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The Cumberland Islander Jan 24, 1925

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Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-FOURTH YE.
Provlnclal Library,    Janl!33
;_j-M___
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA       FRIDAY, JANUARY 24. 1925.
aogMt'TOito SUBSCRIPTION PRICE! TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Alderman J. J. Potter Is
Victim Of Serious Accident
Alderman John J. Potter an employee of No. 1 Comox Mine of the
Canadian Collieries met with a very
painful accident on Thursday morning by a fall ot rock, and Is now lying
In the Cumberland General Hospital
in a very critical condition.
Alderman Potter's right arm was
almost severed above the elbow; a
severe scalp wound and several broken ribs also resulted. At the hospital, Dr. McNaughton found it necessary to amputate the right arm, and
the injured man, although ln a very
low condition went through the operation successfully. The many friends
of the popular chairman of the Board
ot Works will be glad to know that It
Is expected he wlll recover.
ANNUAL HOSPITAL
MEETING JANUARY 31 i
The annual meeting of subscribers
to the Cumberland General Hospital
wlll take place in the Council Chambers on Saturday, January :)lst of
7:30 p.m.
Business, to receive the annual reports of the president, secretary and
treasurer; the report of the committee
appointed to consider proposed additional new wing to present huilding,
and election of officers for 1925.
4-5. T. Mordy, Secretary,
BASKETBALL DANCE
TONIGHT — MEETING
SUNDAY NIGHT
Big New Film
Opens Tonight
At Theatre
Tonight Is the night of the big whist j
drive and dance, under the auspices |
of the Cumberland Basketball Association, which is to he held In the
Ilo-llo Dance Hall. An unusual
feature of this dance is the general
admission price which haB been Bet at
60 cents and for this reason alone a
larger crowd than the overage ls assured. Plump's premier quartette of
musicians have the program In charge
and valuable prizes have been secured
for the whist.     Let's all go!
Members are asked to attend a
special meeting ln the Athletic Hall
on Sunday evening ut 7:00 p.m. Important business re transfers, ls to
be transacted and It is rumored that
a resignation may be before the board.
Please attend.
United To Play
Nanaimo Sunday
Cumberland United will have their
first game for some time when they
travel to Nanaimo on Sunday to engage the City team In a Davenport
Shield fixture. The game Is scheduled to start at 2 p.m. on the Central
Sports Ground and the following lineup will trot out for Cumberland:—
Blair; Mortimer, Stewart; Broke,
Contl, Monobon; Bannerman, Plump,
Graham, Marshall and Hitchens.
Ladysmith Is now out of the running for the Shield as a consequence
of being defeated in the semi-final
round by the Nanaimo Vets. The
former team was without four of their
regular line-up, owing to suspensions,
and sickness, but still they managed
to hold the score down to 2 goals to
3.
It is rumored that a protest may be
advanced hy Ladysmith on the
grounds that Faulds, of the Vets, was
not eligible for play.
P. T. Assn. Held
Interesting Meet.
Monday Evening
The regular monthly meeting of tha
Parent Teachers' Association was
held ln the Public School last Monday evening. In spite of the Inclemency of the weather a large number
attended. The program of the evening was In the hands of the Scliool
Grounds Committee of which Uev. J.
R. Butler is convenor. In this connection interesting addresses wore
given by Dr. B. II. Hicks, Mr. A. T.
Heyland, A. J. Taylor and J. W. Tremlett.
The address of Dr. Hicks was on
Posture and how to promote Its correct development. The speaker demonstrated that the maximum physical
fitness of the child Is greatly Impaired by Incorrect methods of standing and walking, and It naturally ensiled that from early school days the
child should be taught correct physical exercises in an efficient manner.
This paper was a most Instructive*
one.
Taking as his subject "Proper Instruction on the School Play Grounds"
Mr. A. T. Heyland delivered an Interesting talk. He emphasized that
the desire for play wa* inherent In
all, and that if It were directed
through the right channels by proper
Instruction, proper games, etc, it
would result in lasting benefit to the
pupils.     In this connection arrange-
(Continued on  Page Six)
"The Great White Way," the Cosmopolitan Corporation's big motion picture which graphically brings modem
New York and Broadway to the
screen, will have us premier tonight
aud tomorrow night at the Ilo-llo
Theatre.
Many of the celebrities ploy actual
parts ln the film Itself, which is woven around the turf, the prize ring, the
theatre and Broadway. One of tho
big features Is a realistic prize fight,
In which Pete Hartley, well known
professional lightweight, battles Oscar Shaw, leading man of the picture.
Another thrilling feoture of "The
Greot White Way" Is a race track
scene, (limed at Belmont Park on Futurity Day. Earl Sonde Is one of the
cost in this particular sequence.
In addition to these highlights, th***
new picture brings to the screen to**
the first time the entire chorus of tht
famous Zlegfeld Follies. Ned Way-
burn was engaged to produce a special and miniature musical comedy for
•he new photoplay.
The regular profeslonal cost of
"The Oreat White Way" Includes Anita Stewart, Oscar Show, T. Roy
Barnes, Tom Lewis, Dore Davidson,
Olln Howlsnd, Hal Forde, Stanley
Forde, Horry Watson. Billy Gould and
Prank Wonderley.
First Meeting Of New City
Council Held Thursday Night
The City Council recently elected
met in the Council Chambers on
Thursday evening, and were sworn into ofllce by Police Magistrate E. W.
Bickle.
His Worship Mayor Parnham, reelected by acclamation for the third
time spoke regarding the serious accident to Alderman John J. Potter.
chairman of the Board of Works. His
seat, usually occupied, was vacant.
The Mayor expressed his sincere sorrow at Alderman Potter losing his
right arm. He then made a few appropriate remarks to the Aldermen
prosent, congratulating them on their
election for tlie year 1925.
Alderman Maxwell, chairman of the
I'luance Committee said that he expected 1925 to he a very prosperous
year, and thought It would he possible
'.o give the ratepayers some reduction
in their taxeB.     Alderman Mumford,
A microscopic missive so small that it reposed in ctie eye
of a needle has been received at Smithsonian Institution.
The letter, composed of 44 words is so small that it must be
magnified eighty-eight times before it can be read. It
measures l-ll,250th of a square inch. The test is shown
in this photograph, exhibited by an attache of Smithsonian
Institution, the tiny missive shown below under a microscope. The microengraving was the work of Alfred Mc-
Ewen of Washington.
ALL SET FOR MARCH 17
Tuesday, March 17th is essentially
the Cumberland Volunteer Fire Department's Day. Irishmen, the world
over will celebrate on this, the day of
their patron solnt, "St Patrick," but
nowhere will the fun outdo the celebration planned hy the local Fire Department on this occosion, as the Annual Masquerade Ball Is going to be
Bigger, Brighter, Better than ever.
NOTICE! PARENTS
The new scliool term begins Monday, February 2nd, nnd children who
will be six years of oge before April
15th, 1925, ore eligible for entry.
Parents ore advised by Principal
Apps to send In the names of new pun
lis before January 30th, if possible,
and to have pupils at school between
8:45 and 9:00 o.m. Monday morning
February 2nd.
Sudden Death Of "Scotty" Clarke
Entries Received
For Badminton
Tournament
Quite a large number of entries
hove been received for the Open District Badminton Tournament, entries
for which must be in by Saturday,
January 24th. We understand that
the beBt of Comox ond Courtenay
Badminton players have entered, so
that the Cumberland plnyerB wlll hove
to "go some" If the Badminton championship of Comox Valley is to lind a
resting place here.
Among the Cumberland palyors en-!
tered up to date, the following names
were noticed: Mrs. Apps, Mrs. Spicer,
Mrs. Finch. Mrs. Leversedge, Mrs.
Mordy, Miss Treen and among tlie
gentlemen: Messrs H. E. Murray, J.
Vernon Jones, W. Leversedge, F. Lev-
ersedge, F, R. Shenstone. A. It. Nunns,
H. Bryan. T. H. Mumford, T. Mordy
and W. P. Symons
The news of the death of Mr. Walter
Clark, popularly known as "Scottio"
came os o greot shock to his many
friends. The deceased was ln his
thirty-first year, the death taking
place ot Newcastle, Wash., on Sunday, January 11th. The youn man
hod just returned from a holiday
spent at Ladysmith when he developed a sudden acute illness, caused by
a tumor which resulted In his death.
The name of "Scottie Clark" Is a well
known one In Cumberland. During
hi3 residence here which covered a
period of ten years, he was on Active
participant in the field of sport, being a football player of considerable
repute.      He  has  been   residing  at
Newcastle for tlie past three years.
He leaves to mourn his loss, besides
his wife, three young children, two
girls und one boy; his father and
mother, Mr. and Mrs. J. Clark, Newcastle; four sisters. Mrs. J. T. Brown
of this city, Mrs. B. Jackson, Mrs.
George Dean, nnd Mrs. Leo Letcher of
Brule, Alta., Mrs. Thomas Brown of
Scotland; also three brothers John.
James and Alex of .Newcastle.
The funeral took place from the
family residence, on Sunday. Jon. IS,
o large attendance and numerous floral tributes testifying to the high esteem in which tlie deceased young
mon was held.
Rangers Have
High Score in
Basketball
Quite a competition has been gol:i«
on lately between certain teams in the
Basketball League to see which can
score the highest number of points.
At present the Rangers are high with
01 while the Owls are close seconds
with 60 points, both being scored nt
the expense of the High School team.
On Monday evening the Owls ran
up their even five dozen in a listless
game which turned out to he nothing
more than a scoring bee, although
their opponents only managed to secure a dozen. Last evening was another wild orgy of scoring, in which
the High team "won" (one) hut, sad
to say, the Rangers got 61. Stewart
scored the lone point for his team
from a foul throw, while Altken, Hunden and Dallos did practically all the
shooting for the winners.
In the ladles' division the Hig.i
School OirlB triumped over their hereditary enemies, the Public School
Girls, by a narrow margin, while
Thursday evening saw the C.G.I.T. tall
away before the P.D.Q's by a scoto
of 4 to 15. The latter team Is the
best in the league but last night they
seemed all at sea and it was only by
strenuous checking and a few lucky
shots that they managed to win,
Plump handled the whistle on Monday evening for both games, Whyte
took the ladles' game on Thursday
while Cameron handled the men.
Ledlngham, Jeffrey and Mullen expressed themselves as highly satis-
lied ot tlie opportunity to serve the
ratepayers of the city of Cumberland
and would put forth their best efforts
for the interests of all concerned.
The City Clerk read a communication from the Secretary of the Board
of School Trustees requesting a grant
of $8600.00 to pay the January Salary
expenses nnd to carry on with until
they were able to place their estimates for thc year 1925 before the
council, On motion of Alderman
Mumford this was granted.
A communication from the Cumberland Hospital waB received, expressing their appreciation for the use of
the City Team, and requesting the use
of the City Council Chambers for
llieir annual meeting to be held on
Saturday, January 31st. This was
granted.
During the Illness of Alderman J.
J. Potter, chairman of the Board of
Works, Alderman Maxwell wlll take
tlie helm of the works department.
W. II. Cope was re-appolnted City
Clerk at the usual Balary.
James Baird will act as City Teamster during 1925, although some of the
aldermen thought Ills services for 1921
not very satisfactory, but expected
better results in the present year. He
was reappointed at the same salary.
Dr. IS. ft. Hicks as usual wlll be
Medical Health Officer.
P. P, Harrison M.L.A., local borrls-
tir_wos reappointed City Solicitor, and
Ed. Hughes as Electrical Inspector.
His Worship the Mayor and City
Clerk were authorized to sign cheques
anil transact oil bonking business.
The Court of Revision will be held
on Monday, February 9th, when the
Mayor and Council will act as a whole
The next meeting of the City Council
wlll be held on Monday, February t
and every two weeks thereafter.
TIDE TABLE, JANUARY 23—30 INCUSIVE
The  time  used I 23...
is  Pacific  Stand- \ 24
ard,  for  the  120 I 25
Meridian West. It
ls counted from 0
to 24 hours, from
midnight to midnight.
Date Time
26....
27....
28....
29...
30....
:26
6:12
6:56
0:26
1:13
1:50
2:44
3:28
H't.
13-6
14-1
14-5
0-4
1-2
2-4
3-8
5-4
Time
10:47
11:43
12:37
7:38
8:18
8:57
9:35
10:12
H't.
9-8 I
9-3
Time
10:32
| 16:26
8-8 | 17:22
14-6 | 13:31)
14-5 | 14:22
14-2 j 16:16
13-8 ! 16:011
13-4 | 17:01
H't.
13-1 I 22:55
12-8 | 23:40
12-3 ]
8-0 | 18:21
7-2 ;' 19:23
6-1 2u:31
6-8 21:46
5-2  I 22:57
Time
H't.
-0-1
-0-1
11-8
11-1
111-6
10-1
9-S
WELSH QUARTETTE OF
NANAIMO MUCH APPRECIATED
Duncan Will Be
Courtenay Mayor
COURTENAY, Jan. 23. — William
Duncan was selected Mayor of Courtenay for the present year at a meeting of tho Aldermen here last night.
Mr. Duncan ls n well known pioneer
resident of the Comox Volley. He
hos considerable property ,lu Courtenay and is the owner of several
farms ln the district. Besdies being
the president of the Comox Creamery
Associotion, Mr. Duncan lias held tlie
position of mayor for three previous
years and many important positions
during his life In the Comox district.
Beyond the selecting of the mayor ami
the swearing In of the Aldermen at
last night's meeting, little other busl-
neBB was done.
Mr. George W. Clinton, who has
I been Indisposed for the past few days
| Is able to be around again and has re-
sumed his consular duties.
The Nanaimo Welsh Quortcttc mode
its first Cumberland appearance 111
the llo-Ilo Theatre last Frldoy evening. While the audience was not exceptionally large, It was a most appreciative one. and tlie selections rendered by the quartette ond Its assisting artists were enjoyed nnd lauded to the maximum.
Varied Selections
Selections rendered by the quartette us a whole were "Comrades In
Arms" (Aduni) "Oft In the Stilly
Night" (Thomas) "Old Mother Hubbard" (Gracey) "An Evening Pastorale" (Shaw "Little Tommy" "Sailors'
Chorus" (Parre'y) and White's
"Moonlight nn the Lake." These
numbers wore splendidly delivered,
the blending of voices nnd smoothness
of tone being quite remarkable. In
the quartette Mr. D. Jones sings first
tenor. Sir. C. Roberts, second tenor,
Mr. T. Lewis, first bass, and Mr. R.
Johnson, second bass. Tlie song
"Nivnna" contributed by Mr. D. Jones
was much enjoyed as was "Asleep
In the Deep," by Mr. II. Johnson. Mr.
Lewis' selection "Tommy Lad" and
Lochnngar" by the well known soprano Mrs. G. Mulr deserve special mention, coming in for o lorge Bhore of
prolse and applause.     A Welsh duet
by Messrs. Jones and Lewis, and another "In the Dusk of the Twilight,"
by Mrs. Muir ami T. Lewis wero
splendid anil more than delighted tho
audience. One of Beethoven's famous compositions "Sonata I'ahctlqne"
rendered by Mr. W. Mowbray was well
received and much appreciated.
It is earnestly hoped by Cumberland
music lovers thai then* singers wlll
make another appeaarnce here in
the near future, al whloh nine we
feel certain that the llo-Ilo Theatre
will he filled to capacity, Judging by
the favorable comments and laudable
remarks of those who attended Friday night's performance.
Reception TonduTod
After thc performance a reception
was tendered the concert party In the
G.W.V.A. Mall when some two hundred enthusiasts assembled. A splendid repast was prepared by the Welsh
ladies of Cumberland. Numerous
items of tlie concert program were
contributed by the singers and these
were very much appreciated by tho
crowd. In the early hours of the
morning the puny disbanded, but not
until a movement was Inaugurated for
the celebration of St. David's Day, In
honor of the patron saint of WoIch.
for March 1, 1925.
$80 Set As Cost
Of Football Club
Transportation
At the meeting of the Councillors
of the British Columbia Football Association held in Nunaimo on Friday
last, the question of travelling expenses for thc Cumberland team was
decided.
A protest has been lodged by the
Up-Island Governing Board, a*.
charges made by the Cumberland
management of $105 for cars to
transport teams here for games. This
matter was Anally disposed of when
the Up-Island management, ond the
Cumberland representatives were ask
ed to leave the room and lix up their
differences.     Tliis llicy did. and Wl	
thoy came hack and reported that In
future the eosl will I"' but ?S0 for
transportation.      There was a  Nil   to
he sold on both sides in tills controversy, but the above was the figures
agreed upon, ami both sides were
satlslled.
R. Kaplansky
Opens New Office
It. Kaplansky, who for years has
been In charge of the optical department of li. Forclmmer'a, is opening
an olllco ln Iho Woolworth Building
on Commercial sireet. It Is Mr. Kap-
lansky's Intention to devote his whole
time to optical work, and he has
spared no expense I" fitting up his
olllce with all the latest scientific Instruments. He has equipped his olllce with all the latest Instruments
for eye-testing and sight correction,
and he has also his own plant for
grinding lenses. Mr. Kaplansky ls n
Toronto graduate, and is now examiner for the Port Alberni srhools and
for the medical board of Cumberland.
Anniversary
Celebration
The thirty-fifth wedding anniversary of Mr. ond Mrs. Louis R. Stevens
was celebrated last Wednesday evening when o number of friends assembled lo extend congratulations and expressions of good wishes to the popu-
| Ior couple.
The evening was pleasantly passed
by   tho   ploying  of   five  hundred   at
which Mrs. Cuvin wa3 the successful
| winner ot ladles' lirst prize, and after
| a draw between Messrs Bernstein and
1 Ledlngham, the former was successful
> iu winning the first prize for gentle-
J men.       Dainty    refreshments   were
served, and the evening was generally
j voted a most enjoyable one.
|    Among those present were: Mr. and
j Mrs. G. E. Apps, Mr. and Mrs. G. T.
Bell,  Mr. and  Mrs.  II. B.  Bernstein,
Mr. and  Mrs. G. T. Covin, Mr. anj
Mrs. D. .McLean and Mr. and Mrs. W.
Symons.
900 Books Are
Circulated By
City Library
During the past year some Nine
Hundred books were circulated In the
city of Cumberland thruugh the medium ol tlu- Cumberland Library Association. While B fair percentage
uf this number wan Action there must
also be Included technical works,
books of travel, biography and special
volumes on education, theology and
the llbi ral arts.
The city of Cumberland is fortunate
in having through it favorable working arrangemenl with the Cumher-
laild Literary and Athletic Association
noj only Mich a wide range of authorH
'and subjects but also ouch excellent
accommodation and library service at
such low cost
The Library Hoard In anxious lo
have it  more generally known that
. they are in n position to secure 'or
their members practically any book
that any member mfty desire, booki
on special subjects are often required for reference and consultation,
where Hie occasion does no warrant
purchase, and In BUCh cases an application lo the librarian will usually result in the book being raadi
available within n f(nv days at most.
The nntiunl meeting of the Association will bo hold lu (he Lecture
Room or the Cumberland Literary and
Athletic Association on Monday next,
January 26th at 7 p.m, and it is hoped
■ that   n   full   attendance   of  members
; can he assured. PAGE TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1925.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1925.
MARK THIS MAN
Breathes there a man with soul so dead
Who never to himself hath said:
"My trade of late is getting bad,
I'll try another 'Islander' ad."
If such there be go mark him well;
For him, no bank account shall swell;
No angel watch the golden stair
To welcome home a millionaire.
The man who never asks for trade
By local sign and oft displayed,
Cares more for rest than worldy gain,
And patronage but gives him pain.
Tread lightly, friends, let no rude sound
Disturb his solitude profound;
Here let him live in calm repose
Unsought except by men he owes.
And when he dies go plant him deep,
That naught may break his dreamless sleep;
When no rude clamour may dispel
The quiet that he loves so well.
And that the world may know his loss
Place on his grave a wreath of moss;
And on a stone above: "Here lies
A man who wouldn't advertise."
—Adapted.
BURIED AT TWENTY-SEVEN
Israel Zangwill's heroine, 'Merely Mary Ann,'
exclaims, in the last act of the play, when the
little charwoman becomes an heiress, "Oh, why
does everything in life come too late?" We have
never forgotten that line in the play, it rang so
truly of human experience.
When we are young and the premiums on a
life insurance policy are low, we do not have the
money with which to pay them. When we grow
older and our incomes increase the age limits bar
us from life insurance.
The poet has cried out with the longing to go
back where we were so happy and so poor." It
is the fate of most of us to be poor when we are
young and have the desire to spend, in later years
when money becomes more plentiful we have
often lost the desire for the things that money
buys. There must be some purpose in this common rule of life. Those who have never known
disappointment, those who have never been compelled to practice self-denial, those who have been
born with a silver spoon in their mouths seldom
get the thrills and the joy out of life that comes
to those who have toiled along the path that lead.!
to success. We have in mind the son of a very
rich man who died at twenty-seven because he
started and ended the day with a cocktail. He
never earned a dollar in his short life. Money
was handed to him freely by an indulgent mother. Everything in life came to him early antl
when he was twenty-seven we put him into a hole
in the ground with a blanket of expensive rose,*
to soften the falling of the clods.
Don't be too bitter against your disappointments, young man. They are placed in your way
to test your common sense and courage. Doint'
without things you think you want is the very
best exercise and training a young man or a young
woman can have. The youth of today would be
infinitely better off if things did not come so easy j
for them. Success is attained by going after
things, not having them handed to you.
 L-1
%M/Mk
TOO MANY LAWS
Dealing with "Legislators and Legislation,"
The Calgary Herald says: "An opinion that is
very generally held at the present time in Alberta
as well as elsewhere, is that too many laws are
being passed each year. We have a Dominion
Parliament and nine Legislatures in session every
year. Bills by the hundred are brought in, few
of them of the slightest value. In Alberta's case,
for our comparatively small population, we pay
more than sixty members to spend weeks at Edmonton devising new laws. The province would
be infinitely better off with half the number of
legislators and less than half the annual number
of new laws."
DROSS
FROM THE MELTING POT
BY SCOOP
OVER-TAXATION
Unquestionably one of the causes of the widespread unemployment which prevails today is
over-taxation, so devised as to deprive the business man of every incentive for launching out. If
he succeeds he knows that the State will in one
way or another take a good half of his profits. If
he fails it leaves him with his losses. The odds
are fatally weighted against enterprise.—London
Daily News.
Free love Is usually the most expensive.
• *   *
"I'm getting the hang ot It now," declared the murderer, as the hangman slipped the noose over his head.
• *   •
When the hunting season Is over aud there Is no goli
weather, how does a good Hor keep in proctlce?
• *   *
Sold the raindrop to the particle of dust: "This settlos
you, your name is mud."    Well, that covers the ground.
STOCK-TAKING
SPECIALS
Ladies' Coats ranging in price from $14.75 to $27.50
One only Ladies' Coat in Tunnel Stripe One only Ladies' Grey Tweed Coat, Fur
Velour.     Regular $35.00    M17  PA Collar.     Reg. $28.78          d»i A  7B
Sale Price   «?•£ t .D\J       Sale Price  •:...   tPl'*. I O
One only Ladies' Coat, in Silk Stitched One only Ladies' Coat Teddy Bear Check
Polo Cloth, Full Silk Lined. d»97 Cfl Reg* $30.00                         (POO CA
Reg. $37.50.    Sale Price .... «P*£ i .OXJ       Sale Price   tP^.^i.UV
One only Ladies' Coat, in Two tone Velou:* One  only  Ladies'   Check  Tweed  Utility
Full Silk Lined. Reg. $28.50 (£«><)   Cft Coat. Reg. $24.00                C>1 Q H*
Sale Price   $^.t)v       Sale Price   fJ?LO.IO
One only Ladies Coat, in Tunnel Strips Ono only Ladies' Coat, Two tone Plaid
Velour, Fur Collar and Full Silk Lined. Polo Cloth,   Convertible Collar, Full SUk
S ST $22.50   J-r™^A'37:50 $25.00
FIVE ONLY MISSES COATS, SIZES 12, 14 & 16 YRS, IN FANCY VELOUR
$12.50 REC, PRICE SALE PRICE &8,>i5
MAKE YOUR ADVERTISING PAY
Few merchants really have the proper appreciation of what advertising means to them.
If a man spoKe to his wife only once a month
or every two months she wouldn't recognize his
voice. Yet some business men advertise once a
mofftn or every two months and then wonder why
they don't get more business. Avertise every
week. Remember "the used key is always bright."
The store that tells the public what it is doing
every day is the store that gets the business.—
Kitsilano Times.
NEWSPAPER COSTLY
Anyone contemplating establishing a newspaper will be interested in learning that on its last
year's operations, the Farmers Publishing Co.,
publishers of the Farmers' Sun, snowed a loss of
$28,667. Total expenditures are listed in the
balance sheet as $95,431, while the total income is
placed at $66,764. It cost more than $43,000 to
print the Farmers' Sun alone.
Yes, it costs money to run a newspaper, but
think of the fun we have.—Ex.
Women do a lot of crazy things,
up oil night playing solo.
...
Perhaps a man smiles when a
head because that is his funny bone.
but they don't stay
girl pats him on tlie
The locomotive whistle makes the most noise hut it
does not pull the train.
* *   »
If there were some law compelling us to practice what
we preched there would  not he so much preaching done.
* *   •
A mortgage isn't so bad.    It's nice to have something
on the premises the neighbors can't borrow.
Never ask a girl what she is thinking about.
are enough lies In the world already.
There
Thc farmer with straw in his whiskers is less to be
pitied than the city man with hay fever in his system.
It takes more than a silk hat,
spats to moke a good bootlegger.
0 cane ond 0 pair of
A profiteer Is a man who gets down to breakfast ond
pours thc cream off before you get up.
Don't get mad ot the storekeeper,
unto you as others dun unto him.
He hos only dun
The man worth while is one who can smile, when
three radios ln his neighborhood nre screeching out 0
different tune at thc same time.
•   *   *
The gloss in your windshield is the same kind of stuff
they put 111 hospital windows. Choose which one you'll
watch the rood through.
GET THIS!
BE SURE AND BE THERE.    THE OPPORTUNITY
OF A LIFE TIME
Quick   Action
Sale
 AT A. MACKINNONS	
Mark This Down on Your Calendar
THE OPENING DATE—SATURDAY. JAN.  10TH.
THE OPENING TIME   —   —   —   —   9:30 A.M.
NOTE—Regrets never put money in any one's pocket and it won't In yours, so be there. The
best bargains go first.
"LOCKHEART"
A. MacKinnon
TOTAL ECLIPSE OF
SUN TOMORROW
Saturdoy, January 21th, it will be
so dark ovcr a wide belt of .N'ortli Am-
erica that It will he Impossible to read
0 newspaper without artificial light;
In Toronto, Hamilton and Stratford
(Ontario) the sun will lit* totally blot-
led out. Tlie reason for this is tliat
ot that time will take place on eclipse
of the sun.
Those who happen to be In that
brood bond will he able (0 view a total
eclipse; thoso outside will see the
sun's disc partially covered by the
moon's shadow, the extent of the
eclipse depending upon the observer's
distance north or south of the band.
The sun will rise eclipsed near lied
Lake, and not far from the Lake Of
tho Woods, while Toronto lies just
Inside its path. Tlle path of the
eclipse passes ou*, into tlie Atlantic
and ends a little north of the Shetland Islands off the coast, of Scotland.
The actual duration of tlie eclipse in
Toronto will he 1.8 minutes, that Is,
the sun will ho totally obscured for
thot lenglh of time.
An   English   hospital   Is   teaching
armless persons to write with a device strapped to their breasts.
GROCERY DEPARTMENT
Canned  Peas,  Corn  and  Tomatoes,
3 tins for   55c*
Canned Plums, Red and Greengage,
2Vi tins, 3 for  95c
French Peas, 2 tins 450
Corn on Cob, large tins 3 for   85c
Clark's Jellied Veal, l's tins, 3 for $1.00
Van Camp Pork & Beans, 8 tins .... $1.00
Sliced Pineapple 2's, 3 tins  S5f4
Lyles Golden Syrup, 2's, 2 tins 65<>
Fancy Bulk Dates, 2 for 25<>
Red Arrow Sodas, 2 pkts for 55<p
Creamola Custard Powder, 3 pkts .... 50-p
Bulk Cocoa, 2 lbs 25c
Tillson's Health Bran, pkts   25<:
Brown Vinegar, bots  20c
King Oscar Kippered Snacks, 3 tins 250
Acadia Cod Fish, boxes   45c
ROAST PORK, WITH DRESSING; COOKED HAM;   MEAT
SHIRE HOLL BACON'; FINNAN HADDIE
LOAF;   SWEET  PICKLED  HAMS;   AYIt-
KIPPERED HERRING,
It Pays To Advertise In The Islander
'C'-fSJSHS   Geitus
.aBON6HI*!!L
Sold In Cumberland at
LANG'S DRUG STORE
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
■VM.MKRUIF1EU),    Proprietor
JOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
P. P. HARRISON
BABBISTF.B  nnd  80MC1T0B
NOTARY PUBLIC
I CUMBERLAND - - - B.C.
The Popular Choice!
English Ale  and
Stout, Lager Beer
ASK   YOUR   LOCAL  VENDOR  AND   DEMAND
Silver Spring
BEER THAT NEVER HAS BEEN EQUALLED
Silver Spring Brewery, Limited
Victoria
J.
T.WHERRY
TAXIDfRMKIfiTANNER
awl te prtoa lim •<
*<rk—•*• ••• ll» I
itssin.  Ma,
• Pan-Ion An.,
Victoria. «. C. »
W   .BRUCE  GORDON
DR.   R.   B.   DIER  AND
Dental Surgeons
Offlce:  Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
DR
This advertisement is not published or displayed by tho
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of B.C.
ASK FOB
Fletchers   No.  1   Bacon
CUT FROM TENDER YOUNG PORKERS
A.B.C.—PRODUCT—
AT ALL THE LEADING STORES
CUMBERLAND DISTRICT
City Meat Market   Wilcock Bros,   Frelone's Grocery
Matt Brown's Grocery and Marrochi Bros.
C.  W.  Sillence        G. M. Swan        Fraser & Home
Royston Fanny Bay Union Bay &
FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1H26.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
Go To Tho
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,     GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS        ....        Royston
Phone 134M Courtonay Exchange
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
"The Most of the Best for the Least"
Marocchi  Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
 and Grocers	
 Br EAD IS YOUR BEST FOOD	
 SAT MORE OF IT	
ONE li
CUMBERLAND
11 Illlll I !■ eW"*-: ™ ."I' H<i il H ■■>  tn Willi'IIMIi'MI
N*Msi>ataata*w »-. I
ALL BLACKS TO PLAY IN CANADA
"I Wonder Who
That Was"
She waited only a moment to Inish a conversation with a neighbor before answering the telephone,
but in the meantime the party calling had decided that
no one was home and had hung up.
Who had telephoned? Was it an important call?
The possibilities are endless. Prompt answering
would have saved worry.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
4£S
Jam mfliikmm
t
*■•(
P^ Wm
F
g
n*
B
BETTER MEAT
AT WILCOCK BROS' MEAT MARKET
or the better cuts of Delicious Meats, you can always
et satisfaction at Wilcock Bros* Meat Market.     We
ake a specialty of quality cuts at prices that mean
wholesome saving to you.
Wilcock   Bros.
unsmuir Avenue            —            Cumberland, B.C.
It Pays To Advertise In The Islander
Pbatasraiihrt   at   Ntwuui   Abtmi.   un   In.  titui   where   ttteu   tanmua  ar.dec.uur..,   tlic    "All-mack,    i.l   I'ju,.   pujier)
Stfulr training quartara, twenty raari am. Uaek raw. left to richti H. W. Brown. H. Nlcholls. It. It. Mailers.
, Barrar. J. U. Parker, Q. Donald, II. McL'laarr. Mreand row: J. Steel, H. Brownlii, R. K. Stewart, C Ilrownlle, I.. K.
Capplee, A. H. Weat, L. Paawat, k. White. Third row: A. C Kobllllard. II. G. Mini™, li. Irvine C. (1, Porter, S. S.
Dean, J. Richardson, G. Nepla, A. H. Bart, A. E. Cooke. Front row: J. Mill. N. I*. McRrenor. W. C. Iialley. F. VV.
Laeaa, K. S. Venaon. C. Bedeler    Inaet: G.  Nepla taklnt a place kick.
Canada Is to see the famous "All-Blacks" rugby team of Ne* Zealand, and British Columbia will see thom in action, the
Canadian Pacific Railway announced when making public the fact that this nalaxv of stars, on thc conclusion of
their tour of the British Isles and France, will return home. The team, landing at St. John, N.B., will visit Toronto, Niagara Palls, the Canadian Pacific experimental farm at Strathmore, Calgary, Banff, Vancouver and Victoria At Banff
they will see and probably take part in the Winter Sports Carnival, as they are interested in Canadian Winter Sports and
have expressed a keen desire to see a good game of hockey. They are to play rugby at Vancouver on February 14 and
possibly at Victoria on February 18. Next the team will'proceed to San Francisco, where they will probably play another game, and on February 25 they sail for home aboard the Canadian-Australasian liner "Tahiti."
The "All-Blacks," who will have played SO matches in the British Isles and France before they leave, and who are
■scheduled to fly across the channel to play at Paris and Toulouse, are probably the most famous rugby football team in
the world, and it is expected that there will be a tremendous demand for seats for the games on thc Pacific coast. Successors to the "All-Blacks" which toured England and America in 1906, and was only once defeated, the present team
has set itself the goal of returning to New Zealand with a complete list of victories and seems to be well within sight of
this objective, as out of 30 matches on the European schedule it has thus far won all. Managed by S. S. Dean, and captained by C. G. Porter,
there are 29 athletes in the touring aggregation, of whom the average age is 24, height 6 feet 10 inches and weight 171 ii pounds, figures
which speak for a team of unusually big men. The forwards, who are said to be the stronger portion of the side, though the whole team il •
remarkably well balanced one, are all under six feet but average 180 pounds in weight
, Forty-two persons make up the total "All-Blacks" party as the team has with it a commission whose object is to promote trade between
Canada and New Zealand. E S. Williams, land inspector. Department of Natural Resources, Canadian Pacific Railway, of Calgary, who
wm in charge of the Canadian Pacific exhibit at Wembley last summer and became friendly with thu men there, has been invited to meet them
•t Su John and accompany them across Canada, » 	
Pat O'Hooley
Breaks Bad News
By 1. H. HOLDEN
"Did ye lver know Dan Sullivan.
Mr. Donovan?" asked Pat O'Hooley,
pushln' back his plate and lighting
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Boat Quality
BIEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fr-Mh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SBECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
his pipe. "Dan was a miner, an' ft
drinkin', foightln', howly tarrier he
was! Back In th' nolnlles, he an' 1
wurreked ln th' old Star Moine; an'
he was th' only man I lver met who
could bate me smokln'—he didn't have
much on me at that!
"Dan an' I was on th' night shift
ln those days. Wan avenin' 1 gits
down th' shaft twinty minutes late;
an' hy gorrie, ut was a good thing
fer Pat! I'd jist stipped from th'
cage whin I sees there's bin an accident of some kolnd. A bunch of min
are comln' up th' level carryln' a
body between 'em; an' 'twas none
other than Dan—caught under a ton
of slate.
"'Hey, there, you Pat!' yells th'
foreman. 'Poor Dan's dead! Hustle
up an' tell th wlddle that she's no
longer a wolfe. Ilruk th' news ns
nisy as ye can!' sez he.
"So up I goes, all of a fluster, an'
makes fer Dan's house as fast as 1
can, as they're goln' t' follow me In
no toime wld th' corpse. L't was go-
In' on eight o'clock—an' New Year's
Ave—an' as I scoots along, I composes a most comtortln' little spachc
t' make t' th' wlddle, knowln' tit's th*
custom—especially In novels—t' bruk
tli" news alslly. By th' toime I'm
through th' gate an' on th' from stip.
I have me spache roight on th' tip of
me tongue.
"I had hardly hit tli' dure wan
thump until Mrs. Cullivan came trip-
pin' out from th' kitchen an' opened
ut. She was lookln' as pink an' purty
as ye plane.
" 'Good avenin', Pat,' Bez she.
"'Good avenin', sez 1.     Tis a rot-
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
New Car Service
CAB FOB HIBE DAT OB NIGHT
14 TELEPHONE 100
Cumberland Hotel
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel at
8 o'clock every Sunday morning
and meets boat at Union Bay.
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
The Gem
Barber Shop
OiHi't*  Ilo-llo  Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
ALBIBT ETAN8
Prulleal  Barber,  and  Hairdresser, Shampooing.  Singeing,
Maasaglag,    Scalp    Treatment.
Eye-Strain Is
Painful And
Distressing
IT Is amazing why so many
persons submit to all the distress and discomfort of eye-
, strain, when certain and Immcd-
; late relief can be so easily ob-
; tained.
IMPERFECT vision, headache,
nervousness and all the other
results of defective refractive conditions not only cause
you actual suffering but impair
your efficiency as well. You
are not as good or as useful a
member of society If a nervous-
leak caused by eye-strain ls sopping your energies away.
IF you have defective eyes
you know this to he true.
Can you think of any good
reason why you allow this to
! continue? Ie there anything
to prevent you from putting an
end to this difficulty of yours,
Instantly and permanently?
DROP ln and see me, I have
something    to    tell    you
about    your    eyes,    you
ought to know.
R. Kaplansky, 0. D.
REGISTERED   OPTOMETRIST
2:30-6:00   OFFICE   7:30 - »:80
P.M.        HOURS        P.M.
Medical Fund Building, Cumberland
ten nolght, Mrs. Sullivan!"
"'I didn't think ut was,' sez she.
eyeln' me closely, fer I was not aetiu'
according t* Hoyle at all, at all; an'
I'd plum forgot me foine apaches.
"'Where's Dan?' sez I, not beln'
able t' think of any thin' else.
"'Dan? sez she 'At th' moine, of
course; where else would lie be at
this hour?'
"Jist thin I hears th* rumble of
wheels turnin' th" corner, an' 1 knows
that Dan '8 comin' home fer th' last
toime. 1 haven't a moment t.' spare
This upsets me so that I begins V
shake an' wring me hands- an' ill's a
bad soign!
"'Mam,' sez I, 'Dan's not at th'
moine!'
"'Is he'drinkin' agin?' sez she,
turnin' wholte an" clutchin' me
shoulder.
"'No, mam; he's not!' sez 1. 'Poor
Dan is—he—oh! wurra, wurra! Fwhy
didn't they sind somewan else?' sez
I. cbokln' up.
"'Pat!   sez she  beginnin'  t'  cry,  i
know ut!      Dan's in jail!'
"'Dlvil a wance!' sez I.     'He's not.
Dan's .      Oh,   Mrs.   Sullivan!       1
can't kape ut any longer! I'll bet
ye four dollars Dan's bin liurted at
th' moine an' they're hringin" him
home dead in tbat wagon!'
"An", hy gorrie, if she'd taken th'
bet she'd have lost, fer tli' nixt moment th' wagon stops at th' gate; an'
here I am wid th' widdie leaniif agin
me shoulders in a faint.
'"I moight have known ul!' growls
tli' foreman, comin' up an' takin' th'
widdie from me. 'Ye thick-headed
Mick! ye bungled ut, of course!' se:'-
he. Now, how tb' divil did lie know?
"Wei, ut was two hours before Mrs.
Sullivan uvea opens her eyes, which
was purty lucky at thut, fer we bad
a-plinty of toime t' lay poor Don out
on a shutter an' a couple of blnches.
j We set. a dozen lolghted cantllos
\ around bim, an' he looked us natural
, as loife.
i "So th' word goes out about tb'
! folne wake we're goin' t' have over
: Dan on New Year's noight; an' whin
th' toime comes, all th' frinds fer
| moiles around come drivin' in. There
1 was th' Donleys an' Dugana an' Laf-
i fertys an' O'Briens an" Milligans an'
'Mulligans and Itileys. an" .ill th' rlst
! of tb" lads ami their wolves.
"We had a most llllgent spread!
We had lay and coffee an' cocoa; wc
T. Malpass
GBNEhAt  HAULING
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
.    Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leave your orders at ofiice
Mrs. King's Stationery Store
SERVICE IS OUR MOTTO
Olt PHONE 15 UNION HOTEL
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER
T. Malpass
'iad all kofnds of lunch—brought by
IA wollcn. Wc had poipes an' see-
tars an" cigarettes an' snuff; an' several of tlf lads had a wee drop of
Ould Oirish as un occasional exll-
lerator! Might in th' circle of his
friends was poor Dan, dressed as he'd
niver bin before, fer hadn't he left
three thousand dollars Insurance t'
th' widdie. He bad that! An' she
was sittin' by his side, cryln' wld wan
eye an' radein' th' policy wld th'
ither.
"Th' most amnzin' part of th' affair
was tb" virtues they dug up from th'
past an' laid at Dan's dure. I could
hardly belave me ears, fer I thought
1 knew Dan purty well, an' I'd niver
discovered th' half of 'em. Aven
Dugan, who was a cousin of th' wld-
Jie'fl- an' Dan an' Dugan had fought
loike torn cats—aven Dugan, I say,
gils up in meetin', makes clane brlst
of bis errors, an' shakes hands wld
th' corpse.      l't was most touchin'.
"Along about two in th' mornin',
as most of tb' company is sbowln'
soigns of noddln', I goes over In th*
corner an' begins foolin' wld a Weeja-
ooard (hat wan of th' wimmln' had
trough! along—t' tell our fortunes,
she said, I sits th' paper under the
pincil. puts me hands on the Weeja,
an' Immediately ut begins wlgglln'
loike a one-legged grasshopper. Whin
ut stops, I takes a look, an' sure en-
ough. there's some wrltln' on th'
sheet!
"S-m-o-k-e.' ut sez.
'"L'gh!"   sez   I.      '.Now   fwhat  ih'
divil  does  that mane?'  So  I  tries  at
wance more.      By gorrie In, spite of
ill   I   could do, ut  wrote *S-m-o-k-e'
agin; an' fer three toimes ut done ut!
but  tb' fourth, ut sez '(J-u-l-c-k.'
I    "'Smoke,  quick!'  sez  I, scratchln'
line head,      'Now who wants a smoke,
quick?' An' 1 looks round at th' com-
i pany,  but  iverywan  has his pipe go-
\ in'   merrily   except  th'  corpse.      Jist
thin ' notices that wan of Dan's An-
I gers is crooked loike ut was whin he
wance held his pipe.
"'Well,' sez I, 'ut may be that Dfcn
hasn't reached purgatory yet an' he
wants a smoke- here goes!'
"So 1 imts a rag over me poipe,
binds down, an' begins blow-in" a regular (ores) lire int' Dan's nose. Ivery-
one gits excited; but 1 kape roight on
- an' ye can belave ut or not, in foive
minutes Dan's sittin' up, alolve an*
well, an' smokln' me polpe loike a
statue   injine!
"Kill   up   me   own   dudeen!'   yells
Dan.      '(live   me   a   drink    of    ye'r
whiskey,  yi<  numskulls - I   can  smell
ut!  I'm t li i ii k in * this is my wake, an*
I I  want  I' enjoy ut!'
"Th' nixt half-hour was pandle-
monluml Everybody was talkln' at
wance. Mrs. Sullivan was down on
her knees, laughin' an' cryin' an*
kisstn'  Dan  at  th' same toime.      Jilt
■ thin   sbe   remembers   her   Insurance
j policy.
"•D:in, me darlint!' sez she. 'r-^what
a lovely policy yo left me! We'll kape
the money an' spind ut togither.'
" 'Nothin' doln'.'    sez    Dan.     'I'm
■ alolve!1
"'Yes. but  ye was dead!' se* sbe.
; Everybody sez so; an' we can prove
Ut; th' company will have V pay ut!'
"'No,' snys Dan. "they wont' pay a
cint!'
"'Do ye mane I' say,' sez she, in
a horrified voice, 'thnt me insurance
: policy is no good?'
" 'Noj 'til I'm buried,' sez Dan, 'an
! I'm not  ready yit!'
"Well, sorr, ut was too much! Mrs.
Sullivan gives a squeal an' flops over
| ngin. Whin we'd brought her to, she
; puts her arms round Dan's neck an'
sez; 'Oh, Dan! How could ye do such
a thing!      How could yet do ut?'" FACE POUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1925.
Canadian National Sees Good
Year Ahead For The West
WINNIPEG.—Satisfaction tliat west
era Canada had weath.*r an well as it
haa the period of business depression
from which the dominion lias lieen
suffering,in common with other nations
and a feeling of security insptred by
the brighter prospects already looming on the horizon for 11125, marked
an interview with A. E. Warren, general manager of the western region,
Canadian National Hallways.
While the last grain crop In Canada showed a decrease of about two
hundred million bushels, as compared
with 1923, the prices received have
been so much higher that farmers are
actually better off than with the larger crop, Mr. Warren pointed out, go-
ing on to say that statistics showed
that in western Canada farmers are
devoting more energy to mixed farming. This latter fact he considered
slgnlflcent, making such figures as
the following very gratifying to all
Interested in the growth of the prairies; Dairy products in Alberta alone
ln 1923 were valued at six million dollars, and 88 plants, mostly butter
manufacturing, were operating; livestock increases during the years from
1915 to 1923 were 2.500.000 head of
cattle, 700,000 Bheep and 1,00,000 swine
while Canadian meat packers are calling for an Immediate increase of 100
percent ln hog production to meet
export demands for Canadian pork
products.
Statistics such as these, considered
in conjunction with the gratifying reports of exports, mining products,
etc.. In the opinion of Mr. Warren,
give the He to those who would
spread the gospel of pessimism and
should show that there Is some foundation of the National system make
that Canad is one tlie eve of a new
period of expansion in every field of
activity.
Tourist Business Greater
A resume of the activities of the
Canadian National Railways in western Canada during the year just closed brings to light a steady growth in
passenger and freight traffic. The
season's business at the railways'
summer resorts indicates their increasing popularity. An instance is
Jasper Park Lodge, which last year
was enlarged to provide greater accommodation. The business at thid
mountain liostelty was more than
forty percent greater than the previous season. Nlplgon Lodge, Min-
aki and Highland Inns also showed
increased patronage.
Altogether, the tourist business was
exceptionally good, more particularly in the long haul traffic, as there
was a very noticeable increase in the
number of tourists from the United
States. The new through train service operated between Chicago and
Jasper for tlie first time during last
summer is considered by passenger
officials to be responsible for this.
They report a steady Pacific coast
traffic, using the Canadian National's
triangle route.
Preparations are now being made
to handle during the coming summer
more tourists than ever before, as the
passenger traffic manager states that
present Indications are that sightseers will flock to western Canada In
large numbers this season.
Improved Train Services
Several changes and additions have
been made in the National train service during the past months, Including the through train during the summer from Chicago to Jasper; the
shortening of the running time of the
National between Winnipeg and Toronto to 37 hours, thus providing a better departure hour from Winnipeg and
still arriving in Toronto In time to
make all morning connections from
that point.
Handling of Grain
On January 1, 1924, there was ln
storage 30,076,000 bushels of grain in
elevators along Canadian National
lines and the marketings In January,
February and March were mucli
heavier than ordinarily, with the result that there was a good movement
of grain lasting practically until the
month of July. The short crop 111
1924 meant a comparatively Unlit
movement and the facilities of the rail
ways were not taxed to handle the
shipments.
Through Vancouver, for the crop
year ending July 81, 1924, the grain
movement totalled 54,619,188 bushels,
compared with 19,814,322 bushels for
the previous year. In 1924 the Canadian National Railways handled Into
Vancouver 22,134,564 bushels, or
41 per cent, of the grain shipped
through that port, as against 4,558.949
bushels or 27.8 per cent, of the 1923
wheat routed west.
With added facilities at Edmonton
and Vancouver, the popularity of the
western grain route ls making rapid
strides. The great bulk of the grain
thus shipped goes to the United Kingdom and European ports, with the orient next, and scattered shipments to
South America and New Zealand.
Coal and Lumber Movements
Of the commercial coal mined in the
prairie provinces during the past coal
year, totalling 1,181,180 tons, two
thirds waB carried by the Canadian
National Railways to Its final destination for consumption in western
Canada.
The National Railways originates a
very heavy tonnage of forest products
and the year just, closed shows a nice
increase over 1923. Allied with the
lumber movement is the traffic In pulp
and paper. There has been considerable development in this business
In recent years particularly in tlie
lakehead area, and the tonnage of
pulp and paper, chiefly destined to
United States points, has become a
noticeable factor In the railways'
business.
Officials of the freight department
of the National Railways are looking
forward to a considerable movement
of road construction material during
1925, on account, particular!.., of the
proposed municipal highways construction.
Lire Stock
The outstanding feature of (he live
stock movement during the twelve
months just closed is the very material Increase ln the marketing of
hogs in western Canada, which Canadian National officials attribute to
the relatively better prices which prevailed for hogs as compared to other
live stock. Statistics from the Union Stock yards at St. Boniface, Manitoba, show a considerable increase
over the previous year, the destinations being particularly eastern Canadian markets with a small percentage
for export. Sixty-six per cent of this
eastbound live stock traffic was carried over Canadian National lines.
As a result of the activities of the
Alberta department of agriculture, a
promising, market for live stock products of that province is bei'ig opened up in the Orient, and the trial
shipments of cattle and dairy produce
were transported to Vancouver by way
of the Yellowhead Pass for traits
shipment across the Pacific.
Short Run n Factor
The time being made to eastern
Canada by Canadian National stock
trains has been the subject of mucli
favorable comment on the part of live
slock dealers and shippers. A development of considerable importance lu
1924 was the increased movement of
live poultry, a considerable number
of cars having been moved from the
western provinces to United Stat:-;*
destinations, also to Winnipeg Tli'*
principal market for this product Is
"the eastern United States, but from
A'l*p**ta a number of cars have been
railed to California.
^AUU^J^t"
Now you can secure the personal advisory service of this
fatuous Domestic Science
Authority Free.
Anna Lee Scott, a noted authority
on Cookery Art 3 and Kitchen
Management, antl Director of (he
Maple Leaf Club, has written
a wonderfully interesting course
which is offered free to members of
the Club.
Once you have seen this course, you
will be amazed that it costs you
nothing. Never before have so
many new household ideas and
unusual suggestions for preparing
and serving food been gathered
together as in this course, comprising 20 lessons, which is offered
free to members of thc Maple Leaf
Club.
Ask your Grocer about Anna
Lee Scott and the Maple Leaf
Club Course.
A Wonderfully Interesting and
Practical Course of 20 Lessons
by Mail on
COOKERY ARTS and
KITCHEN MANAGEMENT
To Every User of
HAPLE LEAF
FOR   BREAD, CAKE & PASTRY
In addition to the excellent baking results
which Maple Leaf Flour always guarantees,
you can now secure in every bag a coupon
to apply on the valuable Free Course on
Cookery Arts and Kitchen Management
which contains all the essentials of a rollege
course in Domestic Science.
This course is so thorough and practical
that it requires little or no explanation
outside of the lessons which are mailed to
you each month. But it is so original it
will set you thinking and you will undoubtedly decide to ask Anna Lee Scott
to help you with actual problems which
arise in connection with household manage-*
ment or in preparation of special dishea
for special social affairs.    ■
Kou Can Ask Anna Lee Scott any time
during the five months you are U'.king the
course for advice about any special recipes
you may want—about any cooking problem—about the conduct of any social
affair—in fact any inquiry pertaining to
the preparation and serving of food for any
occasion will be answered personally by
Anna Lee Scott without charge.
Think what a wonderful service this will be.
It is absoluteiy free to every woman who
sends in the four coupons entitling her to
membership in the Maple Leaf Club.
HOW TO JOIN THE MAPLE LEAP CLUB
and Enroll for this Valuable Course.
Coupons will be found enclosed in
(24 lb. bag—1 coupon;   49 Ib. bag
Send only four coupons addressed to the
Maple Leaf Club, Maple Leaf Milling
Co., Limited, Winnipeg, Manitoba, and
you will be enrolled without one cent of
expense as a member of the Maple Leaf
Club and receive the first four lessons in
the course. Other lessons will be sent
in four monthly instalments—4 lessons
each month.   (20 lessons altogether).
every bag of MAPLE LEAF FLOUR.
2 coupons;   98 Ib. bag—4 coupons.)
You pay no money for this course. All
lessons arc sent postpaid. You study
lessons when and how you choose. No
blanks to fill in. No examinations or
correspondence required. You may
write in for advice, however, and Anna
Lee Scott will gladly answer Inquiries
regarding any household problem.
MAPLE LEAF MILLING CO.,  LIMITED
WINNIPEG, MANITOBA
Fishing Industry
The salmon pack of British Columbia was last year a record one, and
the Canadian National secured its full
measure of the rail movement. Much
of this traffic waB handled from Vancouver by steamers of the Canadian
Government Merchant Marine, which
operates a schedule service trom Vancouver to Montreal during the summer and to Halifax, and St. John during the winter months. Through the
port of Prince Kupert, there was considerable tonnage of salmon originating in Alaska moved to Uniied
Status points, routed via Canadian
National from the steamers. Frozen
fish also moved during the year from
Utiska through" Prince Rupert to
United States destinations.
Dairy Products
Dairy products for export moved in
fair quantities via the Atlantic seaboard. The western provinces are
becoming an increasing factor each
year in the movement of export butter to the United Kingdom and last
year there were quite a number of
rnrH shipped from Alberta under refrigeration, via Vancouver and the
Panama Canal, to Great Britain. This
traffic originated along Canadian National lines in Alberta and included
also some butter shipped to the
Orient.
ROD AND GUN IN CANADA
Brimful of Interesting reading Is
the February issue of Rod and Gun in
Canada, which every sportsman Is
sure to enjoy. The Snow Barrier by
Raymond Thompson Is an exciting
iiaratlve of adventure in the frozen
north country. Other interesting
stories and articles, including E. R.
Kerr's The Migratory Birds Treaty
and Cause of Decrease in Numbers of
Wild Fowl, will also attract the reader's attention. The regular contributors of stories, F. V. Williams, J. W.
Wlnson, Bonnycastle Dale and Martin Hunter, have all lived up to thc
reputations they have won for themselves In their different lines of sport.
And the departmental editors have
their departments up to their usual
standard of excellence. Published
monthly by W. J. Taylor, Limited,
Woodstock, Ont.
KEEP YOUR EYES
CLEAN   CLEAR AND   HEALTHY
NJU MA fMI Ifl «*M MOlV MMUI *MKMMM
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS j
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may bs pre-empted by
British subjects ovsr 18 years ot age,
and by aliens on declaring intension
to become British eubjecte, eandi-
tlonal upon residence, occupation,
and improvenieit (or agricultural
purposes.
Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptiona If
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
wblch can be obtained free ot charge
by addressing tbe Department' of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Qov-
ernment Agent.
Records will be granted oorering
only land suitable tor agricultural
purposes, and which ls not timber-
land, l.e, carrying over 6,000 board
teet per acre weet ot the Coast Range
and 8,000 teet per acre east ot (bat
Range.
Applications (or pre-emptions are
to oe addressed to tbe Land Commissioner ot the Land Recording Division, ln whlcb the land applied for
is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained (rom the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied (or
live years and improvement* mad*
to value ot 810 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivating at least live
acres, before a Crown Qrant can be
received.
For more detailed lntoimation ee*
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received tor purchase of vacant and unruservid
Crown lands, not being tlmberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land 1* IS
per acre, and second-class (grating)
land 12.60 per acre. Further latojr-
■nation regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands le given in Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease ot Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or induetrlal sites on
timber land, not *xceedlng 40 sores,
may be purchased or leased, the ootv
ditione Including payment of
stumpage. *
HOMESTEAD LIASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 23
acres, may be leased ae homeilUa,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected ln tbe first year, title being
obtainable after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and Industrial purposes areas not exceeding (40 acre*
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Prov-.
lnce is divided into grazing district*:
and the range administered under *.
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are Issued baeed on
numbers ranged, priority being given'
to established owners. Stock-owner*
may (orm associations (or range
management. Free, or partially tree,
permits are available tor settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head. ^e»
FIHDAT, JANUARY J4, 1»M.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
It
CORPORATION
Report & Financial
Statements for the
year ended 31st
December
1924
DEAR SIRS:—
I beg to report that I have audited the books and accounts of
the City of Cumberland for the year ending December 31, 1924,
and the accompanying Balance Sheet is, in my opinion, properly
drawn up so as to show a true and correct view of the affairs of
the Corporation.
My requirements as auditor have been complied with and all
necessary books and vouchers produced.
The records are in good shape and well kept, all accounts being in balance.
The balance of cash on hand, $220.52, as shown on the Balance Sheet, was deposited in the Bank in the month of January,
1925.
Materials on hand $360.00 is Tarvia for road repairs.
Fire apparatus, wagons, sleighs, plows and horses are shown
at 1923 valuation less depreciation for 1924.
A schedule showing details of Better Housing Accounts Receivable is included in the Statement.
All Bank balances have been verified by certificate from the
Royal Bank of Canada.
Item of $13.45, Cash Overage, was set up at the time former
City Clerk A. J. Merry left the employ of the City, he being
over in his cash that amount.
Accounts payable $88.00 is an account owing to Evans, Coleman and Evans, Ltd., for tile pipe.
The Tax Roll for 1924 has been balanced and shows arrears
of Taxes $1,158.23.
OF THE CITY OF CUMBERLAND
ASSETS
Cash on hand and ln Bank
Cosh on hand - _... 220.52
Cash in Royal Bank
General Account  _   1,166.49
Savings Account  - _ _ -   164.89
BALANCE SHEET AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1924.
Materials on hand  _ - -	
Motor Truck 	
Fire Apparatus  _ _ _ 2,080.44
Less  depreciation    _   125.00
Wagons, Sleighs and Plows   _.._   265.00
LeB   depreciation    -     26.50
Horses   250.00
Less  depreciation   ,     60.00
Tools 	
Municipal Buildings  6,139.81
Less depreciation    306.99
Real Estate	
Tax  Arrears   _	
Taxes ln Suspense, disputed 	
Accounts Receivable, Better Housing
Unexpired  Insurance  Premiums  	
1,551.90
360.00
1,800.00
1,955.44
238.50
200.00
25.00
5,832.82
800.00
1,168.2!,
25.05
6,668.09
230.37
$20345.41)
LIABILITIES
Outstanding Cheques -  495.96
Provincial Government Loan   _  4.300.00
Board of School Trustees (Balance of 1923 account still unpaid)  1,000.09
City Hall Suspense (Taxes overpaid)   100.65
Cash Overage   13.45
Accounts  Payable    88.00
Surplus  Account   _ _ _  14,847.25
$20,845.40
Signed on behalf of the City Council
CHAS. J. PARNHAM, Mayor.
W. H. COPE, Clerk.
Certified Correct
II. J. SELFE, Auditor.
Yours truly
R. J. SELFE, Auditor.
EXPENDITURES AND REVENUE STATEMENT
FOR THE YEAR 1924.
RECEIPTS
Assessment Roll 1924, General TaxeB   5,258.80
Penalties and Interest   245.65
Dog Tax  _  70.00
Trades Licenses   1,750.00
Police Fines    _  115.00
Night Watchman Fees  _  682.50
Pound Fees , _  53.00
Electrical Permit Fees  _  95.16
Scale Fees _... 1.00
Government Grants
Liquor Profits Dividend   1,734.24
Pari-mutuel Dividend   808.32
Motor Licenses Dividend  _  808.95
Sundry Revenues   32 00
Sundry  Sales _ _ _  14,30
Manure Sales _ _.. 24.00
Revenue (rom Hauling „ _  156.70
Donations (or Fire Hose :. 300.00
REVENUE AND EXPENDITURES STATEMENT
FOR THE YEAR 1924
EXPENDITURES
Public Works Department
Roads and Sidewalks
Labor   _ 1,506.47
Supplies    239.99
Sewers
Labor      417.35
Supplies    1,609.75
Electric Light and Water
Police Department
Salaries  	
Expenses 	
Excess o( Expenditures over Receipts            2,314.25
$14,361.37
Repairs to Buildings 	
Health Department
Salaries  _ _	
Supplies and Scavenging
Fire Department
Insurance  	
Supplies, etc	
Stable Expenses	
City Hall Expenses
Salaries  _	
Advertising, Printing and Stationery	
Office Sundries, Postage, Exchange, Telephones and Wartax 	
1,746.46
2,027.10
2,290.50
,100.23
605.35
220.00
73.15
658.50
1,795.20
965.56
3,773.66
1,105.38
2,390.73
650.51
825.35
731.65
393.82
661.91
Insurance  	
Legal Expenses 	
Pound Keeper .....	
Workmen's Compensation ..
Scales Inspection 	
Registration Fees 	
Civic Reception 	
Interest on Housing Loan
Depreciation	
Donations  	
3,322.67
28.85
200.00
7.00
16.40
4.00
5.95
100.00
183.38
608.49
116.65
$14,3«U;
hardship would be worked upon the
business affected. However, Hon. Mr.
Manson has announced that the (ull
letter of the new eight-hour law must
he lived up to and prosecutions will
follow any infringement of the regulations.
j NEW RAILWAY MAY
BENEFIT P. G. E.
GUELPH'S FIRST HOUSE TO BE RESTORED
At tbe Instance of the Wellington Historical Society, the old Priory
building of Guelph, Ontario, erected nearly a century ago by John
Gait, the founder of that city, is to be restored. The various trade*
unions in Guelph have offered to contribute to the restoration and an
energetic campaign is now being carried on among the citizens to raise
the balance of the money required to rebuild, in replica, the building
as it stood on completion ninety-seven years ago. The old building waa
removed from its original site many years ago, and some of the original
logs were replaced with new ones, but there are still many of the timber*
remaining that were placed in position by the Canada Company's axemen in 1837. For some years the old Priory building was utilized as a
passenger station by the Canadian Pacific, but It was abandoned as a
station when the town of Guelph outgrew it Tradition has it that Gait,
taking an axe from one of the axemen struck the first blow against
the first tree to be felled, after which he and hi* party drank to th*
prosperity of Guelph.
VICTORIA. Jan. 22.—Premier Oliver's recent return from Ottawa,
where he attended the federal railway conference, has been received
with mixed opinions of his success
with regard to the disposition of the
Pacific Great Eastern Railway. The
Dominion Government lias decided to
construct a railway that wlll give the
Pence River country an outlet to the
ports of the Canadian Pacific Coa3t.
Even (hough Ihe proposed line may
not form a direct line of communication over the P.O.E., It Is felt here
that the opening up of the huge empire of the north will benefit this province to such a large extent that the
annual deficit and interest charges
on the P.G.E. will be small ln comparison.
8-HOUR DAY LAW
EXEMPTIONS ALLOWED
IN SOME CASES
VICTORIA, Jan. 22. -Exemptions to
the regulations.of thc new eight-hour
day law have been ninde hy the government, through tiie board of adjustment headed by Mr. J. D. McNiven.
deputy minister tit labor, and chairman o( the board. In tho Interior
o( the province, where lumbering is
one of the chief Industries, some lee
way has been allowed. Realizing that
lu many of the camps there the season only lasts for (rom five to seven
months, the board Is permitting the
lumber mills to operate (or nine hours
dally where circumstances warrant.
In the baking business, where holidays demand that an extra supply of
bread ho furnished at short notice,
iho bakeries will be permitted to op-
crate for longer than eight hours
daily. The same applies in thc case
of engineers in various lines of Industry and ln other cases whore a
DISTRICTS VOTING YES
ON BEER QUESTION
In Its issue of January 15, 1925, Tho
British Columbia Gazette lists the following electoral districts as places
where subsection (11) of section 27,
of thc Government Liquor Act," chapter 146 of the "Revised Statutes of
British Columbia, 1924," namely, Sale
of Beer by the Glass, shall apply:
Alberni Electoral District, Atlin
Electoral District, Burnaby Electoral
District, Cariboo Electoral District,
Columbia Electoral District, Comox
Electoral    District,    Cowicban-New-
Castle Electoral District, Cranbrook
Electoral District, Creston Electoral
District, Esquimalt Electoral District,
Fernie Electoral District, Fort George
Electoral District, The Islands Electoral District Llllooet Electoral District, Mackenzie Electoral District,
Nanaimo Electoral District, North Okanagan Electoral District, Omineca
Electoral District, Prince Rupert Electoral District, Rossland-Trall Electoral District, Skeena Electoral District, Vancouver City Electoral District, and Yale Electoral District.
CARLOAD  OF  SILKS  USED
A carload of beautiful, lustrous
silks were used ln a scene portraying
a silk fair of the fifteenth century in
the Cosmopolitan picture "Yolanda,"
starring Mario,, Davles, coming to
the llo-Ilo Theatre on Monday and
Tuesday, January 26-27. The scenes
were all made at night on Aladdin
Hock Farm near Stamford, Conn. A
Dig set was built ont in the forest.
Light was provided by sunlight arcs,
torches and bonfires of the adjoining
hill sides.
The silks used to get the proper pictorial effect would have clothed a regiment of women. Many persons believe that any sort of material can be
used for costumes and decorations in
a motion picture. The eye of the
camera Is pitiless, however, and only
real silks and satins will give the
richness of texture necessary to produce the right effect on the screen.
A marionette Hhow was a feature of
the silk fair. Costumes of the fifteenth century were used on the marionettes and they were operated by
skilled professionals from Now York
who have followed this livelihood for
years.
The five hundred extras taking port
in these Bcenes were provided with
hot suppers brought out by automo
bile from Stamford. "Yolanda" Is
(rom the pen of Charles Major and
was adapted to the screen by Luther
Reed. Robert G. Vlgnola directed.
Miss Davles plays the role of "Yolanda," the princess masquerading as
a burgher girl.
Examine Into your own shortcomings rather than those of others. II
Is unwise to overwork oneself.
Wives: Never nag your husband. A
hubby Is like an egg—if kept continually in hot water he's liable to become hard-boiled.
Shopkeeper:    "He   is   a   splendid
salesman."
Director: "Persuasive, eh?"
Shopkeeper: "Persuasive! He could
sell a snowball to the devil."
Great
Bargain   Offer
The
Daily Province
4 months for $1.00
Subscribe Now
THE SAME RELIABLE FAMILY NEWSPAPER
NOTHING CHEAPENED BUT THE PRICE.
Subscribers who paid in advance at the 50c rate will
be given advantage of this offer. PAGE SIX
TUB   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 34, 1986.
Board of School Trustees, Cumberland, B.C.
JANUARY 15th, 1925.
REPORT AND STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31st, 1924.
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES,
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
I beg to report that I have audited the vouchers and Accounts
of the Board of School Trustees, Cumberland, B.C., for the year
ending December 31st, 1924.
Herewith I enclose a statement of Revenue's and Expenditures
for the year 1924.
The balance in the Royal Bank of Canada is $6045.43 but
cheques outstanding at December 31st, 1924 will reduce this to
$4419.44.
All accounts against the board have as far as I know been
rendered and paid.
The items under the heading Accounts Receivable are for
accounts which were overpaid.
An amount of $1000.09 is still due from the City on account
of the balance owing at December 31st, 1923. The balance owing
at that time $3842.68 was to have been paid into the School Account in the Royal Bank of Canada but through some misunderstanding this was not done.
Yours truly,
R. J. SELFE, Auditor.
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS   FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1924.
DISBURSEMENTS
Salaries, Teachers and Caretaker 	
Secretary's Salary 	
Transportation   	
Repairs    - -	
Janitor's Supplies  	
Audit Fees 	
Insurance  	
Medical Officer's Retainer 	
Stationery and Advertising	
Sundry Office Expenses 	
Workmen's Compensation 	
Fuel   - -
Furniture	
Exchange 	
School Room Supplies 	
Electric Light 	
Water 	
Improvements to Orounds 	
23,208.00
150.00
290.00
2,040.91!
213.93
75.00
564.50
200.00
177.65
52.17
2.85
1,104.20
537.97
.50
647.0,*
65.47
148.50
1,576.05
RECEIPTS
Government Grants 	
Proportion of Liquor Profits 	
Due from City of Cumberland at Jan. 1, 1924  3,738.33
Balance owing at December 31, 1924 _  1,000.09
Amount paid In by City  	
Poll Tax Revenue  ,	
School Tax Assessment 1924	
22,543.40
632.93
2,738.24
3,393.62
6,204.92
Accounts Receivable
Royston Lumber Co  29.20
The Islander    30.00
Balance in  hand
31,054.82
59.20
4,398.09
»3iV>I2.U
MiW13.ll
Signed on behalf of the Board:
E. F. BANKS, Chairman.
A. MacKINNON, Secretary.
Certified Correct
R. J. SELFE, Auditor.
Receipts
NIGHT SCHOOL ACCOUNTS 1924.
Disbursements
Night School Salaries
Balance In hand 	
Balance In hand, January 1, 1924 transferred from City Accounts     107.35
86.00
2135
107.35
Balance of Cash in hand, Public School ,  4,398.09
Balance ln hand, Night School  _      21.35
4.419.44
Outstonding Cheques at December 31, 1924  1,625.99
Balance ln Royal Bank of Canada  6,045.13
Signed on behalf ot the Board:—
E. F. BANKS, Chairman.
A. MacKINNON, Secretary.
Certified Correct
R. J. SELFE, Auditor.
THOUSANDS OF LOGS
RACE WILDLY THROUGH
A RESISTLESS TROOENT
Crashing, hurtling logs tossed ahead
of a resistless torrent make a terrifying    spectacular    background    for
some of the thrilling action ln "The
Tornado," Universal-Jewel starring
House Peters, which will be sho^n at
the Ilo-llo Theatre Friday and Saturday, January 30 and 31.
"The Tornado" is the screen version
of the famous Lincoln J. Carter mel-
15 DAY
Stock - Taking
SALE
COMMENCING
SATURDAY
JANUARY 24 ■ JANUARY 24
A   SALE
of   General   Household   Goods
Including   Furniture,   Mattresses,   Leather   Goods,
Trunks, Suit Cases, Crockery, Glasswear and
Fancy Goods.
Come in and look the store over.    An inspection will
convince you.
TOMMY'S
Hardware   Store
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
odrama ot the same name and the
part played by Peters is one of the
most heroic ln his long motion picture career.
The scene of the action is a logging j
camp, the great forests, ond the turbulent waters of a river down which
thousands of thousands of logs float
to the mills guided and controlled ln
their passage by the skill and daring
of man.
The man known all up and down
the river as "The Tornado," gained
the nickname by reason of his stormy
personality and the resistless manner
In which, as a logging boss, he enforced bis rule.
The arrival In the little settlement
of a man an d a woman from somewhere outln tbe world ot fine clothes,
and what the denizens of tbe settlement of the two and "The Tornado"
gave an nlkllng of the cause of the
man's presence in the wilderness. Tho
real unraveling took place on the soggy bank of the river (rom whence
"The Tornado," despairing' of his
own life, spurred himself to the frenzy of effort that enabled him to save
the woman he loved from the flood.
Ing, dangerous situations, most of
"The picture ls replete with thrill-
which were filmed on location in Idaho- under direction of King Baggot,
who has directed a number of Universal^ most successful productions.
Girls, remember: Nobody pays much
attention to a big hole ln a small
girl's Btocklng; but a small hole ln a
big girl's stocking—Oh, my!
Electrical Appliance*
Year Round Joys
The District's Leading
Electrical Supply House
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBIRLAND, B.C.
SHAW TRAINED THREE
MONTHS FOR BIG FIGHT
In singing paeans of praise to "The
Great White Way," the big picture of
life In New York which Is playing tonight and tomorrow night at the Hollo Theatre film critics nnd prize fight
authorities have marvelled at the exceptionally realistic fight waged hy
Oscar Shaw, leading man of the photoplay, In the big prize fight scene.
Many sporting authorities, including Tex Rlckard, have contended that
Shaw, had he chosen the ring, might
have established himself as firmly as
a boxer as ho has behind the footlights
Thc actor's film battle with Pete Hartley, one of the leading contenders for
the lightweight title held by Benny
Leonard, achieves the acme of realism.
Before being able to withstand the
savage lunges and hard punches of
the rugged Hartley, the actor-fighter
had to undergo a rigorous course of
training that lasted more than threo
months. Johnny Hennessey, well
known conditioner of fighters, was engaged to take the actor In tow. He
immediately put Shaw through a regular professional course of training.
When the fight scene was shot,
Shaw was In perfect condition. Even
Hartley admitted that the actor was
as tough, or tougher, than many professionals he had met.
Tho prize ring scene Is only one of
the many spectacular episodes that
have made "The Great White Way"
the photoplay sensation of the season.
P. T. ASSN. HELD
INTERESTING SESSION
MONDAY EVENING
(Continued From Page One)
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a Vi-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
O. W. CLINTON, Managing Direetor.
■»«
meats are under way whereby Uev.
Butler will secure several interested
members who wlll visit thc school
grounds on certain days of the week
and participate in tlie games of the
pupils. Already keen Interest has
been taken In the skating, resulting
In moro children being taught this
healthy sport than would have otherwise been possible.
Mr. A. J. Taylor gave an Instructive
address on the responsibility of parents for the physical well being of the
children. Mr. Taylor contended that
It the parents would set examples ln
the way of proper exercising nnd physical culture, there would be no difficulty in having children follow. The
speaker gave several demonstrations
of beneficial exercises, which added
greatly to the Interest of his address.
"The Advantage of Steel Equipment on tlie Play Ground" was tho
subject of a talk given by Mr. J. W*.
Tremlett. While Its installation
would entail considerable expense,
the speaker (Icmonslrated the permanence and clllclency of steel equipment on the piny grounds, and Its resulting benefit to the pupils. This
address was very well received and
much appreciated.
Mr. Apps Temporary Secretary
The nomination of a secretary for
the P.T.A. caused considerable comment, as there appeared to be no eligible person willing to take the offlce.
Several nominations were made, but
there were no acceptances. Finally
Principal Apps volunteered to All the
office temporarily until such time as
a new secretary could be elected.
Report on Petition
At a meeting of tbe executive held
on January 8th It was decided that
all those In (avor of adding Domestic
Science and Manual Training to the
School Curriculum would be given an
opportunity of signing a petition to
the effect on election day. Rev. W.
Leversedge, Rev Hood, Rev. Butler
and Messrs Shenstone, Sutherland and
Dr. Hicks constituted the appointed
committe. The Marshall Music store
was secured for voting purposes. Rev.
Leversedge, convenor of the Committee, reported at Monday's meeting that
the number of signatures recorded-
ed on the petition was comparative!;
ly small, and unsatisfactory. The
speaker emphasized that If these two
subjects were ever to be Instituted ln
our schools that now was the time to
act, and suggested that a thorough
canvass be made in this connection,
the vote of the taxpayer of course to
be given first consideration. Three
additions to the committee In the persons of Mrs. Freeborn, Mrs. McLean
and Mrs. Young were made, and the
committee was empowered to add to
its number as was considered necessary tn order to make a complete canvass of all persons concerned with
the idea of procuring a correct report of the pros and cons (or Domestic Science and Manual Training ln
our schools.
Field Day to b* Iiuugnratcd
Principal Apps annonnced that arrangements were being made whereby a field day would be Inaugurated
for the Cumberland schools, the Idea
being to Invite other schools (urther
north and south to bring their best
athletes here to compete. Tbe Principal said that he had received a communication (rom Inspector Patterson
acknowledging himself greatly In
favor of such a movement and willing
to do everything possible (or Its promotion.
Mesdames Braes, Freeborn and Som
merville were appointed on the visiting committee (or the month ot February.
Lives of great men all remind us
Well to cover up our tracks;
And departing leave behind us
No clue tor the Income Tax.
If mother Eve had been as wise as
somo of her daughters, what a fool
she'd have made of that snake!
When the Devil can't Induce you to
lie about other things, he gets someone to ask you If you are afraid of
your wife. FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1926.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE SEVEN
The
"Judge"
Special to
The
Islander
every .
week
■ The Judge: A*Roofer Has
MOW YOU STATE YOU
ARE QUALIFIED TO QWE
EXPERT TESTIMONY OH,
TIN TOOFlNq   -
HOW LONQ HAVE VOU
^L   WORKED AT »T.
jjas.'.U-ps and Downs Joo,\m
HOW OLD
ARE YOU.
i^MOW THEM YOU WORKED
*:;j*  AT IT FROM B.RTH
)   /
]<z\      ■' 1   IS YEARS OFF AND OM
A7A\       [ %o VEARS ON AMD
MO SIR ISA\D
F.SOPFAHDOH
.RS ON AMD
HO YEARS OFF
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Stoie
£VMBERLANI>. B.C.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort  and  Homelike  service.
26  rooms,  electrically  heated,
excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone 16.
R, YATKS, Manager.
Useful Recipes
NOTICE
Wood for sale $5.50 per load
(Also any other hauling)
Telephone 92R Happy Valley
W. C. White
The Islander Is indebted to Mrs.
J.W. for the following recipe of a
Collage Pudding. She hos also kindly offered a recipe for Stuffed Dates,
which she thinks would he very acceptable:
Cottage Pudding
(Sufficient  to  Borve  eight!
When a simple baked pudding ls desired, the housewife almost Instinctively turns to cottage pudding. This
pudding has been a favorite 1 ■ the
house for years and may be eaten by
young or.old. It.Is not very rich,
and should be served with an appetizing sauce:
*4 cup butter, Vu cup of sugar, 1
egg,  well  beaten,  lVi  cups flour,  3
] teaspoons baking powder, i/t, cup of t
! milk, 1 teaspoon any desired flavoring.
Cream the butter, add the ugar, then
well-beaten egg. Sift flour and baking powder together and add alternately with the milk. ■ Add the flavor
Ing.—Mrs. J.W.
Stuffed Dates
To one small package cream cheese,
rubbed soft, add one and a halt teaspoons prepared mustard and a dash
of paprika. This amount will stuff
about thirty-six dates, one package.
We are-pleased to note the Interest
being taken ln this column by the
housewives of the district and this
week publish enquiries for the following recipes:
Please publish a recipe for Steamed
Fig Pudding.—L.M., Bevan.
Miss B. of Cumberland wishes a
good recipe for salmon salad.
Would like a recipe for Oatmeal
Cookies.—The Camp, Cumberland.
A good Canadian Recipe for Sour
Milk Doughnuts is desired by a Chinatown resident.
In our Issue of last week—"An Inexpensive Icing"—If Icing is too thick
or dark, cocoa may be reduced to suit.
A Royston lady writes: "I wish your
'Useful Recipes' column every success
and think it is a good plan. I have
used the following recipe for a long
time and And It very appetizing:
Mann's bakery
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pastries
Special for Saturday
Delicious Cream Cakes, Cream Rolls, Cream Buns, Etc.
'  *    Taste Teasing Palate Pleasing
Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls
Scotch Scones, Doughnuts, Oatcakes, Biscuits '
Make our Quality Bread the Basis of Every Meal
Give us a Trial
Telephone 18 Cumberland
Icing and bits ui candied cherries, nitron peel or angelica tu represent Mah
Jong characters. Small oblong cakes
may he decorated In the same way.
You ketch em Sour .Milk Doughnut
for me,—Chinatown.
We would ask contributors not to
feel slighted if their recipes do uot
always appear, as in some cases, two
and more people send in practically
the same recipe.
HATS OFF TO THE
POLICE OF B.C.
Raisin Pie
1% cups raisins, 2 cups water, %
cup sugar, ■% teaspoon cinnamon, %
teaspoon cloves, V4 teaspoon salt, 4
Tablespoons flour.
1 Clean the raisins and soak them
overnight In the water. Put to cook
ln the same water and simmer gently
until tender. Mix the sugar, flour,
spices, and salt and add to the raisins. Cook until the mixture is thick,
All the lower crust of a pie, cover
with the top crust and bake In a hot
oven.—Royston.
Not to be outdone, a local Chinaman sends In the following:
Mali Jong Cookies
Plain sugar cookies may be made to
look like tiles If cut and baked in oblong pieces.      When  baked decorate
each piece with chocolate or colored
VICTORIA. Jan. 22.—The efficacy of
the Provincial Police, under direction
of Attorney-General .Manson, has been
fully demonstrated through the remarkable apprehensions of American
criminals during the past two "months.
The finding of the murderers of Capt.
Glllis and his son, owners and operators of the "Beryl G." has caused
police officials all over the continent
to "take off their hats" to the Hritish
Columbia force. Added to that achievement was the apprehension of the
perpetrators of the Nanaimo bank
robbery. While the attorney-general
takes no particular credit to himself
for the arrests of the criminals involved, it si only fair to say that he has
shown shrewdness and legal judgment
In the appointment of his law officers
and the latter have "made a name for
themselves' through their clever work.
Upwards of a dozen hl-jackers and
murderers will be brought back to
Canada for trial and it is safe to
say that the almost incredible skill
shown be the Provincial Police in
tracking down the felons will act as
a strong deterrent to other criminals
from the United States who think
British Columbia is a "soft" place in
which to operate.
ANNA LEE SCOTT'S
WONDERFUL FREE
OFFER  TO   WOMEN
OF CUMBERLAND
Anna Lee Scott is a recognized authority on the preparation and serving of food for all occasions. She
hau prepared an interesting up-to-the-
minute and practical Course of twenty
lessons, by mail, on "Cookery Arts
and Kitchen Management," and to all
users of Maple eat' Flour the .Maple
Leaf Milling Company offers thia
Course without one cent of money.
Coupons will be found in every hay
| of Maple Leaf Flour, in a 98 lb. bag
four coupons;   in  u 4!i  lb.  two  coupons;  and in a  24 lb. bag one coupon.
Merely sign and mail four coupons
as directed—send no money—and you
will be enrolled as a member of the
Maple Leaf Club, and receive tlie first
four lessons of the Course in an at-
tractlve looi'e leaf hinder.     The re-
1 mainlng lessons will be sent at the
: rate of four a month—twenty lessons
' in all—postage paid.
Every housewife will be delighted
with Maple Leaf Flour and she buys
it with the positive guarantee thai
I .she never used a better flour.
j Ask your grocer today ahout this
i unusa'l free offer and watch the ad-
! vertising columns of tliis paper for
| further details.
A WILD HIDE IN A TAXI
MAY BE SPORT, BUT ONCE
WILL DO MISS TAYLOR
.« i ■'            .•■'.;
*.'..■
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
BH1NBLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,        1
AND    rURNtSHINaS.
1
i
WB DBLIVBR TO ANYWHERB IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH RBASONADLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
(Night calls: 134X Courtenay
PHONES |0fflce. 1W Cumberland
HESE beers, the products of Vancouver
Breweries, Limited, are extremely popular
on the Island—because of their absolute
purity, their wholesomeness and their fine
"hops and malt" flavor.
vBeerwithouU
and
tuPeer
U.B.C. Beer
On sale at all Govt. Vendors
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of B.C.
(Olii'OltATION   OF  THE  CITY   Or
( milKHLAMl
Court <il' Revision
A Court ot* Revision will bo held un
the Oth February 1025. In the City
Mull, commencing at 7 p.m.
Any person deeming themselves
wrtnigfully inserted or omitted from
the Assessment Holl as having been
undercharged or overcharged by the
Assessor in the Hull, must give notice
in writing to tbe Assessor of the
ground of their eon,plaint at least
TUN DAYS before the silting of the
Court of Revision.
There have been thrilling airplane
rides, trips through bomb and submarine infested waters in ships,
rides on automobile speedways and
rides on runaway locomotives, but
none of these contain more thrills
than the ride experienced by Lau-
rette Taylor, lledda Hopper, Edith
Yorke and a cameraman lu an up-to-
date limousine through the heart of
tbe New York business district, during the rilming of scenes for "Happiness." .Miss Taylor's second Metro
starring picture, which Is coming to
tlie Ilo-llo Theatre Wednesday and
i Thursday, January 28 and 29.
King Vidor directed the screen ver-
j sinn of J. Hartley .Manners' stage suc-
j cess of tlie same name. The purpose
j of the scenes was to impress the au-
j dience With the alarm and thrill ex-
! perlenceJ by .Miss Taylor on her first
ride in an automobile.
Mr.   Vidor  personally selected  the
man  who  was engaged to drive the
' car. The man In question was a taxi-
driver by trade and in the eyes of Mr.
Vidor best qualified for the Job.
"1 want 'o get thrills in this ride,"
Mr. Vidor told him, "but I don't want
any  lives  endangered, either on the
; part of the occupants of the machine
i or pedestrians."
Tbe  driver assured  Mr.  Vidor ev-
•■ erythlng would he all right.     How-
: ever, there was a slight difference of
opinion  between  Mr.  Vidor and the
driver regarding the meaning of "all
| right."     It is true that he didn't kill
anyone, but be did badly frighten a
number of people, including the three
women, who had to be assisted from
the machine at the termination of the
wild ride.
"It was great," murmured Miss Taylor weakly, "but once will be about
enough for me."
A   woman   in  York, Pa., has  been
W. II. COPE, Assessor. ' I'ound  to possess one rib too many,
 = I says the Philadelphia Record.
We once heard of a mail similarly
-- afflicted who got the entire world into
trouble as a result.
Merchant
TAILOR
CLEANING   AND   PRESSING
Open for business November 20
Under New Management
£. Aida
CUMBERLAND TAILOR
Dunsmuir Avenue
BABYS
-OWN
SOAP
Best   „
/t/Sabi/
/•wreu
Car   For Hire
R. RUSHTON
When you are in need of a
numbing it Hunting Englnoer, See j Dependable Car—Careful DrW«r
When in need of a car
see
GEO. MASON
 PHONE	
Royal Candy Or RMldtae*
25 22
CUMBERLAND
Phono 124
Courtenay
Phone 157
Cumberland
Your   needs   will   receive   Immediate
attention.
PETER McNIVEN
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
At Reasonable Prices.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND phone 150
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store. ■*»•■•■
PAGE EIGHT
THE   CVMBENLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
ITtlDAY, JANUARY J4, IMS.
For Friday and Saturday
January 23 and 24
Sporting Notables
tt
In Big Picture
The
Th«  Ctumspslitan Corp o ratio.,
PrttraU
%
It's the Life!
DEAD what Robert Gil-
"bert WeUh -wye In th*
New York Evening Tele-
gram!
"Il b Ih* matt illuminating
Om of gay IU* in New
York Out lun erer bust
made and it hu bean mad*
with overwhelming eztrav-
«gance and unfailing dra-
■utio power."
The
Wonder Picture of
New York'.
"Main Street"
With Anita Stewart, T. Roy IS
Barnei, Oicar Shaw, Tom
Lewie and a cut of th* na-
tion'e celebritiei and tho
entire "Ziogfeld Felhe."
chorus.
tLmmmmsmsm^
"Great White Way"
Rlckard, Strode and Gallagher Among Celebrities In
"The Great White W»r"
It's the Life!   The Wonder Picture of New York's "Main Street"
also a 2 reel Comedy featuring the Fox Monkeys
Adults 50c.
Children 25c.
Note reduced prices for
DANCE SATURDAY NIGHT - 50c COUPLE
MONDAY- JAN^T26 -TUESDAY
Marion
Davies
gives the screen the most
delightful performance of
her career in
k.
YOLANDA
JJ
A haunting and vivid picture of Civilization's most thrill-      |
ing age—when love was won in battle and Romance blossomed     Ja
amidst peril and high adventure.
Marion
Davies
in the thrilling love story
of a Beauty who defied the
powers for her lovers
kisses,
"The Great White Way," a
new photoplay that mirrors
life on Broadway, opens at
the Ilo-llo tonight for a two
days' showing. Leading celebrities of the prize ring, the
track, prominent sports writ
ers and other familiar figures
of sportdom make their film
debut in the picture.
This scene includes such
sporting celebrities as Tex
Rickard, who appears aa promoter; Joe Humphreys, announcer, and Johnny Gallagher as referee. Others
who appear around the ring
or In training quarters of
Madison Square Garden are
Irvin S. Cobb, Damon Runy-
on, "Bugs" Baer, Bill/ De
Beck, "Kid" Broad, Tammany Young and H. C. Wltwer
author of the story.
Another thriling feature of
"The Great White Way" is a
big race track scene, Aimed
at Belmont Park on Futurity
Day. It discloses a realistic steeplechase, specially
staged for the picture, and
many other phases of turf
life Earle Sande world's
premier jockey, is another o*,'
the many sporting celebrities *-ho appears
The regular cast, in addition to "scar Shaw, Includes
Anita Stewart, T. Ro Barne i
Tom Lewis, OH ii Rowland.
Marry Watson. Dore Davidson, Hal Forde, Stanley
Forde and Frank Wonderley
il
YOLANDA
JJ
A power on the chessboard of Empire—a toy in the hands
of Fate—the beautiful Princess Mary matches her wits against
the powers of evil—and wins!
Adults 50 cents
TWO DE LUXE SHOWS at 6.45 and 8.45 NIGHTLY
Children 25 cents
Wednesday and Thursday
January 28 and 29
\ f; *lVi'4i.* rjL***-,.
FRIDAY   and   SATURDAY
January 30 and 31
He was an electrician, but he had the soul  of  a  poet,   and   when
Jenny—bright-eyed, cheerful Jenny, met—well, see for yourself.
3rd Chapter of "The Ghost City"
ADULTS 35c. CHILDREN 15c.
ADl
1—
House Peters, in
"THE TORNADO"
All along the turbulent river men called the grim, silent woods' boss "The
Tornado." He was a stern taskmaster but fair, even those who hated him
admitted. One day there came a man and a woman, strange to the district. The first time "The Tornado" saw them it was apparent that he
had known them before. What the denizens of the settlement did not
know was that once the woman and "The Tornado" had been sweethearts,
that the other man, taking advantage of an opportunity created by the
Great War had beguiled the woman into marrying him. But this the
residents of the logging camp did not learn until after "The Tornado" had
saved the settlement from the log jam, caused by a great storm, by risking
his life. Then, swept away himself he came upon the wreck of the train
in which the man and the woman fled from his wrath and after extraordinary effort saved the woman—but the rapacious river snatched the man
away.    "The Tornado's" soul was washed clean of the gnawing hatred.
ADULTS 50c.
CHILDREN 25c.
IIo=Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND
«Sfl FRIDAY. JANUARY 24, 1925.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE NINE
l>
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
PARTY LEAVE FOR
JARVSS IN LEI
COURTENAY, Jan. iU.—Messrs A.
Oleland and Frank bee left tor Jarvls
liiiet on Thursday lust to look over
some timber holding;;. Mr. Joe. Fitzgerald, timber cruiser, accompanied
tiiem. The party was transported by
Capt. HI. Lloyd of the gas boat
"Hoona" with provisions for a week.
DEAN CLEMENT
WILL LECTURE HERE
NEXT THURSDAY
COURTKXAY,—.Mr. Norman Pritchard lett o-i Monda> morning's train
for Vancouver. Mr, Pritchard is taking a lew days' holiday alter a long
spell of haul work un the farm, While
in tho terminal city ho intends to take
at leasj, P&rt of the .short com so on
I'ouuiy'ut the University of U.C. Mr,
Pritchard is the secretary of the Comox \ aiiey Fruit Growers' Association, whioh organization has arranged
tor a lecture by beau Clement ol the
University, to he delivered in the Agricultural Bull, ,1'ouiunuy, on Thursday, January 2!Hh.
CHIMNEY FIRE 13
CAUSE OF ALARM
COGUTHNAY, Jan. 20.—When the
fire ahum Bounded at 3:30 on Monday
afternoon, more than ona householder
who had left homo and gone lo town
shopping, or on other business, had
visions of their own homo going up in
smoke. The causo of the alarm however, was only a chimney lire at Mr.
C. Beasloy's house situated off the
Lake Trail Road, Tiie Courtenay
Tire Department responded in their
UHhul prompt lj "" "'
JAMES CRONIN,
LOGGER, KILLED
LAST FRIDAY
COURTENAY, Jan. 19.—Another
victim was added to the long list of
those who have losl their lives while
working in ilu woods last Friday
when James Cronln, employed at tlie
camp of Charles Eng. at l.ochhorough
Inlet, met With a fatal accident. Deatli
was caused by the fall of a sky line
wliieh struck (lie unfortunate logger
causing a fractured pelvis and other
Injuries.
'Ihe uody was conveyed to Campbell
River by provincial constable Dawson
where an Inquest was conducted by
Dr, Zolgler, The result .of which
.was u verdict of accidental deatli.
From Campbell River the body was
consigned to Mr. John Sutton of
Courtenay. trom whose funeral parlors it was shipped ou Tuesday to
Vancouver for interment, Deceased
■was 111 years of ago and l< aves a moth
«r, who resides at 2890, Cathleen Ave.,
Burnaby, Vancouver.
WHIST PARTY AND
DANCE IN DOVE CREEK
!- SCHOOL IS SUCCESS
COURTENAY, Jan. 20.—Friday evening last saw a good crowd nt the
Dove Creek School for a very successful progressive whist drive and
dance. The winners at curds were:
Ladies' lirst, Mrs. Parkin, second Mrs.
Pearce. The successful gentlemen
were, Mr. Ceo. BJgelow first, and Mr.
T. Brazier, second. Mr, L. Reese
was the lucky winner of tlie hidden
number prize. The refreshments Which
were brought by Hie indies were served by the social committee and were
very much enjoyed. Towards the
latter part of tlie evening the floor
was cleared and ;i delightful dance
to music supplied by Miss Williamson
nnd Messrs .NA Smith and H. Symonds
was kept going until nearly two
o'clock a.m. Tlie next social evening at Dove Creek is called for Friday, the 80th January.
OLD BOSSIE COW
NEEDS LOOK FOR
OTHER PASTURES
BY-ELECTION
MAY HE HELD
IN COURTENAY
COURTENAY,  Jan.   21.—With   the
exception Of a possible contest for
mayor, or a hy-el it lion for a councillor's seat, the civic elections are over
[or another year,
The new City Council is undoubtedly a very strong one, and augors will
for Courtenay':; prosperity for tho current year. Of the six BUCQOSSfU] ald-
ermaiiic candidates to be returned
Inst weak, four. Messrs Cooke, Flold-
er. Pearse anil McKeniiO huve already
had considerable experience in municipal affairs, It is perhaps a significant fact that Frederick Field, although a new candidate for clvle hai-
ors, should stand out at ihe top of the
poll. Ills figures were 142 out of n
total ballot of 176. There is general
talk of 1925 being a prosperous year.
The man In the street tells you so on
every possible occasion. Things nre
looking good, he says, There is littlo doubt that lll!-' new council is composed of men who will grasp every opportunity for Courtonay s welfare.
The old council wns a good one.
nnd for the most part worked exceedingly well together. We venture to
think thla was largely duo to the fact
thnt in Mayor McPherson the city was
fortunate lu having a chief executive
who combined the finalities of nn untiring worker nl iho city's Interest!*
with those of n very fini type of chairman nt tlie - m oil "i•'■ :"■ [8, It la
to bo regretted that Mr. Mcpherson
so far has not seen hii way to offor
his valuable services for another year
in ofllce; and seeing that Court! iiv
is at present wl houi n mayor for '■■''■
perhaps it I:; no; loo much tn hop-J
that Mr, McPherson will yet bo |l r-
Buadod to reconsider    his   decision,
Much, of course, depends on the ma»'«
or and the ailing of this ofllce will be
awaited with iulerest.
COURTENAY, Jan. 21.—The result
of the "Cow Plebiscite" was a very
plain answer to the question "Are you
in favor of milk cows running at large
within the city?" We people In
Courtenay said no, we are not in favor of cows running at large within the
city. We said so one hundred and
twelve times against fifty-live answers
in the affirmative, There are a number of people in Courtenay who collider that the question should never
have been allowed to come before the
ratepayers in the form of a plebiscite
but should have been killed in the
council hall. Be that as it may, tlic
matter is now a thing of the past aud
Courtenay has advanced another step
iu the right direction. There is little doubt that specimens of the bovine
ace will not longer be seen roaming
about the city. This will make traffic conditions safer and tend to keep
the sidewalks cleaner, besides giving
the gardeners a better chance and
ttie city a less rural aspect.
The boat plebiscite was also a very
decided expression of opinion. There
were in fact only thirty-nine votes iu
favor of the proposed bond issue being guaranteed by the city. To be on
the popular side it was only necessary
to say that you opposed the boat.
That was obvious from the start, and
no doubt some took advantage of the
fact. Among the supporters of thc
river service however, were men who
hold leading positions In the community and also the more progressive
business men. This is surely food
for thought, especially when it is remembered that for years even cities
like Vancouver consistently turned
down money by-laws and have in fact
only recently awaked to the advantages and possibilities of municipal
ownership.
TWO LIVES LOST
BY ACCIDENT AT
TOBEZ INLET
COURTENAY. Jan. 22. — By a
strange coincidence two lives    were
j lost by accident at Tobez Inlet ou
Monday and Tuesday of this week.
Both deaths occured at tho logging
camp of McCoy and Wilson at Held
Bay.
'the first fatality was that of Louis
Lohelle, apparently 40 years of age
and a French Canadian with no known
relatives in this part of the country.
jit seems lie was acting as "whistle
punk' when he was struck with a log
as it was being hauled through tlm
woods.
'i lie second fatality was that of
Robert Cummings, 30 years old, of
Scotch decent and it is thought that
he may have a wife in Scotland, It.
appears he too was li it by a log. Both
bodies were taken to Campbell River
where post mortems were held by Dr.
Ziegler and from (here were forwarded to Mr. John Sutton's undertaking
parlors at Courtenay. The funeral
of Louis Lolselle is to take place Friday afternoon at the Catholic cemetery at Comox. The body of Robert Cummings is awaiting instructions
for disposition.
LAST MEETING
OF OLD COUNCIL
LOGGING TRAINS PASS
THROUGH COURTENAY
AGAIN TO BOOM CAMP
COURTENAY, Jan. 21.—Once more
(he flat cars loaded with former giants
of the forest are to he seen gliding
through town at the railway crossing
on Union Street. The first train
load of logs, about forty cars, went
through to the boom camp on Wednesday morning. This evidently
means that logging operations have
again commenced in the woods wliieh
will no doubt have a beneficial effect
on local conditions. The pay-roll of
the Comox Logging Co. is a decided
boon to this district, and other industries with other local pay rolls would
be very welcome.
Crossing Will he Guarded
The cottage which is being erected
hy the Comox Logging and Railway
Co. close to the Riverside Hotel In
the city is now Hearing completion
This dwelling will house the switch
man who will in future be stationed
here and who will warn the public of
thc approach of the logging train.
This measure will add to the safety
of the level crossing in town. Deities the railway crossing Union St..
the crossing on Wallace St., which has
been opened up since the last operations of the logging company, will
now need protection. Mr. J. Hawthorne will be the occupant of thc
switchman's new quarters, it is understood.
COURTENAY.—Besides the important financial business of the old City
Council ut its last meeting, there were
several other matters which came bo-
fore the aldermen. Mayor McPherson an dull the aldermen were present
with the exception of Alderman W. J.
Hagarty.
Amongst the correspondence was a
letter from Mr. P, P. Harrison referring to the deduction by the Attorney-
General's Department from Courtenay's share of the liquor profits. Mr.
Harrison wrote in answer to a communication from the city clerk asking
for an explanation why sucli a large
sum had been deducted. Mr, Harrison said he was willing to do all
iu his power for Courtenay, and he
felt sure the Courtenay local police
had done all they could in enforcing
the liquor act. Before he could take
any further definite action, however,
he wanted lo know if n request had
been made by Courtenay for help from
the Provincial authorities for the enforcement of the act. Alderman
Pearse moved that the city clerk write
to thc local Police Commissioners enquiring if such request had been made
"Wo can't, complain if the provincial
authorities have been asked to assist"
he said, "even though the charges may
be exorbitant.
By-Law No. 125 being the first temporary loan by-law for 1925, received
its third and final reading. This authorizes the city to borrow from the
Canadian Bank of Commerce an
amount up to $20,000 in anticipation
of its revenue for the current year.
The Medical Officer's report submitted by Dr. T. L, Butters, showed
the health of the city and tho sanitary
conditions to be very satisfactory.
Courtenay had been fairly free from
epidemic during tbe year. I-, March
some thirty cases of measles' had
caused the school to be closed for :.
short time. The water supply was
very satisfactory throughout tlie year.
The question of drainage would become more serious as the city grown.
The sanitary arrangements at the
school was quite satisfactory.
Alderman Pearse reporting on the
Better Housing scheme said the instalments in arrears were forty. Some
of the occupants are eleven months
in arrears which is very unsatisfactory he said. In some cases there
was no need for concern as the city
had ample security, but in others
there was very little if any margin.
It was a matter for the incoming
council to take up very seriously he
thought. In any case the city only
receives ?100 per year for taking care
of an investment of $85,000.00. Mayor
.McPherson thought tbat In some cases
the occupants were abusing a very
great privilege and the city might
as well seize the properties first as
last.
Alderman Fielder reporting as
chairman of the public works committee gave in detail the work done
on tlie city streets during the year.
Total number of loads of grave1, hauled had been 1,811. X this number,
1,125 had been hauled with the new
truck since May last. A saving of
more than fI0 per cent per yard of
gravel had been effected by the purchase of tho truck, he said. Alderman Fielder gave the number of load-*!
that have been put on each city street
These figures included eighty loads
for tbe Lake Trail. The citizens
who live on this road may wonder
where the eight, loads have been put.
Just at present the Lake Trail resembles more of the lake than the trail,
in fact Mayor McPherson afterwards
said he would be in favor of recommending a permanent surface for this
road as it has always given trouble
and  is  constantly full of pot holes.
Alderman Cooke submitted a short
report as chairman of the Sanitary
and Transportation Committees and
Alderman Embleton reported for the
Water Works, in the absence of Alderman Hagarty, the city clerk gave
a very interesting report on the electric light system. He showed very
clearly how that the electric light.
department was the prize winner of
the flock of utilities. When the system was first Installed there were 125
consumers which produced a total
revenue of $5,500. Last year there
were 464 consumers and an income of
$28,600 and City Clerk, Mr. C. S. Wood
took the opportunity of thanking the
aldermen for the sympathetic help
during the year. Replying to Mr.
Woods, the mayor said the electric
light plant was really Mr. Woods'
child. Fortunately for the city Mr
Wood had been taken over with the
plant. As regards the treatment Mr.
Wood had received from the council,
be only got what was coming to him
We usually get what is due to us. said
the mayor and he thought Mr. Wood
was entitled to all tbe help and courtesy possible. He had been a very
faithful servant to the city and he
hoped he would live for many years
and continue to serve the city.
"The mnyor also reported as chairman of the Police Commission. He
detailed the work of Chief of Police
Hornal, showing the many and varied
duties of the office. Taxes collected
by him during the year were: pound
fees $150.04 net; poll tax $230; road
tax ?98; dog tax $108 and besides this
lip bad collected some $637 for the
night watchman. During thc year
over thirty court cases of various natures had been dealt with by the local
police. All the time there was work
tliat kept the police department busy
and the police did not always get the
credit due them he thought.
Pnfore the meeting came to a close,
Alderman Charles Simms moved a
vote of appreciation for the very able
manner in which Mayor McPherson
haa upheld the dignity of the office of
mayor nnd for the manner in which
he has conducted the business at the
council table during the year. He
regretted that the mayor had not sean
his way to hold ofiice for another
term. This motion was seconded by
Alderman Fielder and the last meeting of the 1924 council came to a clo*>e
amidst the best possible feelings all
round.
FINANCIAL REPORT
SHOWS COURTENAY
IN GOOD STANDING
COURTENAY, Jan 22.—The outstanding feature of the last meeting
of the old City Council, held on Wednesday night was the splendid Financial Statement for the past year. In
presenting the Financial Report, Alderman Charles Simms, as chairman
of the Finance Committee said, "It is
a report I am very proud of. I ean-
I not take any credit myself, as i am
not a man of figures. My colleagues
Messrs Cooks and Pearse did all the
figuring at the beginning of the year.
I take the liberty of pointing out to
the Council, that this is the first time
any Chairman of finance for this City
has been" In the position of being able
to declare the financial statement for
the year "duly completed and audited
within the lifetime of the current
council."
In fact the first time since Courtenay was incoporated as a Municipality in 1915.
This achievement is one result of
the strenuous work of the 1022 council when Mr. W. Cooke was chairman
of finance, and when the financial
business foundation for this city was
laid; also the continued good relationship that has been maintained
ever since between the council as a
whole, and the untiring efforts of the
city clerk.
This year's council also did good
service by appointing the auditor at
the beginning of the year, ami insti-
IT'S  A  FACT
THAT YOU ARE GETTING THE BEST THAT THE COMBINATION OF MOTHER
NATURE AND MODERN MACHINERY CAN PRODUCE WHEN YOU ASK YOUR
GROCER FOR:
Comox Creamery Potatoes
Comox Creamery Butter
Comox Creamery Eggs
Comox Jam
EGGS  ARE   CANDLED  AND   GRADED   CAREFULLY   AND   ARE
GUARANTEED TO BE STRICTLY FRESH.
JAM WAS MADE IN OUR OWN PLANT FROM FRESH GATHERED
BERRIES DAILY.
WHEN BUYING POTATOES "LOOK FOR THE TAG ON THE BAG."
•IF COMOX CREAMERY THE "GROWERS" NAME IS THERE AND
THEY ARE GRADED BY US.
Comox Creamery
Associ;
luring continuous audits showing
monthly balance.
Vou will see by the financial statement that the city's surplus shows an
increase of 50 per cent over the previous year, an increase from $31000.00
to  $46000.00.
During the year expenditures on
Capital Account have been aa follows:
Electric Light plant  3500.00
Water Works     800.00
Vault     632.00
Fire Mall     500.00
City  Truck    1376.00
$6808.00
A total of over JfiOOO.OO which has
been paid out of the year's revenue
and not charged to capital account.
Al! street work, opening of new
streets and permanent improvements
have also been capitalized, but have
been charged to maintenance and do
not show in the surpus.
The sinking funds are not only all
(Continued on  Page Ten)
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay.
LOOK!
We have just unpacked the swellest line of Table
Lamps, Shades, Candle Lumps, Etc., which have just
arrived from the east. The very latest in electrical
fixtures. Come and selert yours early before the
Spring rush begins.
Our Sporting Goods Dopt. is still busy with all the
best Guns—Ammunition—Hunter's Clothing, Etc.
-RADIO	
-RADIO	
We sell reliable Radio Sets and Parts and service the
sets we sell.    Get your radio from a reliable firm who
know their businest*.
THE
Piket Electric
Telephone 164
Court-MV
PLACE YOUR ORDERS WITH
Edwards Lumber Co., Ltd.
Largest Assortment of Building Materials In th*
District
Ofllce & Store
Union Bay Rd.
COURTENAY
Lumber Yard
Mill Street
For any Kind of Lumber, Hardware, Paint, Roofings,
Etc.
P.O. Box 62
Phone 17
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
The White Store
The White Bakery
Bat McDryde's lOOC'r Whole Wheat nrrnd, the loaf thnt drives
the polpon from the system.     Hi* that is hulled ns the greatest
writer on heallh says, "Patent foods should be shunned like the
devil and to eat the Natural Whole Wheat Bread."
First Class Certificate (Upper Grade) for bread baking
guarantees the quality
THE COURTENAY TEA ROOM TEN
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1925.
Madame
X
REDUCING GIRDLE
The New Girdle That Reduces
Waist and Hips
This wonderful new scientific girdl
reduces your waist and hips instantly
Makes you look thin while getting
thin! The moment you put it on, thc
bulky fat on waist nnd hips seems to
vanish, the waistline lengthens, your
figure Is erect and graceful—for tlie
girdle ls strong enough to really hold
you ln. But It does not merely draw
In your waist. It actually takes off
the fat, gently but surely.
The Madame X Reducing Girdle is
built on scientific massage principles
that have caused reductions of 5, 10,
20 pounds. It Is made of the highest
grade pure Para rubber, especially
designed for reducing purposes, and
Is worn over the undergarment in
place of an uncomfortnble corset.
Touches and massages every portion
of the surface! With every breath.
with every little motion it gently nfas-
sageB away the disfiguring, useless
fat. Women usually lose one to three
inches the very first week! Makes
you look and feel years younger.
It is entirely new—nothing like it
has ever been known before. The
most comfortable, practical girdle jou
ever had on!
J. Sutherland
Cumberland
WEDDING BELLS
Turnbull - llorhiirr
A quiet wedding of much local Interest was solemnized at Hazleton,
B.C., on Thursday, January 8th, when
Rev. T. D. Proctor united in marriage
Miss Minnie Horbury, youngest dnugh
ter of Mr. Thomns Horbury of this
city, and Mr. James Turnbull of
Hazleton, B.C.
The bride wns attended by her nelCQ
Miss Betty Jayne, while Dr. Petrle of
Hazleton supported the groom. Mr.
and Mrs. Turnbull arrived lu town on
Wednesday and will return on Saturday morning to Hazleton. where they
wlll make their future home. The
bride ls well known In town, having
lived the greater pert of her life here
and the good wishes of a wide circle
Of friends are extended to thc happy
couple.
Saskatchewan has a greater per
capita wealth than any other province of Canada, according to figures
of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
Social and Personal
Ml'* Henry Devlin, Inspector of
mines, visited town this week.
* *   *
Mr. T. Plump left for Victoria on
Thursday morning.
* *   *
.Miss Lena Carey left Vancouver or.
Thursday morning.
Miss Bryden of Victoria Is visiting
with her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
C. H. Tarbell.
• *   *
Mr. and .Mrs. James T. Brown and
children returned from Newcastle,
Wash., Thursday evening.
• •   *
.Mr. A. J. Henderson of North Vancouver Is a visitor to Royston, the
guest of his son. A. S. Heuderson.
.   *   .
Mr, It. A. Seott of the Canadian Unl-
versul Film Co. was a visitor to Curu-
berland this week.
After spending a month's vacation
In town, visiting her mother, Mrs. D.
Stewart, .Miss Hess B. Stewart returned to Vancouver on Tuesday morning
A huge wooden, tar-paper lined
shell erected over the space provided for thc structure and heated by
thousands of feet of steam colls
connected with 380-horse power
boileu, which provide a summer-like
atmosphere for the carrying on of
construction, is an interesting and
novel feature of the arrangements
made to combat the difficulty of
building the new wing of the Chateau Lake Louise, the Canadian
Pacific Railway's famous Rocky
Mountnin hotel, under winter conditions. Thnnks to this Innovation,
the wing, despite frequent drops ln
tempcrnture to far below zero, is
progressing excellently and the company expects it to be ready for next
summer's tourist season.
Sweeping changes in the Canadian
Pacific Railway's service of great
benefit to the communities concerned are scheduled for January 11.
They include revision of the timetable of the Vancouver express (Toronto-Vancouver), to reach Fort
William and Port Arthur between 10
and 11 p.m., instead of 2 and 3 a.m.,
and Winnipeg at 10 a.m., instead of
2.30 p.m., as heretofore. The new
times are more convenient to the
Twin Cities than the old and a half-
day Is gained for business in Winnipeg. Regina is to be reached by
the same train at 11 p.m. instead of
1.20 a.m., and Moose Jaw at midnight instead of 2.45 a.m., Regina-
Saskatoon connections being thus
radically improved, while arrival at
Calgary at 4 p.m. enables Edmonton
to be reached that evening. Vancouver is reached at 7 p.m. instead
of 9.30 p.m. as previously. The Toronto Express (Vancouver-Toronto)
reaches Winnipeg more conveniently, while arrival at Toronto at 8.40
a.m. will make possible connections
with early morning trains for Ontario points and with day trains for
American cities, thus saving more
time. Gains on other trains between
Montreal, Ottawa. Toronto, Chicago
and Winnipeg arc also scheduled.
These arrangements follow the cancellation of the recently inaugurated
train between Winnipeg, Montreal
and Toronto, which It to eome nil
January 10.
P
I
SATURDAY
CUT-RATE DRUGS
ETC.
$1.00 Enos Fruit Salts 88
50c. Shaving Cream   37
35c. Tooth Paste  21
$1.00 Cod Liver Oil Emulsion 87
50c. Emulsified Cocanut Oil  37
25c. Aromatic Cascara 18
50c. Glycerine  3fi
50c. Cold Cream 32
CANDY
1 lb. Neilson's Chocolates, per box 60
Gum Drops, assorted flavors, per ['■' lb 18
BOOKS
New Novels are arriving weekly.     If we have not got
in stock the book you desire, we will order it for you.
Give Our Service A Trial
Lang's Drug Store
—THE REXALL KODAK STORE—
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
Mr. Lockheart, of the Retailers Sal.:
Service, who has been conducting a
luge snle nt A. MacKinnon's, left for
Vancouver on Sunduy.
.   *   .
Mr. Pilling, who hns been spending
the past week here, on business In
connection with tho Mercantile Store
Co., left for Vancouver on Saturday.
• *   *
Mr. G. Bnrton, who hns been spending the pnst week In town on business
in connection with the Victoria Colonist, left by motor for his home on
Friday.
• ♦   *
Mr. and Mrs. N. Klbler, left Tuesday morning for Vancouver. Mr
Klbler returned on Thursday, while
Mrs. Klbler will spend a few days ii
the city nnd return Saturday.
• »   ♦
Confined to Hospital
We regret to report thnt .Mrs. C. H,
Tarbell Is at present confined to the
Cumberland General Hospital.
. - ■ •
,\*?">*^*K3t*.
Bridge Hostess
Mrs. J. H. Cameron entertained at
three tables of bridge last Monday
evening, when Mrs. G. K. McNaughton and Mrs. G. W. Clinton were the
honored prize winners.
Entertains Children
On Saturday evening last ^Ys- C.
K. McNaughton entertained eighteen
members of her Sunday School class
to a supper and social evening. Various forms of amusement were Indulged in, the prize winners being
Misses Isobel Yarrow, Edna Conrod
and Margaret McDonald. The evening was a most enjoyable one.
Guests at Beaufort House
Lieutenant Colonel Charles C. Vil-
liers, general manager of the Canadian Collieries (D) Ltd., and Lady
Kathleen, accompanied by Major Sel-
don Humphries, Mr. Ross Sutherland,
and Mrs. Cudamore, all of Victoria,
arrived In Cumberland on Friday last
and returned on Wednesday. While
In the city they were guests at Beaufort House the official residence of thc
Canadian Collieries.
m~.<
AAA'
VkS|**^ twit
V?
REPAIR
SERVICE
Whether your car needs a "tune up"
or a complete overhaul, you can depend on skilled, careful, and reliable
service here.
We repair any make of car or truck
and can give flat rate prices on any
job.
We are fully equipped, to handle
lathe work, welding, cylinder rcbor-
ing, and all machine shop work.
MAKE MOTORING SAFE
Insure against accident, by haviwg
your brakes ralined with Raybestos,
put on the factory way, and guaranteed for one year.
For THE BEST SERVICE, Try
Blunt & Ewart
Limited
THE COURTENAY GARAGE
Phone'61 Phone fil
Birthday Surprise
On Wednesday evening last a number of friends otok the opportunity of
tendering a surprise party to Postmaster Brown, the occasion being the
celebration of his birthday. Those
present enjoyed a most pleasant evening.
A "chemical sponge" that nbsorbs
food odors and gnses in refrigerators
and pantries is a new Invention.
Guests of an eastern hotel are
paged by radio from the telephone
operator's desk.
A multiplate camera that can be
concealed in the palm of the hand and
holding forty-eight plates has been
perfected.
The ginnt photographic telescope at
the Dominion nstrophysical observatory at Victoria, B.C., weighs forty
tons.
I FINANCIAL REPORT
I       SHOWS COURTENAY
IN GOOD STANDiNG
(Continued From Page Nine)
Born—On January 21, at Fourth
Avenue, Ladysmith, to Mr. and Mrs.
John Campbell, a daughter.
FOR SALE--GERHARD HEINTZMAN
Piano, good as new. Apply Mrs.
Alex King, Dunsmuir Ave. 4-li.
FOR SALE—BAY MARE. 5 YEARS
old, 1400 lbs. Good in all kinds of
harness. Also table turnips (Swede
Turnips) $1.00 per 100. C. Hughes
Sandwick, P. O. B.C. 1.
in order but have been over paid b>
$1500.00, tliis resulting from the re-
dempt ion ot City Bojids over the
necessary amount as provided by the
Municipal Act.
In speaking of revenue. I might
point out the Electric Light Dept..
shows an increased revenue over last
year of $1400.00 nnd the Water Works
$1200.00 which amount includes $520
charge for hydrants.
At the end of 11124 the City had
cleared off all liability owing to the
bank.
This year It has been found necessary to borrow $5000.00 from the bank
as against $10000.00 the previous year
thus proving our liquid position in the
matter of cash to be $5000.00 better
off than this lime last year.
Charles Simms, Chairman Fin. Com.
January 21, 1926.
nX&FCl
Buy Only
At GUARANTEED
USED   CAR   PRICE
Other Makes at Clearance Prices
Dodge Touring   $725.00
Star Touring   $725.00
McLaughlin Touring  $425.00
Chevrolet Touring  $575.00
Chevrolet Touring  $225.00
Chevrolet Touring  $185.00
TERMS ARRANGED ON ANY CAR
Corfield Motors, Limited
FORD DEALER
Phone 46 Courtenay, B.C.
Week-End Specials
SUNKIST ORANGES SWEET AND JUICY
4 Doz. for 85<*> 3 Doz. for 95<»
60*r>      90*i>      $1.00 PER DOZEN
EATING OR COOKING APPLES
4 Lbs. for 25*r> $2.35 Per Box
EXTRA SPECIAL No. 1
25*i> Per Bottle or 2 For 45*f>
Sweet  Relish,   Libby's   Prepared   Mustard,   Holsum
Pickles small size as follows, Sweet and Sour Mixed,
Sweet and Sour Chow. Sweet Gerkins.
Orange or Grape Fruit Marmalade.
Chrisp Ginger Snaps, 2 lbs. for 45>l>
Chrisp Lemon Snaps, 2 lbs. for 55<*
Special Mixed Biscuits, 3 lbs. for $1.00
EXTRA SPECIAL No. 2
35<r> Per Bottle 3 For 95<*
Lion Brand Peanut  Butter,  1-lb.  Glass, Libby's  or
Clark's Catsup,    Libby's Pickles—Sweet or Sour Mixed, Sweet and Sour Chow, Sweet Gerkins and Sweet
Relish.
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38
A late Photograph of Leopold and Loeb, principals in the
Franks Murder Case, as they appear in prison garb.

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