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The Crofton Gazette and Cowichan News Feb 27, 1902

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 tbe Crofton Gazette
DEVOTED   TO
The Mining and Agricultural Interests of Vancouver Island, Texada Island,
and Coast Mainland Districts.
AOL. 1
CROFTON, B. C, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1902.
NO. 1
B>
ALL ABOARD FOR CROFTON.
AT 7.45 a. m., punctually, the Sidney train started
from Fisguard street. By twos and threes the
various parties of sportsmen dropped off at the
wayside stations, and after the final dispersion at Sidney the little band that wended their way to the steamer
" Iroquois " might all be counted Crofton pilgrims, as
indeed they were.
There was the real estate agent, spruce and tidy and
looking full of business, there were several contractors
who had been down before and were wisely provided
with big gum boots. There was the doctor. There
were also various business and professional men who
would be speculators in town lots. There was the genial general manager of the railway, there was the
smelter chief and colleagues and friends — all aboard
for Crofton ! The talk ran of stone and lumber, estimates, dollars in tens of thousands, and of course smelting, with an occasional reference to refreshments. And
presently, with its eager human freight, the little steamer was plying through the picturesque waters between
Salt Spring Island and Vancouver Island.
About two-and-a-half hours journey brought us past
Cowichan arm and on to Maple bay. We could now
perceive ahead of us, to our right, Vesuvius bay settlement lying in a cosy nook of Salt Spring Island. To the
left a wooded promontory cutoff our view, but rounding
this we caught our first fair glimpse of Osborne bay.
At the foot of a gentle slope of wooded hills lies the
clearing upon which are dotted the earliest habitations
of Crofton. To the left Mt. Richards stretches, green
and forest covered, whilst in the distance to the right
Mt. Brenton arises, a misty blue mass with scattered
fields of snow. But the little patch of cleared land with
the yellowish wooden buildings is the mark of all eyes.
The large double building on the high ground to the
left is pointed out to be the smelter offices, and to the
left of them again is the smelter site. To the right,
stretching back, are a couple of ranches. Their
weather-stained buildings sufficiently denote that they
are not a part of a new townsite. The nearest one with
dwelling house close on the shore belongs to Mr.
Arthur Ward, who is shortly leaving for England ; the
homestead behind is the property of Mr. Masters.
The wharf confronts us. It is at present a small
structure erected merely for Mr. Ward's convenience,
but five or six week's hence there will extend in its
place an imposing structure 750 feet long and 60 feet
wide, and having a depth of water for the largest ships
at its extremity.
This leads on to the end of Chaplin street, the northern boundary of the townsite. Chaplin has already been
partially graded. Turning down the water front we
come to the end of Joan avenue, which promises to be
the main business street of the town. It is already
graded and will be gravelled in a few days. It will be
a handsome thoroughfare 100 feet in width. Near the
end of it to the south, on the  water front, will be the
railway station. At the two corners nearest to this two
hotels are going up. On the north side (corner of block
1) is the large hotel which J. T. Pearce, of the Telegraph hotel, Victoria, is erecting. It already promises
to be a handsome building. On the opposite corner of
the avenue (corner of block 2) is the site of another
large hotel which will be owned by M. J. Conlin, of
Klondike fame. Just at the back of his hotel site
Mr. Conlin has put up comfortable temporary quarters
and is providing meals and a few beds.
Going up the avenue A. Howe's butcher store is nearly completed on the left hand. It will be opened in a
few days. On the opposite side of the street (in block 1)
three stores are contracted for, the builders being Moore
& Whittington, of Victoria.
Higher up again, on the right, at the top corner of
block i, is the townsite estate office where genial Capt.
Mackintosh wins all sorts of praises from lot buyers for
his urbanity and business energy. Across the way a pile
of lumber is lying on the ground ready for the building
of a store which is to be run by Mr. Broadwell, of Salt
Spring Island.
Still farther up the avenue, crossing King street and
passing now along blocks 3 and 4, the buildings at present begun are all to the right in block 3. The first
come to is A. B. Whittingham's private boarding
house. This is an upstair building, and is practically
finished, with a sidewalk in front. It is temporarily
being occupied as a general store during the completion
of Dyke & Kirkwood's building near the end of the
block. This evidently will not take many days. Between Whittingham's and Dyke & Kirkwood's are the
stables occupied by Lindsey's teams which are doing
excellent work. Next door, again, a stable is going up
for Keast, of Duncans, who, as soon as he has this accommodation, will run a daily stage from Duncans and
Westholm.
At the end of this block York avenue, another imposing hundred-foot thoroughfare, partially graded, crosses
from north to south. Many of the lots have been sold
bi»:t so far no buildings have begun to appear. Here
Joan avenue ends. The prospect looking down it
across the bay is admirable. The avenue has been so
laid out that there is an uninterrupted view across the
still waters of the bay to a deep dip in the rugged hills
of Salt Spring Island, through which may be caught a
glistening vista of glorious Mt. Baker on the far off
American shore.
In our haste to inspect the various buildings we have
not noticed the gangs of Japs working on the grading
of the streets, or clearing the ground of stumps. Every
now and then " Dynamite Bill " may be seen running
for his life, and, looking for the cause of his trouble, you
suddenly hear a thunder sound and see clouds of earth,
stones and tree stumps, whirled hundreds of feet in all
directions. Blasting, of course, will not be permitted
much longer so the wiser lot owners are having their
large stumps blasted out at once while they may.
(Continued on Page Seven.) THE CROFTON GAZETTE.
MT. SICKER MINING NEWS.
THE LENORA MT. SICKER PROPERTY.
THE Lenora mine is owned by the Lenora Mt.
Sicker Copper Mining Company, Limited, non-
personal liability. The property is situated 1,400
feet above sea-level and in extent is a full-sized mineral
claim. Considerable work has been done by means of
tunnels, which have been driven at three levels. It has
not been necessary to sink shafts so far. The lowest
tunnel which is at present about 1,000 feet long has
a back at the extreme end of about 350 feet. Ore has
been found at all three levels, continuously from the
lowest No. 3 to the surface.
Development work is now being carried on at the
rate of about 300 feet of tunnel per month.
The boiler capacity at present consists of two 25 h.p.
boilers running a 3-drill compressor. A new 5-drill
Cornish compressor will be supplied by Holman Bros,
in about 40 days, and by that time a new 50 h.p. boiler
will be in running order.
The ore has hitherto been sorted by hand but by
the first week in April a belt conveyor, sorting table and
rock crusher will be installed, of which the capacity will
be about 200 tons a day.
The formation on Mount Sicker consists of schistose
rocks with diorite intrusions.
Tunnelling can be put through for $4.50 to $5.00 in
some cases. At the present time there are about 40,000
tons of ore on the dump and two years output at least
in sight. Whilst this ore is being shipped a great deal
of development work can be done and the output of the
mine will accordingly be greatly increased.
To date, only one vein has been worked. This vein
—the south vein—contains ore bodies which have been
mined up to 45 feet in width. It has been found that as
depth is gained the gold values of the ore increases,
which is a welcome sign. The ore so far has been most
uniform the shipments varying only $1.00 to $2.00 per
ton in returns received from the American smelters, to
which so far about 22,000 tons have been shipped.
The north vein parallel to the south contains very high
grade ore. From it numbers of assays running over 200
oz. in silver have been made, the highest of them showing no less than $130.00 in gold, 696 oz. silver and 14%
copper.
The vein upon which the claims were staked is to the
north again of the two above mentioned, and is of a
different character, carrying free gold on the surface.
Work will be prosecuted on this vein during the summer. The matrix of the vein is quartz and will be used
to line the bessemer converters at Crofton.
The Lenora ore is shipped by the Mt. Sicker Railway
which is owned by the Company. It is a 3 ft. gauge
line running 6j( miles to a point near Westholme on
the E. & N. Railway. From this point it will be extended to Crofton, a distance of $% miles, The bridges
and grading along the extension have all been completed and the entire line will be open for traffic by the ist
of April, 1902. Two hundred tons of ore a day will
then be shipped regularly to the new smelter at Crofton.
The townsite of Crofton is owned by the Lenora Company, and already a considerable number of lots have
been sold, and it is expected that a number of industries
will be started in the new town this year. Crofton has
the advantage over most smelter towns in this Province
that it does not depend upon a local supply of ore but
can secure ores by sea from any part of the world.
At Mount Sicker the Lenora Co. have erected a fine
hotsl which contributes greatly to the comfort of those
wishing to exploit the district.
TZOUHALEM   HOTEL,
DUNCANS,
Price Bros.,       -       -       -       Proprietors.
FELL & COMPANY, Limited Liability,
GROCERS,
WINES   AND  LIQUORS.
Victoria, B. C.
MEN'S CLOTHING STORE.
HATS AND UNDERWEAR
—AT—
ARTHUR  HOLMES'
78 Yates St., Corner Broad,
VICTORIA, B. C.
THE MT. SICKER & B. C. DEVELOPMENT CO., LTD.
The Mount Sicker and British Columbia Development
Company, Ltd., own seventeen claims on Mount Sicker,
most of which are in the group adjoining the Lenora
mine.
The townsite of Mount Sicker is situated on this property. Latterly the Company has been doing considerable development work and has erected a substantial
manager's house. The shareholders reside chiefly in
Scotland, and if they have only sufficient faith in their
property to sink money in its development (and they
have plenty of capital for the purpose) their holdings
should become very valuable. They were the original
owners of the Lenora mineral claim, but sold it last year
to the present Company.
DEVELOPMENTS   AT  THE  TYEE.
This company are only waiting for the large double-
drum hoist which they have ordered, and which should
be on the mine by the 10th April, to greatly enlarge their
operations. They will then be in a position to start
sinking again, and to commence stoping from the 200-
foot level to the surface.
In the 100-foot level they have drifted over 200 feet,
the ore body there averaging 25 feet in width, being in
places as wide as 35 feet and nowhere less than 20 feet.
At the 300-foot level a fair body of ore has been
struck, and cut through so far 6 feet in one place and 2l/2
feet in another.
The ore body on this mine has now been proved from
the Lenora line to a distance of 450 feet east, and to a
depth of 200 feet.
ENGLISH   MINERAL  CLAIM   ON   MOUNT  BRENTON.
Mr. Creeden is putting in a tunnel to prove this claim,
and has already struck the lode five feet in width. ' An
average assay of the surface rock went $18 to the ton
in gold, copper, and silver. Mr. Creeden can trace the
ledge for 1,000 feet, and seems to have got hold of a
good thing. THE CROFTON GAZETTE.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦♦♦+♦
Duncans ano Cowicban local 1Rew$.
♦♦♦+»♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦»♦»♦♦♦»♦♦»♦»♦»♦»♦♦♦
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
THE COWICHAN MUNICIPAL COUNCIL.
The meeting of the Cowichan Municipal Council just
held was a full one. On representations from Mr. Croft
it was agreed to take over the streets of Crofton when
completed. The acceptances of Messrs. A. Blyth,
J.P., and W. H. Elkington, J.P., to seats on the Board
of Licensing Commissioners were received with satisfaction. Mr. W. Gidler of the Cowichan Lumber Co.
put in an application for the reduction of assessment on
that property, and a letter was read from Mr. L. G. Hill
acknowledging with thanks the Council's donation to
Chemainus Hospital.
A number of bills were then dealt with. These had
reference to road clearing and repairs, and the road
inspector handed in his report and estimates totalling
about $9,000.
The amendments to the Municipalities Act suggested
by the Reeves' Convention at New Westminster were
read and postponed for consideration to a future meeting. An amendment to the Fire Wardens by-law concerning the storage and carriage of explosives was read
a first time, and the revision of the assessment roll was
then proceeded with. Quamichan and Comiaken-
Cowichan wards having been disposed of, the session
was adjourned until the 12th March, when the Licensing
Board will also hold a session.
THE NEW HOTEL AT DUNCANS.
The embers of the burnt out Quamichan Hotel are
still smouldering but Mr. Joseph Daley, the proprietor,
has taken time by the forelock and given out already a
contract to Walter Ford of Duncans for the erection of
a new hotel, with all the latest improvements, on the
old site. Thos. Hooper, of Victoria, is the architect,
and he has designed a handsome and commodious
building. Fred H. Nelson, who tenanted the old house,
will open business in the new one within three months,
and his many friends in Duncans will welcome him back.
THE ALDERLEA FIRE CO.
A meeting of the Alderlea Fire Co. will be held at
Duncans this week, the matter for consideration being
the purchase of a chemical engine. A. Peterson is the
energetic chief of this body, and it is to be hoped that
the efforts of himself and others will secure so necessary
an aid to the very valuable services of the Fire Co.
THE WESTSIDE
VICTORIA'S   LARGEST   DRY   GOODS   STORE.
ABOUT MAIL ORDERS.
The Westskle's Mail Order Department gives quick and efficient
service. Experienced assistants are placed at your disposal, and every
order is attended to the same day as received. The best aid in ordering
goods is a copy of our 100 page Illustrated Catalogue—sent post free.
MAIL ORDER ADDRESS:
THE HUTCHESON CO.^Ltd.
80 Government Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Annual Meeting of the Dairymen's and Live
Stock Association of British Columbia is taking place
on Wednesday and Thursday at Victoria.
We have to hold over a report of the Supplementary
Meeting of the Cowichan Farmers'Inst., addressed by
the Hon. C. L. Smith, on the "Stabling and Care of
Cows."
Mr. Lamming, of Mt. Sicker, has provided a hall with
anterooms, etc., over his store, and it is proposed to
have social dances there regularly every week. Three
social functions have already been held, and were most
successful. As many as twenty ladies have graced the
hall by their presence on these occasions.
There is a good deal of complaint amongst Mt. Sicker
residents that the mails reach them only twice a week
instead of daily as heretofore. The road up the hill is
not so bad considering the heavy weather. During the
late rains the roadway was transformed into something
approaching a mountain torrent, yet there have been no
washaways to speak of excepting in one little place near
the " divide."
CHEMAINUS NEWS.
The Chemainus Mills have started work again after
being   closed   for   several  weeks.
Mr. Howe, of the Horseshoe Hotel, Chemainus, has
shown the enterprise to instal a dynamo and plant for
the electric lighting of his premises. Finding, however,
the water supply which generates his present power1 insufficient, he has contracted with H. YV. Mallett to lay
on a 10 in. main from Fuller's Lake, a quarter of a mile
away.
It is an open secret that Mr. Howe offered a smelter
site to the Tyee Co., but local influences militated against
its acceptance.
THE WHARF.
LOCAL AND MT. SICKER NOTES.
Mr. Keast is erecting stables at Crofton to enable him
to run a daily stage connecting the new town with the
E. & N. Railway at Duncans and Westholme. This
will give Duncans merchants a show in the opening
Crofton markets.
Mr. S. C. Bull of the Cowichan Meat Market has also
in view the purchase of a lot in Crofton and the extension of his business in that town.
The Cowichan Fishermen's Union will hold their
meeting at Quamichan Indian village on Saturday, 1st
March, at 2 p. m.
The contract for building the wharf has been awarded
to J. A. Carthew of Victoria. The piles have been supplied by Geo. Lewis of Duncans, and are already delivered
and the pile driver will be got to work in a day or two.
Mr. Carthew is at present at Crofton pushing on the
work. His agreement is to complete it within 60 days,
but he will have it ready for steamers in 35 days. This
wharf promises to be one of the best appointed in
British Columbia. When it is completed there will be
a wharfage of 250 feet for ocean steamers, besides a slip
for the ferry, and several other slips for smaller vessels.
It will carry three tracks, and the work of construction
is so arranged that steamers will be able to load and
unload alongside as the work progresses without causing any inconvenience. THE CROFTON GAZETTE.
The Crofton Gazette
PUBLISHED BY
The Crofton Publishing Co.
Manager, H. Mortimer Lamb
Editor, Henry II. Newii.i.
RATES FOR ADVERTISEMENTS:
$1.00 per inch per insertion.
Larger spaces at a reduction by arrangement.
INSCRIPTION. $2.00 PER ANNUM.
All communications for the present to P. O. Box 645, Victoria.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1902.
THE GAZETTE AND ITS POLICY.
CONTEMPORANEOUSLY with the laying of the
first brick in Crofton, the Crofton Gazette
to-day makes its debut in the journalistic arena; and
so favourable an opportunity as the present should
not be allowed to pass without a brief reference to the
object, scope and policy of the publication, of which this
is the first of, we hope, many regular issues. It is unfortunately true that the number of newspapers published in British Columbia in proportion to the population of the Province is unduly, almost absurdly large.
Nearly every little village boasts, while it begrudgingly
maintains (?) its local journal, whose sole and only aim
in life is to defy the world to show a more charming,
picturesque, sanitary or enterprising "city" than the
particular village or hamlet in which the newspaper in
question circulates. But none of this applies to the
Crofton Gazette. There may be too many newspapers, but it is an excellent saying that "there is
always room at the top," and—well our readers we are
sure will obligingly fill out the sentence. Then, so far
as Crofton is concerned, no one could even in terms of
contempt or derision describe it as a " mere village or
hamlet." For it certainly does not answer any such
description. Crofton to-day is a clearing, beautifully
decorated and dotted with newly cut stumps. There
are possibly a dozen buildings of sorts, and the mud on
the streets is of a peculiarly "sticky" type. To-morrow,—that is the metaphorical and rhetorical manner of speaking of three months hence—it will have a
population of we are afraid to say how many thousand
people, with numerous industries in full swing, not to
mention one of the largest and most complete smelting
works on the Pacific Coast—in fact, the largest north of
San Francisco. But we do not propose to rely altogether on the tender mercies of the future residents of
Crofton for our bread and butter. Our constituency
we are happy to say extends beyond such narrow limitations, as any one may see by studying our sub-title.
We have around us a magnificent agricultural and mining territory, whose only "long-felt want," a local
organ, is now at length to be gratified.    Our efforts, in
short, will be directed to the utmost towards furthering
the interests and advertising the great natural resources
of Vancouver and Texada Islands in general and of the
Cowichan and Mt. Sicker districts in particular.
Politically we shall steer an independent course. That
however, does not imply that we shall "sit on the
fence," which at the best is an uncomfortable and undignified seat. On the contrary, being unbound by
party trammels, we hope to be the better and closer
students of politics, i. e. the science of good government, and shall extend our support impartially to those
legislators or to that party whose actions or line of
policy seem best conducive, in our opinion, to the welfare and prosperity of the Province as a whole.
In devoting special attention to mining and agriculture we are concerning ourselves with the most important interests of our constituency. The advent of the
first smelter to our Island is as much a proof of the
amount of mine development accomplished, on Mt.
Sicker especially, as it is a promise of future mining expansion. Wherever there is a growing mining industry
there is an equally growing demand for agricultural
products. In the Duncan's and Cowichan districts of
Vancouver Island we have one of the finest agricultural
areas in the province. So far as we are able we shall
claim for it the attention and consideration that its advantageous position demands.
For the rest we shall endeavour to show, by the
Gazette, that a British Columbia local paper may be
both interesting and entertaining without an indulgence
in silly or offensive personalities.
The legitimate claim of our townspeople for the establishment of a Post Office in Crofton will, no doubt,
be promptly responded to by the Postmaster-General.
The business of this town is developing rapidly, and the
want of a Post Office and regular daily mails is felt
severely.
We believe that the honour of being the first lady
resident in Crofton townsite belongs to Mrs. A. B.
Whittingham of Joan Avenue.
VICTORIA & SIDNEY RAILWAY
Trains will run between Victoria and Sidney as follows:
DAILY:
Leave Victoria at    7.45 a. m.   4 00 p. m.
"    Sidney at 9.00   "        5.45    "
SATURDAY AND SUNDAY:
Leave Victoria at  7.45 a. m.    2.00 p. m.
"    Sidney at     9.00   "        5.45    "
STEAMER   "MYSTERY"
Connects  at  Sidney  with  morning train DAILY for
CROFTON.    Returning connects with
evening train for Victoria.
S. F. MACKENZIE, General Manager.        J. ANDERSON, Traffic Manager. THE CROFTON GAZETTE.
THE SMELTER.
MESSRS. Breen, Bellinger and Fotheringham have
lost no time in placing the contracts for the
erection of their new smelter at Crofton.
Mr. Joseph Bye under whose supervision the North-
port smelter was constructed, is superintending the
construction of the present one which bids fair to
be one of the most complete on the Pacific coast.
Mr. Fred Young, of Butte, is the resident engineer.
The contract for the excavations has been given to
the Victoria Transfer Co. who have fifty or sixty men at
work. The amount of earth to be removed totals up to
some 12,000 cubic yards.
The contract for the boilers has been secured by the
Victoria Machinery Depot Co. and that for the building,
masonry and carpentering by the very capable and energetic firm of Sherbourne and Smith. Mr. Haggerty
is supplying the stone from quarries near Vesuvius Bay
on Salt Spring Island. The transport will thus be only
five or six miles by water. Granite will be used for facing the structure and sandstone for the backing. Such
of the machinery as can be purchased locally has been
so obtained, but a large quantity of special and very perfect machinery is en route from Denver, Col. With all
due allowances for unavoidable delays the smelter will
be ready to treat ores on the ist of June.
Two hlast furnaces are in the first instance to be installed, the largest with a calculated capacity of 400
tons per day. The furnace room will be built large
enough to accommodate threeof these stacks and in addition to the above mentioned stack another is being put
in with not so great a capacity.
Besides these two furnaces a modern bessemerising
plant is being put in ; this will be a great benefit to mine
owners of Vancouver Island and the Coast of British
Columbia and the freight on the matte to New York will
be saved to a great extent, as the output of the Crofton
Smelter will consist of blister copper instead of ordinary
matte.
The power plant will consist of one compound condensing engine of 500 h. p., of which one side, that is
the high pressure one will be erected and at present will
have a capacity of 275 h. p.
In addition a large blowing engine will be erected to
supply the convertors, whilst two connesville blowers
will supply the air for the furnaces. The boiler-room
will contain three boilers of 200 h. p. each. The main
stack is 12 feet in diameter and 125 feet high.
The plant will be fully supplied with electric power
and lighting. The works are built so that they can be
rapidly enlarged without affecting their economical
working, and with the whole coast of British Columbia
to draw from and increased quantities of ore offering,
there can be little doubt that the expansion provided for
will be necessary at an early date. The Works will not
only smelt ores purchased by the Company operating at
Crofton, but will also treat the matte from other smelters sent to these works, reducing it to blister copper,
and thus effecting a considerable saving in freightage
to the Eastern refineries.
HAMILTON  POWDER CO.
(Incorporated 1861.)
Manufacturers   of   High   Explosives,   Stumping   Powder,   Blasting,
Mining and Sporting Powder.    Dealers in Electric Blasting
Apparatus, Safety Fuse, Detonators, etc.
Head office : Montreal.    Branch office: Victoria.    Local offices :
Vancouver, Nelson, Rossland and Greenwood.     Works:  Nanaimo.
THE  STEAMBOAT SERVICE.
We hear on good authority that a large and fast stern
wheeler will shortly be put on the route between Sidney,
Crofton and Nanaimo. She will have comfortable accomodation for a large number of passengers, and will
steam 15 miles an hour. She will be able to carry 200
tons of freight.
A ferry will connect Crofton with the Mainland
railway systems.
MOORE & WHITTINGTON,
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS,
VICTORIA and
CROFTON, B. C.
If you are contemplating
building we shall he
pleased to give you an
estimate.
Head Office:
159 Yates Street,
Electric Power.
Phone A750.
VICTORIA MACHINERY DEPOT CO.
Engineers,
Boiler Makers and Founders,
VICTORIA, B. C.
M. W. WAITT & CO.,
The Largest, Oldest Established and Most Complete MUSIC STORE
in British Columbia. STEINWAY, NORDHEIMER, HEINTZ-
MAN & CO. DOMINION PIANOS. ESTEY, DOMINION,
THOMAS ORGANS. We carry an immanse stock of Sheet Music
and books of all kinds. Write for Catalogues.
44 GOVERNMENT STREET,       .       .       VICTORIA. B. C.
MEETING OF PARLIAMENT.
Parliament was opened by His Honour the Lieut.-
Governor on Thursday. Feb. 20th. All the members
were in attendance except Hon. Speaker Booth who was
absent through illness ; and C. E. Pooley was elected to
the chair for the sitting.
After gratifying allusions to the visit of the Duke and
Duchess of York, and the approaching coronation ot His
Majesty King Edward VII, the Speech from the Throne
regretted the continuance of the war in South Africa
which has taken so many Canadians from their homes.
It reviewed the improving Mining and Agricultural prospects of the Province and promised a report concerning
the results of the commission to enquire into and adjust
freight rates on agricultural products. It stated that
negotiations were continuing with the Dominion Govt,
at Ottawa referring to the relations of the Province with
the Dominion under the terms ot the Union, and proceeded to enumerate the subjects to be dealt with by the
Govt, during the Session, which were :—(1) In furthering the interests of the stock raisers of the interior to
deal with the establishment of a system of cold storage
in connection with abattoirs ; (2) Fishery development;
(3) A fair measure of re-distribution ; (4) The encouragement of immigration and the settlement of unoccupied
lands ; (5) A measure for the purpose of consolidating
existing loan acts and of obtaining authority thereunder
for the issuance of a new loan ; (6) The agreements entered into with several companies for the manufacture
of pulp and paper, and the measures for the establishment of these industries ; (7) The means for securing
construction of a railway from Bute Inlet to Yellowhead
Pass to connect with the railway system of Vancouver,
as also for the construction of the Coast-Kootenay Railway, and finally, legislation dealing with Taxation and
assistance to hospitals. THE CROFTON GAZETTE.
THE HISTORY OF OSBORNE  BAY.
A representative of the Crofton Gazette waited on
Mr. Arthur Ward in his comfortable home at Osborne
Bay, and elicited from him some interesting facts relating to the history of the settlement which has been
his home for several years.
According to tradition the earliest inhabitants of the
bay were a people called " Tli-yamen," a name which is
generally interpreted " people of the mountain," assuming its derivation from the Japanese word "yama"—a
hill. This old race must have lived and died in the bay
many hundreds of years ago. Mr. Ward has come
across skeletons in his garden so ancient and decomposed that they have crumbled to powder at the touch of
his spade. It is assumed that these early dwellers lived
mostly on clams as, in the vicinity of every little stream
where encampments might be expected, heaps of broken
clam shells are to be found More particularly is this
so in Mr. Ward's garden, and on the scene of excavation for the smelter building where compact beds of clam
shells five or six feet thick have been cut through at
. considerable depths beneath the ground surface. Over
these beds have gradually sprung up trees which must
have taken nearly 200 years to come to their present state
of maturity. The antiquity of these old clam-eating inhabitants is thus strongly suggested.
The Chemainus Indians are said to have become the
next possessors of the bay, presumably by conquest, and
they in their turn were later on dispossessed by the
Cowichan Indians. A few of their descendants may be
found living near Comox to this day.
The name Osborne Bay was probably bestowed on
the place by a British warship. The first white settlers
came during the sixties, and seem to have led a more or
less peaceful existence until about fifteen years ago. At
that period two ranchers, Messrs. Dringand Miller, held
the land now to be occupied for the smelter site. An
Indian living in the vicinity had lately been hanged for
some offence, and his vengeful fellows mistaking either
Dring or Miller for the hangman (who in those days
was always a volunteer) entered the ranchers' home one
night, and shot both its occupants dead. The Indian
who fired the fatal shots was tried several times, and
eventually committed suicide in prison by the novel and
laborious but simple expedient of beating his hands
against his breast.
Mr. Ward pointed with some pride to snowdrops already blooming in his garden, and drew attention to his
interesting collection of Indian relics, including stone
knives and axe heads, boat anchors, paint pots, etc. It
is the district's loss that Mr. Ward is leaving almost
immediately for England.
M. J. Conlin's hotel is also making a good show.
This building is going up under the supervision of K.
Sharp, who has been waiting for delivery of the material.
The lumber, however, is now all on the ground, and
two or three days will see a big building going up here.
The hotel is to be a strictly first-class one. Mr. Conlin
hopes to open on the 10th of next month. Meanwhile
at the back of the new building he has put up comfortable temporary quarters where he is providing meals
and a few beds.
PETITION FOR POST OFFICE.
A meeting of pioneer citizens has been held to petition
the government for a post office. The meeting was informal but all who have interests in the town attended
and resolutions were passed unanimously that the
Postmaster General should be humbly petitioned
Firstly " for the establishment of a post office in
Crofton,"
Secondly " that the new post office should be located
in lot 3 block 3 on Joan Avenue," and
Thirdly " that James Kirkwood should be the first
local postmaster."
This petition has since been duly presented by James
Kirkwood in person he being deputed by'the votes of
the meeting to put the matter before the Government.
The Postmaster General's reply has not yet been
received.
CROFTON UP TO DATE
Messrs.  Dyke & Kirkwood have opened their store.
Keast's stables are well in hand, and his daily stage
from Duncans and Westholme should be running within
the week.
Mr. Whittingham's boarding house will very shortly
be ready for occupation. In this business he is being
assisted by Mrs. Whittingham and every comfort is
assured to his patrons.
J. T. Pearce's hotel is going up at lighthing speed.
The contractors Messrs. Sherbourne & Smith, and their
foreman, A. Murray, are to be congratulated. Ten
days ago the foundations were being laid, and now
a two-story building 41 feet by 60 feet and 26 feet high
from sill to plate has arisen upon them.
HOW TO REACH  CROFTON.
The simplest way to reach the new townsite is to take
the Victoria & Sidney train any morning of the week
leaving Victoria at 7.45 a. m. This connects at Sidney
with the s.s. " Mystery" or other steamer which, after
a couple of hours trip through protected water
and lovely island scenery, will land the visitor right on
the wharf at Crofton. The return journey is made the
same day.
The alternate route is by the E. & N. railway to
Westholm, thence by stage. A stage now runs between Duncans, Westholm and Crofton every Saturday
and Sunday. The walk from Westholm to Crofton is
four miles.
SEND YOUR ORDERS
 FOR	
Hay, Grain and Mill Feed
 TO	
The Brackman-Ker Milling Co.,
(LIMITED)
MANUFACTURERS  OF
B. & K. ROLLED OATS.
•/]
VICTORIA-
AND
-VANCOUVER. THE CROFTON GAZETTE.
BUTTER  MAKING AT DUNCANS.
Business in Duncans and neighbouring districts continues to increase in a steady yet unobtrusive way that
is apt to mislead the occasional visitor who thinks he
sees in its placid existence a slumbering land ot nod.
The figures of the last balance sheet of the Cowichan
Creamery for instance are instructive reading. During
the year 1901 no less a sum than $19,651.02 have been
credited to the funds, an increase of $3,403.22 on the
figures of 1900. The sales of butter during the year
have amounted to 80,356 lbs., an increase of 9,445 lbs.,
and this output has sold for $22,375.76, an increase of
$3,025.46 on the receipts of 1900. In 1897 the takings
were only $10,368.79, so that these have more than
doubled during the past four years. This increase as
Mr. J. H. Whittome, the Secretary of the Company,
assured our representative has been a steady growth
from year to year, and the prospects are brighter than
ever. Most of the farmers from Westholme to Cowichan are doing business with the Creamery, and others
are gradually taking advantage of it. The Metchosin
district is being tapped but transport facilities are absent in many cases.
The total cost to the farmer of butter manufactured
by the Creamery is only 3^ cents per lb. including insurance, etc. This compares favourably with Alberta
figures, and the excellence of the article turned out is
attested by the prizes which the company has never
failed to secure wherever it has exhibited. Last year at
Victoria it was awarded a diploma in addition to first
and second prizes.    Bravo Duncans!
,        ALL ABOARD FOR CROFTON.
(Continued from Page One.)
Looking up the hill at the back a time-worn building
stands just on the edge of the bush. Here Capt.
Livingston Thompson has made his headquarters whilst,
assisted by Mr. W. Pinder and an untiring crew, he
has been busy for many weeks surveying and marking
out the streets and lots on the townsite.
And now returning down Joan avenue and bearing
across Robert street, we cross into the smelter domain
by a light bridge over a small stream. Here we come
to two large buildings connected by a covered way.
These are the smelter offices and living quarters of the
staff. Their luxuriousness bears witness to the handsome way in which the smelter syndicate are known to
treat their employees. Here reside • at present Mr.
Joseph Bye, who is superintending construction, and
Mr. Fred. Young, the engineer.
Beyr iid on the high ground the foundations for the
various smelter buildings are being prepared. Behind
are to be the ore and sampling houses, and below them
again the boiler house and furnaces and the great
smoke stack, 125 feet in height, which, with the prevailing winds, will carry any fumes there are right out
to sea. As, however, the ore is to be treated in closed
furnaces this nuisance will be very much mitigated if
not altogether done away with. Below, again, excavations are being made for the works, the lowest platform to be 7^ feet above high-water mark. Here the
Victoria Transfer Co. are employing 50 or 60 Chinamen and the scene is a busy one.
A couple of hours have now passed in what has seemed but a few minutes in this interesting place, and the
steamer is whistling for our return. A few weeks hence
these impressions will be obliterated as ancient history,
but they will serve as a contrast to the hustling future,
and to suggest the rapid development that is now quietly
taking place.
QUEEN'S MARKET
Cor. Govt, and Johnson Sts., Victoria, B. C.    Te.1. 32.    P. O. Box 18.
LAWRENCE GOODACRE & SONS,
Wiiolksai.k AND RETAIL Butchers.    Contractors by appointment
lo His Majesty's Royal Navy, The Dominion Government, etc.
Shipping supplied at lowest rates.
A.  HOWE,
, \ BUTCHER,
Established  for six years  at Chemainus.
Best Meat at most liberal
prices.
Joan Avenue,
Crofton, B. C.
BENNETT'S
CROWN
BRAND
GUTTA PERCHA FUSE
AWARDED THE GREATER BRITAIN EX.
GOLD MEDAL, 1899.
THIS POPULAR FAVORITE STILL LEADS.
HOLMAN BROS.
PATENT ROCK DRILL
AWARDED THE GOLD MEDAL, PARIS, 1900.
IN STOCK AT VICTORIA:
Air Compressors and all kinds of Mining
Machinery.
ESTIMATES ON APPLICATION.
Rowland Machin, Gen'' Aeent'
YATES STREET, VICTORIA.B. C.
TRY OUR ARABIAN COFFEE.
MOWAT & WALLACE,
GROCERS.
Cob. Yates and Douglas Streets, Victoria, B. C.
89 Johnson Street—Tel. 621. 31 Government Street—Tel. 398.
BROWN & COOPER, Victoria, B. C.
Dealers in FRESH FISH, OYSTERS, POULTRY, GAME,
FRUIT, Sit., &c.    .Smoked Fish a specialty—our own curing.
IQpCountry orders or produce sent us will receive prompt attention. 8
THE CROFTON GAZETTE.
The Paterson Shoe Co., Ltd.
Importers and Dealers in all Kinds of
Boots and Shoes, Rubber Boots, &c.
MINERS' FOOTWEAR A SPECIALTY.
Letter Orders promptly and carefully filled. Write for Catalogue.
BRANCH STORES IN VANCOUVER AND NANAIMO.
THE PATERSON SHOE CO, Ltd,
VICTORIA, B. C,
W.   E.   LAMMING,
A. B. WHITTINGHAM,
GENERAL STORE,
PRIVATE   BOARDING   HOUSE,
Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots and Shoes,
Home Comforts.    Moderate Rates.
MOUNT SICKER, B. C.
Joan Avenue,      ...      CROFTON, B. C.
F
T
0
N
ROFTON
^     The New Smelting Centre of
- the Pacific Coast.
FOR LOTS
APPLY TO
Real Estate Brokers
AND
The Lenora Mt. Sicker Copper
Mining Co., Ltd.
(Non-Personal Liability),
VICTORIA, B. C.
J.  H.  WHITTOME,
Agent for DUNCANS, V. I.
London and Lancashire Fire Insurance Co.
Royal Insurance Co.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
By special arrangement with the B. C. Mining Record we are
able lo offer particularly advantageous terms for combined subscription
to that well known excellent periodical and the Crofton GAZETTE for
$3.00 per annum.
Subscriptions received by the Crofton Publishing Co., Crofton,
or the B. C. Mining Record, P. O. Box 645, Victoria.
<J

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