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The Crofton Gazette and Cowichan News Oct 15, 1902

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 11 •
M.
QUAMICHAN  HOTEL
DUNCANS
Now Open. Re-built and
Re-furnished. Heated by
Hot Air. Sample Room
for Commercial Travelers.
Boats for Pishing.
F. Nelson, Prop.
• ••I ilC.ii
J. H. WHITTOME,
Agent   (or   London   and
Lancashire Fire Insurance
Co., Koyal Insurance Co.
Duncans, V. I.
 Crofton Gazette
ani> Cowicban flews
Devoted to the Mining and Agricultural Interests of Vancouver Island, Texada
Island, and Coast Mainland Districts.
VOL. 1.
CROFION, B.C., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1902.
No. 29
VICTORIA R. I.   IN MEMORIAM.
(By Bret Harte.)
(In Harper's Magazine for this month the following
lines are printed for the first time. They were not found
until after the poet's death.)
When your men bowed heads together
With hushed lips,
And the globe swung out from gladness
To eclipse,
When your drums from the equator.
To the pole
Carried round it an unending
Funeral roll,
When your capitals from  Norway
To the Cape
Through their streets and from their houses
Trailed their crape,
Still the sun awoke to gladness
'As of old,
And the stars their midnight beauty
Still unrolled,
i
For the glory born of Goodness
Never dies,
And its flag is not half-masted
In the skies.
THE MANY FUNCTIONS OF CORN.
The following from a paper by Mr. W. S. Hayward in
the September number of "The World's Work" is interesting at the present moment:—     •  '
Food production is only one of the many functions of
corn—the by-products lead into curious avenues. In time
of naval battles this plant will be able to prevent the sinking of ships riddled with projectiles. By tremendous pressure the pith of the corn stalk, a light, yellowish-white substance, mainly composed of cellulose, is compressed into
exceedingly small compass. A pinch of the compressed
fibre placed in a drinking glass and saturated with water
suddenly swells to the full capacity of the glass. It will
absorb about twenty-eight times its own weight of water.
Between the plates of the great battleships this compressed
pith is now being placed.    Should a projectile pierce the
sides of the ship, it must pass through this wall of compressed pith. Immediately upon the .inflow of water the
would closes up, merely by the swelling of the pith.
This same pith is particularly valuable, also, in offensive
warfare, as it is used as a base for the manufacture of explosives  of  high   potentiality.
Cellulose is, of course, the basis of paper. Fears have
been expressed that the spruce forests of the United States
and Canada, which hitherto have supplied the main stock
of cellulose, the basis of the paper trade, will not hold out.
Just  now,  in  the  Southern  sugar cane  producing  States,
experiments are under way to prove that begasse, the refuse
left after the cane crushing, is invaluable for paper manu
facture, while tests have already been made, with a very
satisfactory outlook, to show that the cellulose of the corn
plant may, as a basis for paper manufacture, become one
of the plant's most valuable by-products. The stalks, leaves
and husks are also used for paper-making, and for fibres
which can be wove into various kinds of fabrics.
Immense quantities of corn are now manufactured into
syrups and starches. In the manufacture of the former,
five grades are now produced. In the manufacturing of these
come other by-products in the way of concentrated animal
foods, made from the protein and germ, which, in such an
establishment are deterrents rather than aids. Five kinds
of starches are made and in their production are developed
five grades of dextrine, five grades of grits or foods in the
breakfast food line, together with three grades of gum for
use in adhesive pastes, or for use in the manufacture of confectionery.
Corn oil is not only used in large quantities for the
manufacture of olive or salad oil, but also in coarser forim
as a lubricant for illuminating purposes, for dressing wool,
and in the manufacture of soaps. Another by-product is
oil cake of a high degree of food efficiency for cattle. Other
forms of stock foods are manufactured from the by-products
left after the sugar has been extracted, among them germ
oil meal and corn bran. Another curious by-product is rubber, a form of the oil uniting with pure rubber in such a
way as to produce what is known as vulcanized corn rubber. Various claims are made for it as a substitute for
pure rubber.
Corn is used for fodder; for pipes; from the husks arc
made mattresses and from the silk medicine. Most of our
starch is made from corn; nearly 3.500000 cases of canned
corn are put up each year: and 15.000.000 bushels are used
for spirits. Three tins of cobs are equal to one of coal;
potash is the residue.
If one stands before a field of com a-wave on a stretch
of Western prairie land, the green waves of the sea of
wealth stretch away in the distance and heap up at last
upon the far blue line of the sky. a scene of surpassing interest. A single acre of this wonderful plant pumps up from
the soil from three to four hundred tons of water in a single season. A single week's growth is recorded of 18J/
inches, a growth of 5 inches has been known in a single day.
The total leaf surface of a single mature com plant is 24
square feet.
The corn plant is undoubtedly of American origin. It
was known among the native Indians as far back as our
history reaches, and when in 1879 some of the ancient
mounds in Ohio were uncovered, where the remnants of
a pre-historic race were buried, corn was found in complete
preservation. This native plant, which yearly exceeds in
value all our other cereal crops combined, is being separat- THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN  NEWS.
ed by scientists and the farmers who carry their teaching
into common practice into many divisions, and to each
division is being given new growth and capabilities for
wealth.
MINING NEWS.
A CHEERY VIEW OF THE COPPER INDUSTRY.
Mr. C- M. Palmer, of the Butte and Boston Copper Company, and one of the prominent copper men oi America,
thus States! his view of the copper outlook.    He evidently
has no sympathy with the pessimists and croakers:
"I do not share in the belief that at 11 and 12 cents a pound
copper cannot be mined at a profit." said Mr. Palmer to a
Butte interviewer. "With higher prices it is apparent from
past experience that the volume of consumption will be materially reduced, and this at a time when new properties are
continually being opened and developed, is bound to result in such an overproduction as will be disastrous. With
the price of copper at the first-named figure, I am confident
there will be a market for all that can be mined.    Copper
consumers do not take readily to the substitution of other
metals except in times when they think the ruling price is
excessive.
"Indications point to a large advance in ihe volume of
production within the next ten years. At the present time
the Lake Superior district is but touched. That is a belt
extending 150 miles or more that will some day be one continuous copper producing section. Considerable work is
also being done in Arizona. Mining experts believe that
the Treadwell mines will develop into large copper pro-
lucers.
"The copper mines of Mexico are also attracting the attention of investors and development work and exploration
is being pushed by companies holding concessions. The
great ore bodies of Alaska are still untouched. It is known
that there is copper all aong the coast, but it is not as yet
demonstrated how far down operations need to be extended
to get at the best of the copper deposits.
"In my opinion copper can be mined at a net cost of 9
cents a pound, and a ruling price of 11 'A cents gives a better
margin of profit than is to be obtained in the average commercial enterprise. Since I first came to Butte, and since
the first organization of the Butte and Boston Company, the
processes of smelting and reduction have been marvelously
transformed. It is but reasonable to suppose that new and
improved methods will be found to possess merit. The consumers or copper are familiar with the tost of mining and
will resent vigorously any attempt to make them pay more
than a fair price over and above the cost of production. This
resentment will take the form of using other metals, although
it has been found that copper is preferred at the right price.
From what I have been able to learn there is small danger
of aluminum being used as a substitute to any considerable
extent."
MINING NOTES.
It is proposed, should the Garretson furnace at Crofton
prove a success, to instal a similar one at the Sunset smelter, Boundary Falls.
Thft copper mine at Sooke is being steadily developed.
Its owners talk very little, but their faith in the property
has been tested by several tempting offers, all of which
they have refused. The mine is within half a mile of salt
water, but the intention of the management is not to ship
any ore until it can be shipped continuously.
Machinery for die Tyae and Richard III. is being
unloaded at Somenos by Mr. H. Keast. The new hoist was
unloaded on Saturday.
Col. Hayes is visiting "the mountain," having a look
round.
The latest sensation from Quatsino is the discovery of
a large deposit of cinnabar by Messrs. Gresham and Murdoch.   The ledge is said to 40 feet wide.
A new discovery of mineral is reported close to Victoria at Mount Skirt on the Goldstream river. The ore
assays a high percentage of silver, with a good amount of
copper, and a trace of gold.
The Mineral Section of the Victoria Exhibition was
well got up and arranged by Mr. Koelle; but it is to be
hoped that this section will be better patronized next year.
Lenora and Tyee ores were conspicuous both in quantity
and quality, as well as ores from the Comstock mine,
Quatsino. Sooke mine showed some good looking specimens, and Crofton sent a sample of the first matte smelted*
on the island.
The Royal Commission on Explosions in Coal Mines
finished its labours at Nanaimo last week. The main conclusion come to was the necessity for a Government inspection of powder, also for the adequate watering of mines.
The Pacific Steel Co. seem to be in trouble with their
Texada Island irqn property which they are operating on
an option. The property is said to be very rich, but this
company have not made the shipments contracted for by the
Puget Sound Iron Co to the Crofton smelter. Trouble with
employees is assignee «s the reason of their failure on the
part of the Pacific Steel Co.
THE S. P. C. A—REWARD OFFERED.    "
The Cowichan Branch of the British Columbia Society
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has posted notices
throughout the district reminding all persons that the Criminal Code declares it to be:—
"Cruelty to animals to wantonly, cruelly, or unnecessarily beat, bind, ill-treat, abuse, overdrive, torture any cattle, poultry, dog, domestic animals or birds, or wild animal,
or bird in a state of captivity."
The notice states that all offenders will be prosecuted—
the penalty for such offence not exceeding three months'
imprisonment, or a fine of fifty dollars, or both—and further
proceeds:—
"A reward of $10.00 is hereby offered by the above society to any person who shall furnish sufficient evidence to
convict any party of breaking the law in this or any other
respect."
(Signed)      DAVID  FORD, Secretary.  ■
Northwestern Smelting and Refining Co.
Purchasers of GOLD, SILVER and COPPER ORES,
MATTES,  COPPER   BULLION and   FURNACE
PRODUCTS.      i*t,M.Jit<M.Jt.M\H-Jt'M-JtiX-J<>M-M-Jt-M'M-Jt<M<M
Location of Works, CROFTON, VANCOUVER ISLAND, B. C. THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
1
4
THE INDIAN TRAGEDY.
Simple, sad, and solemn are the events connected with
the recent tragedy in the Quamichan Indian village. Do-
mase and Lizzie were each married according to the rites of
the church. Lizzie practically in childhood had been married to an old man in Nanaimo for whom she could feel
no affection; Domase had married a woman from Saanich
who, as he declared, made his home miserable. Domase
and Lizzie met, and their hearts were stirred. They loved
one another. They each sought divorces in order that they
might be married in the church. Failing in this they married one another with Indian rites, and lived unobtrusive
lives in a state of happiness which no cloud marred, until
neighbouring busybodies interfered. The young couple
were then socially ostracised, and made to suffer every possible indignity. At length their church-going neighbours
said they should not be allowed to enter the same church
with themselves. This was the cruellest blow of all. Domase said to Lizzie: "We will go." She was afraid, but
he said "Why! I want to be good. I want to go to church.
Let us go!" And they set out; but at the sight of their
uncompromising enemies their hearts failed them. They
returned home weeping. Presently Lizzie left the house,
and her long absence alarmed Domase, who. going out to
look for her, found her hanged to a tree. She had ended
the wretchedness of it all. The grief of Domase was inconsolable; but even now his enemies added insults to injury.
They took away Lizzie's body to her brother's house. Domase bought new blankets and other offerings, and entering the house laid them over the remains of all that was
dear to him. His love offerings were rudely cast aside.
This outrage was unbearable. "You shall not take her
away from me!" he cried, and he went straight away and*
shot himself. He had justified his words. He and Lizzie
journeyed together unseparated. It is pleasing to think that
the only reparation possible was made to the faithful lovers.
They were both buried in the same grave.
THANKSGIVING SERVICE.
Sunday, the 5th inst., was observed in the parish of St.
Peter's, Cowichan, as a day of thanksgiving for the splendid harvest which has just been gathered in the district.
Special services were held at Somenos at ii a.m.; at St.
Peter's at 2:30 p.m.; and at the Masonic Hall, Duncans, at
7:15 p.m. The special preacher was the Rev. D. Dunlop of
St. Alban's, Nanaimo. The churches were ^prettily decorated, and contributions of produce, fruit vegetables, potatoes,
etc., were received to be sent to the Protestant Orphans'
Home in Victoria.
Thanksgiving services were held at the Presbyterian-
Methodist Church, Duncans, on Saturday last, the 12th inst.
The church was decorated with fruit, vegetables, jams, etc.,
which were afterwards forwarded to the Protestant Orphans' Home* The preacher in the morning was the Rev.
W. N. Carr, of Crofton; in the evening the Rev. W. C
Schlichter. «
.   SPORTS.
The Baseball Club ball came off on the 2nd inst., and
from a social point of view was a great success. From a
financial point of view, however, it was not so successful.
Dancing was cointinued until a late hour, and a very pleasant evening was spent by all.
The football teams are now busy practising, and several
matches are being organized.
DOMINION HOTEL,
VICTORIA, B.C.
BETTER     THAN     THE     RATES     INDICATE
Board and Room $1.25 and up per day.
Room only 50 cents to $1.50 per day.
THE WESTSIDE
THE GREAT MAIL ORDER HOUSE
SHOPPING BY MAIL ! !
Out-of town Customers can shop very easily by mail if they only care to
use the advantages of our Mail-order System. It you can't come in person
write for anything you want, a post card will bring you samples and information. Experienced Clerks will execute order the same day as received.
MONEY BACK IF NOT SATISFIED
MAIL ORDER ADDRESS—
THE HUTCHESON CO., Ltd.
80 Government Street VICTORIA, B. C.
R. P. RITHET & CO., Ld.
WHOLESALE MERCHANTS
GROCERIES,    WINES,    LIQUORS,   CEMENT,
CUMBERLAND COAL
VICTORIA, B. C.
Furniture, Carpets
WALL PAPER, CROCKERY,
AND
Complete Housepurnishings
For Hotel, Store or Home.
Write for Catalogue.
WEILER BROS. VICTORIA, B.C.
MEN'S CLOTHING STORE
HATS AND UNDERWEAR
-AT-
ARTHUR    HOLMES'
78 Yates St., Corner Broad,
VICTORIA, B. C.
THORPE'S
THORPE'S
Ginger Ale
Prize   Medal
World's Fair
VICTQRU      VANCOUVER      NELSON THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
The Crofton Gazette
and COWICHAN NEWS
PUBLISHED BY
THE CROFTON PUBLISHING CO.
Managing Editor,
Henry H. Nkwiij.
RATES FOR ADVERTISEMENTS.
75 cents per inch per insertion.
Larger spaces and contracts by arrangement.
SUBSCRIPTION, $2.00 PER ANNUM.
All communications for the present to P.O. Duncans or Crofton
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8th. 1902.
THANKSGIVING DAY.
Thanksgiving Day has come round once more, and has
been celebrated quietly and with the customary Harvest
Home entertainment at Duncans. We in this district have
a good deal to think over and be thankful for at this season. The harvest has been bountiful, and the progress of
Duncans and the district has been even greater than in
previous years. The mining industry has grown by leaps
and bounds, and a new smelting industry has been established in our midst—the first smelter on Vancouver Island.
The future is bright with golden prospects.
With regard to the date of Thanksgiving Day it seems
a pity that this cannot be fixed once for all. At present it is
announced but a week or two beforehand, and all arrangements for its celebration have to be inconveniently hurried,
and this is a serious disadvantage in getting people together
over so large a district as this.
THE BLOW-IN OF THE CROFTON SMELTER.
Yesterday the smelting industry on Vancouver Island
may be said to have been practically inaugurated. The results of the experimental blow-in of the Garretson furnace
a week or two ago have not yet been decided, but yesterday
the Crofton smelter, as it was originally planned, was
started, and the work can now proceed continuously.
Messrs. Breen and Bellinger have come into our midst,
and have put hundreds of thousands of dollars into a smelting plant, to treat primarily' the ores of the Mt. Sicker
district, but also ores from every part of the Coast. The
full extent of what the initiation of this industry means to
the Island, is difficult to speculate about at present, but
iU- immediate effect must be a considerable stimulus to the
mining industry, especially in this district, and the influence
Of every development in this industry is necessarily felt in
many others. The cry that it costs too much to export
ores for smelter treatment need be no longer heard. The
smelter is at our doors, and every producing mine on Vancouver Island or every mine prospect within reasonable distance of production has reason to rejoice thereat.
THE INDIAN TRAGEDY.
The awful tragedy which recently took place in the village of Quamichan, but serves to point a moral upon the
existing social system of civilization. The Pharisee amonest
"'  '    <')!  triumphant.    The  Indians  of  Quamichan
hounded two unhappy lovers to death did but what white
people are doing to one another every day. The difference
is that white people have grown callous, to a great extent,
both to the forms of religion and morality; whereas these
two primitive Indians appreciated both acutely. Were
the poet at hand to sing the love story of Domase and Lizzie
its simple directness, rude pathos, and titanic intensity
might rank it amonst the love tragedies of the centuries.
VVe were recently misinformed as to a statement made
in these columns that Mr. Taylor, of Messrs. Taylor &
Smith, of Crofton, had acquired ground in the vicinity of
the town for building purposes with a view of laying out a
suburban townsite. We have been informed that neither
Mr. Master nor Mr. Dunne have sold any land for this
purpose, though it is possible that one or other of them
may erect a few suburban villas themselves.
As we go to press we learn that the school will be
opened on Monday next. The children's desks have at
length arrived. The school trustees were instructed by the
Education Department to appoint a teacher, and have the
temporary school room in readiness by the 1st inst. and this
was done. It is a pity that nearly three weeks have been
wasted waiting for the school furniture.
There has been a scarcity of labour at the smelter.
Vacant houses are being instantly snapped up. More
low priced dwellings are needed.
We have held the paper over for a day this week in
order to include in it reports of the blow-in of the Crofton
smelter and the Harvest Home entertainment at Duncans.
We have again to regret that through an oversight the*
photo-engravers have not our cut of scenes at the Duncans
Fall Fair ready as we go to press.
Victoria Terminal & Sidney Railway
FALL AND WINTER TIME CARD.
On and after September 15th, 1902. trains will run as follows:
NORTH BOUND.
Miles. STATIONS. A.M.    P.M.     P.M.    P.M.
0 Victoria Central Station (leive) 7.00 12.30 4.00 2.00
17   Sidney   (arrive   8.00    1.10   5.00   2.45
SOUTH BOUND.
Miles. STATIONS. A.M.     P.M.    P.M
4   Saanichton      8.45' 1.30   5.10
17   Victoria Central Station (arrive)   9.30    2.00   61.5
Sidney and Nanaimo Transportation Company
Steamer IROQUOIS leaves daily (Sundays excepted) on
arrival of 12.30 train for
CROFTON, CHEMAINUS AND NANAIMO
Arriving at Crofton at 3.30 p.m., Chemainus 4.15 p.m.,
Nanaimo 6.30 p.m. Returning leaves Nanaimo every
morning (Sunday exceped) at 8 a.m., Chemainus 10.15
a.m., Crofton 11 a.m., arriving at Victoria 2 p.m.
STEAMER UNICAN—Mondays: Leaves Sidney on arrival of 7 a.m. train from Victoria for Fulford Harbor.
Beaver Point, Ganges, Mayne Island, Fernwood. Gabriola, Nanaimo. Returning from Nanaimo Tuesday at
7 a.m., calling at Gabriola, Thetis, Kuper, Chemainus,
Vesuvxius, Crofton.
WEDNESDAYS AND SATURDAYS: — Round Trips
Through the Gulf Islands. Leave Sidney on arrival of
7 a.m. train for Moresby, Peir, Fulford, Ganges Harbor,
Mayne, Galiano, N. & S. Pender, Saturna. Returning,
arrives Victoria at 7 p.m.. (N.B.—This is the finest
tourist trip on the Pacific Coast)
THURSDAY:—Leave Sidney on arrival of 7 a.m. train
from Victoria for Cowichan, Burgoyne, Maple Bay,.
Crofton, Vesuvius, Chemainus, Kuper. Thetis, Gabriola,
and Nanaimo. Returning Friday at 7 a.m. for Sidney
and way ports.
Close connections, efficient service and reasonable rates.
For all additional information apply to the Company's
^ffi^S, Central Station, Market Building. Tel. 511.
.      * J. ANDERSON, General Mar - --„
V
mmmmmmmmmmmmmm THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
Crofton Tflp to Date.
THE BLOW-IN OF THE CROFTON SMELTER.
WITHOUT any "blowing" at all or any formal ceremony the Crofton smelter was quietly blown-in
at 7:00 am on Wednesday morning, the 15th inst.
This applies of course to the water jacket furnace, and is a
matter apart entirely from the experiments that have recently been made with the new Garretson furnace. From the
very start every operation has gone without a hitch of any
kind, and as we go to press the "water jacket,' is working
full blast, and dealing with something like 400 tons a day.
This is a much larger furnace than the Garretson, and once
lighted will be lighted forever: though it may be necessary
to close it down for a day to complete arrangements which
have been somewhat hurriedly made. To-day the cupola
furnace will be lighted, and the converter will be brought
into operation, and the first blister copper will be produced
on Vancouver Island.
The Northwestern Smelting and Refining Co. have
made so litle noise about their great work that it is difficult to realize the tremendous stimulus that has been given
to copper mining on the Island by the simple process of
blowing in the Crofton smelter. Equipped in every detail
these large smelting works are now prepared to deal with
ores from every part of the Coast. The works have been
planned for economy and convenienece of treatment. No
detail has been overlooked. The work of construction has
been carried out with admirable thoroughness. In the large
engine room the huge engines run so smoothly that there is
not a tremor of vibration. In the furnace and converter
houses every man knows his work and does it. Mr. Bellinger here controls a bewildering scene of activity with a
word. I
Meanwhile experiments with the Garretson furnace will
still be continued, and Mr. Bellinger is very sanguine of their
•   successful outcome.
THE SCHOOL.
The new teacher. Mrs. Bertiaux, has now been in Crofton nearly a fortnight waiting to open school until the
desks for the children shall have arrived. The teacher's
desk has arrived and the school room premises are all
ready otherwise. Many of the children, too, are anxious to
get to work after their long holiday.
AT THE SMELTER BUILDING.
The elevator to the different floors of the furnace and
converter house is now completed and working daily.
The roller crusher for pulverizing the silica preparatory to using it for lining the converters has been put in
place at the side of the converter house.
The new blacksmith's shop at the back of the boiler
house is about finished.
LOCAL NOTES.
Mr. George Wilson, section foreman on the Mt. Sicker
Railway, is building fine new house on Edmund Street, next
to Capt.  Thompson's place.
Mr. Jeffery, our worthy and popular estate and steamboat agent, and "Mayor," has taken the end house on
Arthur Street. He is expecting Mrs. Jeffery out from England very shortly.
Mrs. Mackenzie, school teacher at Chemainus. spent
Saturday and Sunday last with her friend. Mrs. Bertiaux,
our new teacher. The latter is staying at the Osborne
Hotel.
We regret to hear that Mrs. Parker Clark may have to
go into hospital at Chemainus.
Established 1878.
W. P. JAYNES
Wholesale Importer and Dealer in all Kinds op
Merchandise.
Depot for Giant Powder Co.      B. C. Pottery Co.
Puncans. Quamichan.
Mrs. Rombauer is back from Chemainus Hospital, we
are glad to say.
Mrs. Depiesse and her son have gone away on a pleasure trip.
At the Osborne Hotel recently a visitor found a lady's
gold ring in a tin of tomatoes which had been opened for
him.
Mr. and Mrs. Engle and family from Mt. Sicker have
arrived to stay.
Mr. and Mrs. Doherty have taken the house lately
occupied by the Bakers, on Arthur Street.
A new first class hotel is contemplated in Crofton.
Mr. Joel Broadwell proposes to start a lending library
—an excellent project.
It is intended to enlarge the wharf to provide further
facilities for the  increasing trade.
Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Musgrave of Mt. Sicker have' left
for Victoria for a few days.
Mr W. P. Jaynes will resume his feed mill operations
next week. Owing to the high price of imported feed stuffs
Mr Javnes anticipates a great demand for home products.
The orders he has already received will keep him busy for
at least two weeks. „*-,«..       t-
G T Corfield, Esq., of Corfield; R. E. Barkley, Esq..
of Westholme, and H. Bonsall. Esq... of Somenos. were;
conspicuous amongst prize winners at Victoria exhibition.
Amongst our advertisers at the Victoria exhibition.were
Messrs. Weiler Bros., who exhibited a beautifully furnished drawing room and a splendid collection of carpets, curtains etc.. also Messrs. Thorpe & Co., of Victoria, who on
a very effective crystal pedestal surrounded by green moss
exhibited soda-water, kola wine., champagne cider, ginger
beer, pepsin wine, and other such drinks. Both deservedly
won first prizes.
The exhibition was well managed and arranged, and a
great success. The Cowichan Creamery was second to the
Victoria Creamery in butter both in bulk and in prints.
Esquimalt and Nanaimo Ry
THROUGH TICKETS FROM CROFTON
TO VICTORIA via WESTHOLME
Stage leaves Daily connecting with North and South bound
trains. Double train service Saturdays, Sundays, and Wednesdays, connecting with morning and afternoon trains.
Fare from Crofton to  Victoria: Single   $2.00
Return $3.00
S.S. "CITY OF NANAIMO"
Sails from Victoria, Tuesdays at 6.00 a.m., and on Saturdays
at 7.00 a.m., calling at Crofton on both days, handling freight
and passengers at reduced rates.
GEO. L. COURTNEY,
Traffic Manager
Crofton and Westholme
Stage
Daily connecting with all K. & N. Railway Trains
MALCOLM  ELLIOTT.
Proprietor. THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
Duncans anfc Cowicban local 1Rews
THE HARVEST HOME ENTERTAINMENT.
THE Harvest Home entertainment given in the Agri-
eultural Hall, Duncans, on Thanksgiving Day, the
16th inst., comprised a concert, a dramatic performance, refreshments, and dancing. The arrangements
throughout were excellent, and reflect great credit on the
committee o>f which Miss Jaynes was the secretary, and the
moving spirit. Miss Holmes and Miss B. Jaynes did invaluable work on the Dancing Committee. The Rev. J. A.
Leaky presided, and the hall was completely filled, not to
say crowded. It was decorated with boughs of maple with
fine effect. Amongst those present one noticed Mr. and
Mrs. Elkington, Mr. and Mrs. James Maitland-Dougall,
Mrs. and Miss Marriner, Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Maitland-
Dougall, and Miss Maitland-Dougall, Mrs. Hadwen. Mr. G.
H. Hadwen, and the Misses Hadwen, also Mr. Seymour
Hadwen, Mr. Norcross, C.M.C; and Miss Norcross. Major
and Mrs. Mutter and Miss A. Mutter, Mr. and Mrs. Persse,
Mrs. Dickie, the Misses Holmes, Mrs. Harry Holmes,
Mr. and Mrs. Jaynes and with them Miss Fawcett from.
Victoria, Mr. and Mrs. Blythe, Miss Hall, Mr. and Mrs.
H. de M. Mellin and Mr. Guy Mellin, the Misses Jaynes,
Miss Lomas, Mr. and Mrs. Duncan, Mr. and Mrs. H. Keast,
Mr. and Mrs. Fred. Nelson and Mr. W. R. Robertson.
The programme was as follows:—
(i.) Overture by Miss Lovell' .nd Miss Clark.
(2.) Song, "Loch Lomond," given by Mr. Guy Mellin
with admirable spirit.
(3.) Piano solo, charmingly played with excellent execution, by Miss Clark.
(4.) Song. "The Heavenly Song," by Hamilton Gray.
This was a difficult number finely rendered by Mr. Hearn,
whose accompaniment was played by Mrs. H. de M. Mellin.
(S-) Song, "Ora pro nobis," sung with rare feeling and
effectiveness by Miss Jaynes, and eliciting an encore for
which she gave "Siegert."
The sixth item on the programme was the representation of the farce "Done on Both Sides.' In this Mr. Whiffels, a retired exciseman Hving in a London suburb and his
wife and daughter, are trying to sustain their society reputation on a salary of £100 a year. In order to offer their
neighbours tea and muffins every fortnight they are eventually obliged to part with their maid of all work and do
the housework themselves. Into this circle comes one Mr.
Brownjohn, a self-assertive person who makes up by
"gall" for his financial shortages. He accidentally knocks
down poor old Whiffels in a 'bus scrimmage outside the
bank. Lydia Whiffels is present at the time and attacts
Brownjohn's eye. He wonders if there would be any money
behind a match with her. With this idea in mind he unexpectedly obtrudes upon the morning labour of the Whiffels
household. There is of course consternation, with many
laughable incidents as the family try to hide the signs of
their household drudgery, stating that the servants are out.
The Whiffels family are satisfied that their visitor is a most
eligible parti for Lydia; and Brownjohn comes to the conclusion that old Whiffels is a wealthy but eccentric old
fellow, and with the object of (furthering acquaintance with
the daughter he invites himself to dinner, and even goes
so far as to sketch out the menu which is to include champagne and old Medeira. The Whiffels have no money and
very little credit, but in their despair what to do, their, relative. Pygmalion Phibs. appears upon the scene with a
haunch of venison. They seize upon fit and Whiffels borrows the price of a bottle of wine, and Ihe dinner comes
off. Whiffels ashamed of the countrified appearance of his
relative passes him off privately to Brownjohn as an old
servant. Brownjohn immediately takes the law into his
own hands, and orders "Piggy" as he calls him. to lay the
table and "wait" upon the family. Piggy unwillingly complies on being confidentially informed by Whiffels that
Brownjohn is the head of the veterinary department from
which Piggy wants promotion. So complications ensue until the end of the scene when Lydia gives the whole fraud
away, becoming engaged to Brownjohn. Piggy provides
money for the wedding—goodness knows where he gets it
—the Whiffels senior retire subdued and disgraced, and it
is generally conceded that the parties have been done on
both sides.
The farce was decidedly amusing, but lacking action,
and not strong enough to brine out the full abilities of the
actors, who did their best with the parts allotted to them,
emphasizing every possible point. The acting indeed was
excellent. Mr. H. Williams was exceedingly comical as
Whiffels. The Mrs. Whiffels of Miss Louise Jaynes was a
spirited bit of acting. Mrs. Harry Wilson was charming as
the demure Lydia. As Mr. Brownjohn. Mr. Harry Wilson
was admirable and exhibited a very fine piece of characterization. Mr. G. O. Pooley as Pygmalion had an unconvincing part, but made it "go. He rendered his song, "Behold
a Poor Unlucky Man." excellently.
At the conclusion Mr. Leakey proposed a vote of
thanks to those who had given their services to the occasion
and the National Anthem was sung.
Refreshments were then served, and at about 10:15 p.
m. dancing was commenced and kept up until past one
o'clock, bringing to an end an enjoyable evening. To
Mrs. Mutter, Mrs. Green, Mrs. Springett, Mrs. H. de M.
Mellin, Miss B. Holmes, Miss Z. Holmes, and the Misses
Jaynes the thanks of the community are especially due for
their kind services at the piano.
FLOCKMASTERS' ASSOCIATION.
Mr. J. H. Whittome, secretary of the Flockmasters'
Association, announces that thoroughbred rams are now
being shipped to Salt Spring, and the Islands generally.
LOST.
On or about the 6th inst. was lost from Mr. E. H.
Hicks-Beach's house at Koksilah a sable collie bitch with
white ring round neck and white tip to tail—very timid.
Will any person who should come across a dog of this description kindly communicate with Mr. Hicks-Beach,
Duncans.
ROAD BRIDGE ACROSS THE COWICHAN RIVER.
Mr. C. H. Cookson. of the Lands and Works Department, has been busy on the construction of the road bridge
across the Cowichan River. The trestles are already framed, and will be erected immediately, and the bridge' will
probably be completed in about ten days.
LOCAL NOTES.
We regret to repirt that Dr. D. G. Perry is in Chemainus hospital suffering from overwork.
Mr. G. Mellin is staying with his brother, Mr. H. de M.
Mellin, having returned from a record survey trip in the
Kootenay country.
Our correspondent who stated that Mr. Keast owned
the first rubber tyred buggy probably referred exclusively
to the town of Duncans. Mr. W. H. Elkington and after
him several other gentlemen in the district have been driving rubber tyred buggies for some time.
Mr. Sam Robinson is putting up the new library building at Duncans, next to the Council Chamber.
Mr. Seymour Hadwen, brother o>f Mr. G. H. Hadwen,
has just returned from South Africa.
Everyone should see the beautiful silverware that
Messrs. Pitt & Peterson, of Duncans, are giving away with
every cash purchase.   This is an innovation iin Duncans.
Mr. Chas. Vernon has been having great sport at Cowichan Bay.
Mr. H. D. Morten has rented Mr. Geo. Lewis' house in
Duncans, and is now "batching."
Mr. Jack Savannah, the well-known protographer of
Victoria, has been fishing at the Bay. and taking photographs of the houses and hotels in Duncans and neighbourhood.    He just missed his twenty-pound salmon.
Another bakery is going to be started in Duncans.
Mr. Curry has rented Mr. J. Bibeau's house at Duncans.
The other day a Siwash horse which had strayed into
the garden of the Tzouhalem Hotel was being hunted out
when it tried to jump the fence, but impaled itself, and carried away six inches of the paling in its body.
Mrs. Hearn's handsome collie dog was on Tuesday
last run over by a freight train and completely cut in two
The train afterwards ran into a waggon loaded with bricks,
and derailed a car, .   ' <   <
:\
_ THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
I
THE WATERWORKS.
Mr. E. iM. Skinner has just completed a survey for the
Duncans waterworks supply. A dam will be made on Skinner Creek at the foot of Mt. Prevost, and the water carried
thence and into the town down Ingram Street by a box
Hume. From this piping will serve the various cross streets.
Mr. Skinner found that an excellent grade is obtainable
throughout, and estimates that Ithe work will not be at all
costly as such works go.
Mr. F. L. Wilmer h"s left Mt. Sicker.
Mr. J. C. Lang of *.ie Lenora mine is spending a few
days in the city for his health.
Amongst visitors at the Alderlea Hotel have been:—
Mr. Taylor of London, England; Mr. Robert Mills, New
York; Mr. James Wilson, San Francisco; Mr. Boyd, Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. Lutter of Rossland; Messrs. T.
Thompson and Geo. Kane, Trail; Messrs. Jack Verdie, Abe
Mayea and James Mills of Cowichan Lake; Messrs. Ed.
Brickenden, Strawberry Dale; and Wm. Jones, Nanaimo;
Mr. Chisholm of New Westminster, and Mr. Jack McGil-
vray, Victoria.
Amongst visitors at the Quamichan Hotel during the
week have been: Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Cottenham of Victoria; Mrs. J. Cathcart, Chetrfainus; the Misses Cathcart,
Victoria; Miss Roberts, Cupid Island; Messrs. R. A. Blod-
gett,'Victoria; D. McPherson, Nanaimo; Mrs. Wm. Lewis,
Seattle; Messrs. J. H. Hadley, Victoria; S.'W. Bodley, Victoria; Geo. Buscombe, Vancouver; H. Wrrd. A. AL Ward,
and L. Bonsall, Ladysmith; Thomas Dodo, Thomas Powle,
and David Francess, Nanaimo; and Joseph Callender and
Joseph Aurry, Ladysmith; Messrs. F. J. Gavin and Ed.
Windsor, Vancouver; Messrs. Carl Hansine, Wm. Redmond
and Wm. Galbraith, Victoria; Mr. W. W. Armstrong. Toronto; Mr. and Mrs. Simmond, Victoria; Messrs. C. R.
Smith, Victoria and D. F. Dickson, Vancouver; and Miss
Steowns, London, Ont.
At the Tzouhalem Hotel, amongst other visitors during the week, have been:—Mr. and Mrs. McKay. Mrs. A.
Huxtable, Victoria; Mr. H. Morton, City; Mr. and Mrs. E.
B. Marvin and daughter of Victoria; Mrs. Baxter and son,
Victoria; Miss Ermatinger, St. Thomas. Ontario; Miss E.
Maitland-Dougall, Corfield; Miss M. E. Roberts, Kuper
Island; Miss Marion A. Newcombe, England; Rev. D.
Roberts, Kuper Island; Messrs. George A. Cheeke, Shawnigan; J. B. Spooks, Rossland; Thos. Jones, Golden City;
Duncan Anderson, Rugby, Ont.; E. Molander, Port Towns-
end; and S. Y. Wootton, Victoria; Mr. Cecil H. Cookson,
Victoria; Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Crichton, Kilowna; Mr. J.
G. Potts, Montreal; Mr. W. R. Worth, New Westminster;
Mr. E. M. Molander, Port Townsend; Dr. T. J. Jones,
Victoria; Mr. Robert Prior, Circle City, Alaska; Col. Hayes,
Vctoria.
E. M. SKINNER
Civil, Engineer and Provincial land Surveyor.
DUNCANS
KITTO  & GOOCH
SOLICITORS AND CONVEYANCERS.
Office, Oddfellows Bldg.,     LADYSMITH, B. C.
P. O. Box 243
toCet
Several Stores at Crofton, B. C.    Apply to
THE LENORA MOUNT SICKER
COPPER MINING COMPANY^ LIMITED
Non-Personal Liability
MacGregor Block VICTORIA, B. C.
TZOUHALEM   HOTEL =^zzz
DUNCANS,
Stage to Lakeside Hotel, Cowichan. Lake, every  Monday,
Wednesday and Friday.
PRICE BROS, ... Proprietors
QUEEN'S MARKET
Cor. Govt. Johnson Sts., Victoria B.C.   Tel. 32. P.O. Box 18.
LAWRENCE GOODACRE & SONS,
Wholesale   and   Retail   Butchers.    Contractors   by
appointment to His Majesty's Royal Navy, the Dominion
Government, etc.   Shipping supplied at lowest rates.
THE DOMINION HOUSE
PRIVATE BOARDING ESTABLISHMENT
Home Comforts.       Moderate Rates.
Joan Avenue,       -       -      -     CROFTON, B. C.
Proprietor,
A. B. WHITTINGHAM.
A. HOWE
BUTCHER,
Established for six years at Chemainus.
Best Meat at Most Liberal Prices.
Joan Avenue,
CROFTON, B. C.
W. DYKE
PIONEER MERCHANT.
DRY GOODS. BOOTS AND SHOES.
Confectionery a Specialty.
Agent CROFTON GAZETTE
Joan Avenue, CROFTON, B. C
FELL & COMPANY, Limited Liability
GROCERS,
WINES, AND LIQUORS.
Victoria, B. C.
HOTEL CROFTON
FIRST-CLASS WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS
Rates—$1.00 per Day and Up.
Free Baths fcr Guests. Propr., M. J. Conlin
HOTEL OSBORNE
CROFTON, B. C.
PRIVATE DINING ROOM BATH ROOM
First-Class Accommodation
Rates—$1.00 and up per diem.    Propr., T. J. Pearce 8
THE CROFTON GAZETTE AND COWICHAN NEWS.
1
[
eiR0FT0N
■
The New Smelting Centre of the Pacific Coast
FOR LOTS
I
-APPLY TO	
Real Estate Brokers
 AND-
The Lenora Mt. Sicker Copper Mining
Co., Ltd.
(Non-Personal Liability.)
VICTORIA, B.C.
TO LET.—Several Stores at Crofton, B.C.   Apply to Above.
PRINTING \    Forms of every description for mining
j and smelters made up in quick order.
w \     When you are ordering get only the best
A Nl r\ ( They are to be had from
BINDING   /Thos. R* Cusack, Victoria.
SPECIAL  NOTICE.
By special arrangement with the B. C MINING RECORD we are
able to offer particularly advantageous terms for combined subscription
to that well known excellent periodical and the CROFTON GAZETTE for
$3.00 per annum.
Subscriptions received by the Crofton  Publishing   Co., Croft
or the B. C. Mining Record, P. O. Box 645, Victoria.
■ ■-:, ■     - j_
.     _	
;>C*lMai

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