BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Cranbrook Herald Mar 13, 1913

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cranherald-1.0070635.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cranherald-1.0070635.json
JSON-LD: cranherald-1.0070635-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cranherald-1.0070635-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cranherald-1.0070635-rdf.json
Turtle: cranherald-1.0070635-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cranherald-1.0070635-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cranherald-1.0070635-source.json
Full Text
cranherald-1.0070635-fulltext.txt
Citation
cranherald-1.0070635.ris

Full Text

Array Legislative Assembly
April H-ll
JOB PRINTING
We are well equipped to
turn out tbe beat clan
of work.
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
"   ,.      v-^l
. '■-  " I? ,
ADVERTISING^*. €
In the Herald  .'ay*-—Try
Our   Local  Columns
IF   YOU   WANT  CRANBROOK   TO   GROW.   PATRONIZE   HOME  ENTERPRISE
VOLUMB  15
OBANBBOOK,   BRITISH  COLUMBIA.  THUBSOAY, MARCH 18, 191',
NO. 11
SOME CONSIDEnATIONS AFFECTING THE
MIMING Of THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FRUIT
A statement by the Directors of the British Columbia Prult Growers Association
The, generally low prices received
for fruit during the past aepson have
made pertinent   and proper a     <Hs-
cuaaion ol Un fundamental considers-   lowed by n    small one in '119;
tlons affecting       the future of    our crop in HHO, with a small one
Hritish Columbia fruit Industry  lias
always been especially subject to It.
There was Uie latgo crop nt '08, for-
big
fruit growing Im ustry. Many different opinions are held as to the remedy for n situation whieh, II continued, would be intolerable. Your
dlrectots have fully considered tne
facta, and have endeavored to reach
proper conclusions in regard to
them.
This paper outlines,tbe principal
factors which seem to underlie tbe
present situation. It is to be boned
tbat those factors will be considered
by you ln your deliberations.
Tbe principal condition affecting
the prices of B.C. fruit was tbe very
large crop in tbe United States, re-
autUng in the importation ol large
quantities of American fruit at low
prices, or, what what Is worse, shipped on consignment. All soft fruits
yiet'ed very much above tne average. The figures are not yet to
band, save Uiat we know that some
40,000 carloads of peaches were
■hipped commercially this year In
the United States. Tbe United
Suites apple crop was 34.3 per cent
larger than the average of tbe last
ten years. It was 12 per cent larger than tbe 1911 crop. It totalled
around 40,000,000 barrels. Tbe quality was generally high, 13 per cent
better than tbe ten years' average.
In tbe Northwest States, tbe box-
apple states, about 20,000 carloads
an being shipped, as against only
1,000 last year.
*A a result of these extremely
large crops, prices would naturally be
low, supply greatly exceeded demand; 25 per cent ot tbe Ontario
apple crop is said to, have rotted on
tbe ground. There has been a similar condition in New York State.
Tbe Western states, however, will get
ipnethng lor practically all their
Apples. British Columbia did comparatively well in the matter of
prices, tor our fruit brought more
than in any other section of America.
Other general conditions which
helped to lower thc prices were:
1. Tightness of the money market
of the United States and generally
throughout the world.
2. The largest proportion of boxed
apples to barrels ever experienced.
9. Detective methods of picking
and packing, which injured fruit and
lessened Its keeping quality.
4.   Lack of storage facilities.
are lower than they formerly were;
transportation conditions, although
not yet ideal, are better; and it must
not be forgot'kn that fruit prices for
box fruit have steadily risen. Orchard returns and shipping returns
must be taken over a period ot years
to enable one to arrive at an average
price. Though prices may fluctuate,
there is no reason why we may look
to an average of a dollar a box.
Twelve years ago, the prices of box
truM. were considerably lower than
they are now.
There are many problems to solve
Cranbrook City Transfer
(Worden) 	
Campbell and Manning 	
Cranbrook Trading Co	
City clerk sundries   	
City officials payroll    	
Cranhruok Steam laundry   ...
Cranbrook Electric Light.
Co., Ltd ■  	
Cranbrook Electric Light
(thawing account) 	
0; I'. !t.. (freight 1 	
Corliln Coal and Coke Co.    .
Davis Bros. Eleotric Co.    ...
Dezall, Frank
In the   marketing    nl our Increasing Kast   Kootenay livery (Piir-
1011, and a bumper crop iu 1012. The
Okanagan shipped 5.111 carloads ul
apples last year. In 1918, under
normal conditions, the crop will likely be less. other districts and
other crops under normal (onditions
will likely be the same. This is
equally true of the country as a
whole.
Practically all fruit districts have
good crops this year. Many places
will hnve a normal or average crop.
The North-Western States are not
likely to have more than 15,000
cars of apples. In 1909 tbey had
6,000; in 1910, 15,000; in 1911,
9,000; in 1912, 20,000 cars arc estimated.
Plums and prunes arc almost certain to be a light crop in tho Northwestern States next year. There is,
generally speaking, no great need for
concern about 1913 prices. Our present organizations will, however, require extension of staff and finances,
to be effective.
1913 will be a year of at least
normal prices. In meeting the situation generally, we may expect a
margin of somo eighteen months to
make plans for our next difficult sea-
son.
The acreage in the North-Western
States promises in the future some
real competition. Figures collected
over this territory show that In
Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana,
and British Columbia there are
some 320,000 acres of what promise
to be fairly successful orchard, of
Which over 90 per cent is in apples.
Of this figure, under 30,000 acres are
in British Columbia. It is true, of
course, that it is generally accepted
than only 25 per cent of apples
planted will arrive at commercial,
bearing. At the present time, only
3 per cent of thc entire amount is in
bearing, producing about 25,000 carloads this year.
In 1914 wc may expect between
40,000 and 45,000 carloads ol fruit in
this territory and the crop ot apples
may easily run to 42,000 cars. This
is equal to 20,400,000 boxes, or 8,-
000,000 barrels, practically one-third
of the entire average crop of the
United States tor the last seven
years. If these crop predictions are
correct, there is ample need for protection for us in our markets,
Economic  conditions have changed.
crops;  but they can all be overcome
by our efforts, ability and energy.
We can all well afford to lie entirely sanguine as to thc ultimate
and ondurlng success ot our fruit
industry.
W. Crawford Ricardo,
President and   Chairman of   the Dili. M. Winslow, secretary,
rectoratr.
ker) 	
East,  Kootenay   I.ii
Unlock) 	
II Meat Market ...
Kink Mercantile Co.,
Ltd.
80.25
34.15
.70
30.60
340.00
.75
201.82
408.33
02.70
79.20
9.00
2.1.55
3.50
9.00
18.34
12.011
from among the business men of
Cranbrook, are now in possession ot
tickets, which they have on sale from
Kingsgatc on the west, to Fcrnie on
the east. Tbey hope tn sell at least
1000 tickets at $1.60 each.
The supper will be under the supervision oi the patronesses ami a committee of ladies, and tbey propose
serving a sumptuous spread.
Following arc the patronesses:
Mesdunies (Dr.)     .1. II. King, K. T.
SUCCESSFUL FARMING IN
C.TY COUNCIL MEETING
DIVERSION   OF    SMITH   CREEK
AND RESIGNATION OF ENGINEER PARKER PRINCIPAL FEATURES.
Fire department payroll       250.00
Herald Publishing Co	
Hill, E. A	
Kootenay   Telephone    Lines,
Ltd	
Lidilicoatt and Waller
McBride, .1. D. ...
Mcllridc, ,1. I)	
Parker, II. Y	
Police payroll 	
Parrett, T. N	
Patmore Bros	
Parks and Co	
School board payroll
Ward and Harris ...   .
Worden, W. E	
37.35
24.50
15.40
180.00
5.32
34.54
3.00
380.00
3.40
33.22
37.95
1480.50
9.95
32.38
5. The fruit growers require their Tbe cost of labor has increased
money In the tall, and bank loans greatly in the last live years; and sn
are not made on unsold apples; have the costs ot other items ot pro-
apples must therefore be sold in the ductlon.
fall. ^^^^
8.
Fruit distributing organization,
both in British Columbia and in the
NorthWest States, in tho latter,
particularly, should be made much
stronger.
7. The boxed apple business is a
new one, and little is known about
eBeotive means of distributing it to
tbe best advantage.
The exclusion ot Orientals
has had much to do with this. Our
labor and the other items in thc cost
of production are higher than they
an* in the St.tte nt Washington. An-,
other economic condition which affects tbe situation is the defective
organization ot our competitors.
Their marketing associations were in
poorer shape in 1912 than in previous
years, and   this,    in    the face     of
I.  Practically   no  advertising    Is large crops, inadequate holding    and
done to increase the demand for i tbe storing facilities,    the absence of by-
western    boxed   apple,   while 8200,-  product factories, and unsatisfactory
000.00 a year is spent in advertising < financial conditions.
California oranges. The present condition is only tcm-
,9. The very large apple-handling porary. The fruit and produce liusi-
conorrns In England and New York ness is always cynical, and subject
are working to depress prices on . to periods of depression, followed by
boxed apples. like period ol high prices   nnd great.
10. British Columbia is fighting prosperity. The more we can ellni-
for ber natural markets, which wc inate extremes, the less redaction
are just beginning to adequately there is. British Columbia growers
supply, and In which our competitors are In a particularly favored position.
are at present strongly entrenched.     j'1'he population nl   the prairies, their
11. Because of a curious condition own particular market, is growing
with regard to the Fruit Harks Act larger every year, and at the phc.no-
and Ms enforcement, British Coliini- menal rate of Increase. Tho whole
H'a growers are discriminated country now is being covered by a
against In favor of tlicir foreign network of railroads, which will
competitors. tend    to give better   transportation
It. Canning, preserving, and nth-1 and better service. The experience
erwitc preparing Irults and rege- which we have had, and which has,
tables, are as yet developed to a perhaps, been dearly bought, will
very limited extent In this province, enable us to get better distribution
la California 828,000,000.00 worth tor our products. More knowledge
ol fruit by-products an produced an-. in every way, In production, in
anally. |packing and distribution, will better
The above are among the principal conditions; more advertising
conditions which depressed prices j which every successful box of
this year. Tbe fruit growers ot apples brings, through tlie sattsfac-
the province expect you to deal with tion given to the customer, and the
tbe situation, and recommend      and , careful education of thc general pub
lic on the subject of fruit.    It is
fact often  overlooked that thc    majority ot fruit growers are getting rc-
follow up    means   of    securing our
markets.
Future Prospects: It seems perttn- ,^^_^^^^^^_^_^^^__
nt at this time lor us to consider turns Irom young orchards, and just
what will in all likelihood be tbe I now It Is not sn much the number of
situation In future years. There Is ' boxes to a tree, as the number nl
a general assumption that in 1913 trees to a box, which obviously en-
apple and other fruit crops will bo nances thc cost of production. Thesn
larger than in 1912. People point same trees are growing up, and It
to the Increased acreage and tho will not be long before wc arc gct-
irowth of the trees tor proof. They | ting far bigger tonnngo per acre, at
forget tbe law of action and re-ac- a same or > lower general cost of
aja> which la always at work.    Tbe Wral   production       Freight rates
City council met at the city council chambers on Monday afternoon at
2 o'clock with Mayor Howness in the
chair and Aldermen Clapp, Carr,
Ward, Kennedy, Erickson and Leask
present.
Reading of minutes ol previous
meeting were read and approved.
Communications from P. DoVere.
Hunt and provincial secretary were
received and filed.
Thc board of works presented a
lease in, respect to a part ot Norbury avenue adjoining lots 19 anil
20 in block 88, with N. Hanson and
pin motion of Leask and Erickson, it
was carried that such lease be executed.
Report of the assistant city engineer on diversion of Smith creek was
read and referred to thc board of
works.
On motion.of Erickson and Ward
the assistant city engineer was instructed to have a shed built at the
city pound for protection of the city
water equipment and to have shed
now on the street removed back on
thc lots.
An amended motion being presented
by Aldermen Clapp and Erickson it
wns ordered that a meter be installed at the Young Men's club uuildtng
anil that water be charged at hall
the usual meter rates.
It was carried on motion by Leask
and Ward that .1. C. Olenday lie in
structed to check up all water connections with the water system and
that the city clerk on receipt of such
report see that all users arc rendered
account for such connections.
On motion by Carr and Clapp the
city engineer was Instructed to prepare plans and estimate ot cost tor
lowering such water pipes as may
tie necessary and for improving thc
dam
■ T1h> city clerk was instructed to
render account to A. I). Macdonald
for $35.00 for .cost of transporting
prisoner to Lethbridge.
Motion by Erickson and Ward carried that Alderman Leask with the
city solicitor anil the assistant city
engineer prepare an amendment to
the building bylaws.
The mayor and city clerk were inst ructcd to enter into an agreement
with the Young Men's club as recommended by the sewerage committee
with regard In the sewerage connec-
ion.
On motion that leave be granted
for the introduction of bylaw No.
120, cited ns "Temporary Loan Bylaw, 1013," it was carried that such
bylaw be introduced nml read first
and second times.
Council then resolved itself into a
committee on the whole fur tlie ilis-
ussioii nt this bylaw and on reassembling a motion that leavo he
grnnlcd to expedite matters by Its
third reading was carried.
Bylaw No. 120 was read a third
time nnd passed.
Resignation of City Engineer Parker was received ami accepted and
city clerk ^as Instructed to advertise
in tin' Canadian and local papers and
engineering Journals for applications
asking applicants to state qualifications and salary required.
On motion by Erickson and Clapp
council adjourned.
Following accounts audited by   thc
finance committee were accepted and
ordered paid:
Beattio-Murphy Co., Ltd,    ...8     3.30
(Dr),   F. W (In™, Geo.
A.    I..     MeDerillot,   Ed.
Chas. Magee,    W.  11.
Eiicksob   and   II. A
Wll-
Mc-
Brymner,
lloggartli
Pateisnn,
son,   0.
Kowau.
The general committee an-:
Messrs. J. I). Mcllridc, A. C. Bowness, W. 11. Wilson, .1. K. Campbell,
.1. P. Fink, Robl. McCreery and Drs.
.1. II. King, F. W. Orccn, (I. E. 1.
Mackinnoii, .1. 11. M. Bell.
T
Interesting Advice Given to New Settlers by John
Levett, One of Our Most Successful Farmers
IU11S   il-
[Seflll   t
Tlu* following paper waa read by
Mi. .Iiilm Levett at Un- Partners'
Institute la.si evening ami al tlie
dose it was resolved that Hit Institute get tin* same printed in
pamphlet form to be available foi
distribution, as reliable information Inure or less than a
for tlia    use uf new comers in      the [farming which teachi
icgaids dry farming,     Some
think it  k fanning without
water,   and that ii is do good.    To
my mind it  is tlu* greatest uplift towards  vaisitit. ihe   standard of    agriculture   of the age     It la nothing
il system   ol
how to con-
CHICKED EXPERTS
[district. The institute was lead to
this step by reason of what its members designate as erroneous and exaggerated statements appearing in
pamphlets and advertising matter ot
parties holding land for sale here as
to what can In* done in this district
on     absolutely   new     land the first
Total  M.795.75
GOVERNMENT TO SELL
LOTS XT SIRDAR
Victoria, il. O., March 11.—In-
structions have been sent to the government agent at Nelson authorizing
him to sell a number of lots in, thc
townsit* of Sirdar to persons who
for some time past have been occupying them. , This disposes of an issue
that has been conspicuous in Sirdar
for .some time past.
uinrnnn
CONTRACTS IBE LET
THREE AND A HALF MILLION
DOLLARS WORTH OF WORK
TO BE CARRIED OUT BY
SPOKANE CONTRACTORS.
The Poultry association met, on
Friday evening last in Mathcson's
hall, President Sheppard in ihe
chair. About! twenty-five members
were present. Among items of busi- ,
ness taken up was the question of
prize list and prizes for fall fair,
which was finally laid over until next
meeting. Mr. Webb reported action
up to date of committee appointed to
act on question of meeting place and
stated that until further information
was received from Victoria litthi
could be done. Tbe programme section of meeting wns devoted to a
discussion of Orpingtons, Hull birds
being supplied by Messrs. (lartside,
Sainsburv and Pigott, ami a white
bird by Mr. Kendall.
Messrs. Webb and Kendall took
charge of the meeting, Mr. Webb taking up color questions, and Mr. Kendall shape, each going very fully into
his subject'and answering fully a
large number o. questions on the
breed in all its varieties.
All present showed their interest iu
the work    and  at the  close on vole
selected   Wyandotts    for the    April
meeting.
year.
.Mr. I.evett's conservative advice
has the backing of the institute a* a
body and can he banked on in new
settlers as the best way to make
progress on new land.
Mi.
Chairman nnd Qenllctnent—
.per he
serve the fertility in our soil and
how to conserve the moisture which
insures us against drouth, aud il also (eacbes the minimum amount of
(irrigation water, wheie irrigation is
used. We all know, who have used
water, where it is plentiful there is a
'tendency to put on too much water;
that when it is kept saturated the
soil sets like cement, therefore ft ex-
Ieludes all the air from ihe soil and
destroys all bacteria, consequently
j greatly reducing \h<- quantity as well
Lis quality of the product grown.
And to those who are '.hinkini*)    of
setting out fruit trees on new laud I
would say that I do not think it is a
} good plan, and    too much like court-
Ing di.sastei       Tlip better way is   to
work the   land up thoroughly      the
:.:st    season,     in   order to get      it
[warmed     up,    and in good condition
lot the ydung trees, as there will   be
thing gained ii ihis is left tL,     be
jilnne afu*r the trees are set, as many
ol ihem g-i bruised up by the work-
tng ol  the team, resulting very     often in a sick looking orchard.   There-
1 have a short paper here which I
thought might be of interest to some
of our fellow memhers >•[ 'lie Fanner's Institute, and especially those
who are just settling In tin disti
as I have beeiu asked by two oi thrc
parlies already if I did not Inink
tl.iil alfalfa would be alright tu bo**
on new land this spring. As I understand some ot the land has never
been broken yet. would say, as far a*>
tuv experience goes, that would      be ,
about the last thing I would think of \^K the     man who prepares his soil
doing, with the expectation of realiz-
«FINES 1
DREW GAME UK
Spokane, Wash,, March 12.—Contracts for railroad construction work
aggregating $3,330,000 were awarded
Spokane contractors by tbe Canadian
Pacific Railway company1 for building
the final section of the 'Kootenay
Central line through the Windermere
valley.   .
The contracts awarded were to
Burns and Jordan for sixty miles on
the final eighty mile stretch of the
.Jukeson to Golden cutoff in the Windermere valley district, the work to
cost approximately $2,500,000. The j in
other twenty mile contract went to
Boomer and Hughes, also of Spokane,
for about $830,000.
Burns and .Jordan will start work
on the new contract immediately,
will employ about 2,000 men. and
will   keep    about five or six steam
Game Wardens Lewis and Ward
have just returned from patrolling
the game reserve, starting from
Michel the officers* travelled up Brule
creek to the summit and thence
down Nelson creek to Bull River.
Mere just outside the reserve snow-
shoe tracks were observed; leaving
the reserve the wardens travelled
down the Bull river and ran onto a
Irapline. At a sheltered cabin wapiti or elk meat was discovered and at
thc other cabins the same thing occurred. Venison was also found and
somo cases was spoiling. Two
traps set for lynx were noted, one
baited with a whole deer bam, the
other with a forequarter and another
ham; at tbe next cabin the scalp
of a freshly killed elk was discovered
and other evidence of the wholesale
unnecessary  slaughter ol game
.   i
shovels at work. They will have j Later the owner of the traplinc and
about twenty camps and it will re- cabins arrived and was placed under
quire about two years to do " the arrest and taken out some forty-five
work.      This work Is on the Koote- .miles to   Wardiftr.      Last Thursday
Central    line of the Canadian   the  trapper in question, James    A. |
Pacific railway. [Queen, of Fort Steele, appeared    be- ,
These  contractors have been work- fore  Justices    of the Peace .laffney j
ing for the  Canadian Pacific railway  and Markle and  pleaded guilty      to j
for thc last  thret years, and     just two charges of  violating the    game
completed a forty mile contract. act.    For killing an elk Queen    was |
.    .       .   ___,_   whUe for being l per    I on hay   to    cattle—that there
ing any returns, as the ground has
to be well worked up and cultivated
at least one full -season before one
could expect a good catch of any of
the small seeds, such as clovers or
grasses. So many people seem to
think that because clover makes the
ground rich, {hat it will grow anywhere and under any eoadii ions.
, which is one of the chief causes for
so many failures.
|   In the first place tbe most important thing is a thorough seed bed, and
laud in    fairly good heart and     free
from weed seeds.     While it might be
I possibfe to get a   catch on new. raw
[land, it    hardly   ever amounts      to
'anything, and usually dwindl-s away,
as th« soil does not have the strength
to furnish   the necessary bacteria on
the roots, so it is easy seen why tbe
1 land has to be in a *z"od stale      of
fertility in order for the *.oung plants
i to get a good start.     It seems   tbat
when the nodules are laekira; on   the
roots, that it noes.not have the power to draw the free nitrogen jrorn the
air, consequently has to live at     the
expense   of the   soil, and end,      up
with time and seed wasted      So the
better   plan for  new jand    uould.be
either a crop of oats or a cultivated
crop of some kind, in order to    get
it in shape  for the following season.
1 Alfalfa or clover is one of tbe .  best
crops    for the farmer to   grow, and
has been proven long ago that wherever clover entered largely into     the
I rotation it was where the best stock
were to.be found, and also the  most
prosperous farmers, and by tbe proper condition    as rejsards a thorough
I seed bed, and   Innoculatfon of      the
I seed before   sowing, and also      th"
selection of the hardiest variety     of
seed, it,should not be difficult to gel
a satisfactory stand.
We quite often bear men argue thai
was | It does    not do to feed fifteen dollar
John Jordan   will leave this week fined $250 and  costs,
for Golden    to direct commencement in possession of venison during     tlw
of the work. closed  season    a further  fine of $50
The    contract awarded to Boomer and costs was Imposed. A close pat-
and Hughes yesterday   is tor twenty rol of thc  hills has been maintained
miles of work
Golden 111
on thc Jukeson       to
ARRANGEMENTS FOR
CHARITY BALL PROGRESS
this winter and the majority of trap
pers have been visited. In the future
this policy will be even more strictly
.followed and any flagrant abuse of
|tlie game laws will he promptly followed by lhe appearance of the offender In court, where doubtless he will
receive the severe punishment he deserves.
was no money in it—but I do nol see
how any man can he a fanner very
long I and still hold to such ideas
The land soon turns from the man
who takes all and gives nothing in
return, therefore, it is to our interest
to see that      we start out  with        u
proper system of total ion, whieh
makes it so much easier to keep the
and   in     good tilth, besides keeping
tin* weeds and insect pests in cheek, j
bv a thorough   cultivation and levelling is almost sure to be away ahead
of the man that sets his trees      on
poorly prepared land     \t least that
would be my way ol doing it.   There
are members in this Institute    who
have had more experience In the Irult
line than  I    have and might       give
you better advice, but I have always
found    that     work of this kind well
done is   doubly done, and foi any extra work in     preparing and cultivation it   more than makes up for  the
extra   labor and   money spent.     We
find so many are indifferent    as    to
what time of the season   the land is
ploughed*,    whether fall or spring, as
t here      is     no      comparison,    fall
ploughing should always be practised
whenever   possible, for a good  many
reasons.     Tbe land is turned up and
exposed to the weather and action of
the frost,   which     pulverizes the soil
and   brings   about that mellow state
lor tilth   which cannot be got in   any
'other   way.        It also leaves      the
land in      the best possible condition
} to absorb all the moisture that falls,
I besides   the    land has time to settle,
which makes    a good firm seed bed—
j the vert best   condition for all small
[seeds.     Th** farmer has time to   get
his   crop   put ftyfa good season and
'under the very best conditions, which
J very often means thr difference      between success OT| failure; and     those
[who have   to depend on the moisture
that falls should     see that whenever
the   ploughing is .done thai thc harrow follows as soon as possible     in
order to hold as     much of the moisture, in the soil—where it is wanted—
Otherwise if the harrowing is      neg-
ilected.    as    is often tin* case.      thc
1 ground   becomes   hard and baked-.up,
1 requiring a lot of extra work to  get
'it Into    shape   for any ./Top, besides
losing all the   moisture, which is   allowed  to escape       The banow is.  a
very useful Implement, K makes     a
mulch which acts as a blanket. cotv
•equeotly shuts ofl evaporation.
Then little things may icem small m
tlipiuselvc-s, but with a few of the
most important points always in
iiow, the earefil selection of the
beat seed obtainable, a thorough seed
bed, followed up with froqnent cultivation, all leads up In the right di-
! rectlon towards successful farming,
mid always hearing In mind) that
what yoU do, Jo (hi well, that twetv
COMMITTEES   NAMED  AND ALL
BUSY ON EASTER MONDAY
DANCE.
Bell, J. H. M.
Bcalo and Elwell,	
City engineer's payroll
Cranbrook Foundry 	
Cranbrook      Cartage
Transfer Co.    .., ,... .,
Cranbrook   Sash   nnd
Co., Ltd. ...   	
Cranbrook    Drug nnd
Co	
and
Door
4.00
59.00
867.S0
.50
3.00
10.65
Book
City Uvcry         1.60
Nil POETESS DEAD
Vancouver, B.C., Mar. 10.—Miss
E. Pauline Johnson, the Indian poetess and writer ot stories, died at
the Bute Street   hospital this morn-
Thc special  committee on arrangements for the Charity ball in aid   of
St. Eugene   hospital at the Auditorium on   Easter Monday, March 24th,
are getting things in shape for     the
affair.      Following  ate    the    com- inK-      She had °«*n more or less of
inlttct! who have the dance in charge: an invalid for over a year.
R.   T.    Brymner,   chairman; Archie I
Raworth, A. L. McDermot and H. J. | ~~~
Scott, secretary.
The Edison orchestra will furnish
tho music. The supper will be served bullet style, commencing) at 11
p.m.    The different members of    tbe
committee,  us    well   as the general occupy the boards at the
committee,    which   baa been ehuea theatre.
It will be remembered bj Cranbrook theatre goers thai Miss Johnson visited Cranbrook about, live
years ago, being one of the lirst     to
which would mean better crops   and
j to see that the products grown are
feil on the plaee as much as possible
,in order lo keep, up the producing
power of the land, which is tin* only
way that farming ran be carried on
successfully.
| The problem of fighting the weeds
is a serious matter.     No matter    In
I what direction you go it is noxious
weeds that are staring us in the
face. This is what Is occupying the
minds of our leading men today, to
know how best to help the farmer
towards bringing into use the battel
methods of farming. It Is easy seen
that, with our ihfpshod methods of
the present day that    something will
ly-flfS aires well tilled is far belter
than double the amount poorl) tilled,
U the tendency) with far tuo many Is
to spread their work over too much
ground which results* In unprofitable
crops and a disappointed farmer,
with y poor half worked farm-
■ John Levett.
have to be done, i.s weedl not only
rob the soil of its fertility, but are
very expensive when onr(. Ihey have
gained a foothold.
Auditorium It is quite amusing nnd Interesting   tu   hear the different opin-
SHAMROOK TK\.
The children.of Knox church Sab-
hath school will entertain with a
Shamrock tea on Monday, afternoon,
Match 11th, from i to fl,.1() p.m., in
tho school house adjoining tho
eburth. A cordial welcome will be
given to all. Silver offering to do-
fray MpOMClp Conic and encourage
thc children. THE  OBANBROOR   HERALD
<p
< i
News of the District
; *********************
ELKO
(By Fred Roo),
Mr. Frank Kobsou, the popular
traveller, was an Elko visitor last
week.
Sam Hilburn, ex-mayor of Kalis-
pell, and captain of the Kiilheai
Light, Horse, was in Elko, Cranbrook and Fernie last we."*: buyii-g
elephant hides and sheepskins.
Klko turned out en masse Ln welcome thc "Dreadful Twins," at the
Grand opera house Thursday nwhl
and the boxes as usual were nllri'
with Elko's too and their friends
The receipts ran into four figures as.ti
in addition to every seat being taken
every foot of standing room was occupied. The members of the Italian
colony, who are enlliusiaslie opera
goers, were there in force to applaud
the artists and shout His, His, In
Btentorlan tones. Ai 8.80 tho curtain raised with railroad promptness,
but without prayer, and for one hour
aiHl thirty minutes no one In the
audience needed sylpbur tablets to
keep them warm. It would be out
of order to particularize any one of
the artists, every one delivered the
goods and hit tbo audience with their
jovial personality and pleasing manner. H was the best show ever
plaved in Klko nnd well worth the
price and then some, Hy special request the company will play in
Waldo in titr nrnr future.
Tom McKay, of Medicine Hat,
was in Klko last week visiting tlie
writer.
There's no Carnegie library, no
graft investigation, going on in Klko
as we gjo to press.
A big band of Stony Indians arrived In Klko from Morley, Alberta,
aud went down to Tobacco Plains Indian reserve.
Another big mine discovery near
Elko. The ore was found to contain: German silver, brass buttons,
gold fillings, celluloid, borax, and
pepsin all in paying quantities and
tho lodes somewhere in lhe vicinity
of the bifl lire clay deposits, that
have been sold for fifty thousand dollars to a Calgary syndicate, contains twenty million dollars of
something, and just need capital to
go ahead and find it. Klko is Ruro
set in diamonds amid (lowers that
ever bloom.
.lames Welch and Nort Mac-Lean,
two of'Fernie's live wires, were in
Elko last week.    .
R. P. Green, member for Kootenay,
is doing the good little Imy act down
at Ottawa to perfection- Sometimes
seen. but. never heard.
The Elko hoard of trade wrote the
district health officer at Fernie two
letters but got. no reply to date.
When you can't catch fish mend
your nets,
Thomas A. Kdison, in a recent interview, set forth I hat people nowadays sleep too much. So that's
probably the reason he invented the
pronograph.
Elko, Miss Wardner, may be a
small town, but its too big for one
man to run-
Sam Pyke, . who dabbles in polities
and gum boots, Is visHing tbe Crows
Nest Pass this week for the Vancouver Itubber company. He hangs on
to the rubber boot business like a
Boston terrier.
■ lames Miller, the popular manager
for 1*. Hums and Co,, Fernie, was in
Elko Saturday. -lames Is a walking gold mint* of information, and
thc owner of a memory like a filing
cabinet, and a Chesterfield wherever
you meet him.
Wm.- Murdoch, of Flagstone, B.C.,
who is at present in QlaBgow, Soot-
land, writes, that Lloyd fieorge is
driving the best from the Hritish
Isles, and its only a short while he-
tore the Germans will have an easy
Job making sausage of the rest.
Cameron and Anderson, of Calgary, who own considerable land between Gateway and Roosville, are
putting demonstration farms in each
of their blocks, and getting the services of those who have made a success In the valley nnd still doing it
to give their best advice to tlw new-
settlers.
Tlie local Friday morning was held
up here nearly four hours on account, of a slight accident in the
yard.
Mr. K. Elwell, of the firm ot
Healc and Elwell, Cranbrook, was doing business in town Friday.
Mrs. Otto Wisacr and Miss Janio
Ramsay spent a very pleasant Utile
last Saturday with friends at Cranbrook.
Tho iufant son of Mr. and Mrs.
George Nielly was taken to tho
hospital Friday suffering from paralysis.
Dr. Lyon, of Hull Hiver, was called
to thc home of Geo, Hayward Sa-
iurday. The little hoy is very sick
with measles and pneumonia.
Mrs. I'has. Ruccau returned home
Saturday greatly improved, after her
Very severe Illness at the hospital iu
Cranbrook,
"lllg Hen" writes from Calgary,
where he has been engaged In the real
estate business. Hen- is tired of the
job and wishes Slats, our competent
manager, to forward a contract at
once.
Sttiiler,   was sent to Camrose   after
.lini Houston, commonly called
reporting at Calgary.
Sounds pretty good to hear the
planer going again after lhe winter
recess, and it promises to make a
good run for    the future.
Reports from; the hospital of Provincial Constable MeLain's condition
are not very encouraging. He remains about the same.
Mr. A.1 Sadler severed his connection at tho office and left Saturday
afternoon for Hull River, where be
has secured a position with the C.P.
R. office department.
B. E. Marble was In Cranbrook
Monday.
The greeting heard among the
children is "How's your measles?"
instead of "flow's the skating?" and
we notice, they get away with it.,
Pat Kelly, supreme authority at
Camp 8, called on friends at Cranbrook Saturday and Sunday.
Mr. Mowatt, of Nelson, B.C., called
on business last week. Mr. Mowatt
Is in the provincial forestry depart-
meitit.
Waldo, H. C, for nearly three
Waldo, U, C, lor nearly three
months after travelling abroad completing his education. Many in town
will remember Mr. Cowan as a student among us a short time ago.
Wardner certainly is blessed with a
great climate. Wc have never lost a
crop of oranges yet and don't expect to.
WARDNER
(Special correspondence).
Mr. Walter Magoon was In Cranbrook Wednesday last on business.
Mrs. Louie Larson went to the hospital Wednesday, where she intends
remaining under the doctor's care for
a few days.
Thc children ol this place are suffering, from measles this week, which
has greatly diminished the regular
attendance at the schools.
G. W. liarr has been down cast
to Minneapolis on a trip. George
says it feels good to get back east,
and also to get back west. It makes
a fellow feel good going and coming.
Many will remember I). .1. W. McDonald who was employed at thc
office of tlte Crows Nest Pass Lumber company nearly two year* ago.
He left here in a very weak condition. He writes that he has completely recovered and expects to
drop in and see us soon. He is now
at his old home at Woodstock, Ont.
Mrs. Moore, of Hrnndoti, Manitoba,
is visiting at IWn Leatd'S for a short
time.
BRITISH COLUMBIA FRUIT GROWERS WANT DUTY RAISED
DEPUTATION       ASKS     FOR  2fi
CENTS A BOX TARIFF ON
AMERICAN APPLES.
Ottawa, Ont., Feb. 38.-Tno fruit
growers of British Columbia, through
their representatives, Messrs. Agur
and R. M. Winslow, president and
rotary, respectively, ot the British
Columbia Fruit Growers' association,
, tomorrow, ask the government
to consider raising the duty on
American apples from 13 cents a'box
to at least 25 cents, the latter being
the I'nited States tariff against Canadian apples.
For   the first time the apple grow-
s of Hritish Columbia have come
into active competition) with tin- product of other provinces, and of the
western fruit growing states. Until
this year they have had a local market capable of taking all they grow,
hut this year hundreds of orchards
came into bearing, and the crop of
the province was exceedingly large,
with correspondingly low prices.
The same condition prevailed in the
western states, Oregon, Washington,
Idaho and Montana, and also prevailed in Nova Scotia aod lhe east
generally.
British Columbia growers had to
take the competitive price, and it
hurt. The deputation to Ottawa
has followed. There are other requests to lie made to the government. The British Columbia growers want more protection than thc
tariff affords, and so will ask that
the Inspection and Sales Act be
amended so that American shippers
will be obliged tn mark their fruit
before it enters Canada, as American
shippers are not under Canadian jurisdiction, and as the average producer Iras nothing to do with thc
final destination of his fruit, this being handled by the co-operative association. This request of the
Pacific ooast fruit men Is not likely
to be realized.
They are also asking a change In
thc grades of apples. When the
grades were established a few years
ago, thc British Columbia men insisted on..a fancy grade (absolutely
perfect fruit) and bad thc other top
grades placed hut a Utile below
.They arc now asking that the stand-
I ard of the grades be lowered, which
. is rather notable as the Nova Scotia
growers in convention a couple of
weeks ago, asked that they be made
a little higher. It Is stated thnt in
nil Canada there have not been six
boxes of fancy grade apples packed.
This year    freight rates and    other
matters relating to their industry
will be brought before the government by the. deputation tomorrow.
WOODROW WILSON 1NAUGUR
1TED PRESIDENT
TAFT     RELINQUISHES   EXECUTIVE POWER   TO HIS SUCCESSOR — BRYAPTIN
FOREGROUND.
Washington, Mar. -1.—Woodrow Wilson of New Jersey was inaugurated
today as president of thCwUnltod
States and Thomas R. Marshall, of
Indiana, its vice president.
Under tho dome of the nation's
c.ipitol, in the presence of a countless
cheering concourse of his fellow citizens, the new president raised a hand
toward a prophetic sun ttial burst
through dissolving clouds, and pro-
liotmued the occasion a day of dedication, nol of triumph.
114 was an Intensely human, preoud-
ent-bieaking inauguration. With menu
hers of bin chosen cabinet surrounding him, the justices of the supreme
court before him, his wife and daughters actually dancing for joy on the
platform below, and William Howard
Taft, ex-president of ihe nation, at
his side, the new president shouted a
summons io all "honest, patriotic,
forward-looking men," to aid him,
extending the promise that he would
not fail them in the guidance of
their government.
While the president's concluding inaugural words were tossing in tum-
ul'tuous waves of applause the retiring president clasped his hand and
every patriotic servant in the,ranks
of private citizenship.
"Mr. President," said Mr. Taft, his
face beaming with a broadening
smile, "I wish you a successful administration and thc carrying out of
your aims. Wc all will lie behind
you."
"Thank you," said President Wilson, and he turned to shake the hand
of his secretary of state, William
Jennings Bryan.
Tlicre they stood—Taft, standard-
hearer of a vanquished party after
sixteen years of power, Hryan, persistent plodder of progressive democracy, thrice defeated, accepting a
commission from a new chieftain,
and Wilson, the man of the hour,
victorious, mustering, as he expressed It, "not tbe forces of party, but
the forces of humanity."
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT GIVES A
THOUSAND TO THE WOLFE FUND
Mr. F. U. Wade, of Vancouver,
has received thc following telegram
from Sir Richard McBride:
''Your wire today. Province will
subscribe $1,000 to Wolfe fund."
The  fund referred to is    for    thc
reetion of a Canadian monument to
(ieneral Wolfe near his grave at
Greenwich. Tlie Ontario government has also subscribed $4,000 and
the city council of Toronto -12,500.
letters have been received from the
premiers of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Saskatchewan ' and Alberta
promising to consider the Wolfe fund
in making their estimates and the
Dominion has heen applied to for a
grant of $15,0(10 and the. application
has been, most cordially received. If
expertiitions arc fulfilled the
committee expects before, long to
have $50,000 in hand to complete a
Canadian monument worthy of Canada and ot her great hero.
CRANBROOK LAND DISTRICT.
District of   South    Division.   East
Kootenay.
TAKE NOTICE tnat Phineas DeVere Hunt, of Cranbrook, B.C., occupation Agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at
thc north west corner of Lot 5805,
Group 1, Kootenay district, East
Kootenay; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 20 chains, more or less,
to the cast boundary of Lot 6345,
Group 1; thence north 80 chains;
thence cast 20 chains, more or less,
to the place of beginning, containing
80 acres, more or less.
Phineas DeVere Hunt.
per   Robert  Williamson Henry,
Agent.
Dated February 1, 1913. iMOt
LAND NOTICE
Cranbrook Land District
District of South East Kootenay
Take notice that George S. McCreery of Cranbrook, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at
the southwest corner of Lot 656 G.
I., thence west 80 chains, thence
north 20 chains more or less to the
south boundary of Lot 1235 G. I.,
thence east 40 chains to the southeast
corner of Lot 1235 G. L, Kootenay
District, thence north 20 chains,
thence east 20 chains, thence south
20 chains to the point of commencement,   containing   200 acres more or
Its*
George S. McCreery.
Stewart Morris, Agent.
Dated Uth ol December, 1913.
To Rent- Large Fireproof base-
ment, 20 x 100 ft., $7.00 per
month.- Apply Herald Office*
Have you heard about Peps?
Peps is a new scientific
preparation put up into tabloid
or pastille form, which pro--
vides an entirely new and
effective treatment for coughs,
colds and lung and throat
troubles.
There is no connection
between the lungs and the
stomach.
Suppose something were
wrong with your stomach—
say indigestion, or ulceration
—would you think of taking
some medicine which went—
not to your stomach, but to
your lungs?   Certainly not!
Why then, when your lungs
and chest are affected, should
you dose your stomach—an
absolutely separate organ —
with medicine ? Is it not far
better to treat the ailing organ
direct ?
Peps pro-
vido a direct
treatment for
cougha, colds,
bronchitis,
nnd all lung, „„r,
chest ftiiilSf '
threat trou-fable.,. PepBl*,,,
contain highly medicinal
esHncea and
pine extract!
condensed
into tablet
form. You
put a Pep 011
your tongue,
and as it
■lnwly dia-
sulvoa, those
volatile en-
cenccs turn
into vapor,
You BKKATHE the romedy to your
sore ailinj,' lunga direct— not swallow it
to your stomach, width ia not ailing,
(Seo diagram,) The healing fumes, that;
ln-eatlieu down, bathe the delicate, in-
Qamcd mombraneo of your breathing]
tubcH and pans right on to tho tiny pass*
ages of tli" lungs—a course no liquid or
solid medicine couhl possibly take.
Pops fumes are bt-uling and ant.
scptir. They heal 101*0 timm ami kill
diseane germs. Peps bring pinc>t<>rt*sl
fuinea to your home, instead ot yuugoiLg
to the pine forest t
Fur that cold, thnt nicht cough,
tint touch of bronchitis, don't dose your
btumaaii t The trouble lies in your
lungs. Pepa go to the Iuii^d
direct and will cure yon.
All druggists aud store* (Wo bos.
Write for free sample to Pops
Co., Toronto, or G2 Princess St., Winnipeg. Send
only la stamp for
- pontageand enclose
■this advertisement.
COAL AND PETROLEUM NOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
thirty days after date 1 intend to
apply to the Chief Commissioner ot
Lands and to tho Assistant Commissioner of Lands for thc District of
East Kootenay for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the
following described lands, situate on
the North Fork of Michel Creek,
about six miles north of the Cann-
dian Pacific Railroad and lying between the Mclnnes Group end the
Crows Nest Pass Coal Company's
land:
Commencing al a post planted one
mile north of a point one mile east
of the intersection ot the cast side
line of thc Mclnnes Group and the
north side line of tbe Crows Nest
Pass Coal Company's land, said post
being the initial post of A* E. Way-
faml's claim and marked "A. E.
Wayland's northeast corner," thence
8ft chains south, thence 80 chains
west; thence 80 chains north; thence
8ft chains east lo place of beginning,
containing 040 acres, more or loss.
Located .lanuary 21, 1913.
A, E. Wayland, Locator,
Batlce Lameroux, Agent. 0-flt
For Sale
Ono Oxfonl Engine, 11 x 11. Price
$850,00, May lx' Been ut Benedict Siding, ono mile oust of
Mnyook, B. C.
One Oxford Snw Currinize, com-
plete with ruck fccil, it blocks,
:t post dogs. Price $260.00 ut
Elko, B.C.
One Oxford Friction Feed, complete with cable and sheaves und
drive pulleys. Price $150.00, at
at Elko, B.C.
For further particulars apply to
Leask & Johnson, Elku, B. C.
Mac's Auto Service
PHONE 94
Prompt Service New Cars
Dr. Martcl's Female Pills
Forty years in use, 20 years the
standard, prescribed and recom-
mended by pliysiolans. For Woman's Ailments, Dr. Martcl's Female
Pllli, it you, trvfili..
Ki'prular meetings on
the'   third   Thursday
of every month.
Vlsitinn brethren welcomed.
D. J. McSweyn, W.M.
J. S. Peck, Secretary.
Cbebuent Lodge Mo. :i:t
KNIQHTS ~oT PYTHIAS
Cranbrook, B. C.
Meets   every   Tuesday at 8 p.m. at
Fraternity Hall.
Alec. Hurry, C.C.
F. M. Christian, K. ot R.&S.
Visiting hri'thi.n   cordially invited
to attend.
.O.O.F., KEY CITY LODGE, No, 12
Meots every Monday
night nt New Km-
_-_  toralty Hall. Sojourning Oddfellow* cordially invited.
11. Dixon, W. M. Harris,
N. Q. Sec',.
DURHAM ENCAMPMENT NO.  12.
l.O.O.F.
Meeta first aod    third Wednesdays
in each month.
A   cordial reception extended     to
visiting brothers.
Officers July 1st to December 31st.
W. M. Harris, Chief Patriarch
II. WWte, Scribe.
MAPLE LEAF REBEKAH LODOE
No. It.
Meets every second and   fourth Wednesday at Fraternity Hall.
Sojourning   Rebekahs  cordially invited.
Mrs. Alma Liddicoat, N.G.
Mrs. A. E. Parker, Sec.
ANCIENT ORDER OF FORESTERS
COURT CRANBROOK, 8iM3
Meets in Carmen's Hall Second and
Fourth Thursday ol each month at 8
p.m. sharp.
J. MoLachlan, C.R.
L. Pearron, Sec., Box 618.
 Visiting _nrethren made welcome.^
OVER "SEAS'CLUB.
Meets In Carmen's    Hall Snd    and
4th Tuesday every month at 8 p.m.
Membership   open   to British   citi
tew
E. Y. Brake, L. Pearron,
Pres. Sec.
Box 018
Visiting members cordially wclcom
ed.
Cranbrook  Lodge
No. lute
Mrp-ln r.nry W.pIiii'kpIpi.v
at. K p.m.In IWpvhI Hlink
Kulitlila' Hull, Bilker
btmit.
Klisii. W. Swaix. Diet.     it. S. (.'AIlllKTT, St'i
ANCIENT ORDER OF FORESTERS.
Pride of Cranbrook   Circle, No. 193,
Companion, of tne Forest.
Meets in Carmen's Hall 2nd and 4th
Thursday of each month at 3
p.m. sharp.
Mrs. L. Whittaker, CO,
Mrs. I, Heigh, Secretary.
Visiting Companions cordially welcome.
Electric Restorer tor Men
PhoSphonol "stores every nerve In tlie bod y
■ ■ ■ i.i-!. , —to its proper tension ; rustiires
vim and vitality. Premature decay nnd nil sexual
weakness averted at once. Phuaphoaol will
make vou a new nun. Price 13 a box, or two (or
fii. Mailed to nny address. Th»Scobell Drug
Co., St. CalharlnAi, Out.
For sale at Beattie-Murphy Co., LU.
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL
It innate1, no dltTereoce what jou lljure on
planting thia rmrou—we run supply you,
and with tbe Illicit quality nt nursery stock
svsr grown.
All trett, plants, tlosa, berries, scrubs,
•TcrfTMns, toh's, etc., sold by us sre iunr-
tod
TRUE TO NAHB     -    -       "
It will pay you to got In tourb with ns.
„   KVKRY PLANTER NERDS OUR HOOK-
LANDSCAPE GARDENING
6c  WHAT TO PLANT" .
32 PAGES.       10*(STAMPS)
PRASER
lyALLEY
Ijurseriesltd
N RICHARD M«O)MB.0ENlMCR.
IlBOX.A.ALDcRGROVE,B.C.
LAND NOTICli
Kast Kootenay District
Take notice that H. C. Miller,
married woman, of Hossland, II. C,
intends to apply to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at A. (I. Morris'
north east corner, thence smith
eighty chains, thence east eighty)
chains, thence north eighty chains,
thence west eighty chains.
H. C. Miller.
tf. fi. Cummins, Agent.
Dated December 7th, 1913.
Hotel International
(ii ii. l.<.n..nic Proprietor
Situated at Klngsgate, B.C., on
the Uiiim.h.ry Line, in a spot of
rare Etieniu beauty and the sportsman's pimuiiflt1.
Headquarters for Commercial Men and Tourists
KINCISQATE
B. X
Hotel Coeur D'Alene
Spokane, Wash.
A NEW AND
MODERN
HOTEL
(KtfftOPJ-MN)
A modern equipped Cute at moderate
prices
Kates f i.oo and up per day
Corner of Howard Bt. and Front Ave.
Our bus meete all trains
The Coeur D'Alene Company
PROPBIBTOBB
JABOB QOETZ, President
HARRY F. BAER, Secretsry
The Home Bakery
HlPIPERT FtlAMK, PrOp.
Fresh Bread, Cakes, Pies, and
Pastries of All Kinds
l'HONE 87
Norbury Ave.       Opp, City Hall
Headquarters for nil kinds of
KopnirB
Satisfaction Guaranteed
JOE   MARAPODI
Tlie Shoe Specialist,
FRANK DEZALL
Curries a full stock of
DEERING MOWERS AND
'     RAKES
ami
MCCORMICK MOWERS
Repairs for above alwayi
in stock
CHAS.S. PARKER::
SncraasortoF.T. I'. I'KRUV
DRAYING AND
TRANSFERRING
ACENTS FOR
THE IMPERIAL OIL CO.!
AND CALT COAL     „
50-02 ,;
THE HUME
Nelson's Leading Hotel
Rooms with Baths.   'Phone in
every room
Barber Shop on tbe premises.
Thoroughly up-to-date.
Rates, $2.00 a day
and up
**********************
CRANBROOK-FERNIE
FARMERS' INSTITUTE j',
President: .!. II. McCi.ukk
Hecretary. 8. Macdonald
i For information regarding lands
» and   agriculture   apply   to the
1 Secretary, Cranbrook, B. 0.
Meeting—
Kvery second Wednesday
THE CRANBROOK POULTRY AND PET
STOCK ASSOCIATION
I'rt'riiiii'lH : 0, It. SHKPPAR1)
Moots i'1'siiilnrly 1 lie NtmI Pi'tihiy eviir inprpiu'li
mnnth.
InfurmniMiii nn Poultry imittitrHHUppliml
AdilntH the SBcrutary,
A. ...SMITH, Hi xSna
KING EDWARD'S SCHOOL
Hrnilniistriw: Mltw Clf Mini no ton
Assistant"! Minn Houhhon
TKltMR :
nonfiling Koch • $5.00 per w«*k
rKxiliiriivo nl h-Moii)
School Fees ¥2 00 per week
I liiilii'liiiK Btutiotiory, nun of books, etc,)
Kindergarten - II uri    "
Hub* Kxlrw: 1
I'ioiU'li, Mli' per week ;  Miihm*. .'lOr per week.'
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
ONLY FAULT
DRINK HABIT
Many (iood Mini Robbed of lliiili
Bil.inee and Social .Standing
by Drink
Ollml ut
THK NKA1. INSTITUTK
in tliri'i1 pIiivh
Boi MS, Cranbrook, II. O,
W. F. OURD,
Barriitcr, Solicitor, Etc.
Monuy to loan on favorable lerutl,
CRANBROOK.HHITIHH  COI.tWBI.
HARVEY, McCARTER, MACDONALD
& NISBET
Barristers, Solicitors and
Notaries
Money to l.iinii
DKS. KINO & UREEN,
Physicians and Surgeons.
Oflet at RmMmm, Armitroai tn.
OrriCB HOURS :
Forenoon. •.00 to 10.00
Afternoon. - ■ ■ 2.00 to 4.00
Erenlngi - . ■, - 7.80 to i.W
riundan - - • • 1.80 to   t.M
CRANBROOK :i    :i    u    il    B. 0,
DR. P. B. MILES
DENTIST
OFFICE   HOURS:
• to 12 a.m.
1 to   t p.m.
7 to   0 p.m.
Office la Hanson Block.  -
CRANBROOK        -       -       - B. C,
Cranbrook Cottage Hospital
MATERNITY   .ND   PRIVATE   NURSINO
Terms on Application,
MRS. A. SALMON,
Phone 259 Matron.
P. O. Box 845   Armstrong Ave
B.C.  LAND SURVEYORS
McVITTIE    &    PARKER
Cranbrook anil Fort Steele
IRRIGATION AND RAILWAY WORK
A SPECIALTY
**********************,
J. Q. CUIVlMINaS
irrigation enoineer
dominion and provincial land [
survevor
.^^CraiibrobkVB.C.;
J. T.   LAIDLAW
MINING  ENGINEER
B.  C.  land  Surveyor
CRANBROOK    •     B. C.
F. S.   ROSSETER
A M. Can. Sou. 0. B;
Civil Engineer and Architect
Office over Cranbrook Ding and Book
Co'e. Store
Telephone 389
P. O. Box 37
W. R. Baettr, mnaral Dlracto.
Cranbrook B. C.
Phono 3'lli
P. M. riACPHERSON
UNDERTAKER
Norbury Ave., next to City Hall
Day I'lione 233
Night I'lione 35C
Prank Provenzano
Ganaral Marchanta
Employment Agtnti
CRANBROOK     •     B. C.
P.O. 101IM IWOKIM.
II you want aatiifactlon with
your waihinR  send
it to
MONTANA LAUNDRY
Special |iri™B lor family work.
CENTURY RESTAURANT
0|,|i<ialH, O.I'.K. Million
THE    PLACE    TO     OET    A
QUICK HEAL ANI'   .
GOOD MEAL.
ROOMS TO RENT.
MRS. R. W. EDMONDSON
(iradoate nf London College of
Music, England
Visits and Receives Pupils for
PIANOFORTE OR ORGAN
LESSONS ON THEuHV AND VOICE PRODUCTION
Alan representative for Mason &
Risoh Pianos Legislative Assembly
April 21-11
JOB PRINTING
We are well equipped tu
luiDoul the beat class
of work.
THE CRAM BROOK HERALD
/;
ADVERTISING
In tin) lli-iul,!  l'ay«-Try
Our   Local  Column,
10c. a line
K
IF   YOU   WANT   CRANBROOK   TO   GROW.   PATRONIZE   HOME  ENTERPRISE
(fit
ii 6. €•■
VOLUME  15
(IRAN BROOK,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.  THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1913
NO. 11
SOME OHUIK IFFECTING THE
■HIV OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FRUIT
A Statement by the Directors of the hritish Columbia Prult Growers Association
Tbe, generally    low prices received   British Columbia fruit Industry
(or fruit during the past scpson have always been especially subject ti
made pertinent    and proper a.    dis-   There whs tlie large crop ol '08,
cuseion of the fundamental considcra-   lowed hy a    small ono in '00; n
tions affecting      the future of    our crop In 1010, with u small one
fruft growing iunistry.    Mnny differ- ■ Iflll, and a bumper crop in I'M
ent opinions are held as to tho remedy for a .situation    which, If    con-
Your
the
reach
to
tinuoit, would be intolerable,
directots have fully considered
facts, and have endeavored to
proper conclusions in regard
them.
Tbis paper outlines .the principal
(actors which seem to underlie the
present situation. It is to be hoped
that those (actors will be considered
by you in your deliberations.
The principal condition affecting
tbe prices of B.C. fruit was the very
large crop in the United States, resulting in the importation of large
quantities of American fruit at low
prices, or, what what is worse, shipped on consignment. All soft fruits
yiet'ed very much above tbo average. The . figures arc not yet to
band, save that we know that some
40,000 carloads of peaches were
shipped commercially this year in
the United States. The United
Spates apple crop was 34.3 per cent
larger than the average of the last
ten years. It was 12 per cent larger than the 1011 crop. It totalled
around 40,000,000 barrels. Tne quality was generally high, 15 per cent
better than the ten years' average.
In the Northwest States, the box-
apple states, about 20,000 carloads
are being shipped, as against only
9,000 last year.
Aa a result of these extremely
large crops, prices would naturally be
low, supply greatly exceeded demand; 25 per cent of the Ontario
apple crop is said to, have rotted on
the ground. There has heen a similar condition in New York State.
T!ie Western states, however, will get
something for practically all their
.apples. British Columbia did comparatively well in the matter of
prices, for our fruit brought more
than in any other section of America.
Other general conditions which
helped to lower the prices were:
1. Tightness of the money market
of tbe United States and generally
throughout the world.
2. The largest proportion of boxed
apples to barrels ever experienced.
3. Defective methods ot picking
and packing, whieh injured fruit and
kenned its keeping quality.
4. Lack of storage facilities.
5. The fruit growers require their
money in the fall, and bank loans
are not made on unsold apples;
apples must therefore be sold in  the
un.
6. Fruit distributing organisation,
both In Hritish Columbia and in the
North-West States. In tho latter,
particularly, should be mado much
stronger.
7. Thc boxed apple business is a
new one, and little is known about
elective means of distributing it to
the best advantage.
500 carloads
Okanugaii shipped
apples last year. In 1018, under
normal conditions, tho crop will likely bo less. Other districts ami
other crops under normal tondiWons
will likely be the same. This is
equally true of the country as a
whole.
Practically all fruit districts havo
good crops this year. Many places
will have a normal or average crop.
The North-Western States arc not
likely to have more than 15,0011
cars of a-PPles. In 1909 they had
6,000, in 1910, 15.000; in 1911,
9,000; in 1912, 20,000 cars are estimated.
Plums and prunes are almost certain to be a light crop in the Northwestern States next year. There is,
generally speaking, no great need for
concern about 1913 prices. Our present organizations will, however, require extension of staff and finances,
to be effective.
1913 will be a year of at least
normal prices. In meeting the situation generally, we may expect a
margin of some eighteen months to
make plans for our next difficult season.
Tlie acreage in the North-Western
States promises in the future some
real competition. Figures collected
over this territory show that in
Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana,
and British Columbia there are
some 320,000 acres of what promise
to be fairly successful orchard, ol
which over 90 per cent is in apples.
Of this figure, under 30,000 acres are
in Hritish Columbia. It is true, of
course, that it is generally accepted
that only 25 per cent ol apples
planted will arrive at commercial,
bearing. At the present time, only
8 per cent of tho entire amount is. in
bearing, producing about 25,000 Carloads this year.
In 1914 we may expect between
40,000 and 45,000 carloads of fruit in
this territory and the crop of apples
may easily run to 42,000 cars. This
is equal to 26,460,000 boxes, or 8,-
000,000 barrels, practically one-third
of the entire average crop of the
I'nited States for the last seven
years, If these crop predictions are
correct, there is ample need for protection for us in our markets,
I   EeonQmio  conditions have changed,
are lower than they formerly were;
transportation conditions, although
not yet ideal, are better; and it must
not be forgotten that Iruit prices for
box fruit have steadily risen. Orchard returns- and shipping returns
must lie taken over a period of years
to enable one to arrive at an average.
; price. Though prices may fluctuate,
..there is no reason why we may look
Ito an average of a dollar a box. I
Twelve years ago, the prices of box
fruit were considerably lower than
they are now.
There un* many problems to solve
■ in the   marketing   ol our Increasing
Crops, but they can ull he overcome
by our efforts, ability ami energy.
Wo can all well afford to be entirely sanguine as to thc ultimate
and enduring success of our fruit
industry.
W. Crawford Kicardo,
President and   Chairman of   the Dill. M. Wtnslow, secretary.
rcotoratc.
Cranbrook      City    Transfer
(Worden)   80.25
Campbell and Manning    84.15
Cranbrook Trading Co  .70
City clerk sundries     30.110
City officials payroll       340.00
Cranbrook Steam laundry   ... .7.i
Cranbrook     Electric    Light
Co., Ltd  201.82
Cranbrook     Electric     Light
(thawing account)   406.33
c. P, K., (freight)         62.70
Corbin Coal and Coke Co. 79.20
Davis Bros. Klectric Co,    ... 9.00
Dezall, Frank 3H.G5
Kast   Kootenay Livery (Porker)                        8.50
Kast   Kootenay   Livery (Mc-
Lintock)   0.00
11 Meat Market   it 18.84
Kink Mercantile Co., Ltd.   ... 12.00
Fire department payroll       2SO.00
CITY COUNCIL MEETINS
DIVERSION   OF   SMITH  CREEK
AND RESIGNATION OF ENGINEER PARKER PRINCIPAL FEATURES.
llerald Publishing Co
Hill, K. A	
Kootenay   Telephone
Ltd	
Liddicoatt and Wal
McBride, .1. I)	
McBride. J. D	
Parker, II. Y	
Police payroll 	
Parrett, T. N	
Patmoi'e Bros	
Parks and Co	
School board payroll
Ward and Harris ...
Worden, W. K	
er
87.8f
2-1.50
15.-10
180.00
5.32
81.54
8.00
380.00
3.40
33.22
37.05
1466.50
0.05
32.38
The cost of labor lias increased
greatly In the last five years; and so
have the costs of other items of production. The exclusion of Orientals
lias had much to do with this. Our
labor ami the other items in the cost
of production are higher than they
hit in the State ot Washington. Ath
other economic condition which affects the situation is the defective
organisation of our competitors.
'Hair marketing associations were in
poorer shape in 1012 than in previous.
years, and   this.    In    the face     of
fl.   Practically   no   advertising     is  large crops, inadequate holding     and
done to increase the demand fori the  storing facilities,    tho absence of by-
wwtern    boxed   npple,   while $200,-  product factories, and unsatisfactory
000.00 a year is spent in advertising I financial conditions.
California oranges. The present condition is only tetii-
.9. Thc very large apple handling porary. The fruit and produce husi-
conoerns in England and New York news is always cynical, and subject
are working to depress prices on . to periods of depression, followed by
boxed apples. jlike period of high prices   and great
10. British Columbia is fighting prosperity. Tbe more we can elim-
(or her natural markets, which wc in»t« extremes, the less re-action
are just beginning to adequately , there is- British Columbia growers
supply, and in whieh our competitors arc in a particularly favored position.
are at present strongly entrenched.       The population of   the prairies, their
11. Because of u curious condition own particular market, is growing
with regard to the Krult Marks Act larger every year, nnd at lhe phefto-
and its enforcement, British Colutn- mcnal rate of Increase. The whole
h'a growers are discriminated country now is being covered by a
against in favor of their foreign network of railroads, which will
competitors. .tend    to give better   transportation
12. Canning, preserving, and nth- | ami better service. Thc experience
crwisc preparing fruits and vegn- which we have had, and which has,
tables, arc as yet developed to a perhaps, been dearly bought, will
very limited extent in this province, enable us to get better distribution
In California $28,000,000.00 -worth (or our products. More knowledge
ot fruit by-products are produced an-, in every way, in production, in
nually. packing and  distribution, will better
Tbe above arc   among thc principal  conditions;        more        advertising
conditions which depressed prices I which every successful box of
this year. The fruit growers of apples brings, through the satisfac-
the province expect you -to deal with tion given to the customer, and the
the situation, and recommend      and , careful education of thc general pub'
(ollow up    means   of    securing our
markets.
Future Prospects: It seems pertin-
lie on the subject of fruit. It is a
(act often overlooked that the majority of fruit growers are getting re-
City council met at the city council chambers on Monday afternoon at
o'clock with Mayor Bowness in the
chair and Aldermen Clapp, Carr,
Ward, Kennedy, Erickson and Leask
present.
Reading of minutes of previous
meeting were read and approved.
Communications from P, DeVere,
Hunt and provincial secretary were
received and filed,
The board of works presented a
lease in respect to a part of Norbury avenue adjoining lots 10 and
20 in block 88, with N. Hanson ami
on * motion of Leask and Erickson, it
was carried thai such lease be executed.
Report of the assistant city engineer on diversion of Smith creek was
read and referred to the board of
works.
On motion-of Erickson and Ward
the assistir.it city engineer was instructed to have a shed built at the
city pound tor protection of the city
water equipment and to hove shed
now on the street removed hack on
the lots.
An amended motion being presented
by Aldermen Clapp and Krickson it
was ordered tbat a meter be installed at the Young Men's club uulldtng
nml that water he charged at half
the usual meter rates.
It was carried on motion by Leask
and Ward that •'■ C. Olenday be in
st meted to cheek up all water connections with tbe water system and
that the city clerk on receipt of such
report see that all users arc rendered
account for such connections,
On motion by Carr and Clapp the
city engineer was instructed to prepare plans and estimate of cost for
lowering such water pipes as may
be necessary and for improving thc
dam
The city clerk was instructed to
render account to A. B, Macdonald
for 535.00 for .cost of transporting
prisoner to Lethbridge.
Motion by Krickson and Ward carried that Alderman Leask with the
city solicitor and the assistant city
engineer prepare nn amendment to
the building bylaws.
The mayor and city clerk were instructed to enter into an agreement
with the Young Men's club ns recommended by tbe sewerage committee
with regard to the sewerage connection.
On motion that leave be granted
tor the introduction ot bylaw No.
120, eited as "Temporary Loan Bylaw, 1018," it was carried that such
bylaw he Introduced «nd read lirst
nnd second times.
Council then resolved itself Into a
committee on the whole for the discussion ol this bylaw nml on reassembling a motion that leave be
granted lo expedite matters by its
third reading was carried.
Bylaw No. 120 was rend a third
time and passed,
Resignation or City Engineer Parker wns received and accepted and
city clerk wns instructed to advertise
iu the Canadian and local papers and
engineering Journals (or applications
asking applicants to stnte qualifications and salnry required.
On motion by Erickson ami Clapp
council adjourned.
Following accounts audited by   tlw
finance committee were accepted and
ordered paid:
Beattie-Murphy Co., Ltd.   ...$     3.30
Total
,.$4,705.75
from among the business men of
Cranbrook, arc now in possession of
tickets, which they have on sale fii ni
Kingsgate on the west, to Fernie on
the east. Tbey hope to sell at least
1000 tickets at $1.50 each.
The supper will he under ibe supervision of the patronesses and a committee of ladies, anil tbey propose
serving a sumptuous spread.
Following are the patronesses:
Mcadamcs (Dr.) -l. H. King, R. T.
Brymner, (Dr). F W Green, Geo
Hoggarth,   \.   I     McDermot,  Ed.
Paters    Clias. Mngee,   W, II   Wil
son, (i. Grioksoh and il A Mc
Kowun.
The general committee are:
Messrs. J. D. McBride, A, C. Howness, W. II. Wilson, J. F. Campbell,
.1. P. Fink, Robt. McCreery and Dm.
J, H. King, F. W. Oreen, (
Macklnnon, .1. H. M. Bell,
SUCCESSFUL FARMING IN
1
Interesting Advice Given to New Settlers by John
Levett, One of Our Most Successful Partners
.}. E. I.
The following paper was read by
Mr. John Levcti at Ure Farmer*'
Institute lust evening) and at the
close ii was resolved tbat the Institute get. the same printed In
pamphlet form lo bo available for
distribution.
for iIn*    use
ions as regards dry fanning. Some
seem to think it is farming without
water, and that it Is no good To
|mj mind it is tbe greatest uplift to*
wards raisins thB standard ol agriculture ol thc age, It la nothing
as reliable Information more or less than a good system ot
f new comers in      the  farming which teaches us how to con-
GHIGKEH EXPERTS
DISCUSS HIKTK
|district.    The institute was lead   to (serve the  fertility in our soil.
this step by reason of what its mem- |how to conserve the moisture
lii-tsj     designate as erroneous and ex- ';   —*—* ■»—•«*■ :
aggerated statements appearing      in
pamphlets and advertising matter of
parties holding hind for sale here as
to what   can be done in tbis district
| un     absolutely   new    land the first
GOVERNMENT TO SELL
LOTS AT SIRDAR
Victoria, D. O,, March U.—Instructions have been sent to the government agent at Nelson authorizing
him to sell a number of lots in, thc
townslte of Sirdar to persons who
for some time past have been occupying them. Tbis disposes of an issue
tbat has been conspicuous in Sirdar
for some time past.
KOOTENAY GESTRAL
COfflCTS IBE LET
THREE    AND   A HALF MILLION
DOLLARS WORTH OF WORK
TO BE CARRIED OUT IIY
SPOKANE CONTRACTORS.
The Poultry association met on 1
Friday evening last iu Matheson's
hall, President Sheppard in the
chair. About) tweirty-tive members
were present. Among items of business taken up was the question uf
prize, list and prizes for fall fair,
which was finally laid over until next
meeting. Mr. Webb reported action
up to date of committee appointed to :
uot on question of meeting place ami
stated that until further Information
was received from Victoria llttla :
could he done. The programme section of meeting was devoted to a
discussion of Orpingtons, Hull birds
being supplied by Messrs, Garts.dc,
Sainsbury and Pigott, und a white
bird by Mr. Kendall.
Messrs. Webb and Kendall look
charge of the meeting, Mr. Webb taking up color questions, and Mr. Kendall shape, each going very fully into
his subjeet'and answering fully a
large number o. questions on the
breed in all its varieties.
All present showed their interest, in
tlie work and at the close on vote
selected Wyandotts for the April
meeting.
•— ♦ ■
HEAVY FINES FOR
BflEHC CAME LAWS
Mr Levett's conservative advice
has the backing of tbe institute as a
body ami cm lie banked on by new
settlers as ihe best way to make
progress on new land.
aud
which
insures us against drouth, and it also teaches thc minimum amount of
irrigation water, where irrigation is
uaeda We all know, who have used
water, where it is plentiful there is iX
tendency to put on too much water;
ih.it when ;t is kept saturated the
soil M*ts like cement, therefore it ex-
. hides all the air from the soil and
destroys all bacteria, consequently
neatly leduetnj; ibe quantitv as well
niuM*.
dr. Chairman an
entlemeu
1 have a short paper here which I
I bought might be of Interest to some
of our fellow members t the Parmer's Institute, and espef iallj ;: ose
who are just settling In the dlstri I
as 1 have bcejii asked ti\  two
Spokane, Wash., March 12.—Contracts for railroad construction work
aggregating $3,330,000 were awarded
Spokane corutractors by thc Canadian
Pacific Railway company for building
the bnal section ot the 'Kootenay
Central line through the Windermere
valley.   .
The contracts awarded were to
Burns and Jordan for sixty miles on
the final eighty mile stretch of the
Jukeson to Golden cutoff in the Windermere valley district, the work to
cost approximately $2,500,000. Thc >
other twenty mile contract went to
Roomer and Hughes, also of Spokane,
for about $830,000
Game Wardens Lewis and Ward
have just returned from patrolling
the game reserve, starting irom
Michel the officers* travelled up Brule
creek to the summit and thence
down Nelson creek to Hull River.
Hero just outside the reserve snow-
shoe tracks were observed; leaving
Hie reserve the wardens travelled
down the Bull river and ran onto a
trapline. At a sheltered cabin wapiti or elk meat was discovered and at
'the other cabins the same thing occurred. Venison was also found and
somo cases was spoiling. Two
Iraps set for lynx were noted, one
baited with a whole deer ham, the
other with a forequartcr and another
parties already if I did not tr.in
il,.it alfalfa would be alright to sow
on new land this spring As I understand some of the land has nevei
been broken yet, would say, as far as
my experience goes, that would be
about the last thine I would think
doing, with the expectation
ing any returns, as the ground has
to Ik? well worked up and cultivated
at least cm* full season before one
could expect a good catch of any of
the sm&fl seeds, sueh as clovers or
grasses. So many people s<*t'm to
think that because clover makes the
ground rich, that it will grow anywhere    and     under   any    conditions,
, which is one of the chief causes for
so many failures.
|   In thc lirst place the most imp^rt-
[ant thing is a thorough seed bed. and
land in fairly good heart and free
from weed seeds.     While it might be
] possibfe to get a catch on new. raw
land, it hardly ever amounts tc
anything, and usually dwindles away.
as the soil docs not have the strength
tu furnish the necessary bacteria on
the roots, so it is easy seen why toe
| land lias to be in a snod state of
fertility in order lor the youne plants
i to get a good start. It seems that
when the nodules are lacking on the
roots, that it noes,not have tbe power to draw the free nitrogen irom the
air, consequently has to live at the
expense of tin- soil, .iiid *rel- up
with time and seed wasted- So the j
better plan for new [and
cither a crop of oats or a cultivated
erop of some kind, in order to get
it in shape for the following season.
And to tbus.' who ,u" thinking    of
setting oui fi '.* trees or. new laud 1
would say that I do not think it is a
good plan, and    too much like courting disastt!      The better way is   to
work the   land up thoroughh       the
first   season,    in   order to gel      it
wanned    up,   and in good condition
' ii the young tre s, as there will  be
thing gained if this is left to     be
after '.he trees are set, as many
( tbem get bruised up by thc work-
ng ol tbe team   resulting very    ol-
■ n ii. a si k lo ..King orchard.  There-
ore thc    man who prepares his soil
of rcaliz- |hy a thorough   cultivation and levelling is almost sure to be away ahead
of thi- man that sets his trees      on
poorly prepared !.■• '       Li Vast that
would be my wa]  of      i i it.   There
are members in tbis Institute    who
have had more experience in the fruit
line than 1    have and mighi       give
yon better advice, but 1 have always
iound    that     work of this kind well
done is doubly done, and foi any extra work in     preparing and cultivation it   more than makes up for   thc
,'xtra   labor and   money spent.    We
find so many arc indifferent     as    to
what  time of the season   the land is
ploughed,    whether fall or spring, as
there      is     no      comparison,    fall
ploughing .should always be practised
whenever   possible, for a good   many
reasons      Thc land is turned up and
exposed to the weather and action of
the frost,   which    pulverizes tbe soil
and   brings   about that mellow state
of tilth   which cannot be uot in  any
other   way.        H also leaves      the
land in      th** best possible condition
[to absorb all the moisture that falls,
[besides   the   land has time to settlp,
which makes   a good firm seed bed—
the verj best   condition f'-r all small
The farmer has time to  get
Burns and Jordan will start work ham; at the next cabin the scalp
on thc new contract immediately, <>f a freshly killed elk was discovered
will employ about 2,000 men, and and other evidence of the wholesale
wilt keep about five or six steam and unnecessary slaughter ol game.
shovels at work. They will have | Later the owner of thc trapline ami
about twenty camps and it will re- cabins arrived and was placed under
quire about two years to do the arrest and taken out some forty-five
work. This work Is on the Koote- j miles to Wardngr. Last Thursday
nay Central line of the Canadian thc trapper in question, .James A.
Pacific railway, ,(»)ueen, of Fort Steele, appeared    be- ,
These  contractors have been work- fore   .Justices    ot the Peace .laflney [seed, it,should not be difficult to get
ing for the   Canadian Pacific railway   and Markle and   pleaded guilty      to
for the last   thret years, and      just  two charges of   violating the    game
completed a (orty mile contract. act.    For killing an elk Queen    was
.John Jordan   will leave this week   fined $250 and  costs, while for being
for Golden    to direct commencement in possession of venison during
of the work,
would.be j seeds. ^^^^^^
his crop put ii,, in uor*J season and
under the u-ry best condition:-, which
very often means the difference      bc-
I Alfalfa or clover is one of the     best ;ltt,*n wcceffl OT, IaUu«; and     those
jwho have  to depend on thc moisture
crops    for thc farmer to   grow, and |
-. j that  falls should     see that whenever
has been proven long ago that wher-
evpr clover entered largely into     the i
rotation it was where the best stock \
were to, be found, and also the   most
'prosperous farmers, and by the proper condition   as repprds a thorough i
Isced bed, and   irmoeulation of      the
! seed  before    sowing, and also       th'-
selection of the hardiest variety     of '
The    contract awarded to Boomer
and Hughes yesterday   is for twenty
miles of work
Golden line
on the Jukeson      to
ent at this time lor us to consider turns from young orchards, and just
what will in all likelihood be the j now it is not so much the number of
situation in future years. There is'boxes to a tree, as thc number ot
a general assumption that in 1913 trees to a box, which obviously en-
apple and other fruit crops will bo hances thc cost of production. These;
larger than in 11*12. People point same trees arc growing up, and it
to the increased acreage and tho will not bo long before we arc get-
growth ot the trees for proof. They , ting far bigger tonnage per acre, at
forget tbe law of action and re-ac- ,a same or a lower general cost of
tion which it always at work.    The.general   production.      Freight rates
BpII, j. h, m. 	
4.00
Healc and Elwolli	
59.00
Oily engineer's payroll
S67.50
Cranbrook Foundry ... .
.50
Cranbrook     Cartage
and
3.00
Cranbrook   .Sash   and
Door
Co., Ltd	
10.65
Cranbrook    DniR and
Hook
Co	
.00
1.50
ARRANGEMENTS FOR
CHARITY BALL PROGRESS
COMMITTEES NAMED AND ALU
BUSY ON EASTER MONDAY
DANCE.
  till!
closed   season    a further   line of $50
and costs was Imposed. A close patrol of the   hills has been maintained
this winter and the majority of trap-
peri have been visited.   In the future
this policy will be even more strictly   t" see
; followed  and any flagrant alius,'    uf  proper
Ithe game laws will \n- prompt))    foi-  moke*
lowed by the appearance of tbe offender In court,   where doubtless he will
receive tlie severe   punishment be deserves,
M POETESS KM
satisfactory stand,
Wo quite often bear men argue that
it does not do to fmi fifteen dollar
per ton hay tf. cattle—tbat then-
was no money in il—but I do not see
how any man ran be a farmer very
long*and still hold to such Ideas
The land soon turns from the man
who takes all and gives nothing In
return, therefore, ii is to our Interest
tn see that wc star! oul with n
system    of rotation,  which
  it so much easier to keep   the
land In «t»"il tilth, besides keeping
tho weeds and Insect pests in check,
which would mean better crops and
I to see that the products grown    arc
fi*<l  on  (he  plaee  as  much  as  possible
jfn ordei to    keep, up   th.- producing |t0 sprpad Ul,
.power of the land, which is the only
[way that farming ran be carried   On
the   ploughing is ,d<>n'- that thc harrow' follows ar-  soon as possible     tn
order to bold as     much ol the mois-
tnrQ in the soli—where it is wanted—
otherwise if the harrowing is     neglected,    as   is often the case.      the
! ground   becomes   hard and baked*up,
requiring a loi <J eitra work to  get
■ it into    shape   for any\crop, besides
losing all the   moisture, which is  allowed to escape      The barrow is. a
very useful Implement, it makes     a
, mulch which acts as a blanket,   con-
■eajuently    shuts    oil    < raporatlon.
These little things may seem small in
[themselves, bul with j few ol      the
most  important   points always       in
riow, the   carefci] selection ol     the
beat seed obtainable, a thorough seed
bt d, foil* *.'.,-.| up with frequent    cultivation, all leads up In 'be rl^ht direction     toward ll (.inning,
and     always    hearing in mind, that
[what  you do, Jo do well, that fcwett-
.ly-fivy acres well tilled is fiir better
i than double ibe amount poorlj tilled,
as Ibe tendency! with far too many is
work over too   much
ground   which results In unprofitable
Vancouver, B.C., Mar. 10.—Miss
E. Pauline Johnson, the Indian poetess nnd writer of stories, died at
thc Bute Street   hospital this morn-
Thc special   committee on arrangements for the Charity ball in aid   of
St. Eugene   hospital at thc Auditorium on   Easter Monday, March 24th,
are getting things in shape for     thc
affair.      Following are    tho    com- inK-      Sha nad beeR more or 1(,-ss (>!
mittee who have the dance in charge: an invalid for over a year.
R.   T.    Brymner,    chairman; Archie j
Raworth, A. L. McDermot and H. J. |
Scott, secretary.
Thc Edison    orchestra will furnish
thc music,    The supper will be served buffet style,    commencing at    11
p.m.    Tho different members of    tho _
committee,   as    well   as the general occupy the boards at the Auditorium
committee,     which   has been vbc-sea  theatre.
i It will be remembered by t'ran-
brook theatre goers that Miss .Johnson visited Cranbrook about live
years ago, being one of tbe find    tn
successfully.
The problem ol fighting the weeds
is a serious mallei. No matter In
whal direction you go it is noxious
weeds that are staring us in the
face. This is what is occupying the
minds of our leading men today, to
know how bisl to help the farmer
inwards bringing^ Into use the better
methods of farming. It is easy seen
ilia I, with our nhlpshod methods of
the present day thai something will
have to be done, qS weeds not only
rob the soil of its fertility, but are
very expensive when onco thoy have
gained a foothold.
It is (jtiite amusing and interesting   to   hear the different optn-
crops
with ;1
and a  disappointed    farmer,
poor half worked farm.
• John Levett.
SHAMROCK TEA.
The chlldreniof KnOX church Sabbath school will entertain with a
Shamrock tea on Monday attcrnfoon,
March 17th, from I to B.80 p.m., in
tbo school house adjoining tho
church- A cordial wetedme will be
given lo all. Silver offering W, do-
fray expenses. Coma and encourage
the children. THE CRANBROOK HERALD
Your enjoyment of a phonograph depend* not only on tho
number of .elections. It depend, on the quality of each. The
Edison Blue Amberol Record
was invented on the quality idea.    It produces the most clean
cut, lifelike and beautiful tone you ever heard.
It will never wear out and indifferent handling
of it or dropping it on the floor won't break it. It
is constant in its ability to please.
Your Edison dealer will be glad to play Blue
Amberol Records for you.
Tana. A. Edl.oa, lo... 100 Uk..ld. A..., Onaae, N. J.. U. S. A.
A coaaplal" line of Edi.on Phonograph, and Record, will b. found it
"The Beattie-Murphy Company, Ltd."
"Thc Cranbrook Drug and Book Co. Ltd/'
CAME OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ,ret■ m »*»«■"""*■«'""   s"
rough, and burses can generally      he
EXTRACTS   FROM    PROVINCIAL
GOVERNMENT OFFICIAL BULLETIN NO. 17.
taken up a great part of the way—in
tact, oltcn right up to lhe summits—
und this section is generally sparsely
limbered. When thc Selkirks are
leached the mountains rise to even
a greater altitude, become more rugged, the timber becomes thicker, and
I hero is also a greater rainfall.
There are, however, plenty of hunting  trails,   so that    horses   can be
used.
ot interest to district sportsmen: .
„.      ,. ,--„     ,      ,■,„„■. ;„      lire   Rockies, the summit of which
Since the year 1778, when Captain1 .."     ,'     i       . »   »,,
_   ,       , ,   ,. i   „,  forms the eastern boundary    of   the
Cook made a voyage to the coast   of ' .
i, •.■ v. n i     ui    ii .it-        i...c province, are truly well named;,their
British Columbia, the country,     has '
been famous for its game atnl fish.
Owing to the quantity ol sea-otter
obtainable on the west coasti of
Vancouver island, a trading post
was established   al Nootka In      thc
The following extracts from
bulletin issued hy the departm
agriculture, dealing with the
ot British Columbia," will be
a late
■ni oi
'Came
humid
year 1778; subsequently the abundance
ot beaver, bear, and other fur-bearing
animals attracted the attention ol
the Northwest companj and its successor, the Hudson's Hay company.
It was entirety due to the value ot
thc lur trade thai British supremacy
became established and thc country's
vast resources in timber, minerals,
etc., were discovered.
During all these years millions of .
dollars' worth of furs have been j
taken away and yel the stock is not
exhausted, while gamo ot all kinds is
still here iu quantity. Owing tn its
topography no other part ofithe con-
tinent is so favored in ihis respect.
Thc area ot the province is, roughly
speaking, 700 miles long by 10(1 miles
wide, and throughout J his enormous
territory there is not a square mile
that does not contain game of some
kind; moreover, 1 hero are miles and
miles ot mountains thai \\\\\ no!
be settled for years to come, and
where  there    will   always bo game
lower parts are pretty densely covered with a growth of "jaeki pine,"
which makes travelling hard.xbut,
owing to a less rainfall, not as bad
as in the Selkirks. After the timber-line, at an altitude of 7,000 to
8,000 teet, they consist of more oi
less bare rock, where the glaciers and
permanent snow are of smaller extent than iu the Selkirks. Morses can
only be used on the trails and can
seldom be taken high into the hunttr
ing country, so that the man who
wishes to get a big-horn, for whieh
thc mountains are especially famous,
must he strong in wind and limb.
The greater portion of this vast
province is still unsettled, some of it
even unexplored, and owing to its
mountainous character will remain So
lor years to come. The consequence
is that, while some species ot game
in certain districts, may have become
scarce, in others they arc as plentiful as ever, while moose have been
steadily increasing for some years
past. Even in the most settled districts careful preservation has had a
wonderful effect, sn that close to
Vancouver, a city ot, 165,000 people,
deer   and bear are commonly killed;
There are three principal ranges ol pheasants actually frequent some of
mountains-,..,,* Coast, ihe Selkirks, |the gardens, and mountain-goats still
and the Rockies-and thoj form Lhe ",|liain on somo ,,f tho neighboring
watershed ol a large number of lakes |mountains.
nt nt which
Fra
and rivers, the
the Columbia
Stfktne rivers.
The   climate    varies
the coast being    more
little frost   and, except
a very light snowfall, to
There is absolutely    no
part    of   the province where      good
Skeeiia and
unsiderahly,
humid, with
in the north,
the east    of
the coast range ol mountains there is
a dry belt, the rain and snow fall be
I sp&rt ot some    kind cannot bo     ob-
jlainod, in fact,   it ia one great game
preserve.
With    the  exception    ol musk-ox
! and antelope,   we   have every species
id game that exists on, tbe continent.
There are even a    lew wood-butfalo
still in existence, while the rarest, ol
ing light,    tho   summers holler, and   other   species are still to be    found
thc winters, while colder, are never
severe or of lengthy duration. Farther to the east, where tho Selkirks
are entered, the snowfall gets heavier
and the COld increases dning the
winter. Tbe climate is healthy
everywhere, in fact, British Columbia
is one;vast health resort, and in the
interior the fall months are especially delightful. Apart from ils sporting attractions, a tew weeks In the
invigorating air id the mountains, or
on the waters ol our coast among the
islands, will prove one of the best
tonics in the world to tbe tired and
weary business man or lo the Invalid
in search of health For mountain
climbers or those interested in botany, geology, etc., there are unlimited resources.
There are no poisonous insects
in fair quantities. In addition, the
Kuropean red deer is to be imported
to add an additional attraction to
those Nature has bestowed with      a
\ In" ish hand. Besides i,nr big gam"
there are ducks, geese, and snipe,
pheasants, grouse nnd quail, sonic iri-
' tiVO, others acclimatized, thai furnish sport for tbe gun, while all our
I waters have   I tout and grayling, and
[ or size and numbers Die salmon-fishing is the best in the world; In fact,
Bo many and varied are lhe sporting
possibilities that it would take years
j io exhaust them.
1 It must, however, be borne in mind
that, while we have plenty of game,
il does not exist in vast quantities,
as it does In Africa. Moreover,
each species of game has ils own
particular range or habitat, and while
reptiles in the mountains, and      any I you may    get one    or two difTerent
mosquitoes or Hies there may be   in kinds from    one   camp, as a general
thc valleys do not Inst long, and are rule    you   have to   move  from   one
always   gone by   the bunting season, place to   another,     so that regular
Good, water can always be obtained hunting-lodges arc not in vogue    and
In    the   dryesl   .parts,   even  in tho living   under    canvas is a necessity.
height of summer.      Ladies can, and Also this   is not a country for       a
frequently do. go into the wilds, and man wishing to  travel with     every
are absolutely   sure id being treated luxury   and a host of servants     to
with the  greatest   respect by      thc wait on him, so that he may    make
roughest of backwoodsmen or most
uncivilized Indian. What is more,
they frequently return with a number,of fine trophies,
Vancouver Island and all the country to the west of tbe coast range is
more or    less   densely limbered, and
big bags at his leisure without exertion. In most places you can be
assured ol all ordinary comforts and
reasonable attention, but the trophies
obtained will to a great extent depend on skill nnd endurance, For the
line sportsman, one who values    his
lhe mountains are steep and arduous trophies for their rarity and ibc me
to climb,    in tho dry bell    on   thc
rtit     side nf tbe const range      Ibc
mountains    run up as higli
morlcs  attached   to tb.* difficulty of
blaming them, this is ,. great eouu-
11,000 .try, und   while he may not get
cord specimens he can generally be
assured ot a number of trophies ot
which he may well be proud.
Muring the last few years it has
been the policy of the government to
preserve the game, and for this purpose stringent game laws have been
enacted and arc being rigidly enforced
for rich and poor alike. There is a
limit of game allowed to be killed,
and shooting one day or one month
before the season opens is an equal
offence. Visitors must not carry
firearms or fishing rods (except when
travelling on a public conveyance)
without, first taking out a license,
| Another point is that under the
1 game laws of the province open or
close seasons may he declared at any
time for any species ot game in any
district. For instance, all birds and
the Coast-deer seasons are opened
yearly, as is considered advisable;
again, wapiti are not allowed to be
shot anywhere in the province at
present, nor are moose in thc Fernie
and Cranbrook districts, or sheep in
Okanagan, Yale and Similkameen.
It is absolutely impossible to keep
this bulletin up to date in these matters, and intending hunters should always inquire carefully beforehand.
Infi rmatlon on these nral other point si
is best obtained direct from the
provincial game warden in Vancouver.
EAST KOOTENAY.
This district can be reached either
by Golden, on the main line of the
C.P.R., or ..Michel, Fernie, or Craa-
hrook, on the Crows Nest, branch, at
my of which places guides and outfits, can be arranged for. ft has thc
greatest variety of game ot any district in the province, as, in addition
to tho famous big-horn sheep, which
reaches its highest stage ot ■development there, there arc moose, wapiti,
mule, and white tailed deer, goats,
black and grizzly bear, arid caribou.
Wapiti are not allowed to be shot,
and thc present close season is liable
lo be extended for a year or two;
when it opens there will he excellent
sport, as these magnificent animals
animals grow horns quite equul to
those- in Wyoming and arc rapidly increasing in numbers. Moose arc fair-
iv plentiful iu the northern portion,
hut as they have been a little tfver-
diot a close season is likely to be
declared at any time. There are still
a fair number ot sheep, but as they
frequent tbe highest peaks, hunting
them is arduous work and should
only he attempted by men ot experience.
Caribou are only found in the Selkirks. Coals and grizzly bear are
rory plentiful, (hough there arc probably more in the Selkirks than
elsewhere.
There are also a good many grouse
and some excellent wildfowl-shooting
in ihe valley of thc Columbia.
The Elk and Fording Rivers are
famous trout-streams, and there are
many other streams aud lakes that
furnish excellent sport.
MOUNTAIN-SHEEP.
Big-horn (Ovis canadensis).—The
big-horn reaches its highest stage of
development in thc Rocky Mountains,
and in South East Kootenay is still
quite plentiful. There used tn be a
good number in parts, ot thc Gold
Range, in the Okanagan, and on the
eastern slope ot the Coast Range, in
Ibe Asbnola Mountains. In both
thesoj districts they have been so decimated that there has been a close
season declared. In Ashnola district
then* has been a large increase, and
ait open season may he allowed in a
year or two.
Moose (Aloes gigas) .—Twenty-five
years ago moose were hardly known,
except in the extreme north of tills
province, and even there they were
scarce. It is probable there have
always been a few of this species in
Fast Kootenay; but, even so, a low
years ago they were thought to be. a
thing of the past. Ot late years
moose have been steadily increasing,
and within thc last live years have
multiplied at such a rate they arc to
be found in numbers all over the
northern portion, and arc again quite
plentiful in Kootenay.
In North Fast Kootenay the hulls
do not run to the size ot those in
Casslar, but some very fair heads
have been obtained there during the
past three open seasons. In this district they stay in the valleys most
of their time, but later in the year,
during October nnd November, must
be looked tor in tbe burnt patches
some distance up the mountainsides.
(►wing to too many bulls having
been killed in Kootenay. another close
season is probable.
Black or Mountain Caribou (Rang*
iter moiilanus).—There is little difference between Ibis and thc above-
mentioned species, except they do not
average such big horns and live on
more or less timbered plateaus. They
nre to be found all through the Selkirk Range from the United States
boundary line, at any rate, up to the
84th degree if altitude. Their range
widens as you go north until it extends from the extreme east ot the
province almost down to the coast.
In thc south tbe best points tn outfit for them are Revelstoke and Golden, on the main line of the C.P.R.;
Mara or Vernon, on the Okanagan
branch; and Cranhrook, on the Crows
Nest line. A fairly good range can
also be reached from Nelson.
In tlie interior tbe best shooting is
generally obtained about Bin-Mile
House, on lhe Cariboo Road, but It
varies a good deal, according to
whether tho numerous lakes and
ponds have sufficient   water.    Other
Means   Nice Hair and a
Clean Scalp.
herpicide
Loss of hair, itching scalp, dandruff
and other forms ot hair trouble al-
/ays cause one to think instinctively
f Newbro's Herpicide.
Grateful relief from various forms
of hair and scalp disorders may invariably be found iu Newbro's llerpi-
cidi*.     Buy il and see.
Newbro's Herpicide has long been
recognized as the most reliable hair
remedy on the market, hacked up by
a guarantee that  means something.
It is the nriglnnl remedy and tho
best.
Recommended and applications
made 1iy the best) barbers and hair
dressers.
Send Htc. postage to The Hcrpicido
Company, Dipt. R., Detroit, Mich.,
for sample and booklet on the Care
id tho Hair.
Xewbro.s Herpicide in 50c. and
J 1.0b sizes is sold by alt dealers
who guarantee It to do all that is
claimed. If you are hot satisfied
your monev will be   refunded,
good places are: The Columbia Valley, in East Kootenay (reached Irom
either Golden or Cranbronk), Salmon
Arm, Savonas, Okanagan Ijanding,
Nicola;and Kootenay Landing.
COLUMBIA    SHARP   -    TAILED
GROU.SE   (COMMONLY CALLED PRAIRIE CHICKEN).
These birds are only found to the
east ot thb Coast Range. They had
fairly numerous in certain places, a"d
in October and November, when they
begin to get, wild and fly last, afford
splendid sport. There is generally
some good shooting to be got at
various places along the Cariboo
Road and some parts of tbe Okanagan district, as well as in Kamloops,
Similkameen and Cranbrook districts.
Now, with regard to thc best
places to hunt them, the heads ot
any of the long inlets on the coast
are good, but it is generally advisable to get some little distance back
trom the sea. In the interior ail
along the eastern slope ot the Cascades grizzly are to be found; Lytton,
Lillooet, and Hope are three of the
best outfitting places. In the spring
the Selkirks and the Rockies are good
almost anywhere, and you can outfit
at any of the following places: Revelstoke, Golden, Nelson, Kaslo,
Cranbjook, Fernie and Michel. In the
fall, when the salmon arc running,
until, actua-ly on the coast, the
outfit at Quesnel, Barkcrvlllc, or
Fort George-,
Grizzly Bear (Ursus horribilis).—
There are but few places on the
mainland where there is not a chance
of running across* a grizzly, but they
are never found on Vancouver Island, or any of the other islands. In
the Selkirks and Rockies they are of
medium size, and arc generally of the
silver-tip color when in full pelage,
and are then the choicest ot all
grizzlies; they also have the long
blunt claws, and their main habitat
is fairly high in the mountains, seldom, being seen in the valleys, except
in the north, where they come down
to fish salmon. As you get nearer
the coast they appear to increase in
size and become of browner color,
until, actually on the coast, the
grizzly bear has a strong resemblance to the northern brown bear ot
the Alaskan coast. These coast
grizzlies also differ from those of
the interior in that they live a great
deal in thc valleys, and are occasionally to be met with on thc saltwater beaches.
The Lillooet district is without
doubt the best on the continent tor
this species, and they are still increasing there. The Okanagan district is again well stocked, while
Similkameen, Grand Forks, Kamloops, and Kootenay alt afford good
hunting; in tact, there is not now
much of the southern interior where
fair sport may not he obtained.
While-tailed Deer (Odocoileus vir-
glnianus).—These deer are chiefly
confined to lhe bottom lands and
low-lying hills to the east of thc
Coast Range nnd south of the main
line ol the C.P.R. A tew years ago
their numbers were greatly diminished, and in many places where they
once abounded they have bad to retire owing to the advance ot settlement. However, during the past
year or two they have made a wonderful recovery in Kootenay, nnd in
the south-eastern part of that district, along the line of the Crows
Nest railway, they are now more
plentiful than ever.
Studebaker
(E-M-F)
"30"
Studebaker
(Flanders)
"20"
EDUCATIONAL CONGRESS.
Sun Francisco, Mar. 12.—A congress nl university students, representing III different nations Irom all
quarters ol thc globe, will lie hold at
tlie I'nnama-I'ncilic International Ex-
'position at Man Francisco in 1015,
Papers will be read by leading members of the world universities on
topics ol social, economic, political,
educational and religions Interest.
The congress, which will lust several
days, will he al tended by men and
women and will he non-seclariiin,
broad mid liberal in Its outlook and
treatment.
The World's Best Medium-
Priced Cars
To say that the Studebaker "20" and "30" models are the best medium-
priced cars in the world may sound like an extravagant statement, but we
mean every word of it.   We know it is true.
More than 100,000 Studebaker owners bear out our statements. So
universal an endorsement is an argument beyond question. When 100,000
people agree you can be absolutely sure.
The time has come when in a Studebaker "20" or "30" a man can invest his money as confidently as he can in a government bond. He is as
sure of satisfaction as he is in the purchase of a standard watch or other
well made machine.  You take no chance in buying a Studebaker.
The "30" is a big, roomy car of handsome appearance, fully equipped
and fitted with four-inch tires and electric lights. Now full nickel trimmed,
it has the appearance of cars selling at double the price.
The "20" is a Canadian car whose design exemplifies the best automobile practice the world over. In public performance and trials of all kinds
three qualities of this car have been repeatedly demonstrated. These are
Speed, Power, Hill Climbing and Reliability.
iSSI
Studebaker (E-M-F) "30"-$1375
MODELS AND PRICES
Studebaker "20" Touring $ 950
Studebaker "30" Touring   1,375
Studebaker "20" Delivery  1,000
PRICES P.O.B. WALKERVILLE. ONT.
\        W. H. WILSON
\ Dealer for Cranbrook, B. C
 . ♦
The \
Studebaker   **,&
Corporation, ^q..
Walker-wile, Ont.   \\
Please tend me catalogue      %
ahowing your can.
Addre»„
10 THE MID
REMARKABLE    HINDU   LAD   IS
LOOKKI) UPON    AS   REINCARNATION OK CHRIST
-COMING TO. AMERICA .SOON.
Soon there is coming to America a
sixteen-year-old boy with a. remarkably beautiful lace whom thousands
ot men and women will hail with reverence.
For this lad, Krishnamurti, otherwise known as Alcyone, is believed to
be a new Messiah, a bring through
whom the Spirit ol Christ will inani-
fest Himself to this generation and
century.
The theory of Theosophists, and
the followers of the higher Buddhism,
accept is, that at long, rare intervals, one of tlu; great Spirits visits
earth and reincarnates himself in
some human body. At one period
this Spirit was known as Confucius,
at another as Buddha; at another as
Christ; at another as Mohamet. From the fastnesses of the Himalayas, where reside the "Masters of Wisdom" (initiates who have delved deep into occult knowledge, and thus achieved
spiritual clairvoyance), the message
lias come forth that some such great
soul is due here ugain, that he may
even be ln the llesh now, preparing
for his manifestation and for the
great work he is to accomplish for
our generation. These initiates are
as the Wise Men ol the East to whom
the star foretold the coming of
Christ lo Bethlehem, and their pre
diction, given forth sixteen years
ago, created i, sensation among
those who believe such illelu super
naturally inspired.
That the body Into whieh this
spirit has lieen horn is actually
Krishnamurti, the initiates do nol
definitely declare, but because ol the
extraordinary spiritual gilts and
wonderlul intuition be has displayed
since childhood they believe thai 11
ho is not the new .Messiah he is destined, like St. .lohn the Baptist, to
prepare tlie world for his coming.
The hoy was horn in Northern India, and by reason of the genius lie
early manifested, those who sought
the realization ol the "Master's"
prediction concluded thnt he was the
lookod-for manifestation. The initiates began their mystic investigations and traced bis previous reia- t
carnations through thirty-one births ;
iind existences. Tbis information,
sifting through lhe Indian world,
was brought to the attention ol the
Thcosopblsls nnd others who have
accepted tbe philosophy ot the higher
I Buddhism, and at once this chief became the center of their thoughts and
j hopes.
As if to accentuate their strange
belief, the boy, at twelve—significant
agt—after studying English for a
very few months wrote a hook. It
is called "At the Feet of the Master." It is declared that no one, be
he Christian, Buddhist, .lew, or Mohammedan, can read this strangely
simple, lucid, and beautiful exposition of thc true rule of conduct for
attaining spiritual consciousness
without realizing its vital significance
and the extraordinary quality of the
mind that gavo it birth. A year after
publication it was translated into
fourteen different languages, and
today it is the creed ot those who believe tbat Krishnamurti may really
be prophet ol the Way, the Truth and
the Life.
Today tho boy, witb his brother,
Nitayanda, is living in luxurious se-
elusion at the country home of Laxly
Do Lai Warr in Sussex, England.
There they are being most carefully
educated in science, literature, languages, and economics—in all the learning of both east and west—so that
when the time comes Krishnanvurti
may go forth equipped to dispute if
necessary with the doctors, and in all
tongues "bring the Message of Peace
and Brotherhood, thc dominant
thought, which the Masters of Wisdom say the new Christ Is to teach
through Alcyone when he returns to
the earth."
One muyi sense the remarkable
holies centered in Krishnamurti by
limiting from tlie sworn statements
in a suit now pending before a district judge in Chinglepllt, Madras. A
Hindu government pensioner seeks to
regain from the celebrated Mrs. Annie llesanl, his two nous, Krishnamurti and Nitayanda, It wan Mrs.
llesanl. who discovered the lads, and
won the lather's consent to take
thorn to England. In a very singular legal document Died In court, the
father declares that last year the
boys were inuking rupid spiritual progress, "and were approaching initiation by thc masters." He also submits that Mrs. Ilesaat "has lieen
stating, thnt the lirst hoy wlm is
named Alcyone, is, or is going to be
Lord .lesiis * * ' with thc result thai the hoy Is deilled, and that ,
a number of respectable persons
prostrate belore bllil, and show other signs of worship."
Mrs. Bcsanl has answered in a significant way.
Thc boy is not deified," she answers, "but is a happy, healthy lad,
fond of tennis and rowing. It Is
true that respectable people have
prostrated themselves before him,
but," she insists, "It was his father
who began it two years ago"
ENCOURAGEMENT      TO     MAR.
RIAGE.
The controllers ol Hamilton, Ont.,
set a precedent recently when they
bonusscd a man lor entering tile
marriage state. ,They gave S. Mc-
Mullin, a former employee oi the International Harvester company,
$5.50 for taking unto himself a bride
in April of- ltlll. It was in tbis
way that tbe premium was placed ou
Ihe blessed state. Mr. McMulllo
was drawing i960 from the Harvester company in 1911, and as he was
a bachelor, only $600 ot that was
exempt from taxation. In April,
1011, he married and moved to Fort
William, and at the regular time received a tax paper Irom Collector
Kerr, oi Hamilton, ior $7.66 taxes
on his income over $600. Ho wrote
a letter- asking for a refund as ho
had been married in that city ln
1911. Assessment Commissioner
Maclcod recommended that a proportionate amount be refunded, based
on the $7.56 for one year and deducting a portion of it equal to nine-
twelfths of it, as Mr. McMullin was
married lor thc last nine months ol
IOU. "We should encourage marriage," said Controller Cooper. The
other members thought so
loo and Tax Col
lector Kerr was Instructed to relund
$5.50. Thc world surely "do" move
and yet, after all while this may be
"lhe hist time a man has been bonusscd in the way hero set down the
■proposition that bachelors should be
municipally encouraged to become
benedicts is no new one.
»        «
WESTERN  LUMBER FREIGHT
RATES.
According to recent reports from
Western Canada It Is expected that
Ibe milling of thc Dominion board of
railway commissioners in connection
with the cwiiiiiv into western
height rates will Include an adjustment of the lumber tariff, amounting
lo a reduction In tbe rates. Tbe
chief alteration expected is in the
form of a concession making a uniform rate for a uniform! mihsrgn.
This would enable shippers on a Private line to secure the same rate as
those on tho main line, on shipment
covering an equal distance. It Is
thought that this concession will be
grunted and II such is the case the
lumber Industry will be benefited
greatly.
'«
WANTED.-A general Mrraat. Apply Mrs, G, A. Leitch, Armstrong
avenue. 6-U
Electric Restorer for Men
PhoSDllOtlol mtoraa .very nerve la th. bod.
villi snd vitality. Preaiature decay snd sllseansl
wp-aknMS .veiled at enca. thapepaum., will
make you a new man. Price Jfl. boa, or two for
.ft, Mailed to anv sitdteas. th. ■o.b.U Dryag
t:o„U.CMIaarisM.0at.
For al* at Bnttia-Murpkf Co., Ltd. THE   OBANBUOOK   HERALD
{M
No Other Hosiery
Offers This
rFoot-clothinij that fits with absolute perfection I
'reasons you will readily see if you'll glance nt the
/picture here   . . the only hose made thnt is perma-,
f nently shaped to the foot and leg, and that is both '
[Seamless and Snug-Fitting!
3'rf,U,hW.°l,,li1"" "link 0,f,b.u»1»« '™» wl«h a seum .1,1 the front
[ bscatw, you didn't know  there wns a kind free torn S
■.tan get the better kind In any weight or color if 1
buy hosiery made by
Penmans Limited
P«"» Canada
Did.rw.ar,   Sweeten,   Bealary
a
TiillAahioned
1 Seamless
HOSIERY
THE PROVINCIAL
ELECTIONS ACT
AN ACT TO   AMEND THE "
VINCIAL ELECTIONS
ACT."
His majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the legislative ns-<
sombly of the province ot Itittish Columbia, enacts as follows"
1. This act may Ik1 cited -As the
"Provincial Elections Act Amendment Act, 1913."
2. Section 4 of the "Provincial
Elections Act," being chapter 72 of
Uie "Reevised Statutes of British Pnn_t_b>!
Columbia, 1911," is hereby amended
by striking out tho last live lines
thereof.
3. Section 7 of said chapter 72 is
hereby repealed, and the following is
substituted therefor: "7. Chinamen, Japanese, Hindus, ■ and Indians
are disqualified and prohibited from
voting at any election and from making application to have their names
inserted in any register of voters."
4. Subsection (1) of section 11 of
said chapter 72 and section 3 of chapter 9 of the statutes of 1912 are
hereby repealed, and the following Is
substituted therefor: "11. (1). The
lieutenant-governor in council shall
appoint for each electoral district, or
'or any polling or polling divisions of j
an electoral district, a person to be
registrar of voters, and among other j
duties it shall br the duty of thc registrar: j
"(a). To furnish to any one applying for the same any of the
first three forms in the schedule hereto, without charjqe:
"(b). To receive horn any person
offering the same a sworn, affidavit in
writing in support or nn application
to vote in the Form A. in (Ik*- schedule hereto, and l„ insert the name
of such person in a list of persons
claiming to vote, which list shall bo
•posted in the office ol such registrar, and a copy thereof shall he
placed in some conspicuous place on
the outside of the door of such office;
and such list shall bo according to
Korm l>. in the schedule hereto
"The registrar shall nol insert the
name of any person upon such list un
lew the- said Form A. as furnished in
accordance with this act, and shows
such person to he entitled to, be
placed on the register of voters: Provided, however, that a iniiiister "[
the crown shall, on application and
without any affidavit in supporl
thereof, hi* entitled to have his name
less than three conspicuous places
within the district for which, or for
the polling division whereof, he shall
havo been appointed."
ft. Said section 11 is hereby
j further amended hy striking out all
I tho words after the word "objection"
.in tho last senlence ol sub-section '
j (a) of subsection (2); and by sub- I
stitilting the following for siihsee-
j tion (5): "(5). In the case of the '
first register of voters, the same
made up as above, shall he certified
to by the said registrar, and forwarded forthwith to the provincial
secretary, who may order the same
to be printed, ami the said register
of voters shall he the list used al
any election which may take place
before tbo next revision has been
completed"; and by siibslitutii.g the
following for the last nine words of
subsection (ti): "to the provincial
secretary, and    the   same may      he
total districts or polling divisions,
and io he advertised, for such nine
as may he directed by the Lieutenant-
governor in council, in a newspaper
or newspapers published aud circulating in such electoral districts respectively, oi- jf |l(( newspaper be
published in any electoral district,
then in a newspaper published in tin-
province and circulating in such electoral district.
(2). No application ami no affidavit shall be received or accepted by
any registrar i,f voters or be eon-
sideied at any court of revision unless il he made ami daU-d snh-
Bequently to Hie third day of March,
1918.
(3), Notwithstanding anything in
this section contained, the voters'
lists hy this act cancelled shall he
lhe lists nf inters to he used at any
election thai may he held prioi to
I tho certification and printing of the
first register ol voters prepared undei
authorltj of this act,
12. Notwithstanding Un* cancellation ol tho voters' list as provided
J for in the next preceding section, the
persons who on the date of the passing of this act are commissioners
| by virtue of their appointment under
section IU of said chapter 72 shall
continue to he commissioners until
tho iliirly-iirsl day of December,
UM.'J; and after the passing of ihis
act tlw lieutenant-governor in council
may appoint any person who is a
Hritish subject, and whose name is
on any register of voters that is cancelled pursuant to this act, to he a
commissioner for the purpose men-
| tinned in said Section 19 until the
said thirty-first day of December,
the lieutenant-   al use.
Vice-Admiral Sir Percy Scott,-lhe
famous gunnery expert, has invented,
and the'British admiralty, after long
and severe trial, has adopted an apparatus'for improving naval gunnery,
hy which astonishing results have
been attained. The gear, known as
a "lire director," was fitted in the
super-drnadnoiightf ."Thunderer,"
armed with ten 13.5-inch guns, and
this vessel carried out a series of
comparative tests with a sister ship,
the "Orion," fitted with the "lire
control" system   previously in gener-
her
after sec
order of
governor- in council."
ti. Said chapter 72 i
or amended by addin
11 the following:
| "11a. If the registrar holding a
court of revision entertains a douhl
as to whether any application to he
placed on the voters' list sliocild' he
accepted, or if he is not satisllcd
with the evidence produced us to the
[nationality of tin* npplicanl or as
to his having become a naturalized
subject, he may on reasonable notice
'require such applicant tn appear he
i fore him in person for tin* purpose of
'proving his right to he placed on the
register of voters; and if the applicant does not produce satisfactory
proof or fails to appear at the time
and place mentioned in the notice,
his application may he struck out,"
7. Section IB of said chapter VI is
hereby repealed, and the following is
substituted therefor: "19, The lieutenant governor in council may appoint any person who is a Hritish
subject, and whose name is nn the
register of voters prepared under ihe
provisions of this act, as a Provincial Election Commissioner (or a
limited period, without payment of
any fee, for the purpose of taking Ihe
affidavits provided for in subsection
(1) (b) of section il hereof m the
electoral district in which he resides, but no tee shall In* charged [or
taking such affidavit."
8    The next preceding section shall
come into    effect on   tin
day of ivconiber, 1913.
Firing in rough weather at
a range   of   10,000 yards,   at ;ni or-
hy furth-   dinary battle-practice target (99 feet
said
said
placed on the register of voters tor
any one electoral district in tlte
province.
"Any person, i ther than the
registrar, who shall remove
cause to he removed from the
office, or from the said door, the said
list or'any part thereof shall he
liable to a penalty of nol less thnu
five dollars or mole than fifty dollars for each offence, to he recovered
on complaint of any person under the
provisions of the "Summary Convictions Act."
The said list of persons elniming to
vote shall Ik* suspended from and after the first Monday in April and October of each year, and all application to vote received after the
said first Monday in April and October shall be held over until after the
courts of revision provided for in
subsection (c) hereof respectively,
when they shall he posted up as provided In subsection (b) liereof:
"(c). To hold a court of revision
or* the third Monday of May and
November In each and every year, of
which ono month's notice shall be
given by him; such notice shall he
published in the Gazette, and copies
of such notice shall he posted In the
office of such registrar, and on tho
door of the principal court house of
the electoral   district,   and t»    not
long and 30 feet high) the most extraordinary results were obtained,
tin* "Thunderer" making four times
as many hits as tho "Orion," the
average of the former vessel being
eighty per cent of hits to rounds fired. The tests were carried out in
Ihe presence of a large committee of
naval officers, including Ueai-Admiral
Peirse, an ex-inspector of target
practice; Hear-Admiral Hrowning,
the present inspector, and a large
staff of specially selected naval gunnery experts. As a result of the
tests it has been decided to lit the
apparatus to all ships of thc dreadnought type at an estimated cost of
$2,500,000, while the inventor of the
system has heen honored with a baronetcy.
The greatest precautions have been
taken by the Hritish admiralty to
prevent the details of the new system from being made public, ami
this is very .significant when it is
recalled that nil previous inventions
of Sir Percy Scott have been patent-
ted, and, therefore, published, ln its
essential features, however, the "lire
director" resembles a similar apparatus whieh was in use in the muzzle-
loading era when many of the battleships which were built carried from
six to a dozen heavy guns of the
same caliber. This was invented by
Capt. Moorsom, of the Hritish navy,
thirty-first and, to quote from a work on "Naval
Gunnery," hy Capt. Garbett, was an
Section 2ii of said chapter 72 is
hereby repealed, and the following is
substituted Iheivfoi: "20, Registers
of voters for any doctoral district
shall, when printed, he fuii.ished by
the King's Printer for the sum of
twenty-five cents each. Written cop.
les of the register ol voters, or anj
part thereof, shall he furnished hy
thc registrar of voters for the sum
oG twenty-five cents per one hundred
words."
19.    Form I>. in the schedule      in
said chapter 72 is struck out, and the
following is substituted therefor:
FOKMi    OF   1.1ST   OF   PERSON'S passing along   directions 1
CLAIMING TO VOTIv
In the Kleelorn)   District (or
Polling Division of
the .Sectoral District),
apparatus "by means of which the
hearing and distance of the target
and the heel of the tiring ship were
all determined, and the guns laid
accordingly; it was generally fixed
on the upper deck, over the center
main-deck gun, or other convenient
position, and the signal or order to
tire hy.thc officer attending it as
soon as lm found the object coming
on with his sights." Many scientific
and mechanical advances have, of
course, been made since this apparatus was invented in 1850. Instead ot
the officer in charge of the "director"
the cap-
sains of the guns by word of mouth,
he directs the guns himself electrically under Admiral Scott's system;
and instead or giving "an order or
■ —  [signal to lire,"   he fires himself    by
1. lilack, .lames Andrew, Parson's pressing a button aud completing     a
Bridge, mason. | circuit.       All    that   the guns' crew
2. Doe, John,     Sooke River, Sec.  have to do is to clean out the   guns
47, Sooke District, farmer, {after each   round    and to load them
3. Roe,     Richard     Samuel,     I It!   for the next.
Royal Avenue, Ks^iituall, bank clerk. | It has been stated that the "Thun-
Ete. | deter,"     while undergoing the tests,
 ; fired   several concentrated and sitnul-
N.    H.-Insert Christian name nnd,*aneous    broadsides.      It is   under-
suri.an.r- at full length, residence and  stood, however, that  the Scott   ap-
profession, trade or calling. Iparatus is    such that there is a mo
ll.    (1). On   the     third day      of  mentary    interval   of   time between
March,
voters'
1913,   the present authorized , tho firing    ot   ™ch    P«*ir   of turret
lists shall he cancelled,    and  R»ns, so that thc structure   of    the
thereafter   shall not, except as bete-  sbJP Is not    called upon to bear
inafter   mentioned,   be   used at any
election to  be held    in the province;
and on the passing of this a«'l the registrars  of   voters   for thc different
electoral districts or polling divisions 'elevated position on the foremast, as
shall forthwith cause notices in the in the case of the lire control np-
form In tlie schedule hereto, or lo the paralus. The obvious drawback,
like effect, to be posted in conspicu- to the. system is that if one shot
OH places   In their   rcsiHt'tLve eke-   misses the whole must miss, but   o„
the
absolutely simultaneous discharge   of
ten guns, each   with a muzzle-energy
of 60,000 foot-tons.
The fire-director Is situated in    an
PROVINCIAL ELECTIONS ACT
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the List of Voters of th,.
CRANBROOK ELECTORAL DISTRICT has been cancelled, ami
Unit implications to be plucml on tin- Voters' List will be received nl
my office, at the Government Buildings nt Cranbrook, where printed
forms of affidavit to be used in support of nn application to vote will
be supplied.
The List of Voters olaiqiing lo vote will be suspended from nml
after the Seventh day of April. 1913, and a Court of Revision will be
held on the Xini'teeiilli day of .May. and notice of objections lo I lm
insertion of any name on the Register of Voters must be given tome
thirty i-lenr duys before tin; holding of the Court of Revision.
A. O, NELSON,
Registrar "f Voters for the Cranbrook Electoral District,
Dated this-llli day of .March. II11H
SYMPTOMS OF CONSUMPTION
Yield to Vinol.
The medlenl profession do not believe that uonauinptlon In inherited,
but a person may iuherlt a weakuemj
or tendency in thai disease.
A pronifneiit citizen of Evansvllle,
Ind,, writes: "i was ill for five
immihs with pulmonary trouble, and
had the best or doctors; I had hemorrhages aud was in a very bad way.
Through the advice of a friend I tried
Vlnol, and 1 feel that It saved my
life. It is all you recommend It to
he. I believe it Id the greatest medicine on earth. 1 have advised others
to try Vlnol, and they have had the
same results." (Name furnished on
request.)
Vlnol aoothes and heals the Inflamed
surfaces and allays the cough. Vlnol
creates an appetite, strengthens the
digestive organs and gives the patient
strength to throw off Incipient pulmonary diseases.
Try a bottle or Vlnol with tho understanding that your money will be
returned   IC  it  does  not  help you.
Cranbrook Drug and Hook Co.,
Cranbrook, B.C.
the oilier hand, if one strikes home
nine others, or as many others as
the no may be on the broadside, strike
home as well, and the ship has not
yet been built whieh could stand the
attack of ten 1.250-potind shells simultaneously. The thorough tests
carried out hy the British admiralty
(how that four out ol every five
broadsides can be depended on to
reach the target.
NOTICE.
Thc Campbell Realty Company «.
Winnipeg, Man., will let a contract
for the clearing and stumping of li,
acres and tbe building ot two road
:iU feet wide; to he cleared and grad
ed through their property known a
Cranbrook Orchards, The roads ari
approximately two miles long. Tin
25 acres to he cleared and slumped n
time for spring planting.
Money to be paid on approval o
work of our representative, Mr
■James Laidlaw. The lowest or an J
tender not necessarily accepted.
The blue print of the proposci
work, can be seen at Bcalo and 121
well's office.
Address all communications li
.1. Wells, care Campbell Realty l
pany, 745 Somerset Building, W
peg, Man. 1
11
FOR SALE.-S. C. iff. Leghorn
cockerels and roosters. Apply* Box
526, Cranbrook. 10-lt*
FOR SALE OX EASY TKHMS.-
Six roomed modern residence on
Garden avenue; $300 cash and balance as rent. Delivery .lime 1st
next. A snap.—Care Box J., the
Herald. 10-tf
COAL AM) PETROLEUM NOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY CIIVEN that
thirty days after dale I intend to
apply to the Chief Commissioner ol
Lands and to the Assistant Commissioner of Lauds for the District ol
East Kootenay for a license to pros
pcet for coal and petroleum on the
following described lands, situate on
the North Fork of Michel Creek,
about six miles north of the Canadian Pacific Railroad and lying be
twecn the Mclnnes Oroup and the
Crows Nest Pass Coal Companj 's
land:
Commencing at a post planted at
A. E. Wayland's northeast, corner,
same being the initial post of R- O.
Belden's claim, and marked "R. C.
Belden's northwest corner"; thence
80 chains south; thence SO chains
east; thence 80 chains north; thence
80 chains west to place of beginning,
rontaining 640 acres, more or less.
Located January 21, 1913.
R. O. Relden. Locator,
Batlce Lameroux, Agent, ft-fit
TO RENT
Large Basement Warehouse, 20 x 100 ft.
Very warm and dry. $7.00 per month if
rented for 3 months or more. Apply at
Herald Office. tf
m
***********
ROYAL BANK OF CANADA \
Incorporated 1S69 ♦
HEAD OFFICE  -  MONTREAL, QUEBEC %
Capital Paid Up $11,500,000        Reserve $13,500,000 J
IL 8. HOLT, President      E. L. PEASE, General Manager I
Accounts of Firms, Corporations and Individuals solicited. ]
Out-of town biiHiness receives eveiy attention. 4
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT-Deposite of $1.00 and upwards received J
and interest allowed at current rate.   No formality or delay in f
withdrawing. J
A Genera! Banking Business transacted. ♦
Cranbrook Branch : T. Ii. O'CONNELL, Manager ♦
*****************
***********
*
A Good   Home
is what is ilear to every man. A home
is where Peace, Comfort, Contentment.
11ml Plenty is fouml. That is tho reason
men throughout British Columbia, when
"Cranbrook" is mentioned think of the
provisions Jos. Brault has made for an
ideal home at the
Canadian Hotel f
*********************************************
***************
*
**********************
If You Want
Your house connected with tlie new sewerage system,
PHONE H40. Our work guaranteed. Estimates of cost
cheerfully given.
• i The Cranbrook Plumbing, Tinsmilhirtg
emd Heating Company
W. F. JOHNSON, Proprietor
P. 0. BOX 004 WOKKfi: EDWARD ST.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIH EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., I.L.D., D.C.I.., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD JOHN AIRD
General Manager Aaalatant General Manager
CAPITAL, $15,000,000 REST, 812,500,000
FARMERS' BUSINESS
The Canadian Bank of Commerce extends to Farmers every
facility for the transaction of their banking business, including
the discount and collection of sales notes. Blank sales notes
arc supplied free of charge on application. a5
R. T. Brymner, Manager Cranbrook, B. C.
♦♦*♦♦«♦'.♦♦*«•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦ it ,..>♦♦♦,>
Imperial Bank of Canada
MBAU OPPICEi TORONTO
CAPITAL AUTHORIZED
CAPITAL SUBSCRIBED
CAPITAL PAID UP      -
RESERVE FUND
TOTAL ASSETS
$10.000,000.0,0
6,620,000.00
fp.t.85.000.00
o.ooi.OOO 00
572.000,000.00
I). It. IV1LKIK, I're.Ulenl.
HON. ROBERT JAFFRA?, V'ice.Proaldenl
Accounts   of   Corporations.   Municipalities,    Merchants
Farmers and Private Individuals invited.
Drafts an,; Letters of Orexlil issued available in anv part of
tho world.
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT     Special   attention
given to Savings Hunk Accounts.    Deposits p>f $1.00   and
♦   upwards received and interest allowed from date of deposit.
♦    Cranbrook Branch: H. W. SUPPLE, Mgr.
♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦**********************
»««,»«• + •   •♦♦«■»♦.":
***********
FRUIT   TREES
Buy HEALTHY HONE GROWN TREES
No iJitugir i>f importing ptmi*   :;    . jury trom famtgation
No drying out iti ..'ti>.- nl *:i.r.'trtHH
AND THERE IS NO DANGER OF WINTER  KILLING
All »iur tr**« nr» wintered in Croat-] rooi cellare
Therefore prot^yooraell by baying our trw*   \\ * te lor Catalogue
and Price List v-
THE RIVERSIDE NURSERIES
DEPT. B, GRAND FOKK.-. B.C.
Batobliaswd 1&pppi    On* baBdnd imp] twenty lire pi, res
Representative: F. H. WORTHINOTON
X. li.-w* hipve DWARF stook ia SI. Intonh Ited. Wealthy, Jonathan, Coi'a
Grange, iintAn.i. Northern Spy pii.pi Wajpsner
*********************************************1
f-'SKSSSi
UP=T0-DATE METHODS —
SiXTEE.N YEARS' EXPERIE.NCE
Art- tie r^affinfi for my irtvat *arv«* in )\ -\ .*,w» < f men.
I keep abr**B*t ol the tlm^* and adopt ererr nea method
.hit baa prored rarceatfol Thip explaiaa why I amiii'-
oldttt apecfalitt in stiokaii*- amj hat*- ben Inr eerev years
in the atmie location. No r<iK tnrn«l away, utileM ii ie In-
curable. I vTfii'i.mcfii'-Ti Thar r,tb*>r*» bare failed to i* Hi ■•-
.My own apodal m- tboda   nre wbere otben f«i!.
Visit Our Free
Anatomical Museum
OUmUSTRATED BOOKLET
FOR THE ASKING \
If you .tmnot vi-it m- pmooaUj. do an hundred* d!
oihtr-t haw .lore UD.J an- doing, tt n*> me full detalU ol
your rafift ,.i,t] I will prescribe ror treatmantj tbat ara
guaranteed to care ererj ■■/.«> that if not Ineorable.   No
cure— nj p«y.
DR  KELLEY
210 Howard St.
SPOKA.NE, Wash.
An Opportunity for a
Reliable Man in
Cranbrook
We have some Gilt Edged Original Prairie Townsltea
(not uub-divisions), which appeal to the intelligent investor, and we intend to put on fin extensive advertising campaign in CRANBROOK as soon jib we complete arrangements with it first-class man, who can follow up inquiries,
Wc mail tin* district thoroughly. Tlu; right man who will
apply himself can make this u permanent and very profitable position. Apply H, W. McOnrdy, 502 Temple Build-
ing, Toronto,
A*************      a**************
Fruit
Trees
Ornamental
Shrubs
COLDSTREAM ESTATE NURSERIES
VERNON, B. C.
ALL STOCK OFFERED FOR KALE GROWN
IN OUB OWN NURSERIES
P. DE VERE HUNT, Local Ajrent
Phone 139 Cranbrook, B. C.
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
* TIIK   CItAN BROOK HERALD
LIBERALS
ATTENTION!
The Voters' Lists have been cancelled, and all must register
before APRIL 7th.
THE LIBERAL CLUB ROOMS
OVER LESTER CLAPP'S STORE
will be open from io a.m. to io
p.m. until April 7th, where Commissioners will be ready at all
times to take your application.
aw 	
CKANI.I'ODIC HERALD
Hr tin" Herald   Publishing Company,
K. .1. Deane, Managing Editor.
CRANBROOK, B.C., March 13th, 1913
anil
EOliCHIAL NOTES
A carrful stmlv of the new nrnviii-
eiol elections act, which is printed in
full elsewhere in this issue, shows
more plainly thai this net is one of
the greatest outrages ever perpetrated upon ihe people nf this province.
Every analysis shows Unit tli,. whole
tiling is a doop-lntd am! long-studied
scheme upon the pari of (he government to defeat tlir will of the electorate. Never before in Ctonadn has
political trickery and dishonesty descended to such a depth, Evory care
scd tn Frame this
i way that the paid
nservativcfl through-
• «ill secure    every
ow lists, and at the
Liberal and
vernmcnl of    the
has- been oxerci
measure in such .
army of Die I'm
out the provliici
voto on the now
same time deprive -
opponent   ot the go.
right of franchise.
The Vancouver Sun says:
'"Past experience shows that it has
been thc practice ol tho Conservative machine to file objections to the
retention of Ihe names of many Liberals who were duly qualified, trusting that they would not appear al
the court of revision, in which case
their names were struck off the list.
As a matter of fact when an objection was filed the onus was on the
party to whom the objection was
mado lo assert, his right to vote.
■This law si ill remains, bul under tbe
old act the Liberal organisation was
ifcblc to examine the lists a reason
able time before the court was held
and could thus lo a great extent de
feat the machinations of ils opponents, Now the lists arc held us absolute government property until il
Is too late for Ibc opposition organization to take any ncliun. Thc result will be that many persons, particularly in the rural districts, either through indifference, or because of
living     too    remote Irom the regis
trar's    office,     will not   appear
their names will be struck off,
"The Liberal organization, kept, in
Hit* dark as it, will be, is quite helpless, while the government with tine
lists in its possession and with hundreds of officials who depend upon its
bounty, to do its world, will be able
at the propct time to drum up every
supporter it can rely upon."
RESUME)   OF     ACT    TO AMEND
"PROVINCIAL    ELECTIONS
ACT," 1013, WITH COMMENTS THEREON.
1. By section 11, sub-section 1, Ol
this amended act the present voters
lists are cancelled, and from tbis
dale (March 3rd) the province is entirely without a voter's list ol any
description, subject to tho exception
in next paragraph referred to.
2. By sub-section 3 of section U,
il is -provided that the present voter's list, which by this act is cancelled, shall be used should any election take place before the new voter's list lias been compiled and certified and piiuled. In the usual
course the new voter's list should
he compiled and printed within a few
■k.s after the court ol revision is
held in the month 0f May. Should
an election, Dominion or provincial,
take place before tbey are printed
then the old list would be used. The
printing of the new lists will be in
ihe hands of the provincial secretary
without any   restrictions as to time,
Going Up!
Real KHtute values climb higher
every day- It will pay von to invent now; then yon can bcI] to nood
iidviintjiu'"' later, ronliidng a hand-
Home profit
"Back to thc Land"
etc, The' result is that should an
election take place this summer tlie
government could survey ibe situa-
iiuii and if it suited their purposes
they could delay tbe printing and use
lhe ohl lists or if the'new lists
would better serve their purpose
they could expedite the prinling and
make use of them.
3. It will be noted from lhe above
Uiat should an elcctlan be held Ihis
slimmer thc old lists might possibly
be used; yet there is no opportunity
oE revising it at the approaching
May court, nor will the thousands ol
electors throughout tho province
who have in their tegular way filed
applications since last November find
themselves entitled to exercise Unfranchise.
■L By sectic/n II, sub-section 2 ol
the act, as amended, every individual
In the province entitled to the franchise, even though he may have made
application a few months or a tow
weeks before, must again make ttnil
file a new application. There is no
provision for the opening of application booths in various parts of each
electoral district. All applications
will have io ha filed witb the single
registrar of voters in each electoral
district.
5. In order io be on the new voter's list for the May revision so that
electors may be sure of having    the
is a cry thai
these duyf.   V
lose by tire or t
in Ileal Kstatc.
Tall
The
ty are heeding
know yon can't
res if von invest
about it.
ment with their army of officials    in
every nook and    corner iu tlie prov*
, inoe,    practically all of whom      are
I commissioners, although paid lo    do
[other workt,    will, we know-,      from
past experience,     devote their exclusive attention   to this    work, giving
their party!    a tremendous advantage
in obtaining registration.     As above
slated,   under this amendment     this
new list may be ,used should an election take   place   this year if it suits
tlicir   purpose to do so.      A greater
outrage can scarcely be conceived.
ii. ScctlOE*(5 of the act as amended deals with the handling of objections to the list of voters as compiled after each revision iu May and
November. Under the old act any
elector could file an objection lo the
retention of the name ol any person
on the voter's list who had not the
necessary qualifications. These ob-
Jcctlons have been numerous in the
past, and will bo equally numerous
in the future because under the net as
now amended there is nothing to
prevent the filling of the list witli
fictitious names. Cnder the old act
when an objection was lodged with
the registrar lie was compelled to
send a notice addressed to the per
sou, objected to at his last known
place of residence so that he might
appear and sustain his right to have
his name retained on the list. The
registrar was also called upon to
publish for three weeks the names of
all voters, objected to in one or more
weekly newspapers, or once a week
for three weeks in one or more daily
newspapers circulating in the dis-
t riot. By the present amended act
these names will not now be puli-
lishcd in the newspapers, with the
result) that there will it© no intimation to the public or to the party
organization that a certain number
ol names are objected to. Experience
has shown, that it has been the practice of the Conservative machine
this province to file objections to
tho retention ol the names of many
Liberals 'who were duly qualified,
trusting that they would not turn up
at the court ol revision, aad their
names would be struck off. As a matter of fact when an objection was
filed the Jmrdeu was on the party
objected io to assert his right to
remain on thc list instead of compelling the objector to sustain his
objections. The result is that particularly in the rural districts many
may be objected to who, either
through indifference or through living
too remote from the registrar's, office will not appear and their names
will be struck off. In fact many objected to who know that there is no
ground for thc objection and that
they are duly qualified will decline to
appear believing that their name cannot be removed. Under these circumstances thc publication of the
list enabled the party associations
to scrutinize the list objected to and
take measures to prevent any person
duly qualified, Irom being struck off.
Under the amendment this list will
no longer he published with the obvious result. It is trite that the
objections were so numerous in- the
past that the publication of the list
objected to was a matter of consider-,
able expense. This could very well
be obviated il the objector was
compelled, as he should be, to sustain his objection on oath belore. being aide to displace the name of a
man who had already taken the oath
of qualification.
7.   Perhaps the most glaring injustice is inflicted by section 5 of     the
new act whereby.sub-section 5 of section 11 of thc old net is struck    out
and the  following  substituted therefor:     "In the case of the first register of voters the same made up    as
above, shall he certified by the    said
registrar and-forwarded forthwith to
tho provincial   secretary who "may" ,
order  the   same    to be printed, and .
the same register of voters shall   be »
the list    used at any election which |
may lake place before the next     revision    has been completed."   Under
the former act, when the voter's list
wns compiled after each revision and
certified by the register they had   to
be  forwarded   to the King's Printer,
who  was    compelled    to print   thc ■
same,    and by section of thc old act '
Halsall & Co.
Ladies', Misses', and Children's Wear
Pictorial
Review
Patterns
Splendid Showing of Spring Goods
E wish to announce our magnificent showing of the newest creations in LADIES' SUITS! COATS, WAISTS, NECKWEAR,
ETC.   Stocks are now almost complete.
We invite your inspection, whether you are an intending purchaser
SEE WINDOW DISPLAY
No disease germs or insects
can exist on a wall covered with
Alabastine. And Alabaitine,
from tests, has proven it allows
air to circulate through the
| walls, thus keeping air
I in room pure and
healthful.
5 lb. pk|. ol this
artistic "nd sanitary
wall coating
for only OOi
F. Parks & Co.
Hardware and House
Furnishings
CRANBROOK ■ B. C.
privilege of    exorcising tho franohlso (,ii0  i<iMR's   printer    was hound to
in the event   nl nn election occurring furnish    tor 25 cents  a copy printed
ilurinR the comiiiR summer, it is ab- jj^ts (0r any electoral district. Under
solutely   necessary  that applications ||,0 present   nmendeil    act it is dis-
should lie in the   hands ot the rcRis- ci'ollonary with thc provincial score-
Chapman Land & Inv. Co.
Two doom from tho If'** Thoatra
PHONK40I P.O. Box Vir.
trar within the limited period between this date and April 7U) next,
tin* last day fur receiving application
lor the   May court.    It is obviously
impossible    lor all the ('lectins      in
that they are not obliged io print
them ami may simply do so on the
CVo ol an election when tlie least possible use can lie made ol them by
their opponents. It will readily be
seen that under this new act it will
he impossible for opponents of the
government who ate not furnished
with lists after each court nf revision to intelligently revise the list
on tlie two dates in the year set
apart for that purpose. There is only
one way provided hy the new act
whereby an elector may obtain a
copy of the voter's list after each
revision, and that is under section 'A
which provides that the registrars of
voters shall furnish written copies of
tlie list, or any part thereof for the
sum of 25 cents per one hundred
words. Assuming that there arc
20,000 registered voters In lhe city
of Vancouver, and each name on the
list with description, etc., will take
up about four words, you will see
that it will cost Ibousands of dollars for anyone to obtain a complete
copy of the voter's list for that
city. A more brazen attempt to
prevent tbe public from seeing and
examining anil correcting the voter's
list until the eve of an election can
hardly be conceived.
8. Further, by section 11 a, ot the
new act the registrar of voters—a
government official*—may, it lie is
not satisfied tbat any applicant^-ai-
though ho may swear he is duly
qualified—Is entitled to he on the
list, may summon him belore him
and call upon him to produce more
Satisfactory proof, or il he fails to
attend in answer to this demand his
name may lie struck off. It would
appear thai hy tbe use or this section the Light lo vote at all may he
denied one duly qualified by some
Unscrupulous minion 0I the government.
To sum up in a general way tlie following objections may he noted:
1. Hundreds of people in this
province temporarily absent will he
deprived of tbe franchise should an
election occur ibis summer und the
now lists be ■used, as they may bo.
2. The burden ol compiling an
entirely new list, fur tlie entire province is thrust upon the people within
the limited period of about 8-1 days,
and this without the slightest notice
of warning. Notice of such a
change should be given at least six
months or a year before hand.
,'J. Thousands of applications collected and filed since last November
at great trouble and inconvenience
represent wasted efiort, although
there is no reason why these applica-
tionne should not be placed on the
new list ot voters.    They rmist    rc-
Thc E*ster as11""-
■I. Tbe government arrogates to
itself Mie right to refuse to furnish
the people with    printed copies      at
NEW SUITS
Serges. Bediord Cords, Whipcords,
Tweeds, Etc.
Ranging in Price From $20.00, $25.00,
$27.50, to $30.00
NEW COATS
JOHNNY COATS — LONO. COATS
At $10.50, $13.50, $15.00, $18.00, and $25 00
New Ideas in Silk Waists
Navys, Tans, Browns, Greys, Etc.,
with newest touches. Robespierre
effects.    Also plain tailored, at
$5.50 AND $6.50
Choice New Neckwear
ROBESPIERRE COLLARS-Everything New in Neckwenr - ROBESPIERRE JABOTS
ibis prov
possible'
nee—In
to    file
fact  physi
their    applications
tary   whether the lists will Ik* printed or not alter each revision,
government, we know from past    experience,   havo    declined   to furnish
parties   with printed copies    of   tho teas0nablo cost, a9 provided    hy the
last revised   voter's lists as required 0ld uct, ol the    voter's lists      after
within this limited time. The govern-  hy law.       Now the act in sn worded each revision.    In other words  tbey
say "we can pad and stuff the list
as much as wo choose, and tho |
first intimation you will have ol it
is on the eve of an election when it
is too late to correct it, unless indeed you choose lo order copies from
the registrar of voters at 25c. per
hundred words at n cost ol several
thousand dollars for each single
copy." This is an outrage of ordinary decency, and a little refleetion
will show what use the government
can make of this arbitrary power.
The public are offered no special
facilities for registration in this limited time, while voters of the government will be looked after by an
army of officials paid to do other
work. Indeed, we know from experience that many of these same
henchmen of the government with
treacherous cunning often take the
applications of parties who are opposed to the government and having
(lone so deliberately throw them
away without,filing. The result is
that these parties bcllcvo that they
are on the voters list, hut find out
at election time that they have lieen
duped. We say this from knowledge of actual cases in tho upper
country, and personally we would
advise any opponent of the government not to trust their applications
with government road foremen, game
wardens, etc., etc. Wc do not say
that all resort to this dishonesty,
but experience has shown that they
have done so in sufficient numbers to
make it inadvisable and unsafe for
any Liberal or opponent ot the government to trust them.
6. It may be noted that tho government have by legislation extended
the life'of thc next parliament to five
years. Tliey are plainly planning to
win, if possible, tho next election hy
trickery with tlie aid of this amendment nnd then enjoy five lull yeum
further before lu-inet finally called to
account.
7. This amendment, in my opinion,
Is a crude attempt at parly advaul-
nge. , The government apparently
will only play with marked cards and
loaded dice.
8. At thc same time let it not be
thought for a moment that thc Liberal party and opponents ol a government whieh is fast losing public confidence intend to throw up their
hands. Far from it. They are already taking active steps to meet lhe
situation, and have an efficient organization to do so. Handicapped
though they are, the foundation for a
vigorous campaign to build up new
lists have already been laid. They
feel that the losses I hey will sustain
by this political jugglery and by tho
government'* intention lu relus©    to
The Ladies of Cranbrook
May Now Have Beautiful Hair—The Cranbrook Drug and Book
Co. Has the Article and
Guarantees It to Grow
Hair, or Refund Your
Money.
The Cranbrook Drug and Book Co.
backed up by the manufacturers o[
SALVIA, the Great Hair Grower,
guarantees it' lo grow hair,
SALVIA destroys Dandruff In
ten days.
The roots of thc hair arc so nourished and fed that a new crop of hair
springs up, to the amazement,and delight of the user. The hair is made
soft and fluffy. Like all American
preparations SALVIA is daintily
perfumed. It is hard to find an
actress who does not use SALVIA
continually.
Ladies of society and influence use
no other.
SALVIA is a non-sticky preparation, and is the ladies' favorite. A
large, generous -bottle, 50c. The
Scobcll Drug Co., St. Catharines,
Canadian distributors.
it has the ability to adjust itself to
environment and conditions.
Delving into the subject of organic
evidences of evolution, lie showed the
process which is at work in the physical world, declaring that the
struggle for existence is confined
solely to the members of their class.
He laid special stress on the statement that the different class are not
in competition with each other. The
remedy, he said, is the intelligent
application of economic laws.
Professor Lewis was emphatic in
lus opposition to the orthodox view1
that man has existed on the earth
only two or three thousand years,
and offered proof in the form of civilization, discovered in Java, that
man, in very primitive condition, existed during the tertiary period, or
many millions of years ago.
deliver copies of lhe lists except at
prohibitive prices (so prohibitive
that the proviso is a farce) will be
more than offset by accessions of
strength from ninny electors, who are
beginning to realize that the government machine is going altogether too
far in its efforts to prevent thc tree
expression of opinion by the public
ou ils public acts and administrative
record.
DISEASE AND STRIFE TO END
BOIENOK TO SOLVE l'ROHLKM-
MAN HAS   EXISTED KOH
MILLIONS OK YEA US.
Kd 111 01! toil, Alia., Mar. IL—Professor Francis .1. Lewis, of tlie department of biology nt thu (University ol Alberta in Edmonton, said in
tbe course of a public address hero
yesterday that with thc knowledge
already possessed by science it
should be possible to remove every
form ol epidemic from the known
■orld within fifty years, ,11c added
that this conclusion also fils the economic world, saying its application
| human race, which means eithet e»-
labor would remove all friction before thc close oT 1060.
Referring to ihe question of disease, the speaker said there is none
known to nature, except amongst the
human facet which means either extermination or readjustment. Thc
former results in the case of man;
hut, with nature it is otherwise,    as
Hardy Northern Grown Pedigree
STRAWBERRY
PLANTS
SENATOR DUNLAP, PARSON'S BEAUTY,
GLEN MARY, CLYDE
And other leading varieties, best
suited to this district
Express charges prepaid and 10 per
rent, discount allowed on nil oirfeis
with remittance in full received liefole
March 20.
Catalogue sent on request
MONRAD WIOEN
Wynndel.B. C.
SUTTON'S
SEEDS S
Hecd»men to 11 In MajeHty (lit* King
A. J. WOODWARD
Sole Agents
512 Granville 8t. VANCOUVER
lilt Fort St, VICTORIA
CATMOCUE ON APPLICATION
FORJENT
Five-roomed Modern
Cottage
New, on Garden Avenue
$30 per month
Apply W. J, Atchison     u.n
Dr. de Van's Female Pill*
A reliablt Preach regulator; never to Hi. Then
pills are eicetdtogly powerful tn regulating till
generative portion of the fcin.iU* system. Kefuai
all cheap imitations. Dr. da Van's are sold at
lli a box, or three 'or HO. Mallet! lo any addreia.
Tfca tM.Mll Drag Co., at. CUharUM. Oat,
For nl* «t Btttf-t, Murphy 4 Co.. THE  OBANBEOOK   nEHALD
ENGLISH LINEN
NOTE PAPER
Paper      -       40c lb
Envelopes -       40c lb
2 lbs for 75c
The Beattie-Murphy Co., Limited
The Ift&xaJUL Store
WHERE   IT   PAYS  TO   DEAL
Cranbrook • - . u. C.
Those dull aches across
the forehead, thoso frequent sick or nervous
headaches, are all the
result of eye strain that
the proper glasses will
cure. Not much use
dosing yourself with
drugs when the real
trouble is with your
eyes—you've simpiy
got to take the strain
off the eyes before
relief will come. Shall
we find what's wrong
and right it ?
W. H. Wilson
Jeweler and Optician
her niece, Mrs. J. It. Thompson,
Meet me at Bob's Place.
Rabbit raising is taking in this
district. This week a number of
the Rufus Red variety were brought
in by local fanciers.
Improved ranche for rent on Kootenay river, near . Mayook; all facilities for farming except live stock.—
Beale and Elwell. 11-1
Miss Wallinger, sister of N. A.
Wallinger, arrived today from England with tlte intention of remaining
in this country.
R. Campbell, formerly of Moyie,
and later associated with C. B. Garrett in thc boot and shoe business in
this city, has opened a gents furnishing store at Grand Forks, B.C.
The prices of these
watches are cut so fine
that they will startle you.
Every variety of watch that
every variety of person is likely
to need ut every variety of price.
Gome in i<wlny and Inipect tha flout
and moat modarata priced Mteetlon ot
watchei in thli aectian of the country,
RAWORTH BROS.
C. P. R. WATCH INSPECTORS
CRANBROOK AND LETHBRIDGE
stittile in the province. This will
enable   Institute members to obtain
powder for   land   clearing at $5 pet-
box laid down here.
Meet me at Bob's Place.
•See Kink's window of "triple
weight" California navel oranges-
guaranteed absolutely free from frost
and juicy and sweet.
Under tho new law regarding the
closing of bars tlie local saloons
closed at 12 o'clock on Wednesday
night and opened this morning at 8
a.m. On Saturday night they will
close at 11 o'clock,
Mrs. Main, nf Moose .law, accompanied by Miss Manning, were in tbe
city Monday, the guests of Dr, ami
Mrs, King. They were on their
way to Proctor, where they will
make an extended visit.
Formal Spring Opening
TOWN TOPICS
Meet me at Bob's Place.
Mrs. Oeo. A. I.ciU'h will receive on
Thursday, March 20th.
Orders taken for Peerless incubators.—S, Macdonald. 10-tl
W. ,1, Mootgomery, ol Vahk. was
in the city on Tuesday on business.
Spanis'j onions at Kink's Pure Food
(Irocery.
Mrs. A. II. Webb.will receive al
the new borne on (lurden avenue on
Wednesday, Matt* 19th,
Shamrock!, for tbe 17th nt tho
(Irocnhouse.; phone 190. U-lt
Thc Yabk Lumber Co., Ltd , arc
contemplating the installation of a
couple nl aerial skiddcrs this spring.
"dill's" pure honey at Fink's Pure
Pood Grocery.
Mrs. (!)t). Green returned Monday
trom a two weeks' visit with friends
at the coast.
Miss Moss, sister ol Sirs. W. V.
(lurd, leaves today on an extended
visit with Iriends in Seattle
P. V. MoOoinb, ol Fertile, was In
the city Wednesday and a guest at
the Hfllcl I'rnnhrook.
Frank Murphy, of the Beattie-Murphy Co., has returned to his storo alter being sick for several days.
Dr. Lyon, who has been at Dull
Hiver lor somo time, left this week
lor Yale, B.C., where he will take
up practice.
We will have green carnations tor
St. Patrick's day. Leave your orders now.—The Fink Mercantile Co.
Mrs. Margaret I). Whytal, of Los
AngtHes, California, bus arrived In
UM fitf tor an e«tended visit    witb
Our full spring range ol ladies
waists, bouse dresses and spring and
summer underwear is on display now
at lowest price:-, nl lhe Model Variety Storo.
Goo. Hoggarth, mine host ol the
F,gg dyes for Kaster at Fink's | Cranbrook hotel, returned the lirst ol
the week from a month's sojourn in
sunny Southern California. lie visited the principal cities and returns
much rested and rejuvenated and   re-
Pure Food Grocerv.
Thc Ilex theatre started tliair matinees on Monday and find that a
good number arc attending. They will
hold matinees hereafter on Monday,
Wednesday, Friday and Saturday.
Order your Easter lilies now.
Tli,.
ports a much enjoyed vacation.
Graham Donahue has been engaged
by the Cranbrook Liberal association
nnd will occupy thc club rooms over
...Lester
store, from Id i
supply is    limited.—East      Kootenai',1'1'1"'''     l'lap1'
Greenhouse Co., phone 190.        1MM "ntil ln   •»•»'• mt* ,la>' unlil   A<"'il
  17th, prepared to receive the application for registration of voters.
It. II. Bohart, proprietor "I the
Wardner hotel, and who recently bad
his license revoked, was in the city
on Wednesday and met with a number ol the hotel proprietors in tlie
evening.
Mr. Willis, who has heen on thc
local staff ol the Canadian Hank ui
Conwueree, left today for Victoria,
where be has been transferred hy the
bank officials.
See the florist for hanging baskets
ami window boxes. Now is the time
lo order— K. K. Greenhouse, phone
100. 11-21
Knox church Sunday school will
commence a series of bazaars, socials, etc., with an entertainment on
March 17th, which has for its purpose the raising ol $300.00 during the
.  j year for missions.    Thc church    has
New Zealand fresh grass butter at 'promised $1200 for this branch ol
the work and the other church societies will raise $:t00, leaving) $600 to
be raised by tho congregation.
Fink's Pure Food Grocery.
W. A. -lames, construction cngincci
of the C.I'.H. from Winnipeg, passed
through Cranbrook   Ihis week on his
•lust in:   Full line of spring     and
Pink and while Master a/alias
pots.—Mast     Kootenay
So., phone 190.
way to Wasa, to inspect the progress ; summer   Misses, hoys  and children's
ol the big bridge over   the Kootenay jln-adwear.—Model Variety Store.
river at that point. 	
  Miss II.   .1. Si'ipII, the Klko school
in ' teacher, who was accidentally shot
Greenhouse lost week, was removed from St.
ll-2t KuKene hospital to the residence of
Mr. and Mrs. llenj. Palmer, where
she will remain for some time. Thc
probe for the bullet was inelTectual
and she will carry it In remembrance
pif her narrow escape.
B. Boss Mackenzie was up from
Fernie this week., having sold out his
interests in the moving picture business titer,! and hns etubnrkeil again in
the real estate business.
Full range of hoy Buster sailor
suits and rompers, girls overalls ami
dresses on display at Model Variety
Store.
Harold Darling and C. W. Louhach
returned Wednesday evening from ft
trip to Vancouver. They were accompanied homo hy Mr. Darling's
sister, Miss Helen Darling, of Vancouver, who will remain in the city
lor somo tlmo visiting with hoc
brother and family.
A* the Farmer's Institute last
evening the secretary announced that
henceforth thc government will pay
tho freight on stumping powder iu
lota o( ooi? hundred boies to any, In
Tho Fink Mercantile Co. will have
an immense- display of Kaster novelties in their Pure Food Grocery window next week. Prices will he
marked in plain figures ou each assortment and so low thnt everyone
can share the joys of Easter.
Mow about your spring bedding
plants'.' Asters, vcrbann, stocks,
salvia or- flowering sage, pansles,
etc., at the Greenhouse. 11-21
At an adjourned meeting of the
license commissioners held at the city
hall Wednesday morning at' 11 a.m.
to act upon the application of R. A.
Fraser lor a wholesale liquor license, lhe commissioners were advised by tbe city solicitor that tbe Uy-
WHEN the  new modes for Women,
Misses and Children will be displayed in pleasing variety.    You
will be most welcome  to view the display,
try on the Hats, Suits. Etc.
THURSDAY,   FRIDAY,   SATURDAY,
AND FOLLOWING DAYS
An Extraordinary Showing of
Brilliant Colors
will mark the presentation of styles. Nell
Rose—the deep rich pink named in honor
of the daughter of President-elect Wilson,
and the vivid flame yellow will be the two
features. Following these comes Tans,
Browns, and many beautiful shades ol blue.
In the Display of Suits
will lw featured the uow moclisli productions in Bedford
Cords, Shepherd's Oheeka and Fine Serges and Worsteds,
Tho strictly plain tailored cob tu Dies will In* featured,
tn Coats, tin* three-quarter length with roundel front'.
and loose back will in* seen, ns well as tht1 plain tailored
effects in Long Coats.
The Showing of Millinery
Quaint, boat-shaped Ii»|uob, with tall Xuuiuli mounts,
unciwonileriul artistic creations in soft Tngel straw -smart
littlo productions with soft satin crowns nml trimmed on
the side with small fruits ,>r buds, nil embodying the popular brilliance of: color. Pattern hata. from tbe great cen-
tres of fashion on this continent and also from Europe,
will bo displayed.
">N
Mr»P"DTrT*ri?V   DDAC Cranbrook s Dry Goods
I^ICVIVILJLIV I     DKUvJ,   and Clothing Stores
law was faulty and they referred the I Cranbrook lodge, No. 101!), Loyal
bylaw back to the city council for Order of Moose, un Wednesday evea-
amendment before passing on tlie up- ing elected the lollowlng officers for
plication. the ensuing year:    Dictator,   W. M.
  ' Krler; past dictator, Fred W. Swain:
Beale and Elwell are offering for BO ' vice-dictator, W. C. Adlard; secre-
days onlyi eight lots in the Walkley | tary, R. S. Garrett; prelate, Allen
Yddiiion for $200.00 each, all front- Marchant; treasurer, IV Matheson;
inR on the Wattsburg Road, one inin- sergeant-at-arms, Horace Monroe, de-
ute walk from the new school and legate to supreme lodge, F. W,
seven minutes from C.I'.H. shops. Swain; inner guard, .J. A. Crawford,
Sidewalk from post office right up to outer guard, F. Carlson; deputy su-
these lots; water main will be laid premc dictator, F. W. Swain; irus-
on this sprint;. These lots are tees, R. P. MoRatt, .1. R. Thomp-
50x130 and are nice and even and son, Gus. Andeen.
beautifully situated.     After 80   day
tho    price
positively rise      to
Vineland   pure raspberry or straw-
$2r>0.0il0.    Terms of sale, $10    cash   berry   jam,    75c. per   5   lb. pail at
,,nd monthly payments of $5, with 8  Fink's      Pure    Food   (irocery—pail
•per cent interest.    Also a few    lots   weighs one half pound mote than any
in the Wardman Addition at $200.00,  other braad.
on the same terms. ll-2t ■   - ■
 ■ The Cranbrook    Veterans' assocla-
Now is the lime to buy your Eas-   tion    will   hold another whist drive
ler cards,   two for 5c. at the Model   and dance at Carmen's hall on     Sa-
Varlety Store. lurday evening, April 5th, in aid    of
  lie funds   for the rifle ran^e.      Tin
Wm. .1. B. Guerard returned from . Veterans' are taking a lively interest
Medicine Hat on Monday and an- in the new rifle range, which is pronounced thai lie has secured the man- vided for by the provincial govcrn-
agement of the Corona theater, ment and thc establishment of a
which is known as the "theater range here will follow in the course
beautiful," and is the largest and of a short time. A im-eling will be
best show house in that cily and held later this month to determine
will assume his new duties about some points in connection with the
the 15th of April. He will leave new range.
with his family about the lirst      of) ——
the month, Medicine Hat is a very] FOR RKNT.-Fke roomed modem
busy little city these days, and Mr. house on two lots, line garden, chlck-
Oiuerard was impressed with the | en house, etc. For terms apply
number nt people on ibe streets ami ( Herald oilice.
tho     prosperity   which     is   evident
11-lt
everywhere.
Finest line nf Kaster nov
shown    in   town
Store.
The Kpworlb League social held at
the residence of   Mrs   (.'rooks      on
was well attended
ever  Tuesday evening
Model Variety   and all     present pronoum-e it
Un
best entertainment of the sort     held
here.    Thc chief source of entertain-
Knox Church Ladies Aid will   hold   ment was a hat trimming contest J.
an Easter sale on Saturday, March
22ml, iu the church school room. Afternoon tea will be served and there
will be an attractive display of plain
and fancy sewing and cookery.     11-lt
of
Mr. and Mrs. .John Macdonald
I.ucknnw,   Ontario, arrived in
cily this   week for an extended visit
lhe gentlemen present, several ol
whom gave, evidence uf such talent
that it is quite likely tbey will be
going to Paris to devote all their
time to this line nf work. The prize
winner at the contest was Mr. V. J.
Maycock.      The ladies  present  were
with their snn,
nld and family.
Mr.    A. H. Maedon-
They ale on  their
way   home,   having spent the winter
at Vancouver, Victoria and Nelson.
tnc condemned to wear the creations
produced for the balance of tbe evening to the enjoyment of Ibe men. if
not of themselves. Tin- evening
closed witb coffee and refreshments
Violels, roses, carnations nnd     all
kinds ol cut (lowers tn order nt   the
Wm.   Battholntneu,
Ccttful poultry fain mi
ie of tin
of  the
Greenhouse., phone 100.
11-21   liiit, who resides   near WycliOc, ha.
Cran-
brook's
Family
Piioto-
Play
House
THE OFTENER YOU GO
to the Moving Picture show, tht livelier will lie lhe interest yon take in
the world of Roman*,-.*. History, Customs and General Affairs."
ROMANTIC AND EDUCATIONAL
is what may be said of ihe ideal Moving Picture 6bow< loch as oure. All
part«of tlu* world, al! a^e* °* history, roll before the regular attendant at
ourtheatre.   Comedy and Lrama are also jour-.
FRIDAY AND SATURDAYS PROGRAMME
L  THE GREATEST TKINC IN THE WORLD.    Viugraph).
-'■  AT THE RAINBOW'S EN0.    LnWn .
3.   THE PECULIAR NATURE OF THE WHITE MAN'S BURDEN.    Essany).
I.   FAT BILLY'S WOOIHC.    Comedy.    [Selig .
recently invented a ne« chicken* incubator and has made arrangements
with -I. J>. McBride of this city, who
will manufaeture and put on the
markret. The cow incubator will be
called trie "Mcllridc" incubator. Mi.
Bartholomew has a rery high urade
line nf pouHry, includiiiK White Minorca*, Buff and Partridge Wyandottes, Anconas and Indian Runner
Ducks. While in the eltj Mondaj
he received Hue,- white Leghorn
rocket eK from a celebrated breeder in
the slates, at a cost of $30.00 each,
lie Intends to inerease the number ol
fowls anil at the same lime keep
nothing hut high standard birds.
FOR SAL.-J.—House and two lots
In the city on Pewar avenue, two vacant lots on Watt avenue; also Veterans' grant nf 16-1 acres in New
Ontario. For price and particulars
apply to   A.     C. Pigott, 1'- <). Box
r»tr.
:it\
WANTKIJ
work, Twt
ply Parisian
avenue.
9-t!
-Girl io assist iu house-
children In family.   Ap-
Dye   Works,   Fenwick
M-ll
FOI M)~\! noon on Wedoeadaj a
lady brought into lhe Herald ;, nol
Kold chain waleh fob. The owner of
name can recover il. hy pa) ing      lor
ihis advertisement.
Baby carriage and bath, used a
.short time, H the two Apply Herald office. 10-tr*
Fire roomed modern house, with
2 lo's, chicken bouses and garden for
rent.—Tht; Chapman Land and lav.
Co., Box 125, phone 401.
FOR SALL.-One 120 egg Peerless
incubator, 1 Pee;less brooder; seed
otaloes Burpee's I a.proved— S.
Macdonald, 1'. O. llox 102. lu-lt
FOR SALL CHEAP loi! CASH.
Seven year old pony, cart and harness. Pony broken to bolh saddle
and harness.—f'.ue Hex .1,, the Herald. 10-tl
FOR SALE.—A Hall safe in good
ondition. Apply City Herk at
city hall. 7-tt
Owner must have money, will sell
a now house, cost J1200 for <*S00.
Better look this over,—Thc (.'hap.nan
Land and Inv, Co., Box 12">, pbeOC
401,
FOR KALK.—Two roomed liotisft
and large lot for $3*)ii house papered; all furnished; on the hill. Apply
Herald onVe or Bnx 22ft.
Will sell or, trade one learn of
ponies with harness for horse,   about
MOO lbs
city.
Apply Handier, Box 2.1.1,
l0-2f THE  CHANRROOK   HERALD
******}
I    News of the District    \
$♦♦»»♦»♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦+♦♦♦*
ELKO
(By Fred Roo).
Jim Tltistlebeak, Elko's philosopher, is trying to set "Pete Lund's
tale of woo" to music. If the poor
lumbermen of B.C. are suffering, why
don't they smile and suffer in silence.     Please pass the salt.
Miss Scott, Elko's popular teacher,
was shot In accident while out with
Manager C. II. Rowc and wife, of
the Merchants hank. The three were
out walking along the esplanade towards Cahbago Town, and passing
along the Balkan Heights a party nf
llohunks and Kentucky Dagos were
shooting at, targets, ami although
they have been cautioned about this
practice, still persist in doing it,
with the result thai Miss Scott was
shot in tin* hip, anil another bullet
grazed Mr. Rowo's par, Chief of
Police Gorman placed the shooter
under arrest and Miss Scot! was
sent to Cranbrook hospital.
Mr. Moat, of Ibe B.C. lands department, was an Klko visitor List
week.
Mr. and Mrs. C. 0. Broadwood
passed through Elko on their way to
Nelson.
reh and     Foste
!>■
old London,
i,   Tobacco
Messrs.     II
English   tourist
an*   rusticating
Plains.
The Brewer Bros, err!veil in Klko
last week nnd are buying an outfit
tor their South Fork ranch, These
are the first1 In arrive Ibis spring.
It will be much pleasantcr when the
government builds that twenty-live
thousand dollar road in there to get
in supplies (when they do), Lead
on McDuii.
There's soil in tin- Roosville Valley
so rich thai a man dare not stand on
one foot any length of time lest
that leg become longer than lhe
other one.
The North Slav logging eainps
have all closed down and reports say
the logs are the liinsl in the district.
The report circulated around this
district hy a Nelson man, that R.
T. Lowry, of G-tccnwo'od, and the
writer were going into the lumber
business, (from tin- standing timber
to taking the farmer's money, is a
lie. It's loo short a route into the
millionaire class for lhe writer.
Tho latest rendering of the Burns
lines, is given in Efko thus, "Oh,
wad some powei tht- giftie gie us, to
see Gorman before be see us."
.1. A. Broley, Fernie, and several
consulting engineers from Calgary,
were visiting  Roosville last  we?k.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Letcher, nf
Fernie, were visiting the Roo's, of
Roosville,  last  week.
If ordinary eggfl are worth 50c, pec
dozen what should double yoked eggs
be worth) The minister of agriculture will please answer.
The Vancouver professor who fasted thirty days nol only restored his
heallli, but went a long way to solving the high cost of living.
It doesn't hurt a man to get full of
Hope, and lie doesn't have to send
his good money to Timothy Hard-
racket Eaton to get it. He can get
H righl here in Elko.
The writer spent Ihe week end at
Roosville last week jjjeltiiig facts and
figures for Vancouver and Calgary
capitalists.
American   mining   men are getting
interested in the copper properties
along Phillips Creek, Roosville.
M. Phillips, of Fruit lands, owns
tin* Copper Giant, and intends working it this summer.
The suffragettes havo no kick coming at this writing.
The strongest feature of the International Securities company to dale
is the. appointment of L. W. Mowry
as agent.
The central committsc of the Conservative association met in the. Fernie hotel last, Monday night, March
10th, at 8 by the clock to study how
best to meet the coming events and
the lime knighthood will be in full
bloom.
A large contingent of people from
Baynes Lake came to Elko last Saturday lo buy goods ami gave ihe
old historic burg qUlto a gala appearance. The crowds were so dense,
at one time on main street thai a
lumberjack got his leg hroken in the
rush.
Land around Gateway on tbe Canadian side cleared    and plowed is sell-
! ing for $;i0ll.l)li per acre.
Will      the      Ottawa     Conservatives
■ teach second base'*
I ill. Conner, the RoosvUlo or-
cbandist, whose fruit and strawberries gave the valley such a big boost
last summer,     is selling his holdings
in the valley,   we understand, to the
Broley Syndicate    company, of Fer-
WARDNER
(Special correspondence)
William Eschwig, of the Northern
hotel, Fernie, called in town Wednesday on business.
.1. T. Martin became suddenly 111
Friday, necessitating his removal to
the hospital. Mr. Martin has not
been well for a very long lime.
After repairing at tlie machine
shop the company's logging engine
was taken home to Galloway, w Bill
Spraguc accompanied as captain,
Mr. P. Lund returned home Friday
afternoon after an extended trip
east.
Mrs. T. Oaflney was in Cranbrook
Saturday with friends.
Ou Saturday afternoon Mr. and
Mrs. Clyde Nixon lost tlicir only
child after an illness ol several days.
Mrs. Nixon at present Is very sick.
Funeral services were held Monday
afternoon at trie graveyard, attended
by a number ot young friends from
the Sunday school and were eon-
ducted by Rev. W, Stephens.
Graham Dpnalroo was visiting with
friends at Cranbrook Sunday.
Arthur Fenwick, of Fori Steele,
dropped in lo see us. Mr. Fenwick)
has only just returned Tron. across
Ibe pond and as usual is glad lo get
back.
Mr. Gameli, of the Bisslon Saw
company, called Tuesday looking up
lil friends.
Ray Kelly, of baseball fame, called
renewing old friends Monday.
Mrs. Lcsleyoung was shopping at
Cranbrook Tuesday last.
Mrs. Leslie Young was shopping at
were in Cranbrook   Tuesday on busi-
Kegislratinn of voters is occupying
Ibe attention of the people of this
plaee these days, along witlt the
measles,
in going straight to the weak
spot in treating disease ? II so,
you will never use anything
but Peps lor coughs, colds, bronchitis, and throat and lung
troubles.   Listen why I
Peps are tiny tablets, which
contain rich medicinal ingredients, so prepared that they turn
into vapour in the mouth, and
iae breathed down to the throat,
the breathing tubes and lungs
direct.
(..'tuigh mix hires go—not to the lunga
j snd ih "l ut all, but to tbo Btf.mnch,
I T ..to Is ftbnolutely no direct connection
i butween Bioiimuli And ImigH.
When you have a had cold, yonr
.V.joetion ii wonkmed,   Ynuloioippft*
; tin*, iii't if ii in.>T'ty,.|,r iin<ittl«nioketl»e!i
out ".iirtogi'od.,: In other word*., your
.i,,;r. .t.-'.'t) uy.itcti is lucking tone. All
. n h  mixtures  m&ke  thu condition
:    V..1VH.
i ion't ruin your stomach to heal your
lung-*,   T..i;o»iemedy tbat goes right to
-.not— Pepa.
Surprising how tbey end ooughs,
catarrh, brnuouitis, Boie-thront, "clergy-
niftu'o throat," luthnitt, And all lung
ti nV.eB, Contain no poiion, and are
beat for children.
Dr, Ijurdmi 8tab'es siyt:—"If you
., irii. to caiO aVnd end a OJllfjh, if )'ou
,Jr* ti looflin tii'Uing phlegm, and
!<*ir i i.■' tli •'mt, ami the brer.'Iiing tuhnrt,
i in }V|).-i. 'I ue pine funias and tinUnitiic
nimi'-i, £0 benuflulrtl iu throat aud lung
util it', wbiiih are liberated when a Pep
h put into the mouth, also serve aunt her
i-.iivt purpose. Tbey are strongly gernii-
c dul,aud ;', mum of disease ia the mouth,
ou the palate, in the Hi rout, and in the
breathing Cnbun, are at one* destroyed
by tliBir action."
Have yen tried this famous
remedy!   If not, cut out this
ftrtiel *, write across it the name
arid dale of this paper, and mail
it (with lo. stamp to pay return
po.it age) to Pspi Co., Toronto.
■*J3L  v   A free trial packet will then
^?SJf- I meruit you. All drug*
miij.'J--~ _?.     filial   Bint    ati-ima    a_ll
•ilher of lhe parties to it is under
he Inllueiicc of liquor or if he has
easou to believe either party is in-
tana. He shall also be liable to
mprisnnnient for not exceeding 13
months.
The bill further provides that tho
issuer of lhe license, if he has knowledge or reason to believe that either
of ibe parties- to the marriage is
idiotic, insane or an epileptic, shall
require the applicant to leave with
him a doctor's cettificate to the effect that neither party is deficient
melt-tally as stated above and if the
ipplieaol does not do so he is to refuse the license. The issuer of tho
 uses who is (guilty of an infraction of the law is to be liable ((, a
fine of $500 and imprison men I tot 13
months.
The bill further requires that the
issuer of licenses ou receiving an application is to put up a notice containing the names of the parties and
keep it posted three weeks before the
license is issued.
NEW DEVELOPMENTS
IN BRITISH NAVY
CONSTRUCTION OF VESSELS OP
NEW,   TYPE    LIKELY    TO
SURPRISE RIVALS FOR
SKA POWER.
London, Mar. in—Naval developments of a remarkable nature are
taking place under a cloak of great
secrecy. "In the course of the next
twelve months," says the Doily
Express, "some astonishing details
will become known regarding change's
in warship types, hut none will be
more noteworthy than lhe development of the submarine.
"An entirely new type of underwater craft of considerable offensive
power and capable ol crowing the
Atlantic- at a high rate of speed is
being hullt tor the British navy.
These crafts will cany guns, bul in
addition they will he able to lire
eight torpedoes.
"In the meantime there are plana
before the admiralty for a flotilla of
above-water craft of a Speed of forty
knots and carrying several heavy
quick-firing guns especially mounted
for use against air-craft."
COMING TO CANADA.
It Is announced that the I'nited
States Steel trust proposes to establish a $20,nno,f)0fi .plant nt Sandwich, Ont, The I own dwellers naturally regard tlte proposition with
much favor, but people on the outside
are doubting the wisdom .<f allowing
the giant corpora'ion, out of which
Andrew Carneglo'a wealth is derived,
to get its tentacles in Ihis manner
around the steel Industrj ot Canada.
That such   lustitulio,,:, must he      ol
local benefit goes without saying,
and as for the rest the only possible
objection is that methods and systems adopted by the company are not
nf a nature- to In* welcomed. As to
this part ot tbe subject il is a question if tbe general public are sufficiently well posted lo form any opinion. Even if they were il is doubtful if tbo methods adopted by home
capitalists would be any improvement. It is suggested, however,
thai tho company is actuated by a
desire to escape the results of tbe
anti-trust agitation in the Slates,
even more than to take advantage of
the tariff. If Ihis be the ease, it is
a far more serious matter, for we
cannot afford to allow combinations
ousted from their own country to
come to ours lo carry on their operations. What is undesirable in one
plaee Is undesirable In another. Hut
there ate other advantages of whieh
it can he helieved the company is not
Unmindful Firstly, there is tbo
water-route thai is available from
all points in tlie upper lakes and
again down the St. Lawrence. Secondly, there is tbe supply of ore lo
he obtained from tlu* fields in Northern Ontario. Al that the advantages are nol all with the company,
for other Industries must follow, Including increased shipping and shipbuilding, and a thousand and one
other things of which steel and iron
form a pail, The opposition doubtless comes from interested parties,
hut that the coming ot lhe company
will he prevented, or ils operations
Interrupted, is entirely unlikely.
MARRTAOR BILL IN' ONTARIO,
Dr. Godfrey's marriage bill before
the Ontario legislature which will
render subject to a fine nf HiOO, a
minister or clergyman, or other person who solemnizes a marriage while
[ SEED FOR
SPRING PLANTING
Calgary, Match 12.—This is the
season when farmers are securing
their seed supply for the coming
spring. The importance of using
seed of high vitality and free from
weed seeds cannot be too strongly
emphasized. Very often in tne
past farners, through ignorance of
the quality of ihe seed they were
sing or for some oilier reason, have
sown weed seeds.
During the past lew years the
Dominion seed branch has been endeavoring to effect improvement iu
the seed trade by educational work
with fanners and seed dealers, supplemented by lhe enforcement of the
Seed Control Act. This act defines
the commercial grades of seeds. All
timothy, red clover, alsike and al-
itlfa seed offered for sale by "cither
wholesaler or retail merchant must
be gratled and marked Extra No. 1,
No. |, No. 2 or No. 'A, according to
quality. Seed thai will not grade
No. :, cannot legally he sold except
fur export or for cleaning. This taller clause applies In farmers as well
as seed dealers.
Farmers selling seed that is below
No, :f In their neighbors, for seeding
or lo dealers on the understanding
that it is to be retailed for seeding
without reeleaning, arc liable lo
prosecution, nnd (.very effort will be
made lo apply lhe Act lo farmers as
strictly as to seed merchants.
Paper packets of vegetable and
flower seed must be marked, showing
the year in which they nre filled, and
farmers and others purchasing such
seed should see that all packets are
marked before purchasing.
Seed grain, clover and grass seed,
a*; well as root and vegetable seeds,
whether in sealed packets (,r in hulk,
must be capable of germinating in the
proportion ol at least  I wo-thirds    of
the legal standard for good seed ot
tbe kind. Seed that will nut germinate in this proportion must be
plainly marked, showing lhe actual
percentage of seeds capable uf germinating. Farmers having, or purchasing seed, the vitality of which
they have reason to suspect, should
have a germination test made of a
sample, of it.
Seed grain, (lax, white clover,
grasses and all other forage plant
seeds must he free from noxious
weed seeds, or be labelled.! showing
lhe names of the noxious weed seeds
present. The above are the outstanding features of tin* Seed Control Act of Canada, and, if -persons
purchasing seed insist on the observance of lhe above rules, they will
nut only obtain a seed ot superior
quality but will do much to ward off
an infestation of their farms by noxious weeds. Ml persons so wishing
it may have their seeds tested free
of cost al Ibe seed laboratory, Tab*
bury, Alta.
A. d. Campbell,
Inspector for Alberta & British   Columbia.
TO DKFY THE     FRIDAY SUPERSTITION.
One bold steamship company will
on April lib defy Friday. It is tlie
fust In break away from on ancient
faith. For ages, so far as we know,
Friday has been held unlucky by
sailors and others, even when the
same people had lei go their belief
in a personal God, Columbus discovered America on Friday, bul the
superstition was not shaken even
when a happy western continent unrolled its good link io all mankind.
George Washington is said lo h.Uc
been born nn Friday, hut if he was,
tin- fact did not shake the belief of a
great people in the halefulncss ot Fri
day. Perhaps we did not want to
lapse into a nation, of infidels about
our Friday, 'lite old bell on Independence, hall rang the joyful first
Fourth of .July on Friday.
Each of us knows some good man
or woman who was born on Ftiday.
Some of the sweet children of our
homes—a favorite daughter, a noble
snn—saw Friday first. .lust how we
explain the discrepancy has been very
difficult. It was quite impossible to
persuade that same daughter to set
her wedding on Friday, though there
were gnnd reasons otherwise. She
embraced her mother, stroking back
the white locks and protested "Never
on Friday." Il was a sight lo
make a philosopher gnash his teeth.
Both mother and daughter were, born
on Friday!
And now Neptune is to be boldly
faced. Of course, it was lhe American line that dared. In America
the old faiths are crumbling. No
doubt the first -ship will be full. But
if we could consult lhe Delphic
oracle, no'tloubl we could see tbat
the ocean is getting ready. Friday
is already busy, down in lhe unsunned caverns of the sea. There will be
a mighty tussle.—New York Mail.
COAL AND PETROLEUM NOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
thirty days after date I intend to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands for the District of
East Kootenay for a license to prospect fnr coal and petroleum on. the
following described lands, situate on
thc North Fork of Michel Creek,
about six miles north of the Canadian Pacific Kailroad and lying between the Mclnnes Group and the
Crows Nest Pass Coal Company's
laud:
Commencing at a post planted one
mile north of a point one mile east
of the intersection of the cast side
line of the Mclnnes Group and the
north side line of the Crows Nest
Pass Coal Company's land, said post
being the initial post of A. E. Way-
fand's claim and marked "A. E.
Wayland's northeast corner," thence
80 chains south, thence 80 chains
west; thence 80 chains north; thence
80 chains cast io place ol beginning,
containing 010 acres, more or less.
Located .lanuary 21, 1913.
A. E. Wayland, Locator,
Batice Lameroux, Agent. 9-6t
For Sale
One Oxford Engine, 11x11. Price
$860,00, May be Been nt liene-
ilict Hiding, one milo cast of
Mnyook, B, O.
One Oxford Knw Carriage, complete with ruck bed, ii blocks.
:i inst (logs, l'rici! $2.">0.00 at
Klko, B.C.
One Oxford  Friction  Feed, complete with cable and sheaves and
drive pnllevs, Price $150.00, at
»t Elko, B, C.
For further particulars apply to
Leask it Johnson, Elko, B. C.
Mac's Auto Service
PHONE 94
Prompt Service New Cars
Dr. Martel's Female Pills
Forty years in use, 20 years the
standard, prescribed and recommended by physicians. For Woman's Ailments, Dr. Martel's Female
Pills, at your druggist.
SOCIETY AND CHURCH    j
DIRECTORV j I
Cranbrook     Lodge,
No. 31
A.F.  & A. H.
Rogular meetings ou
the'  third ..Thursday
ot every month.
Visiting brethren welcomed.
D. J. McSweyn, W.M.
J. S. Peck, Secretary.
Crescent Lodge No. ;i;i
KNIGHTS ~of PYTHIAS
Cranbrook, ti. C.
Meets   every   Tuesday at 8 p.m. at
Fraternity Hall.
Alec. Hurry, C.C.
F. M. Christian, K. ol HAS.
Visiting brethren   cordially invited
to attend.
I.O.O.F., KF.Y CITY LODGE, No. ii
Meets every Monday
night at New Fraternity Hall. Sojourning Oddfellows cordially invited.
It. Dixon, W. Jl. Harris,
N. O. Sec'y.
DURHAM ENCAMPMENT NO. 13.
l.O.O.F.
Meets lirst and    Uiird Wednesdays
in each month.
A   cordial reception extended     to
visiting brothers.
Offloers July 1st to December 31st.
W. M. Harris, Chiel Patriarch
II. Wkits, Scribe.
MAPLE LEAF BEBEKAH LODGE
No. 19.
Meets every second and   fourth Wednesday at Fraternity Hall.
Sojourning   Rtbekahs  cordially invited.
Mrs. Alma Liddicoat, N.Q.
Mrs. A. E. Parker, Sec.
ANCIENT ORDER OK FORESTERS
COURT CRANBROOK, 8943
Meets in Carmen's Hall Second and
Fourth Thursday of pacb month at 8
p.m. sharp.
.1. McLachlan, C.R.
L. Pearron, Sec, Box 618.
Visiting brethren made welcome
OVER SEAS CLUB."'
Meets in Carmen's    Hall 2nd    and
4th Tuesday every month at 8 p.m.
Membership   opeu   to British   cltl
zens,
E. Y. Brake, L. 1'earron,
Pres. Sec.
Box C18
Visiting memhers cordially wclcom
ed.
g&gM Cranbrook Lodge
No. 1010
Marts every tVednradaj
in 8 p.m.Iu Hi,ml li k
Knit-lei.'   Hull,   linker
btroet.
Fiikh. W. Swain, Diet,    K. s. Oaiihstt, Sn-.
ANCIENT    ORDER.    OF   FORESTERS.
Pride of Cranbrook   Circle, No. 153,
Companions of tne Forest.
Meets in Carmen's Hall 2nd and 4th
Thursday of each month at 3
p.m. sharp.
Mrs. L. Whittaker, C.O.
Mrs. I, Heigh, Secretary.
Visiting Companions cordially wcl-
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL
It makes no difference wlnl you flipire ou
plintlng this mason—we cnti luppljr jou,
anil With liio finest quailtj* of nuwery Stock
mr irown.
All life*, plants, tin"", berries, stirutis,
•mtirttns, rnMs, tic, sold by us aro |tiar-
(Md
TRVB TO NAME
It Will pi? 3i-ii to get In tutu li with us.
,,   EVERY PI.ANTKlt 1SEED9 OUH HOOK-
LANDSCAPE GARDENING
6c  WHAT TO PLANT" .
32 PAGES,       10+CSTAMPS)
CRASER
IVALLEY
LlURSERIESI™
P| RICHARD MfCOMtWHlMGR,
IIbox.a.aldergrove,b.c.
CRANBROOK LAND DISTRICT.
District ot   South    Division,   East
Kootenay.
TAKE NOTICE tnat I'hineas DeVere Hunt, ol Cranbrook, B.C., occupation Agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchnsc the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at
the north west corner of Lot 5805,
Oroup 1, Kootenay district, East
Kootenay; thence south 80 ch..lns;
thence west 20 chains, more or less,
to the east boundary of Lot 0315,
Group 1; thenco norlh 80 chains;
thence cast 20 chains, more or less,
lo the place ol beginning, containing
30 acres, more or less.
Phineas DeVere Hunt,
per   Robert  Williamson Henry,
Agent.
Dated February 1, 101.1. ll-lut
Hotel International
Oko, LoNDPRBt Proprietor
BUuated nt Kinutate, B.C., on
the boundary Line, in a spot of
rare pceuiu lieautyand the BportB-
niun'e piiradiut*.
Headquarters for Commercial Men and Tourists
KINOSQATB
B.     .C
Hotel Coeur D'Alene
Spokane, Wash.
A NEW AND
MODERN
HOTEL
(EUROPEAN)
A modem equipped Cnfe at moderate
prices
Rates $1.00 ami up per day
Comer of Howard Ht. and Front Ave.
Our Iiu.h meeta all trains
The Coeur D'Alene Company
PROPRIETOR!)
JABOB QOETZ, President
HARRY F. BAER, Secretary
Btf
The Home Bakery
Rohert Frame, Prop.
Fresh Bread, Cakes, Pies, and
Pastries or All Kinds
PHONE 87
Norbury Ave.      Opp. City Hall
j Headquarters for all kinds of
Repairs
j       Satisfaction Guaranteed
JOE   MARAPODI
The Shoe Specialist
FRANK DEZALL
Carries a full stock of
DEERINC MOWERS AND
RAKES
and
MCCORMICK M0WER8
Repairs for above always
in stock
GHAS.S. PARKER::
SuiTcBsor to P. T. F. PBBRV
DRAYING AND
TRANSFERRING
AGENTS FOR
THE IMPERIAL OIL 00.
AND GALT COAL     „
M-52 , [
ONLY FAULT
DRINK HABIT
Many Good Men Robbed ot High
Busmen and Social Standing
by Drink
Cured at
THK NKAI. INSTITUTE
in three days
Box 325, Cranbrook, B. O.
t High
ling
ITK       1
—I
W. F. OURD,
Banister, Solicitor, Etc
Money to loan ou favorable terms.
ORANBROOK.BRITISH dOI.tWRI.
HARVEY, McCARTER, MACDONALD
& NISRET
Barristers, Solicitors and
Notaries
Money to l.oiin
IMPERIAL BANK IUILDINC,  • CMKINOK •. C.
DRS. KINO & 0RBEN,
Physicians and Surgeons.
Oates at RssMstos,  Armstrong  t.s,
OFFICE HOURS :
Forenoons 1.00 to 10.M
Alternoons - - - 1.00 to 4.00
Evenings • ■ ■ ■ 7.00 to i.00
Aiudaya .... 1.00 to   s.00
CRANBROOK :i    ;•    «    h    B, O,
DR. F. B. MILES
DENTIST
OFFICE   HOURS'.
0 to 12 a.m.
1 to   0 p.m.
7 to   0 p.m.
Offloe ia Hanson Block.
CRANBROOK -        -       - B. 0,
Cranbrook Cottage Hospital
MtlBKNITV   AND   PRIVATE   NUHSIN0
Terms on Applicntion,
MRS. A. SALMON,
Phone 259 Matron.
P. O. Box 845    Armstrong Ave
B C   LAND SURVEYORS
McVlTTIE    &    PARKER
Cranbrook and Port Steele
IRRIGATION AND RAILWAY WORK
A SPECIALTY
********************* ;
J. O. CUiYlMINOS   *
IRRIGATION HNdlNBER
DOMINION AND PROVINCIAL LAND
SURVEYOR
Tat-No"™8 Cranbrook,B.C.::
.&.*A.ttAAA«fcAA«*fca*k«t«fcA«%a*k«%a%AAA
J. T.   LAIDLAW
MINING ENGINEER
B.  C. land Surveyor
CRANBROOK    -     B. C.
F. S.   ROSSETER
A M. Can. Hoc. C. E.
Civil Engineer and Architect
Office over Cranbrook Drug and Boos
Co's. Store
Telephone 380
P. O. Boi 37
THE HUME
Nelson's Leading Hotel
Rooms with Baths.   'Phone in
every room
Barber Shop on the premise!.
Thoroughly up-to-date.
Rates. $2.00 a day
and up
CRANBROOK-FERME
FARMERS1 INSTITUTE,
Presiilont: J. H. McGi.urk
Hflttretary. H. MacdonaM)
For in format lo'ii regarding lands
and   agriculture   apply   to the
Secretary, Graiihrnok. B. C.
Meeting—
Every second Wednesday
■»»*>»>»»»*>»a»<».»a»a>i.t#.«>i
THE CRANBROOK POULTRY AND PET
STOCK ASSOCIATION
1'iTK.ili'iit; 0. H. Sn*r.l'i*AHl>
Meats rftgiilfl'ly the flrat Friday eveiJogeapri
month.
Information on Poultry mntti>rnKupplie<l
AtlilrcKHtlinScrretiiry.
A. B. SMITH, Box 853
KING EDWARD'S 8GH00L
Hi'iulmislrrss: MissriiKHRlxoTos
Assistant: Miss UinifistiN
T131IMH I
IlniinlliiKKiHs $r,,00 ppr wawk
(ttirliialvp nl tuition)
BahoolFcea - »:!<10psr»«>lt
(lnchiillbi, stationery, uaeol liooka, .to.)
Kiuiii-iKiiricii •      |i ar,   "
Hoi. K.tra.:
l'ivii, I., otic par watk; aleak, HO. i*r saak.
W. R. battr. raaanl.Dlra.ta.
Cranbmok B. C.
Phone 346
P. M. riACPHERSON
UNDERTAKER
Norbury Ave., next to City Hall
Day Phone 233 Night I'lione 35C
Frank Provenzano
General Merchants
Employment Aosnta
CRANBROOK
P.O. Ml IS4
B. C.
MOW 144
It you want satisfaction with
your washing send
It to
MONTANA LAUNDRY
Hpeclsl nrioea lor latnily work.
CENTURY RESTAURANT
Uppoalta O.l'.K. Htiition
THE!    PLACE    TO     OKT    A
QUICK HEAL AM    ,
GOOD MEAL,
ROOMS TO RENT.
MR8. R. W. EDM0ND80N
Graduate ol London College ol
Music, Englsnd
Visits and Receives Pupils (or
PIANOFORTE OR ORGAN
UMONI ON THIMY AND VOICE PRODUCTION
Also representative (or Muson &
Risen Pianos
MSM
mm THE CRANBROOK   HERALD
The Easy Laxative
li Justice to yourself you should My RwU-Ordcrlies,—your
money back If you don't like them.   \Jyfafy& * candy con-
i that really do five easy relief from constipation.
Good health is largely dependent
upon the bowele. When they become
tlusgiih the waste material'that ia
thrown off by the system accumulates. Thia condition generates
polaona whieh circulate throughout
the body, tending to create coated
toagut, bad breath, headache, dull
brain action, nervousness, biliousness
Ud other annoyances.
Avoid harsh cathartics and physic*.
They give but temporary relief.
They often aggravate thc real trouble.
They are particularly bad for ohil-
flren, delicate ot aged persons.
Coma In tablet form, taste just like
•ttdy and are noted for their easy,
Mpthing action upon the bowels.
They   don't   purge,   ariijr,   CKUM
j », looseiiAH, nor tlie inconven-
unoaa attendant upon the use of
purgative*. Their action is an plcan-
ut that the taking of Kciall Order-
UN almost becomes a dealre instead
of a duty.
Children   like   Retail   Orderlies.
Tbey are ideal for aged or delicate
person^w well as for the most robuat.
They gfct toward relieving constipation, and also to overcome its cauaa
and to make unnecessary the frequent use of laiatives. They serve
to tone and strengthen the nerves
and muscles of the bowels and associate organs or glands.
Make Us Prove It
We guarantee to refund every
penny paid m for Hexali Orderlies if
tbey do not give entire satisfaction.
We ask no promises and we in no
way obligate you. Your mere word
is sufficient for un to promptly and
cheerfully refund the money.
Doeen't that prove that Rexall
Orderlies must be right? You must
know we would wit dure make such
a promise unless wo were positively
certain that Hexali Orderlies will do
ell we claim for thnm. There is no
money risk attached to a trial of
Reiall Orderlies, and in justice to
yourself, you should not hesitate to
test them.
Hexali Orderlies come in conven-
»nt vest-pocket else tin boxes. 12
taUeU, 10c; Ufl tablets, 26c; 80
tablets, 60c.
CAUTION: Pleaao bear In mind that Retail Orderlies are not aold by all drug-
gliU.   You can buy Rexall Orderlies only at the Retail Stores.
You ou buy Hexali Orderlies in this community only at our store:
Beattic Murphy Co. Limited
The WaSaiL Store   Bri,i8h c°lumbia
Cranbrook
There Is a Retail Store In nearly every town snd city in the United States, Canadnand
Great Britain. There is a different Reiall Ranwly for nearly every ordinary human HI —
each especially deaignsd for the partleulsr ill for whioh it li reootnmentied.
The Rexall Stores are America's Qreetest Drag Stores
0. C. SWAGE SITUATION
.    (From the Canada Lumberman)
Two important facts stand out. in
connection with the recent speech
-delivered by Hon. W. R. Koss, minister o( lands for British Columbia, in
moving the second reading of his
bilk to amend the Forests Act. In
the first place, so far as the lumbermen of the province are concerned,
tbo. bill is one which involves tho
doubling of thc royalty charge ipon
tbe cutting, of timber. Thc preterit
royalty is 50 cents per thousand feel.
In the second place, i*. is evident
from the speech of the minister of
lands that thc use of the Doyle rule
In tbe mountain district oi Hritish
Columbia is likely to be made the
Subject of an investigation with a
view to adopt some other method of
measurement whieh will brin.1; better
results to the government. 'I lit* third
feature of considerable inte*<si is the
announcement that the government
intends to make a levy of lj eeats
per ' acre for tire forest protect!nn
tund instead of 1 cent per acre. So
far as tbe lumbermen of the province
•are;concerned, therefore, the measure
Is one which will take from them
sufficient money to enable the government to increase its cxpendit tro
upon conservation and forestry woik.
This may be said to be a logical
outcome of the increased service,
'which is being given by tlie government in the direction of preserving
the forest resources of the province.
It is scarcely to be ex|>eeted that so
radical a change in the direction ol*
'increased taxation will be greeted by
'tbe lumbermen with enthusiasm.
j Mr. Ross' address in moving tin*
second reading of the bill was fairly
"brief, awl at the same time exceptionally interesting. In a general
way- he drew attention at first to the
rapidly changing conditions in con-
necMon with tin* lumbering industry
in British Columbia, nnd in connection with the forestry problems
whieh it involves, lie laid particular
stress ■'.ipon a general feeling that
niter the opening oi tlte Panama
Canal the value of timber in Hritish
Columbia will be great ly Increased
Thlj, fact, together with the rapid
opetfing up of the country by rail-
ways, tlie increase in population owing to immigration and similar conditions in connection with the
other province of Canada, was widening the markets for Hritish Columbia lumber, and Hon. Mr. Ross mentioned them as factors which were
certain to bring aboul a great appreciation in the value of Hritish Columbia standing timber. In this way,
lie claimed that the government was
amply justified in increasing the.
charges placed upon the lumbermen in
the form of royalty. Throughout
tbe address one note was clearly
paramount, \'v/., that tho increased
value of timber was a legitimate excuse lor Increasing tbo taxation upon
stumpage.
If this point iif view is examined
OrOSely it becomes quest imiahle
whether the excuse is as legitimate
as it appears ut lirst glance. The
increased value of timber does not
involve Increased profits to thc
men who cut it. This is an old assertion, but none the less true. Tlte
man who holds his timber is the one
who makes money. Tlie man who
cuts it, in most eases, paid a price
for his timber which was proport
tiouate to the increased value of timber in general. What Is more, when
he comes to do the cutting he hns to
pay .for his labor, machinery and
supplies, prices which have increased
In equal proportion to thc increase in
tbe cost ol timber. Mr. Ross mentioned in particular, as a reason for
increasing the stumpage charge, that
tbci purchasing price of a dollar was
much less than It was some years
ago. If this is a good excuse for
Imposing a higher tax it also must
be cmwMcrerf as an Important offset,
because thc lumber operator is equally handicapped when it comes to
purchasing timber, labor, machinery
and supplies with money whieh lias
decreased greatly in ils purchasing
power. When thc lumber operator
conies to ligute out tlie results of
his operations, u. is not often that,
he finds himself in even ns good a
position as tho man who made lumber years ago, from timber which
cost less and at a time when labor,
machinery and supplies were also
less expensive than they arc today.
Following along  tho same line    of
thought    there are oilier   conditions
today   which co-operato with    those
already mentioned to prevent        the
lumber     manufacturer   from making
any belter   profits   than those    who
preceded   him   in tho same business.
The chief of these is tho facility    of
transportation.      strange as it may
seem at    first glance, the multiplication of facilities    for getting lumber
to market    is not  an unmixed blessing.      It not only multiplies      tin* ;
available    market, but it   multiplies
the competition,    and, though      the
markets are always there, they    are j
not always   good1; whereas the      increased competition which is created
by greater    facilities for transportation is always   there, the only difference being thai in times of depressed I
trade, the competition becomes mot.*. '
keen than at other times. With     the :
lumber manufacturers of   Hritish Co-
fumbia ihis     condition is one which
has been brought    home U rcibly dur- j
ing the last hwo or three years. They
have suffered greatly on account     of
the   competition of lumber manufacturers   from    other parts of Canada
and   also   from the   United   States. ■
They have no redress against     com- :
petition.    They have nol even      the
satisfaction   of   protect inn    against
foreign lumber,   although up to date !
they have been handicapped In      the ,
markets of the United states by the J
heavy   duly   upon    lumber entering I
that   country,       Though their markets are open to the world, practically everything they   use ill connection
words, ought nut the stumpage
charges to be Imposed upon a basis
whioh places the burden upon the
party holding the timber, rather
than upon the party who manufactures it?
The address of the minister of
lands paid some attention to tho
fact that the charge for holding timber is extremely low. This charge
figures out at 22 cents an acre in
the coast district, and 18 cent's in
the mountain district, or from one-
half cent to throe cents per thousand
feet of timber, according in the
density of the stand. This provides
tiro government with a reasonably
certain income from its timber
I lands.
a careful reading of tlie speech ol
I the minister of lands upon this hill
leads to the conclusion thai while)
he is actuated'by q splendid ambition
i to make tho forest resources a perpetual source of largo income and to
make lhe most of the limber resources tor the people of the province, there is room for a consideration of Ihe question of increasing the
annual cut until it reaches the
amount of tlte animal growth, and at
tin* same    lime avoiding the placing
of a burden upon tho saw-milling
business In which profits are always
uncertain and moderate only; seeking
in fact, to secure its increased revenues, whenever necessary, more
directly from those who make
money nut of the timber resources of
the province.
That the proposed Increased stumpage charges will meet with extensive
land energetic opposition oil the part
[ of ihe lumber industry is indicated hy
events which have occurred since the
introduction of the bill. On February 17th a conference was held be-
I twecn a delegation of nearly 120 representatives of the lumber and timber interests of the province and
Sir Richard McBride and his colleagues. As a result of this conference
tho minister of lauds lias had further
consultations with a committee of
the delegation. The government has
been informed that the announced intention of doubling thc stumpage
charge has created consternation
among lumbermen. Resolutions had
been passed by a meeting of lumbermen urging that if the stumpage
were to be Increased il should not
become effective until 1018, and that
then it should be raised to 75 cents
only, and should remain there for. ten
years. Another resolution was
passed to ihe effect that if tho government would see to it that fire
wardens were appointed purely upon
their merits and not from any political consideration, no,, opposition
would be offered to the increased
charge of one-half cent per acre
against the holders of timber for fire
protect ion purposes.
The reply of the premier to lhe delegation was not encouraging. It
was practically lo the effect that the
lumbermen had had ample notice of
the intention of the government to
increase the stumpage charge; that
the government needed lhe money,
and that with the rapid expansion of
markets which was taking place the
lumbering Industry ought to bo able
to fool  the bill.
A   Woman    of
Few Words
Mrs. Harry K. Bye, Main Street
North) Mount Forest, Ont., writes:
"Your remedy for kidney, bladder
and stomach trouble lias given me
great relief. Have taken three
boxes and now feel like living and
better than I have felt for years and
I give your
FIG PILLS
all the praise, for they arc the best
I have ever tried!" At all dealers,
25 and 50 cents, or The Fig 1'ili
Co., St- Thomas, Ont.
Sold by the Cranbrook Drug and
Hook Co., Ltd.
Afterwards she tried to stab herself
with a hatpin. The manager succeeded in preventing hoc from killing
herself, hut she has since become deranged and is now iu an asylum. Tho
anger of the occupants of lhe gallery
was , chiefly directed nn Director
Uregur, who has frequently disappointed the audiences by substituting
■unknown singers at the last minute.
WEN'S THIRD
INDUSTRY   HAS CHIEAT
FUTURE.
with
their
opcrnll
oils
is i>rou
«twl
by ilul
!   "R°
inst lore
ign
compcti
lion.
lucre
used
stumpage
Oil
Urn ber
dors
nol thc
reton
• hear cli
isc ^
cnrMnj
as
well as
one
might
I,,, inclined
lo
Ihink p
it firs
1   glance
It  lias
the
qucsilo
asblo
fffirt of
enci
mraging
lhe
owner
of timber tu 1
old
on to l
I. in
the hope of making more money
through its Increased value on the
stump, rather than convert into lumber. 11 discourages culling, or
rather il puis upon the man who
cuts, a burden sufficient to enable the
government to adopt modern methods of forest protection Nothing
but praise is due to ihe government
for seeking to protect ils forests sufficiently, but the important question
today is how io impose the taxation
to moot the cosls. The man who
uts the lumber under present conditions, pays for the cost of protecting
the speculative holder of timber
against loss by fire mid by the many
ther agencies who co-operate In reduce lhe value of standing timber, It
might he reasonable to continue pie-
sent methods if there were Immediate] danger of Ihe timber resources
being depleted, but apparently tho
opposite Is the ense. The minister
of. lands reports as the result of investigations which have been made of
late, that the annual growth of timber in Hritish Columbia is greater by
five times, than the quantity which is
being cut. Therefore, large areas,
he states, upon which the timber is
over-ripe nnd where decay is taking
place for want of cutting.
Under these conditions should not
the. government consider more thoroughly Ihan it appears to have done
Speaking before lhe Business Club
in Vancouver, II. Ft, MacMillan,
head forester for the provincial government, gave many statistics regarding the timber industry of. Hritish Columbia. He discussed at some
length    the great benefit of the    fire
■ protective service, and stated that if
. this were as successful as planned it
■ would insure one of the largest Industries to this province, since there
.are only three places which have s()
■much virgin timber.      Only one-fifth
■ of the annual growth is now cut,
and  onlj one-third of the trees    are
i marketed. He thought that instead
Of there being only 300 sawmills
there should he 3,000, it markets-
i were made accessible and fire protee-
I tion is adequate.
j T. F. Patcrson, a praelical mill-
man, who followed, was not quite so
optimistic as Air. MacMillan; still he
called the industry one of the greatest in the province and one capable
| of development. He declare^ that
'the charges of lhe government for
timherliind were abnormally high-
(The cut in 1012 he placed at 1,500,-
> Ollll.OOO feet and said that would he
'exceeded. Mr. Patterson thought lb
was the government's duty to find
.out what can be done toward securing by-products from the woods
grown in the province.
AUDIENCE)    HOSTILE,    SINGER
aoKS MAD.
HAS    STAGE    FRIGHT, MAKES
PITIABLE FAILURE-HOOTED BY AUDIENTJE ATTEMPTS SUICIDE.
Vienna, March 11.—Tho violent
hostility of the audience at the Im-
Perlnl theatre last night drove tlte
Swiss singer, Prau Jaurno to make
_^^^^^^^^^^^^^^_.^.^.^_. an attempt at suicide. She. had been
tho necessity for encouraging cutting substituted for Frnu Wcidt, who* was
on such areas? Ought not tho in- ill, in the role of Valentine, in Mfeyer-
dustry whieh actually creates the beer's "Les Huguenots/' Frau
merchantable article out of the. , .Inuruo had an attack of ■stage fright
standing timber to. he encouraged in nnd made a pitiable failure. Tho oo-
manner which would mean more cttpants of thc galleries hooted and
certain profits rattier than lhe man whistled nnd shouted, "Away with
who speculates upon the future value her; we. have enough," and the young
ol timber lelt utandlng?    ln     other  woman, retired   in a fit of hjri.Uet.ttJ.
Golden, B.C., Mar. 10—Determined
to make the third annual fair held at
Golden a much bigger success than
previous exhibitions held here have
iroven, the officers and directors of
he (1 olden Agricultural association
to now In harness. At the adjourned annual meeting held on Saturday afternoon, officers for the ensuing year were appointed and much
other important business transacted.
The accounts presented showed the
association to be in a very robust
condition financially, and altogether
the affairs of the organization are
very; healthy. The fixing of tho
dates for the fair Ihis year was, on
motion, left in the hands of the. directors, as was also the matter of
conducting an attractive programme
of .sports separately from the fair,
hut on the same dates.
OFFICERS ELECTED.
The officers elected were:
President—Thomas King.
Vice-President—N. M, Foulvcs.
Secretary!—R. I.andells.
Treasurer—J. A. Ruckham.
At tho conclusion of this meeting
the Golden District Farmers' Institute was called to order, and
much important business connected
with this body transacted, paramount of whieh was the receiving of
the report of the delegate to the recent iannual convention of the Farmers' Institutes of Hritish Columbia,
held at Victoria. The delegate
from this district, G. B. McDermot.
lated that thc most important. resolution passed at the Victoria gathering ■ was that requesting the provincial government to Immediately
appoint, a royal commission on agriculture,   whieh has since been done.
This commission is enquiring into
matters of all kinds pertaining to
the advancement of agricultural interests,, bul its chief scope* is to enquire into tho feasibility of making
government loans to farmers. The
commission will sit in Golden in the
near future, and Mr. McDermot requested all farmers in the district to
attend lhe sitting. The officers and
directors of the Golden Agricultural
association were chosen to preside
over the affairs of the Golden District Farmers' Institute during the
coming year.
A   GOOD  FINANCIAL   SHOWING.
(Morning Albertan).
The province of Hritish Columbia
showed a deficit of thousands of dollars, and the provincial treasurer estimated u much larger deficit during
the current year. The province of
Ontario shows a deficit of thousands
of dollars, and the acting provincial
treasurer announces tbat the expanding interests of the province make
the expanding of large sums of money
necessary.
The province of Alberta, the
youngest of all the provinces, with a
limited revenue, shows a surplus of
about $120,0(01 from the general revenue and for the telephone department. The needs ate greater, comparatively speaking, in Alberta than
in any of the other provinces. This
shows that the government did excellent financing and used the strictest economy. The cry of reckless
llnancing will cease from this time
forward, and let us hope forever.
ONE   CANADIAN   IN PRESIDENT
WILSON'S CABINET.
Washington, March II,—One Canadian has become a cabinet minister
on the accession of President Wilson.
He is Franjcltn Knight Lane, who
was born in Prince Edward Island in
1884. He was educated in California, however, and practiced law
tbere. Ho was a candidate for
governor on the Democratic ticket in
that state and received the Vote of
his party for senator. He has for
years been a member of the interstate commerce commission and represents lhe I'nited Stales on the international railway commisdon.
an
Advertisement!
T CAME into being as the spoken language
came • slowly, gradually, and to meet an
urgent need. I have been worked for evil, but
mostly I have worked for good. I can still be
worked for evil, but each day it grows more
difficult so to do.
I am at once a tool and a living force. If
you use me wisely, I am a tool in your employ.
If you misuse me, my double edge will injure or
destroy you. If you do not use me, I am a
force that works ever against your accomplishment of the aims and purposes that animate
your business.
I spenk a thousand tongues and
have a million voices.
I am the ambassador of civilization, the handmaiden of science, and
the father of invention.
I have peopled the prairie, and
with my aid commerce has laid twin
trails of gleaming steel in a gridiron
across the continent and stretched a
network of copper intothe far corners
of the globe.
I am the friend of humanity— for
I have filled the commoners life with
a hundred comforts denied the king
of yesterday.
I laugh at tarilis and remake laws.
I have scaled the walls of the fanner's isolation and linked him to tlu.'
world of outer interests.
I build great factories aud people
them with happy men and women
who love the labor I create.
I have made merchants princes out
of corner shopkeepers and piled the
wealth of a Monte Cristo into the
laps of those who know my power.
I am a bridge that cancels distance
and brings the whole world to your
doors, ready and eager to buy your
wares.
I find new markets and gather the
goods of the world into a handful of
printed pagcB.
I fathered the ten-cent magazines
and the penny paper.
I am either the friend or the foe to
Competition—so he who finds me first
is both lucky and wise.
Where it cost cents to hire me yesterday, it costB quarters to-day. and
will cost dollars to-morrow. But
whosoever uses me had best have
sense ; for I repay ignorance with
loss and wisdom with the wealth of
Croesus.
I spell service, economy, abundance, and opportunity; for I am the
one and only universal alphabet.
I live in every spoken word and
printed line in every thought that
moves man to action and every deed
thnt displays character.
I am Advertising.
Advice regarding your advertising problems is
available through an application to the Herald
Advertising Department. THKOKANBttUOK HERALD
A FIREMAN'S PERIL.
How Zam-Buk Delivered Him,
Ave
Edmonton.
At 215 Fraser
Alta., lives W. P. Mahy
member of the local lire brigade,
who has wonderful cause to. he
thankful for the curative powers of
Zam-Buk. He says: "A serious skin
disease broke out on my face, and
spread until I was In a terrible
state. The spots svml foUle ulcers
were (rightfully irritating, and yet
when scratched or rubbed they bled
and smarted. Shaving caused me
agony, and sometimes I would have
to go two weeks without a shave. I
tried home-made remedies, herb
salves, and various other preparations, but the. sores got no better.
When Zam-Buk was mentioned I had
little faith that it would be able to
do me any good. My case seemed
such an obstinate one. I gave it a
fair trial, however, and the lirst box
made such a wonderful change for tin-
better that it gave me encouragement to continue, f did so, and to
cut a long story short, Zam-Buk, in
the end, quite cured me. My face is
now clear of all traces of the terrible disease, which troubled me tor
so long."
Thousands of sufferers from eczema,
blood    poison,   ulcers, chronic sores,
piles,  ringworm,  cold sores,     cuts,
burns and skin injuries, have been relieved and   cured, as   was Mr. Mahy,
by Zam-Buk.    As a balm for all skin
injuries   and   diseases it is     wilhoui
equal,    All druggists and stores    a
50c. box, or post, free from the Zam-
Buk Co., Toronto,     Ont., for price.
Refuse harmful substitutes.
will be Athalmere   and it is thought I
that   preparations    lot   the coming
work will be made by thc shipping in
of their supplies shortly after       the
opening of navigation.  This company I
ADDRESS BY GOVERNMENT
EXPERTS
lu'va tendered
evening.
the speakers of    the
a former |was operating in here up to tlie late
summer ot I»12. They hail a large
store in AttaliniTc anil at times
would have an many as three Hundred men scattered through thcln
various camps in the neighborhood
cutting the lumber Irom "fl their
lar^e limits.
ILLUSTRATED  LECTURES     AT
CITY   HALL ON   SOIL FERTILITY   AND POTATO
(■ROWING.
THE WML OF
WHITE HOCK
The editor of thc Saturday Sunset
has received numerous complaints of
the operations of a subscription agent
acting for a certain magazine publication in this city, by whom the
name ot both the Saturday Sunset
and its editor have been used to promote thc sale of certain subdivision
lots near White Hock, a seaside resort, not. very prominent as such
however, near the boundary.
The editor while in Chilliwack this
week met with many indignant
subscribers lo the magazine who
wanted to know about certain
things. As 1 was entirely ignorant
of the affair I asked my interrogators
lor an explanation, which was given
to me in large and fluent blocks.
The lirst man who talked to me
was a mcrchnnl whom I know well
and with whom I have.done considerable business. His story is as follows:
A certain individual had approached him in the interests of the
magazine in question. The agent represented that the Saturday Sunset
was interested in the publication
and us I am fairly well known in
Chilliwack, as the merchant explained, the man's bouahdes, and his proposition were received without question. His proposition was that for
every two-dollar subscription to the
magazine the subscriber would have
the privilege of purchasing a lot at a
placed called White Ilock Heights for
which the insignificant sum of thirty-
five dollars would he charged. The
lots were sold subject to inspection,
and, the merchant told me, if they
were not satisfactory the subscrip-
er would at least get value for tho
deposit money by a year's subscription to the magazine. In all, seven
subscriptions and sales ot lots were
made in that one store, the young
lady clerks among others taking lots.
About forty lots were sold iu thc
town-
After the transaction thc purchasers delegated a committee to go to
White Rock Heights and sec the lots.
The merchant describing them to me
said they were up on a bench, not
near the sea. There was no road or
trail to tbem. To get to them one
would need hip boots to wade
through the swamp. The lots were
covered with fallen timber and
stumps, some of which would cost a
hundred dollars to take out, He and
others who spoke to me jjbout them
expressed the opinion thnt the transaction was nothing less than a
swindle. After hearing the report ol
tbe committee the subscribers decided to refuse to take the lots,
which they accordingly did.—Saturday Sunset.
Thc canvasser appeared in Cranbrook about two weeks ago and we
learn that u number of our citizens
have purchased White Hock property
in consequence.
 »  ,      ...
In the provincial estimates for thti
year ending March 31st, 1914, the
Columbia riding is down to receive
the sum of $112,580.01) for roads,
streets, bridges and wharves, being
the amount to be expended iu the
ordinary course of opening up the
territory. In addition to this there
is the important grant of another
sixty thousand dollars towards the
construction ol the famous Haufl-
Windermeie automobile road This
part ol the International highway is
being constructed across the Rocky
Mountain range. The present work
was- commenced at Castle on the
main line of the Canadian Pacific.
From there it travels along south
and west and meandering through the
Kootenay Hiver Valley crosses the
western range of the Rocky .Mountains by Sinclair Pass. In ihis pass
it goes by the eommcndablc hoi
springs of the same name as the
pass, and then follows on down to
tbe main trunk road of the Columbia-
Kootenay rivers valley. Last year
an appropriation of seventy-live thou-
saod dollars made by the provincial
government and supplemented by a
like amount from the Canadian
Pacific railway was spent in the
road's construction. This year the
Canadian Pacific railway arc again
meeting the government grant with
like appropriation, so that by the
close of the year if all the money appropriated has heen spent it will
mean a total outlay up to that date
of two hundred and seventy thousand
dollars. It is hoped before the
close of the season of 1013 that communication over this road will be
possible with Banff and Calgary.
At a meeting of the directors ot
the Windermere District Agricultural
association held recently at Athalmere the secretary presented a draft
copy of the proposed bylaws and
look the first step towards tlw. arranging of thc fall lair prize list.
This handy booklet should, it is
hoped have passed through the hands
of the printer and be ready for distribution by the first of May next.
The dale of the fair, as set at thc
annual conventtion, 's the first, second and third of September. This
makes a most excellent arrangement
in order to enable this district to
enter into hearty co-operation with
its neighbors and make up a most
excellent display for exhibit in    the
uls-ide fairs, whieh follow ours in
due and regular course.
ln spite of the rather mild weather
which for some days has prevailed,
the enthusiastic members lof the
Wilmer Curling club have been holding a fest and been busily engaged in
pulling off a number of matches
amongst the rinks of their club.
It is a widely advertised fact that
many ol the about-to-arrtve settlers
br'nging in many varieties of
prize poultry, with which to start
chicken farms aud the local industry
itself is being augmented and stimulated. The choicest varieties in
here up to the present are the Rhode
Island Reds; White Orpingtons,
White Rocks and Brown Leghorns.
 f. ■
CHURCH COLUMN
KNOX PRESBYTKRIAN CHURCH.
Pastor, W. Kelman Thomson*.
Morning    service, 11 a.m. Subject:
nod the Searcher of the Heart."
S. S. and Bible class-3 p.m.
Kveniiiag service, 7.30 p.m. A Study
ot      Old.     Testament     Characters.
Ishmaet.
, * ,
BAPTIST CHURCH.
Morning worship, 11.00k. Subject*
Tho Berean Revival." ,
Sunday school and Bible class, 3
p.m.
Evening worship, 7.30k. Subject:
The Witnesses of Saul's Conversion."
TOWNTOPICS
Mrs.   (Rev).   \V.    E.   Dunham has
becu very ill this week.
ROOMS ip   LET.-Iioard il desired.     P. O. Bos 852.     'I'lione 199.
TTH
E DPEA.TI
LAROK    AMOUNT    FOR BANFK-
WINDERMKRE AUTOMOBILE
ROAD - OTHER ITEMS
AT INVEKMERK.
Invermere, March 12.—It is currently reported and rumored on the
streets that it is the intention of the
Columbia River Lumber company to
resume their logging operations here
this year.      Their local hendnuarters
The special meeting under the auspices of the Parmer's Institute in the
government's short course schedule
held in the. city hall on Monday
evening was very poorly attended,
but those present were amply repaid
for coming to the addresses given.
The chair was occupied by J. II.
McClure, president of the Farmer's
Institute, and without any delay he
called upon Mr. B. Hoy, of Victoria,
tn address the gathering.
Mr. Hoy spoke on soil cultivation
and fertility. ln his remarks on
cultivation Mr. Hoy drew attention
lo tin* need of artificial methods to
free soil from superfluous water as
bacterial action, which was tlie
means by which plaint food became
available, was destroyed by, the
presence of such water, and then do-
voted his attontioni to tlie different
menus used to retain the necessary
amount or water to facilitate decay
of mutter iu the soil and growth of
plants.
Tho speaker divided this last into
two heads. First, get your soil in
condition to hold water. Second,
cultivate the soil to retain this
moisture. As a means to accomplish the first he spoke on subsoiling,
deep plowing and green manuring and
recommended Ik* soil mulch as the
tuie means to bring about the-second,
mentioning methods and tools most
serviceable to this end.
In his talk on fertility Mr. Hoy
gave his attention to commercial fertilizers and the crops on which they
(((tiid profitably he used.
Ptcfacin)*} his remarks by remind-
in.; his hearers that all plant food
was comprised in the three eonstut-
uents, potash, phosphoric acid and
nitrogen, he spoke of the value of
barnyard manure emphazing the
fact that this .source of fertility had)
two values, i.e., the direct value of
the amount of plant food it contains and the much greater indirect
value it has hy its effect on soil by
means of the action its fermentation
aud decay produces in the breaking
down and liberating of mineral fertility already in the soil but not
available in its natural state and
again iu ils value as added humus in
the soil by adding to the moisture-
relalulng quality of thc soil and opening it up to penetration of air. Mr.
Hoy stated that chemical fertilizer
applied lo soil devoid of humus was
of very little value and to secure results humus must first of all be supplied. Nitrogen could be supplied in
soil by plowing down green crops, by
applying it as commercial nitrate of
soda which contains 16 per cent o(
nitrogen, and is used for crops wanting quick and early growth in small
successive applications. Its chief
place is for growth of leaf and stalk
mops such as lettuce, rhubarb, etc.
Sulphate, of ammonia is another
form in which to apply nitrogen but
is of slower action and requires plenty of lime in the soil to get best
results.
Tankage and dried blood arc also
forms in whieh nitrogen is supplied
and in this form used for late crops
and fruits.
Potash is applied either as sulphate
of potash, muriate ol potash or wood,
ashes.
This is the clement necessary     to
produce starch sugar, flavor and keeping qualities, but the muriate of   potash form   is not advisable for a po-  changes
talo  manure as it    makes the tuber   interior
waxy.
Phosphoric   aeid is supplied as superphosphate whieh contains IB      per makin8 thti    Auditorium
cent phosphoric acid is applied in'the   Mv«   amusement    place.
spring   or in the    form of basic slag
which contains phospheric acid     and
Pure-bred White Wyandotte
Eggs for Hatching. Record layers.
$2.00 sitting Q. W. Patmore.
Miss Stewart, who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. R. T. Brymner,
left Saturday for Spokane.
Maurice Qualn came in from Medicine Hat this week and is spending a
few days with his business here.
Mr. and Mrs. .1. F. Doano left
today for Kamloops on an indefinite
visit with friends,
Mr, and Mrs. Fred Chapman and
young son spent the first few days
of the week at Calgary returning today.
Rev. A. E. Smith, of Nelson, will
preach at the Methodist church next
Sunday at both services. Mr. Smith
is one of the strongest preachers of
thc northwest. Special musical
programme will ho rendered at both
services.
SPECIAL PRICES. — Apples,
$1 75 and $1.65 for cash. Potatoes
$1.00 per cwt.—Cranbrook Trading Co.
Mrs. N. M. Cummlngs and little
daughter, Phoebe, returned to their
home in Nelson today1 after spending
several weeks here, visiting her son,
T. C. Cummings, teller at thc Royal
Bank.
On Wednesday -J. I). Murray, proprietor lof thc East Kootenay Mercantile company, made^a voluntary
assignment oni behalf of his creditors. -I. A. Arnold was named as
assignee. The store will be open
temporarily in charge of Mr. J. Kum-
sey, pending am agreement among
the creditors.
A meeting of the Conservative association which was well attended
was held in Matin-son's hall on Monday evening. In the absence of tho
president and vice-president Ira Manning was chosen for presiding chairman. A discussion over the securing of names for registration,was indulged in and Mr. A. Henderson was
appointed to cover thc district. A
number of local commissioners will
be busy in thc city.
After a spell ot real spring weather
and several sunshiny days" we awakened ^Wednesday morning to find that
winter had sprung a little joke on Us
in the shape of about a loot of snow.
It continued to snow until Wednesday
noon, and the snowstorm ,was one
of those ot which Cranbrook can
boast that no country can excel!.
However, it is warmer today and we
continue to look for spring in spite
of the) little joke by the weather
man.
SPECIAL PRICES. — Apples,
$1.75 and $1.65 for cash. Potatoes
S1.00 per cwt.-—cranbrook Trad
Ing Co.
Workmen have been busy this week
at the   Auditorium,    making  several
in the appearance of     the
building  new   steps,   and
painting the   front.      The new proprietors,    Baldwin     Bros.,    propose
an attrac-
 |" One improvement will  be an air vent      in
the    ceiling    which   insures a good
and is   applied thc fall belorc >PPlv oi fresh air in «* hal1 at a11
is commonly    used for orchard .tomes.
IHE WORLD OF FASHION
tools now used in up-lo-date potato
A stroll through the dry goods and culture on a large scale and the
clothing store ol McCreery Bros, will methods of planting, tilling, harvest-
impress on one that various trends ing and storing,
of fashion arc followed with care by He stated that varieties that were
the people ot Cranbrook. at present leading the markets    and
Probably thc feature of greatest in- advised that it was thc jjart of wis-
terest is thc wealth of gorgeous dom for the potato grower to keep
colors, cleverly exhibited in thc new his acreage aboul) tlie same from
millinery. For present wear, nearly
everything that is shown is small
smart shapes with tall trimmings,
Nell rose and flame yellow, christened *'Co(i de rocliE," radiate the brilliance of the colorings. tixuoiisilc
tans   and    browns     in all   shades,
lime
and ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
and pastures, and also as ground
hone, which is used for the same
purpose and to get best value re-
tpiltcs to be finely ground.
Mr. Hoy emphasized the fallacy of
the claims of some agents that commercial fertilizers contain humus and
concluded hy saying that an actual
test of fertilizer on the soil was the
only reliable way ol ascertaining
whether it would pay.
Mr. P. French's address was ou ,1,^_.^.J,1,^.J,_.1.^_.1,^__i,.1,^.1.1,^_i_
potatoes and emphasized thc benefits start at nine o'clock and the band
of selection of seed. He recom- twill play tho first few numbers on
mended seed from a shorter season the programme, being later relieved
district for early crop and gave a by the orchestra.
very   instructive talk on the various
Invitations arc being issued tori thc
City Band dance which occurs at the
Auditorium on Monday evening,
March 31st, 1913, and which promises to he one of the most popular
after-Lent functions. The music will
be by the Edison orchestra, augmented by members of the band. The
refreshments will be in thc hands of
a number, of ladies and promises to
be a "classy" spread.    Dancing will
j   Miss Marion Paterson died at   the
home of her mother in this city    on
Wednesday morning at 3 o'clock    ol
heart   trouble.       She was a     well
] known    young lady, and one     year
ago was a stenographer at the C. P.
R. land  office, her sister holding    a
similar position with    thc Canadian
Bank of Commerce.    She has been in
year to year.    Thc man who did this   poor health since before the holidays,
usually averaged    a fair profit while   The body was taken to the undertak-
the one that jumped in big one year   ing parlors of  F. M. Macpherson and
and little or none the next, as       a   a brief   funeral service was 'held     at
rule, reaped    little profit in thcilong   the station this afternoon, conducted
run. by Rev. E. P. Flewelling, thc    body
At thc close of Mr. French's    dis-   being  shipped    to Sutton, Ont., lor
Ocean green   and beautiful shades of  eottrse r a number    of lantern slides   interment,
blue are used. were shown,     illustrating the laying | —
The .splendor of color is probably out of orchards, systems of pruning I TO RENT.—Comfortable eight
explained by the attention that is and cultivation,1 inter-cropping and roomed house with largo bathroom
drawn to Turkey, Bulgaria and various tools untl appliances found and pantry; electric light, 'phone,
Oececc through thc war.       Oriental  useful. etc.,   nice   grounds,   chicken   house,
and Bulgarian trimmings on suits and     At the close the meeting adjourned   coal and wood sheds.   Apply   G. H.,
coats are distinct outcome:; after at   hearty    vote ot thanks had   Herald office. PHt*
Men and  Women, You Now
Have a Chance of Regaining
Your Health Since the
Importation of
VIGOROL
THE GREAT FRENCH TONIC
Into Cranbrook by the Cranbrook Drug and Book Co,,
tbe Leading Druggists.
Weak and run-down, tired and full
ot pain. Do you know you can feel
better in a tew days if you ate only
wise enough to tabu VKlOHOL, tho
Oreat French Tonic. Your pains
and aches will go. If you are rundown, 110 ambition, tired and lazy,
VIGOROL will make you strong.
VIGOKOL builds up thc nerves, purifies* tlie blood, removes rheumatism,
cleanses the whole system, drives out!
everything that pertains to disease.
Disease cannot live where VIGOROL
is. Why suffer? Surely your lite is
worth a tew dollars. Well then,
you can buy VIGOROL for one lot-
lar a bottle, or six for five dollars,
at Cranbrook Drug and Hook Storo.
Those Blue Serge
.103 lttOlI i **^
Suits
At $18.00 are equal to almost
any Suit you ever saw at
$25.00.
WILL W0RKJ1 PRIZE LIST
Tho executive ot the Agricultural
association met in the secretary's
office, on Wednesday evening. The
president! not being present Mr. T.
S. Gill, second vice-president, was
moved to thc chair.
There was very little business before the meeting, the prize list committee reported that they expected
to take up their work at once and
asked permission to add to their
numbers, which was granted.
The committee on constitution reported that they had thc draft prepared aud would present it at the
next meeting.
A committee from thc Poultry association asked consideration for a
request for a better building on the
grounds and some action to avoid
sidetracking the poultry exhibit, as
formerly, by its out of the way lotion. The president of the Poultry
association, Mr. Sheppard, and Mr.
Webb, presented the request,and a
committee from the executive was
appointed to confer with the delegation and they were assured even-
effort would be made to satisfy
them.
Mr. Hamilton presented a list of
fruit varieties largely grown at
Creston and a request tbat those be
added to tho prize list this year.
Consideration of this was turned over
to the prize list committee.
Just come to the store and
let us show you this Suit
and let us prove its great
value. We defy competition.
*****************••.
my
*
************i
NOTICE   TO    TELEPHONE SUBSCRIBERS.
The  following new    numbers have
been put into service:
No. Name. Residence
460 Mrs.   J.    S. Brake ...Residence
461 J. D. Gllmour Offlcc
428   J. D. Oilmour   Residence
461 Government   Forestry   Servile,
J. D. Gilmour.
462 E. F. .Johnson (Plumbcr)...Shop
459   Geo. R. Leask Workshop
72   Young Men's Club
Please    use numbers when railing.
Cut this out and   paste in your telephone book.
 ♦
THE      SINGING    REVIVALISTS
VISIT CRANBROOK.
Brig, and Mrs. Green, of Vancouver, conducted special services in the
Salvation Army hall on Wednesday
and Mrs. Green was very much ap-
tendance was very good both evenings, and tho singing of Brigadier
and Thursday of last week. The at-
preciated by all. Capt. McLean
ot Fcrnie, sang a number of beautiful
solos.
I
NOTICE. ■
Lee Mow and Let Fat have purchased the property at the corner of
French avenue and Van Home street.
and are conducting the Kwong Chong
Wing restaurant thereon. Mt
STORAGE   ROOM
TO RENT
Furniture, Pianos, ' runks. Buggies,
Sleighs, Etc., stored at very reasonable
rates, in good dry warehouse
APPLY A I   HKPALI) nF' I  F tt
********** ********
P- BURNS & CO., LTD.
Cranbrook, B. C,
PROVISIONERS and
EXPORTERS
All Our Meats are Government
Inspected
Head Oflice.  CALGARY, ALTA.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦•>•>♦•>•>♦♦♦<
EGOS FOR HATGHINO
A list of local poultry breeders,
with varieties kept, will be supplied
free to all inquirers by applying to
the Secretary of tho
CRANBROOK POULTRY ASSOCIATION
FTIE
CITY OF CRANBROOK
APPOINTMENT   OP    CITY ENGINEER.
Applications arc invited for tin* position of City Engineer tor tin1 Corporation of the City of Cranbrook.,
Applicants would kindly -slate experience and salary required. Applications should he addressed to the
undersigned so as to he received by
March 29th, 1»13.
T. M. ROHKKTS,
City Clerk,
Dated    at   Cra*n.hiook,   B.C., this
Hh day of March, 1013. ll-2t
GRAY HAIR
Dr. Tremnin'n Natural Hair Restorative will
positively restore (fray hair tn natural <*i'lor nti-l
keep it no. IT IS NOT A DYE ami will not in-
jure the flcatii. SatirifHtHun tTiinrutileed or tr.np. y
refunded. Frio* one doIUr. Sent peat *mnl.
Addr.aa THC TREMAIN SUPPLY CO.
Dapt. 13, Toronto. Ont.
Cranbrook Kindergarten
Edward fitwt
CONDUCTED IV MRS. ». A. MCKIVEFT
f.rtlflcut«ri Teaehrr, Heliool It'd for London
Flour.: Into l!i; 8 to 4
terms: far. lorfnttr rntki
Address A. B. Smith,
Box 852, City.    •
MACHINERY FOR SALE
I have the following machinery tor
sale and In order to clear them out,
oitrr them at the prices below, which
are about one-filth the price that
new machinery would cost:
1 Chandler aid Taylor firebox boiler, 54"xl8' long. Pressure 80 lbs.
last II. 0, Inspection, 48 h.p. Price
loaded on can at McNelllie, near
Creston, B.C., $175.00.
1 Atlas Keturn tubular boiler,
5U"xl4' long. Pressure 80 lbs. last
II. 0. Inspection, 45 h.p. Price
loaded on cars at McNelllie, near
Creston, B.C., 1175.00.
1 refitted Atlas automatic cut-oil
engine, ll"xl6" stroke. Price at
Cranbrook, B. C, J200.00.
1 saw husk complete with top saw
frame and mandrels and saws and
20 feet extension shaft, I25O.0O.
1 four saw edger with taws. Price
at Cranbrook, 1200.00.
1 Hoyt planer and matcher, 24".
Price at Cranbrook, $100.00.
Also a quantity of shafting, etc.
Apply to
THOS. W. LEASK
Elko, B. C.
COAI. AND PETROLEUM NOTICE.
thirty    days alter  date  I Intend to
NOTICE IS HEREBY   GIVEN that
apply to the Chief CommlaroMr of
Lands and to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands for the District of
East Kootenay tor a license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the
following described lands, situate on
the North Fork of Michel Creek,
about six miles north of tke Canadian Pacific Railroad and lying between the Mclnnes Oroup and the
Crows Nest Pass Coal Company's
land:
Commencing at a post planted at
R. O. Belden's northwest corner,
same being the initial post of R.
Covington's claim, and marked "R.
Covington's southwest corner,"
thence 80 chains north; thence M
chains east; thence 80 chains south;
thence 80 chains west to place of beginning, containing 840 acres, more
or less.
Located January 21, 1918.
R. Covington, Locator.
Batlce Lameroux, Agent. Ml
COAL AND PETROLEUM NOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN tbat
thirty days after date I intend to
apply to tho Chief Commissioner ol
Lands and to tbe Assistant Commissioner of Lands for thc District 01
East Kootenay tor a license to prospect for coal and petroleum on tbe
following described lands, situate on
the North Fork ot Michel Creek,
about six miles north ot Un Canadian Pacific Railroad and lying between thc Mclnnes Oroup and tbe
Crows Nest Pass Coal Company's
land:
Commencing at a post planted at
(. O. Belden's northwest corner,
same being the initial post ot R.
Covington's claim, and marked "R.
Covington's southwest corner,"
thence 80 chains north; tbtnee 80
chains cast; thence 80 chains south;
thence 80 chains west to place of beginning, containing 840 acres, more
or leas.
Located January 21, 1918.
R. Covington, Locator.
Batlce Lustrous, Agent  Ml

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cranherald.1-0070635/manifest

Comment

Related Items