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The Cumberland Islander Feb 23, 1924

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Array Th2-CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
FORTY-THIRD YEAR—No. 8.
Re Liquor Control
Correspondence
An interesting side light on Ihe
methods of the Liquor Board is disclosed b, correspondence read by the
City Clerk at the last Coucil meeting,
and published elsewhere in our columns.
It appears that Cumberland's share
ol the liquor profits for the last period of 1923 amounted to J122.2S.
From this sum, the amount of $9220
was deducted by the Inspection Dept.
of the Liquor Board for "Costs of in •
vestlgallons and prosecutions from
April 1st to Sept. 30th 1923, and a
cheque for the balance ($1130.08) was
forwarded on the 31st December lasl,
to which a memorandum was append-
er stating that the deduction was
made for "Expenses obtaining evidence and prosecutions, Voucher No.
73, (88.20; Expenses obtaining evidence and prosecutions, Voucher No.
HUB, (29.00.
The Clerk promptly replied that no
prosecutions In which officials of the
Board were Interested hnd taken place
In the City, mid suggesting that a mistake had been made In debiting the
City with costs of obtaining evidence
and prosecutions which had actually
taken place In the Provincial Police
District, outside the City of Cumberland, and under these circumstances
asking that the balance of $92.20 till!
Improperly deducted from the grant
to the City be forwarded.
The Secretary to the Board replied
to the effect that the letter had been
referred to thc Deputy Minister of
Finance, as the distribution of profits
■igwas made by the Treasury Department, but carefully Ignoring tho mat-
$92.20, by the Inspection Department
ter of the Improper deduction of the
of the Board.
On the 7th February, D. McClugan.
"Supervisor of Luw Eiiforeemeni,'
Liquor Control Board replied to the
letter, and in effect states that tin
Board determine thc amount of costs
and expenses In enforcing the Act iu
Municipalities and that authority for
so doing Is provided In Sec. 99 of the
Act, and, that "as particulars relating to such costs and expenses would
Involve disclosure of Information of
a confidential nature, it is not advisable nor In the public Interest to furnish same."
Again we see that the point at Issue, i. e., the Improper deduction of
$92.00 on vouchers which are untrue
and Incorrect Is Ignored. The prosecutions referred to have never occurred, and surely some of the personnel of the Board ore responsible
for submitting and passing such untrue vouchers, yet this "Supervisor
of Law Enforcement" airly passes
over such a gross Irregularity with the
statement that "particulars relating lo
such costs and expenses would Involve disclosure of Information of a
confidential nature, etc" It Is for
the Board to explain why their officials are permitted to charge expenses
for prosecutions which have never
taken place.
With which is consolidated the f umber bind Hews.
CUMBERLAND,  BRITISH  COLUMBIA  SATURDAY.   FEBRUARY  23,  1924.
COMBINATION WHIST I
AND BRIDGE PARTY I
A combined Whlst and Bridge Party
will be held in the Anglican Hall on
Monday, February 25. There will be
no dancing after cards as the card
party will start at 8 and continue to
j 12. Patrons can have their choice of
either bridge or whist. Don't forget
Monday, February 25. Admission 50c.
Bowser Gives Oliver
*   *   *   *   *   K*   ***■.*.*'*.■*<'****..   *   ..; a .
Credit: Clean Political Opponent
Picture Filmed
Under Great
Difficulties
Desert heat, thunder storms and
roadless canyons confronted 200 members of a Paramount motion picture
company as they left Flagstaff, Arizona, for Lee's Ferry, Southern Utah.
The caravan faced hardships of the
pioneers they Imitate to secure authentic locations and local color for,
Zone Grey's "The Heritage of the
Desert," which will be the feature at
the Ilo-llo Theatre on Friday and
Saturday.
Canyon roads oblltered by recent
thunder storms were repaired as the
On Wednesday night the Comox
Conservative Association held a public meeting in the Agricultural Hall
at which the chief speaker was W. J.
Bowser, leader of the opposition In the
' provincial legislature. Mr. D. It.
.MacDonald. of Cumberland, runner-up
I for the nomination at the convention
! that was held In the afternoon acted
as chairman. lie said that though
Mr. William Duncan had beaten him
for the nomination he was satisfied
with the choice of the convention and
asked the co-operation and support
of the public for Mr. Duncan. Mr.
Michael Manson, who had received
the nomination of the Conservative
convention held at Powell River on
Tuesday night, was the next speaker
He felt confident of winning the McKenzie seat for his party and snld thai
when he and Mr. Duncan got busy in
the north any opposing candidate
would have to go some to beat the
I pair.      Mr.  Anderson, of Quatbiaska
party    advanced.       Motion    picture !^ove   rjon
players, road engineers, packers and
a  tribe of Navajo  Indians were  In-1
eluded In the train, the trip to loca-1
tlon taking a week.
Lee's Ferry Is at the head waters of J
the Colorado, an inspiring desert Io-1
cation described by Zaiic Grey In his
well-known novel.     The story deals
With  the  primitive  warfare between
God-fearing pioneers and the bad men j
of the desert for the possession of the
water rights.     Today this same fight
has been changed to a legal conflict
affecting national life.
"The Heritage of the Desert" Is the
third Zane Grey story to he plctur-
lzed by Paramount. Irvln Wlllnt was
the director while featured in the cast
ure Bebe Daniels, Ernest Torrence.
Noah Beery and Lloyd Hughes. Albert Shelby Le Vino made the adaptation.
Being 150 miles from civilization.
the party was forced to live primitively. Camp was moved nearly
every night and the caravan had ill
the characteristics    of   an    original
servative candidates at the
last provincial election wns on tlei
platform and he asked the Conservatives to present a united front^ at the
election when It Is called. Mr. J. E.
Merryfield, provincial organizer of
the Conservative party also occupied
: a place on the platform hut did not
speak.
There were two hundred and fifty
present and they listened with patience and attention to what Mr.
Bowser had to say. especially did they
show Interest In his defense of the
charge that had been made against
himself and the Hon. William Sloan
Minister of Mines, by General A. I).
McRae. leader and organizer of the
Provincial Party. While perhaps
Mr. Bowser did not show as much
force and energy as he has done in
the past, he nevertheless made n
characteristic reply to the charges
levelled at him by the leader of the
new party. He told his audience that
General McRae had a motive In hi.i
anxiety to get Into parliament, not so
covered wagon" expedition; ~Pa« o, imudl .to."° 9omt'tw"« fof tflc Ml™J
the journey was along a 62-inch road
built on the sheer face of a narrow-
canyon. A motion picture actor's
life is not all It's cracked up to be.
tlon of the country as to protect his
own  investments.      He said   that
justment  would have to be made at
the end of tliis year and would be on
a  basis of twenty-seven    dollars    u
thoutmnd for manufactured lumber ot
at whatever price lumber was selling
for at that time.      In    making    the
statement that there would be timber
legislation introduced at the next session  General  McRae    wus    probably
thinking of something to bis own advantage if he were in control of the
house.     The charge tbat he had received fifty thousand dollars from the
Pacific Great Eastern railway for his
own personal gain was branded as an
absolute  falsehood.      He  had   never
In his twenty-one years of public life
accepted one dollar In that way and
no man could point his finger at Mm
and prove tbat he had done a dishonest act (n bis service to tbe province.
General McRae would be given ample
opportunity to make good his charges
but be thought that when the Royal
Commission bad finished its work and
the peoble bad had a chance to judge
for themselves  and  an  election  was
brought 'on, tbe result would be the
same a*! it had  always  been—a   renewal  of tbe  people's  confidence   in
him as [their representative and
dishonornig of General McKae,    who
had toldUhe members of his own party
that he thought his record was such
that  he had  better  not   continue  aa
leader of the Provincial Party.     The
lawyers [who had framed the petition
to the Lieutenant  Governor    setting
out the charges made, knew what they
were doing, for not one of them signed  the petition.      He did  not  know
how many delegates had attended tin;
Provincial Party convention from this
district but they bad evidently beon
given a tip with  the    exception    of
Major Clark.      At the conclusion yi,
his defense of the McRae charges Mr.
Bowser proceeded to    n.uu,\e    figures,
from official records to proy-e the ex-
travagance--;^the Oliver Gaverrtmeiit.
He gave the Hon. John Oliver cretKl
for being a clean  political opponen1.
O! BOYS, IT'S LEAP YEAR
Yes, the boys are going to get their
chance at last. A regular Leap Year
Dance will be held on Friday, February 29 In the Anglican Hall. Come
and enjoy it. You will not he disappointed. Each one entering the
hall will be given a numbered ticket,
for a chance on a dandy prize. Dancing 9-12.     Admission 50c.
Successful First
Attempt Of The
New Formed Club
The Linger-Longer Club, a newly
organized club, composed of Bachelors and "Bachelorettes" held their
first social event of the season on
Wednesday evening, when about Hon
Invited guests gathered nt the llo-Ilo
Hall for "The Dance of the Season"
The hall had been very prettily decorated for the occasion, the committee
In charge of this important feature
deserve every praise for the results
obtained. Dancing was commenced
at 9.30 to music supplied by Plump's
Orchestra. Refreshments were served at midnight, the large crowd present being catered to by the members
of the club In a first class manner.
Dancing was again indulged in after
refreshments, the many present trip-
plug the light fantastic until 2 a.m.,
terminating a most successful first attempt of Cumberland's Linger-Longer
Club.
PIONEER CROSSES
GREAT BEYOND
of the Provincial Party, General M
Rae had made the assertion that
iwu uiv   at it nun im ' was t,le hcavlest   Individual    limber
TOM MIX AT ILO-ILO IN ! holder of the province, ond that t!i»
"MILE-A-MINUTE  ROMEO"   \ stntement had been made that timber
MONDAY AND TUESDAY ! legislation would be Introduced at the
_^_^_ 'next session of the Legislature.     Mr.
, saying  that  the   premier  had   never
Searchlight No. 8, the official organ { ,tl.U(,k „,„, bc,()w (he ,)e„ „„,, he ,„„,
": never done it to the premier. At the
3 i finish of liis address the chairman
asked if anybody wanted to ask any
question. None being forthcohflng j
the meeting was closed by the singing
of the National anthem.
SOCCER EXHIBITION
GAME ON SUNDAY
The local soccer team will be at a
loose end this week-end owing to cup
ties, consequently there will be ;io
game for the locals In the Upper Island League Schedule. The management, however, have decided to stage
an exhibition game between teams
designated as Blue and White versus
White . The Blue and White team
will be us follows: Blnir, Jolty and
Stewart; Brake, Mortimer and Jackson; Heyland, Gough, lzall, James
and Harrison. This team wlll be opposed by the following: Clark. Foster
und Mitchell; Hitchens, Conti and
MoimSun; Deluce. Turner, CraLjni.
.Milligan and Horne. The kick-off is
scheduled for 2.45.
NEW INDUSTRY IS
SPRINGING UP IN
COMOX VALLEY
those talents by which he hns become
so widely recognized.
An erring father, a daughter with
rnmatlc aspirations, two vlllinns Instead of the customary one and Tom
Mix, form the basis of this production's merits. Comedy relief Is provided   In   scenes  showing    a    cross-
Died on Saturday afternoon. February 16th, at the Cumberland General Hospital, Daniel Stewart, after a
very brief Illness' He was In his
sixtieth year and a native of Scotland. ]
The deceased when leaving his
native land came to the United States.
arriving at British Columbia thirty-
seven years ago. He was nn employee of R. Dunsmuir and Sons, ot
■Wellington In the enrlv days and a ! country run staged by Tom Mix.
resident of Ihls City for the pas, j ne">' Jewel' J- G°"lon Russell, Jas.
twenty-two years. He was favorably : M»«m, Duko Lee »»(l J»™0!" «>"""
known and highly respected by all | olc ,lle Principal players. The pro-
who had the prlvlledge of his no-1 (U"'tlon wos <"™cted by Lambert Hlll-
iiuulntunce. I ''er'
The funeral look place on Monday.
from the family residence. Allan Ave.,
to the Cumberland Cemetery. Rev.
James Hood olllclatlng. The pall
bearers were John Bennie, Joseph
Horbury, Alex. Maxwell, William Mar-
Detylng death, by riding amidst a
drove of wild horses, under the belly
of Tony, his famous horse, to escape
his pursuers, Tom Mix will burst Into
the Ilo-llo Theatre, Monday and Tuesday for a two-day engagement of
Mile-A-Mlnute Romeo" his most recent William Fox effort.
Demonstrating a decided penchant
for thrills, this production    ls    pronounced the only one in which Tom
Mix exposes his entire bag of equos-I
train tricks.
The story ls by Max Brand, an nu-!
thor  who  has  long been  noted  for
ability In western dramas.     It pro-      The City Council held their usual
vldes Mix with opportunity to display | session  In  the Council Chambers on
Bowser told of how when he was a
member of the McBride Government
an act had been passed stabilizing
timber royalties. This hnd been done
at the request of the timber men of the
province. By thnt act the stumpaga
royalty was placed on a sliding scale
In cycles of five years. The first was
collected on the basis of a price of
eighteen dollars a thousand fnr ninn-
A new Industry
the Comox Valley.
Is being begun In
Mr. Frank Steph-
Al the Parent-Teacher Association
meeting held on Monday night the address of the evening was given by Mr.
John Kyle, Provincial Organizer of
Technical Education.
Mr. Kyle explained thnt manual
training was nol to supplant book-
work iu the school, but to supplement
It and make the teaching from books
more effective. It might be termed
education through handwork. The
greater proportion of children learn
naturally through their hands and not
by hearing and seeing; they are motor-minded. A common saying that
this or that lesson goes "In at one ear
and out at the other," does not apply to the hand. We never hear of
something going In at one hand and
out at the other."
The supreme value of training
through the hands has been well understood for thousands of years, and
a revival of the old Idea has been made
necessary owing to the ever Increasing demand for efficiency.
Domestic Science deals with the
activities of the home, said Mr. Kyle
and education could not centre round
any occupation more noble and dignified. The home is the "cradle of
race." the first great and all inmport-
nnt school. The great qualities wlhch
make for successful citizenship, brotherly love and co-operation, arc exercised in the home. It Is there where
children learn from each other, they
learn by doing and not by theorizing.
The speed of progress Is remarkable
and the professional teacher despairs
of ever having it kept up In the day
schools.
Cookery, sewing, laundry work and
knowledge of textiles, laws of health,
hygiene and child welfare are worthy
of a central position in the education
of girls.     English, arithmetic, history
and geography can easily be grouped
around  the  essential  subject.     The
art of beautifying human Uvea la a
subject which should not be permitted
to be relegntcd to n secondary posl.
: tlon on school curriculum.
'    Manual training and domestic science  subjects  should  not be  looked
: upon as  training for carpentry and
1 joinery, or as cooks and domestic servants.     At the work bench the draw-
lug and arithmetic are real subjects,
not mere exercises; and the treatment
of foods and  clothing is also prac-
ANMH'NCEJIKXT
Dr. 11. P. Christie announces that tie
will open bis modern Dental Surgery
In the Booth Building on Monday,
February 2.1th nud will be pleased lo
welcome you and your friends.
Cumberland Olllce: Sec olllce ddor,
next to Royal Bunk. 3rd St., for office
ufactured  lumber.
The second  ad-   hours at Cumberland.
L. Finch Demands Immediate Payment „
Friday's Drive
Huge Success
rldcld, Richard Coe, Jr..   nnd   John
Horbury.
The deceased leaves to mourn tal-i
loss, a widow, four sons and three
daughters.
1924 CALENDAR
Another pronounced success was
last Friday night's Whist Drive and
Dance In the Anglican Hall under the
auspices of the Women's Auxiliary
of that church.
Between forty nnd fifty players Indulged in cards from eight to ten
o'clock, the winners being: Mrs. W.
A. Owen, lady's first; Mrs. Copo.
lady's second; Mr. F. D. Pickard,
gent's first and Miss Slllence, who
took a gentleman's part got gent'3
There were no eonso-
The 1924 Spray Calendar has just
been Issued hy the Horticultural
Branch of the Provincial Department
of Agriculture, Vlctorin. This calendar contains full Information as to second prize,
the best sprays and oilier methods of  latlon prizes.
control to be used In the combating of After whist, refreshments wore
different Insects and diseases attack- served and dancing was the order till
Ing the various fruits grown In the 12 o'clock, many more coming for
Province. the dance, the music for wlhch was
The calendar is free upon appllca- supplied by Mrs. Finch and Messrs
tlon to thc Deptment of Agriculture, Bud Oraham, II. Murray and A. Pil-
Vlctorla, B.C. ling.
I Monday  evening,  with   a   full   bean'
- present,   including   the   chairman   of
the Board of Works, who mappcil oul
the street work for 1SI24.     Tlle grud-
I ing of Fourth  Street, the replanting
of trees on the Boulevard and keeping
1 the grass green, and grading of Third
Street.   He said there were two tennis
hauling gravel and that the government grader had done good work dur-
j Ing the  week and  expected  to have
j the streets In fine shape In the near
| future.
1 His Worship the Mayor, said lhc
j Boulevard on Dunsmuir Avenue wus
useless unless it was kept iu repair.
■ It was either n question of keeping It
green or tearing it out.
Aid. Maxwell, chairman of lhc Finance Committee, suggested the Council as a whole take In the town and
see what work was necesnry to be
done. The Finance Committee sotild
then make up their estimates for the
year 1924. lt was decided fo give
tlle City n general Inspection on Wednesday afternoon.
Under the heading of Ihe bener
bousing scheme, the City Clerk informed the Council that G. H. Wyoh.
erlcy of the Mercantile Store Co., hn.l
paid $250 and purchased the Interest
of the Robert Thomson House,, which
bad been assigned to P. P. Harrison
and was prepared lo pny the City a
balance of $1675.00. On motion this
was accepted and the City Clerk Instructed to prepnre the necessary
papers.
The communications from the Supervisor of Lnw Enforcements were
received nnd filed.
Frank Porter presented    bis    final
audit of the Public School Accounts.
I whicli  will be banded over    to    the
Board of Trustees. ,- -.
j Accident policies for Volunteer Firemen was laid over until next incut-
, Ing of the Council.
i L. H. Finch, contractor (or tlle re-
| conlsructlon of the Fire Mall sent In
j his final account witli a request for
! immediate payment or lie would lake
'proceedings. It appears that tad
I Finch account amounts to $387.46 for
extras and the Council objects to pn'v-
i ing II. They consider themselves
overcharged In many enses and ser-
cral items are included In the original contract. Mr. Finch will be asked to produce a detailed statement of
accounts unpaid iu connection with
the Fire Hall; also a statement of
wages paid in the moving of the fire
bell from the old tower to the ne.v
one.
farming. Besides four pair of silvc
foxes that he will have, there wlll he
al least sixteen pair belonging to
people In other parts of the Islnnd.
particularly Victoria.
Mr. Upper, of Calgary, who operates a silver fox farm at Calgary, has
been in tiie district making arrangements for the stocking of this fur farm
and predicts a great future for the industry. In 1917 his farm at Calgary
was started with seven pair valued
twenty thousand dollars and in
1921 the value of the animals was
nearly a quarter of a million. The
climate of this valley has been said
to be Ideal for fox farming and great
results are looked for In the future.
enson of Grantham Is going into fox rtlcal   drawing,  arithmetic, chemistry
and physics. Add to these the encouraging stlmulotis to Industrious
application nnd the harnessing of Ihe
natural activities of children and It
will be found that the Introduction of
the subjects referred to enriches tbe
curriculum and makes school training more effective In preparing children for life itself.
Pictures were thrown on the screen
! Illustrating the remarks and the aud-
I iencc was very responsive.
Chairman Rev. Mr. Leversedge.
2 AUTOMOBILES CLASH
ON COURTENAY ROAD
COURTENAY CONVENTION
Basketers Are
Anxious For Game
The Ladysmlth Durants Ilnckrtbnll
team arc anxious for a game in tl"1
district and would be quite willing hi
play a game here if their expenses can
be guaranteed. They estimate their
expenses at §3n for the trip.
There are enough fnsi players In the
district to put up an interesting battle
with this last-stepping aggregation.
How about this fellows? They have
thrown down the gauntlet, are you going to pick It up?
The   Liberal-Conservatives    of   the |
Coniox   Electoral   District   held   Ihelr I
convention ot Courtenny on Wednes- j
day  afternoon   with   forty-nine  dele-
gates present, and a large number nf
Provincial    Conservatives.      Several |
of the northern delegates  who were
unable to attend the convention were i
represented hy proxy, making a total |
of 72 votes.
The convention was called to order
by J. E. Merryfield of Vancouver,
Provincial organizer of the Liberal-
Conservative parly. Mr. George
O'Brien, of Cumberland, wns unanimously elected secretary of the meeting.
Credentials Committee were Messrs
T. W. Scott, Cumberland; J. N. McLeod, Courtenny; R. O. Kerr, Merville
and H. Verdlcr of Campbell River.
Mr. M. Manson was present nnd ad-
dresscd lhc meeting while the committee were examining the delegates
credentials.
1). It. MacDonnld. ex mayor of Ihe
(lly of Cumberland, and William Dun-
Can, ex mnyor o fthe City of Couri-
f enny, were nominated and both gentlemen were given fifteen minutes to address the convention on the Import-
Mill Issues of lhc day.
The result of Iho ballots gave Mr.
Irnncnn 39 votes and Mr. MacDonald
36. The defeated nominee made a
motion thai thc election of Mr. Duncan he mnde unanimous, which was
carried without a dissenting voice.
Alex. Maxwell, driving his Ford
truck, left Cumberland on Friday
morning, accompanied by Stanley
Warren, traveller for Tooke Bros.,
when Hearing the road leading to 'he
Waddell Farm, on the Courtenay road
and a short distance from Cumberland, met Mrs. Waddell driving her
new Oldsmoblle, coming out of the
side road.
Upon taking her-side of the main
road, Mrs. Waddell apparently ran Into
the Maxwell truck, damaging the front
j wheels nnd breaking the wind shield,
i Flying glass Injured the nose of Aid.
j Maxwell, who was driving the truck
'and cut the forehead of Mr. Warren,
' making It necesnry for hlra to proceed to the local hospital for treatment.
Wc understand thnt the Oldmoblle
was taken to Courtenay for repairs.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES
SHIPPING AT UNION BAY
Katie, Coastwise; Swell & 8cow,
Seattle; Plunger, Vancouver; Esdud,
Coastwise; Gleeful, Coastwise; Dauntless, Coastwise; Odttnn, Seattle; Joyful, Comox.
P. P. HARRISON
PROVINCIAL ELECTION
CANDIDATE
We arc Informed from a reliable
source that Mr. P. P. Harrison, local
barrister, wlll contest the Comox constituency tn the coming Provincial
Election.
f\
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Manual Training;
Domestic Science V
PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 23. 1921.
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. c.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY,  FEBRUARY  23,  1924.
THE (iKEATEST THINGS
too much.
The
cleverest man    one who
ahv
does \v
'hai he thinks is right
The
lifst teacher   one  who
ma
you wi
tut to learn.
The
best pan of anyone's re)
Igio
gentleneBB and cheerfulness,
Thf
meanest teeling—jealous
iy.
The
must important training-
—tri
inn in
democracy.
Dr  Frank
Cn
A   NATIONAL   MISTAKE
One ut the very worai matrimonial
mistakes is the marrying of a man of
evil habits by a good, pure girl In tho
hope of reforming him. It Is a fine
thing for any woman who has missed
marrying a man with a bad or indifferent character. We know there are
women who Kay they do not mind men
being a little wild, that whin they
settle down they mako the best husbands. The devil never spread a
blacker lie among Intelligent people,
and the wonder is that In spite of tho
poor, broken-hearted, miserable women who have tried the experiment
and tailed, any Intelligent, sensible
woman will believe it for a minute.
We do not believe In any woman marrying a man in a missionary spirit,
hoping to reform him. If his regard
for his sweetheart does not lead him
to reform, consideration for his wife
will not do it. If a man has lived a
fast life until lie is twenty-live or
thirty years of age .nothing but ihe
grace of God will make a decent husband of him; and life in the home with
a man of this kind will in time fade
away the delicate lints of womanhood
from the sweetest character.
THE DOl.L OK TODAY
Compare a taste i'or dress with a
taste for knowledge, culture, virtue
aud piety. Dress up an ignorant woman in the height of fnshion, put on
plumes and flowers, and diamonds and
gewgaws; paint ber face aud gird un
her waist and nothing can equal hev
this side of a painted, feathered savage, nor is there anything more unpleasant lo behold. Vet such young
women we meet every day on Iho
street and in public places in tite
large cities. Why is it so? It is he-
cause too many women are regarded
as a doll to be dressed, a plaything to
be petted, Mow the soul of womanhood is dwarfed and shrivelled hy such
trifles and kept away from the great
and useful fields of active thought by
the gew gaws that hang about her.
The richest dress is always worn on
the soul. The adornments that will]
not perish, and ihat all men must ;il-
mire. shine from the heart through
this life. We do not criticise the
well-dressed person, man or woman.
We can but feel that God is a lovet
of dress. He placed robes of beauty
and glory upon all his works. Every
(lower is dressed in richness; every
field blushes beneath a mantle nf
beauty; every star is veiled in brightness; every bird is clothed in the
habiliment of the most exquisite taste.
The cattle upon a thousand hills nr«j
dressed by the hand divine, but in
love dress is quite different to being
a slave to fashion. Ito you gef tin'
idea, poor little doll ?
HER SECRET
One of the happiest women that wu
have ever known lives in a modes!
bouse beside a river in a small town
She is over seventy years old. but lo
look at her you would think her fifty
Whenever we are discouraged we go
ostensibly to talk with ber. hut really
to look at her. Her face is a perfect
panacea for a downcast spirit. She
has a disposition which makes you
think she has a monopoly of God's
sunshine. Her cousel to the young
is as sweet as is her cheery word to
the aged. We asked her once how
she had kept so young in heart and
looks .and we cannot do better than
to quote her words: "'Well. I thi lit
it must be because I always felt con
tent with what it was given my lot
lo have. Thnt lol would not seem
much, 1 suppose. In tbe eyes of ihe
world today, hut it was enough to
make me happy. Ilecnuse my husband did not grow rich as others did
around him. I never thought we were
forgotten. There were iwo blessed
babes in our little home and I knew
of thousands of women who had less.
I was happy in what I bad. never naked for more and that is why I suppo.,
money came to me when I was sixty.
Hut these lust ten years have nol
seemed any brighter, With little I
waa just as happy as now I am with
plenty. This world wns so Btlliny,
my boy, I could not help being sunny.
Hlessings for what 1 bad slipped over
my tongue just as tbe brook slips over
its pebbles and mosses. I always
had enough to eat -though I might
have wished at times it were better.
1 had enough colthes—though they
were not always stylish and most becoming to me; my nights were never
sleepless, and my days never fretful
So why should I have grown old? Old.
did 1 say? Well, perhaps you will
call seventy-two old. but the world
looks very young to me yet, and It
grows fairer every day. And why
should T not be content?"
H
ere an
<m
ere
Manitoba is perhaps the most
marrying province in Canada. For
Instance, in Ontario, there were 24,-
871 marriages in 1921, a rate of 8.5
per 1,000, while in Manitoba it waa
8.7 per 1,000 of its 610,000 population.
Eastbound steamship travel from
Canadian ports via Canadian Pacific steamships is heavier at the
present time than fur several years
J ast at this season, a recent report
eclares. Bookings in some instances
have run as high as 70 per cent increase over those of last winter.
WILL MANUAL TRAINING
BE INSTALLED IN THE
PUBLIC SCHOOLS?
According to a recent official compilation, out of every 100 people in
Canada 51 live on farms. The 70,-
000 farms in Canada represent a
gross worth of $700,000,000 or about
$10,000 per farm, and produce an
annual revenue of nearly $1,500,004,
an average income per farm of f!,-
000 yearly.
From the opening of the crop
>*ur, September 1st, to the official
closing of navigation, December
12th, the Canadian Pacific Railway
reported ihe heaviest marketing of
grain since the inception of the road.
Cars loaded by the company alia
created a record for the season, having numbered 110,2:12. Grain marketed lopped the 200,000,000 bushel
mark.
Thirty-seven per cent of all automobiles in Canada are owned by
farmers. Ownership of the balance,
according to recent statistioa, ia
made up as follows: busineaa men
and brokers, 16 per cent; salesmen
and travellers, 16 per cent; professional men, 8 per cent; laborers, 4
per cent; contractors and livery men,
3 per cent each, and miscellaneous
and no occupation stated, 13 per cent.
When the Canadian Pacific liner
"Empress of Canada" left New York
on January 30th for her great
round-.he-world cruise, (he waa the
first Canadian vessel ever to commence such a voyage carrying a
regular bookstall in tha eharge of
experienced attendants, in addition
to a free library. The stock includes
many excellent recent booka on
travel, which will enable passengers
to prepare themselves for the foreign lands they will visit, at well aa
a large number of novels by the
best-known authors.
Of the total wheat exported from
Canada in November, amounting to
64,196,903 bushels, by far the greater
Sroportion went to the United King-
om, which took 43,815,391 bushels.
The United States was second largest importer of Canadian wheat,
taking 9,010,143 bushels. Italy came
next, taking 4,013.152 bushels, and
Greece next, with 2,066,480 bushels.
The exports of Canadian wheat to
France during this period amounted
to 1,328.30s bushels and to Belgium
1,075,216 bushels. Those to Germany totalled 129,320 bushels
In the keenest competition, embracing entries from al] important
agricultural districts of the North
American continent, Alberta farmers
won 43 prizes at the recent international stock and grain show at
Chicago. Two grand championships
—wheat, Major G. H. L. Strange
and oats, J. W. Biglands—went to
tho province. Major Strang* was
also first with white field peas and
Nunemaker Brothers, of Brooks,
first with red clover seed. Major
Strange's success is especially remarkable as he bas only been a
farmer four years.
The latest statements of the earn-
;gs and expenses of the Canadian
Pacific Railway show that the strong
position of that organization has
been well maintained, and that a
ateady improvement has been
i.'hieved, in spite of thc difficulties
It the past few years. The figures
for December show gross earnings
if $19,136,674, working expenses of
$15,180,546, and a net profit of 98,-
956,127, an increase of $491,322 svsr
tbat of Decembei. 1922. The 1(88
totals show gross earnings of $195,-
837,080, working expenses of $158,-
358,079 and a nei profit of $37,479,-
310, an increase of $1,177,319 over the
total earnings of the road in 1922.
Vet earnings for this year were ths
Vghest since 1917 and gross earn-
|>gs the highest since 1929,
DQNTj
DO
THIS
LJRYTHC
tfATCH
TEST
'Cm You Hear?
rPIic« watch lo ear than »L_,.
~ »w»».   You should hear tick a*\
736 inches.   Do*, a tin«ia« in jwrl
mis prevent your proptt Kaarin|>
LEONARD EAR OIL;
Ttelimdiodi Head Noieee end DeeI-1
•H. lull rub il beck .1 eete •»« I
inierj in eoitrili. Price $1 J*
For Sale  Etenrvrhere.
Int.re.tini descriptive fottHt.
s.nt upon eequeti.
A. O. LEONARD, lac
TO StW An.
New Yerk^
That Manual Training should he
installed In our schools, was demonstrated conclusively by Mr. John Kyle,
of the Department of Education in his
address to the members of the Parent
Teachers Association on Monday last.
In some countries, according to Mr.
Kyle, Technical Education Is male
compulsory by the government. Yet.
in our provinces, today, there still remain cities which do not realize thai,
to obtain the highest standard ot efficiency in our schools, the natural activities of the child must be harnessed, In order to master the more monotonous routine of book work. Manual Training should be used, not as a
substitute but as a supplement for the
text hook method of study employed
today. Too long have the pupils of
the  elementary  schools  been,  as  It
were, "spoon-fed" by the teacher. |
too long have they relied on her int.
tlative, and counted on her superior
judgement. The result, in most
cases, ls disastrous. The adolescent
youth goes into life totally unprepared to undertake responsibility in
any shape or form. Our school system, said Mr. Kyle, is obviously to
blame, and In many communities, the
fault has been remedied.
Education Should Fit Us For Life
We must fit education to the existing
conditions of life. Education, above
all else, must be practical, and the
practical solution to this problem is
Manual Training. All children, boys
or girls, have an Instructive natural
desire to do things themselves. That
love ot action Is easily seen iu the
schoolroom. Manual Training is
merely a system of education thereby
the child performs the work, relying
on himself, and no one else, for accuracy. Allow the child to take port
In Manual Training, and, under the
guiding hand of the instructor, lie
learns, through these activities, in the
most acurate way possible. Arithmetic, English, Drawing, and, in fact,
almost every study taken ln our Elementary schools.
City Now At Best, Financing
Have we the right to deprive our
boys and girls of the superior education which children of other cities
are enjoying? The installation of
Manual Training and Domestic Science appliances would cost, according to Mr. Kyle, about $700, the government grant on this sum being 50
per cent of the total, fit was thought
poslble tbat Courtenay might combine with Cumberland In the matter
of teachers, should there be a settlement of this subject. In this case,
the total salaries would perhaps am-
niouiit to $1850 for a Manual Training Instructor, and $1300-$1400 for a
Domestic Science teacher. On these
salaries the government would grant
Ihe total Bum of $1130 per annum.
The financial state of our City from
all reports, seems to be excellent. No
increase in taxation should be necessary. Under these conditions, therefore, there ought to be no opposition
to the installation of Manual Training and Domestic Science in the City
schools. The executive of the P. T.
haB been authorized to discuss matters with the school board, and we
hope that suitable arrangements will
he made. Now ls the time. It ls
your child who ls to be considered.
Let us hear your opinion.
—M.M.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Willard Block
Phone 116 Cumberland
Res. Phone 70L Courtenay
EiBiBiaiBMaiBHBisiaiBiBis^^
Car  For Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phones:   From   9 a.m. to 11 p.m.   25
From 11 p.m. to   9 a.m.   22
Ask for Geo. Mason.
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co
Cumberland  and Courtonay.
Chevrolet Touring
BUY  A CHEVROLET
THIS OAR HAS PROVED ITS DURABILITY, SO A
Chevrolet
OWNER IS Sl'RE OK GOOD SERVICE AS WELL AS COMPORT.
I GOOD APPEARANCE AND ECONOMICAL TRANSPORTATION.
igi3igigfflaaSfiaiaiBlBH3IH^^
I Blunt & Ewart, Limited
COURTENAY   GARAGE
PHONE 61
A. A. Brown
General Hauling
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District   ■
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leave your orders at olllce,
Mrs. King's Stationery Store
Phone SB.
SERVICE IS OUR MOTTO
Or Phone 15 Union Hotel
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER
A. A. Brown
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite  Ilo* Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical  Barber, and Hairdresser, Shampooing, Singeing,
Massaging,   Scalp    Treatment.
"It Pays in Every Way"
1. In the event of total disability a monthly payment
is guaranteed.
2. Protection is secured for dependents.
3. Provision is made for the future.
4. Double Indemnity in case of accidental death.
All these features are covered in a Dominion Life policy
Write the undersigned for further information.
The Dominion Life Assurance
Company
T. HUMPHRIES, Manager for Vancouver Island.
406-7 Pemberton Bldg., Victoria, B. C.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
PHONE 11       CUMBERLAND
MANN'S
BAKERY
THE HOME OF HIGH CLASS CAKES AND PASTRY
Grand Selection See Our Window
Hot Pies Every Saturday
Once you try them, you always prefer them.
Phone 18 CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Highest Quality Job Printing at
The Islander Office SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1921.
3*
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE THREE
is
■a.;...L.i.-... .3waiia|i;'B.TO^
Begins Thursday,
FEBRUARY 21st
And will continue for
TEN DAYS
STOCKTAKING SALE
All High-Grade Merchandise
DRY   GOODS,   MEN'S   AND   BOYS'   FURNISHINGS
BOOTS   AND  SHOES,  very  specially  priced
The following is only a partial list of the exceptional values we will have to offer:
The balance of our stock of Watson's Underwear,
"The underwear that will wear," at a discount of
DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT
20  P.C.   DISCOUNT ON  ALL
DRESS   GOODS. AND   SILKS
DURING THIS SALE.
Sheeting
8-4 HEAVY BLEACHED
SHEETING, REG. PRICE 90c.
SALE PRICE PER YARD
65c
Dress Ginghams
36-INCH PLAID AND CHECK
GINGHAMS,   NEWEST   PAT-
TERNS.       SPECIAL      SALE
PRICE, 3 YARDS
$1.00
HUNDREDS   OF   REMNANTS
AT BARGAIN PRICES TO BE
CLEARED.
Flannelettes
30-INCH  WHITE & STRIPED
FLANNELETTES, VALUES AT
35c. PER YD.   SPECIAL SALE
PRICE, 5 YARDS
$1.00
Chambrays
STRIPED CHAMBRAYS, REG.
10c.  PER  YARD.      SPECIAL
SALE PRICE, 4 YARDS
$1.00
Whitewear
ALL WHITEWEAR & FLAN-
NELETTEWEAR AT BARGAIN
PRICES TO CLEAR.
Ladies', Misses' and Children's
Footwear.
20 P. C. Discount
on all Ladies'
Misses' and Children's Footwear.
Get in early on these Bargains
PILLOW COTTON
42 inch Best Quality Circular Pillow Cotton
Regular 75c, Sale Price, yard, 60c.
LADIES' SUITS-Ladies Tweed and Serge
Tailored Suits to clear at Bargain    I97C
Price8--$7.50,$9.50, $11.50 and * Lei O
Corsets
Curtain Muslins
Our Complete Stock of Curtain
Muslins at Bargain Prices.
Boys' Furnishings
BOYS' BLOOMER PANTS
Boys' Navy Serge Bloomer
Pants, sizes 24 to 27. Regular
$2.50.     Sale  $1.75
Sizes 28 to 32. Regular price
$2.75.     Sale Price  $1.95
Special in Boys' School Tweed
Pants,   in   Brown   and   Greys,
Sizes 26 to 32.     Regular price
_____  $2.50.     Sale Price $1.65
BOYS' CLOTHING—Boys School Suits, in Greys, Browns and Blues, in all
sizes, at greatly reduced prices to clear.
BOYS' UNDERWEAR—Odd lines in Boys* Underwear at Special Sale
Prices.
BOYS' JERSEYS—Boys' Jerseys "St. Margarets" Make in Brown, Navy
and Cardinal, in line Cashmere, in sizes 28 to 32. Regular $3.00. Sale
Price   $1.95
PRINTS
The Balance of our Stock of Wash Prints, at
4 yards for #1.00
Special Sale Bargains in Towels,
Hosiery and Bed Spreads
Men's Furnishings
SHOES
Men's   Heavy   Chrome  Blucher
Work  Boot,  with solid leather
counter and too cap, Hungarian
nailed.      Regular $8.50.     Sale..
Price   $5.50
Odd Lines of
C. C. A. La Grace
Corsets
AT   SALE   PRICES
{nuapf
Men's Hipress, 6 Hole Miners'
White Rubber' Boots, Regular Men's Fine Dress Shoes, in Velour
$6.50. Sale Price per pair $5.65 C.M> '"Black and Brown. All
v sizes. Values to $11.75. Your
 !  Choice this lot $1.75
List of Grocery
Specials will be
announced later
BARGAINS IN BOYS' SCHOOL SHOES, CAPS AND SWEATER COATS   laaMaMsiaaMaMisMaiSEH
MEN'S CAPS—Your choice of about  150 Men's Tweed Caps,  values to
$2.50.     Sale Price, each   75c.
MEN'S SUITS—The balance of our stock of Men's Suits al sacrifice prices
during this sale $10.00, $14.50,   $17.50, $20.00, $22.50
MEN'S SOCKS—About 350 pairs broken lines Men's Socks at Special
Bargain Prices.
WORK SHIRTS—In Khaki Drills, Ginghams and Flannelettes.
Broken lines in Men's Underwear..
SPECIAL BARGAIN SALE PRICES IN MEN'S HATS
CAMPBELLS
CUMBERLAND
TOfffl^amrtMi^eaamffia^wdM^^ PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1921.
FOR SALE
Buick Master Six
. $875.00 =
All good tires; Spare never been used; 2 spare rims;
Automatic Windshield Cleaner and Hand Windshield
(leaner; Boyce Motometer on radiator; Eight-Day
Clock on Dashboard; Hartford Heavy Duty Shock
Absorbers on front.
Watch For
Big Drawing
To Commence
MARCH 1
1st Prize 30 gallons gasoline, as desired
2nd Prize, One Brownie Automatic Windshield Cleaner
3rd Prize, One Brownie Automatic Windshield Cleaner
4th Prize  Pair Ford Drum Head Lamps
One chance for every 50c. cash purchase
PAY CASH AND SAVE MONEY
CUMBERLAND
MOTOR   WORKS
KIDDIES' MENU ON NATIONAL TRAINS
DINING CAR
MENU
FOR THE LITTLE FOLK
47~3HEN little Folk a travelling go
|W|There's one important thing to know
About a dining car:—
The Line whose printed menus tell
What hungry girls and boys love welt,
AND THAT'S THE C.N.R. I
/pCI A MEAL in the Diner is such a treat!
\am) We And tbe moat wonderful things to eat,
And what makes everything twice worth while
Is to have it served in the "National Style."
THIS is not a page out of any ordinary nursery rhyme book,
but is the front and back cover
of the Canadian Nntional Railway's
new menu for children, which is now
in we on all dining cars on the system. No more need the mother
travelling with little ones dread the
ordeal of trying to choose suitable
niciils for the children, with two
pages of combination menus for
breakfast, dinner and tea made up of
the most nourishing and appetizing
foods obtainable at prices which arc
in accord with thc size of the small
patrons   who enjoy the meals.
The Canadian National is one of
the first railways to cater in this
way to the young travelling public!
and in future each visit to the dining
car will be looked forward to by thc \
little folk with great pleasure if only
for the opportunity of seeing again
the "little picture book" from which
they may choose what they will have
to eat. Eight pages of gaily colored
pictures and funny little verses combine to make a most delightful story
to pass the time while the waiter is
getting the order.
So attractive is the "Menu for the
Little Folk" and so much enjoyed by
children since its introduction on the
National trains, that numerous appreciations have come into tbe office
of the superintendent of dining cars,
Mr. Walter Pratt, who feels that he
is doing a service, not only to the
parents, but to many children who
will be taken along on the'Very next
trip we make, because travelling
with kiddies is certainly no hardship
now and it is a shame to deprive
them of all the fun they could get
out of their own personal dining car
service such as this," to put it in the
words of one father and mother who
travelled west the ''.National Way"
just a few, days ago.
In an endeavor to make the dining
car service the greatest possible
benefit to the travelling public, Mr.
Pratt has recently inaugurated a
lunch counter service in Colonist
•ars between Winnipeg and Toronto.
These are on trial at present ond if
■hey meet with the approval of the
•ublic will be placed on all transcontinental trains in the service.* .fudging from the patronage of the first
lunch counter Colonist car sent out,
the convenience is much appreciated.
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 113. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
F i) r
REPAIRING,      OVERHAULING,      ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,     GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS        ....        Royston
I'lione 134M Courtenay Exchange
&
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos lor Hire.    Coal ami Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones I and (il
Cumberland, B.C.
ft
tt
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
alter repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material. Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
B-
=^
I
.   i
Quick Action and Accuracy
are what one depends upon when placing a Long Distance call.     These are factors which our Long Distance stall' exert themselves to provide you with.
Are yon making your Telephone deliver 100 per cent,
useful service in your business or home life? At your
disposal are Long Distance lines to all principal towns
and villages within hundreds of miles of your own
Telephone, including many United States points.
Call onr "Kale Clerk"  I'or charges.      You will find
them reasonable,
British Columbia Telephone Co.
I i
m
HE
LAMPS
ELECTRO-AUTOMATES
.(AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC LAMPS).
NO BATTERIES! - NO ACIDS!
| <
'WILL   LAST   A   LIFE-TIME'
«PU»UUW|f.f     ¥ aBt    a    r ipw.timv?.«pO»"U
Practical, Durable, Always Ready on Land, Under
Water, Any Climate, Anywhere
The Electro Automate ls an Electric Lamp made in France without a battery or refills, and of a new conception. It is a perfect
machine; the result of years of test In the plants of the manufacturers ill Switzerland and Fiance :: This marvellous little
pocket lamp, embodying simplicity, reliability and compactness,
weighs only 12 ounces.     It is patented In all countries.
The dynamo, with permanent magnet, based on new methods,
gives dense magnetic fields of perfect concentration, which surrounds the Induction without loss of magnetic dispersion, and
permits the maximum exploitation of the energy.
Construction of these lamps ls very carefully carried out by
skilled Swiss clock and scientific Instrument makers :: Electro
Automate Lamps are tight and dust-proof. They can be used
in all climates, Including equatorial regions. They will everywhere render the utmost service, giving a clear white light, without fear of the bulb burning out or the generator beaming
warm.
AU Electro Automate Lamps are guaranteed for six months, conditionally that they are not tampered with. With reasonable
care they will last for years. Any part can be renewed at slight
cost.     Lamps are provided with a pocket for extra bulbs.
This lamp Is especially useful to travellers, tourists, marine and
mining engineers, automobilists, dairymen, in fact everybody.
They are indispensable on life-boats and rafts, where u light ls
needed that will not be extinguished by wind or wave :: Every
mine should be provided with one or more of these lamps *at Us
portal or entrance, for the convenience of the employee or official
whose work takes him in and out of the mine at Irregular Intervals, lt Is the cheapest and best light on the market for this
purpose :: Marine engineers welcome Electro Automate in their
engine room. It saves them from the annoyance and loss of
time occasioned by the unreliability of battery lamps when they
wish to locate irouble or tind something in a hurry :: Pilots are
favorable to these little lamps because they are always standing
by ready and able to do their part in any and all kinds of
weather. They are hardy little fellows and will stand any
amount of knocking about, even to the bulbs, which are superior
to any others on the market:: Mushers over the northern trails
take these lamps in preference to others, because they give a
never ending light and add less than a pound of weight to their
outfits. The winds can't blow them out and the snow or wet can
not short circuit them.
DIRECTIONS
The working of this self-generating lamp is very simple. Pull the
lever completely and sharply with the fingers and let go, allowing
It to open fully In order to take another full stroke. Strokes
should be even and sharp for best results. This lump ls the
ouly one of its weight that will give a perfect light. Tbe bearings of this lamp should be oiled about once a month.
SOLD LOCALLY BY
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
si
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a U." valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
Cumberland and Union Water
Works Co. Ltd.
A TOAST TO CANADA
Here's to the wheatlands,
Thc oat lands, the rich lands,
Here's to the grass lands.
Where the lusty cattle low.
| Here's to the ploughed lands,
j The brown lands, the quick lands,
I The rich lands of Canada,
Where foodstuffs grow.
Here's to the deep mines,
The rare mines, the rich mines.
Here's to the black mine,
It's miner tamp aglow.
Here's to the wild wood,
The strong wood, the great wood.
The wooden walls of Britain,
.        Where the wild winds blow.
Here's to the great hearts,
The strong hearts, the true hearts,
' The hearts iu the breasts
Of Canadian men we know.
i
Here's to their purpose.
, There high, loyal purpose.
To give even life itself
That freedom shall not go.
—Joanna E. Wood.
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
(llll) B.C. Permanent Loan Bldg
PHONIC aim      VICTORIA, BX.
T.WHERRY
WANNER
#*■« <» mm urn ■
na.ra Ave.,
iria, 1. o. *
NOTICE OK DISSOLUTION
OK PARTNERSHIP
TO SPEAK AT PORTAGE
Sir Henry W. Thornton, chairman
and president of the Canadian National Railways, has accepted the invitation of the Portage la Prairie
Board of Trade to address a luncheon
of that organization In the near
future.
NEW SILVER REGION
Referring to the rush now in progress from Mayo to the newly discovered silver region of Beaver River
district in the Yukon territory, W. HI.
Cockfleld, of the dominion government geological survey, states that
silver lead ores have been discovered
at many points and with much of thc
area still unprospected there Is an excellent chance that further discoveries will be made. The district is
fairly accessible, being within a fe.v
miles ot territory already prospected
and partly worked.
WESTERN ROUTE
CONFERENCE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thut
the partnership heretofore subsisting
between us, the undersigned, as grocers, at the City of Cumberland, B.C.
and carried on by us under the firm
name and style of "The B. & B. Grocery" has this day been dissolved by
mutual consent.
All debts owing to the said partnership arc to be paid to the undersigned
MATTHEW BROWN, at Cumbei-
land aforesaid, and all claims against
the said partnership are to be presented to the undersigned MATTHEW
BROWN, by whom the same wlll be
paid and satisfied.
Dated this 14th day of February
1934.
JAMES   BURNS.
MATTHEW  BROWN.
{ Witness:—
P. P. Harrison.
Cumberland, B. C.
Barrister.
WANTED -TO HEAR FROM OWNER
of good Farm for sale.' State cosh
price, full particulars. D. F. Bush,
Minneapolis, Minn.
FOR SALE—BEAUTIFUL PIANO.
Cost $550. In first class condition.
Apply 30G Maryport Ave.
The Calgary Board of Trade has de-
cided to call a conference during the
summer of farmers, grain men and
others In Alberta Interested ln the
western grain route. The Vancouver
Harbor board and others In British
Columbia will attend.
EGG PRODUCTION
Total production of farm eggs In
Canada last year was approximately
2II2.18C.50S dozen, as against 194,058,-
408 dozen in 1022. The total estimated value was $48,770 In 1923. compared with $48,490,478 In 1922.
CANADIANS WELL OFF
Conditions among the farmers in
Alberta and other parts ot Canada are
much better than 'In the north western States, according to Dt. H. M.
Tory, of Alberta University, who has
just completed a survey of the rural
credits question across the line for
the Dominion nuance department.
IMPORTANT VISITOR
Hon. .). E, Theodore, labor premier
of Queensland, and his party, travelled over Canadian National lines from
const to coast last week en route to
England. In an Interview at Vancouver, Mr. Theodore told of Australia's desire to sell cotton to Canada, the state of Queensland being
hopeful of expanding its cotton production to the point where the empire would be independent of foreign
supplies.
C. N. R. IMMIGRATION WORK
Extensive plans for Immigration and
colonization work this year were made
at tiie annual conference of officials
and staO's of the land and townsite,
colonization development departments
of the Canadian National Railways
held at Winnipeg Inst week by Land
Commissioner A. E. Field. A substantial increase in the snle of farm
lands during 1923 over, the previous
year was reported.
WHY OPERATE?
for APPENDICITIS, GALLSTONES, stomach and liver,
troubles, when HEPATOLA does
the work without pain and no
risk of your life nor loss of time.
Contains no poison. Nol sold
by druggists.
Mrs. Geo. S. Almas,
Sole Manufacturer.
230 4th Ave. S„ Saskatoon, Sask.
Price $6.50.       Phone 4855.
Praccl post  25c. extra.
NOTICE
Comox Assessment District
NOTICE is hereby given, In accordance with the Statutes, thnt all assessed taxes levied under the "Taxation Act" and the "Public Schools.
Act," are now due and payable for lhe
year 1924.
All taxes collectable for the Comox
Assessment District ure due and payable al my olllce, situated in the Provincial Collector's olllce. In the City of
Cumberland.
This notice, lu terms of law, is
equivalent to a personal demand by
me upon all persons liable for taxes.
Dated at Cumberland, B.C., Ihls 15th
day of February, 1924.
WM. W. MOORE,
Collector of the Comox Assessment
District. '.«
y
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE FIVE
Yes! Cavin has them == Paris Pit Boots
A REAL BOOT — ASK TO SEE THEM
FINNS MAY IMMIGRATE
Six or seven thousand Finns are
wating to emigrate to Canada because of the closure of the Finnish
quota to the United States, according
to Martin Maurd, representative, of
the Swedish-American line at New
York. Mr. Maurd prophesies thut
there will be a great wave of Immigration from Scandinavian countries to
Canada during 1924.
B. C. PRODUCT NOT
EXCELLED BY ALASKAN
OR AMERICAN FISH
Attention is called by Hon. William
Sloan, commissioner of fisheries, to
tbe campaign preceding Ihe recent
election In Great Britain, when opponents of preferential trade wlih
tbe Overseas Dominions stated that
Canadian canned salmon was inferior
to the American pack.
This statement raised the ire of
Agent-General F. C. Wade .who so-
cured letters from many leading Brit.
Ish dealers in canned salmon, letters
which showed plainly thnt the British
Columbia product was far better than
(he Alaskan or American, fish.
ALBERTA COAL
GAINING GROUND
lion al Sudbury is Wnsteni Canadian
coal, used in preference to the American product ai the same price, according to a. N. Walker, of the Alberta
Coal Distributors, who hns just returned from a trip to Ontario. Mr,
Walker found Hint dealers in middle
and northern Ontario are buying Alberta bituminous in preference to
IViihvIvania hard at the same price.
IlllllUIi
Expense Cut Responsible For Increase
In Earnings Says C.N.R. President
Sixty per cent, of the coal consump-      NORWEGIANS MAY COME
il!
How Much
Have You
Lost?
Canada   will   secure   between   eight
and (en thousand Norwegian Immigrants during the coming navigation
season, il" reports of live prominent
Norwegian shipping men who have
just arrived in Canada are received
with favor by the interested partle;
in Canada. They have come to thle
country for the purpose of studying
farming conditions, so that they may
present an intelligent and detailed
report upon their return.
By Not Using Triplicate Sales Books
NO ONE LIKES TO ADMIT THAT HE LOSES, Yet serious losses that were unsuspected
have been discovered by users of our Triplicate Sales Books. When you fail to insure
against the loss of original entries, and titne needlessly spent in checking, YOU LOSE.
OUR O.K. TRIPLICATE BOOK insures every original entry be retaining a full copy in a
bound book.     If a sales check is missing a full and complete copy is found in the bound
book.     By supplying such information alone O.K. Triplicate Books save thousands of
dollars every year for their many users.
ORDERS MAY BE PLACED WITH OUR AGENT WHO WILL BE PLEASED TO CALL J
The Cumberland Islander    1
M PULP COMMISSION
Members of the Canadian Pulp Commission arrived in Winnipeg last wocit
via the Canadian National to open investigation into the pulp situation i1
Western Canada. Three days w?rc
spent In Winnipeg, thc Commissi')*
leaving February 9 for points further
west along National lines.
•HONE 3!>
P.O. BOX 430 m
llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
Week-End
Specials
Canton Flannel, Reg. 45c, 3 yards for $1.00
Stripe Flannelette, Reg. 37'/2c. 3 yards for $1.00
Stripe Flannelette, Reg. 25c. 5 yards for $1.00
Curtain Muslins, Reg. 25c. 5 yards for $1.00
Curtain Madras, Reg. 50c. 2\'-> yards for $1.00
Plain Scrim, good quality, 3 yards for $1.00
Cretonnes, in a good assortment of colors, Reg.
values to 40c. 3 yards for $1.00
Ginghams, a special line of small check Ginghams
in four colors, 5 yards for $1.00
Mraj^s»MsraiaasEi^^
Boys' Sweater Coats, a good range of sizes, d» -|   A A
values to $1.75.    Special  «P J.*UU
Boys' Pants, well lined, Reg. $1.95. Special .... $1.40
Boys' Pants, well lined, Reg. $2.90. Special .... $2.25
Leckies' Red Stitch Shoes for Boys, Reg. $3.50, $4.25
and $5.00.    Special at $3.00, $3.50 and $4.25
Special prices in Men's Dress Shirts, fancy Stripes,
with French Cuffs,
Regular   $2.00.   Special   $1.60
Regular. $2.50.     Special   $2.00
Regular $2.75.     Special   $2.00
Blue Serge Pants, all sizes, Keg, $5.75.     Special $4.75
Tweed Pants, all sizes, Reg. $4.95.    Special $3.95
Caps, in assorted colors, Reg. $1.50.    Special .... $1.00
LADIES' WEAR
Flannelette Night Gowns. Reg. $1.50. Special $1.00
Flannelette Night Gowns, Reg. $1.75. Special $1.15
House Dresses, in fancy Ginghams, Reg. $2.25.
Special $1.50
Ladies' Flannel Dresses, well made, properly shaped,
and well trimmed, at very special prices to clear.
Regular $11.95.     Special  $7.95
Regular $ 9.45.     Special   $6.95
Regular $ 8.50.     Special   $5.25
Ladies Sweaters, $5.25 values on sale ..._ $4.00
Ladies' Sweaters, $4.50 values on sale %9M
Ladies Black Fleeced Hose, 3 pairs for $1.00
Towels, a fair size, 4 for $1.00
Towels, a good one at 2 for $1.00
A line of Corsets to clear at (g"|   A A
Per pair   «pJL.Ul/
A. McKinnon
Cumberland, B.C.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, |i. C.
Comfort   and   Homelike   service.
211   rooms,  electrically  heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone 15.
H. YATKS, Manager.
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    -    dinning    -    Repairs
Telephone I.     •     P. 0. Box I?
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL:
WM.MEKHIKIKII),   IVoprii.tor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue. Cumberland
Courtenay
Billiard
Parlor
Billiard and Pool Tables
McPHEE BLOCK (Downstairs)
COOL — LIGHT — CLEAN
COME IN—
LOOK AROUND i
BE SOCIABLE    i
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
~"  NOTARY PUB*LIC
BRITISH   EMPIRE
Exhibition
Wembley   Carl.   April In October
London        l Iff I
HAIL
—THROUGH—
AMI  OCEAN   BOOKINGS
—Sec .Me For -
FARES,    SAILINGS,    ETC.
If you have friends iu Knrojie
whom you wish  lo assist In    ,
coming to this country, come
in aud see me.
K. W. BICKLE, AGENT
Cumberland,  II.C.
CANADIAN NATIONAL
RAILWAYS
MONTREAL,—The following statement has been issued by Sir Henry
Thornton .chairman and president ot
the Canadian National Railways:
"Dispatches emanating from Ottawu
have stated that the results from the
operation uf the Canadian National
Railways for the mouths of November
and December, 11)23, must have been
of un unusual character, and that
large savings must have been effected during those months to justify the
declaration of the president of the
company placing the net revenues for
the year at $20,127,447.
"This view is entirely correct.
There was a reduction in expensed in
the month of November 1SI23 of $1,942,-
Oliu as compared with the corresponding mouth of 11)22, and at tlle same
time an increase in gross revenues uf
$690,000, making air Increase in
net revenue for that month
$2,632,000.
"In the month of December, 1021,
expenses decreased by $5,083,000 as
compared with December 11)22, and
gross earnings were Increased by Ihe
sum uf $1,732,000, representing an improvement for the month uf $6,815,000
it should be mentioned that iu December, 1922, the Canadian National Railways bad an operating deficit oi
$8,291,000.
"The improvement shown iu the financial position of the railways during November and December 1923. was
due primarily to a reduction In oper
uuugurated in 1923 a plan of speculating expenses. The administration
ing money on maintenance lu the
earlier mouths of the year, when labor
is abundant and consequently less expensive, at the same time bringing thi
transportation machine to its highest
state of efficiency to handle the large
traffic movement which occurs during
tlle last four months of the year. Much
was likewise due to constantly Improving transportation efficiency,
coupled with Ihe conscientious and enthusiastic effort put forth by the officers and employees also.
"In the month of December, 1922,
a number of charges of various kinds
had to be taken care of In operating
expenses which had not been charged
out currently over tbe other months of
that year. The policy has been to
make each month of 1923 carry its
share of the expenses of moving traffic and maintaining the property."
Here and There
Navigation of the St. Lawrence
river Is expected to open early in the
month of April According to preliminary schedules issued by tht various steamship companies operating
between Canadian Atlantic ports
and Europe, 192 ships will visit the
port of Quebec in 1924.
the I The Canadian Pacific Railway hu
of j inaugurated as a special feature th*
I serving of afternoon tea regularly
on all dining, cafe and buffet ear*
throughout the system. The tasteful little menu which the company
provides includes tea, coffee, chocolate, toast, muffins, cake, ice cream
and preserves at reasonable pricea.
The Spiller Company, a great
British concern with 1150,000,000
capital, has completed arrangement*
for the establishment of facilities In
Canada which will entail an outlay
of $6,000,000 to finish th* plant of
the Alberta Flour Mills ia Catoary,
with another $2,000,000 to btsM aa
•levator at Vancouver.
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
Thc second of th* two larg* paper
machines recently installed hy th*
Belgo-Canadian Paper Company at
Shawinigan Falls, Que., has commenced operations. Th* machine,
which is th* product of th* Domia-
ion Engineering Company, la now
producing nawsprint. It wfll to
tuned up and ia expected U prodac*
a commercial grade of nawsprint at
or above its daily capacity *t II
tons in th* near futur*.
Speaking at Toronto mssto, I.
W. Beatty, President *f tha Canadian Pacific Railway, declared that
"what Canada is suffering from k
lack of men, lack of capital ami hack
of those forward policies which will
enable the country to realise Withal
a reasonable tima its own maatfatt
destiny." He added that b* SU Mt
believe in "exaggerated whiapariaas
er in any statements which an calculated to destroy th* boltof tt Canadians in their own country."
Captain    S.    RobiMta,    C.B.B.,
R.N.R., commanding th* Canadian
Pacific liner "Empress af Canaan,"
was invested with th* C.B.S. hy lit
, Harry Armstrong, British Casual-
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON j ^$»™ Sk^S^S
LUMBER CO., LTD. to setting out on her great world
Offlce *«*« Bridge Street, Victor..,...«'., ^ ^."dom^ln* % 5
 j New York.   These honors watt ia
i recognition of his gallant watt
when commanding the Canadian
Pacific liner "Empress of Aattra-
lia" at Yokohama, at th* Urn* et tha
Japanese disaster.
According to Canadian Paeifl* tt-
I ficials,   immigrants   from   lamp*
who spend a few hours in Montreal
on their way west arc re-discoverlng
i America—or  rather  Canada—at a
i .treat   rate.    Some day* ago then
were   eighty   Scandinavians   dramming their heels in the big waiting-
| rooms at Windsor Station, bored to
j 'ears.    Then one of them suddenly
j liscovered that the Province ef Que-
. lee, unlike Sweden, is not "dry." The
! rush of the Danes on Alfred a Eng-
and  was as nothing compared to
,  hat with which the delighted Scan-
linavian   gentlemen   emptied   that
i .vaiting-room.   So excellent did they
find the beer that they did n*t shew
up again till train-time, whan they
announce I     unanimously,     though
with slight difficulty, that "Canada
bane one fine country."
I'nion Bay Road
LUNCH counter cars which will
care for thc needs of passengers in thc colonist, first class
and tourist cars of the main line
trains, if they desire to patronize
them, arc to be operated by the
Canadian National Railways for
thc convenience of lhc travelling
public, nud particularly of immigrants arriving in Canada. As an
experiment, lunch counter cars
have been placed in service between Winnipeg anil Toronto.
While these trains carry dining
cars and while the Canadian National Railways also have lunch
counters and restaurants at all divisional points, it is considered that
the lunch counter car will be a
great benefit to women travelling
with children and to others who
may be physically unfit or unable
to leave thc train at stations because of severe weather, or fur
other reasons. »
The lunch counter has been fitted
up at one end of a steel colonist
car, where the best grade of tea
and coffee freshly made will be
served. Light meals comprising
cereals, sandwiches, pics, preserved
fruits ond other canned goods will
be available at Canadian National
standard lunch counter prices. A
competent and courteous attendant will be in chorge of each lunch
counter ond service mny be secured
at any time during the dny.
Thc suggestion of the lunch
counter curs was made by Mr.
Walter Pratt, General Manager of
Dining, Sleeping and Parlor Cars
and of Hotels, who has been anxious to provide this facility to further improve travelling conditions
nnd add tu thc comforts of passengers on the Canadian National
Railways.
To be stranded in a Strang* city
with no worldly asset* but a salt of
dress-clothes and yet to coma ant •**
the adventure victorious la to
achieve something. Jo* and Bill arrived in Montreal a tow night* an,
their baggage consisting of tn*
clothes they wore, tw* dress saito,
an adequate quantity of th* a**d-
ful and an enthusiastic determination to see Life with a capital L.
When they woka on th* morning
after, Ihey found that someone baa
relieved them of everything they
possessed except the dress salts
they had slept in, and which they
had worn for th* previous night's
affray.
In this predicament they appealed
to the authorities at th* Canadian
Pacific Windsor Station, tor work
whereby to earn enough to take
hem out of the wicked city. Sympathetic officials put them en thc
snow-shovelling gang. And htr*
these two stout fellows, in thatr
dress suits, Joe with his toet wrapped in sacking to keep them warm,
labored heartily far four day*, earning the price af their ticket* back to
the little old h*m* town. So one*
i more fiction Mi tha movla* ar«
bantu, PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1921.
GENTS!
Have you seen
the new
ASTORIAS at CAVIN'S?
NET REVENUE INCREASE
NEW SERVICE
meals  or  not  able,  perhaps,  to  ns,'
the station lunch counters at division-
Colonist  cars    on    Toronto-Winnipeg  «1 P°lnts-     The service is being given
run  of  the Canadian  National  Rail, j a trial and if it meets with public ap-
nil
An increase of nearly $11,000,000 in
the  net   uperating  revenues    on    nil
lines of the Canadian National Hail- , ,..,,. .   ,
, i ,i        ,.   moo   wnvs have  been  enuinnpil  with  lunch   proval  will   be   inaugurated     011
ways  during  eleven   months  ut   192.1   ways na\e open equippeu witu niii'ii
counters, as a convenience for those I transcontinental   trains   on   the   Byi
not wishing  to prepnre    their    own   tem.
,Mountie\   A Husky Veteran of the Trail
is shown lty oflicial figures giv*m ou;
this month.
I li-awtH^-u* »■*•»» '-^Bran
Before You Get That New
Car, Come In And
See the
OVERLAND
91
$895.00
F.   O.   B.   COURTENAY
Sparks   Co.   (Courtenay),   Ltd.
Phone 99
Phone 99
Courtenay
VISITORS to the Chateau Frontenac at Quebec
and especially those who patronize the Winter
Carnival there in February have a treat in store for
them—that of driving behind a real northern dog-
team, led by one of the greatest huskies "in the business," Mountie, the latest acquisition to the team.
In November it was found necessary to secure a
new leader for the Chateau Frontenac huskies. It was
decided that none but the very best available would
do. Wires and letters were sent broadcast throughout the Canadian sub-Arctic to Edmonton. Le Pas,
Fort McMurruy, and Peace River; in fact, to every
point whence a husky of suitable standard might be
secured. It was only after a three weeks' search by
many authorities on huskies that Mountie was eventually secured at Le Pas, Manitoba, the price paid
greatly exceeding that usually given.
It was s real stroke of luck which secured this
splendid animal, for he is a veteran of the northern
trails and, more than that, as his name implies,
has done practically all his service with the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police. Hailing originally from
Lac-du-Brochet, in the far North, he was bought by
Sergeant Grennan of that famous force in 1019, when
very young. His training was carried out by the Sergeant and so well did he acquit himself later that
the Mounted Police wrote of him: "He has never
missed s patrol or been a day o.ff duty since we hava
had him."
So he is a real Policeman and no mere movie hero,
co-worker for years with the comrades of such men
as Dempster, FitzGerald and other heroic trail-
makers of Canada's glorious corps, a comrade grown
old in battling through snow and storm on the King's
business for the maintenance of the right.
Mountie, as one of the finest huskies ever kept on
the books of the Police, is a magnificent-looking fellow, a dark grey giant with shining, slit eyes, pointed
ears and muzzle, thick fur ami gleaming fangs. There
is about him more than a breath of the keen, romance-
laden Arctic winds and one is not surprised to learn
from the Mounted Police that "he has always been
admired wherever be has been, both from appearance
and capabilities."
The work at the Chateau Frontenac will be puppy's
play to Mountie after the desperate toil he has known
in the far North. But he deserves well of the people
of Canada and has nobly earned his rest and tha cone-
fort he will henceforth enjoy.
MAN. BUTTER SHIPMENTS  r   BYNG INSPECTS SHOPS
From B.C's Model Brewery
sBeerwithautaPcar
and
U.B.C. Beer
All the resources of the greatest
brewing institution in the West
combine to make these popular
beverages the last syllable in
purity, palatable flavor and appetizing perfection.
Free  Home Delivery Service—
Place Your Order Today.
VANCOUVER   BREWERIES
LIMITED
This advertisement Is not published or
displayed by the Liquor Control Board or
hy thc Government nf British Columblu.
King George Hotel
Victor Bonora, Proprietor
FIRST CLASS
ACCOMMODATION
Excellent Cuisine
Heated Throughout
Dunsmuir Avenue—Cumberland, B.C.
Out of a total of 10.730,150 pounds
of creamery butter ln 1923, Manitoba
exported 3.863.264 pounds 111 180 carloads, representing 68,969 56-pound
packages and valued at $1,513,169.76.
The shipments were to the Old
Country, New York. Chicago nnd
Montreal. The 1922 production was
10,559,601 pounds.
During the
war
the Point St. Char-
les  shops  of
Ihe
Canadian
National
Railways at
Montreal  sent
overseas
more volunteers than any one Indus-
trial plant iu Canada. As the vast
majority of these men served In the
Canadian Corps under General Byng.
they enjoyed the privilege of meeting
their old corps commander when His
Excellency paid a visit of inspection
lo the shops a few days ago.
RATHER A LENGTHY TRAIN
BRITISH INTERESTED
Considerable Interest ls being shown
In the colonization plans of the Canadian National Railways, according to
a report from Dr. W. J. Black, manager of colonization and development
of the National System In London.
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, O. D.
Graduate Aptometrist and Optician.   Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tuesday
MEDICAL FUND BUILDING
Hours: 1.80 to 5.30—7 to 9p.m.
Vhenpure
sweet milk
is essential
Free Recipe Book—Write the Bor
don Co. Ltd., Vancouver.
A line of loaded grain cars placed
end to end and stretching from Winnipeg to a point more than 40 miles
west of Edmonton, is represented by
the total loadings of the Canadian Na-
\ tlonal Railways from the opening of
■ the present crop year, Sept. 1, to Jan.
23.     Divided into trains with an aver-
! age of 60 cars per train more than
18,333  locomotives were  required to
deliver the 110,000 cars of grain  to
| either the lake head or Vancouver,
I leaving a number of cars to be sandwiched lu with trains of other commodities.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND • •  B. C.
When you are in need of a
SOLD AT LANG'S DRUG STORE   I p,umWng & HeatinB Engineer
CONDITIONS BRIGHT
THROUGHOUT CANADA
Hon. T. D. Pattullo, minister of
lands, has returned from Ottawa, Montreal and Toronto, and reports conditions throughout Conoda as nevir
having been better. He visited points
along the Canadian National In British Columbia and is optimistic over
the prospects of a new pulp and paper
Industry at Prince George. Establishment of n plant there thlB summer
Is s certainty.
R. Rushton
Phone 124, Courtenay, B.C.
or
Phone 157, Cumberland, B.C.
YOUR  NEEDS  WILL  RECEIVE
IMMEDIATE ATTENTION
DOUKHOBORS LEAVE
The vanguard of the Doukhobor
movement from Western Canada left
last week when 24 Dnukbobors from
Kamsack, Sask., went cast over tho
Canadian National lines to New York.
where they will set sail for Odessa.
The party consisted of eight families,
few of whom could speak English.
NEW LAMP
BURNS 94% AIR
Heats Electric or Gas
A new oil lamp that gives an amazingly brilliant, soft white light, even
better than gas or electricity, has
been tested by the U. S. Government
nnd 35 leading universities and found
to be superior to 10 ordinary oil lamps.
It burns without odor, smoke or noise
—no pumping up, is simple, clean,
safe. Burns 94% air and 6% common kerosene (coal oil.)
The inventor, J. B. Johnson, 579 Mc.
Dermot Ave., Winnipeg, is offering io
send a lamp on 10 days' FREE trial,
or even to give one FREE to the first
user in each locality who wlll help
him Introduce It. Write him to-day
for particulars. Also ask him to explain how you can get the agency, and
without experience or money make
$250 to (500 per month. —39-47.-1923. #
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE SEVEN
Correspondence Between The City Of
Cumberland And Liquor Control Board
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Beat Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fiah
|    HOTELS AND CAMPS
| SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
w. P. Symona
Proprietor
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Delivered Ut All Parts of District.
CmI, VTeod and Goods ot Any Kind
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
January 1. 1021.
I The Secretary,
]    Liquor Control Board,
Victoria, B.C.,
j Dear Sir;—
I Ite your cheque. 1.(11 65,--So. A 45SS1
I 1 beg to acknowledge receipt of your
cheque as above for $1130.08, being
' the balance of total amunnt of $1222.28
, us originally awarded as this City's
| share of the liquor profits for the last
period of 1923.
The deduction of $92.20 made from
| the original  amount  as  awarded,  Is
i explained  by your memorandum,  as
being for costs of Investigations anil
prosecutions, April 1st to Sept. 30th,
1923.
Evidently a mistake has been made
iu allocating such costs to this City,
as during the past year (1923) Twelve
(12) prosecutions have been made by
the Chief of Police under the Liquor
Act, and in no single instance has
any official of the Liquor Control
Board ever been advised or approached in any way In connection with such
prosecutions, nor has the Board been
advised In any other way than by the
monthly returns which have been submitted.
Apart from the prosecutions instituted by the Chief of Police nf this
City, no other prosecutions   by   the
TELEPHONE
53
TELEPHONE
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA,  B. ('.
The Largest and Most Up-to-dale Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
nn Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladles' and Bents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop in and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent In Cumberland, who
will advise you nn any work you wish
lo have done.
Onr   Work   und   Service
Will Please Vol	
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B.C.      -      Phone 8802
Llguor Board or nny of their officials
has taken place within the limiis of
of this City, so obviously this City
cannot be charged with expenses of
obtaining evidence and prosecutions
whicli have not occurred.
I think that you will find that u
mistake has been made in debiting
this City with such costs which were
actually Incurred by your officials In
prosecutions whicli took place outside
the City of Cumberland, and In the
Provincial Police district, ns two or
three such prosecutions in which your
officials were interested hnve, I believe, taken place during the past few
months, but such prosecutions were
in no way whatever connected with
the City of Cumberland.
I nm directed by His Worship, the
Mayor and Aldermen of this Clly to
bring these facts under your notice,
and to nsk that your cheque for the
balance ($92.20) may be forwarde.l
as soon ns you have adjusted1 this
matter.
Yours faithfully,
CITY CLERK.
Liquor Control Board .Memorandum
December 24, 192:i.
From—Inspection Dept. Liquor Con
trol Board.
To—Municipality of Cumberland.
Subject—Costs of Investigations and
Prosecutions, April 1, to September 3D,
1923.
Expenses obtaining evidence ami
prosecutions. Voucher No. 73, $63.20.
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING  MATERIALS,   MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES, WINDOWS  AND DOORS,
HIGH  GRADES AT  LOWEST  PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Slab Wood
(Double load)
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
 $450
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone  159 : Night—134-X  Courtenay
Expenses   obtaining   evidence   and
prosecutions, Voucher No. HOB, $20.00
Total   $<h2.i>()
January 8, 1924.
The City Clerk.
Cumberland, B.C.
Dear Sir; —
I beg to acknowledge the receipt of
your letter of the 1st instant in iv-
gard to your City's share of the liquor
profits for the period ending the sutli
September. 1023.
I beg to advise ,vou that the revenue
derived by the Liquor Control Board
Is paid Into the consolidated revenue
of the Province, and tho distribution
of profits, therefore, Is mnde by tho
Treasury Department,
A copy of your letter Is being fur-
warded to the Deputy .Minister of Finance who I have requested to communicate with you.
Yours truly,
SECRETARY
February 7, 1924.
The City Clerk,
Cumberland, B.C.
Door Sir; —
re: Liquor Profits
In reply to your letter of the 1st
ult. re the above, the costs and expenses incurred by thc Liquor Control
Board in respect of the enforcement
of the "Government Liquor Act" within each Municipality have been determined by the Board, and ns particulars relating to such costs and expenses would Involve disclosure of
Information of a confidential nature
it Is neither advisable nor in the public interests to furnish the same.
Authority for these deductions ami
the manner In which they have been
dealt with is provided for In Section
99  of the "Government  Liquor Act"
(subsections 1 and 2).
Yours truly,
SUPERVISOR OF LAW
ENFORCEMENT
I Februnry 14, 1921.
Mr. D. Dugan,
j    Supervisor of Law Enforcement,
Victoria, B.C.
; Dear Sir;—
ResLiquor Profits
I Further to my letter of the 1st Jan-
I uary ulto, and your reply thereto
i dated 7th February Inst.,
j I am directed to inform you that,
i before taking further steps In the tnat-
| tcr. my Council desire that you thor-
I oughly understand the position of of-
| fairs as far as this .Municipality Is
.concerned.
j As already pointed out, this Muni-
j cipallty has been charged with an
amount of $92.20 for expenses Incurred by your officials In connection
I with two prosecutions under the Liq-
! uor Act.
No such prosecutions have occurred,
therefore the vouchers numbered re-
jspcctlvcly 73  (for 113.20)    and   Hull
I (for  $29.00)   endorsed  as   "Expenses
obtaining evidence and prosecutions,"
arc evidently fraudulent.
j    The fact that no such prosecutions
have occurred has already been pointed out in my previous letter.
Your reply of tlle 7th Inst, implies
i that officials of the Board can make
whatever charges they like against
any Municipality whether lawfully in-
the present case, where such charges
curred or otherwise, nnd that, as In
are shown to be incorrect and improper, the Board's officials concerned are protected by the provisions of
the Liquor Act, on the ground that n
"disclosure of the conditions under
whicli such charges arc made i<
against the public Interests."
The Act in no way gives protection
■ to   any   officials   who   misrepresent
facts, as in this case.
Please treat this  letter as a  final
application for the amount of $92.jn
due to the City of Cumberland as the
I balance of the amount of Liquor pro
fits   awarded   to   them  for  the   last
period.
Your prompt attention to this mat-
tor will be appreciated.
Yours fatihfully,
CITY CLERK.
PRIZE GRAIN FUND
Tn appeal for donations to a fund
for encouragement In the growing of
championship grains in Western Canada, In which he already has enlisted
'■ thc support of the Alberta govern-
ment, Major H. G. L. Strange, presl-
\ dont of the Alberta Seed Growers' Association. Is addressing a Joint meeting under the auspices of the Wlnul
. peg Board of Tarde and Grain Exchange.     The farm on which Major
j Strange grew the 1923 world's cham-
I plnnshlp wheat is located at Big Valley, on the Alberta division of the Na-
! tlnnal Railways.
LAND OFFICIAL
Announcement has been made ot
the appointment of G. G. Balrd, formerly assistant land commissioner of
the Canadian National Railways, to
th epositlon of manager ot the land
and townsite department for the company with headquarters at Winnipeg.
OBJECTIVE SET AT
THIRTY MILLLION
In a talk to Canadian National employees by radio last week, Sir Henry
W. Thornton, chairman and president
of the System, pointed out that while
the net earnings of the company last
year amounted to twenty million dollars, he hoped this year to make It
thirty million. Given a little luck
and the support ot his men, he bad
every confidence that the objective
could be reached.
COMOX JAM
Ask your grocer for COMOX JAM it is made from pure fresh fruit and
B.C. Cane Sugar, nothing added by way of filler or preservative.
STRAWBERRY _ LOGANBERRY — RASPBERRY and a limited am
ount of ITALIAN PRUNE — GREENGAGE and PLUM.
COMOX POTATOES
"Look for the Tag on the Bag"
Your are entitled to a graded potato. If it's a Comox Creamery Sack with
the tag it is graded and better value. Demand no other.
Ilo=Hd Theatre
CUMBERLAND
FRIDAY and SATURDAY, FEB. 22-23
ZANE    GREY'S    GREATEST   STOIIV
"THE HERITAGE OF
THE DESERT"
Daring horsemanship, thrilling fights, wonderful outdoor scenery—The story of a bitter fight for desert
water rights, told against a colorful background of
hand to hand fights, cattle rustlers. Indian attacks and
a hundred other thrills.
 2 DANDY COMEDIES i 1
"The Spat Family" and
"The Four-Flusher"
Matinee Saturday 2.30 p.m.
Dance Saturday at 9.30 pjn.
Ernest Torrence in Zane Grey's
•The Heritage of the Desert
.  A Paramount Picture
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
A picture of thrills, the cross country race, the firing
of the lonely prairie cabin and the wonder riding of
Mix.
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY
THE 111(1 NORTHERN PICTURE
"SHADOWS OF THE NORTH"
AND
"THE RADIO KING"
NEXT FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Thomas Meighan in
"PIED PIPER MALONE"
WILLIAM FOX
presents
domTIlk
WX9*    "»
i-A-MMJlE
ROMEO
wilh
^WONDER H0RSI
tarn
ami
;mm
-tJr
1MUT MUVtt
NOTE-
COMING MARCH 14-15
"THE STRANGER"
Filmed in England.
-Roth of these pictures were made onthe exact location of the story.
COMING MARCH 10-11
"IF WINTER COMES"
Filmed in England. PAGE EIGHT
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1924.
IL
SI   .- "-■■ ■ ■    -.^"'^^f?
; liatnirir   A SagteiiiSa^n nil11 nm
IVhy Ford Predominates
Ford Resources
The Ford is the product of a
self-made institution which, over
a period of years, has provided
dependable transportation for all
peoples.
Recognizing the value of Ford
transportation, these peoples have
purchased Ford products in such
volume that the sale of Ford cars
and trucks equals the sales of all
other makes combined.
As a result, the resources of Ford
of Canada are now over $20,-
000,000.   These resources mean
ability to buy the best material
at a minimum price.
They mean the ability to organize each process of production,
from the purchase of materials to
the completion of the finished car,
on sucn a basis that every nonessential operation is eliminated.
The economies thus accomplished
are reflected in Ford prices
which, always consistently low,
are now the lowest in history.
This is what Ford resources
mean to you.
See Any Authorized Ford Dealer
CARS   .   TRUCKS   .   TRACTORS
Mg.'^'iSgiBEIWrJibl
aicjUvlgBIBiaaTJiaMBIBIffli
The Mercantile Store Co.
G. H. WYCHERLEY
"The General Store With A General Purpose"
Upon my recent visit to Vancouver I secured one or
two real Bargains for Cash in Boots and Shoes
A BIG SATURDAY SPECIAL
ONE HUNDRED
AND TWENTY-FIVE PAIRS MEN'S DRESS SHOES,
IN BROWN BALMORALS, RECEDE TOE; BLACK BLUCHER BOOT,
CALF WELTED .
VND A BROWN BLUCHER BOOT IN SMART STYLE
ANY
PAIR YOU CHOOSE, PER PAIR, ONLY
$4.95
Ladies' Semi Dress
Hats-Moderate Price
Men's Smart Suits
From $23.00 up
Call in and see our new $10,000 Dry Goods Stock
The Mercantile Store Co.
Cumberland, B.C.
PHONE 138
PHONE 133
BBISiaBIBBiBIBiaaB
"Mrirj^EUalfflagMaiM
iBiateAgi»ifergB~
i
FARM ACREAGE TREBLED   auartorn ol the total addition to tho   colonization nnd development of the
cultivated area, was    placed    under; C.N.R.. nt Boston, states thnt on an
rhe  acreage   under  lleM   crops   In   Wheal nnd oats, so records of the Xltt-   nvernge of 150 families    of    French
Canadians   nre   returning   In   Canada
I from  New  England   weekly.      This
; movement has heen going on since the
ARE   RETURNING! first of the year and n considerable
I Increase si expected with the arrival
I. K. l.ai'tirep. general agent oi" of spring.
Canada lias almost trebled since 1000,
nearly 37,500,000 acres of new land
having been brought under cultivation: an acreage larger than that ot
England and Wales combined. More
than 27,000,000 acres, or aboul three-
minion  Bureau of Statistics show.
FRENCH CANADIANS
r
there's not much
FIGHT lifT IN THOSE DOGS    i
OF Y0UHS, GENEWM.! TV|E\ WOK
/ M^-LErencoME^uT
THEV WON'T GET ANY 30NC5
fO TICK HfRE!
L
<-f*
\
<rait%Si'^i^a*
t %e\MH
/w^sEVES
lefreshes Tired Eyes
WriteMullneCo.,Chlck|o,fofEveCtrcBook I
SLATS' DIARY
DR. R. . B. DIER AND DK
W .BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeons
Office:  Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
SYNOPSIS OF
UNDittTiWENHENIS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted bj
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens un declaring Intention
io become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
.md Improvement for agricultural
jiurposes,
full information concerning regu
.atlons   regarding    pre-emptions    ts
given In Bulletin No. 1, Land Series.
How to Pre-empt Land," copies ol
,'hich can be obtained free of charge
>y addressing   the    Department   ol
.iinda, Victoria, B.C., or to any Gov-
nment Agent.
.Records will be Brained covering
iinly land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, i.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions art
o  be  addressed   to  the   Land   Com
ilssioncr uf the Land Recording PI
Islon, in uliii|i the land applied foi
is situated, and ure made on printed
forms,  copies  ut  which  can  be ob-
liueii from the Land Commissioner
Pre-empllrins must be occupied to
five years and Improvements made
io \ mtie of $10 per acre, including
Hearing uud cultivating at ietitit nv
acres, before u  I'nuvn  Grant  can  In
ecelved.
For more detailed Information see
ho Bulletin -ilow i>» Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received fur pur-
ilu.se of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being tlmborland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
(/rice uf first-c'afs (arable) land Is $5
per acre, and vecond-olass (grazing)
By KOSS KAUQUllAlt
FRIDAY—Well me nnd n lady of ,\
fair sox had a bole lot of (rubble today,      Tho toucher ast
me what I was a doing
that   I  was  ho  late tn
skool  and   1   unformed
her I was a tendinis to
my  own   bigness    and
she    tlllss    understood
the way 1 ment it as I
was putting sum money
into   the   bank    for   a
saveing   club   and   she
sed  she had  all   ways
thot   1   was   a   gentel-
niaii.      And   I   replyed
back  and  said.      Yes
and   1   all     ways     had
thot   she   was   a   lady.
And she went and give
me a slap on the Profile and remarks at the same Instance.
Now try and forget thai.     1 gess we
was both mistaken.
Saterday—We   got   a   paper   telling
all  about   the   wedding  of  the  neeee
DC the sister of I of mn s old skool
' mates  today  and  it went, on  to tetl
how thc bride wns drest up In white
and I asl ma why was (he brides all
ways  drest   in   white  when   they  attempted to get  marryed and she sed
white was  to denote Joy  and   1   ast
[ her why was the groom drest in black |
! then.     1 gess she diddent hear me.
Sunday—Well we got a nother Joak
nu Ant Emmy pn and me has. She
never new till today but what a Spiritualist was a man witeh made his own
lieker to drink.
Monday-! confided to Jano that 1
diddent think I wood ever get to be
very good looking and she sed. O
cheer up you no the Butterfly was a
wirm nt 1 time, as the poets use to
yny.
Tuesday- Ma brot home a new dre*s
today and she ast pa how did he
like it and he sed Not very well, and
she sed. Well never mind Honey I
wont wear it very long. And pa sed
Well on 2nd thot I spose the longer
you wear it the better I will like It,
Wensday—When ma cum home tonite I ast here If she thot lt wood male;
m esick if I wood eat a doz Cooky*
nnd she sed it mite make me very
dangerous sick. But it haddent.
How ever sum of the results was
very pane full. When ma discovered
that they was eat.
Thiraday—When Ant Emmy cum
home this evning ma was a balling
and sed she had fell down and broke
1 of her casseroles and Ant Emmy got
skared and went & telefoned for a
Dr. rite away. And sed Bring your
Cloroform along.
The Winnipeg Board of Trade is In
receipt of a request from Utah for information of use to intending settlers.
indicating that residents of that state
arc contemplating settlement in or
near Winnipeg.
.md   $2.60   per  a
mutton regardlii;
■ if crown lands
No, 10, Land Si
Lease of Crown
Mill, factory,
Imh
further infor-
- purchase or leas>-
:s given ln Bulletin
riei, "Purchase and
Lands."
r Industrial sites un
land, not exceeding 40 acreB,
iimy be purchased or leased, the conditions Including; payment of
s:i,inpage.
HOMESITE LEASES
I'nsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20 I
acres, may be lea ted as homeaitea, j
conditional upon a dwelling helm: I
erected In tin* first year, title being j
obtatnah'e after resilience and lm-
pro vein en t conditions ore fulfilled ■
and  land has been surveyed.
LEASES
1'or grazing uud   Industrial   pur-
poses areus not exceeding 640 acres
may  be leased  by  one  person or a
company. I
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Prov-
Ince is divided into grazing districts '
and the range administered under 'i j
Qraising       Commissioner.       Annual j
grazing permits ure issued based on <
numbers ranged, priority being given
io established owners. Stock-owners i
may  form   associations    for    rang"
management.   Free, or partially free, !
permit.s   are   available    for    settlers, j
campers   and   travellers,   up   tu   ten
head
"The Superior Grocers"
Where  Most  People  Trade
SHfflS'llBMSEISiaEiaEHEffl
SPECIALS
41bs. tin Strawberry Jam   95c.
Corn, I'/Vs, 7 for   Sl-00
Quaker Tomato Soup, 2 for   25c
Poaches, 2i Vs   55c.
Pears. 21/Vs   55c.
Apricots, 21 Vs   55c.
Corn on Cob, 21/Vs   35c.
Side Bacon, by tho piece, per lb.   37'/jC.
Peameal Bacon, by the piece, per lb.  40c.
Premier Colfee, a high grade steel cut vacuum packed
coffee, excellent value, per lb 70c.
Old Drury Tea. per lb * 75t"-
The sales of this splendid Tea are increasing weekly.
Oranges ORANGES Oranges
$1.00   6 dozen   $1.00
HOIBli:
Mumford's Grocery
T. 11. Mumford
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
J. Walton
CUMBERLAND SATURDAY, FEBIIUARY 23, 1921.
TBE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER-
9
NINE
I See by the Light of the
"STARS"
COME IN AND SEE THE MOST TALKED OF CAR IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.     DRIVE
IT YOURSELF AND BE CONVINCED THAT IT IS REALLY THE BEST  INVESTMENT FOR YOUR DOLLAR IN THE AUTOMOBILE MARKET TQDAY
IMMEDIATEE™™™        $ 895.00
llVimiJlSl/* 1 Ej REGULAR d»    qqp aa
-^-..  wmt rwtw^wsr-,^      ROADSTER     «P     OtfO.UU
DELIVERIES ®SN0        $1075.00
—>      "SS, $1500.00
•SB? $1145.00
THESE PRICES INCLUDE SALES TAX AND FULL TANK OF OAS, CAR OILED AND
GREASED AND SERVICED AND READY TO DRIVE AWAY.
Our Motto—Civility and Service
Meredith Bros, and Bell-Irving
PHONE 182
Day or Night
STAR DEALERS
COURTENAY, B.C.
P.O. BOX 121
CANADIAN DAUGHTERS
FIRST WHIST DRIVE
SUCCESSFUL AFFAIR
COURTENAY,—Under Ihe auspices
of Courtenny Assembly. No. G. Canadian Daughters' League, one of the
most enjoyable whist drives held this
season In Courtenay look place last
Friday night in Booth's Hall.
Twenty-four tables were in the play
and others who earae just to spend a
social evening were present and thoroughly enjoyed themselves. Messrs.
John McKenzie, Jr., and William Hagarty on behalf of the Daughters, looked after the tables   ami   everything
went with a spirit that was commendable. Ladies' prizes were won by
Miss Williamson, Mrs. Victor Shop-
land and .Mrs. Harry Austin and gentle
men winners were Messrs. II. I. Smith
of Victoria, a visitor in town. Frank
Dack and Henry Parkin, of Headquarters. The refreshments were In
charge of the ladies, who were ably
assisted lu serving by members of the
Native Sons Lodge. After tbe serving of refreshments a dance wus enjoyed until two o'clock. Next Wednesday, another whlst drive will be
held under thc joint auspices of tlle
Canadian Daughters' League and the
Native Sons, to which tbe public Is
cordially Invited.
TOUR OF THE WORLD
AT SCHOOL SOCIAL
Get A Raincoat
GET IT AT McLEOD'S
Get A Pair Of Rubbers
GET IT AT McLEOD'S
Get A Suit Of Underwear
GET IT AT McLEOD'S
Get A New Suit
GET IT AT McLEOD'S
TIIE FINEST STOCK OK OEM'S AMI BOYS' CLOTHING AND
FURNISHINGS   IN  COMOX   VALLEY
EASIEST PRICES
McLEOD'S STORE
TELEPHONE 41
COURTENAY
COURTENAY.—Last Friday night
the public school was the scene of a
most enjoyable party, organized by
the pupils of the high school and
which was attended by nearly one
hundred and fifty people.
It was a novel affair, taking the
form of a travel and Valentine social,
the guests being transported from one
country to another, the rooms of the
school being appropriately decorated
to represent Comox. in charge of Margaret Duncan; Hudson's Bay, in
charge of Beatrice Cntchnole; The
Far North, In charge of Muriel McPhee; Egypt, In charge of Nellie Taylor; Carolina, In charge of Sidney Williams; Japan, In charge of Dorothy
Sutherland; Bohemia, In charge ot
Marlon McPherson.
It was necessary to first obtain a
passport allowing free travel in the
various countries and district. This
department was presided over by
Chester Haas and Madaline Swan.
The tickets used resembled a long
drawn out affair similar to those ln
use on transcontinental railways.
Isabelle Moncrief as ticket agent.
In each room the visitors or travellers were allowed 10 minutes in which
to view the sights.
After the tour was completed community singing was indulged in, the
accompaniments being rendered by
Mr. Harold Simmons. Dainty re.
freshments were served after which
dancing was the order until twlevo
o'clock, the music being voluntarily
provided by Miss Beasley, Mlas Smith
and Mr. D. Simmons. Special invitations had been Isued to the teaching staff of the public school and the
school trustees and a great evening
was spent by all those who had the
good fortune to be present.
rsss
FISHING TACKLE
We have a full and complete line of Rods, Reels,
Lines, Spoons, Casts and Hooks. In fact, all tackle
necessary for the "Complete Angler."
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES
We are headquarters for Electrical Supplies and
Radio Sets and Parts in this District. We are electrical contractors and no job is too big or too small.
LET US QUOTE ON YOUR ELECTRICAL WORK
THE
Piket Electric
LET'S GO!
Phone
164
COURTENAY
B.C.
P.O. Box
71
■■SHHBHBHHfHMBBWB
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
Try our 100 per cent Whole Wheat Bread, the only
physical culture loaf.
Always a nice selection of cakes to choose from
which you know.
First Claii Certificate (Upper Grade) for
Bread   Making   guarantees   the   quality.
NOT HOW CHEAP, BUT HOW GOOD
The Holding-on-to Quality Shop.
The Courtenay Tea Room
IMPOSSIBLE EPITAPHS
Here Is the grave of Timothy Tether
Who never kicked about the weather.
Here lie the bones of Absolom Earl
Who never cussed the telephone girl.
HANGER
That groom Indeed Is
Falling fast
Who tells his bride all
Of his past.
Put one hundred men un an Island
where Ilsh Is a staple article of sustenance. Twenty-live of the men
catch fish. Twenty-five others clean
the fish. Twenty-live cook the Ilsh.
Twenty-live hunt fruit and vegetables.
The entire company eats what thus
ls gathered and prepared.
So long as everybody works there :
'is plenty.     All hands are happy.
Ten of the allotted Ilsh catchers stop
catching fish.
Ten more dry and hide part of ihe
fish they catch.
Five continue to catch Ilsh, but work
only part of the day at lt.
Fewer fish go Into the community
kitchen.
But the same number of men Insist
upon having the same amount of 11..h
lo eat as they had before.
The fifty men who formerly Cleaned
and cooked the fish hnve less to do
owing to the undersupply of fish. Hut
they continue to demand food.
Gradually greater burdens arc laid
upon the fruit and vegetable hunters.
These Insist upon a larger share of
Ilsh In return for their larger efforts
In gathering fruit und vegetables. It
Is denied them, and soon twenty-five
quit gathering fruit aud vegetables.
But the entire one hundred men
continue to insist upon their right to
eat.
Tho daily food supply gradually
shrinks. The man with Iwo Ilsh demands three bananas In exchange for
one of them. The man with two bananas refuses to part with one for fewer than three fish.
Finally the ten men remaining at
work quit in disgust. Everybody continues to eat. Thc hidden fish nre
brought to light and consumed. Conies
a day when there is no food of nny
kind. Everybody on the Island blames
everybody else.
What would seem to be the solution? Exactly. We thought you
would guess it.
For we repeat that you ean't ent,
PRICES
BIO SURE AND GET OUR PRICES ON ANY KIND OF BUILDING .MATERIAL, BEFORE YOU BUY.
BECAUSE there are so many different grades, and
qualities-of lumber, sash doors, roofing, etc.
THEREFORE if you will only take advantage of our
long experience in figuring costs of building materials,
we are sure that we can at least help you to decide
WHERE to buy.
DONT HESITATE!
■Ill
SanitayyT.o place/W (vrmt t»
rsott on Cold Stdl Cgnjjtu'um
SOLD BY
Edwards  & Orr
Builders' Supplies and Working Shop
Dealers in Rough and Kiln-Dried Lumber
Express Deliver Phone Chargos
Anywhere' ONE-SEVEN Reasonable
Opposite Corfield Motors , Courtenay
Mr. A. L. Carruthers, bridge inspector of the department of public work",
was a visitor to Courtenay on Monday. He left for Victoria on Tuesday morning, accompanied by the resident engineer, Mr. O. W. Smith.
i COURTENAY COUNCIL
PURCHASE TRUCK
FOR STREET WORK
COURTENAY,—The City Council
held a regular meeting on Monday-
last when a campaign to repair the
| streets of the city was Inaugurated by
the passing of a resolution to purchase a Chevrolet truck and appoint
a man to do work continually on the
roads within the city and any other
work that the truck can do in au
effort to put the streets in first class
shape.
A communication was read from
lhe Liquor Control Board in reply to
a request by the city for particulars
of the deduction of (369 from the city's
share of the liquor profits. The re.
ply was to the effect that to disclose
why the deduction was made for enforcement would be disclosing the
'■ method of prosecution, and not in the
! best interests of enforcement.
ALBERTA WINS AGAIN
buy,
wear
sell,  steal,  give  away,  hoard, i what Isn't.—Editorial   from   Chicago
use, play with or gamble with | Herald and Examiner. |
Nick Taltenger, of Claresholm, Alberta, who has been a  winner with
j his seed barley at the International
Hay and Grain  Show, Chicago, has
I won further honors at the brewers'
exhibition tn Great Britain, where he
carried off the championship with his
two-rowed barley. ln the Colonial
class, with 52 bushels, he won fourth
place. This show Is thc largest of Its
kind in the world.
"•Wr
"PROVINCIAL  ELECTIONS  ACT
Ciiiiiox Electoral District
NOTICE Is hereby given that I shall
on Monday, the 7th dny of April, 1924.
nt Ihe hour of 10 o'clock ln the forenoon, ai the Court-house, Cumberland.
hold a special Bitting of the Court ot
Revision for thc purpose of revising
lhe list of voters for the said electoral
district, nnd nf bearing and determining nny and all objections to the
retention of any name on the said list
or In ihe registration as a voter of any
applicant for registration; and for
the other purposes set forth In the
"Provincial Elections Act."
Hated at Cumberland, B. C, this
20lh dny of February, 1924.
JOHN BAIRD,
Registrar of Votcre,
Comox Electoral District. TEN
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1924.
NEW SPRING GOODS
For Household Use
For the household we have very large selection of new
Curtain Nets, Marquisitcs and Nottingham Lace Net,
the choice is indeed large and the prices are lower than
today's prices.
Colored Silkoline, in a good variety of shades, makes a
splendid drapery, about !!(> inches wide.     Per yard 35c.
Heavy Cretonne, in shades of Helio and Pink, fully 30
inches wide.     Price per yard   35c.
Curtain Net, good for bedroom curtains, in white only,
Price per yard  ,  25c.
Marquisite, in a splendid wearing quality, both in white
and Cream, Price per yard       -15c.
Beautiful Lace Drapery, with lace on both sides, makes
a very pretty Drape. Price per yard   75c.
Very fine soft Curtain material, looks particularly well
on the window, and has thai rich appearance whicli
makes a window attractive.     Price per yard .... $1.25
New Axminster Rugs, for the Floor. Prices S 1.50 $5.95
Linoleum, in 4 yards wide, best quality. Have your
floor laid all in one piece, no joins in the centre. See
the quality and coloring.
A new shipment of Restmore Mattresses, in quite a
number of qualities to suit your requirements,
Pictorial Review Patterns Have Arrived and are now
on sale.
DRYGOODS
& GENTS FURNISHINGS
mr nn i" Fiflra
m
That British Columbia is winnig it^
fight against social disease, is clear
from the report just issued hy liio
Hon. J. D. MacLean, Provincial Secretary,
The Government's Rght a gain 81 venereal disease was Inaugurated thn •>
years ago wilh the establlshmenl of
[ree clinics ot Victoria and Vancouver.
"We did not expect to find any
startling diminution Cor five yea,rs
after the inauguration of the work,
Inn now we lind an encouraging diminution reported after only three
years uf work." states the report.
In this Province, 1500 syphilis
cases a yeur are made non-infective.
Thirty-six children, ranging from two
to fifteen years of ago, all of them innocent victims of syphilis are heiug
treated in Victoria alone.
Besides paying for the clinics, the
Government Is supplying Balvarson Lo
any physician sending for ii for his
patients.
The siimnry of the work of tho two
clinics shows ii growing number of
new patients us follows: I'.t2l. lil'l
new patients; L922, 17s7; and 1922,
189S.
Total treatments last year in Victoria  numbered  S.i1!!!  and    in    Van
couver 20,803, Besides these ther.
were \M-2\i tests made for venereal
disases.
The Sudan Government has accepted a tender for lfio.onf) railway
ties of Douglas Fir. The contract
expressly stipulates ihat these ties
shall he of British Columbia  Douglas
Fir.
o
The  irude  extension  branch  of the
British Columbia Forest Service made
itrong representations to the engineers of i lie Sudan Government Kail-
ways In 1921 rgarding the value of
Dougla Fir which resulted in a small1
order being placed. This repeat order is evidence that the quality of
British Columbia Fir has beeu appreciated.
CAM) OF THANKS
Mrs. D. Stewart aud family wish to
thank the doctors and nurses and Mrs.
Maclntyre of the local hospital for
lheir ever-willing help and kindness
to the lute Mr. Stewart while a patient
there, and also for the many offers of
help and expressions of sympathy
during their recent bereavement.
i
• I rhi iJSi'-- ■•»*-:
ffl
"IT PAYS TO DEAL AT LANG'S"
tt
SATURDAY
CUT-RATE DRUGS
— — ETC.
$1.50 La-Cti-Pi-A (Natures own Tonic  $1.28
,50 Effervescent Morning Salts      .43
.75 Creolin. 20-oz, tin .  «2
,86 Tooth Paste, Carbolic, Peroxide, Charcoal     .28
,85 Face Cream (Vanishing)   23
.25 Talcum Powder       .18
.75 Asprolax   (S3
$1.00 Syrup Hypophos Co.  87
gri'it SKl.l-l II.I.INt: FOUNTAIN PENS, tVIIILE THEV LAST
EACH   DU   CUNTS
Candy Specials
Ryley's Creamy, and Assorted Toffee, per lb 35c.
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
His Master's Voice Victor Records
Local Briefs
Mr. John Cameron made a business
trip to Vancouver last Monday.
* •   •
Mr. F. G. Freeman, who was in
Cumberland for the week-end, returned to Vancouver on Tuseday.
* *    *
Mr. and Mrs. S. Alexander and Mr.
M, Herainington returned to Cowichan
Lake on Monday.
* .   .
Mrs. M. Hemmlngan and son return-
ed to Cowichan  Lake    on    Tuesday
morning.
* *   *
Bob. "Peanuts" Robertson, the pop-1
lar young Junior football player, un-!
derwent an operation for appendicitis
in the local hospital ou Friday morn-1
Ing.      Lntest reports say that he is
doing as well as can be expected.
Lt Col. Charles W. Villiers, General Manager of the Canadian Collier,
les IDuusmuir) Ltd., left for Nanaimo
on Friday morning, accompanied by
General Superintendent Thomas Graham.
* #   *
Mrs. W. P. Symons left for Vancouver on Saturday on a two weeks'
vacation.
* *   *
Wi. A. Owen, Construction Engineer
of the Canadian Collieries left for
Nanaimo on Tuesday and returned on
Thursday.
SCOTCH CONCERT TO
BE HELD MARCH' 14
It Is not generally known that iho I
correspondence   courses   Inaugurated
by Hon. J.  D.  MacLean,  Minister of!
Education, arc being taken advantage
of.
The course for coal miners is beina.
taken by 152 mine workers who are
seeking to qualify as overmen, shot-,
lighters, mine managers    and    mini i
surveyors.
Thc elementary course tor pupils
beyond the reach of schools is being
taken by 184 pupils to whom it is
proving a great boon.
Don't forget that a Scotch Concert
will be held In the Presbyterian
Church on Friday, March 14th. Re-
member the date and you won't regret
lt.
Joe Bartoldi on Friday tast acci-
dently backed Damontc's coal truck
that he was driving into the building
of Henderson's Candy Store and broke
one of tbe large plate glass windows.
The estimated damage wlll be one
hundred dollars.
NEW REGULATIONS
NOW IN EFFECT
The new (lame Conservation Board
regulations passed at the last session of the Legislature, which wero
expected to do much towards the en i-
servatlon of fur In this province, are
now In effect and reports from game
wardens show that the changes have
resulted tn much improved conditions-.
The Board points out that British
Columbia is the chief source of fur
on the continent. There nre lOO.Onn
square miles of virgin territory, where
the sound of the rifle Is rarely heard
only reasonable protection to ensure
and where the fur-bearers require
a good "crop" for many decades to
come. Every effort is being put
forth to conserve this valuable Industry, which produces severul millions of dollars of revenue annually.
FOR SALE
BARRED ROCK COCKERELS—AG-
asslz and Agassiz-Golding strain,
(4.00 each. R. Waddell, R.R. No. 1.
Cumberland. F.ld
FOR SALE—CHILD'S GREY W'K'i:-
er Sulkey, with hood. Apply to A.
F. Brownsey, 307'/*. Penrith St.
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
Ntw shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeki, •muring frith good!
■11 th* time.
Henderson's
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders tt
Tommy's Hardware Store
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hof"el
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Connecting ith Boat at Union Bay
every Sundi.y Horning. Leave Cumberland Hotel, I o'clock.
Here rand I h
ere
A new reronl his h"en p.sfn.*.ished
hy the Dcp.v. tmcnl ef Marine and
Fisheries in the number of white
fish eggs colleei «d for hatchery purposes in the Greal Lakes and the
l.'ikc of the Woods. A total nf 101.-
560*000 eggs were obtained, which
exceed- all previous collections in
the province of OntHi-in.
A new deposit of noapstone hai
been discovered on Trap Lake, a
small lake south of Wabigoon Lake,
in northwestern Ontario. The quality
»f Uie stone hus been reported as excellent for various industrial uses,
ami practical trials are under way.
Water transportation is available
direct from the deposits to Wabigoon
and Dryden, on the main line of th*
Canadian Pacific Railway.
It is announced by the Canadian
Pacific Railway that two free
scholarships covering four years'
tuition in architecture, chemical,
civil, mechanical or electrical engineering at McGill University, are
offered, subject to competitive examinations, to apprentices and other
employees enrolled on the permanent
staff of Uie company and under 21
years of age, and to minor sons of
employees.
Canada's fisheries' production during 1923 is estimated to he worth
140,000,000. At the beginning of the
year it was not thought that anything like this mark would be reached, for the Fordney tariff had cut
deeply into export* to the United
StetM. Bat as the year wore on the
demand and prices generally improved, thnt giving fishermen along
the Atlantic coast especially a much
better market.
Approximttely $5,000,000 will be
spent by tbe Dominion Coal Com-
ptny to open up a new mine and
colliery at Lingan, Nova Scotia, nnd
construction of a branch line of railway to tbe new site has already been
started. The new colliery will be
•quipped with every modern device,
tnd t model town will be planned in
its vicinity. It will have a capacity
of some 2,000 tons daily.
Tbe tenth annual Ski Tournament
will be held at Revelstoke, February
6th tnd 6th, in connection with which
ski-joring, tobogganing, snowshoe-
ing, sktting, etc., will be featured
An endeavor is being made to secure
the tttendance of Uno Hilstrom,
Sweden's champion ski-jumper, as
well as other famous ski-jumpers
from both Canada and the United
States.
Canada in 11123 produced mora
coal, lead, col alt and asbestos than
during any other year since mining
records have been kept. The output
of coal was in thc neighborhood of
17,300,000 tons, or 035,000 tons better than the best previous record,
and 2,000,000 tons over that in 1922.
The output of copper, nickel, cement
and asbestos was also much above
that for the preceding years. Gold
production wus down somewhat, but
this was due more lo a power shortage than anything else.
As a result of efforts on the part
of Hon. 1. A. Robb, Minister of Immigration and Colonization, a 20 per
cent, preference rate on Atlantic
passages for all British immigrants
settling in Canada has been arranged to come into effect on March
1 and continue until the end of the
main immigration season at the end
of November. It will apply only
to British immigrants coming direct
to Canada from the British Isles,
and will affect, all lines coming to
Canadian Atlantic oorts.
Three delightful cruises have been
awarded to agents of the Canadian
Pacific Railway for services rendered the company during the past
year. Oy of them, J. J. Forster,
general agent at Vancouver, will
sail on a lound-the-world cruise on
the "Empress of Canada"; W. C.
Casey, general agent at Winnipeg,
will spend sixty-eight days cruising
the Mediterranean on the "Empress
of Scotland," while D, R. Kennedy,
ceneral agen! at Buffalo, will enjoy
j. twenty-nine-ihy cruise in the West
Indies on the "F.mpiess of Britain."
The trips were awarded by the company   in   n 'iiilion  of  last  year's
wort in coin ■     "ii 'v'nh cruise bookings. '
NOTICE
The Grocery business carried on by Burns and
Brown has been dissolved by mutual consent, Matt.
Brown, one of the partners, having bought out the interest of Mr. Burns.
The business will continue as heretofore, all debts
will be paid by tho owner M. Brown and all accounts
clue Burns and Brown will be paid to M. Brown.
To facilitate the full adjustment of the concerns
of the business I will begreatly obliged if those owing
accounts will have thorn paid as soon as possible so
that all liabilities against the business may be met at
the earliest opportunity.
To our many customers who have extended us a
full measure of support our thanks are tendered, and a
continuance of the same will be much appreciated.    -
(Sdg.) M. BROWN.
HIS HEARING RESTORED
The Invisible ear drum invented by
A. O. Leonard, which ls a manintutc
megaphone, lining inside the ear entirely out of sight, is  restoring  the
hearing of hundreds of people ln New
York   City.       Mr.   Leonard   Invented
this drum lo relieve himself of deafness and head noises, and It does I liis
so successfully that no one could tell
he wus a deaf man.      It ls effective
when deafness ls caused hy oatarrah
or by perforated or wholly destroyed
natural  drums,      A  request  tor  Information to
A.  O.   LEONARD,
Suite 430, 70 Fifth Ave..
NEW VORK CITY,
will  be  given  prompt   reply.
DEAFNESS CAN
BE CURED
DEAFNESS, NOISES IN TIIE HEAD,
ANO NASAL CATARRH.
The new Continental remedy culled
"I, A It M A I, E N E" (Kegd.)
Is n simple harmless liomctreiitnicnl
which absolutely cures deafness, noises In the head, etc. No Expensive Appliances Needed fnr this new Ointment, Instantly operates upon the nf-
t'eclml parts with complete und permanent success. Scores of Wonderful
Cures Reported.
RELIABLE TESTIMONY
Mrs. K. Wilkinson, of Slnd Road,
Stroud, writes I—"Flense could I
trouble you to send me unollier box of
the Ointment. It Is not for myself, but
for a friend of mine who Is ns bud us
I wus, aud cannot get nny rest for the
uolses In the head. I feel a new woman, and ciiii go tu lied now und get n
good night's rest, which 1 hud not
been iible to do for ninny months. It
ts a wniderful remedy and urn mosl
delighted to rcriininiende It"
Mrs. E. Crowe, of Whltehorse Itond,
Croydon, writes: "I um pleused to
tell you that the small tin ot ointment
yon sent to me at Ventnur, has proved
a complete success, my hearing is
now quite normal, und the horrible
head noises hnve ceased. The uctlon
of this new remedy must lie very re-
mnrkuble, for I have been troubled
with these complaints for nearly ten
years, und have had some of the very best medical advice together with
other expensive ear Instruments all
to no purpose. 1 need hardly soy how
very "grateful I am, for my life hns
undergone an entire change."
Try one box to-day, whicli can be
forwarded to any address on receipt
of money order for lfl.00. There Is
Nothing Better at uny 1'rlee.
Address orders to: —
"LARMALENE"  CO.   (II.  Thomas)
"Wooolands"
Bcun Hartford,
Kent, England.
With The
Churches
HOLY  TRINITY  ANGLICAN
Sunday, February 24, 1923.
Holy Communion S.3U a.m.
Sunday School 2.30 p.m.
Evensong 7 p.m.
—Rev.  W. Leversedge
GRACE   METHODIST   CHURCH
Sunday. February 24, 1923.
Morning Service 11 a.m.
Sabbath School 11.45 a.m.
ICvenlng Service 7 p.m. Subject—
"The Great Invitation."
Solo and chorus "Beautiful Words
of Jesus." by Miss E. Henderson ami
choir.
Everybody felcome.
-Rev. J. It. Butler, Pustor.
Auction Sales
TOMORROW,  SATURDAY,  KEII. SI.
For Mrs. J. A. Fraser, 211 Maryport Ave., Cumberland, Household   Furniture   and   Effects.
Sale at  1.30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, NEXT FEB. 27
For Mrs. J. Webster. 30H Maryport
Ave, Cumberland.—Household Furniture, etc., Including:—Morris, Seu-
gruss and other Easy Chairs; Carpets
and Kuas; Hookcnse and lnrge tiuaut-
Ity of Hooks; Handsome Solid Oak
Library Table; Dining Table and 5
Chairs; Linoleum; Open Fire Stove;
Child's Rockers and High Chairs; Curtains and Blinds; Double anil Single
Bedsteads; n Pillows; child's tsm;
Oak and other Dressers; Kubber Ball)
Tub; Vacuum Cleaner; Cook Range,
nearly new; Kitchen Table and Chilli's
Kitchen Cupbourd: Crockery, (Haas.
China, cis.; Kitchen and Cooking
Utensils.; Garden Hose; Large Tent
Fly nnd a very large quantity of other
lirtieles.
Terms Strictly Cash
Further  particulars  In  posters  from
G. J. HARDY
AUCTIONEER COURTENAY
TO RAISE FUNDS
FOR THE U. B. C.
BUILDINGS
Revenue lo offset at least part of
the cost of the University of British
Columbia buildings at I'olnt Grey will
be secured this summer by tlio government through the sale of building lots
nt Point Grey. The government
owns 3,000 acres of land' In that vicinity, the,greater part of which Is considered the best building property in
Greater Vancouver. About WO acres
will be disposed of this year, the area
being laid out according to the most
modern town-planning rules. It Is
expected that by the time the entire
acreage has been disposed of the total
cost of the institution will probably
have been taken care of.
1

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