BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Crofton Gazette and Cowichan News May 15, 1902

Item Metadata

Download

Media
croftongaz-1.0070050.pdf
Metadata
JSON: croftongaz-1.0070050.json
JSON-LD: croftongaz-1.0070050-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): croftongaz-1.0070050-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: croftongaz-1.0070050-rdf.json
Turtle: croftongaz-1.0070050-turtle.txt
N-Triples: croftongaz-1.0070050-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: croftongaz-1.0070050-source.json
Full Text
croftongaz-1.0070050-fulltext.txt
Citation
croftongaz-1.0070050.ris

Full Text

 IU Crofton Gazette
and COWICHAN NEWS
Devoted to the Mining and Agricultural Interests of Vancouver Island, Texada
Island, and Coast Mainland Districts.
VOL. 1.
CROFTON, B. C, THURSDAY,   MAY   15, 1002.
NO. 12
COAL  MINING ON VANCOUVER  ISLAND.
By William M. Brewer.
(Introduction to a descriptive article on British Columbia
coal ifields published in the Engineering and Mining Journal,
to whose courtesy and to that of Mr. Brewer we are indebted
for our illustration.)
TIHERE is a historic feature connected with the discovery
and development of the coal .fields of British Columbia
which is of sufficient interest to be referred to by the
writer as an introduction to the following descriptive article
of the various coal fields aud collieries ou Vancouver Island
and the Mainland.    Dr. George M. Dawson, Dominion geolo-
Suquash, and the other at Kirk River, on the beach about 2%
miles distant from Port Rupert, in Beaver Harbour. The
borings at Suquash were continued to depths of 329 feet 4%
inches and 2(55 feet 4 inches, respectively; that at the Kirk
River was carried to n depth of 180 feet 7 inches. An examination of these records does not show that any coal seams of
commercial value were encountered, but as work was carried
on continuously from 1849 to 1853, there were undoubtedly
several other shafts and borings besides those of which the
records were obtained by Dr. Dawson. About the latter date,
according to history, coal was discovered at Nanaimo, about
100 miles northwest from Victoria by water, and the force of
miners transferred to that point, where extensive collieries
aie being   operated   to-day by the New Vancouver Coal &
Arkal GEOLOGY of Coal Mining Region on Vancouver Island.
gist, in his report dated March 1, 1887, refers to the fact that
Dr. W. F. Tolmie in 1S155 was the first to make known the
occurrence of gold on Vancouver Island. It was not until
about 1849 that any systematic exploratory work was commenced. This was inaugurated by the Hudson's Bay Company, which brought a number of coal miners from England
to Vancouver Island. Suquash, situated on the northeast
coast, about semi-distant between Port McNeil and Beaver
Harbour, and near the head of Queen Charlotte Sound, was
selected for boring. Two seams of coal outcropped on the
beach at this point, the upper being about 1 foot and in places
2 feet in thickness, and the lower about G inches, with about 1
foot of soft shale separating the two seams. A short tunnel
was driven and several borings made. From the former it. is
reported that in all"about 9,000 tons of coal were mined, and
the bulk of it shipped to Victoria. A record of three borings
is included in Dr. Dawson's report, two of these in the northwest   from Victoria   by water, and   immediate   vicinity   of
Land Company, which acquired its title from the Hudson's
Bay Company.
The history <>f th»se coal fields dates back to about 1853,
when boring operations were suspended at Suquash because
of the discovery of a wide scam of coal in Nanaimo Harbour,
on the east coast of the Island and about 100 miles by water
from Victoria. Until 1802 the Hudson's Bay Company mined
coal from a shaft sunk within the present city limits of
During thct year a large amount of this coal field was
acquired by the New Vancouver Coal Mining & Land Company, Limited, an English corporation, which is still actively
engaged in coal mining in the same 'field, with headquarters
and main working shaft still located at the outskirts of the
city of  Nrnaimo.
Soon after the organization of this company, the late
Hon. Robert Dunsmuir, who had been in the employ of the
Hudson's Bay Company as a miner, commenced systematically
to prospect the territory outside of   the lands acquired   by THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
the
the
be-
fol-
the New Vancouver Coal Company. He first located the
Hnrewood field, at a distance of about 3% miles to the west
from Nanaimo, and secured 9,500 acres for an English company, which has since sold the trace to the New Vancouver
Goal Mining iS: Land Company. Later he discovered the
Wellington field, -about six miles northerly from Nanaimo,
which lie acquired himself, a short time previous to tho entrance by British Columbia into the federation of
provinces.
This portion of the history of the development of
coal mining industry in British Columbia is important,
cans* as a direct result of Mr. Duiismuir's work, it has
lowed the building of the Esquinialt & Nanaimo Railway, as
well as the opening up of the collieries at Wellington, Extension, Alexandria and Union, the latter about 50 miles up the
cast coast of the Island from Nanaimo. In all those enterprises he was, during his lite, tlie prime mover and organizer.
Associated with him in building the railroad and operating all
tho collieries, except Wellington, wove tho late Senator Leland
Stanford, the late Charles Crocker, the late 0. P. Huntington
and General Billiard, of California, who wore the organizers
of tho Southern Pacific Railway. In tho Wellington colliery
sonic officers in tho British navy wore associated with Mr.
Dunsmuir, but their interests wore purchased by that gentleman previous to commencing construction of the Tsquimalt &
Nanaimo Railway.
Natural outcroppings of coal occur in many portions of
the coal fields under consideration. Tho dip of the soanis
varies from about 1 foot in 12 foot to 1 foot in 5 foot, and the
strike is usually nearly east and west. The direction of tho
dip varies because of the number of nnticlinals and synclinals
which occur. On Gabriola Island there is apparently a basin
covering considerable area where tho coal dips towards a
common centre from the various points of the compass. This
has boon demonstrated by diamond-drill boring, as well as the
fact that a thickness of nearly 2,000 foot of shale overlies the
coal seam. The roof of the coal throughout tho entire area
is variable, sometimes "being composed of conglomerate, at
others of shale, and in some cases sandstone; the floor is
sometimes sandstone, but usually shale. Fire-clay of commercial value is wanting in this portion of  the Island.
There are two productive soanis, known as the Douglis
and the Wellington, the latter underlying tho former. At the
Nanaimo and Alexandria collieries the Douglas seam Is mined,
and on a portion of the Nanaimo field both seams are productive; but at the Wellington aud Extension collieries the
Wellington scam only is mined, the Douglas having been carried off   by erosion.
Much faulting has occurred through this portion of the
Island, which of course causes complications in the workings.
For instrnce, a bore-hole on tho Harewood property exposed
a\ workable soani of coal, but a shaft sunk about 200 foot
$.1)111 the bore-hole failed to intersect the seam at the depth
estimated, and later investigations proved that a fault find
occurred in tho space between the shaft and and borc-holo,
which was not apparent on the surface, and tho down-throw
had boon 80 foot. Another instance is at Extension, where
the main working tunnel was driven half a mile to catch the
coal scam on the dip; beyond tbe intersection a fault occurred,
and tho tunnel being driven another half-mile, picked up
apparently the same seam, the dip in both cases being to
tho south.
To tho north and west from Nanoose there occur limited
areas of the igneous and metamorphifl rocks of tho Vancouver series, which form a break in tho continuity of the
cretaceous coal measures for o short distance, rnd) divide tho
Wellington and the fields south of it from tho Comox coal
fields, to tho northwest. Those latter are of vast importance
and furnish the bulk of coal used by ships in the Alaska trade
and a portion used by tho British North Pacific squadron,
stationed at Esquinialt Harbour, near Victoria.
Tho total area of the productive territory cannot be estimated, because no accurate detailed geological survey has
been made. With the exception of the Wellington colliery
proper and the acreage owned by tho Now Vancouver Coal
Mining & Land Company, and a few small holdings, the entire
field is included in the land grant of the Egquimalt & Nanaimo.
Railway.
MINING NEWS.
AN   IMPORTANT   LEGAL DECISION.
An important point in mining law was recently decided
by the Full Court in tho case of Paulson versus Beaman. In
that case tho map tiled by the plaintiff in the office of the
miring recorder showing the nature and extent of his adverse
claim was only a sketch map, and although made by a provincial land surveyor was not made from an actual survey of
the ground. Tlie Full Court hold that this map was insufficient, and it would appear to be necessary in adverse cases to
have tho ground in dispute surveyed before filing the adverse.
This is an important legal decision for prospectors to note.
similar to the Lenora and Tyee ores, and as tho Augusta lice
on the same load of ore as do the other mines, its ore body is
no doubt a continuation of the Lenora and Tyee ledges. The
Augusta mineral claim is owned by Mr. E. W. Molander, of
Port Townsend, and it adjoins tho Fortuna. Mr. Molander
is continuing steady development work.
THE YREKA COPPER CO.
Tlie Yreka Copper Co. will start to crosscut from the
bottom of their shaft at the Yreka mine, on Mount Richards,
this week. The intention of this company is to develop
thoroughly to a depth of  200 foot.
THE LENORA-MOUNT SICKER MINE.
Lenora-Mount Sicker mine development is continuing very
satisfactorily. The installation of the sorting machinery 1ms
been completed. The five-drill compressor plant supplied by
Holman Bros, arrived and is being set up. The now hoist
worked by compressed air has boon erected in No. 2 tunnel.
It is agreed that the recent strike inthis mine in No. 3 (the
lowest) tunnel has increased the ore tonnage of the mine by
about 30 per cent.
THE   TYEE   MINE.
Another strike is reported on tho Tyee mine, and a body
of rich ore is said to have boon oponodup. It is declared to
be the best looking ore that this mining company have yet
found on their property. Work on the aerial tramway siding
near Soinonos is proceeding apace. Messrs. Keast iV: Lewis,
of Duncans, are busy drawing the now machinery that is to
be installed in the Tyee mine, and they hope to finish their
work this week. The same contractors have also secured the
contract to draw the supplies and material, etc., for tho new
aerial tramway.
MOUNT   SICKER  NOTES.
Mr. G. S. Williams, editor of the B. C. Mining Exchange,
who recently visited Crofton and the Mount Sicker mines, has
expressed himself to several reporters as simply astonished at
the development both at the smelter works and at the mines.
Alderman H. M. Grahame, of Victoria, who also has been
visiting Crofton and Mount Sicker, gives quite an enthusiastic
description of both the scenery and the work that is going
on, and declares that it behooves the business men of Victoria
to take cognizance of the fact that Mount Sicker is rapidly
developing into an important mining centre. Crofton he found
to be already "quite a bustling little town.
A rich strike has, Ave hear, lately been made on the Copper
Canyon property.     The lodge is four feet in width.
Capt. Wasson is proceeding energetically with his new
machinery to develop the Key City property, adjacent to the
Ler.ora.
A large solid block, 30 feet through, of fine ore from the
Lenora. mine at Mount Sicker may be seen in Mr. Pellew-
Harvey's office at Victoria. His assay value is $58.84 in
geld and copper.
WEST COAST NOTES.
Mr. J. R. Archbold, representing the Tarsis Copper Company, and who lately visited tho Mount Sicker district, has
more recently boon up the West Coast to Nootka and Alberni.
lie declares that it, is "a healthy coast'"! lie is leaving again
in a few days for Sidney Unlet and other places further north
on the coast, being accompanied by Dr. Marshall.
Messrs. Rafenbury and Omni have just returned from
Wreck Bay, where they have been looking over some placers
with a. view to purchase for the American Amalgamation.
They have brought many samples of tho black sand.
Mr. J. H. Little, who has mining claims on Mount Sicker,
has gone up the West Coast, to the Quatsino district to prospect the country.
Messrs. Gwin and Clarke, of the Yreka Copper Company,
have just returned from their properties at Comstock Mountain, Quatsino Sound. They have 40 men working there. It
was their intention to have shipped 700 tons of ore on the
20th of this month, but the horses theytook up with them
had to be tumbled overboard to swim ashore, owing to absence
of landing facilities, and the consequence was a general
attack of grippe. Tho transport of ore from the mine to the
salt water was thus delayed: but by tho 10th of June
Messrs. Gwin and Clarke say that they -will have 800 tons of
ore ready for shipment. By that time the Crofton smelter
will probably be ready to take everything that is offered to it.
Messrs. Clarke, Gwin and Lea have taken over separately
a property at Quatsino known as the .Tunc group of claims.
Indications point to the richness of the vein in gold, silver
and copper, but especially gold. The difficulty will'lie in
transportation, as the mine is four miles distant from 11^
coast.
THE   AUGUSTA MINERAL   CLAIM
A body of  good ore was struck on the
clfim, on Mount Sicker, a  few days ago.
MOLYBDENUM.
Augusta mineral
The ore is very
From the report of   the Geological Survey Department
just issued Ave clip the folloAving interesting statement about THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
molybdenite, and the economical value and occurrence of this
little known mineral : " The demand for molybdenite at good
prices still keeps up, so that with the discovery of workable
and accessible deposits a now industry could be in auguratel.
This mineral is of common occurrence in the Laurontiau rocks
of Eastern Canada, and discoveries are also reported from
British Columbia. At no point, however, has it so far boon
developed sufficiently to prove its existence in commercially
workable quantity. It seems to occur mostly as disseminated
crystals in iquartz veins, and whore the larger and thicker
foliated crystals are plentiful, it would seem that profitable
extraction by crushing and hand picking should be possible in
view of the prices offered, viz., $200 to $250 per ton for tho
carrying the mineral evenly disseminated in small flakes, as
is so often the case, difficulty would probably be experienced
iu making an efficient separation by the usual methods of ore-
dressing, the flakes being apt to float away with the lightei
gangue material."
GOOD  PROSPECTS  FOR THE  LUMBER  INDUSTRY
THE Vancouver "World" says that sawmills in British
Columbia, most of which are situated either in Vancouver or in the immediate neighbourhood, have more
orders on hand than they can fill. The statement was made
by a prominent man iu connection with the lumber industry.
He also stated that, notAvithstanding the article in an evening
contemporary, logs are still a comparatively scarce article,
lnthough two or three 'booms Avere brought down last week.
Three of the local establishments are partly shut down because
of the logs not coming in fast enough to keep the machines
going.
The output of tho shingle and lumber mills form interesting statistics. It was recorded previously that the product of
the shingle manufacturing establishments with the recent increase in the number of mills Avas 800,000,000 shingles per
year, and of this amount it is expected that 225,000,000 will
lie disposed of in the Canadian market, and the remainder in
the United States. The estimated cut of logs for 1902 is
20(1,000,000 feet, roughly speaking. Two-thirds of this quantity will be fur, with a small percentage of spruce. One-
third will be cedar. Of the amount of fur cut one-quarter
will run from 35 to 100 feet in length. The prevailing prices
for logs are: No. 1 long deck plank, $9 per M; fir merchant
able, $7; fir flooring, $8; No. 2 merchantable, $(!; 50c. per
M is added for each additional 10 feet from 40 feet in length
upwards; No. 1 cedar, $7.50 per M, and merchantable, $0.50.
All the above prices are delivered at the mills. The local
market, it is stated, is bare of logs, as up to the end of the
year it Avas possibl eto export, especially cedar logs to Puget
Sound, while the past winter has been a very wet and unfavourable one for Avorking in the woods. The mills holding
leases are increasing the number of camps operating on their
own account. A sharp lookout is being maintained by the
government officials (o discover if any timber is being taken
out of the province contrary to the provisions of the law
governing the export. According to the act which came into
force at the first of the year, it is illegal for any timber cut.
from licensed ground to be exported, and the officials have
been instructed to be vigilant in the matter.
Since the law came into effect, the increase in tho timber
dues has been such as to astonish the department at Victoria.
During the last nine months the receipts have reached an
amount which exceeds that of the twelve months previous,
and when the fiscal year is completed the returns will show a
sum which should not fail to bo a source of satisfaction to
the government for having passed the law
/LITERATURE FROM THE BUREAU OF PROVINCIAL
INFORMATION.
We have received several bulletins published by Mr. R. E.
Gosiell, chief of the Bureau of Provincial Information.
Those booklets are about subjects as interesting as "A General
Review of Mining in British Columbia," "British Columbia of
To-day," "The Skeena River District," and last, but not least,
"Good Roads." Both are sources of information for the
settler, and as hand-books for tho would-be settler, or oven
the tourist, they are invaluable. They are comprehensively
written and very interesting reading, and will later on bo incorporated in the forthcoming edition of tho Year Book of
British Columbia, which Mr. Gosnoll has edited with such
coi spicuous ability and success. In the "Mining" Bulletin
(No. 1). the amount of mining work already accomplished has
been ably summarized. Contained in it also there is an article
on the pulp and paper industry, dealing briefly with pulping
woods, economic and other conditions, markets, etc. The
'Good Roads" Bulletin (No. 5) is a little book full of practical
information. The first part, dealing with road-metalling, rolling and drainage of roads, dimensions and crowning, embankments and cuttings, location of roads, bridges and culverts,
effects of waggon tyres, etc., is taken from the Report of the
Si perintendeiit of Roads in Ontario for 1890. The second
part has been extracted from the Report of the Commissioner
of Public Roads in New Jersey for 1900. and, as tho introduction states, "it mav be known to most readers that New Jersey
som" time ago vigorously took up the subject of road improvement  and that state is now famous for its good roads."
THE WESTSIDE
THE   GREAT MAIL   ORDER   HOUSE.
SHOPPING BY MAIL ! !
MAIL ORDER ADDRESS:
THE HUTCHESON CO., Ltd.
8o Government Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
R P. RITHET&Co.Ltd
WHOLESALE MERCHANTS.
GROCERIES,     WINES,    LIQUORS,    CEMENT,
CUMBERLAND  COAL.
Victoria, B. C.
TZOUHALEM   HOTEL,
DUNCANS,
Price Bros.,
Proprietors.
FELL & COMPANY, Limited Liability,
GROCERS,
WINES  AND  LIQUORS.
Victoria, B. C.
Thorpe's Ginger Ale
Prize Medal
World's Fair
VICTORIA. VANCOUVER.
NELSON.
MEN'S CLOTHING STORE.
HATS AND  UNDERWEAR
-AT—
■■•■
ARTHUR  HOLMES'
78 Yates St., Corner Broad,
VICTORIA, B. C THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
The Crofton Gazette
and COWICHAN   NEWS
PUBLISHED BY
The Crofton Publishing Co.
Manager, H. Mortimer Lamb
Editor, Henry H. Newill
RATES FOR ADVERTISEMENTS:
$1.00 per inch per insertion.
Larger spaces at a reduction by arrangement.
SUBSCRIPTION. 12.00 PER ANNUM.
All communications for the present to P. O. Box 645, Victoria,
P.  O. Duncans and Crofton.
THURSDAY,   MAY 15. 1902.
THE WEIRS IN THE COWICHAN RIVER.
THERE is a strong feeling in and around Duncans that
the movement to induce the Government to insist upon
the opening of the weirs in Cowichan River is a wrong
nnd mistaken one. The Indians have always retained the
right of making and using weirs. Mr. F. Price, of Duncans,
who has been fifteen or sixteen years in the country, gives to
the "Colonist" an eminently sensible opinion on the question.
He jMiints out that the weirs do not prevent fish from passing
np the river. If they did so, the Indians would certrlinly not
take the trouble to build other weirs 10 and even 15 miles
further up stream. Besides, Mr. Price himself has seen fish
passing through. Quite recently nn angler caught four large
eteelheads—the largest 11 pounds—just above a weir, and only
on Tuesday lost we hear that a schoolboy caught a steelhead
of 9 pounds weight in the river just above a weir. In any
case the weirs are open on Saturdays and Sundays, and they
moreover frequently rest on stones at the bottom, and so
would in any case allow fish to pass through. Mr. Price points
out that ten years ago there were four times as many weirs
in the Cowichan River ns there are now. The real cause
why the fishing is degenerating is attributable to log-driving,
also in a degree to night fishing by the Indians, and this of
course is illegal and to be condemned. But as for weirs, the
privilege of using them lis a hereditary right amongst the
Indians. Aud in any case it would be a great mistake to fall
foul of the Indians around Duncans, with their good fishing
and hunting rights over most of the neighbourhood.
There is broad common sense in this view of the question
when we come to consider that the welfare of Duncans is
bound up to a certain extent with her fishing and hunting
advantages. Since there seems to be absolutely no positive
proof that the weirs do stop the fish from ascending the river,
while there is eye evidence that fish can and do pass through
tho weirs, and indirect evidence of the same in the fact that
Irdians live on the same fish higher up the river, why then
deliberately sot about to make enemies of tho Indian owners
of most of tho best fishing and hunting in the neighbourhoodV
The Indians have always shown the greatest courtesy in
allowing visitors aud tourists to fish along their reservations,
and it would seem, to say the least, a pity to stir up strife unnecessarily, apart from the harm that would thus be done to
Drncans as a fishing resort.
We hoar that the management of the Victoria Terminal
& Sidney Railway has again changed hands, and that Mr. J.
Anderson, the late traffic manager, is now the general manager. We congratulate him heartily. Ho has been a
frequent visitor to Crofton, and has made many friends. At
tho same time we are assured that we shall not altogether
lose our genial friend Captain Mackenzie, who finds that the
superintendence of the ferry services between Liverpool and
Sidney and Crofton will fully occupy his time.
A portion of the beautiful island of Martinique, in the
West Indies, has been subjected to a catastrophe the extent
and horror of which will not easily be realized by a generation that prides itself upon the controlling powers it has undoubtedly acquired over many of the rude forces of nature,
and whose worst shocks have hitherto been insignificant in
comparison with this overwhelming disaster. The volcano
of Mount Pelee has erupted and overflowed, and the gay town
of St. Pierre, lying at its feet, is a buried Pompeii. The
almost simultaneous eruption of La Soufriere, on the neighbouring island of St. Vincent, whereby 2,000 pertons are
supposed to have perished, would have been iu itself a
stupendous catastrophe, but words cannot well express an
idea of the awful feelings that occur to one at the thought of
upwards of 80,000 persons being thus hurried without a
moment's notice to a terrible doom. The two French islands
of Guadaloupe and especially Martinique are probably the
brightest and gayest of all the West Indian Islands. The
very dress of the people suggests the fact. In the British
West Indian Islands you may note that the prevailing dress
of the people is of white cotton. In Martinique it is of the
brightest colored fabrics obtainable. The fact that 30,000
of the lightest-hearted of God's creatures have thus suddenly
been ushered into eternity is a subject for meditation: it is
too deep and awful for words.
The Kamloops "Inland Sentinel," in urging the establishment of a creamery in the Okanagan district, makes the
cei.sorious assertion that: "There are many cattle-raisers iu
this province who never milk a cow, and who use canned
milk on their tables." Our contemporary doubtless speaks
from facts, but we hope that the Cowichan district, with its
flourishing creamery, is without suspicion in this respect.
We admire the "Sentinel's" sturdy demand for "more»vigor-
ous farming, and less of the dolce far niente variety." The
fact is very evident that a general "waking up" of farmers
all round would certainly do this province no harm, and it
might be relied on to do our trade competitors no good.
VICTORIA & SIDNEY RAILWAY
Trains will run between Central Station Victoria, and
Sidney as follows:
DAILY:
Leave Victoria at  8.00 a. m.   4.00 p. m.
"    Sidneyat 9.00   "       5.45   "
SATURDAY AND SUNDAY:
Leave Victoria at  8.00 a. m.   2.00 p. m.
"    Sidneyat 9.00   "       5.45   "
STEAMER  "MYSTERY"
Connects at Sidney with morning train DAILY for
CROFTON.    Returning connects with
evening train for Victoria.
Special Sunday Excursion to Crofton leaves Victoria 9 a. m.
Fare, round trip, $1.00
J. ANDERSON, General Manager.
* 1 THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
PROGRESS OF THE SMELTER CONSTRUCTION.
THE BIG STACK.
The erection of the big stack was commenced on Saturday
last, and this imposing circular chimney is now being built
up by Messrs. Smith & Sherboume's bricklayers at a very
rapid rate. Every day sees it attain several additional feet
in height, and with an inside diameter of 12 feet and a totall
height of 125 feet it will in a few weeks time l>e one of the
landmarks of the country. The main flue connecting it with
the furnaces has already been solidly built into the foundation.
ORE BINS,  SAMPLING AND  MACHINERY HOUSES.
The ore bins, capable of accommodating over 1,000 tons of
ore, are now completed; the gates of special construction,
made so that they are mechanically self-acting, were landed
from the steamer Mystery on Monday. Situated immediately
between the two blocks of bins is a lofty and very massively
built building, in which are rooms for the sampiiug machinery
and working space for an elevator which will lift ore from a
heavy rock-crusher below. The building is practically complete, but the machinery has not yet arrived. The sampling
machinery will work automatically, and indeed the ore will not
b» directly handled from the time it is dumped into the bins
until it leaves the furnaces. By the time the required
machinery arrives, the somewhat steep railway incline on
trestles leading to roofed-in floors just above the bins will be
finished construction, and this part of the smelter works will
then be completed. Several carloads of machinery are already
lying at Liverpool, awaiting transportation by the new ferry
service.
THE ENGINE AND BOILER HOUSES.
These were built a week or more ago. The boilers have
already been placed in position, and the iron boiler stack,
which along with the three boilers was made by the Victoria
Machinery Depot, merely requires raising and setting in place.
The engine-house next door has two large towers, with windows, through which power can be transmitted both to the
sampling and machinery houses, or to any other part of 'the
works, by means of rope pulleys. A dynamo for electric lighting purposes has already arrived.
THE WATER SUPPLY FOR THE TOWN.
The new Avater supply was turned on If st week, and works
well, meeting all present requirements. To Mr. J. C. Lang,
who carried through the scheme with so much promptitude
and energy, much credit is due. The flume conveying the
water from the dam on Grouse Creek to the tank at the top
of Robert street, is over 2,300 feet in length, and necessitated
a deep cutting through the bank for about 30 yards of its
course. From that point iron pipes are laid through the town
and the fall will carry water well above the roof of ,the
highest house likely to be built for some time to come.
THE BUILDING OF THE COPPER QUEEN.
The building of Crofton's first ship is progressing apace.
The hull of the new 24-foot racing yacht "Copper Queen" is
all but completed, and she will be ready to take the water in
a few days. She is being built on a slip at the smelter works,
close to the engine house. The builder is Mr. (Fred. Clark,
and the designer is his brother, Mr. Parker Clark, who has
already designed several very successful racing yachts in
America. The owners, we understand, are Messrs. Parker
Clark, George Williams and Fred. Young, all engineers in the
employ of the smelter company. They have entered her for
the 24th of May racos at Victoria, by which time they hope to
have her completed, though the short interval of time at their
disposal will not allow of much previous testing of her speed
and sailing. She is the lightest of skimming dishes to 'look
at, and will have a steel centreboard nnd a rudder that can no
drawn up like the centre-board. A sister yacht by the same
designer has won not a few races on "the other side," in all
weathers, and the Victoria racing swans will have to be on
their mettle when they offer battle to the "Copper Queen,"
bird of Crofton.
MR. H. C. BELLINGER RETURNS.
Mr. H. C. Bellinger, the eminent metallurgist and director
of the Northwestern Smelting & Refining Co., arrived back
from Greenwood on Monday, having there attended the
blowing-in of the Sunset smelter, and came down to Crofton,
where he has been busy inspecting the progress of the smelter
works and forwarding operations. He will probably build a
house at Crofton.
Keast's Livery Stable.
DUNCAN, B. C.
Operating Crofton and Mt. Sicker Stages.
WESTHOLME to CROFTON,
Daily connecting with all E. & N.  Railway Trains.
DUNCAN to MT. SICKER,
Daily, Sundays excepted.
H. KEAST, Proprietor.
E. M. SKINNER,
Civil Engineer and Provincial Land  Surveyor.
DUNCANS.
MOORE 5 WHITTINGTON,
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS,
VICTORIA and
CROFTON, B. C.
If you are contemplating
building we shall be
pleased to give you an
estimate.
Head Office :
159 Yates Street,
Electric Power.
Phone A750.
The Flour that makes the Best Bread
is sold by
MOWAT & WALLACE, VICTORIA, B.C.
Try it.    Moose Jaw is the brand.
Established 1878.
W   P.  JAYNES,
Wholesale  Importer and Dealer  in All Kinds ok Merchandise.
Depot for Giant Powder Co.       B. C. Pottery Co.
Duncans. Quamichan.
DUNCANS   FLOUR AND   FEED   MILLS
Manufacturer of
Dairy Chop and All Kinds of Mill Stuffs for Feeding
Purposes.
W. P. JAYNES,
Proprietor.
FURNITURE, CARPETS,
WALL PAPER,  CROCKERY,
AND
Complete  Housefurnishings,
For Hotel, Store or Home.
Write for Catalogue.
Weiler Bros., Victoria, B.C.
J 6
THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
!
Duncans ant) Cowichan local mews.
THE NORTH COWICHAN MUNICIPAL COUNCIL.
i
A meeting of this Council will be held on Saturday next,
the 17th instant, at Duncans, and amongst other business to
be transacted will he the consideration of a by-law to give the*
newly-incorporated Duncans Waterworks Company, Limited,
powers to put in and operate a waterworks system to supply
Duncans. Popular opinion is very strong in support of the
objects of the company making this application, as it is widely
recognized that a waterworks system for the town is more and
more becoming an absolute necessity; and there is no time to
be lest at this season with the dry weather coming on. Our
municipal fathers may, we think, be trusted to support the
project with their unfailing regard for the best interests of
the municipality.
NEW  BUILDINGS.
Building activity has been very noticeable in and around
Duncans during the past month or two. The Quaniiehaii
Hotel is now all but completed, and will be opened within a
week or two. Mr. R. H. Whiddeu's premises on the Government road are receiving their last touches, and Mr. Charles
Gra&sie's new residence is nearly finished. And now Mr. J. M.
Camphell having received a contract to erect an office for the
Tyee Copper Company, has started in to work at once, and a
3'J-foot by 24-foot structure, two storeys high, is now in course
of erection on the lot adjoining the Post Office.
LOCAL NOTES.
Mr. F. Harrison, we are glad to say, has returned from
hospital.
The Cowichan Lawn Tennis Club will open the season on
the 24th instant.
Mr. and Mrs. P. Woolaston are spending a few days at
Cowichan Lake.
Mr. S. Tolmie, veterinary surgeon, has been paying a professional visit to Duncans.
Dr. A. C. West is in Duncans, attending to the soundneas
and repair of wise people's teeth.
Mr. H. Mortimer Lamb, managing editor of the Mining
Record, has taken a house in Duncans for a month. Mrs.
Mortimer Lamb and family are with him.
Mr. C. Rivaz met with an accident and cut his foot badly
whilst working on the Tyee tramway survey with Mr. E. M.
Skinner.
Mr. Joseph Martin has been spending a few days in Duncans, where he caught some excellent baskets of trout, and
incidentally met a few followers.
We regret to hear that Mr. S. Hagan, who met with an
accident about six months ago whilst working at the Chemainus River mines, has been obliged to go to the hospital, and
will bo laid up for about six months.
Messrs. E. Hicks-Beach and F. J. Ticehurst, pioneer
ranchers of the Bulkeley Valley, have just returned from
England, and are spending a few days visiting friends in
Duncans.
A strange accident happened to a Chinaman who was
working on the right-of-way for the Tyee aerial tramway.
Two Chinamen were undercutting a log, and one slipping, fell
upon the saw. The other at the same moment drew the saw
and literally cut his fellow-worker's throat. The injured man
by latest reports is just alive.
Mr. Barry, when filing a saw at the Shawnigan logging
camp, stepped back, and caught his foot in a root, with the
result i;hat he fell agah'st the saw and his arm was nearly
cut off.    He came to Duncans to Dr. Perry for medical aid.
Amongst others staying at the Tzouhalem Hotel during the
week have been Lieut. F. F. Rose, of H. M. S. Shearwater;
Mr. and Mrs. P. Woolaston: Dr. A. C. West; Mr. Joseph
Martin, M. F. P.; Mr. A. G. Sargison; and Messrs. G. M.
Perdue. B. J. Perry, C. S. Baxter, W. Chinte. G. II. Hayes,
C. H. Piles, C. B. Lund, W. H. Burton and F Harrison.
CROFTON LOCAL NOTES.
Mr. Beltiuer is building a house for himself on Chaplin
Street.
Is it possible that we have had two American multimillionaires at Crofton and entertained them unawares?
Mr. and Mrs. Baker have rented the second of Mrs.
Cleaves' houses on Edmund street. Mr. Baker is working at
the smelting works.
Mr. Deppoisse, of Ladysmith, has bought the comfortable
house on the main trunk road, just opposite that lately occupied by the townsite survey party,
The painting of the Crofton Hotel is now completed, and
this architecturally picturesque building looks very pretty in
its red coat and white facings. Mr. Walter Harvey was th»
painter, and he is doing other work in the town.
Mrs. Dyke and family have come to reside at Crofton.
Mrs. Diyke is the wife of our pioneer merchant, who has built
additional premises on to his store in Joan Avenue for the
accommodation of his family.
Mrs. Foot has been making a stay at Crofton with her
husband, Dr. Foot, who, short as his professional residence iu
towo has been, has already made himself very popular. His
office is in York Avenue, facing down Joan Street.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Cayzer, late of Galiano Island, with their
two daughters, are now temporarily, located in Captain L.
Thompson's late residence, on the main road. The view from
this site is most commanding, and embraces nearly the whole
town below, and the distant views across the bay are very fine.
Mr. Cayzer is working with Messrs. Smith & Sherbourne.
Our hotel proprietors, Messrs. J. T. Pearce, of the Osborne,
and M. J. Conlin, of tho Crofton, have been paying business
visits to Victoria. The finishing touches are now being put to
the furnishing and' decoration of both these comfortable houses.
Both would seem to be doing good business. Mr. A. B.
B. Whittingham's boarding house, further up the street, is also
being well patronized, and provides good cheer.
Ore is a natural mineral compound that is commercially
valuable, containing metal.
Turner,   Beeton &  Co.,  Ltd.,
WHOLESALE,
LIQUORS, CIGARS AND DRY GOODS.
Sole Agents for
ROBERT   BROWN'S 4-Crown Scotch Whiskey.
PLAYER'S Navy Cut Tobaccos and Cigarettes.
VICTORIA, B.C.
SEND YOUR ORDERS
-FOR-
Hay, Grain and Mill Feed
-TO-
Another of the most charming excursions that can be
taken in one day from Victoria is announced for Sunday next
by the Victoria Terminal & Sidney Railway through the beautiful Saanich peninsula to Sidney, and thence by the steamer
"Iroquois" amongst the islands to the new smelting town of
Crofton, where the smelter works which are now in an advanced stage of construction can be inspected, as also the
new town and its picturesque surroundings during a stay of
about three hours. The train leaves Central Station, Victoria, at 0 a. m., and excursionists on their return will reach
Victoria at G:30 p. m.    Fare for the round trip, $1.
of
It takes about one pound of  coal to evaporate one gallon
water.
The Brackman-Ker Milling Co.,
(LIMITED)
MANUFACTURERS OF
B. & K. ROLLED OATS.
VICTORTA-
AND-
-VANCOUVER. THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
DEHORNING REEF CATTLE.
The Sydney (Australia) Stock aud Station Journal strongly
ad\oeates the removal of horns from cattle intended for beef.
The Journal contends that "humanity, utility and the xin-
answerable argument of market discrimination against horned
heeves all urge the removal of these useless and often unsightly appendages. Among the great advantages of dehorning may be mentioned the saving of space at feeding, bunk
hayrack shed, watering tank, or wherever cattle congregate;
less danger of injury in shipping; a more uniform appearance; and, most important of all, the fact that, other thinsis
being equal, horns detract 10 to 15 cents per hundredweight
from the selling price of cattle. This is especially true where
they are intended for further shipment alive; in fact, some of
the Eastern shippers have instructions not to buy horned
(i.ttle if they can possibly fill their orders with dehorned animals of the required weight and grade. * * * We believe
that, it is to the interest of every man who raises or feeds
cattle to dehorn them, and the younger it is done the better.
This of course refers only to cattle to be fattened for
slaighter. There is no valid argument iu favor of dehorning
breeding animals, and many against it.
HIGHER TARIFF ON FARM PRODUCE.
Thus the Kamloops Sentinel : " The Okanagan Board of
Trade is apparently of the opinion that if the Dominion
Go -eminent would increase the tariff on farm produce the
farmers of that section would be able to successfully compete
with produce imported from the United States into the Kootenay district. The Government cannot make a tariff discriminating in favor of a certain locality, and there is nothing
to be gained by passing resolutions asking for it, and it is
very doubtful whether even if it were granted that would
altogether fill the bill. Take hay, for example. The Colvill
Valley hay enjoys a reputation far above that of any other
hay taken to the Kootenay market. It is clean timothy, well
cured, and customers are willing to pay more for it .than for
an inferior home-grown article. In order to successfully compete with it, our farmers must grow just as good a quality
and cure it in the same perfect manner. There is no reason
why butter and other dairy produce cannot be produced and
marketed rs cheaply by British Columbians as by our neighbours across the line. The fact of the matter is the dairying
business, with a few exceptions, is not gone into with the
thoroughness nor to the same large extent as is the case on
tho other side. There are many cattle-raisers in this province
who never milk a cow, and use canned milk on their tables.
This is a great mistake. What is required is required is more
vigorous farming, and less of the dolce far niente variety.
With the establishing of more creameries conducted on a
sufficiently large scale to ensure the economical production of
butter, much could be done towards promoting the farmer's
prosperity. There appears to be an opening in this district
for a creamery. The butter made locally by farmers is of
excellent quality, but it is made in small amounts, and cannot
therefore be sold as cheaply as that made in creameries, where
W. DYKE.
(Pioneer Merchant   of Crofton).
Boots, Shoes,  Dry Goods,   Confectionery.
 JOAN AVE., CROFTON.	
HAMILTON POWDER CO
(Incorporated 1861.)
Manufacturers   of  High   Explosives,   Stumping   Powder,   Blasting,
Mining and Sporting Powder.    Dealers in Electric Blasting
Apparatus, Safety Fuse, Detonators, etc.
Head office : Montreal.    Branch office : Victoria.    Local  offices :
Vancouver, Nelson, Rossland and Greenwood.     Works:  Nanaimo.
DUNCANS     EMPORIUM
Is the place to purchase supplies when in Duncans,
they are
Wholesale and Retail dealers in Groceries,
Mill Stuffs, Dry Goods, Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes,
Hardware and Mining
Supplies,  etc.
Also are agents for the Hamilton  Powder Co's goods.
All orders carefully and promptly filled.
JUST     ReCEIiZGD
A splendid stock of LAWN TENNIS  GOODS made
by Wright & Ditson and Ayres,   including Racquets,
Balls,  Poles,  Nets,   Presses,  etc.      Croquet Sets and
other summer games.
M. W. WA1TT & CO., 44 Government St., Victoria.
QUEEN'S MARKET
Cor. Govt, and Johnson Sts., Victoria, B. C.   Tel. 32.    P. O. Box 18.
LAWRENCE  GOODACRE  & SONS,
Wholesale and Retail Butchers.   Contractors by appointment
to His Majesty's Royal Navy, The Dominion Government, etc.
Shipping supplied at lowest rates.
A. B. WHITTINGHAM,
PRIVATE   BOARDING   HOUSE,
Home Comforts.    Moderate Rates.
Joan Avenue,      -      -      -      CROFTON, B. C
A.  HOWE,
BUTCHER,
Established  for six years  at Chemainus.
Best Meat at most liberal
prices.
Joan Avenue,      -      -      Crofton, B. C.
~ BENNETTS-
crown
BRAND
GUTTA percha fuse
AWARDED THE GREATER BRITAIN EX.
GOLD MEDAL, 1899.
THIS POPULAR FAVORITE STILL LEADS.
Holman Bros.
Patent Rock Drill
AWARDED THE GOLD MEDAL, PARIS, 1900.
Drills and Accessories, Columns and Tripods,
IN STOCK AT VICTORIA.
Manufacturers of Air Compressors and all
kinds of Mining Machinery.
ESTIMATES ON APPLICATION.
PITT & PETERSON,
Proprietors.
Rowland Machin, Gen'' Asent-
YATES STREET, VICTORIA.B. C. 8
THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
ROFTON
The New Smelting Centre of
the Pacific Coast.
FOR LOTS
APPLY TO
Real Estate Brokers
AND
The Lenora Mt. Sicker Copper
Mining Co., Ltd.
(Non-Personal Liability),
VICTORIA, B. C.
J.  H. WHITTOME,
Agent for DUNCANS, V. I.
London and Lancashire Fire Insurance Co.
Royal Insurance Co.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
By special arrangement with the B. C. Mining Record we are
able to offer particularly advantageous terms for combined subscription
to that well known excellent periodical and the Crofton Gazette for
$3.00 per annum.
Subscriptions received by the Crofton Publishing Co., Crofton
or the B. C Mining Record, P. O. Box 645, Victoria.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.croftongaz.1-0070050/manifest

Comment

Related Items