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The Crofton Gazette and Cowichan News May 22, 1902

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 tU Crofton Gazette
AND
COWICHAN NEWS
Devoted to the Mining and Agricultural Interests of Vancouver Island, Texada
Island, and Coast Mainland Districts.
VOL. 1.
CROFTON, B. C, THURSDAY,   MAY   22, 1902.
NO. 13
COAL MINING ON VANCOUVER ISLAND-!I.
By William M. Brewer.
(Conclusion of an article in the Engineering and Mining
Journal, to whose courtesy aud to that of Mr. Brewer we
are indebted for our illustration.)
IN the following description of the collieries in these coal
fields, the writer will begin at the southern portion :
Douglas District. Extension Mines — Operations by
the Wellington Colliery Company, Limited, were commenced
at these collieries about three years ago, when an adit 14x8
feet was started under the coal seam and driven one mile in
a southerly direction! with the dip of the coal. This tunnel
serves to-day for transporting the coal to the surface from a
field having a superficial area of 2,400 acres. The breast of
the tunnel is about 300 feet below the surface. Nature has
done a great deal towards forming this field advantageous for
economic mining. The upper folds of an extensive anticlinal
have been eroded off, leaving a valley lying between the two
ridges. On the north side the coal measures dip northerly,
and on the south side southerly. The field to the north,
which has not yet been opened up, covers an area of about
5.000 acres, that to the south immediately adjacent an area
of 2,400 acres. Beyond the southern boundary of this a
fault occurs, and the coal is not picked up again for a distance of about two miles to the south. At that point No. 1
slope was driven on the south slope of Mount Benson, from
which the coal mined on that side of the fault is hauled to
the surface and shipped to Extension over a narrow-gauge
railway three miles in length.
On the north side of the fault, in addition to the main
tur.nel already referred to, there are two other openings,
designated as slopes Nos. 2 and 3, which have been connected
with the main adit level, but at the time of the writer's visit
were closed because of the fire which broke out during the
summer of 1901. Preparations are being made to flood these
slopes. This could not be done economically during the summer, because the water necessary would have to have been
pumped up a considerable distance and elevated about 300
feet, but during the rainy season the accumulation of water
above the level of the slopes can be carried into the burning
mine by gravity.
All of these openings are on the coal seam known as the
Wellington. A record of three bore holes on the line of the
main tunnel and ahead of its present breast shows the following : No. 1. bore at a depth of 402 feet, coal was encountered, underlying conglomerate;    below that the record reads:
Coal      1 foot
Shale      9 inches
Coal   2 feet 7 inches
Coal and shale  1 foot 3 inches
Co.nl    4 feet 3 inches
Coal and shale   0 inches
Coal  7 feet 9 inches
Coal and shale   0 inches
Coal    2 feet 9 inches
No. 2 bore on same line, coal encountered at a depth of
50i» feet, underlying conglomerate; below that the record
reads :
Coal    2 feet 3 inches
Shale  9 inches
Coal      3 inches
Coal and shale     G inches
Coal       0 feet
No. 3, on the same line, coal encountered at a depth of
519 feet underlying conglomerate; below that the record
reads :
Coal    4 feet 3 inches
Coal and shale  9 inches
Coal    1 foot 3 inches
Shale      2 inches
Coal     1 foot 10 inches
A portion of this field, but apparently limited in extent,
lies to the south of the Nanaimo River, while all that portion
already referred to lies to the north of the river.
At the tunnel opening, the coal as mined is hauled in cars
of about lMs tons capacity by mules from the levels to the
inclines, where a cable is clipped on and the loaded cars are
lowered by means of an electric winch, of 50 horse-power,
stationed near the face of each incline, to the sidings on the
main tunnel level, which is double-tracked.
There the loaded cars are coupled together and hauled to
tho weighing scales at the mouth of the tunnel by an electric
motor. At Nos. 1, 2 and 3 slopes the coal has heretofore
been hauled to the surface by steam hoists, but since the connections have been completed between the tunnel and Nc8. 2
and 3 slopes, these hoists will l»e only used in future to lower
the loaded cars to the main tunnel level, and haul the empties
up the slopes to the entrances of the levels. The main tunnel sidings and winch stations are lighted by incandescent
lights. Two 10-tou electric motors are in use for haulage
through the tunnel.
All coal mined in 'British Columbia is weighed as it comes
from the mines previous to screening. The output from this
colliery during 1901 was 415,580 long tons; the sales, 309,154
long tons.
The Extension colliery is about 13- miles by present branch
railway from Ladysmith, on the ma in line of the Esquinialt
& Nanaimo Railway, over which the coal is hauled to the
wharves at Oyster Bay, where the town of Ladysmith has
been built within the past two years. A shorter branch is
being constructed which will reduce this distance to 9'/2 miles.
On the shore of Oyster Bay bunkers have been built with
a capacity of 9,700 tons, while the wharves are so constructed
as to afford a loading capacity of about 5,000 tons per day
into vessels. There are three wharves —one 1,000 feet long
by 40 feet wide, with three standard-gauge railroad tracks;
in ether 400 feet long by 00 feet wide, with four railroad
tracks; and a transfer wharf for handling freight for the
steam ferry which plies between Ladysmith and Vancouver.
Cranberry District. Alexandria Colliery — To the northeast from the Extension mines is situated the Alexandria
colliery, which has been in operation about six years, but was
closed down at the time of the writer's recent visit. The output from this colliery during 1901 was 71,829 long tons, of
which 70,450 were sold. The operator is the Wellington Colliery Company, Limited.
Nanaimo Colliery — This colliery is owned and operated
by the New Vancouver Coal Mining & Land Company, Limited, which acquired that portion of the field adjacent to
Nanaimo Harbor and underlying the straits, as well as the
islands of Newcastle, Protection, Gabriola and ii portion of
Salt Spring, from the Hudson's Bay Company in 1802. This
property embraces a total acreage of about 30,000 acres.
The shipments during 1901 reached a total of about 500,000
long tons.
The openings at this colliery are shafts Nos. 1 and 2,
Esplanade; vertical depth of each, 034 feet. No. 1 is the
main working shaft, while No. .2 is an upcast for ventilating
all the workings between No. 1 and Protection Island. Protection Island shaft is situated about one mile' north from
No. 1 shaft; vertical depth, 070 feet. Soutlnfield No. 5 shaft
is situated 3% miles south of No. 1 shaft; vertical depth,
501 feet. Harewood shaft is 3% miles west from No. 1 shaft:
vertical depth, 226 feet. Newcastle shaft is in the centre of
Newcastle Island, to the northwest from Protection Island:
vertical depth, 380 feet. The air shaft is connected with
workings under Protection Island, for ventilating field north
from that island. Slopes and levels have been driven from
these shafts to work the extensive field east, north and south.
The seam of coal chiefly worked at this colliery is the
Douglas; its thickness varies from 2 feet to 20 feet. Except
on Gabriola Island, the coal dips to the east at an incline of
about 1 foot in 12. Bore-holes have demonstrated that under
Gabriola Island there occurs a basin, with the coal dipping
from the different points of the compass towards a common
centre. The underground workings have not yet reached
this basin.
The upper portion of the seam where it reaches its maximum thickness is softer, and a poorer quality of coal usually
than the lower, but because of the lack of regular stratification of the coal itself, the entire thickness has to be mined.
The lower portion of the scam in these thick places averaging
about eight feet in thickness is a much harder coal, and most
_______ THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
of it is therefore sold for domestic fuel, while the remainder
is  an excellent steaming coal.
In the northern portion of the field, near the boundary of
the Wellington district, the Wellington seam, a coal of better
quality than the Douglas, occurs, underlying the latter, and is
also being mined. The extent of the productive coal field to
the west from Nanaimo cannot be estimated from present
knowledge, but the seam is workable on the llarewood tract,
3Vt miles west, which embraces an area of 9,500 acres, and
is also owned and operated by the New Vancouver Coal Mining & Land Company. To the east of Nanaimo harbor, under
the sea, the productive area of the coal fields extends an undetermined distance.
The main slope from the bottom of No. 1 shaft has been
driven 7,200 feet towards the east.    All the workings from
Two Ingersoll-Sargeaut cutting machines, also worked by
ct Hi pressed air, are in use.
The No. 1 and Protection Island shafts are equipped with
two cages, with a carrying capacity of two cars each I1/.
tons loaded. The Protection Island shaft is 20x12 feet, Hare-
wood shaft 10x8 feet, No. 5 shaft 20x8 feet. The two latter
are equipped with cages, carrying only one car each. The
total length of underground tracks is 30 miles.
In addition to the electric motors on Nos. 1 and 2 levels,
and about 100 mules for handling cars between the stalls and
levels, a system of endless rope haulage has recently been installed near the bottom of No. 1 shaft to replace the old one
of single rope, and winches to serve Nos. 3, 4 and 5 levels.
The Danville, 111., Foundry & Machine Company have furnished this plant.    The Morgan clip will be used.
OUNSMOIR
Oi ST.
0OUGUS
DI3T.
/
1
and connected with No. 1 shaft, except those under Newcastle
and Protection Islands, are under the water. From a point
about 1,800 feet down the main slope another has been driven
towards the southeast in good coal. This slope extends for
about 4,500 feet and will work a territory three miles square,
the coal varying from 5 to 10 feet in thickness. About 1,500
feet further down the main slope a level has been driven to
the north, connecting the main slope of Protection Island.
Since all the workings have been connected with No. 1
shaft and the endless rope haulage installed, the hoisting
plant heretofore in use on Protection Island will be abandoned, and the entire output hoisted through 'No. 1 shaft.
Shafts Nos. 1 and 2 are circular, being 17 feet and 14
feet respectively in diameter, and timbered with cedar blocks;
all the other shafts are rectangular in shape. Two Howells
mil.ing drills worked by compressed air are used in the mine.
There are ten miles of broad-gauge railroad connecting
the various shafts with the wharves, from which all the coal
mined is shipped by water to Victoria and California ports,
except that sold for local consumption in the city of Nanaimo.
The loading system at the wharves was designed by W. H.
Wall, the company's mechanical engineer. The railroad cars
are run by gravity to the shipping stages, where each car is
elevated by a hydraulic lift to a height of 38 feet above extreme high title, and discharged into chutes to suit any
height of vessel and pour coal into three hatches simultaneously. The blinker capacity at the Nanaimo wharf is 10,000
tons, while that at Protection Island wharf is 7,500 tons.
The wharves are lighted by electricity, so that night operations can be carried on with perfect safety. The company
employs 1,100 men in all.
Wellington   District.      Wellington   Colliery — This   mine, THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
3
Avhich was the scene of the late Hon. Robert Dunsmuir's
operations on his own behalf, was closed down late in 1900,
presumably having been worked out so far as profitable operations can be conducted through the old openings. The coal
produced from this mine belonged to the Wellington seam,
and was of such a superior quality that it commanded the
highest price in the California markets. The results from
this mine made a millionaire of Mr. Dunsmuir, besides furnishing the bulk of the capital required to build the Esquimalt
& Nanaimo Railway. The shipping point for this colliery
was departure Bay, to the north from Nanaimo Harbour.
There an extensive wharf and plant for shipping were erected
and operated until the mine was closed down.
West Wellington Colliery — This mine adjoins the Wellington property on the west. The property has not been
actively operated for some years. When it was, the output.
was shipped from Nanoose Harbour, six miles distant, and
connected with the mine by means of a wooden tramway.
To the north and west from Nanoose there occur limited
areas of the igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Vancouver
seiies which form a break in the continuity of the cretaceous
coal measures for a short distance, and divide the Wellington
and the fields south of it from the Comox' coal fields, to the
northwest. Iu another article the writer will describe these
latter, which are of vast importance and furnish the bulk of
coal used by ships in the Alaska trade and a portion used by
the British North Pacific squadron, stationed at Esquimalt
Harbour, near Victoria.
MINING NEWS.
THE TYEE SMELTER AT LADYSMITH.
Ground has just been broken for the excavations for this
smelter. Mr. J. Haggerty has secured the excavating contract, and has 25 men working on it.
THE COPPER CANYON STRIKE.
Mr. W. A. Dier seems to have struck a really rich ledge
in this mine. The ore is showing exceedingly well, both in
quality and quantity. It would seem as if a new strike ln<
the Mount Sicker district were becoming almost a daily occurrence.
NEW STRIKE ON THE TYEE.
The new strike on the Tyee mine is found to exceed
expectations. The assay value runs : Gold, $8.80; silver,
11.30 ounces; copper, 23.85 per cent. The new body of ore
lies over 200 feet from the surface, and 000 feet from the
Lerora boundary.
MINING  AT. SOOKE.
A Victoria syndicate have evidently got hold of some very
premising mineral claims in the Sooke district. The property
now being exploited is situated about 1,200 feet from Sooke
Harbour. The ledge on which work is being done is 14 feet
wide, and may be traced through the property for over 600
feet. The assay value of the surface ore goes 26 per cent,
ia cepper, and already 400 tons of this ore are lying on the
dump ready for shipment to the Crofton smelter.
THE WESTSIDE
THE GREAT MAIL ORDER HOUSE.
THE "INDEX" AND "BALTIC" CLAIMS.
The Messrs. A. and M. Howe, of Chemainus, are doing a
good deal of work on the Index and Baltic claims, on Mount
Sicker. These claims lie on the northern slope of the mountain, and are about four miles from Westholme, near the
switchback on the Mount Sicker Railway. The assay value
of surface rock on the Index shows $4.82 in gold and 1 1-5
ounces silver. Strangely enough, there is no trace of copper.
This looks like being a free-milling proposition.
SHOPPING BY MAIL !!
Out-of-town Customers can shop very easily by mail if they only care to use
the advantages of our Mail-Order System. If you can't come in person write
for anything- you want, a post card will bring you samples and information. Experienced clerks will execute order the same day as received.     Money Back if
not Satisfied.
MAIL ORDER ADDRESS:
THE HUTCHESON CO., Ltd.
8o Government Street, VICTORIA, B. C.
R P.RITHET&Co.Ltd.
WHOLESALE MERCHANTS.
MACHINERY  FOR THE  KEY  CITY.
Captain Wasson has been down at Victoria superintending
the transportation of a large quantity of machinery which
has arrived for the Key City mine by the steamer Queen.
SHIPMENT PROM THE MONITOR MINE, ALBERNI.
The steamer Queen City brought down 150 tons of ore
from the Monitor mine. This is en route for the Tacoma
smelter.
GROCERIES,     WINES,    LIQUORS,    CEMENT,
CUMBERLAND COAL.
Victoria, B. C.
TZOUHALEM   HOTEL,
DUNCANS,
Price Bros.,
Proprietors.
FELL & COMPANY, Limited Liability,
GROCERS,
WINES  AND  LIQUORS.
Victoria, B. C.
Thorpe's Ginger Ale
Prize Medal
World's Fair.
VICTORIA. VANCOUVER.
NELSON.
MEN'S CLOTHING STORE.
HATS AND UNDERWEAR
—AT—
ARTHUR  HOLMES'
78 Yates St., Corner Broad,
VICTORIA, B. C. THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
The Crofton Gazette
and COWICHAN   NEWS
PUBLISHED BY
The Crofton Publishing Co.
Managing Editor,   •
Henry II. Newill
RATES FOR ADVERTISEMENTS:
$1.00 per inch per insertion.
Larger spaces and contracts by arrangement.
SUBSCRIPTION. $2.00 PER ANNUM.
All communications for the present to P. O. Duncans or Crofton.
THURSDAY.   MAY 22, 1902.
VICTORIA DAY.
Victoria Day, 1902, is but the second anniversary of that
holiday which, since the death of our lute beloved and revered
Queen, has necessarily lost its old name, "the Queen's Birthday." And what a birthday it was indeed ! To us in the
colonies the name and fame, the memory of Queen Victoria, is
associated with the foundations of our freedom and the
growth and progress of our prosperity. She made the throne
of the British Empire respected throughout the world, and
greatly also by her noble personality and her virtuous life won
that respect for the home government which has contributed
in no small degree to the impulse of imperialism that is surging through the British Empire to-day. Victoria Day is the
memorial anniversary of that lady of glorious and! beautiful
memory, but many — most of us, indeed — will celebrate it with
scarcely a thought but that it is a holiday and a day of enjoyment. Thus indeed do we make it wholly a holiday, nnd so
perhaps do most honour the occasion. Tho citizens of Victoria
are even now girding themselves for the commemoration. The
streets of the city are festooned with tlags, and! long programmes of sports to be held are being circulated. Tbe
Capital City will probably enrol most of the inhabitants of
Duncans and Crofton amongst its visitors on the 23rd and
24th instants. To Oroftouians indeed there is a special inducement to go to Victoria to witness the result of the yacht race
in which the "Copper Queen," owned and built by employees
of the smelter company, will uphold the budding sporting fame
of  the smelting centre against all comers.
THE   WEIR   QUESTION.
The weir question is still agitating people's minds in and
around Duncans. It has been urged that the weirs must
necessarily be some sort of obstruction to the fish passing up
the river. This indeed is a self-evident fact. Rut it is also
evident that sufficient fish do, in spite of the four or five existing weirs, pass up the river and still provide good fishing. The
question reduced to a nutshell, then, is whether it is wortn
while—or indeed whether it is even just—to outrage the feelings of neighbouring Indians by coercing them into the iinme-
diiite destruction of their old-time weirs. That the Indians
have rights in this direction is undeniable. In every document
relating to the transfer of the Indian tribal lands, without
exception, occurs this clause, in these words: "It is also
understood that we are at liberty to hunt over the unoccupied
lands, and! to carry on our fisheries as formerly."
Further, in an amendment of 1891—the latest—to Section
22 of the Indian Act, Chap. 43 of the Revised Statute, a subsection  distinctly  entitles an  Indian  to remove n  trespasser
from his land, and to cause him to "cease fishing in any such
marsh, river, stream or creek as aforesaid." There can accordingly 1k> no doubt at all that the Indians possess certain
rights in carrying on their fisheries, as formerly, to use weirs;
also that they have power to prevent other persons from fishing on their reservations. It is, of course, quite practicable to
override all these rights, but hardly so with justice. As
matters stand, the Indians own most of the riparian lands in
the neighbourhood of Duncans, and they can, if they like, close
the fishing to-morrow. Nobody can say for certain that they
would take this step, even if their weirs were destroyed; but
they have hitherto shown themselves fairly adaptable and
arxious to live on good terms with their neighbours, and it
seems to us somewhat of an arbitrary proceeding to suddenly
deprive them of a right which is theirs by long custom. Constant local friction with the Indians will not add to the prosperity of  Duncans as a fishing resort.
It is estimated that there are already over twenty children
resident in Crofton, and tho absence of a school is- a matter
of growing anxiety to their parents. We have an official
assurance that the institution of a public .school at Crofton is
not being overlooked by tbe Department of Education. Estimates for a school building will necessarily have to be passed
by the 'Legislature in supply; and there is, moreover, some
doubt as to the size of school building that will be required.
The statement that is being filled up in Crofton, giving names
of parents and children already located in the town, will help
the authorities to some decision upon this point, and the
opinions of parents in this matter and of others interested in
the growth of the town will have due weight.
The petition to the 'Post Office authorities fur an additional
mail service by way of the Westholme stage is lying for signature at the Crofton Hotel.
VICTORIA & SIDNEY RAILWAY
Trains will run between  Central Station Victoria,  and
Sidney as follows:
DAILY:
Leave Victoria at 8.oo a. m.    4.00 p. m.
"    Sidneyat 9.00   "       5.45   "
SATURDAY AND SUNDAY:
Leave Victoria at  8.00 a. m.    2.00 p.' m.
"    Sidneyat     9.00   "        5.45   "
STEAMER   "MYSTERY"
Connects  at Sidney  with  morning train DAILY for
CROFTOty.    Returning connects with
evening train for Victoria.
Special Sunday Excursion to Crofton leaves Victoria 9 a. m.
Fare, round trip, $1.00
J. ANDERSON, General Manager.
0*\ THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
Crofton TIlp to Bate.
THE RAILWAY AND WHARF.
The formation already graded has now been prepared for
laying the rails on to the wharf. The line branches from a
point about 100 yards above where the trestle work is being
erected on the smelter site to carry the rails up to the level of
the top of the ore bins. The ore cars will there unload
directly into the bins, and roofing has been constructed as a
protection against weather. The wharf is now practically
completed ready for the laying of the rails. A movable slip
for the ferry service, similar to that at Sidney, is being made
whereby cars can be run off the barges on to the wharf at
almost any state of the tide. This will be completed in a
few days, and then there will be nothing to delay any longer
the transference of the train of cars loaded with machinery
which, consigned to the Northwestern Smelting & Refining
Co., is now lying at Liverpool awaiting the completion of
this work.
ERECTION   OF   HOUSES.
" Tenders are invited for the erection of six to fifteen
dwelling houses at Crofton. Plans and specifications maybe
seen next Tuesday at the offices of the Lenora-Mount Sicker
Copper Mining Co., Macgregor Block, Victoria."
This is a very welcome announcement, as with the progress
that is at present being made on the smelter works, and the
permanent employment that will be offered to so many men
upon their completion, there will assuredly be a, large demand
for family house-room at a moderate rental.
BOXING   CONTEST.
A friendly boxing contest took place on Saturday night
between Sid. Dickinson and W. Roper. It was fought under
Queensberry rules with 8-ounce gloves, and was an interesting and scientific display of the noble art. In the very first
round Dickinson apparently had his man staggering, but let
him off, and again in the fourth round it looked as if Dickinson could have put in a decisive stroke. In the sixth round,
however, the tables turned, and Roper got in a blow that
finished his opponent. Roper thus came off victor iu the
contest.
THE   LAUNCHING   OF  THE   " COPPER  QUEEN."
The 24-foot racing sloop "Copper Queen," built on the
smelter site by Mr. Fred. Clark and designed by his brother,
Mr. Parker Clark, was launched from the smelter slip at 0
o'clock on Monday evening. The ceremony of christening
was performed by young Conlin—not the "Pioneer Kid," but
his younger brother. The proceedings were most successful,
and the boat took the water like a bird. The only hitch—if
hitch it may be called—that occurred was the failure of the
bottle of wine to break, and its subsequent disappearance
overboard. It was, however, recovered later, and the christening ceremony duly performed. The wine was provided
by Mr. Conlin, of the Crofton Hotel. A large number of
Crcfton's inhabitants were present, and groups of interested
spectators watched the launching from the shore and from
the wharf, and hearty cheers went up when the little boat
ei teretl the water. In her are centred the hopes of
Croftoniaus for the Victoria regatta; and in any case, whether
she carries off a prize or not, her designer and builder ami
her owners, Messrs. Parker Clark. George Williams and
Fred. Young, are to be congratulated on the production of a
dandy little craft. She was taken round to 'Victoria on Wednesday by Mr. Macdonald, and made a fast passage down the
coast.
LOCAL   NOTES.
Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Bellinger, accompanied by Miss Morgan, arrived in Crofton by the stage On Monday, and are
making a lengthened stay.
The Rev. Mr. Can- has arrived at Crofton. He has been
appointed Presbyterian minister, and Crofton will he the
headquarters of   this mission for the district.
Mr. Joseph Bye, superintendent of the smelter construction, returned from the Sound on Wednesday.
Mrs. Foot left. Crofton on Tuesday to pay a visit to friends
at Cobble Hill.    Dr. Foot proposes to build a larger residence.
The steamer Mystery did not turn up on Monday, and the
worst was feared, and even later hoped, by one or two passengers who wanted to get away. It turns out that she did not
return from Liverpool in time to take the Crofton service.
She does not pass along with the steamer Iroquois into the
hands of the new management of the V. & S. Railway, but
will inn on the ferry service. She will, however, be allowed
to make the daily trip to Crofton for a few days more, until
a new boat has been chartered.
Keast's Livery Stable.
DUNCAN, B. C.
Operating Crofton and Mt. Sicker Stages.
WESTHOLME to CROFTON,
Daily connecting with all E.  & N.  Railway Trains.
DUNCAN to MT. SICKER,
Daily, Sundays excepted.
H. KEAST,       - Proprietor.
E. M. SKINNER,
Civil Engineer and Provincial  Land  Surveyor.
DUNCANS.
MOORE 5 WHITTINGTON,
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS,
VICTORIA and
CROFTON, B. C.
If you are contemplating
building we shall be
pleased to give you an
estimate.
Hkad Office:
159 Yates Street,
Elf.ctric Powf.r.
Phone A750.
The Flour that makes the Best Bread
is sold by
MOWAT & WALLACE, VICTORIA, B.C.
Try it.    Moose Jaw is the brand.
Established 1878.
W   P.  JAYNES,
Wholesale  Importer  and Dealer  in All Kinds ok Merchandise.
Depot for Giant Powder Co.       B. C. Pottery Co.
Duncans. Quamichan.
DUNCANS   FLOUR AND   FEED   MILLS
Manufacturer of
Dairy Choi- and All Kinds ok Mill Stukks por Feeding
Purposes.
W. P. JAYNES,
Proprietor.
FURNITURE, CARPETS,
WALL PAPER,  CROCKERY,
AND
Complete  Housefurnishings,
For Hotel, Store or Home.
Write for Catalogue.
Weiler Bros., Victoria, B.C. THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
^AA||A4Aii|ii||AA
Duncans anfc Cowicban local Wews.
THE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL MEETING.
A meeting of the North Cowichan Municipal Council was
held at Duncans last Saturday. There were present Mr. .1.
N. Evans (reeve), and Messrs. II. Bonsall, A. A. B. Herd
and 0. Dobson, councillors, and Mr. J. Norcross, clerk. The
piincipal matter before the meeting was the application of
the new Duncans Waterworks Company for powers to put in
and operate a much-needed waterworks system for the town.
The first reading of a bill to authorize tho incorporation of
the company, and to grant the necessary rights and privileges,
with immunity from taxation for 15 years, was passed, on the
motion of Mr. Dobson, seconded by Mr. Bonsall. It will have
to be voted on by the ratepayers, however, before becoming
law. Messrs. F. Price, T. A. Wood and H. Smith attended
as a delegation to press the project. The .second i*eading
of an amendment to the Traders By-iLaw, raising the fee to
bo paid on a hawker's license from $10 to $25 was also carried through. Contracts for the repair of roads were let,
amongst them to Mr. A. B. Elliott for work on the Crofton
road, to Mr. H. Norcross for Bell's road, to Mr. H. D. Evans
for the Quamichan Lake road, to Mr, JR. Smith for Herd's
road, to Mr. Windsor to lay sidewalk on Wharf street at
Chemainus, and to Mr. Wiseman for work on Fine street. A
committee consisting of the Reeve and Messrs. Herd and
Dobson was appointed to get information with regard to Speck
road. This road, eventually connecting with Bell's road,
would provide a straight road from Duncans to Somenos Lake,
and would save a score of farmers several miles in going to
the creamery. Oh the motion of Mr. Herd, seconded by Mr.
Bonsall, the Reeve was requested to call a public meeting to
(oi sider a public celebration of Coronation 'Day. The next
meeting will be held on the 21st June.
Creelman, superintendent of Farmers Institutes in Ontario.
Mr. Creelman, who is a telling aud fluent sneaker upon all
agricultural subjects, will address a meeting of the Cowichan
Farmers' Institute to be held iu the Agricultural Hall, Duncans, on Tuesday next at 8 p.m.
SELLING LIQUOR TO INDIANS.
At a court held by J. Maitland-Dougall. Esq.,, a Japanese
named Fuku Motau was brought up by Mr. A. H. Lomas,
provincial constable, on a charge of selling liquor to Indians
at Westholme. The charge being proved, the magistrate
sentenced the prisoner to pay a fine of $100 and costs.
THE   STRUGGLING   RANCHER.
He doesn't go to picnics, aud he has no time to think,
And paying visits isn't in his line;
Bu!i in breaking in young heifers and in teaching calves to
drink
The rancher has a gay and festive time.
When he gets his pea crop in, it's fairly ruined by the jays;
He's sure to have at least one breachy cow;
But he's too dog-tired to wonder why his ranching never pays
As he chases up the field behind the plough.
There are most things in his woodshed except a stick of wood;
The condition of  his fences is a shame.
The framework of his grindstone went to smash before  the
Flood,
And he's not had time to fix it up again.
A special band of  robins always overlook his seeding;
They raise the grain as fast as he can sow;
And when his early turnips and potatoes all want weeding
He can't remember where he left the hoe.
His chickens strive to help by thinning out his onion-bed,
And his courteous protestations are in vain.
He clings to his old barn until it falls in on his head-
Arid then he tries to prop it up again.
His hens all lay their eggs astray inside the old hay mow;
His harness is a positive disgrace.
His neighbour's bull turns quarrelsome and hooks his best-
bred cow—
For there's nothing else worth hooking on the place !
But on dark and stormy autumn nights, when rain drops from
the boughs,
'Tis then the joys of ranching come out strong !
When the happy rancher gambols forth to find his playful cows
And takes two hours to get the brutes along.
LOCAL  NOTES.
There will be a dance at Salt Spring Island on Friday.
Mrs. C. II. Dickie's two sisters paid her a short visit on
Sunday last.
Mr. E. W. Shaw caught a 10-pound spring salmon in the
Cowichan River on (Friday last.
Miss Tothill, of Barrie, Out., is at present paying a visit
to her sister, Mrs. C. J. Eaton.
Our popular merchant, Mr. T. Pitt, expects to have his
now residence completed in about a month's time.
A Roman Catholic church will be built immediately, making Duncans the centre of this church in the district.
Mr. James Murchie has just received the biggest carload
of  lumber ever drawn over tlie E. & N. Railway.
We hear that Mr. William Gidley, of the Cowichan Lumber Company, intends to build a residence in the near future.
The ladies of Somenos are giving a dance to-night, the
proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of shingling the roof
of  the church.
Duncans was in strong force in Victoria on Wednesday
al'tcrr.non. Which was the "Andy" who brought a baby's
rattle back with him !
We are sorry to hear that our old friend, Mr. John M<'-
Innes, has left the Tyee. Mr. Jim Hattie is the newly
appointed foreman of  the Tyee mine.
Mr. HI. P. Peterson has gone to Cowichan Lake to make
preparations for work to be done on the property of the
Duncans Mining &: Development Company.
Messrs. Dickie, M. 1\ P.. O. Livingston, Wood, Conway,
Pearson and Alexander paid a visit of inspection to their
mining properties on Malahat Mountain on Saturday last.
They have returned more than satisfied with their prospects.
Mr. Ogden Graham, resident factor for the Hudson's Bay
Company at Kamloojis, has been staying at the Cowichan
Lake Hotel. He states that he had first-rate sport, and is
very pleased with his visit.
The new building next to the Post Office containing offices
for Messrs. 0. Livingston and the Tyee Company, also for
Mr. J. II. Whittome. notary and mining broker, will be completed probably within the week.
If is with the greatest regret that we have to
tjie death of Mr. Joseph Salmond. of Anchtergavin,
aged 70 years, at the homo of his son-in-law, our
municipal councillor, Mr. Alex. Herd, to whom we
condolences. \nrTf\T>
Duncans will receive a visit next week from Mr. G. C.     VICTORIA
He's drenched and poked and prodded by each overhanging
limb,
But cattle-hunting always is a lark.
Ho gently drops a mash-bucket upon the stable "glim"—•
And has to finish milking in the dark.
It's generally the city men who bag the deer and grouse;
The rancher hasn't time to touch n gun !
He's doing all he can to lift the mortgage off the house,
And of course his wife and children share the fun.
The stores declined his butter with an air of civil sorrow;
"We only deal in creamery, my friend."
That (finished off the rancher—and the funeral's to-morrow,
At which mourners are requested to attend.
-IRENE M. NORCROSS.
SEND YOUR ORDERS
-FOR-
Hay, Grain and Mill Feed
—to-
announce
Scotland,
respected
offer our
The B'*ackman-Ker Milling Co.,
(LIMITED)
MANUFACTURERS OF
B. & K. ROLLED OATS.
AND-
-VANCOUVER. THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICttAN NEWS.
INTERNATIONAL MINING & DEVELOPMENT CO.
This company now owns six claims iu a solid block located
on Mount lloreb, on the Cowichan Lake mining district.
These comprise the Thistle, Richard IV., Two Friends, American Boy, Seattle and Sea Gull claims. They are situated
about eight miles up the Chemainus River from the Copper
Canyon mine, ami at an altitude of 000 feet above and about
a mile and a half from the river up a small creek. The usual
route to these properties, however, is by the Cowichan Lake
waggon road and trail from Duncans, a distance of IS miles.
The ore body exposed on this property is simply a continuation
of the Mount Sicker mineral belt, which may be traced across
the Island. Outcrops on these claims are 50 to 00 feet wide,
and may be traced for 3,000 feet. Mining work is now being
resumed. Mr. Rhinehart went up to the mines for this purpose on Sunday last. Two hundred ami twelve feet of tunneling has already been driven, and a contract has just been
allotted for the continuation of this work for another hundred
feet; after which it is proposed to raise, crosscut, .sink, drift
and thoroughly exploit the property. Copper stains are already
showing in the schist, which is being drifted through. Five
men are at work, in two shifts. A 12-foot shaft already sunk
from the surface has yielded 10 tons of good ore, assaying $20.
Other assays of the ore on these claims have given $2 to $18
in gold, and 2 to 8 per cent, ill copper. The prospect is a very
promising one.
SHAWNIGAN (LAKE NOTES.
The flag was flying over Mr. George Koenig's newly
huilt hotel on Tuesday last, signifying that this fine house is
now open. Messrs. Smith & Sherbourne, the contractors for
the building, have put up a picturesque and imposing looking
edifice. The bar has been moved from its temporary quarters into the new house, and the furnishing of the rooms is
almost completed. Judging from appearances, Mr. Koenig is
going to offer his guests even more comfortable accommodation than he did in the old house, and that is saying a
good deal.
The Strathcona Hotel opened for the season on Wednesday. Mr. Henry Moxon, one of the most popular stewards
of the C. P. N. Co., is the new manager. The 32 rooms of
this hotel are now fitted with electric light throughout, aud
the rates are, we hear, to be as low as $1.50 and $2 per day,
and it is safe to predict that this commodious and beautifully
sitrated house will be full to overflowing throughout the summer—aye, and the winter, too, for in this favoured region
there is attraction for artist, sportsman, pleasure-seeker,
naturalist, or the mere lover of peace and quiet and beautiful
sctuery throughout the entire year.
SAANICH NOTES.
The building activity which has been so marked a feature
of the Cowichan district this year is also noticeable in the
Saanich peninsula. The new wharf and ferry slip at Sidney
was a big undertaking, and is now nearly completed. J. Say-
ward, of Victoria, and local lumber merchants have been
reaping a harvest. Buildings going up are barns for Mr. W.
Harrison and for Mr. J. Heal, buildings for Messrs. J. Tur-
gcose and X. Marcotte, and a cement floor barn for Mr.
J. Bryce.
JUST   RecEiveD
A splendid stock of LAWN TENNIS  GOODS made
by Wright & Ditson and  Ayres,  including Racquets,
Balls,  Poles,  Nets,   Presses,  etc.      Croquet Sets and
other  summer games.
M. W. WAITT & CO., 44 Government St., Victoria.
QUEEN'S MARKET
Cor. Govt, and Johnson Sts., Victoria, B. C.   Tel. 32.    P. O. Box 18.
LAWRENCE  GOODACRE  & SONS,
Wholesale and Retail Butchers.   Contractors by appointment
to His Majesty's Royal Navy, The Dominion Government, etc.
Shipping supplied at lowest rates.
A. B. WHITTINGHAM,
PRIVATE  BOARDING   HOUSE,
Home Comforts.   Moderate Rates.
Joan Avenue,      -      -      -      CROFTON, B. C
A. HOWE,
BUTCHER,
Established  for six years  at Chemainus.
Best Meat at most liberal
prices.
Joan Avenue,      -      -      Crofton, B. C.
BENNETT'S
CROWN
BRAND
GUTTA PERCHA FUSE
AWARDED THE GREATER BRITAIN EX.
========================^======== GOLD MEDAL, 1899.
Turner,   Beeton  &  Co.,  Ltd.,     this popular favorite still leads.
Holman Bros.
Patent Rock Drill.
AWARDED THE GOLD MEDAL, PARIS, 1900.
Drills and Accessories, Columns and Tripods,
IN STOCK AT VICTORIA.
WHOLESALE,
LIQUORS, CIGARS AND DRY GOODS.
Sole Agents for
ROBERT   BROWN'S 4-Crown Scotch Whiskey.
PLAYER'S Navy Cut Tobaccos and Cigarettes.
VICTORIA, B.C.
HAMILTON POWDER CO.
(Incorporated 1861.)
Manufacturers   of  High   Explosives,   Stumping  Powder,   Blasting,
Mining and Sporting Powder.    Dealers in Electric Blasting
Apparatus, Safety Fuse, Detonators, etc.
Head office : Montreal.    Branch office: Victoria.    Local offices :
Vancouver, Nelson, Rossland and Greenwood.     Works:  Nanaimo.
Manufacturers of Air Compressors and all
kinds of Mining Machinery.
ESTIMATES ON APPLICATION.
Rowland Machin, <MLJH^
YATES STREET, VICTORIA,!?. C. 8
THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
CROFTON
,   The New Smelting Centre of
the Pacific Coast.
FOR LOTS
APPLY TO
Real Estate Brokers
AND
The Lenora Mt. Sicker Copper
Mining Co., Ltd.
(Non-Personal Liability),
VICTORIA, B. C.
J.  H.  WHITTOME,
Agent for DUNCANS, V. I.
London and Lancashire Fire Insurance Co.
Royal Insurance Co.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
By special arrangement with the B. C. Mining Record we are
able to offer particularly advantageous terms for combined subscription
to that well known excellent periodical and the Crofton Gazette for
$3.00 per annum.
Subscriptions received by the Crofton Publishing Co., Crofton
or the B. C. Mining Record, P. O. Box 645, Victoria.

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