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The Islander Apr 1, 1916

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Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
VOL. VII., No. 1       THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, APRIL  1. 1916.      Subscription price, $1.50 per year
farmers to be Benefitted
Victoria, March 27.—The government to-day placed with a
Canadian financial house a loan
for a million dollars, which, under
the terms of the Agricultural
Credits Act, will be lent out to
farmers all over the province.
The government succeeded in
getting the money for a twenty-
five year term at the rate of 5.63
per cent.
In New Zealand, where this
system has been fairly well perfected, the cost of administration
of the fund runs to about 1 per
cent This means that applied
in British Columbia the farmer
will get his loan, for a period of
25 years, if he wishes, at 6 1-2
per cent, or a fraction more.
The money is expected to be
placed in the hands of the government some time this week and
the operation of the act is to be
brought into force at once by an
order-in-council. Then will come
the organization of the loaning
and inspection board and the arranging of the official machinery
to handle the business. It is
presumed that six weeks or two
months will elapse before the first
cash advances by way of loans
will actually be made to the
farmers.
The price obtained for the loan
to-day represents a distinct improvement over the rates at
which the last Provincial Government treasury notes were renewed some months ago. The interest
rate then obtained was 6.39 per
cent. To-day's issue under the
farmers' legislation would doubtless be regarded as slightly more
desirable to the investor because
of the longer period which they
run. But the interest rate accepted today was certainly highly
gratifying to the government and
will, of course, be vigorosly employed as an argument that the
soundness of British Columbia's
financial position is exceedingly
well regarded in Eastern Canada
and the United States, despite
what the Opposition may say of
the country going to the dogs,
MacNeill & Young of Toronto
submitted the lowest bid for the
loan and walked away with the
plum, a Nine bids from other firms
were received. Several representatives of Eastern American firms
are still in Victoria this after-
PROFIT AND LOSS.
Kaiser: "Think of our gains."
Germany: "But think of the price.
noon, having waited over for the
announcement of the terms on
which the loan was made in order that they may be in a position
to intelligently tender on other
issues which it is, generally expected the government will announce befo-e the end of the
present session. Members of the
cabinet were told today by representatives of American financial houses that they would be
glad of a chance to submit bids
on a loan for ordinary expenditure or for Pacific Great Eastern
Or shipbuilding or all of them, if
the administration proposed to
place these on the market within
the next few months.
C. H. MacKintosh has resumed
his duties at the accounting
office of the Canadian Collieries.
Sacred Cantata
This cantata is to be given in
the Presbyterian Church a, few
days before Easter. The choir
of St. George's assisted by members of the other churches in the
city have been busy preparing
for this special event ever since
Xmas. The choir is under the
leadership of Mr. C. Edwards
while Mr. Parnham will preside
at the orgBn. J. H. McMillan will
be violinst. There is no doubt
this will prove to be the one musical event of the season as far as
Cumberland is concerned and
lovers of good music will get a
good treat. Full particulars of
the program and various parts
will be given in next week's
edition of this paper.
THE CITY COUNCIL
The City Council held their regular meeting in the Council Chamber on Monday evening. Present
His Worship Mayor Parnham, and
Aldermen Macdonald, Henderson,
Brown and Bate. The minutes of
the last regular meeting were read
and adopted.
The following accounts were
referred to the finance committee
for payment.
C. H. Tarbell & Son $ 2.70-
F. Monaco._.   6.00'
A. R, Kierstead 14.00
B. C. Telephone Co. Ltd..    .601
Campbell   Bros 25.00
Total... $48.30'
The deputation from the Council'
which visited the management of
the Canadian Collieries with reference to fuel for the destitue
families which were reported in
want at a special meeting of the
Council, reported that Superintendent Clinton kindly promised
and supplied the families in question with fuel. It was decided to
tender the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir), Ltd. a vote of
thanks for their kindness. The
Council named the 24th day of
April as the date for the Court
of Revision to hear all complaints
against the Assessment Roll for
the year 1916.
Mr. and Mrs. George Bertram
left for Ladysmith on Friday.
Honor*' List in Public School.
Five pupils from each division
who have done best work during
month ending March 31.  1916.
Div. I.—Ethel Lighter, Maisie
Piercy, Maggie Cessford, Joe
Dallos, Abie Lighter.
Div. II. —Albert Winningham,.
Edward Creech, Ellen Hunden,
Valentine Dalby, Alice Leeman.
Div. III.—Vivan Aspesy, Edward Searle, Edith Francioli,
Matthew Stewart, Genevieve
McFadyen.
Div. IV.- Hector Stewart,
Pearl Hunden, Naborn K. Abie,
Christena McKinnon. John
Brown.
Div. V.—Beatrice Bickle. Edna
Marsh, Earl Stevenson, Emma.
Mussato. Carlina Damonte.
Div. VI.—Jack Peacey, Emma
Bonora, Rosie Knight, Nellie
Potter, Charles Merletti.
Div. VII.—Mary Francioli, Malcolm Stewart, Edward Bickle,..
Howard Russell, John Lockner.
Div. VIII. — Jessie Maxwell,.
Dulcie Odgers, Josie Bono, Chris-
sie Sutherland, Vera Picketti.
Div. IX.—Leslie Dando, Rosie
Memincourt, Thelma Barry, Marian Brown, Herbie Gibson. IWO
THE ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, ti. C.
- BE OF GOOD CHEER
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAQ.
Tublished every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, APRIL 1st, 1916.
What Drinking Does:
Drink baffles us, confounds us,
shames us and mocks us at every
point. It outwits like the teacher,
the man of business; the patriot
and the legislator. Every other
institution flounders in hopeless
difficulties; the public-house holds
its triumphant curse. The administrators of public and private
character are told that alms and
obligations go with rates, doles
and pensions to the all absorbing
bar, the public house.
But the worst remains. Not a
year passes in either town or
village without some unexpected
and hideous scandal, the outcome
of habital indulgence, often
small and innocent in its origin.
Some poor creature, long and de
servedly high in the respect, perhaps reverence of the neighborhood, makes a sudden shipwreck
of character. Under the accumulating influence of alcohol, aggravated, perhaps, by others still
more powerful, still more treacherous agencies, the honest nature turns knave, the respectable
man suddenly loses principle and
self-respect, the wise man is
utterly foolish, the rigidly moral
man forgets his mask and his
code and takes a plunge into
libertism. It then turns out,
what possibly some have suspected, that drink is at the bottom of
it, and that some poor wife or
friend has long been doing the
best that could be done to check
to cure, and, at all events to hide,
till the truth would out. Of
course, on such occasion, rivals
and competitors in the race of
life are not to be denied their paltry triumph. It would be much
more to the purpose to take warning, and do  something toward
The New
Spring and Summer
Styles and Fabrics
of
Individual Ladies' Tailoring Co.
Are now on Exhibit.
Tailor-Made
Suits, Coats, Skirts
To Your Measure.
All Garments are Guaranteed For
Fit      Quality
staying the huge mischief, which,
in one way or another, confounds
us all, and may—for we cannot be
sure-crush and ruin any one of us.
Rags in the Window.
Every rag stuck in a window
to keep out the cold from the
drunkard's home denotes a contribution towards buying new
suits for the publican and his
family. The more elegance and
ease in the publican's family,
the more poverty, degradation
and despair in the family of those
who patronize him. The corner
grog-shop, with its large plate
glass windows and marble floors
is paid for by the tenants of other
landlords. The more plate glass
and marble slabs there is in a
saloon,  the more old hats and
worn-out garments must be stuck
in the windows of their patrons
to keep out the cold air. The
more silk flounces upon the dress
of the saloon-keeper's wife, the
cheaper the calico upon the wife
and children of his patrons. The
more spacious the parlor and
brighter the fire of the publican,
the more scantily furnished,
cheerless and cold are the abodes
of those who patronize him.
While the publican drives his expensive span, his customer cannot afford a 5-cent horse car.
From the bunghole of ever ybarrel
of liquor that is sold by the dram-
seller, there flows a constant
stream of drunkards, criminals,
lunatics and imbeciles to fill poor-
houses, houses of correction, jails
and prisons while blasted hopes,
ruined homes and pauper's graves
are the relics of the trade. Every
shilling that the owner of the
dram-shop and the dram-selling
tenant put in their pockets comes
out of the pockets of the poor,
and is a dead loss as far as the
public good is concerned. Worse
than that, the more drink sold,
the more burden there is imposed
upon the honest citizen and tax
payere. The richer the landlord
and his rum-selling tenants grow,
the poorer becomes the landlord
who gets his buildings for tenements and legitimate business.
It is an undisputed fact that the
laboring man who has a family
cannot indulge in liquor drinking
and pay his landlord and grocer.
To wreck a train is a crime, but
to wreck a human soul is a privilege the state sells. THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
rf
Toys to be Made in
Canada.
Ottawa,—It is a curious fact
that the nation whose soldiers
used little Belgian children as
shields to protect them against
the fire of British and French
giinSj the nation that rejoices
when bombs dropped from Zeppelins kill innocent English children, the nation that exulted
when the bodies of murdered
children from the Lusitania floated on the ocean, is the one which
before,the outbreak of the war,|
made toys for children all over the
world.~ There was no sentiment
in it. The Germans knew that
every child throughout the world
delighted to play with toys and
every little girl desired a doll.
In almost every Canadian household children played with German dolls and toys. Once a year
the great Canadian department
stores and the wholesale houses
that supplied small retail stores
with toys sent their buyers to
J3erman£ to purchase toys: Since
the out break of the war German
goods of all kinds being excluded
from Canada the large department stores have found it exceedingly difficult to get toys to supply the Canadian demand and
similiar conditions prevail in every
-country of the British Empire.
The Department of Trade and
commerce has recently received
several inquiries from England
as to whether Canadians can supply toys to take the place of the
German toys now excluded from
the United Kingdom.
With a view to encouraging
the manufacture of toys in Canada both for the home market
and for export Sir George Foster
has arranged for a Toy Conference which will take place in the
Royal Bank Building at the corner of King and Yonge Streets,
Toronto, on the 28th of March
beginning at 10 o'clock in the
morning. A large number of
samples of German toys such as
were formerly imported into Canada will be on exhibition to show
Canadian manufacturers what
the Germans supplied and there
will be a collection of American
toys to show what our neighbors
in the United States have been
doing to replace German toys. It
is hoped that all Canadian manufacturers of toys will send exhibits so that the exhibition will
be thoroughly representative.
There has been a surprising development of toy manufacturing
in Canada since the outbreak of
the war and there are known to
be not less than twentyfour toy
manufacturers in Canada at the
present time. There may be
others. All manufacturers of
children's plavthings and games
are invited to ' send exhibits.
Most of those now manufacturing toys in Canada are making
them as a side line, using waste
materials, but there are a few
concerns that are devoting their
entire attention to the manufacture of toys. While the Toy con:
ference will not open until March
28, it is desired to have the exhibits in place not later than
March 21, in. order that everything might be well arranged. It
is proposed to keep the toys on
exhibition for about a week after
the day of the Conference. Exhibits should be addressed. Toy
Conference, Royal Bank Building, corner King and Yonge Sts,
Toronto.
All the large department stores
and a number of wholesale houses in Montreal and Toronto have
promised to send their toy buyers to the Conference, and as
most of these toy buyers have
been accustomed to visit Germany every year and are acquainted not only with the requirements of the Canadian mar
ket, but also with German methods, it is expected that they will
make practical suggestions of
value to Canadian toy manufacturers, and those who contemplate the manufacture of toys in
Canada.
All Canadian toy manufacturers, and those who contemplate
the manufacture of toys in Canada.
All Canadian toy manufacturers, all department stores, wholesale houses and retail merchants
who handle toys are invited to
send representatives to this con
ference, and any others who
may be interested in making or
selling toys will be welcomed.
As one of the objects of the
conference is to interest capita!
in the development of toy industries already established it is
hoped that capitalists willing to
investigate the profits of the industry will be present at the
Conference. It is believed that
many of our large .industries
might make use of waste materials in the manufacture of toys
and it will be well worth while
for such industries to send representatives to the Conference.
Sir George Foster will take the
chair and deliver the opening address.
day afternoon at a session in the
Board of Trade rooms.
A resolution wss passed authorizing an organization as follows:
"Resolved, that it is the opinion of this meeting that a permanent organization should be
formed to promote the production
of toys for home and foreign
consumption and for the holding
of an annual toy fair in some
convenient centre and that a committee be formed to carry out" the
projects outlined in this resolution.
Sir George Foster, minister of
trade and commerce, said:
"If you want to nave the department of trade and commerce
help you, you must put yourselves
in the form of a permanent organization. You should make the
toy fair an annual event."
NAPOLEON SHOWS HOW
TO BECOME A GENERAL
Toronto, March, 29—Consolidation of the toymakers of Canada
into an organisation allied with
the Canadian Manufacturers'
Association was effected yester-
Provincial Estimates Confirmed
The estimates of receipts and
expenditures for the fiscal year
ending March 31, 1917, were
tabled in the Legislature Monday
afternoon The estimated revenue
is put at $5,944,015. and the estimated outlays at $11,301,374.86,
compared with an estimated revenue for fiscal year ended March
31,1916, of $7,034,615.13, and an
expenditure of $11,163,056.11.
While the revenue for the coming
year is expected to show a decline
of $1,090,600, the expenditure
will increase $138,318.75, leaving
an adverse balance of $5,357,359.
Grants for roads, etc., according to districts are estimated as
follows: Alberni, $33,300; Atlin,
$18,000; Cariboo, $123,000; Ohilli-
wack, $33,300; Columbia, $36,000;
Comox, $59,500; Cowichan, $33,-
300; Cranbrook, $41,000; Delta,
$22,500; Dewdney, $68,500,
Esquimalt, $36,000; Fernie, $41,-
000; Grand Forks, $28,800; Greenwood, $19,800; The Islands, $27,-
700; Kamloops, $72,000; Kaslo,
$36,000; Lillooet, - $65,000; Nanaimo City, $9,000; Newcastle,
$24,300; Okanagon, $79,000;
Revelstoke, $37,000; Richmond,
$40,000; Saanich, $5,500: Similka-
meen, $72,000; Skeena, $176,000;
Slocan, $86,000; Yale, $51,300;
Ymir, $72,000; Kingsway-Burn-
aby Municipality (re-vote), $80,-
500; roads, Point Grey, $10,000;
road construction.interned aliens,
30,000; road, Strathcona Park,
$9,000; Observatory road (completion) $2,000; main road, Saanich, paving, $20,000; Assistance
towards Dyke, Nicomen Island,
$10,000; confhingPeterson Creek,
through Crown lands, sections 25
and 36, Tp. 106, Kamloops district, $25,000; location of roads,
$5,000; protection of river-banks,
$10,000; road machinery, $5,000;
wharves generally. $25,000;
wharf, Prince Rupert (maintenance),$8,000; bridges generally,
$450,000; bridge, Fraser river,
Prince George, $150,000.
Brilliant Advice of Greatest Soldier--—
Common Sense, Maps and Mathematics Are the Recipe
A French colonel has been at considerable pains to scan the literature
of • Napoleon and select from it every
observation of the greatest of military
—geniuses that bears upon the art and.
science of war. Anybody can read
what Napoleon advises. There is
nothing manifestly obscure about his
principles. If only one could read it,
and tiien proceed to discomfit and destroy the Germans. One natu-ally
turns to those precepts that ar*. collected under the head, "How to be a
Great Captain." Napoleon was a great
captain, and he knew undoubtedly how
one ought to act ln order to be one.
He says in the first place that one
ought to make aggressive war. Napoleon recommends that the soldier who
aspires to be a great captain should
read and reread the maxims and campaigns of Alexander, Caesar, Hannibal,.
Gustavus Adblphus, Turenne, Eugene
and Frederick the Great. He fails to
mention Marlborough in this connection, though at another time he said
that Marlborough was the only English general he would consider fit to
cross a sword with. He Insists that
there is nothing vague or mysterious
about the art of war. Its general principles are unchanging, and most of
them have to do with the blunders
ef the enemy.
Experience no Teacher
Napoleon said it was remarkable
that though he had fought sixty battles
he knew no more when he finished
than when he began. Caesar, too,,
fought his first battle like the last.
He said that it was a great art in
battles to change tLe line of operation during action. He attributed to
this principle, of which he claimed to-
be the discoverer, his victory at Marengo. The simples! manoeuvres were,
in his opinion, the best. He added:
"Yet one must have common sense..
I cannot understand how generals can
make mistakes; lt is perhaps because
they wish to act by inspiration. The
most difficult thing ls to guess the
plans of the enemy—to perceive the
truth in all the conflicting reports that*
you receive. It is like a fist fight.
The more one hits the better. It is
necessary, however, to study the map
carefully."
His observations about generals-
were to this effect: "The time for a
commander-in-chief to work is night.
If he uselessly fatigues himself during
the day he is worn out at night. At
VittorlL we were beaten because
Joseph (Napoleon's brother) slept too
much. If I had slept the night of
Eckmuhl I would never have executed
that wonderful manoeuvre, which was
the finest I ever made. I multiplied
myself by my activity. A general-in-
chief ought not to sleep. The essential quality for a ge eral is firmness—
the rest is the gift of heaven. To
be a good general one mu t know
mathematics; ln a thousand circumstances mathematics will serve to rectify ideas. Possibly I owe my success
to my mathematical ideas. A general
ought not to have too vivid an imagination; that is worse than anything.
Because the enemy has captured an
outpost it does not necessarily follow
that the entire army is there."
Analyzes Himself
His own great gift of generalship
he reduced to the possession of one
gift—to see the truth clearly, and even
In a talk to see through all the phases
of a question to its base; a gift one
might think that has to bv born in a
man and cannot be acquired, even
though all the military chronicles ever
written were read and digested. Naturally enough, he blamed his own reverses to hard luck and was unable
to see that his enemies had any military gifts at all. He asserted that,
Wellington was an ordinary man, who
was merely prudent. He had an alibi
for every defeat. Of Waterloo, he said
that all failed whe. all had won. "It
might have restored Europe." FOLE
TH    ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Tax oa Fusl Oil Stays.
Ottawa, March 29—In the
Commons this afternoon Hon. G.
P. Graham presented a memorandum fiom the railways and
various industrial interests in
British Columdia objecting to the
tax of one-half per cent, on fuel
oil. It was argued that this would
be a heavy tax on the railways.
The share of the C. P. R. would
be 155.000, and it was stated that
dearer oil would hinder industrial
development. The tax, however
was adopted without further discussion.
British Take German Trenches.
London, March 27—The British infantry to-day stormed and
took first and second line
trenches along a front of 600 yds.
at St. Eloi, says the British official communciation issued this
evening. The text of the statement reads as follows:
"This morning, after exploding
mines, infantry of the Northumberland Fusiliers and Royal Fusiliers assaulted the German salient at St. Eloi, successfully
taking first and second line
trenches on a front of 600 yards.
Heavy casualties are known to
have been caused to the enemy.
Two officers and 168 men were
made prisoners.
ILO ILO ITEMS.
THE BROKEN COIN
Episode No. Twenty-Danger on the High
Seas.'
Episode No. Twenty-one "A Timely ResJ
cue."
Episode No.  Twenty-two-"An American
Queen,"
The annual Hospital Ball under
the auspices of the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Cumberland General Hospital will be held in the
West Cumberland Band Hall on
Wednesday, April 26th.
Red Cross Society.
The following articles are urgently needed by 102nd Battalion
Hospital at 3omox: Pins (common
and safety), clean linen and
gauze, flannel squares 20 to 40
inches, socks, drinking cups bedroom slippers, tooth brushes,
mops, brooms, scrubbing brushes, hot water bottles, dusters,
floor-cloths, bed socks. The Boy
Scouts will call at every house on
Saturday, April 8. to collect any
contribution.* of the above, or
money if preferred. It is hoped
a generous response will be made
in behalf of those, who were
ready to give up the comforts of
home life for their country's good
and are preparing for greater
sacrifices at the front. The collection made at the last Red Cross
Tea will be forwarded to the
Canadian Red Cross Society at
Vancouver and not to Comox, as
announced in last week's issue.
cJD<3E!K<]t><%»(!:>-aBE>G^(SZD<2!><3BeCi>aMDGI>aiiBQi><Ka»<ii>«3HH><3i?
ILO ILO THEATRE
PRO. CHANGED MON., TUES, THURS. ft SAT.
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Notice is hereby given that on the 29th
day of April next application will be made
to the Superintendent of Provincial for the
transfer of the license for the sale of liquor
by retail in and upon the premises known
as the Heriot Bay Hotel, situate at Heriot
Bay, British Columbia, from Albert Ross
to H, A. Bull, of British Columbia.
A. ROSS, Holder of License.
H. A, BULL, Applicant for Transfer.
Dated this 30th day of March, 1916.
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|   MATINEES TUES., THURS., and SAT., CHILDREN 5c.
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BROADWAY FEATURES S
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TONIGHT   20TH. episode     I
The Broken Coin"!
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"BLACK BOX" i
Serial in Fourteen Episodes.
A DIPLOMATIC TRIUMPH.'
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'GREATLY EXAGGERATED. "-Fitzpatrick in St.Louis Dispatch
What Your Telephone
Represents.
Did you ever realize that having a telephone places
at your disposal the resources of an $8,000,000 investment?
Not only are you always in instant communication
with your friends, but also with all parts of the province.
There is also the advantage, too, of being able to
telephone to all parts of the Pacific Coast, and even to
Toronto, Montreal, Chicago and eastern American cities.
British ColumbiaTelephoneCo.,Ltd.
FIREWOOD
Slab Wood for Sale "at $2.00 per
Load.   Cash or. Delivery.   Phone
9SL.
RoystonSawmill Co.
Ltd.
CORPORATION  OF THE CITY OF
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Notice is hereby given that a sitting of
the Court of Revision for tha purpose of
hearing and deciding complaints against
the assessment as made for the year 1916
will be held in the City Council Chambers
on Monday, Aprit 24th, at 7.30 P.M.
Any person desiring to make complaint
against the said assessment must give
notice to the assessor in writing at least
ten days prior to the sitting of said Court
of Revision.
Dated at Cumberland, B.C., this 22nd
day of March, 1916.  •
A. MACKINNON,
City Clerk. /
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIVE
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0*-O*»tSQS*»JO$»J-«KJO*»**XR
FIRE   INSURANCE
jj Queen Insurance Company,
8
(Fire and Automobile,) and
National Fire of Hartford.
FOR RATES AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO
EDWARD  W.   BICKLE
OFFICE;   THE   ISLANDER   BLDG.
DUNSMUIR AVE.. CUMBERLAND
nooo
St: George's Presbyterian v
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Biblie Class, 1.30 p.m.-
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,    Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday evening 7.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible Study: Adult Bible Class
at 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastor,
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for Mid-Lent Sunday:
8.30 a.m., Holy Communion.
2,30 p.m. Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service  of   Intercession    on
Wednesday at7.45 p.m.
Litany on Friday at 11 a.m.
Arthur Bischlager. Vicar.
«._.
8. C. WHITE
White
LEGHORNS
(Finest
Heather Strain
Winter Layers)
EGGS FOR HATCHING
$2.00 per 15 $9.00 per 100
A few laying pullets for sale at
$1.50 and $2.00 each.
H. LEIGHTON,   ROYS ROAD.
Box 64. Cumberland,
Girl Guides.
The Girl Guides rtieet evtry
Thursday evening at 6.30 o'clock
p. m., in the basement of the
Presbyterian Church.
The Patrol Leaders and  Second's meeting will be held every
second Tuesday in the basement
of the Presbyterian Church.
Bessie Stewart, Secretary.
By order, A. J. Taylor. O.C.
The Spirella
MadiHo-order Corset, of
the finest quality.    Every
~"   pair guaranteed.
For further information apply to
Mrs.  JOHN GILLESPIE,
West Cumberland.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.
For Sale Now
SOLID OAK MISSION DINING
FURNITURE, PIANO, PICT-
UKES, CARPETS, 23UREAUS,
DOUBLE BEDSTEAD, CHINA,
AND KITCHENWARE.
Mrs. E. Allen,
Happy Valley.
T. D. McLEAN
Watchmaker and Jeweller
A COMPLETE  SUPPLY OF RAILROAD WATCHES
OV FICIAL WATCH INSPECTOR FOR THE
Wellington Colliery Railway Company,
[Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited]
Book   Magazines, Periodicals, Etc.
Dunsmui   Vve.,
Cumberland, B.C.
=5--.
We have just received a consign-
ment of
60 Watt Nitros
the lamps which consume % less
current and give a prettier, whiter
light than the ordinary Tungstens.
Try One in Your Parlour.
Every  One  Guaranteed.
PRICES:
60 Watt Clear Nitros, -   $1.10
100    "      "      " -   1.25
200    "      "      "       -     2.10
Add 10% for Frosting.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phono 75 Co., Ltd. p. o. 314
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamel ware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Graphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279
Phone 31 SIX
IHE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
When I Come
Your House
Don't think I am a bill-collector
or  peddler;   my   business
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyei- ■
By the best of modern equip
ments and up-to-date trethoiN
I can press for you and keep
your clothes in perfect condition at a low price. We never
disappoint our customers.
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
is an economy, not a luxury.
Local agents for
The Victoria Hat Works,
f Victoria, B C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
I        The
;  New Home
Bakery
I   A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
afternoon teas served
J. H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No* games of any kind will be
permitted  on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m, and 3.p.m.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
TH0S.E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 67
Agent for the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex Heileison, Proprietor
Estimate!) and Designs furnished *
on Application
MAROCCHI B BOS
Grocers and Bakers
Agents.for Pilsener Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
E L SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations]
COAL mining lights of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Terri
tories and in a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a terra
>>f twenty-one years ar an annual rental of
flan acre. Not more than 2,500acres
will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person tn the Agent or sub-
Agent of the district ia which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must ba
described by sections, or legal subdivisions
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory
the tract applied for shall be staked out by
theapplicatit himself.
Each application must be accompanied
by a fee of $5 which will be refunded if the
rights applied forare not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on ths
merchantable output of the mine at tha
rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with svrom returns accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the ooal minisg rights are
not being operated, such returns shall be
furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the cosl mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purohase whatever available surface rights may be considered necessary
fnr the working of the mine at the rate of
flO.OOanacre.
For full information applicatiun ahould
be made to the Secretary of the Depart*
ment of the Interior, Ottawa,  or to  any
Agent or Sub-Agent ofDominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B— Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for.
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EFFECTIVE   MAY   1st.   1915.
in ********      * i. ■ —
READ   UP
Sat.
P.M.
4.35
4.10
4.05
4.00
3.55
3.50
3.45
I
Fri.
P.M.
7.35
7.10
7.05
7.00
6.55
6.50
6.45
3.30- ■ ^a?
Thur.
P.M.
4.35
4.10
4.05
4.00
3.55
3.50
3.45
5.30
Wed.
P.M.
7.35
7.10
7.05
7.00
6.55
6.50
6.45
6.30
Tue
P.M.
4.35
4.10
4.05
4.00
3.55
3.50
3.45
3.30
Mon.
P.M.
4.35
4,10
4.05
4,00
3.55
3.50
3.45
3.30
Sun.
A.M.     VM.
9.35    3.35
9.10 3.10
9.05 3.05
9.00 3.00
8.55 2.55
8.50 2.50
8.45 " 2.45
8.30 2.30
STATION^
'
READ
DOWN
ejcr. >
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed,
Thurs
Fri,
Sat.
Cumberland
A.M
7.00
P.M.
1.00
A.M.
10:30
P.M.
2.00
A.M.
10:30
A.M.
7:00
A.M,
10;30
A.M.
7:00
Bevan
7.25
1.25
10:55
2.25
10:55
7:25
10:55
.7:25
Puntledge
7.30
1.30
11:00
2:30
11:00
7:30
11:00
7:30
(f) Lake Trail Road
7.35
1.35
11:05
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
(f)Courtenay Road
7.40
1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
(f)    Minto Road
7.45
1.45
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
Royston
7.50
1.50
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11:20
7:50
Union Bay
8.00
2.00
11:35
3,00
11:35
8:00
11:35
8:00
>
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY f
•IHV1 lbLA.ND.EK, CUIVIMkki.a
SEVEN
A
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, G.V.O.. LL.D. D.C.L., President
JOHN AIRD, General Manager. H. V. F. JONES, Ass't General Manager
CAPITAL. $15,000,000    RESERVE FOND, $13,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1 and
upwards. Careful attention is given to eveqy account Small account*
are welcomed.   Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, withdrawals to be made by any one of them or by the survivor. S50
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.       A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
J-MMMMMMMflM|MMMMMHM«iMM«M
Wfl Una rtorc   Beauty'may be only skin deep;
T? -ai!|ja|jci o   but don't buy your wallpapers
before you have examined our stock, ranging in price
from 15^ a double roll, to the best ingrains.
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, «. C.
Phone 14   -
A. McKINNON
THE FURNITURE STORE
19
Queen
Beer
Good Beer is a substantial food in itself.    It
supplies energy.    Is a
fine tonic.
USE QUEEN BEER
With your meals.    It aids digestion.    It is the ideal
temperance drink.   Good beer is enjoyed by thousands
of ardent advocates of real temperance,   Drink beer
and be temperate.    Always ask for Queen Beer.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquartenf forXJhoiee Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees. Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on .'application.
[establibhrd;24 years. 1
LONDON AT BAY AS
ZEPPELIN ATTACKS
Millions Watch and  Defy Germany's
Monster—England   Unafraid—Rage,
Not Alarm,  Inspired j
The   following   is a published de- j
scription   of a Zeppelin    raid    over j
the heart of London: Above the din \
of the orchestra there sweeps over
the theatre a cavernous bass "Boom."
"Zeppelin," whispers a pretty girl sitting next to a Scotch officer.   "No,"
you hear him whisper.' "It's a door
banging."   He's lying, and knows it.
"Zeppelin."—
"Zeppelin," the whisper runs
through the audience.
If you knew what was transpiring
ln the street you'd be out there, instead of waiting for the last act to
end. Such a scene is being enacted
out there as the old town of London,
in all its rich, thousand years' history
never beheld until Germany tried her
new war.
The curtain goes down. You flic out
of the theatre into a crowded station
and traffic is at a standstill. A million quiet cries make a subdued roar.
Seven million people of the biggest
city in the World stand gazing into the
sky from the darkened streets. Here
is the climax of the twentieth century. Among the stars floats a long,
gaunt Zeppelin. It is dull yellow, the
color of the moon. The long Augers
of the searchlights, reaching up from
the roofs of the city, are touching all
sides of the death messenger with
their white tips. Great booming
sounds shake the city. They are
Zeppelin bombs — falling — killing —
burning. Lesser noises—of shooting
—are nearer at hand, the noise of
aerial guns sending shrapnel into the
sky.
Fires and Battle
"For God'3 sake don't do that!"
says one man to another who has
Just struck a match to light a cigarette. Whispers, low voices, run all
through the streets. "There's n red
light in the sky over there; our houses
may be burning," exclaims a woman,
clutching at a man's coat. "There
are a million houses in London; why
ours particularly?" he responds. A
group of men talking French stand
gazing up from the street. They are
in waiters' clothes and have rushed
out from the supper room of one of
the most luxurious hotels in the world.
"The devils!" exclaims one, and then
—"We've got it—it can't get away.
There's shrapnel all around it."
"Oh—my neck!" says a pretty girl
in evening wraps. "I can't look up a
minute more." But she does. All
about you are beautifully garbed women and men in evening clothes.
"Oh's," "Ah's," and long-drawn out exclamations of admiration like the
sounds made by holiday crowds
watching fireworks, greet the brilliantly white flafties of shrapnel.
Suddenly you realize that the biggest city in the world lias been the
night battlefield on which seven million harmless men, women and children live. Here is war at the very
heart of civilization, threatening all
the millions of things that human
hearts and human minds have created
in past centuries. Mourners to-night
will leave the side of their dead to
look into the sky fearfully. Little
children, who have said "Now I lay
me down" and have gone to sleep,
will be awakened and rushed into cellars to save them from death. There
are more cries—"Good God, it's staggering!" as a shrapnel flash breaks
apparently near the great airship.
What a roar of joy would go up
from the millions of this great city
if they could suddenly see the yellow
object transformed into the flash of
one gigantic explosion, little white!
gloved hands clap their approval at
the Zeppelin's near approach to death;
white teeth sparkle in smiles; men!
roar with delight. These men and
women, flowers of the twentieth cen-1
tury culture, have become elemental.
Dirty, bloody, battle-mad soldiers felt
the same way in battle. Killing has
been put into the hearts ol these
crowds. If the mon up there Iii the
sky think they are terrifying London
;ney are wrong.   They are only making England white-hot mad.
Brothers  All
The redness of a burning building
fills the sky. The dome of historic
St. Paul's cathedral looms up against
the redness. You pass the old church
ln a side street At the gateway
stands the old verger, half dressed.
It has been his duty for the past half
century to guard against church
thieves and fires ta other sextons
have guarded lt for centuries past.
But he's got a bigger Job on his hands
than any of them ever had before.
The verger's white-haired wife stands
beside him. They are talking with
three girls such as never come into
the lives of church sextons except on
nights like this. They are pointing
out to the aged couple with cheaply
Jewelled lingers the slowly fading yellow form of the Zeppelin. We are
brothers and sisters in theastreets of
London to-night. Neither' man nor
woman, neither good nor bad—just
human, outraged, mad, unwilling to
die. lt is a miracle the great gas bag
In the air brings about.
On the Plinth of "Chinese" Gordon's
monument sits a soldier and a girl.
She is tracing invisible figures on the
stone pavement, his arm is about her;
her face is bent to his. Maybe they've
seen this Zeppelin to-night, but just
now she's listening to the old story
that will be new when the books telling of the story of to-night's Zeppelin
raid have crumbled into dust. They
typify London and England—unchanged one iota by this Zeppelin raid that
only ended in the loss of harmless
lives.   The next day recruiting tripled.
"Trench" Back
The latest complaint to get a name
of its own in this war of surgical surprises is "trench back." Many cases
are under treatment at Brighton, Eng.
They come almost Invariably from the
trenches. Usually the injury is caused by sandbags or masses of earth
hurled on the men's backs by bursting shells. Some patients have been
io seriously injured that they have
to be carried on stretchers. Fortunately, a. rapid and effective cure has
been found, and quite helpless men
tiave recovered after a short course
xt treatment.
In the Wrong Place
The heavy tragedian was in a terrible rage.
"What's the matter?" asked ths
manager.
"Matter!" howled the actor. "That
fool of an orche.tra conductor hss
spoiled the play!"
"How did he do It?"
"He struck up 'Where did you get
that hat?' when the Judge put on the
black cap and sentenced the prisoner
to death!"
Famous "Whens"
tm
A
i
*****
en you weJte \vp art
houf \&t&,
nd  dance   cround
[flte rriAd,
sure   to do the
Latest   steps,
-' ifie hAe, tH&raA, EIGHT
THE ISLANDEK. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS
Geo. Deans left for Ladysmith
on Wednesday.
Samuel McLeod left on Wednesday for Suquash.
Alex King has secured a position as carpenter in the main
shops at Union Bay.
Miss   Bryans of   New York,
stenographer to H. S.  Fleming
left by Monday's train for Victoria.
Frank Sawford. Superintendent
of the Canadian Collieries at
Union Bay was here on an official
visit on Wednesday. _
Lost—A gold brooch set, with
pearls and amethyst. Finder
will pleaee return to the British
Columbia Telephone office,
Cumberland B.C.
H, S. Fleming, Chairman of
the Executive, and J. R. Lockard
General Superintendent of the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd. left for Ladysmith and Victoria on Sunday by auto.
Clarke Russell who recently
underwent a serious operation at
the Vancouver General Hospital
returned on Tuesday. Dr. James
A. Gillespie performed the operation which was very successful.
Application has been made and
permission has been granted by
the management of the Canadian
Collieries, to establish a tennis
court at the Grant and Mounce
sawmill site immediately below
the Wellington Colliery Railway
Station.
A man, (no matter where or
when) entered the cab of a locomotive, rode twelve miles on the
engine until it entered the roundhouse. He remained seated in
the cab for about fifteen minutes
when an official of the railway
came along and aroused the absent-minded gentleman, who
might otherwise be sitting there
still. Asking the official if he had
arrived in Cumberland, he said:
"'By Jove, I thought we were going through a tunnel!
A meeting of the Cumberland
Tennis Club will be held in the
offices of the Canadian Collieries
Co. at 8 o'clock Monday April 3rd.
All old members and any others
interested in tennis are requested
to be present as important new
business is to be discussed. By
order of the president. E, R.
Hicks. (Secretary.)
It is understood that instruction has been given to commence
relief work on Monday for those
v ho are destitute and unable to
secure employment. Married
men will bevgiven four days per
month with an additional day for
each child. Single men will receive three days per month. This
is another reason why the Federal Authorities should increase
the duty on Fuel oil. With an
increased import duty, coal
would then be placed upon a
competitive basis, and then the
destitute would be able to secure
work in the local mines instead
of being a charge upon the Provincial Government.
i****e*..
^
THE   BIG  STORE
NORTHWAY
GARMENTS
Customers that Come to Stay.
And where is the woman who isn't look
ing for the merchant who carries the
most stylish and best made apparel?
Northway Garments have been bringing
these folks together for twenty years.
Keen to be better dressed than most
women, Northway Styles capture her
interest on sight.
0
Alert to detect that real sincerity which
means shape-keeping and perfect tailoring qualities,—she finds them in North-
way Garments, which are made under
the personal supervision of members of
the firm in tne workrooms.
See our new smart up-to-date suits; they are very smart and
the styles are the latest. No two alike, we strive to give
you satisfaction.
New Sport Coats are arriving from time to time. Our
present assortment comprises the most desirable Coats and
you will find our prices are right.
New Northway Skirts, and every one with an individuality
of its own.   We think you will be pleased; ask""tosee them.
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG  STORE.
Phone 3-8
f*t*********m***^r\** *.

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