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The Islander Jul 24, 1915

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 Imtfte
Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
VOL. VI., No. 18       THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, JULY 24. 1915.       Subscription price, $1.50 per year
*
COAL GAS RESIDUALS
While Germany has been the
largest producer in the world, of
by-products from coke and gas
works, these industries have become even more important since
the outbreak of the war. In Germany such by-products as benzol
and tar oil replace gasoline, the
importation of which has ceased,
and sulphate of ammonia is taking
the place of Chili saltpetre, to be
used as fertilizer and in the manufacture of explosives.
To obtain sufficient by-products,
the coke production has been inert ased. The German government
buildings and railways, etc., are
now obliged to use cake, together
with fuel of other kinds, and
orders have been issued regulating the proportion of coke to be
used in the mixture.
The principal coal gas residuals
recovered are tar, naphthalene,
cyanogen, ammonia and, in the
case of coke-oven gas, also
benzol.
Tar.—The tar produced from
coal gas is one of the chief residuals. It finds its most important
application in the arts, where it
forms the basis of aniline colour
production; 392 different colours
and shades are listed as made
from tar. These are produced
by distilling the tar and. after a
a certain temperature has been
reached, water-like oil is secured.
This oil forms the base of all the
beautiful coal-tar colours.
Carbolic acid, naphthalene, an-
thracine, and benzol are also produced in like manner, and each
of these in turn produces a long
series of other products. Alari-
zarin, a valuable colouring matter
which forms the base of artificial
indigo, is produced by treating
anthracene.
ln 1913, Germany exported coal
tar dyestuffs worth over $55,000,
000 (equivalent to 40 per cent of
the mineral production of Canada.) During the same year the
gross value of byproducts (estimating dyestuff, etc., in the form
of crude intermediate products)
wasted, by beehive coke ovens in
the United States amounted to
over $75,000,000. It is probable
that the loss in Canada, due to
the use of such ovens, is greater
in proportion than that of the
United States.
DISCOVERER OF TYPHUS ANTI-TOXIN OFF FOR SERVIA
Left to right:*Dr. Geo. Baehr, Dr. Peter Obitsky and Dr. Harry Poltz, photographed at New York just before**Baehr and Poltz sailed for Nish, Servia,
where they will join Dr. Richard P. Strong. Director of the American Red
Cross Commission at Nish.   Dr. Poltz is said to have discovered a
new typhus antitoxin and Dr. Obitsky will remain in New York
to make an ample suppiy of the serum for use in Servia.
NO SANDBAGS REQUIRED
In our last issue we were requested to publish an appeal for
sandbags, and that the local Boy
Scouts had been detailed to make
a house-to-house canvass on the
24th of July. Now comes the
statement from the corresponding
secretary of the Canadian Red
Cross Society and secretary of
the National Service Committee
of Toronto, who says that Mr. F.
G. Colmer, secretary of the Canadian War Contingent Association, states most definitely that
the British War Offic is providing
all the sandbags and respirators
necessary and begs that none be
sent from Canada, with the request that the information be
spread as widely as possible. It
is a mistake to instruct the Boy
Scouts to canvass for that which
is not wanted.
RECORD IN PATRIOTISM
The small town of Puntledge is
one of the most patriotic little
places in the West. Situated
about three miles from Cumberland it came into existence with
the sinking of No. 8 mine of the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd. When the call of "Halt,
Fall in! " came, fifty per cent of
the population responded.
Dr. F. S. Reynolds, of Nanaimo,
was here on a visit on Monday.
Three years ago the single men
of Cumberland wanted a holiday
and with the assistance of the
agitators and the U.m.W. of A.
they obtained the desired vacation
on the funds of that foreign organization. Supported thus for
some considerable time, they
were eventually left on the drift-
ting planks asleep, with no work
and in absolute want. The provincial treasury cam* to their
assistance in the unfortunate circumstances into which they had
placed themselves, brought about
by their Own actions, with no one
ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS
The results of the High School
Entrance Examination, held on
June 21, 22 and 23. have been
announced by the Department of
Education. The total number of
candidates was 3,366, out of
which 2,394 were successful in
passing. The results for Cumberland Centre are as follows:
Number of candidates 10; nine
passed. Peter Mar, 739; Blanche
L. Dando, 731; Rose Pearse, 650;
Nellie Ronald, 628; AnnieWilcock,
625; Neta A. Winningham, 606;
Dayrell M. Bate, 601; Mary
Picketti, 601; Gladys M.D.Lewis,
596.
Fanny Bay—Number of candidates, 3; passed 1: Nellie E. Larson, 652.
Hornby Island — Number of
candidates, 1; passed none.
Union Bay—Number of candidates, 3; passed 2; George Russell
615; Edwin R. Glover, 580.
HIGH SCHOOL EXAMINATIONS
The results of tte June examinations held in the Cumberland
High School are as follows:
Preliminary course, junior
grade; maximum marks, 1,000.
Number of candidates, 16; passed
6: Jacob Lighter, 705; George
Mordy, 614; Eva G. White. 558;
Thomas J. McQuillan, 546; Bessie
B. Stewart, 538; Josephine B.
Balagno, 527.
Advanced course, junior grade;
maximum marks, 1,000. Numl e *
of candidates, 6; passed 3: Wm.
H. Mordy, 665; Agnes Potter,
562; Eva L. Coe, 517.
Private study — Third class,
maximum marks, 1,100. Number
of candidates, 1; passed none.
to blame but themselves. Now
the Provincial Government has
seen fit to withdraw the allowance from the s ngle men and
the latter are now requesting the
civic authorities to intercede on
their behalf that they might secure work. The call to " Halt.
Fall in!" has been sounded and
recruits are wanted for the front
The men who have tried and
failed in the medical examination
have done their best. But what
about those who have never tried
at all—those white feather men
conspisuous with the red flag
when the district was prosperous.
Sr
J. V. Nordgren is open to buy
shares of the Cumberland Waterworks, providing the price is right TWO
THE ISLANDEtt,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
BE OF GCOD CHEER
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAB.
®hr Jalattfcr
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, JULY 24th, 1915.
Re-alignment of Industry.
In talking with people about
the proposal to place an import
duty on foreign fuel oil we have
uncovered some curious objections
to such a tariff. Strange to say
they come from people whose interests are bound up with the
very industry for whose benefit
the tariff is suggested. They
have not been, and will not be,
used by the fuel oil interests, because they are not sound reasons,
they will not "hold water." But
they cannot be wholly ignored
because they reveal a surprising
lack of understanding as to the
real bearing of the facts about
fuel oil invasion.
One of these alleged reasons
for a "do-nothing" policy is as
follows: There are oil fields in
Alberta which may become as
heavy producers as the California
fields at some future time. A
duty on foreign fuel oil cannot
affect these new Canadian supplies, and it is to be anticipated
that, owing to its nearness,
Alberta oil will eventually prove
to be an even more serious competitor to coal than Colifornia oil
now is. Therefore, it is said, it
is useless to put California oil
under a duty.
There are two fallacies in this
argument. In the first place it is
quite wrongfully assumed that
possible future competition from
another direction has a bearing
on present competition. It has
no such bearing. The Alberta
fields are not proven to such an
extent as to make their future a
matter of certainty. Even if they
are successful it must be years
before they can become producers
on anything resembling the California scale. In the meantime,
we are facing a crisis of the immediate present. Let the future
wait.
In the second place it is wrongfully assumed that the future
competition of Alberta oil will be
of the same purely destructive
DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT
SUMMER WEAR
Ladies' and Misses' Cambric and Crepe Underwear.
Special value in 3, 4 and 5 inch Embroidery Edging at 15c. a yard
Corset Cover Embroidery at 20 and 25c. per yard. Allover Embroidery Flouncings at 35c. per yard. 45 inch Skirting Embroidery at 50c. per yard.
White and Printed Piques, Fancy Muslins, Cotton Crepes, and
Zephyr Ginghams at 15c. to 35c. per yard.
Sport Middies Another shipment expected to arrive this week of Sport Middies
made in the new Rugby stripes of navy, flesh, sky, and black
stripes; also white Pique and Repp Skirts.
Misses' and Children's Little Brownie and White Duck Sandals,
75c. a pair.   •
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Underwear
Embroideries
Wash Goods
Sandals
Underwear
Socks
Shirts
SDecial value in Men's Balbriggan Underwear at 50c, 75c. and
$1.00 each. Porous Knit Underwear 75c. each. Men's B.D.V.
Union Suits, $1.50.
Silk, Lisle and fancy Cotton Socks, 25c. to 75c. a pair.
Gents' Pongee Silk Shirts, with attached and detachable collar and
French cuffs, in white and natural at $3.50 each.   Newest stripes
in Muslin and Cambric Shirts; also novelty patterns in mushroom
pleats.
Special Value in White Duck Tennis Pants and Tennis Shoes
GROCERY  DEPARTMENT
Fruits arriving this week; Melons, Pineapples, Apricots, Cherries, Peaches, Bananas, Cocoanuts, Loggan Berries, Tomatoes, Etc.
For Campers and Picnickers Cooked Hams, Lunch Tongue, Chicken,' Lobsters,
Sardines, Veal Loaf, Deviled Ham and assorted pastes; also
Olives, French Mustard, India Relish, Chutney, Peanut Butter,
Heinz's Sweet Pickles and Sauces, and Durkees' Salad Dressing.
character as the present competition of California oil.
There is apparent in this assumption an inability to see the
vital difference between domestic
and foreign competition, as they
affect the labor situation. Either
kind, if successful, will wipe out
the capital of the defeated industry and throw its plant into
the scrapbeap. But as touching
the labor involved there is this
difference: foreign competition
entirely destroys the market for
labor, which results in prolonged
and aggravated unemployment;
whereas domestic competition
results merely in a re-alignment
of industry—a transference of
labor from one industry to another. There may be a certain
amount of distress while the adjustment is proceeding, but nothing at all resembling the acute
and widespread distress which is
inevitable when an industry is
destroyed by foreign competition.
Suppose for a moment that
Alberta oil instead of California
oil were competing successfully
with coal today. This is what
would happen: The new oil industry would require large quantities of labor. Many of the out-
of work coal miners would go
directly into the oil works, while
many others would be absorbed
into other industries in place of
still others who had shifted into
the oil industry. Since oil does
not employ as many men as coal
there would be a residue of unemployed amongst whom there
would be some distress, but even
they wouldeventually be absorbed
through the continually expanding demands of new industries
allied to the oil industry. The
final outcome of this realignment
would be that Canada would have
an Alberta oil industry instead of
a British Columbia coal industry.
All the benefits of the industry
would remain in the country.
As it is, in place of the jeopardised coal industry, there is grow
ing up a California oil industry
which is giving employment to
American labor through a realignment of American industries.
Canada (British Columbia) is left
with an indigestible mass of
pauperized labor for which there
is no apparent opportunity of
usefulness in any direction.
Therefore if we ignore the
possibility of future competition
from Alberta it would seem to be
wise to protect ourselves against
the present competition from California; and if with timorous pessimism we quail before the Alberta
bogey, still it will be sound policy
to put shackles on the California
invader now; so that when the
coal trade has to go down the
Alberta oil industry may be able
to absorb our labor speedily,
without the hindrance of having
to fight against an entrenched
and fortified foreign foe. THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
(
o^
Q. P. M.
A Salesman who wants no Salary
A SALESMAN willing to work day and night.
Neither Eats nor Sleeps. Goes anywhere.
No hotel bills—just transportation. A most persuasive
talker. Well dressed, pleasant spoken, handsome. Can
—-and does—get to the "boss" nine times out of ten
tries. Gets orders. Will be welcome when he calls
again.
"THIS Salesman offers you his services.    He's a Wizard, and he's ready
* "    to start out Monday Morning in your name to sell your goods.
Can go earlier if the case is urgent.   His name is G. P. Matter (G stands
for good, and P for Printed.)
He will work for any and everybody-—the
small retailer, the big manufacturer, the
banker, and everybody else who needs a
salesman. But G.P.M. prefers to work for
those who will dress him up decently and
neatly.    He is willing to wear a red necktie
or a scarf of any other striking color, but
he prefers to have his apparel made a color
harmony.    He has one other preference; he
likes our tailoring.
YOU know what we mean. This Al Salesman, this peerless one, is a
circular, a booklet, card, or any other form of representative. Sent
personally addressed, with the King's Stamp on it to give it swift delivery,
this ambassador of yours can and will plead your cause eloquently. It will
be your fault, not his, if he fails to achieve his mission.
Good Printed Matter costs nothing: that is,
it more than repays its cost, for it sells what
you have to sell, at your own price.
We're printers. We do good work—this job
proves it. Come and examine the paper we
have in stock-—good and attractive in its
blank state.    The addition of Printer's Ink
will transform it from being a dead, voiceless
thing into a living Spirit, with a tongue that
speaks and a charm of personality that will
win your eyes and attention, and hold both.
We'd like mightily to endow with pulsing,
pleading, persuasive Life a piece of blank
paper for you to send out in your behalf.
■OME in and talk it all over.    Better still,
*      let us go to you.    Our phone No. is
35
THE ISLANDER
Printing & Publishing Co.
Cumberland, B.C. FOUi
THF] ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
CHURCH
A GERMAN'S "HONOR"
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 r\m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,     Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Wednesday evening 8.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services, 7 p.m.
Bible  Study   (Sunday  School),
2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastor.
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for S. James' Day.
8.30 a. m..  Holy Communion
11 a.m., Matins.
2.30 p.m., Sunday School
7 p.m., Evensong.
Arthur Bischlager, Vicar.
'Columbia'
Double-Disc
Records for
JULY.
The Columbia Double-Disc Records for June have just come
in and are now on sale.
These records are for use on
either Columbia or Victor
machines.
The June list contains some
of the finest selections ever
offered to the public. Every
class of good music is well
represented.
If your name is not on our
monthly mailing list, or if you
Have not received one of our
Free Record Catalogues
We shall be glad to add your
name on request.
This photograph shows Heinz Hardenburg
in the Tombs Prison Court Yard, in
New York, where he is being held to
testify at the hearing of Gustav Stahl
the German reservist now under indictment for falsely swearing that the
Lusitania was armed. Hardenburg
was found in Cincinnati after a long
search. He says that although he
knew the Lusitania was to be torpedoed he urged his Irish sweetheart to
make the trio on the boat—she was
drowned in the disaster—so that he
might be able to board the ship on
the day she sailed and spy about to
ascertain whether or not she was an
armed vessel. The German witness-
prisoner will swear that there were
no guns on board the ill-fated Cun-
arderon her last trip,
FOR THE LATEST IN
MILLINERY
SEE
Mrs. John Gillespie
West Cumberland
Order Your Records  Early
G.A.Fletcher
Music Company,
22 Commercial St., Nanaimo
FIRE   INSURANCE
For absolute protection
write a policy in the London & Lancashire Fire Insurance Co., of Liverpool.
Total Assets - $26,788,930.
W.   WILLABI
LOCAL AGENT
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.
Now is the time to purchase
screen doors and window screens
before the hot weather comes on.
A full line at Tarbell's Hardware
Store.
f; lighter
PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER
JEWELLER AND OPTICIAN
SPECIALIST ON ENGLISH LEVER
AND SWISS WATCHES.
ILO-ILO   THEATRE   BLOCK
Dunsmuir Avenue.
FIRST-AID COMPETITION
The following is the report of
the first-aid competition held in
Bevan on July 1st, 1915, under
the auspices of the St. John Ambulance Association.
The following teams entered
for the competition: Bevan Nos.
1, 2 and 3; Courtenay No. 1, and
Extension, but, unfortunately, the
car in which the Extension team
were making the journey broke
down on the way: and two of the
Courtenay team having joined
the colors the previous day, left
Bevan Nos. 1, 2 and 3 teams only
to compete, which were composed
of the following:
Team' No. 1.— W. Chapman,
Capt.; S. Cameron, H.Buchanan,
M.Lyons, and J. Webber, patient.
Team No. 2.—T. A. Spruston,
Capt.; E. Jones, J. O'Connor, S.
A. Humphrey, and L. Humphrey,
patient.
Team No. 3.—H. R. Tappin,
Capt.; W. Williams, E. James,
J. Sandland, and F. Yearby,
patient.
The No. 1 test was as follows:
"A man is removed from the
water to the beach unconscious
and apparently drowned. Give
first-aid treatment."
No. 2 test: "A fireman overcome by smoke falls thirty feet
from a burning building; he
is found unconscious with the
following injuries: (a) Scalp
wound two inches long exposing
bone over right temple; (b) Blood
oozing from ears and nostrils; (c)
Bruising, swelling, deformity and
Crepitus on outer side of right
thigh and ten inches above the
knee-cap.    Give first-aid treat
ment, place on stretcher and
carry distance to bed (blanket)."
In addition an oral examination
was held, many questions on first
aid work being put to the competitors. The spectators were
treated to an excellent exhibition
of what can be done by trained
men in first aid. The bandaging
and stretcher work was as good
as could be seen in any mining
town in the country. A silver
cup given by the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited, and
$25.00 were awarded to the winning team, the prize going to H.
Tappin's team. The judges were
Dr. J. A. Gillespie, of Vancouver;
Dr. Geo. K. MacNaughton, of
Cumberland; Dr. Montgomery,
of Comox.
The council of the municipality
of Coquitlam at its meeting last
week decided to hold a tax sale
on October 4th, 1915.
HARWOOD—The death took place last
Friday of James Oran Harwood,
of 1721 Albert Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Deceased was 29 years of age, and leaves
to mourn his loss his widow and young
son, also his mother and four sisters. Deceased had lived for a number of years in
Cumberland and Comox.
NOTICE.
EFFECTIVE FROM OCT. 1ST, 1914.
No games of any kind will be
permitted  on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p,m.
Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
GRAND OLD MAN ORDERED TO THE FRONT
Earl Brassey, an authority on naval matters and a statesman, though 79
years old, joined the Royal Naval Division at the outbreak of the war,
and has now been ordered to the Dardenelles to act as an advisor. THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIVE
o1
A MECHANICAL BOMB-THROWER
This illustration shows a new French device for shooting bombs at close
range.   It is a sort of gun which hurls the bomb at any required
angle into the air.
TALLEST ONE-PIECE FLAGPOLE     THE ELUSIVE EVELYN
The Royal" Mail Steam Packet
Company, through its Vancouver
agency, Frank Waterhouse & Co.
has been asked to handle the huge
flagpole which is bound for London care of the British Columbia
Government Agency. The pole
has been donated by Brooks,
Scanlon & O'Brien, and is claimed
to be the tallest one-piece flagpole in the Empire. It was felled
on Gordon Pasha Lake, and it
was intended to ship it last fall,
but a washout on the logging railroad delayed the plan. The tree
was subsequently brought to Vancouver and trimmed. The flagpole is now 215 feet long. It is
32 inches diameter at the butt,
and this dimension is carried on
' for sixteen feet. From the sixteen foot mark the pole is octagonal for 100 feet, and for the
balance of its length is round. At
the top it is twelve inches in diameter. It will probably be
shipped on the Merionethshire.
The one principle of health
which may fairly be described as
fundamental and universal is
temperance —temperance in the
pursuit of pleasure, in excitement
in speech, in thought, and above
all, in worry, which kills oftener
and far more surely than work.
Next to temperance comes sleep.
Insufficent sleep is probably the
most frequent cause of nervous
failure; and certainly when failure has come, sleep opens the
surest avenue to recovery. Then
indeed, too much sleep can hardly
be taken; for, as in infancy, the
recuperative powers seem to
work only|during complete sleep.
A snapshot of Mrs. Evelyn Nesbit Thaw,
taken a few days ago in New York,
after her refusal to testify in her hus
band's sanity trial, Her doctors say
she is suffering from nervons trouble
and was unable to go upon the stand.
Mr. Van Sicker, of the Van-1
couver Life Insurance Co., visited
this city on Thursday.
John Frame returned from a
week's visit to Seattle on Saturday last. Mrs. John Frame is
expected home today.
The Boy Scouts, under command of Scoutmasters J. Brown
and A. J. Taylor, will leave on
Monday morning for their annual
outing which this y«ar will be
held near Comox.
Mr. Martin Brown, who commenced his career in the local
branch of the Royal Bank of Can
ada. has been transferred and
promoted to a branch of the same
institution in Havana, Cuba.
Fire destroyed the fine residence of Mr. Sam Calhoun last
week. Mrs. Calhoun and family
are camping at Royston Beach,
and Mr. Calhoun was en route to
visit them. He can not understand how the fire originated.
The barns, in which a large quan
tity of hay was stored, escaped
the flames, but all their personal
effects, silver, jewellery and furniture were destroyed. The loss
is placed at $5,000, partly covered
by insurance.
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 87
Afcunt fur the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Ale.\ Heinle Don, Proprietir
Estimates and Designs furnished
on Application
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland
MARQCPHT  PROS.
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for PlLSENER BEER
Cumberland    Courtenay
SPECIAL LINES IN
WHITE PIQUE
TO-DAY AT
Wftt/tA/te//l
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations
COAL mining lights of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Sa-k itchewan hii-i Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, tlm N- rthwest Terri
tone** and iu a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may he leaved for* term
of twenty-one years *.< an annual rental of
tl an acre. Not more than 2,500 acres
will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must, be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or l(<((al subdivisions
of sections, and in uusurveyed erritory
the trace applied for shall be staked out by
theapp'icaut himself.
Each application must be aee' mpani-d
by a fee of $5 which will be refunded if the
riuhts applied forare not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at the
rate of live cents per ton.
The person operation the mine shall
furnish the Ageut with sworn returns ac-
counting for the full quamity nf merchantable coal mined aud pay the royalty
thereon. If the eal mining tights are
not being operated sue returns shall htr
furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, bnt the 1 s-.ee may be permitted to purchase whatever available sur
face rights may be considered necessary
for the working of the mine at the rate of
JlO.OOaiiHCie
For full information application should
he made to  the Secre'ary of the Department of the Inteiior, Oitaw**,   or to   any
Agent or Sub A«-nt * fD.-minimi Lands.
W. W. CORY.
Deputy Minister "f lie Interior.
N.B- Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will not b« i aid for.
Of garden hose and sprinklers
we have a good stock. C, H.
Tarbell and Son.
SPENDING $100,000
TO INCREASE TELEPHONE FACILITIES
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY has in hand over
$100,000 worth of extensions and improvements in the Province.
Already the work in Nanaimo and Norih Vancouver has been completed. In
Victoria over $30,000 is being spent in providing additional facilities; in
Vancouver another $30,000 is being spent. In Cloverdale and Milner Districts many miles of poles are being set to reach new subscribers. On Lulu
island 40 miles of wire is being placed. In the interior extensive work is
being carried out in Nelson and Rossland.
In addition, the company has overhauled all its exchanges, renovating
and redecorating. Al! this is in line with its policy to be always prepared
to give telephone service.
B. C. Telephone  Co., Ltd. SIX
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
HIGH-CLASS
DYERS   AND   CLEANERS
Cleaning,
Dyeing and
Pressing.
Next door to Bask of Commerce,
Dunsmuir Ave.,        Cumberland, B.C.
SPRINGTIME
After the fires your house with dirt
gets thick.
So don't you think you had better be
quick,
And call on the painter and have
your house fixed.
H. PARKINSON
Painter and    Paperhanger
SIGN WORK A SPECIALTY
Cumberland. B.C.
Practical Carriage and Wagon
Builders.
Gencal   Blacksmiths.      Horse-
Shoeing  a specialty.   Auto
Wheels Rebuilt, or
Repaired.
Any kind of Body built to order.
All Work Guaranteed.
Kierstead & Burton
P.O. Box 410   Cumberland. B.C.
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON  TEAS  SERVED
J. H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
We Recom-
mend the
use of
'QUEEN'
BEER.
A beer you can't help liking—so
mild, so pure, so very good.
Every possible precaution is taken
in the brewing and bottling.  Ask
at the hotels for QUEEN BEER,
—you'll like it.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EFFECTIVE   MAY
1st.
1915.
READ   UP
STATIONS
READ   DOWN
Sat.
Fri.
Thur
Wed.
Tue
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thura
Fri.
Sat.
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
4.35
A.M.    P.M.
9.35     3.35
Cumberland
A.M
7.00
P.M.
1.00
A.M.
10:30
P.M.
2.00
A.M.
10:30
A.M.
7:00
A.M.
10;30
A.M.
7:00
4.10
7.10
4.10
7.10
4.10
4,10
9.10    3.10
Bevan
7.25
1.25
10:55
2.25
10:55
7:25
10:55
7:25
4.05
7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
9.05    3.05
Puntledge .
I
(f) Lake Trail Road
7.30
1.30
11:00
2:30
•11:00
7:30
11:00
7:30
4.00
7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4,00
9.00    3.00
7.35
1.35
11:05
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
I
3.55 I 6.55
3.55
6.55
3.55 ,
3.55
8.55    2.55
(f)Courtenay Road
7.40
1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
3.50 | 6.50
3.50
6.50
3.50
3.50
8.50    2.50
(f)    Minto Road
7.45
1.45
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
3.45
1
6.45
3.45
6.45
3.45     3.45
8.45     2.45
Royston
7.50
1.50
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11:20
7:50
j 3.30
6.30
3.30  , 6.30
3.30  : 3.30
8.30     2.30
Union Bay
8.00
2.00
11:35
3.00
11:35
8:00
11:35
8:00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY ItiVi   1SLANDEK.  UUiVJBJliKLAMU tf. U.
SEVEN
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER. C.V.O..LL.D..D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD. General Manager JOHN AIRD. Ass't General Manager
—mtjm !■■■ ■» iwiimiJkiuiiw*-w^^^iiiia^l-i-af*jx.-'*it---awav-j.iwm. l I'.oi.'Wur KHMMm
V
(\
$
1
o
CAPITAL, $15,000,000    RESERVE FOND, $13,500,000
FOREIGN BUSINESS
This Bank offers unsurpassed facilities to those doing business with
foreign countries. It is specially equipped for the purchase and sale of
Sterling and other Foreign exchange, drafts and Cable Transfers, and
for the financing of imports and exports of merchandise.
Commercial credits, Foreign Drafts, Money Orders, Travellers' Che-
ques and Letters of Credit issued and available in all parts of the world.
Collections effected promptly at reasonable rates. 822
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.        A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
MRS. B. G. CRAWFORD,
DEALER IN
HAY, FLOUR and
GENERAL FEED
BARN IS NOW FULLY STOCKED AND IMMEDIATE
DELIVERY CAN BE MADE.
Warehouse at Courtenay.
Phone* Y91 and R99.
IMPORTANT  TO  CUSTOMERS:-—No  Orientals,  Agents,  or  Solicitors
employed.
SweepingReduction
-IN-
LADIES' and GENTS'
TAILOR-MADE
CLOTHING
Suits made to order that were $30.00 and
$35.00.   Your choice now for...	
$25.00
When material is supplied making is reduced from $20.00
to $14.00.
S.   ISAKA,
Maker of Ladies' and Gents' High-class Clothing
Dunsmuir Ave., Cumberland, B.C.
r
SPECIAL SALE OF
DINNER SETS
AND
TOILETWARE
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, «. C.
Phone m
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE  STORE
s a fcanaes
Furniture, Crockery, Enamel ware
Paints, Oils, Edison it Columbia
Graphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E. BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279
Phone 31
It has been demonstrated that with
power at.7c per KW. Hr., the
entire cooking for a small family
may be done for $5.00 a month.
WE   SELL   THE   FAMOUS
HUGHES
ELECTRIC
For as low as $43.00.    No smoke
—No dirt- No flames---M> Stifling
Hot Kitchen!!
THE PRESENT WEATHER IS
OUR BEST SELLING AGENT.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.      p. o. 314
Phone 75
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees ancl plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[established 24 YEARS.] EIGHT
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS
E. W. Jackson has left Vancouver for the fi ont.
Miss Mitchell left on Monday
to resume her duties at the Che-
manus Hospital.
The City Council has decided to
recommend the opening up of
Fifth street.
The Licence Commissioners on
Monday evening cancelled the
New England Hotel licence.
J, H. McMillan left for Victoria
on Wednesday, and expects to
return today.
Robert Henderson left for Victoria on Monday and returned
on Friday.
Alex Peden, of Victoria, is here
representing the New York Life
Insurance Co.
George Bertram and A. McKel-
vie are spending a few days at
Ladysmith.
Miss Louisa Bickle, of the Victoria Jubilee Hospital, is expected
home today on a month's vacation
William Hayman, of the Ideal
Store, returned from a visit to
Victoria on Tuesday.
Conrad Reifel, o'' the Union
Brewery Company of Nanaimo,
was here on Thursday.
Fire did $50 worth of damage
to the home of George Stevens at
Fanny Bay on Monday morning.
A. S. Henderson, accountant at
the Canadian Bank of Commerce,
left on Sunday for Chilliwack on
a two weeks' vacation.
Frank Sawford, superintendent
of the CanadianCollieries at Union
Bay, also Dr. Thurm and E. Han-
berg were here on Thursday.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Dalby and
family left this morning for Denman Island on a month's vacation.
During their stay on the Island
they will occupy the residence of
Mr. T. D. McLean.
T. W. Scott, late resident engineer of the Canadian Collieries,
has been promoted to a corporal,
and left Vancouver for Ottawa
and the front on Thursday.
A party of Victoria tourist, en-
route to Campbell River, visited
this city on'Thursday. The local
boys defeated the tourists at a
game of baseball on the same
day..
J. H. Stevens left for Vancouver on Sunday, and returned on
Wednesday. He visited Royston
on Friday, and will spend the remainder of his holiday in Cumberland.
J. R. Lockard, general superintendent of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd., returned
from an official visit to Victoria
and Ladysmith on Tuesday.
Miss Marcella Gregory, of the
school teaching statf of Rossland,
B.C.. is spending a two weeks'
vacation here, the guest of her
friend, Miss Janet V\ hite.
Jack • Bransfield, of this city,
arrived last Saturday evening
after spending a week at the International Convention of Shrin-
ers held in Seattle.
Mr. and Mrs. Lockard. of Pittsburg. Pennsylvania, parents of
the General Superintendent, are
occupying the G. W. Clinton residence at the Beach during ^he
warm weather.
n
THE   BIG   STORE
CORSET SPECIALS
The D. & A. Service Corsets
The Popular Priced  Corsets
No.  1. Splendid 75c. Corset,
Made of Coutil, medium low bust, and long
009 close-fitting skirt.   Has four hose-supporters.
Just the thing for those who like a light-weight
Corset.   All sizes.
No. 2.       A Beautiful Model
that will give great wear and service.     Has
medium high bust neatly trimmed, strengthened in front, which keeps the corset from
stretching out of shape.   D. & A. leader,
$1.50
No. 3. Incomparable Reducer
With double straps, by the aid of scientifically
laid pieces, will give the ideal front effect, and
reduce abdomen, hips and back. Hook at
bottom of front. Satisfaction guaranteed in
this special corset.   Price
$2.50
tiWnWEfm
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE.
Phone 3-8

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