration of prin-
i iple. but a concrete, binding commitment to specific acts.
Stronger and More Dangerous Enemy
In West
"But a stronger and more menacing
enemy has arisen. For some years
past there has been growing up first
on the prairies of the west and later
Ih rough selected parts of Eastern
Canada, a party backed by a costly
and persistent propaganda, the purpose of which is to reverse the tariff
policy of tills country. This movement, led by the Hon. T. A. Crerar
and Mr. H. W. Wood, has also set
down tlie Immediate tariff demands ln
black and white. They need not be
here repeated. The resolution of the
Liberal convention quoted above substantially embodies, indeed wns modelled upon the platform of the Wood-
I'rerar party. The latter, however,
demand also the free entry of coal and
vehicles, unrestricted reciprocity with
the United Stntos, and free trade with
England within live years.   The Fed
eral Liberal party of Alberta, merging
its demands in the Agrarian platform,
has officially demanded as well free
trade with tlie United States within
live years. There Is no need of drawing line distinctions. The great mass
of those subscribing to these demands
are determined opponents of any protective system in this country, aud
their goul they are resolved to reach,
by as rapid means as they can command.
Means Abandonment of Protection.
"The immediate enactments which
.lotii sections of the Opposition are
pledged to put into effect .inevitably
nean the abandonment of the protective system. No Bystem can be deluded or can continue whicli strips
lundreds of tlie most essential indus-
rlca of thia country of all protection,
and leaves less important Industries ln
he enjoyment of tariff protection. It
a, therefore, beyond dispute, both because of tlie Intent of the vast ma-
,orlty behind these programmes and
jecause of the logical consequences ot
lie programmes themselves, that the
eal thing we are called upon to resiBt
it the presentjlme is a free trade
jolicy for Canada. The United States
iroiective tariff, much reduced In 1913,
vas last March restored to the moat
prohibitive level In force for many
years. Even as their tariff stood they
lad sold this country In the last five
years goods to the value of nearly
eighteen hundred million dollars over
and above the value of all they bought
.rom us.
Our Dollar at a Discount
They have nowlmpoBed high cus
corns taxes with a view to purchasing
.•till less from us, and as a part of
such policy they have placed almost
prohibitive barriers agatnst farm products of this country. Our dollar is
Already at a serious discount in the
Jutted States mainly because of our
■excessive purchases there compared
.villi our sales. Under these circum-
itances ft is indeed hard to conceive
low serious-minded Canadians can
mggest as the proper course for ua
lie wiping out entirely ot our
present moderate duties on farm products coming into Canada, and the
general levelling down of our tariff
,n order that while we are compelled
to sell them less we may bo induced
to purchase more. To follow such ad-
■ice means the los of additional mil-
dons In the discount of our money.
It means grossly unfair competition
.or the great mass of the farmers of
.'anada. It means tho curtailment or
lie closing down of many scores of
industries, the discouragement and
contraction of our towns and cities,
and the Impairment of the best market for the products of our farms. It
means tlie surrender of the advance
,ve have made as a self-contained, aggressive Industrial nation, and rever-
,ion to a position where dependence
ipon a more favorable American fiscal
jolicy will become more and more a
iiational  aspiration.     The  spirit   of
ills country will not tolerate a course
io weak and so. disastrous.
Canada's Noble Aspirations.
"Tlie war Is a memory, and a proud
memory, but It is no longer an issue.
Canada from 1914 to 1918 under the
leadership of Sir Robert Borden passed
ih rough one of those crises that reshape the soul of a people. We must
now face with courage the gigantic
task of reconstruction. We must sustain and improve services already
established for assisting those who
especially suffered from the war; we
must map out our course; we must
choose policies that accord with our
aspirations as a nation, that are suited
tu the present stage of our development, to our surroundings ln the
world, and to the troubled age in
which we live.
"By tradition, by the sense of common inheritance aud of common
ideals, the Dominion of Canada aspires to one destiny and one only—a
destiny than which there ls no nobler
—nationhood within the British Empire. I am convinced there is no
single thing more vital to the best interests of the world than that the
British Empire, as at present constituted, should be maintained. We enjoy
the fullest autonomy, and that autonomy ls not challenged, and never shall
be challenged. For the maintenance
of the British Empire as a league of
autonomous nations there are common burdens that all must share, but
these burdens are light, and the advantages abundant, ln comparison
with either the burdens or advantages
of any other destiny that can be conceived. Sentiment and interest are in
accord ln upholding British connection.
Important Conclusions Driven Home.
"Forty-two years ago Canada adopted and ever since has consistently
maintained, a protective tariff. At
the time the Canadians decided on this
policy experience had driven home two
very Important conclusions:
1. Our nearness to the United States
waa tending to drain the resources of
our younger country Into the larger
manufacturing establishments of the
republic, there to employ American
workmen in their development and
American railways and other commercial Interests in their distribution and
sale. Hundreds of thousands ot Canadians, workmen and others, were
accordingly compelled to emigrate.
2. After this process had continued,
a change ln the American policy resulting in the imposition ot a high
protective tariff against us threw
Canada into a state of reaction and
depression, and to escape this penalty
there was strong temptation to assume
a submissive or dependent relationship towards the United States.
"Acting ln the light of these experiences, the Canadian people decided to*
build up an Industrial system of their
own. To thus develop our own resources and keep our people here
earning wages and salaries and profits
therefrom, a protective tariff was
essential. A study of thejiast 40 years
will clearly show that the conclusions
drawn by our fathers In 1878 were
sound and right conclusions. Thoso
years have been years of continuous
development through good times and
ill; the markets of our towns and
ities have become more and more the
reliance of our agricultural producers.
Great Increase of Canada's Trade.
Tlie valuo ot our manufacturing,
mineral und agricultural' production
bas multiplied many times over.
Belifg able to depend so largely on an
ever-expanding home market, wo have
produced upon u scale that enabled us
to enter markets abroad, and bo successful have we been that the trade
of Canada has multiplied many times
over and over again. Our exports last
year wero 14 times In Value what they
were In lSUU, and four times what
they were as late us 1910. Our total
trade Is now over seven times what It
was 20 yeara ago.
Indeed, the por capita trade ot
Canada stands In front of the larger
nations of the world, and has stood as
high as 2Mi times tho per capita trade
of the United States. Wo have taken
the strong, self-reliant course, and
have been able to purusue that courBe
and maintain our prosperity regardless of tlie policy of any other nation.
"AgniiiBt tlie tariff proposals of Hon.
Mackenzie King and all whom in this
contest lie represents, against the tariff
proposals of Mr. Wood and Mr. Crerar,
and all whom they represent, I ask
the people of Canada to pronounce.
Anti-Protection Campaign Is Cause ot
the Unrest
"Already there Is unsettlement of
business conditions resulting ln unemployment and loss to all classes.
A persistent anti-protection campaign,
resulting in uncertainty and lack of
confidence, has so disturbed and curtailed production as to account for
many thousands being out of work
today.. A decisive verdict by the
Canadian people will be-the signal for .
returning confidence, for renewed productive activities, and for better times.
Tlie laboring population of our country will be the first to benefit by such
a verdict, and would bo tlie heaviest
sufferers should the tried and proven
policy of this country be exchanged
for manifestly fallacious theories.
Canadian tanners would soon find
that with the reduction of destruction
lit our Industrial centres would pass
away not only their most profitable
market, but, at Ihe same time, the
source of tho greater portion of our
revenue, with the result that the burden of taxation would thereafter have
to lie borne more aiid more by themselves. Tlic time lias come to settle
this issue, ami tlle well-being of one
and ull depends upon It being settled
right.
Premier Consistent Position.
"There are other subjects of importance, and these I have on several
platforms discussed and shall again
discuss. As respects one and all my
position has been and shall be definite,
understandable and consistent. There
is no topic of public interest tliat we
wish to evade; there can be no attack
that we are not eager and able by
thc presentation of facts to repel. We
have carried through these years a
responsibility unprecedented in Its
magnitude, und for tlie discharge of
that responsibility we are prepared
to answer through all portions of the
Dominion and all classes of the people
of Canada.
Responsibility on the People.
"On the shoulders of the people
themselves the responsibility now is
placed. They must decide, and I pray
ihat the gravity of that decision every
man and every woman will fully comprehend. They must decide between
sure and ordered progress and perilous experiment; they must decide between the certain fruits of a strong
and stable Government, and that
sterility and despair which can be the
only product of class alliances and the
balancing of groups; they must decide
between a tariff policy which, in
Canada's position is the very root ot
her prosperity, and tlie progressive
absorption of Canadian industries and
with them Canadian manhood aud
womanhood in the ever expanding
system of the United States.
Especial Appeal to Women.
"To the women of Canada I make
especial appeal. The Government now
In offlce, supported by the party which
I have the honor 40 load, extended to
you three years ago the Federal franchise. Your rights of auffrage aro
now in every respect tho aanie as the
suffrage rlghta of men. Thla was done
voluntarily as an act of justice. The
servieea of women iu the war had
oeen such that In tlie judgment of the
Government and the party that supported it their qualifications for franchise had been earned. Nevertheless
there were those opposed to us who
resisted the Government's action In
this regard, and who still insist that
such action was wrong. My appeal to
women ls not, however, on any ground
peculiar to themselves, but my appeal
to them ls earnestly and thoroughly
to study the great issues that now
confront their country, and conscientiously to seek a conclusion on that
issue from the standpoint of country-
loving Canadians to refuse steadfastly
to he moved by reckless and unsupported calumnies of public men or by
the cry of prejudice or by class appeal.
Through the long struggle of the war
the women of our country proved
themselves equul with man in stern,
unselfish patriotism and fervent devotion to duty. I confidently hope
that in the execution of the trust reposed iu them now they will prove to
be a steadying and enlightening force
In our public life, that tbey will show
forth an example of public conduct
dictated by love of country alone, aud
will thus vindicate to all the world
their right to share with men responsibility for publlc affairs.
"ARTHUR MEIGHEN."
"Did he kick tlie bucket?''
"No; but he turned pale," tssssssssss\sssssnssssssnsstsWk\s\\\\\nss\aaaai
.^^■■■■■■■■■■■■■M
:™rmsEa*»J
October 29, Mi.
mSi CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Sevell
(,
THE
PIKET - ELECTRIC
WIFE SAVING STATION
Electric Vacuum Cleaners
ELECTRIC WHITE CAP WASHING MACHINES
ELECTRIC DURO WATER SYSTEMS
ELECTRIC STOVES, PLATES, TOASTERS
ELECTRIC FLASH LAMPS, PERCOLATORS
Complete Line of Batteries
Bells, Fixtures of every descripthion.  Complete line of
Lamps in Stock.
EXPERT WIRING OF OLD AND NEW BUILDINGS
Estimates Given Upon Application.
LEN D. PIKET
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR—DEALER
Phone 131-R COURTENAY
British Columbia
By DAVID WARWICK
(Courtesy of the  Canadian   National
Railways Magazine)
IN all kinds of work, good results require good implements kept in good condition. If the right sort of
implement is important to an individual workman,
efficient tools for industry and commerce are a necessity.
Telephone service is one of the tools of industry and
commerce in most common use and upon which much
depends. To transmit the vibration of the human
voice from any point to any other point demands an
expensive mechanism of the highest order of scientific
precision and an efficient organization.
It is our aim to have the telephone, with the cooperation of the public, the most dependable tool of
indutsry.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Deposit Your Savings
Regularity in depositing in our Savings Bank, even
in small sums, will make your balance increase surprisingly.   For example:
End
Deposits of IstVr.
$ 1.00 Weekly       $ 52.69
10.00 Monthly         121.G5
OPEN A SAVINGS ACCOUNT AND PROVE IT
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
End
End
2nd Yr.
3rd Yr.
$106.95
$162.84
246.92
375.98
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
- -     $15,000,000
- -     $15,000,000
•    J. GRAINGER, Manager.
(Continued from Last Week)
There are some portions of British
Columbia where the climate is so
mild that grapes and peaches may be
grown ou tlie sunny sides of houses
as iu the Old Land over the sea. The
apples of the coast are sought after
iu many markets. The production in
small fruits Is prolific. So, from any
angle, the future of British Columbia
from a fruit-growing point of view is
extraordinarily bright. It is believed
at the coast that in time the valuo ot.
the fruit produced annually will equal,
if it will not exceed, the value of the
annual return from any other resource.
The truck farms are mostly in the
hands of Chinese, ure close to the
large centres, and produce wonderful crops. The alien from the Celestial republic Is a wonder where intensive cultivation is concerned. He ls a
bard worker, prompt with deliveries
and can live more cheaply than can
his white-skinned competitor. The
Chinese and Japanese constitute a
problem at the coast that seems difficult of solution, a problem that will
probably be discussed in some detail
when the statesmen of the western
hemisphere and those from the eastern, gather at Washington this fall
and discuss armament matters. There
is no doubt it can and will be solved
in Canada, with justice to all parties
concerned.
Cereals are not extensively grown
in British Columbia, but potatoes are
a staple crop and we are becoming
reconciled to the Idea that splendid
tubers are produced in abundance ln
tbe coast province. Those who have
persisted iu the opinion that the product of New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and of New Ontario could
not be excelled in Canada, may yet
have to modify that assertion, If the
reports from the coaat are true.
These facts, as set down, seem to
cover fairly well the extent of the
agricultural industry at the coast but
tbey may have inadvertently expressed
the revenue possibilities. In that connection it should be borne in mind that
while British Columbia ls a big province, only about one twenty-fifth of
its area is suitable for agriculture at
all. The valleys where most ot the
mixed farming is carried on are widely
separated. The communications by
rail and water comprise as yet not
much more than a skeleton of what
they will be when the development Indicated here has been accomplished.
Fruit and specialty-farming will
probably be the chief lines followed,
and, from theae, tho rewards would
appear to be limited only by the
capacity of production and the industry of the workers on Its fertile acres.
Thero are many worse places to be
than one of those little farms tucked
away ln a valley sheltered from the
bleak north winds, where there is
precious little frost; where the days
are wurm and the nights cool, and the
fertility of the soil all that could possibly be desired.
AINT IT THE TRUTH
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
NOTICE
Accounts owing to F. Wilcock,
formerly of the City Meat Market, may be paid at that office.
F. WILCOCK.
P.O. Box 165, Cumberland.
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
      i T
Her French,
"Where did you learn your French
—abroad?"
"f!o, right here, off perfume bottles,"
answered the druggist's assistant.
Electric bulbs can be frosted by dipping them ln a strong solution of Epsom salts and vinegar. This softens
the glare of the light.
BROWN'S
TOBACCO, CIGAR AND
CONFECTIONERY STORE
Good Selection of Pipes, Cigar and
Cigarette Holders.
Football Results Every
Saturday Night
James Brown
Cumberland
Are there cows upon the street,
Do tiie sidewalks hurt your feet-
Blame the Cop.
Is your man the kind of joker
Who enjoys n game of poker-
Blame the Cop.
Is he inclined to roam,
Or does he sit all day at home?
Blame the Cop.
Is the price of "hootch" too high,
Or should tlie town be dry—
Blame the Cop.
Do you think there's too much rain,
Do your corns give you a pain-
Blame the Cop.
Don't tlie dancers "Jazz" enough,
Or are they far too rough—
Blame the Cop.
Should the little girls and boys
Pluylug games make too much noise-
Blame the Cop.
Should your kids be home by eight,
Do you let them stay out late—
Blame the Cop.
If your neighbor is a toad.
Dumps his ashes on the road-
Blame the Cop.
And now the winter's coming,
And you've trouble with your plumbing
Blame the Cop.
When you took a little drink,
Did it land you in the Clink?
Blame the Cop.
Are you sore because you're pinched*
Should the other guy be cinched?
Blame the Cop.
And If your neighbors chickens
Iu your gardens raise the dickens-
Blame the Cop.
If among these other evils
Your family has the measles-
Blame the Cop.
But if things are far from quiet,
And it looks much like a riot-
Call the Cop.
If you have any sadness,
If your life's bereft of gladness-
Tell the Cop.
Are you reaping what you sowed?
Why, you can just unload
On the Cop.
But this is more true
Than most thinga are:
In time of peace
Or time of war—
You need the Cop.
- By the Cop.
LEGAL NOTICE.
432-1921.
IN THE SII'HKMK COURT OF
BKITISII COLUMBIA.
BETWEEN:
SPENCE HIREEN, Plaintiff,
and:
J. C. McGREGOR, Defendant.
Before   the   Honorable   Mr.   Justice
Murphy in Chambers:
Monday, the 17th day of October, 1921.
UPON tbe application of the Plain-
tin' and upon hearing Mr. P. J. Slnnott
Solicitor for the Plaintiff, and upon
rending the Allidavll or Patrick J.
Sinnott sworn Ihe lfilli day ot October
1921, and tiled herein;
IT IS ORDERED thai Ihe Plaintiff
bo at liberty to servo the Defendant
with tho Wril of Summons In tills action by the publication by advertisement of the said Writ of Summons
and ol* this Order In one Issue of Iho
Victoria Dally Colonial newspaper for
two successive weeks and in one issue
jf a newspaper having a circulation
in the City or Cumberland, llritish
Columbia, for two successive weeks;
AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED
Ihat Ihe Mine for appearance to the
laid Writ of Summons Bhall he within
light days after the final publication
iiy advertisement or the said Writ of
Summons, inclusive of the day of such
ervice.
V.C.F.
B.C.L.S.
60c Victoria.
D. MURPHY, J.      Oct. 17. 11121
Registry.
Entered Vol, 38, Foi. 733
Dale 10-10-21"
By J.S.G.
B. C. L. S.
i.OO
II. No. -132
1021
IJi THE SUPREME COURT OF
BRITISH COM'.HIIIA
BETWEEN:
SPENCE IIIREEN, Plaintiff,
and:
J. C. McGREGOR, Defendant.
Vicloria. Oct, 6, 1021.
Registry G. H. M.
GEORTH THE FIFTH, by the Grace
of God, of the United Kingdom of
Great Britain and Ireland, and or the
British Dominions Beyond the Seas,
King, Defender of the Faith, Emperor
of India.
To J. C. McGREGOR, Cumberland,
B. C.
P. J. Slnnott, Plaintiff's Solicitor.
WE COMMAND YOU, that within
eight days after the service of thia
Writ on you, inclusive of the day of
such service, you do cause an appearance to be entered for you in an action at the suit of
SPENCE HIREEN, Douglas Hotel,
Douglas Street, Victoria, B. C.
AND TAKE NOTICE that in default
of your so doing, tlie  Plaintiff may
proceed therein, and judgment may ho
given in your absence.
Seal of the
Supreme Court ot
Britisli Columbia.
WITNESS   THE  HONORABLE  GORDON  HUNTER,  Chief Jllslico,  tlie
6th day of October In tho year of
our Lord one thousand nine hundred
and twenty-one.
N.B.—This wril is to lie served
within twelve calendar months from
the date thereof, or, it renewed, within twelve calendar months irom the
date of the last renewal, Including the
day of audi date, and not afterwards.
Appearance ia lo lie entered at the
offlce or the District Registrar of this
Court at Victoria, U. C, out of which
this writ ia issued.
Statement of Claim.
The Plaintiffs claim is for the sum
of $286.45 due by the Defendant to the
Plaintiff and being (1) tbo sum of
$250.00 the amount of the cheque made
hy tbe Defendant in favor of the Plaintiff and dated the 15th day of September, 1921, payable at the Bank ol* Italy,
San Francisco, California, which
cheque was duly presented for payment and dishonored; (2) the sum of
{28.20 being the amount of exchange
paid by the Plaintiff ou or about the
mid 15th day of September, 1021, in
■•espect of tlie said cheque and due by
the Defendant to the Plaintiff; (3) the
mm of $4.00 for lodgings supplied by
-be Plaintiff to the Defendant at the
Douglas Hotel, Victoria, B.C., on or
Jbout the" 15th day of September,
1031; and (4) the sum or $4,20 being
■.'or telegrams ami long distance telephone tolls paid by tlie Plaintiff for
the Defendant.
PARTICULARS:
3ept. 15.
1021.
To dishonored cheque        $250,011
" exchange paid thereon    2S
" lodgings at Douglas Hotel..     4.(in
"  telegrams and telephone....     4.20
Total  $286.46
Place of Trial, Victoria, B. C.
DELIVERED this Cth day of Octo-
jer, A.D. 1921.
P. J. SINNOTT,
Plaintiff's Solicitor.
AND the sum of $40.00 (or such sum
is may be allowed on taxation) for
costs.
If the amount claimed lie paid to the
Plaintiff or his Solicitor or Agent
vltliin four days from the service
lereof further proceedings will lie
itayed.
Fall
Announcement
We have just received a full and complete range of
RUBBER GOODS
LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S RUBBERS
MEN'S AND BOYS' RUBBERS
MEN'S HIP AND KNEE GUM BOOTS
BOYS' GUM BOOTS
'rhe.se are selling at a Reduction of 15 to 25 Per Cent.
off last year's prices.
MEN'S AND BOYS' CAPS
We have a choice selection, in the newest colors and
shapes.   Priced from 75c to $2.50.
Men's Hosiery and Underwear
Another shipment of men's Hosiery and Underwear
at the lower prices.
STANFIELD'S MEN'S UNDERWEAR, in two-piece
suits and combinations, at these low prices:
Shirts and Drawers, per garment, from $1.50
Combinations, per suit $3.00 and $3.90
MEN'S AND BOYS' SWEATERS AND SWEATER
COATS
See our large assortment at Reduced Prices.
The Model Clothing and
Shoe Store
Phone 152
F. PARTRIDGE
P. O. Box 34S
E. & N. RY DONATES
SQUARE TO LADYSMITH
Some time ago tiie city ollicials of
Ladysmith approached tlie Lands Department of the E. & N. Railway in
respect to what is known as the
.Market Square, asking tliat the square
be turned over to Ibe city. Contrary
to general understanding, this land
lias belonged to the railway ever since
the city was incorporated.
After taking the matter under advisement, the land agent lias informed
the council that so soon aa tbe city
forwards a description of tho property
a conveyance will be forwarded, turning the property over to tlie city for
llic registration fee.
A JIVT AttB TWO WISHERS
Not often can n Joke be made about
a serious accident, but this was told
at a recent convention.
"It seems that a crazy man in a
small town stole a flivver. Whllo ho
was driving ho met two Chinese Iaun-
drymen along tho road. He gave thom
a lift. Without looking he drove tho
machine* across the railroad tracks
directly in front of a train. Thero
was an awful crash—and when tho
train crew stopped and looked ahout.
what do you think they found? All
they could find waB a nut and two
washers."
Christian   Science  dates  from  tho
publication of the text book In 1875.
Perpetual Motion.
"Has   Bobby   been   eating   between
meals?"
"Bobble has no between meals."
An elderly couple got married. The
lusband locked one room in the house
'.lie Inside of which his wile Iiad never
*een. Being curious as to its contents,
die begged to be allowed to enter the
room.
At last lie consented, and hi and he-
hold, tile room was full of cheese. He
explained tlie matter by telling hor
Ihat for every sweetheart ho had In
liis young days he bought a cheese.
His wife began to cry.
"Don't cry, dear," lie continued.
'I've had no other sweetheart since I
met you."
"It's not that," she replied, still sobbing, "I wish I had been as thoughtful as you and bought a loaf or bread
or every man that kissed me when I
.vas n girl; we could have iiad enough
bread and cheese to last us all our
days!"
Specials for  this
Week
2 Only, DRESSERS in ivory finish, bevel fJJOP AA
plate mirror.   Specially priced at ...... tysUd,\j{}
3 Only, CHIFFONIERS, in ivory finish, (POP AA
bevel plated mirror.   A snap at tytinlO-\J*\j
1 Only, WHITE ENAMEL DRESSING  djnr A A
TABLE, three mirrors. Priced at tp^9«UU
1 Only, IVORY FINISH DRESSING     flJOA A A
TABLE and BENCH; a very fine gift tpOU.UU
HEATERS
Before buying your Heater be sure and inspect our
lines and get our prices. We invite inspection and
comparison.
Nairn's Linoleum
We have just received two rolls of Nairn's Scotch
Linoleum, priced at $1.50 a yard.
The
Furniture Store
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B. C. Sight
THE  CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
October 29, 1921.
Underwear For
The  Cold   Days
CHILDREN'S AND MISSES' WHITE HEAVY VESTS,       rJPp
fleece lined, long sleeves. Specially priced, garment.... I f V
GIRLS' HEAVY FLEECE-LINED BLOOMERS; all sizes. QPu,
Per pair iWV
MISSES' WHITE HEAVY COMBINATIONS, sizes 26, fl»0 KQ
2$. 30 and 32.   Per suit  WM.VV
MISSES' CREAM FLEECE-LINED UNDERVESTS—        QCp
A very nice garment, each  t/t»v
BOYS' NATURAL WOOL DRAWERS, about four dozen QP-
In the lot; all sizes from 22 to 32.   Clearing price «""»
BOYS' NATURAL WOOL SHIRTS, Turnbull make;    (PI   r7C
a really good garment.   Prices »Ui>, IU0 aud WJ-fl «
BOYS' NATURAL WOOL COMBINATIONS—Just the thing for
tbe boy who does not need too heavy a garment.     (PI  QC
MEN'S NATURAL WOOL SHIRTS AND DRAWERS, Turnbull's
make; every garment guaranteed to give satisfac- (PO KA
tion.   Price, per garment  wtttUV
MEN'S UNION SUITS, natural shade; Penman's (£9 CA
make.   Per suit  ! VO.OV
MEN'S NATURAL WOOL   COMBINATIONS, QA QK
Turnbull's make; per suit  WtmW
MEN'S COMBINATIONS, Stanlleld's heavy make. dM QC
Price, per suit  Wttt/U
MEN'S FLEECE-LINED UNDERWEAR, all sizes.      fl»1   Of!
Price, per garment  •"MLtttv
LADIES' CREAM FLEECE-LINED VESTS, with or (P"l   A||
without straps or half-oleevea.    Price, each  *uJX«VU
LADIES' CREAM UNDERVESTS, with half sleeves. QfXn
Price     *,OK/
LADIES' FINE UNDERVESTS, strapped shoulders,    flJO KA
lace fronts.   Price, each  WtinOM
LADIES' COMBINATIONS, cream fleece-lined. (PO KA
Price, each  iDii.OV
LADIES' PINK OR WHITE BLOOMERS, CAp
Per  pair   .,   tlUlu
LADIES' HEAVY BLOOMERS, fljl   OR
per pair  iDx.MU
AYRSHIRE BLANKETS
Secure your needs now—prices are reasonable.
DRYGOODS
GENTSFURNISHINGS
There was a young man lioin the city.
Who met what he thought was a kitty,
He gave it a pat,
Said, "Nice little cat,"
Then buried his clothes out of pity.
Jack: "Whence the black eye, old
thing?"
Bill; "Oh, I went to a dance last
night, and was struck by the beauty
of the place."
The skipper waa making up the log
for the day, and the first item ran;
"The mate was intoxicated." The mate
asked the aklpper to delete the entry.
"No," said the skipper. "It's true,
isn't It?"
A few days later the mate was ln
charge of the ship, and his first entry
ln the log was: "Captain sober today."
The captain, seeing the entry, was
angry and asked the mate what it
meant.
The mute replied; "Well, it's true,
isn't It?"
NOT TIME TO CHANGE
Little Mary came Into the house bedraggled and weeping.
"My goodnesB," cried her mother,
"what a sight you are. How did it
happen?"
"I am s-sorry, mamma, but I fell
Into a mudpuddle."
"What!  with your best dress on?"
"Y-y-yes, I didn't have time to
change it."
Spinsters like to call themselves
"bachelor girls," but no bachelor ever
calls himself an "old-man man.
BIG STOCK OF
Royal Stafford
Teapots
JUST ARRIVED
From $1.60 to $2.75 Each
BULBS
Brand's Best Selected
HYACINTHS, each   25c
CHINESE NARCISSUS, each  25c
SINGLE TULIPS $5.00 per 100; dozen 75c
DARWIN TULIPS $6.50 per 100; dozen 90c
SNOWDROPS—
Single $3.00 per 100; dozen 50c
Double $4.00 per 100; doien 60c
DAFFODILS—
Emperor (mammoth) $10.00 per 100; dozen $1.35
Sir Watkin (mammoth) $8.00 per 100; doz. $1.10
Emperor, Empress, Sir Watkin, N. Obvalaris—
Price $6.50 per 100; dozen 85c
C. H. TARBELL & SON
Hardware and Sporting
Goods
Phone 30
Cumberland
PERCOLATIONS
Most ball players can steal second,
but few married ones can steal home.
Hardest thing in tlie world to forget is your landlord's address.
How did Brown ever manage tc
get so deeply In debt?"
'I wish 1 knew. I can't even stand
my grocer off more than two week
at a lime."
They used to hide their rouge, now
they rouge Iheir hide.
A man who says lie never kisaed a
girl before will lie about other thing
also.
The worst   habit   is   the   haliil   ol
forming bad habits.
Ten and  15-cent  bands   don't   improve nickel cigars.
Some neighbors will   borrow  anything but the baby.
Our Friend   Bill   says   tlie   lowest
hyprocrite  in  tlie  world  is  tlie  man
who chews cloves to make his friend
believe he has had a drink.
We have only tills to say about the
man who deceives his wife—He's a
wonder!!
Opportunity knocks, but temptation
kicks the door In.
A tempest in a teapot is a mere
zephyr compared to tlie tornado In a
bottle or moonshine.
What do you think or the candidates?"
Well, the more I think of it the
more pleased I am that only one of
them can be elected."
"Did your uncle ever keep a
saloon?"
"Well, not all alone—but he did his
share."
CLUB NOTES
Cumberland Literary nnd Athletic
Association.
Visitors.—J. A. Murphy, Vancouver;
J. E. Jary. Bevan; Edward Parkin.
Bevan, Arthur Meachen, Bevan; Jas.
Yoursley, Nanaimo; W. Beaumont,
Nanaimo; G. C. llaker, Victoria; J. 11.
Stevens, Victoria.
Tlie new consignment of 300 books
for the Library are on tlie shelves
ready for circulation. There ure aulte
a number of very interesting books
among these.
Two hundred and fifty members of
the Club are now taking books from
the Library.
A meeting la called for Sunday evening next, at 7.30, for ihe purpose ot*
forming a Debating Club among the
members.
Tournaments in billiards, pool and
table games will start very shortly.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
October 20—Esdud, Progressive,
Alert, coastwise; Talthybius, Manila;
Qualicum, Vancouver.
October 21—Melanope, Princess
Beatrice, Vancouver; Progressive and
Scow, Powell River; Dauntless and
Cheerful, coastwise.
October 22—McCulloch, coastwise.
October 23—Clayburn and scow,
Vancouver.
October 24—Gunner and Buster B.,
coastwise.
October 25—Esdud, Active, Olive M„
coastwise.
October 26—Canada, Storm King and
Wireless, coastwise; Waihora, San
Francisco; Beatrice, coastwise.
Cumberland Lodge
1662, Loyal Order
Of Moose
A General Meeting of the
above Lodge will be held on
Thursday, Nov. 3
at 7 o'clock, in thc Fraternity
Hall.
A large class will be initiated on this occasion.
FRANCIS W. IIOBSON,
Secretary.
Ancient Order of Foresters
Meetings are held on tlie second
and fourth Wednesdays of eacli month,
In the Fraternity Hall. Dunsmuir Ave.
Visiting brethren cordially invited.
Hugh McLean Davidson. 0, Ranger;
F. Baton, Secretary; F, Slaughter,
Treasurer. l
Personal Mention
Miss Knox of Royston and Mlaa
Whitely of Puntledge wore guests of
he Missea McFadyen ovcr the weekend.
Fire Chiet and Mrs. V. W. Stewart
>r Victoria, who snent a lew daya in
rhe city as guests of Mr. and Mrs. C.
I. Parnham, left by motor on Tuesday
or Nanaimo, where thoy remained a
louple of days before proceeding to
Victoria. Chief Stewart was one of a
rarty who visited Denman Island over
he week-end arid aecured a good bag
if pheasants.
Mr. Francis Vi. Holraon left for
Victoria Tuesday morning on a brief
Halt.
Mr. Knowlea, of England, who hai
jeen the guest ot his sister-in-law,
ill's. J. 10. Spicer, Ior u few days, left,
hla week on his return trip.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Super
nteiident of the Canadian Collieries
[Dunsmuir) Ltd., left for Victoria
A'ediicsday morning.
Mr. J. Ii. Stevens, of the Canadian
lolllertes (Dunsmuir) Ltd. Victoria,
irrlved on Saturday and returned
Wednesday.
Mr. (.on Reifel of Nanaimo was in
Hiwn during the week.
Miss M. Evans arrived from Van-
louver Saturday on a week's visit to
ler sister, Mrs. J. B. Bergland.
Mi*. Henry Devlin, Inspector of
Mines, acompanled hy Mrs. Devlin, relumed to Nanaimo Wednesday.
Mr. G. C. Baker, of the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., Victoria,
arrived on Saturday and returned
Wednesday.
Mr. A. S. Killam, representing Fleck
Rros. of Vancouver, and Mrs. Killam,
<pent last week-end in town and were
the gueat3 of Mr. and Mrs. E. Vi.
Uickle.
On Friday evening last a large number of friends called upon Mrs. John
Smith and announced a "surprise"
party. Mrs. Smith, who was taken
-liiite by surprise, made the visitors
welcome and a very pleasant evening
waa spent in musical selections, cards,
etc. Mrs. J. Brown won the first prize
in whist, while Mrs. J. Pinfold, was
awarded the consolation.
ANOTHER CARLOAD OF FORDS
Al a time when one reads of depression nnd unemployment, it is refreshing to hear tliat the Corlleld Motors
Limited of Courtenay are exceptionally busy. They aell Ford cars and do
repairs to cars of all makes. Today
another carload of cars has arrived
for them, making the third since September 20. Eacli car contains six
Fords of various styles, principally
tiie familiar touring model, so that
eighteen uutomobiles have been received, and there is still another carload on order, which Is due to arrive
next month.
WEDDING
Dunn-Coventry.
Air. Wilson R. Dunn, who formerly
was on the staff of the Islander and ls
well known in this district, waa united
in marriage Thuraday evening to Miss
Georgina Coventry, of Courtenay.
Following the wedding a reception
waa held at the home of thc bride's
parents, nfter wliieh Mr. and Mrs.
Dunn left for Vancouver and other
points, where tlie honeymoon will be
spent. Air. Dunn Is now on the staff
of the Comox Argus.
GREAT VARIETY OF
Masquerade
COSTUMES
FOR  HIRE
Order Early
J. WALTON
Mumford & Walton's Grocery-
Costumes should be spoken for at
least five, days before the day on
which they are to he used.
Choice Okanagan
APPLES
ALL  BEST No.  1   PACK
JONATHANS— <I»Q **7K
Per box   «pO. I ti
MACKINTOSH REDS— '     f$Q QK
Per box   <PO OO
No. 2, UNWRAPPED— (PO  PA
Per box   tpA.OV
SEE OUR FINE
DISPLAY     OF
Fresh Fruits
MALAGA GRAPES
TOKAY GRAPES
ORANGES
LEMONS
GRAPE-FRUIT
BANANAS
PEARS
APPLES
CRABAPPLES
CRANBERRIES
Fresh
Vegetables
HOTHOUSE TOMATOES
HOTHOUSE LETTUCE
CAULIFLOWERS
CABBAGE
CUCUMBERS
PUMPKIN
SQUASH
SWEET POTATOES
GREEN TOMATOES
GREEN PEPPERS
CARROTS, ONIONS
POTATOES
JUST ARRIVED
Grandmother's   Cooking   Ware
LOW BOWLS, all sizes DEEP BOWLS, all sizea
JUGS, all sizes CUSTARD CUPS
ROUND CASSEROLES
Also a fine assorted selection of Tea Pots, Fruit Dishes,
Bread and Cake Plates, Water Sets, Berry Sets, Cream
and Sugar Sets, in Plain and Colored Patterns.
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A
Rattling Good Car
CUT OUT THE RATTLE—
Or rather let us do it.   We know how to make your car behave,
and will give you a lot of free advice on the subject if you ask us.
Harling & Ledingham
Telephone 8 Cumberland P.O. Box 349
A CALIFOKMA MAID
A lady stopping at a hotel In San
Francisco rang the bell the first morning of her arrival, and was very much
surprised when a Japanese boy opened
the door and came in.
"I pushed the button three times
for a maid," she said sternly, as she
dived under the covers.
"Yes," the little brown fellow replied, "me she."
(irnti'fiil Appreciation.
When Whistler, the famous artist,
was living In London he was annoyed
not a little by a bumptious Englishman who always persisted in accosting him familiarly In public places.
"Hello, Whistler," exclaimed the
peat as they met one afternoon In a
(dub. "Hello, Whistler, 1 passed your
house today,"
"Thank you!" retorted the artist
fervently.
A bee can carry throe times its own      Americana own about one-half of all
weight of honey when flying. the diamonds In tho world.
Majestic Theatre, Courtenay, Friday and Saturday
ATTRACTION EXTRAORDINARY-2
DAYS   ONLY
Oct. 28 and 29th
CHARLIE CHAPLIN
IN —
The Super-Comedy that
took a year to make—and
it packs enough laugha
to last another year!
CHARLIE  DOES   ALL
THE THINGS YOU'VE
NEVER SEEN HIM DO—AND THE GREATEST KID IN THE
WORLD LENDS A HAND!
The Kid
SHOW COMMENCES ON
FRIDAY AT 8 P.fo.
SATURDAY AT 7 P.M.
Admission r
ADULTS   50c
CHILDREN 25c
Special Matinee Saturday, at 2.30 p.m.
ADMISSION:  ADULTS 35c, CHILDREN 20c.
J

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