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Cranbrook Herald Sep 17, 1925

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Array THE CRANBROOK HERALD
VOLUME
~~ .B1NCIAL LIBRARY
2 7 Apr. 1-HH
CRANBROOK, B.C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER  17th,  [925
\ V  M I! li R   .! II
Shows Wealth
of District
Fall Fair Wednesday Brings
Together Varied Display
of Produce
qualityIs HIGH
Considering the cold disagreeable
duy and the fact that thc attractions
outside of the fair features themselves were uot as great as formerly,
the attendance ut Crnnbrook's fall
fuir was better than many expected.
The athletic events on the truck attracted a good crowd of spectators,
who enjoyed the competitions.
It will bo necessary to leuve the
publication of thc prize awards till
the next issue, and only a short resume of the fair can-be given on account of Inck of time to treat it
adequately.
The exhibits in the building were
well above the average for fairs in
Cranbrook, the display in the women's section being particularly creditable. The exhibit of fancy work,
home cooking, flowers and school
work attracted much attention. That
beautiful flowers can be grown in
Cranbrook was abundantly evidenced
by the profusion of bloom on display,
Mrs. Geo. Smith, who was a heavy
winner in this class, should be given
credit for a good showing in this
class as a whole. Considering that
the district has been visited by several frosts, the display made was all
the more creditable.
That St. Mary's can grow something besides wheat was made plain
by the winnings of Mrs. F.'J. Mott
in the flower show, she having several nice displays.
The fancy work brought forth a
nice collection of work, which represented much painstaking work on the
pnrt of the ladies. Someone estimated that it would even break Ford
if he hod to pay a cent for each
stitch in the collection. In this class
Miss Mott waa the heavy winner
with many beautiful pieces of work.
The displny of cooking was also
very tempting, particularly for anyone having a weakness for pie.
The competition for the prhea oft
fered by the Fleetwood Flour company resulted in several new recipes being presented for bread, cookies, etc.
The display of work from the Public school wus good, but did not arrive in time to be properly displayed.
The manual training exhibits also
drew forth much favorable comment, und the exhibition of Indian
wares Was very good.
The Forestry department, under
the direction of Mr. Flummerfelt,
hnd a displny which was well worth
the whole trouble of a visit to the
fair building. A section of the main
building, about twenty-five feet by
twelve, wns transformed into a minn-
tUN forest landscape, showing mountain, hill, lake, stream, farm, ratl-
wny, mill, game, and the undesirubte
burnt over areu. This exhibit, doubtless, took much time to prepare, 90
bags Of BAWdlUt and many bags of
moss, with which it was covered,
trees ami evergreens, etc., being required Tut  its mnking.
Live Stock Display
The holla showing wus good in
quality, but not ns many were shown
lis wns anticipated. The saddle hor-
SM wen* a strong class.
The showing of pigs larked in
numbers, bttt was very good at the
top.
There wns n nice displuy of cattle,
a Guernsey yearling of Mr. Lancaster being the grand champion hull
of Ihe show.
.1. Taylor, of Wycliffe, had the best
beef female in tht show, a Short-
born yenrlingt
St. Kugene Hospital showed that
they CU boast of something besides
good sisters, nurses am) doctors,
when they walked off with the grnnd
championship in the dairy cattle, fe-
innle cluss.
Miss Margaret McClure continued
her successful cureer us live stock
judge by winning the 1st prize for
tbe highest aggregate awards for live
stock judging.
The judges in the several classes
were ns follows:
Hogs nud sheep, Samuel McCleg-
iin, Fort Kelts; Live Stock, R.
(iladwyn Newton. lnvermere; Pout
try, K. Greenwood; Crops and Vegetables, Mr. E. White, Vancouver;
Flowers, Fancy Work, Home Cooking,  etc.,  Mrs.   Rothwell,  Wardner.
The Women's Institute were busy
as bees on Wednesday taking care
of the hungry, shivering spectators
with hot coffee, tea, sandwiches and
rako. The ladles are deserving of
very much credit for the large amount of time that they devote to
matters of this kind. More societies
of this kind or more mem ben and
support to thr effort* of thfe miesy
SIX DAY PERIOD
FOR ADDING NAMES
TO VOTERS' LIST
Court of revision for the purpose
of receiving applications for admittance to the voters' lists for the approaching Dominion elections, will
be held from October (Uh to 13th, it
is announced. Registries for the rural and urban centres will open their
offices on September 24th, und thu
voters lists will remnin on view ut
these places till September 30th.
The busis uf the new lists will be the
existing provincial lists, und it will
be necessury for every voter to verify the entry of his or her name on
the federul lists. Names of electors who did not exercise their frun-
chise nt the lust provincial election,
were to he dropped in the revisions
mude in subsequent yeurs if no cause
was shown for retaining the name,
and thus many mny find their names
are not on the list. There will be
no absentee vote for the federal elections, it is understood, but us nt
the last federal election, there will
be an advanced poll for trainmen and
commerciul travellers, who might
otherwise be deprived of their vote.
Names of those who voted absentee at the last provincial election, and
who would thus be found on their
home lists, will be challenged, if still
absent, it is understood, so ns to
force them to register in the district
where they may now be residing.
PRESENTATION MADE
TO VETERAN MEMBERS
OF I. 0. 0. F. LODGE
On Saturday evening last the local lodge of Oddfellows held a social session at the Auditorium, in honor of the visit to the lodge of the
Deputy Grand Master for B.C., Bro.
Roy Perry, of Vancouver. To the
gathering thc Rebekahs were invited.
and an interesting feature of the
gathering wns the presentation to
two members of the order of veterans' jewels, denoting the completion
of a quarter of a centure of uninterrupted membership in the order.
One of these members was Dr. J.
H. King, a charter member of Key
City Lodge, and the second Noble
Grnnd of the lodge, following the
late R. K. Beattie. The recipient of
the other jewel wns R. P. MofTatt,
of this city. The two veteran members were called to the platform by
the Noble Grand of the lodge, and
the presentation was made by Bro.
Perry, the deputy grand muster, ns-
sisted by Bro. \V. D. Gilroy, who is
the district deputy grand muster.
Suitable acknowledgment of tht presentations wns made by the two veteran members.
Dancing wns then engaged in tilt
midnight, when supper was served,
bringing a very pleasant function to
close. Mrs. J. H. King wns among
the guests present to witness the
presentation of the two veterans' jewels.
Minion Band Social
On Saturday nfternoon Inst the
beautiful grounds of the home of Mr.
nnd Mrs. Cnrlyle were the scene
of a delightful garden pnrty. it being the first function staged by the
newly formed "Carry the News"
Mission Band of the United Church,
which at present is composed of girls
only. Ice cream ami candy found a
ready sale and as a result of their
efforts the members realized the sum
of nbout twenty-five dollars for the
bank account of the hand.
would be lo the city's very hest interest.
At the fair mnny were interested
in the two pumps wliich Mr. Flumer-
felt, of the forestry deportment, had
on exhibition, in connection with his
"Save the Forest" section. One wns
un Kvenrude, weighing sixty pounds,
so [dined on n frame thnt it is very
easily packed* This will throw u
stream of water fifty feet through an
inch and a quarter pipe one thousand
feet long. The other wns a Ross-
pacific, weighing thirty-eight pounds
and rnted al three horse power. This
pump is the very latest in the line
of emergency fire fightfcy-r npparat-
us and is snid to be most efficient.
Mrs. W. T. Rothwell, of Wardner,
who wns the judge of the fancy work,
flowers, cooking, etc., ot the fair,
complimented the ladies on the arrangement of their display. The
fair board was fortunate in obtaining the services of Mrs. Rothwell,
who is extremely competent in this
line of work, not only through experience, but also through study at a
college which specializes in judging
of this kind.
The garden and farm produce sections were a revelation to those who
have said that thc climatic conditions In this section of the country,
are against agricultural effort and
gardening. Some of the exhibits,
from St. Mary's Prairie farms, and
elsewhere, and others from buck gardens In the city, were testimonies to
tba fact that ft la not so much that
it cannot bo dune, aa In knowiag bow.
SCHOOL ENROLLMENT
REACHES WELL OVER
EIGHT HUNDRED MARK
Most Marked Increase Is Seen
in the High School, With
Six Classes
Enrolments in the achola ul Cranbrook for the new term totals -^27
pupils, uml more ure being enrolled
every day, so that the grand total
has probably not yet boon reached,
The totnls for tlie vorloUB school,
are given below:
Central  School
Div. I, Miss A. Woodland, Grade
8,   Enrollment       llll
Div. 2, Miss M. Grace Johnston,
Grade 8, Enrollment  ,')-l
Div. '.I, Miss Ruby Glaser, Grade
7, Enrollment   .'!!>
Div. 4, Miss S. 1). White, Grnde
7, Enrollment   u.i
Div. 5, Miss E. Wright, Grades
IS and 7, Enrollment   28
Div. G, Miss M, MeCnslin, Grade
0, Enrollment   .16
Div. 7, Miss M. G. Bannerman,
Grnde 0, Enrollment   {15
Div. 8, Miss Muriel Baxter, Grade
5, Enrollment  44
Div. 0, Miss P. G. M. C, McDonald, Grade 4, 2nd, Enroll  43
Div. 10, Miss Florence Paul, Grade
4, 1st, Enrollment   32
Div. 11, Miss Florence E. Best,
Grade 4, 1st, Enrollment   .'IO
Div. 12, Miss Helen Freeman,
Grade 3, 2nd, Enrollment  35
Div. 13, Miss Bessie Woodman,
Grade 3, 1st, Enrollment 32
Div. 14, Miss Bessie Robertson,
Grade 2, Enrollment   41
Div. 15, Miss -E. B. Paterson,
Grade 1, 2nd, Enrollment   34
Div. Ill, Miss L. C, Henderson,
Grade 1, 1st, Enrollment   3(i
Total  5(17
South Ward School
Div. 1. Mr. F. W. Hodgson, Grades
2a, 3b, 3a, Enrollment   41
Div.  2,  Miss  JI. J.  Rice,  Grades
la, lb, 2b, Enrollment   3(1
Kootenay Orchard
Div. 1, Miss Winnie Lippett, Enrollment (approximately)  25
Total   71
High  School
Div. 1, Grade 12   11
Div. 2, Grade 11   35
Div. 3, Grade 1(1  2(1
Djy. 4, Grade.10  .„  ill
Div. 5, Grade il   30
Div. 0, Grade 11   30
Total  158
Enrollment figures ure approximate, new pupils being enrolled dai-
ly.
The stan* of (he High School consists of the following:
Mr. R. M. Archer principal; Mr.
Barclay, vice-principal J Miss Giegerich. Hiss Smith, nnd llr. G. W. G.
O'Meara.
LOCAL CONTRACTOR
INSTALLING POWER
LINE TO MOYIE
Starting this week with a gang of
twenty-two men out of Moyie, nnd
eleven out of Cranbrook, Mr. Fred
Belanger 's nOW busily engaged on
the contract which he has witli tlie
Consolidated Mining nnd Smelting
company i'or the clearing of the right
of way for the high power line from
tbe sub-station here to the Moyie
cuncetitrntor. The work is expected
to takp about five weeks nnd nn
nvcrngp of 75 men will be kept busy.
Mr. Bellinger's contract nlso calls for
the delivery of the poles, The line,
nccording to plans and sperifietaions
will be a first class one. The poles
ore to be 40 feet in length and of
good quality. The line is 17 miles
long, I miles being saved through the
direct route followed. Engineer R.
P. Hrown will be in chnrge.
Clean-Up
the Prizes
Local Entrants at Westminster Fair in Stock Judging
Score   High
WONDERFULL SUCCESSES
It is certainly a pleasant duty for
tie- Herald lo perform in publishing
tlu- following list of iiu- awards gained by tlie team of youthful judges
that journeyed to tin- Westminster
Fair, uitiler the supervision of Mr.
Annus Hay. Tiny mado a clean
sweep of lhe pwai'ds in lho various
classes of judging open for teams
and individuals under twenty-one.
The team consisted of Miss Margaret McC'luro, aged 15, daughter of
Mr. und Mis. II. II. McClure of Wycliffe; Ernest Worden, aged 12, son
of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Worden of
Crnnbrook; nm] .Maurice Godderis,
need  13, son of Mr. and Mrs. On-
NEW COMPANY TAKES
OVER HOMESTAKE
MINE AT PERRY CREEK
Local Men Form Syndicate
to Develop Well-Known
Mining Property
This week saw the completion of
arrangements whereby the Old Home-
stake will be operated by new owners, who have purchased the rights
in the many claims comprising the
Old Homestnke mine'at Perry •Creek.
. At the present time the property
Is being proved up, there being seven
men now steadily engaged on the
property! and the highest expectations
ure entertained, Those interested in
the new company are: l'res., A, C,
Bowness; treasurer, W. S. Santo;
secretary, J. D. Brackctt; F. M. Mac
Phorson, A. Hurry, C. J. Little, W,
E, Worden, Geo, Anton, A. R. Jones,
Dr, MacKinnon, A. Doyle;
It will be seen that all theso interested nre Crnnbrook men who
have faith In the district and nre nc'
afraid to put up their money to back
it Up.
The new company have entered
into n contract to drift 500 feet, Mr.
Scorgio beirtg iii chnrge.
Cranbrook Junior Judging Team Carries all Before It At
the New Westminster Fair
Members of the Junior Judging Team who were so .successful at the
New Westminster' Fair last week, and their instructor. .Seated, from
left to right, they are Muurice Godderis, Margaret McClure and Finest
Worden.     Standing at the rent-is Mr.  A.  L.  Hay,  district  ngriculurist,
who acted as coach for the team.
ODDFELLOWS ENJOY
VISIT FROM OFFICER
OF GRAND LODGE
Hoy Perry, of Vancouver, was a
visitor to Kimberley nnd Crnnbrook
last week-end, in his official enpne-
ity as Deputy Grand Master for the
Oddfellows in B.C. On Friday evening he visited Sullivan Lodge at
Kimherley, nccompnnicd by n good
number of brethren from this city,
and on Saturday evening, when a
special meeting of Key City lodge
took place, the compliment was ret-
ifrned, Kimberley being represented well nt the meeting. During his
visit to the district Bro. Perry wns
given on opportunity to look over
the Concentrator at Kimberley, and
and on Saturday afternoon went to
Lumberton wliere he was shown over
the plunt of the B. C. Spruce Mills,
in which he evinced great interest.
Bro. Perry recalled thut he was a
visitor to the city fourteen or fifteen years ugo when the Oddfellows'
grand lodge session were held In
thla city, those meetings also heing
Md at thr Auditorium.
mille Godderis of Cranbrook.
The   prizes  they  won    were    as
follows:
Team Competition!
1 First prize Silver Cup and individual Gold medals for the best
judging of stock.
2 First prize Silver Cup and individual Gold medals for the best
judging of crops.
3 First prize Silver Cup nnd individual Bronze medals for the
best judging of poultry.
■I Miss Margaret McClure won first
prize (S12.HU) for the best judging of all branches of live ntock.
5 Ernest Worden won second place
and   $10.00  in  above.
C> Miss Margaret McClure took first
place and $12.00 for the best
judging of crops, potatoes, oats
and mangles,
7 Ernest Worden took fourth place
nnd $0.00 in above.
8 Ernest Worden took first place
and $12.00 in a special horse
judging competition prizes donated hy A. D. Paterson, M.L.A.
i) Margaret .McClure took 2nd and
$8.00 in above;
10 Margaret McClure won u $10.00
special prize donated by Dean
Clements, of the U. B. C. as a
prize in the judging of dairy cattle,     .Induing was |n Jersey cows.
B 1 r t li
BORN. — On Sunday, September
13th, to Mr. ami Mrs. Joseph Rogers,
at the St. Eugcno Hospital, a daughter,
In commenting on the success of
the Cranbrook team at the New
Westminster Fair, the Vancouver
Province says that the duy of the
farmerette in British Columbia has
surely arriver.
"At this year's provincial fair,"
says the Province, "fifteen year-old
Margaret McClure, daughter of a
Cranbrook dairyman, made a clean
sweep in the livestock and other junior judging competitions, being closely followed in nearly every tvent
by her teammate, 12 year old Ernest
Worden.
"In the tenm competitions, Cranbrook secured first place in both events — judging of livestock and field
crops — and take home with them
the two cups, the individual members
of the team being awarded gold medals. The team consisted of Margaret McClure, Ernest Worden nnd Maurice Godderis.
"The success of the Cranbrook
team at the Coast exhibitions hns
been phenomenal. For two years in
succession it has taken first place at
Vancouver] this yenr it was first at
New Westminster, nnd in previous
years hns also taken a high place at
this fair, Mr. Angus L. Hay, dist-
lict agriculturist at Cranbrook, who
lias coached the team, has been the
recipient of many congratulations
on the remarkable success whicli has
attended his efforts."
Nelson PrORresiivc Convention
Tlu* Farmer Labor nominating convention for Knotenay West will he
held in Nelson on September 17, the
call being issued by the local executive last week. It is expected that
L. W. Humphrey, late member, will
be nominated without opposition,
Rumors, supposedly of Liberal origin, hint that no Liberal will be placed in the field. Mr. Humphrey,
while a member of the Progressive
caucus, gave the King government
support on nil critical questions. At
the annual mooting of the Nelson
Conservative Association last week,
Mr. K. Ealing, of Rosxlnnd, party
candidate for Kootenay West, predicted n Conservative sweep. Committee rooms will be opened there
immediately.
Leaving for Montreal
Major H. B. Hicks is leaving at
the beginning of next week for Mon-
treal. where he will be for a few days
previous to the arrival nt Mrs, Hicks
and family, who are returning from
their holiday in the Old Country.
An Old-Time Political Meeting
E. I. Paterson, of this city, who
left for Nelson on Sunday, in company with Dr. and Mrs. King, nnd
Kenneth Campbell, former member
for Nelson in the legislature, ga
out an interesting reminiscence of
old times in Cranbrook in the Nelson News of Monday, in one of the
"Instant Interviews" published by
that paper, It was as follows:
"The first Kootenay election I was
in occurred in 1809. I was one Li
beral among a dozen Conservatives where I was, so I tramped into
Cranbrook. There a political ban
quel was on. It had abundance of
liquid refreshments, hut no viands,
and lasted three days."
ENTHUSIASM MARKS
FIRST MEETING OF
UNITED CHURCH
Monday evening last, the night of
many meetings, a large gathering of
the members aud adherents of the
United church look place at lhe
church, when a lot of business was
done.
This consisted mainly ui" the election of officers of the various church
bodies, as outlined in the new rules
and regulations, of thf United
Church of Canada. Naturally these
wore new to most of those present,
but under the efficient chairmanship
of Rev. B, C. Freeman, and guided
by others well versed in parliamentary procedure, the necessary steps
were carefully taken, and all decision
Ived at unanimously.
The election of members of the
board  of elders of the  session  re-
ulted In the following being elected:
Elected for three years—(J. D. Car
lyle, J. Lundy, G. W. Patmore.
Elected for two years—G. W. Morton. I, Hannah, W. Shepherd.
Elected for one year—ti. T. Moir,
J. Laurie, Martin Harris,
Afte,- the election uf the session,
oting for the board of stewards r'e-
ultd oa follows;
Km- three years—I. T. Sarvis, F.
II. Dezall. H. M. Clarke.
For two years—W, A. Kesbit, S.
Taylor, F. Collins.
For ono year—F. O. Willis. .1. P.
Fink, F. Maldment.
A special meeting o
elected board was held I
poiutinents. win n mattei
ance to the congregnth
cussed,   After this was c
tho newly
ter the ap-
i :' import-
Dr. King Named
As Candidate
Received  With  Acclamation
at Convention Saturday   Last
OPENING   OF   CAMPAIGN
Pr. King's election campaign got
away to an enthusiastic start with
lhe big convention at whicli he was
again  placed  in  nomination  for the
ridli
It
East  Kootena;
eminent Interests.
convention,   in  tha
side points had ele
the  convention, th
ing made of them.
tlon of credentials.
the  large  attendance    fr
brook  and  vicinity,  then
out   fifty-three  delegate*
Columbia riding
so from Fernie.
of lnvermere, wi
champion of Llbe
the  convention.
M. BV'ii?1^ ''-"''
in   th
e gov-
list-
In addition to
from   Cran-
cere  uh-
rom  tho
and some forty or
R. Randolph Brnco,
ell   known   stalwart
dlsm,  presided  at
nd   Alderman   P.
ted  as   secretary,
e said Wator nW«ttt-
'-vhv with the Comptroller of Water
lights,   Parliament   Buildings,   Victoria. B.C., within thirty days nfter
. it ance <>' this notice iu
a Jocal  newspaper.
A- Hied with Water Hoard by the
East Kootenaj Power Co., Ltd., power will be supplied within Kootenay
•:.  B.  C. and if permitted by
■omp;
choo I
concluded the
y   repaired   to   the   Sunday
where the ladies had a
tl  lunch pre] tred thoai
. A short program was given,
which, due to thi lati ru if the
.-■veiling had to be curtailed. Tho*
taking pari wero Miss Brumby and
Mr, I. Hannah.
FAREWELL TO FORMER
PRINCIPAL; WELCOME
EXTENDED TO PASTOR
thority, within Alberta. The
■ r tl    approval of the un-
will be hi ard In the office
Board of Investigation, Victoria. Lt. C. at a date to be fixed
by the Comptroller and any Interest-
fitotfihation, Dr. 'King
I MtX ttauion to reply to criticism
made that he had done but little for
the district since he had become its
representative. In a speech lasting
about an hour he outlined what he
considered had been don" of benefit
to the district, and also touched on
the main issues of the campaign.
He pointed to the completion of
the Banff-Wlnderemere road by the
government, and the construction of
'he road west from Lake Louise to
On Monday ever I Ig •'-■
church, a social gathering   i ii e.
whhih w*ns nffide ro Swi-V* at >/»<■<-iV Fielu-Hnu O&den which is. r.*f\V under
a farewell to two valued members.
Mr. and Mrs, H. L. Potter, who were
leaving the next day for Brandon,
and also n; a welcome to Lev. and
Mrs. W. T. Tapscott, who have returned after an absence of about
three months. There was a large attendance, all branches of the activities of the church and Sunday School
being represented, and many ipoke
both to express their regrets at the
loparture of Mr. and Mrs. Porter,
and of the privilege of welcoming
back their veteran pastor after a
ummer's absence. The da - of the
C, G. L T., which Mrs. Porter has
particularly fostered, made her a
presentation of a beautiful vase.
Miss Jessie McCinnis making the
presentation, while on behalf of the
church member hip, Rev, W. T. Tapscott handed to Mr. Porter a purse
if money os a token of appreciation
>f his work among them. There was
i number of musical contributions
luring the course of the evening, and
i bountiful supper was served to rap
the pleasure of the evening.
Pat-tor   Inducted   Into Charge
Rev. M. S. Blackburn, who lj taking up the pastorate of Knox Presbyterian church, arrived in the city
this week, and the service of induction is to take place at Knox church
n Thursday evening of this week, at
Ighl o'clock. Lev. A, D. Smith will
onduct thii tervice, On .Sunday next
Mr. Blackburn will conduct the '>pcn-
ing services of his pastorate in the
city nt Knox church.
MINISTER OP PUBLIC
WORKS ACJAIN NOMINATED BY LOCAL LIBERALS
Nominated al Ih Liberal Convention on Saturday last in llii* city,
Dr. King is being opposed by Dr. J.
W. Rutledge, Conservative candidate.
way: the expansion of the Dominion -Experimental Farm at lnvermere
and Windermere; and additions to
the governmnt telephone service to
the district, and the new metallic
line from Vahk to Creston: these he
considered some evidence of his activity on behalf of East Kootenay,
By the establishment of a bounty
en lead and zinc Dr. King claimed the
government had greatly benefitted
mining in the Kotcnays, and as a re-
Bolt of overtures made a bounty was
also put on copper production, which
was going to result in a renewed
activity for mines of that nature.
Home  Bank  Failure
In regard to the failure of the
Home Bank, Dr. King stated lhat in
1916 the government of the day was
apprised of the condition of affairs in
regard to the bank, and had action
been taken then, the depositors
would not have lost a cent, he claimed. The investigating committee of
the government found lhat the depositors had "a moral claim in equity," and the government had therefore brought down a measure to provide $6,000,000 for the relief of the
depositors, bringing the total repayments made up to a total possibly,
of seventy per cent. Dr. King cri-
tized Mr. Melghen's attitude in this
connection, saying thnt the people of
Fernie did not wish to feel they were
being dealt with on a charity basis,
but   simply   wanted   fairplay. Dr.
King also criticized th'' senate for
their attitude in refusing to sccepl
the government measure! and forcing amendment-. Instancing this
as u reason for senate reform. The
measure was ••• changed, it. fait, that
Dr. King Mid tbo governmenl could
not be held responsible for the final
Komi   Hank bill .
Serving   the   Weil
In a larger field. Dr. Ring said he
had tried to advance the Interests nf
the province, particularly with development at th.- coast This year
Vancouver, by the equalisation of
freight rates, would be able to take
care of the entire Alberta crop, and
half that of Saskatchewan, Victoria,
Prince Rupert and Vancouver being
all   included   in     the   government's
program for development. The increase in outward and inward trade
with the orient helped the railways,
and meant in turn some benefit to
Knst Kootenay. Endeavoring to look
tr. lhe interests of the whole of Cunada, the government had tried to
build up also the shipping Interests of
the marltlmOS, and trade preferences
With the West Indies had meant millions of dollars in trade to the provinces on tin* Atlantic seaboard, and
thin in turn might be of benefit to
Continued oaPage Five) PAQEEldHT
THI  CBAHBBOOK  MHUI*
Thursday, September 10th, 1925
**************************
I FAIR WEEK
SPECIALS
|   VASES
|    CRRAM k SUGARS
I  TEA POTS
¥    CUPS and SAUCERS
| — See Our Window —
I A.Earle Leigh
I Watchmaker & Jeweler
$ NORItURY AVE.
**************************
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Argue, accompanied by Mrs. W. B. McFarlane
and Mr, Woodman, spent Labor Day
week-end al Fairmont
Conklin & Garrett, who for the
last five years have exhibited in
Cranbrook. are to be here alt next
week, thoy having made a satisfactory arrangement whereby they will
Ik;   showing   in   the   city,    and    on
Fair- Day ill
attractions
hill.
ey will tako a lot of thoir
up lo tho grounds mi tho
UOHN.
Iji-i- Sih, nl
to Mt*. nnd
(in Saturday, Neptem-
iIh- St. I'.'iiKi'.nc Hospital,
Mrs. It. Walker, of May-
io, u son.
Cranbrook
Board of Trade
The regular monthly
meelin-g of the Board
will he held in the City
Hall, Cranbrook, on
MONDAY, the 14th instant. All interested in
public affairs are earnestly urged to attend.
CAMPBELL, J. LEWIS
Secretary
LOCAL
*PENING$
Insure with Beale & Elwell.
Chus. Morrison motored to Calgary on Sunday.
Mr. A.  Elwell, 7? Cranbrook, was
town visitor on  Friday.
Mrs. Thomas Miller and children,
of Crnnbrook, were the guests of
Mra.  Wm.   Barr  last   week.
Mrs. Angus Livingston,
been visiting at the Coast
home  Sunday.
who   hm
Miss
is   speii
lledley McLeod,
Doris  Conovei
ling  a   few  iln
if  Spokane
with   Mil
Mrs
.lay fi
mer pi
Mary Laker
r a six weeks
ace of reside
left on We.
' visit to hei
ice. Vnncouv
Mr. nml Mrs. Harold Brown are
leaving next week on a holiday tri|
to  the  Coast nnd  other  points.
Mrs. Foster aud"her daughter, El
sie, returned from a holiday ti
Kamloops on Friday.
Miss A. McCartney and Mlsa Delia
Column   were   v
last Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrt
spent Sunday
mont.
to  Klngsgnti
Bremno
md  Mom
family
,t Fair-
The Campbell Boys, of St. Catherines, Onl., nephews of Mr. F. H,
Dezall. were visi tins ul I lie Dezall
home last week.
"Carry the News" Mission Band
[ot the United Church will hold a
Garden Party ut the home of Mrs.
G, D, Carlyle, on Saturday, September 12th, from :t to (i o'clock. Afternoon tea, candy ami ice cream
will be sold. 2!)
SPECIAL: — Tungsten lamps, 10,
25, 40, 50 and GO watts; 25 c each.
at _ W. P. DORAN'S.
Mr. and Mrs. A. II. Black and their
daughter, Hazel, of Calgary, are visiting Crunbrook nnd district, and
are the guests of Mr. nnd Mrs. J.
M. Clark.
Mrs. M. Carrie, of Denver, Col.,
Mrs. Sandman, of Chinook, Alta.,
Miss Robertson, of Newdale,, Man.,
and Chas. Johnston, of Klko, are in
the city on account   of   the serious
ndition of their mother, Mrs. Johnston, of Elko., who is nt the St. Kugene hospital.
On Sunday evening next Mr. II. L.
Porter, who has been supplying the
pulpit of the Baptist Church in the
absence of the pastor, Rev. W. T.
Tapscott, will speak for the last time.
here. It is expected that the congregation of the United Church will
worship with the Baptist congregation as a mark of esteem on this occasion.
MBttWML HIB
■;■;.:, iv:' VP .:■■;::.,;!: ,.Wil;r-':.."";'.. :    ..
EliMI'li! h&M
School Opening Specials
Children's Shoes, Boys' Suits, Girls' Dresses, Overcoats,
Sweaters. All these lines will be at special low prices,
Saturday and the whole of next week.
B. WESTON'S STORE
liiiiBiiii '!..!   I-1.:: ii*:;ju»::i;
DANCE AT
Smith Lake Pavilion
Wednesday, Sept. 9 and
Saturday, Sept. 12
Burns   Orchestra, of Salt Lake City, Utah, U. S. A.
Will furnish the Music for these two dates.
This Orchestra is one of the best in the West and included amongst its players is Hick Midgley, the well
known Composer and Pianist.
It will he a treat to hear this.   You will want to dance
and dance more
Don't miss it.        $1.50 couple. Tax included
ANNOUNCEMENT
Mrs. T.K. Futa
is again conducting a Grocery Business at the old stand
on VAN HORNE STREET
The patronage of former customers is solicited, while
new ones will find Service and Satisfaction in
dealing with the
Futa Grocery - - Phone 211
Mrs. Johnson, of lnvermere. was
a visitor in the city for a few days
at the beginning of this week, a
guest at the home of Mr. ond Mrs.
K A. Small. She accompanied her
son, Jack Shibley, who had to undergo an operation ut the hospital
on Monday, and they returned to
their home on Thursday.
BORN. — On Monday, September
7th. at the St. Eugene Hospital, to
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Melntyre,
of Waldo, a son.
Mr, nnd Mrs. H. L. Harrison and
son are spending two weeks or so ut
lnvermere, where Mr. Harrison is
relieving ns vendor in charge of the
government liquor store.
BORN.—To Mr. nnd Mrs. Henry
Ryder, Crnnbrook, at the St. Kugene Hospital, on Friday, September
'Ith, n son.
From now till further notice, the
Crystal Dairy will pay 88c for sweet
and 30c per pound butter fat for
sour    cream, Checks  mailed  the
same day cream is received. Express charges paid in and out on
cans.
This has been an unlucky week
for motorists on the Kimberley rood,
thore having been reported no fewer than three accidents in the last
few days, when curs left the rond
from various causes and overturned.
In all three cases, closed cars were
involved, probably preventing the
mishap from ending more seriously
than they did.
Possibly due to the excellence of
their contributions to the program at
the recent high school graduation exercises by the students of the graduating class, the impression has got
around that they were not of their
own preparation. The Herald is
glad to say that it has received assurances thut such is not the case,
each having been responsible for his
or her own address.
Keep the date open — October
|(lst — for the Pythian Sisters Whist
Drive, Basket Social and Dnnce, at
the K. P. Hall, Cranbrook, 29tf.
The Christ Church Sunday school
will reassemble, after the holidays,
on Sunday, September 13th, at 12:30
p.m., in the Parish hall. Will all
scholars nnd teachers make a special attempt to be present so that
classes can be made up for the new
session.
Our Low Prices win every time
For prompt repairs and satisfaction go to Ratcliffe & Stewart's garage. 20tf
G. R. Leask has commenced the
work of putting up the mineral specimen cuse on the outside of the post
office building on Baker street, tho
contract having been awarded to,
him. It will be a pretentious case,
substantially built, nnd when well
filled with adequate specimens, properly lighted, will perform a mission
that many think the city in general
lias been lax in attempting—that of
showing visitors to the city the plaee
that mining operations are considered to hold iu the industrial activity
of the district.
R. Perry, of Vancouver, the Deputy Grnnd Muster for B. C, of the
Independent Order of Oddfellows,
will be in the city nnd district this
week-end to pay official visits to the
lodges of the order at Cranbrook and
Kimberley. On Friday evening he
will be nt Kimberley, and on Saturday evening he will be entertained
by Key City Lodge at a special meeting, to bc followed by a social time.
It is expected thut a number of the
Crnnbrook members will be attending thc meeting at Kimberley, und
cars will leave the Auditorium nt
6.45 p.m.
Mr. and Mrs. F, H. Dezall are leaving this week-tnd for a visit of nb-'
out a month with relatives in the
cast
BOYS' SUITS, five to seven years
$5.00. Boys' Two Pants Suits,
eight to sixteen years, $10.00. Our
low pices win every time. W. F.
Doran,  Cranbrook Exchange. tf
Mr. V. Z. Manning, public school
inspector, returned lust week from
the coast, where he spent the summer, along with Mrs. Manning und
family, states tliat in his inspector.
ate ull the sellouts started out properly manned with teachers, and in
most of the schools little change was
necessary in the stall's. The Fernie
public school stalf remained iuluct
from last year, and at the Crunbrook
public Bchool only two new teachers
were necessary. At Kimberley over
ninety new pupils were on band to
be enrolled on Tuesduy morning, and
it will be necessary there to huve two
new beginners' classes, where only
one had been anticipated. These two
classes will nol commence their work
until the new quarters have hei
prepnred for them in the building
now being erected. Mr. Manning
wus at Kimberley on Tuesday morning looking into the matter, und presented the situation to the department for their approval of his recommendations.
The schools started up on Tuesday
for another term's work, and in every case things got under way with
little difficulty. There is a marked
increase in the high school enrolment
where there are now over a hundred
and fifty pupils enrolled in the five
classes. At the Central School between twenty and thirty beginers
were enrolled, ns well as other new
pupils in other classes. Figures at
the South Ward School have not
been learned.
Midway Show for Fair Week
The Conklin and Garrett amusement, which has shown in Crnnbrook
for a number of years, is returning
for Fair week and from Monday to
Saturday will be showing here. The
company has consolidated with another show and this year is bigger
and better than ever. They ure
playing in Fernie this week.
Besides the ever attractive merry-
go-round and Ferris wheel, new features nnd shows will be seen. A-
mong these are the big European
novelty ride, the chair-o-plane, the
cros3-word puzzle show, great west
show, the circus show, jungle land
athletic show, mystery show and motor drome,.
Free shows will be given on the
midway, during each evening.
SALE OF
BOYS' SCHOOL SUITS
J
There will be barrels of fun at
the Whist Drive und Basket Social
of the Pythian Sisters, on October
ist.
Mr. nnd Mrs. F. G. Morris nnd fn-
mily arrived buck in the city on Monday, after having spent the summer
vacation ut the coast. They motored both ways, und after spending
time ut Vancouver, while Mr. Morris attended the summer school
16 for manual training teachers,
they went across to Victoria to visit
■r u time with relutives.
A new purquct floor put in the
windows of A. Enrle Leigh recently,
has been tlie cause of some favorable
niment, permitting of a style of
window dressing that is coming
to vogue more aud more in the eity
stores in that line. The work wus
xccuted by Geo. R. Leask, local
contractor, who mnde up the design
und executed it in his own workshops,
Oak nnd mnhoghany are the materials used, and the size of the grained
squares can be varied according to
the nnture of the work. This
similar in design to the parquet
floors found in a few of the homes
in the city, but it is the first one
put in a store window in Cranbrook.
Work is now under wny renewing
the sidewalk ou the west side of Hanson Avenue. As in other plnces, n
cement curb is being put iu and a
hard surfaced walk thnt will give
good service, and is a considerable
I improvement on the wooden sidewulk
thnt hiiK fallen into duuvpair.
NATIVE DAUGHTERS
MEETING TO START
THE FALL TERM
With the appronch of the full season societies and lodges which have
been more or less dormant during
the summer months are now lining
up things for nn nctive winter's
program. Among these is the Native Daughters of Canada, who,
though but recently organized, are
having their first fall meeting on
Monday the Uth inst., when it is
expected thut there will be a full
attendance of the old members and
also a large number of new ones for
initiation. Following the business
session, it is expected that several
of the Native Sons will speak on
matters of interest to the society.
"BE READY"
Mr. Bruce Robinson wishes to announce that his fall term opened on
September 8th. In connection with
the matter of acquiring a musical education, Mr. Robinson says "Music
is like ti rough road, which
you must travel carefully. Getting
a prompt start is half the battle,
Practice makes perfect. "That is good
teaching which does for the pupil
only that which he cannot do for
himself." Don't handicap your own
success. From the start, resolve to
practice regularly. It was the great
pianist, Murk Humbourg, who said
"Sometimes one henrs of people doing five or six hours of practice a
day. Maybe! But a great painter once said thnt a student who
couldn't make nn artist on three
hours a day never would make one."
We cannot ull be virtuosos, nnd if
for nothing else music hus the power to form character. To the music
lovers and those who intend to take
up this art, no matter what instrumentation, I would ask again to "Be
Ready for work," for work it is,
and not be like those who have had
the chance, but failed to grasp it.
One can spend a lot of money on
music to no avail. The following
pupils of Mr. Robinson, who were
successful in thc examinations held
last June were: McGill Conservatory
of Music, Intermediate Grade, piano,
J. Paterson, Melaine Lebeau, Malcolm Harris. Posses—Junior Grade,
Theory, L. Paterson. Honors—Junior Grude, Pinno, S. Paterson. Pass
—Elementary Grade, Piano, J. Barber. Honors—N. Sakagulchl. Pass
Lowest Grade, Piano—Jessie Mnc-
kay, Honors, and John Mnckay, Honors. Associated Board, R.A.M. and
R.C.M.—May Marsden, Bull River,
liter me diute Grade, Pass. Primary
Grade—Pauline   Bowness,   Pass.
att-ix
wwwwvwwwww
Two
i    Pairs
Trousers
oVffffffffffffffffff
ffffffffffffffffffff
ffffffffffffffffffff
ffffffffffffffffffff
Trousers
Pairs
ffffffffffffffffffff
ffffffffffffffffffff
The Extra Pair Doubles the Wear
These Suits are made "FIRST FOR WEAR" — in All-Wool
Serges and Worsteds. Next — are in Style lines ■— which carry
out the same fashion as in Dad's Suit. Two pairs of Trousers—
one long pair and one pair of knickers. All the popular colors.
Some are four-piece Suits —Coat, Vest and two Pairs ofKnickers.
HAVE YOU OUTFITTED THAT BOY FOR SCHOOL?
Miss Hazel McCartney spent u few
days last week in Crnnbrook.
Local   Weather   Report
Sate
August 2G
August 27
August 28
August 2!l
August 30
August 31
September I
Max.
82
77
07
Ci)
78
84
80
Min
84
42
34
34
33
:io
43
SHIPMENTS OF ORE
MADE TO TRAIL
SMELTER LAST WEEK
LEAD
Bell,  Beaverdell    4R
Bluebell,  Riondel    8!)
Duthie,  Smithers    (12
Emerald,  Salnio    44
S. White, Gerrard   12
Hewitt, Silverton    20
JeweU, Greenwood   3
Lucky Jim, Roseberry   35
Providene-e, Greenwood   121
Silversmith, Sandon   20!)
Victor, Sandon    40
ZINC
Bosun, New Denver   28
Bluebell,  Riondel    9!)
RYLEY
DINING ROOM
and BAKERY
B.C.
COMMERCIAL MEN
APPRECIATE
HOME COOKINO
WHEN AWAV FROM
HOME
All White Help
fffffffffffffffoVfffffoy
For sales and service Nash and Star
cars.   Sec Ratcliffe t\ Stewart.   33tf
We caitT a (ull Hot ol Uui Women's and Wsbm' Shoes. iff'
WANT ADS.
WANTED TO RENT—Cottage or
, Bungalow, modern.   Apply at Herald
Lucky Jim, Rosebery      49 offlce or nhonc 2r„i. tf
Lucky Thought, Silverton      OB'
Silversmith, Sandon   102
COPPER
Boundary Merc. & Equipt..
Greenwood   1B0
Canada Copper Co., Allenhy ....    30
Granite, Taghum      27
DRY
Knob Hill, Republic   112
Quilp, Republic   325
Company Mines     9814
Total  tonnage      11490
+*+++♦♦♦***♦+♦**++♦♦++♦*♦■*
THE
Regular General  j
Meeting]
of the i
I G.W.VA i|
«-
WILL BE HELD IN THE .',
CLUB ROOMS j
I Sat.. Sept. 191
AT 8.00 p.m.  \
MUSIC TUITION.—Lessons ot pupils' homos. Preparation for examinations if desired. I'hone Fin-
layson's Ranch. 29-30p
WANTED TO RENT. — Housekee
ing rooms, or small cottage.     Apply to lleruld Offlce or Phone 372.
29tf
FOR SALE—-Heavy tenm suitable
for logging. Standard ranch,
Cranbrook. 20tf
FOR SALE—One
Apply W. Ci.
B.C.
Hundred
Bateman,
Ewes.
Moyie,
28-31
FOR SALE— Three-speed bicycle.
In good condition. Moffntt's Variety Store. 27-30
REWARD
Ten dollars reward for delivery of
my Aii'dale dog to 128 Lumsden A v.,
('ranbrook. Last scon at Sheep ('reek
Hot Springs on August 18th. Has
collar with dog licence No. 80 attached.    II. 0. Kinghorn. 2Hp
Theodore
Padburg, A.L.C.M.
Teacher of Violin
— PHONE 502 —
Last Year's Successes in
L. C. M. Examinations
INTERMEDIATE
Roy Henry Linnell   Honors
Mary Wilson McDonald and
Willie Spence .... 1st Class Passes
ELEMENTARY
Allan William Patmore „ Honors
David Weston .... 1st Class Pass
W. F. DORAN.
Our low prlc-M win every una.
For first class automobile repairs
see Ratcliffe & Stewart. 33tf
Special prices on new Baterles at
Service Gatage.   Phone 34 ltf
LOST.—Large Purse, containing be
tween $211 and $80, near Hank of
Commerce, on September 4th.
Finder will be suitably rewarded
by returning same to Herald Office. 29
LOST—In K. P. Hall Saturduy night
a silk scarf. Finder kindly leuve
it ut thc Herald offlce, or send to
Mrs. Brooks, Kimberley.
REPORTS OP   DELEGATES TO THE DOMINION
AND PROVINCIAL CONVENTIONS     WILL    BE I
OIVEN  AT THIS MEET
INO
An  Invitation  Is Extended r"
to All Ex-Service Men     %
to be Present
FOUND. — Purse containing sum of
* money. Apply to City Police Office. 29
WMIHMMIIMMII <
Wood and Coal Heaters
Now is the time to think about
HEATERS
We have a nice selection of both
for you to choose from.
Come in and look them over
WILLIAM THOMPSON
t   Phon. 76 P.O. Boi 118
Second Hand Dealers
tj\ Cfaahn-ek
WATER NOTICE
(Use  and  Storage)
TAKK NOTICE that the East Kootenay Power Company, Limited,
whose address is Fernie, B.C., will
apply tor n licence to take and use
200 cubic feet per second and to
store 30,000 acre feet of water out
of Fording River, which flows southerly and drains into Elk River in
Lot 7089.
The storage dam will be located
about 2 miles cast of N.E. comer
Lot 8905. The capacity of the reservoir to be created is about .10,000
acre feet, and it will flood about 000
acres of land. The water will be
diverted from the stream at a point
about 2 miles cast of N.E. corner
Lot 8965 and will be used for
power purpose upon the undertaking
described as East Kootenay Power
Co., Ltd.    (Lot No. 4588.)
This notice was posted on the
ground on the 19th day of August,
J 925.
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and lo tbe
Water Act, IHU," will he filetl iu
the office of the Water Recorder at Fernie and Cranbrook.
Objections to the application may
be filed with the said Water Recorder or with iln- Comptroller or Water
Rights, Parliament Buildings, Vicloria, H.C, within thirty days after
tbe first, appearance <>* this notice iu
a local  newspaper.
As filed with Water Board by the .
East Kootenay Power Co., Ltd., power will bc supplied within Kootenay
District, B. 0,| and if permitted by
lawful authority, within Alberta. The
petition for the approval of the undertaking will be heard in the ofllce
of the Board of Investigation, Victoria, B. C, ut a date to be fixed
by the Comptroller and any interested person may file an objection thereto in the offlce of thc Comptroller or
of the Water Recorders, at Fernie,
B. C., and at Crunbrook, B. C.
East Kootenay Power Co., Ltd.
A. B. Sanborn, Gen. Mgr.
(Applicant)
The date of the first publication
of thi* notice ia Sept. 3rd, 1925,
28-81 THE CRANBROOK HERALD
^dlNCIAL LIBRARY
VOLUME    27 Apr- i-i»H
CRANBROOK, B.C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER  17th,  1925
N U Al I! 1: R   .1 I)
Shows Wealth
of District
Fall Fair Wednesday Brings
Together Varied Display
of Produce
quautyIs HIGH
Considering the cold disugreeablc
day and the fact that the attractions
outside of the fair features themselves were not as great OS formerly,
the attendance at Cranbrook's fall
fair was better than many expected.
The nlhlotic events on the truck attracted a good crowd of spectators,
who enjoyed the competitions.
It will lie necessury to leave the
publication of the prize awards till
the next issue, and only a short resume of the fair can be given on account of luck of time to treat it
adequately.
The exhibits in the building were
well above the average for fairs in
Cranbrook, the display In the women's section being particularly creditable. The exhibit of fancy work,
home cooking, flowers and school
work attracted much attention. That
beautiful flowers can be grown in
Cranbrook was abundantly evidenced
by the profusion of bloom on display.
Mrs. Geo. Smith, who was a heavy
winner in this class, should be given
credit for a good showing in this
class ns a whole. Considering that
the district has been visited by several frosts, the display made was all
the more creditable.
That St. Mary's can grow something besides wheat was made plain
hy the winnings of Mrs. F.'J. Mott
in the flower show, she having several nice displays.
The fancy work brought forth a
nice collection of work, which represented much painstaking work on the
pnrt of the ladies. Someone estimated that it would even break Ford
if he had to pay a cent for each
stitch in the collection. In this class
Miss Mott was the heavy winner
with many beautiful pieces of work.
The display of cooking was also
very tempting, particularly for anyone having a weakness for pie.
The competition for the prizes oft
fered hy the Fleetwood Flour company resulted in several new recipes being presented for bread, cookies, etc.
The display of work from the Public school was good, but did not arrive in time to be properly displayed.
The manual training exhibits also
drew forth much favorable comment, and the exhibition of Indian
waies was very good.
The Forestry department, under
the direction of Mr. Flummerfelt,
bad a display which wns well worth
the whole trouble of a visit to the
fair building. A section of the main
building, about twenty-five feet by
twelve, was transformed into a minn-
ture finest, landscape, showing moun-
lain, hill, lake, stream, farm, railway, mill, game, and the undesirable
burnt over area. This exhibit, doubtless, look much time to prepare, 90
hags of sawdust and ninny bags of
moss, with which it was covered,
trees and evergreens, etc., heing required for its making.
live  Stock  Display
Tbe horse showing was good in
quality, but not as mnny were shown
ns was anticipated. The saddle horses were a strong class.
The showing of pigs lacked in
numborij but was very good at the
top.
There was a nice display of cattle,
a Guernsey yearling of Mr. Lancaster being the grand champion hull
of the show.
.1. Taylor, of Wycliffe. had the best
beef female in tht show, a .Shorthorn  yearling.
St. Eugene Hospital showed that
thoy can boast of something besides
good sisters, nurses anil doctors,
when they walked off with the grand
championship in the dairy cattle, female class.
Miss Margaret McClure continued
her successful cureer as live stock
judge by winning the Ist prize for
the highest aggregate awards for live
Stock judging.
Tbe judges in the several classes
were as follows:
Hogs and sheep, Samuel McCleg-
an, Port Kelts; Live Stock, R.
(iladwyn Newton. lnvermere; Poultry, E. Greenwood; Crops and Vegetables, Mr. E. White, Vancouver;
Flowers, Fancy Work, Home Cooking, etc., Mrs.  Rothwell,  Wardner.
The Women's Institute were busy
as hees on Wednesday taking care
of the hungry, shivering spectators
with hot coffee, tea, sandwiches tnd
cake. The ladies are deserving of
very much credit for the large amount of time that they devote to
matters of this kind. More societies
of this kind or more members and
support to th* effort* of this society
SIX DAY PERIOD
FOR ADDING NAMES
TO VOTERS' LIST
Court of revision for the purpose
of receiving applications for admittance to the voters' lists for the approaching Dominion elections, will
he held from October Oth to 18th, it
is announced. Registrars for the rural and urban centres will open their
offices on September 24th, and the
voters lists will remain on view at
these places till September .'10th.
The basis of the new lists will be the
existing provincial lists, and it will
be necessary for every voter to verify the entry of his or her name on
the federal lists. Names of electors who did not exercise their franchise at the last provincial election,
were to he dropped in thc revisions
made in subsequent yeurs if no cause
wus shown for retaining thc name,
and thus many may find their names
are not on the list. There will be
no absentee vote for the federal elections, it is understood, but as at
the last federal election, there will
be an advanced poll for trainmen and
commercial travellers, who might
otherwise be deprived of their vote.
Names of those who voted absentee at the last provincial election, and
who would thus be found on their
home lists, will be challenged, if still
absent, it is understood, so as to
force them to register in the district
where they may now be residing.
PRESENTATION MADE
TO VETERAN MEMBERS
OF I. 0.0. F. LODGE
On Saturday evening lust the local lodge of Oddfellows held a social session at the Auditorium, in honor of the visit to the lodge of the
Deputy Grand Master for B.C., Bro.
Roy Perry, of Vancouver. To the
gathering the Rebekahs were invited.
and an interesting feature of the
gathering was the presentation to
two members of the order of veterans' jewels, denoting the completion
of a quarter of a centure of uninterrupted membership in the order.
One of these members was Dr. J.
H. King, a charter member of Key
City Lodge, and the second Noble
Grand of the lodge, following the
late R. E. Beattie. The recipient of
the other jewel was R. P. MofTntt,
of this city. The two veteran members were called to the platform by
the Noble Grand of the lodge, and
the presentation was made by Bro.
Perry, the deputy grand master, assisted by Bro. W. D. Giiroy, who i.s
the district deputy grand master.
Suitable acknowledgment of tht presentations was mnde by the two veteran members.
Dancing was then engaged in till
midnight, when supper was served,
bringing a very pleasant function to
close. Mrs. J. H. King was among
the guests present to witness the
presentation of the two veterans' jewels,
Minion   Band   Social
On Saturday afternoon last the
beautiful ground:: of the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Carlyle were the scene
of a delightful garden party, it being the first function staged by the
newly formed "Carry the News"
Mission Band of the t'nited Church,
which at present is composed of girls
only. lee cream and candy found a
ready sale and as u result of their
efforts the members realized the sum
of about twenty-five dollars for the
bank account of the hand.
would be to the city's very best interest.
At the fair many were interested
the two pumps which Mr. Flumer-
felt, of the forestry department, hnd
on exhibition, in connection with his
Save the Forest" section. One was
an Evenrude, weighing sixty pounds,
so placed on a frame that it is very
eusily packed. This will throw a
stream of water fifty feet through an
inch and a quarter pipe one thousand
feet long. The other was a Ross-
pacific, weighing thirty-eight pounds
and rnted at three horse power. This
pump is the very Intest in the line
of emergency fire fightvyr apparatus and is said to be most efficient.
Mrs. W. T. Rothwell, of Wardner,
who was the judge of the fancy work,
flowers, conking, etc., at the fair,
complimented thc Indies on the arrangement of their display. The
fair board was fortunate In obtaining the services of Mrs. Rothwell,
who Is extremely competent in this
line of work, not only through experience, but also through study at a
college which specializes in judging
of this kind.
The garden and farm produce sections were a revelation to those who
have said that the climatic conditions In this section of thc country,
are agulnst agricultural effort and
gardening. Some of thc exhibits,
from St. Mary's Prairie farms, and
elsewhere, and others from back gardens in the city, were testimonies to
the fact tbat It U not so much that
it cannot bv done, M in knowing bow.
SCHOOL ENROLLMENT
REACHES WELL OVER
EIGHT HUNDRED MARK
Most Marked Increase Is Seen
in the High School, With
Six- Classes
Enrolments in the sc-huls ul' Cr
brook for the new term totals )
pupils, null more ure being enrolled
every day, so that the grand total
lias probably not yet been reached.
The totals for the various school
are given below:
Central   School
Div. 1, Miss A. W Hand, Grad
A, Enrollment   no
Div, 2, Miss M. draco Johnston,
Grade K, Enrollment   &4
Div. 3, Miss Kuby Glaser, Grade
7, Enrollment   .'Ill
Div. 4, Miss S. I). White, Grade
7, Enrollment   3:1
Div. 5, Miss E. Wright, Grades
(i and 7, Enrollment   28
Div. C, Miss M. McCaslin, Grade
0, Enrollment'  .'15
Div. 7, Miss M. C. Banrtermnn,
Grade fi, Enrollment   S5
Div. 8, Miss Muriel Baxter, Grade
5, Enrollment   44
Div. 9, Miss P. G, M. C. McDonald, Grade 4, 2nd, Enroll  4.1
Div. 10, Miss Florence Paul, Grade
4, 1st, Enrollment   32
Div. 11, Miss Florence E. Best,
Grade 4, 1st, Enrollment  30
Div. 12, Miss Helen Freeman,
Grade 3, 2nd, Enrollment   35
Div. 13, Miss Bessie Woodman,
Grade 3, 1st, Enrollment 32
Div, 14, Miss Bessie Robertson,
Grade 2, Enrollment   41
Div. 15, Miss -E. B. Paterson,
Grade 1, 2nd, Enrollment   34
Div. 1(1, Miss h. C, Henderson,
Grade 1, 1st, Enrollment   3(1
Total  5117
South Ward  School
Div. 1. Mr. F. W. Hodgson, Grades
2a, 3b, 3a, Enrollment   41
Div. 2, Miss M. J.  Rice, Grades
la, lb, 2b, Enrollment   30
Kootenay Orchard
Div. J, Miss Winnie Lippett, Enrollment (approximately)   25
Total 	
High School
Div. 1, Grade 12 	
Div. 2, Grade 11 	
Div. 3, Grade 10 	
Div. 4, Grade.10	
Div. 5, Grade II 	
Div, fi, Grade il 	
71
Total  158
Enrollment figures tire -approximate, new pupils being enrolled daily-
The stnn* of the High School consists of tlte following:
Mr. R. M. Archer, principal; Mr.
Barclay, vice-principal; Miss Giegerich, Miss Smith, antl Mr. G. W. G.
O'Meurn.
LOCAL CONTRACTOR
INSTALLING POWER
LINE TO MOYIE
Starting this week with a gang of
twenty-two men out of Moyie, and
eleven out of Crnnbrook, Mr. Fred
Belutigei- is now busily engaged on
the contract which he has with the
Consolidated Mining nnd Smelting
company for the clearing of the right
of wny for the high power line from
tbo sub-station here to the Moyie
concentrator. The work is expected
to take about five weeks and an
average of 75 men will be kept busy.
Mr. Belangcr's contract also calls for
the delivery of the poles. The line,
according to plans and speeifictaions
will he a first class one. The poles
are to be 40 feet in length and of
good quality. The line is 17 miles
long, 'I miles being saved through lho
direct route followed. Engineer R.
I*. Ilrown will be in chnrge.
ODDFELLOWS ENJOY
VISIT FROM OFFICER
OF GRAND LODGE
Hoy Perry, of Vancouver, was a
visitor to Kimberley nnd Crnnbrook
last week-end, in his official capacity as Deputy Grnnd Mnster for the
Oddfellows in B.C. On Friday evening he visited Sullivan Lodge at
Kimberley, accompanied by a good
number of brethren from this city,
ond on Saturday evening, when a
special meeting of Key City lodge
took place, the compliment was returned, Kimberley being represent
ed well at the meeting. During his
visit to the district Bro. Perry was
given an opportunity to look over
the Concentrator at Kimberley, and
and on Saturday afternoon went to
Lumberton where he was shown over
the plant of the B. C. Spruce Mills,
in which he evinced great interest.
Bro. Perry recalled that be was a
visitor to the city fourteen or fifteen years ago when the Oddfellows'
grand lodge session were held tu
this city, those meetings also being
held at the Auditorium.
Clean-Up
the Prizes
Local Entrants at Westminster Fair in Stock Judging
Score   High
W0NDERFULL SUCCESSES
It is certainly n pleasant duty for
the Herald to perform In publishing
the following li^t ,,r iiu- awards gained by the tenm of youthful Judges
tbat journeyed tn the Westminster
Fair, tinder tlte .supervision of Mr.
Angus Hay. They mndo a elean
swoop of the awards in the various
classes of judging open for teams
and individuate under twenty-one.
Tlu- team consisted of Miss Mnr-
srnrot McClure, aired 15, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. JI. II. McClure of Wy-
elill'e; Ernest [Worden- aged 12, son
of Mr. nnd Mrs. W. E. Worden of
Cranbrook; nnd Maurice Godderis,
aged  13, son nf Mr. and Mrs, Ca-
NEW COMPANY TAKES
OVER H0MESTAKE
MINE AT PERRY CREEK
Local Men Form Syndicate
to Develop Weil-Known
Mining Property
This week saw the completion of
arrangements whereby tlie Old Home-
stake will be operated by new owners, who hnve purchased the rights
in the many claims comprising thc
Old Honicstako mine* nt Perry-Creek.
. At the present time the property
is being proved up, there being seven
men now steadily engaged on the
propertyj ond the highest expectations
are entertained. Those interested in
the new company are: Pres., A. C.
Uowness; treasurer, W. S. Santo;
secretary, J. D. Brnckett; F. M, Mac
Pherson, A. Hurry, C. .7. Little, W.
E. Worden, Geo. Anton, A. K, Jones,
Dr, MacKinnon, A. Doyle.
It will be Seen that all these interested are Cranbrook men who
havo faith in the district and nre not
afraid to put up their money to back
it- up.
The new company have entered
into a contract to drift 500 feet, Mr.
Scorgie being in charge.
Cranbrook Junior Judging Team Carries all Before It At
the New Westminster Fair
Members of the Junior Judging Team who were so successful at the
New Westminster Fuir last week, and their instructor. Seated, from
left to right, they are Maurice Godderis, Margaret McClure and Ernest
Worden.     Standing at the rear is Mr. A.  L.  Hay,  district  agriculurist,
who acted as teach for the team.
mille Godderli
The   priz.es
follows:
of Cranbrook,
they   won    were
Team Competitions
1 First prize Silver Cup and individual Gold medals for thc best
judging of stock.
2 First prize Silver Cup and individual Gold medals for the best
judging of crops.
.1 First prize Silver Cup nnd individual Bronze medals for the
best judging of poultry.
4 Miss Margaret McClure won first
prize (S 12.00) for the hest judging of all branches of live stock.
6 Ernest Worden won second place
and SI0.00 in above.
G Miss Margaret McClure took first
place and $12.00 for the best
judging of crops, potatoes, onts
nml mangles.
7 Ernest Worden took fourth place
and §0.00 in above.
8 Ernest Worden took first place
and ?12.00 in a special horse
judging cnnipet.ition, prizes donated by A, D. Paterson, MX-A.
9 Margaret MoGlure took 2nd and
$8.00 in above.
10 Margaret McClure won a $10.00
special prize donated by Denn
Clements, of the U. B. C. as a
prize in the judging of dairy cattle.   Judging was In Jersey cows.
Birth
BORN. — "ti Sunday, September
18th, to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rogers,
nt the St. Eugene Hospital, a daughter.
In commenting on the success of
the Cranbrook team at the New-
Westminster Fair, the Vancouver
Province says that the day of the
farmerette in British Columbia has
surely am ver.
"At this year's provincial fair,"
says the Province, "fifteen year-old
Margaret McClure, daughter of a
Cranbrook dairyman, made a clean
sweep in the livestock and other junior judging competitions, being closely followed in nearly every tvent
by her teammate, 12 year old Ernest
Worden.
"In the team competitions, Cranbrook secured first place in both events — judging of livestock and field
crops — and take home with them
the two cups, the individual members
of the team being awarded gold medals. The team consisted of Margaret McClure, Ernest Worden nnd Maurice Godderis.
"The success of the Cranbrook
team at the Const exhibitions has
been phenomenal. For two years in
succession it has tnken first place at
Vancouver; this year it was first at
New Westminster, and in previous
years has also taken a high place at
this fair. Mr. Angus L. Hay, dist-
rlct agriculturist at Cranbrook, who
has coached the team, has been the
recipient of many congratulations
on the remarkable success which has
attended his efforts."
Nelson   Progressive   Convention
The Farmer Lahor nominating convention for Kootepay West will he
held In Nelson on September 17, the
call being issued by tho local executive last week. It is expected that
L. W. Humphrey, late member, will
be nominal I'd without opposition.
Rumors, supposedly of Liberal origin, hint that no Liberal will be placed in the field. Mr. Humphrey,
while a member of the Progressive
caucus, gave the King government
support nn all critical questions. At
the annual meeting of the Nelson
Conservutivo Association last week,
Mr. K. Esllng, of Rossland, pnrty
C&ndldatc for Kootenny West, predicted n Conservative sweep. Committee rooms will he opened thero
immediately,
Leaving for Montreal
Major If. B, Hicks is leaving nt
the beginning of next week for Montreal, where he will he for B few days
previous to the arrival of Mrs. Hicks
and family, who are returning from
their holiday In the Old Country,
An   Old-Time   Political   Meeting
E. L Paterson, of this city, who
left for Nelson on Sundny, in company with Dr. and Mrs. King,
Kenneth Campbell, former member
for Nelson in the legislature, gave
out an interesting reminiscence of
old times in Crnnbrook in the Nelson News of Mondny, in one of the
"Instant Interviews" published by
that paper. It was as follows:
"The first Kootenay election I was
in occurred in 1890. I was one Li
bernl among a dozen Conservatives where I was, so I tramped into
Crnnbrook. There a political banquet was on. It bad abundance of
liquid refreshments, but no viands,
anil luted three days.'*
ENTHUSIASM MARKS
FIRST MEETING OF
UNITED CHURCH
Monday evening last, the night of
many meetings, a large gathering of
the members and adherents of the
United church took place at the
cluircli, when a lot of business was
This consisted mainly of the election of officers of the various church
bodies, as outlined in the new rule?
and regulations, of thr United
Church of Canada. Naturally these
were new to most of those present,
but under the efficient chairmanship
of Rev. IJ. ('. Freeman, and guided
by others well versed in parliamentary procedure, the
were carefully taken
arrived at unaninioii:
The  election   uf
ooord of elders of ih
suited in the followini
Fleeted for three yc
lyle, J. Lundy, C. W
Fleeted for iu,- yea
ton. J. Hannah, W. Shepherd.
Fleeted foi  01 e '!. T. Moir.
J. Laurie, Martin Hani .
After thc election .-; 'he lesjdon,
voting for the board of stewards re-
sultd as follows:
For three years—J. T. Sarvis F.
IL Dezall. ii. M. (larke.
For two year.-—W. A. NY-l.it, S.
Taylor, F. Collins.
For one year—P. O. Willis. J. P.
Fink, F. Moidment.
A special  meeting of  the newly
elected board was held after the ap- :
polntments, when matter- of import-j
ance to the congregation were di.-- ,
cussed,   After thi- waa concluded the j
company   repaired   to   the   Sunday j
Bchool, where the ladies had a most
excellent lunch prepared  for those
present.   A short program was given,
which,    due to the lateness "f the
evening had to he curtailed.    Those
..akine. part were Miss Brumby and
Mr. I. Hannah.
ecesi
ary
tepi
mi a
mbe
1 dec
•s of
sion
thc
ie   s
BSiOl
re-
bein
B el.-,
ted:
rs—
:. li.
Car
Pat
-   i
rtore,
. W.
Mor-
Dr. King Named
As Candidate
Received With Acclamation
at Convention Saturday   Last
OPENING   OF   CAMPAIGN
Dr.
King's election campaign got
away to an enthusiastic start with
the big convention at which he was
again placed in nomination for the
goV-
l.O     list-
xamina-
ition to
Cran-
East Kootenay riding, ii
eminent interests. It w
convention, in that whii
side points had elected d
the convention, there wi
ing made of them, and n
tlon of credentials, In
the large attendance fr
brook and vicinity, there were about fifty-three delegates from the
Columbia riding, and some forty or
•I. from Fernie. R, Randolph Bruce,
of lnvermere. well known stalwart
champion of Liberalism, presided nt
the convention, and Alderman Y.
M.
Edr
FAREWELL TO FORMER
PRINCIPAL; WELCOME
EXTENDED TO PASTOR
On Monday evening af the Baptist
church, a social gathering look place,
whk'h v?as nfftde to ?ei\b ar >tnvt-k<4 Fiekraim G&den whicn « r.rfiv under
a farewell to two valued members.
Mr. and .Mrs, JL L. Porter, who were
leaving the next day for Brandon
and also as a welcome to Rev, and
Mrs. W. T. Tapscott. who have returned after fn absence of about
three months. There was a large attendance, al! branches of the activities of the church and Sunday School
being represented, and many spoke
both to express their regrets at the
departure of Mr. and Mrs, Porter,
and of the privilege of welcoming
back their veteran paster after a
summer's absence. The class of the
C. G. I. T., which Mrs. Porter has
particularly fostered, made her a
presentation of a beautiful vase,
Mis? Jessie McGinnis making the
presentation, while on behalf of the
church membership, Hev. W. T. Tapscott handed to .Mr. Porter a purse
of money as a token of appreciation
of his work among them. Thore was
a number of musical contributions
during the course of the evening, and
a bountiful supper was served to cap
the pleasure of the evening.
Pastor   Inducted   Into   Charge
Rev. M. S. Blackburn, who i, taking up the pastorate of Knox Presbyterian church, arrived in the city
this week, and the service of induction is to take place at Knox church
on Thursdny evening of this we. k. at
eight o'clock. Rev. A. D. Smith will
conduct thi- service, On Sunday next
Mr. Blackburn will conduct the opening services of his pastorate in the
city at Knox church.
MINISTER OF PUBLIC
WORKS AGAIN NOMIN*
ATED BY LOCAL LIBERALS
'•maVL -.^rfusioii   to
unetion, Dr. King
reply to criticism
made tha; he had done but little for
the district since he hod become its
representative. In a speech lasting
about nn hour he outlined what he
considered had been done of benefit
to the district, and also touched on
the main issues of tlie campaign.
He pointed to the completion of
the BanfMVlrideremere road by the
government, and the construction of
the road west from Lake Louise to
Inn ted at th Liberal Convon-
i Saturday  last   iu  this cily,
llr. KinK in being opposed by Dr. J.
W. Rutledge, Conservative candidate.
way, the expansion of the Dominion Experimental Farm at lnvermere
and Windermere; and additions to
the govern mnt telephone service to
the district, and the new metallic
line from Yahk to Creston; these he
considered some evidence of his activity on behalf of East Kootenay.
By the establishment of a bounty
on lead and zinc Dr. King claimed the
government had greatly benefitted
mining in the Kotenays, and as a re-
tult of overtures made a bounty was
also put on copper production, which
was going to result in a renewed
activity for mines of that nature.
Home Bank Failure
In regard to the failure of the
Home Bank, Dr. King stated that in
1916 the government of the day was
apprised of the condition of affairs in
regard to the bank, and had action
been taken then, thr- depositors
would not have lost a cent, he claimed. The investigating committee of
the government found that the depositors had "a moral claim in equity," and the government had therefore brought down a measure to provide $5,000,000 for the relief of the
lepositori, bringing the total repayments made up to a total possibly,
of seventy per cent. Dr. King cri-
tfzed Mr. Meighen's attitude in this
connection, saying tbat the people of
Fernie did not wish to feel they were
etng dealt with on a charity ba.-is,
but simply wanted fairplay. Dr,
King also criticized the senate for
their attitude in refusing to accept
the government measure, and forcing amendment-. Instancing this
us a reason for senate reform. The
measure was so changed, In fact, that
Dr. King said the government could
not he held responsible for th.- final
Home Bank bill .
Serving   thf  Weil
In a larger field, Dr. King said he
had tried tt. advance the Interests of
he  province, particularly with development at  the coast.      This year
Vancouver,   by   the equalization of
freight rates, would he able to take
of the entire Alberta crop, nnd
half that of Saskatchewan, Victoria,
rince Rupert and Vancouver being
all   included   in     the   government's
program for development.      The in-
rease in outward and inward trade
with the orient helped thc railways,
and  meant  in  turn some benefit to
Fast Kootenay.   Endeavoring ta look
to the interests „f the whole of Canada, the government had tried to
build np also the shipping interests of
the maritimes, and trade preferences
with the West Indies had meant millions uf dollars in trade to tlie provinces on the Atlantic seaboard, and
this In turn might be of benefit   to
Continued 01bPage Five) -    PASS   TWO
THB CRANBROOK  HERALD
Thursday, September IOlh", 1923
REGULAR MEETING OF
THE CITY COUNCIL ON
THURSDAY LAST WEEK
The regular meeting of tlio city
council was held In the council chamber on Thursday evening last when
besides his worship the mayor. Aldermen Fink, Flowers and Cameron
were present. After the reading and
adoption of the minutes the following business was dealt with:
Electric Light Meter Readings
A letter from the Enst Kootenay
Power Co. and from J. N. Llghtbody,
enclosing his report and account for
.$135 were read and referred to the
light committee. The aceount together with $40 for expenses were
ordered paid.
Beer Plebicite
A letter from the Hon. Attorney
General, enclosing copy of order in
council passed August ltith, was read.
City Clerk Burgess reported thut u
copy had been sent to the Bourd of
Trade.
/ When using n
WILSON'S   N
FLY PADS
~^  READ   DIRECTIONS
b      CAREFULLY AND,
?>5_ ~x_ FOLLOW THEM,
Sm exactly7
Best of all Fly Killers 10c
per Packet at all DruKRista,
Grocers and General Stores
The Salvation Army
HARVEST FESTIVAL SERVICE
Sunday Evening Next at 7:30
HARVEST FESTIVAL SALE OF PRODUCE
Monday Evening at 7:30
ie Army Hall
iinson Ave.
)DY WELCOME
A letter was received from Mr.
Fred Willis, secretary of tlm Kimherley Board of Trade, enclosing $25
on account of jitney hire ami trip
of lire truck ami the department to
Kimlierley on July -Uh.
A communication from the city
clerk of Courtoney, B.C., with a resolution asking the licence fees payable
by beer parlors and clubs under the
government liquor act be made payable to the treasurer of the municipality. On motion of Flowers and
Cameron it was decided to endorse
the resolution.
City Management
A circular letter from Mr. R, Baird,
inspector of municipalities re the
question   oC  city  management  was
read.
It was suggested to Mr. Baird that
a legislation be enacted to enable the
municipalities to delegate its author!
tics nnd to udopt the principles out-
j lined in his circular il' he desires. The
I letter had to do with the delegation
I to some official of a certain portion
of Lhe administration work designated
I by the act as duties of the council.
CANAI
SAILINGS
Fr'm MONTREAL-QUEBEC
To Liverpool
Oct. 2 Oct. 30 Nov. 25 t-Montnoirn
I Oct. 1) Nov. 0  Montrose
i Oct. 10, Nov. 13 Montcalm
Oct. 23, Nov. 20 Montclare
I     To Chet-'b'g S'hampton Antwerp
■ Oct. 7 Nov. 4 Mclita
Oct. 21, Nov. 18 Mlnnedosa
To Belfoit, Glaigow
Oct. 8, Nov. 5 Motafjamn
Oct. 22, Nov.  Ill Marburn
To Cher'bg, S'tbampton, Hamburg
Oct. M t-^mprcsa of Prance
"Sept. 30  tRn'l,res-s of Scotland
t From Quebec
*Not Calling ut Humburg
liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii»iii»ii]i»»»ii»i[]iimii»iiii]iiiiiiiiiiiiDiiiiiiiii»iiiiiii«i»i[r
urther notice we will pay the   1
a
i: |
J 38c per lb. butterf at
1.36c per lb. butterf at
We mail your check the day we receive your cream.
WE PAY EXPRESS CHARGES IN AND OUT ON CANS
With these prices your bank account should grow.
CRYSTAL DAIRY, LIMITED
— PHONE 88 —
'^annimlUKltl^UUItllUIHIIilUlllIlHllllllllllIIIIllMllllllCllllllimilltllllllMIIIIIElHIllllimiEllllllllIIIIICJIIII IlllllllltlllllllCIIIIIIIIIIlimilltJItlfn"
Sour
CHRISTMAS SAILINGS
From St. .Tohn to
Dee. 5 Montrose Liverpool
Dec. 10 Melita Cherbourg,
Southampton, Antwerp
Doc. 11 Metagama Glasgow,
Liverpool
Dec. lfi Montclare Liverpool
Sleeping Cars and Coaches
will be run from Western Cana-
ada through to ship's  side.
Apply Local Agents or
R.W.GREENE
Aait. General Agent
Calgary
or
W. C. CASEY, Gen. Agt.j
346 Main Street
Winnipeg
Accounts and Reports
Accounts amounting to ?,r>,919.73
were presented and ordered paid.
The following reports were read:
Health nnd relief. Dairy inspector.
Light department. -Fire department,
works department.
A letter from the provincial health
officer re complaint of Mr. Lamont
was read and a copy of a reply by
Mr. Eassie was read.
The matter of the descrepancy existing the rates charged for water
to some of the larger business places
in excess of 1,000 sipiare feet was
referred to the water committee for
investigation.
By-law No. 209, an amending bylaw making it compulsory for all
places where boarders or roomers nre
kept, where there are more than ten
rooms to keep a register was passed.
The fire department report showed
three alarms during tht month. One
was to the Thompson's Second Hand
Store; loss, $(10; and another was to
the rear of Dan's Place, where a
small blaze did $4 damage.
Dr, Rutledge reported tlmt four
tuberculin tests had been made at
Lancaster's and six at IMayle's, nit of
which showed no reactions.
The electric light department report showed a lot of routine work was
being done, and the system kept in
first class shape. The current consumed last month was 50,500 k.w.
Council adjourned at 10:;i0.
INSPECTION OF IRON
CLAIMS NEAR KITCHENER IS FAVORABLE
Inspection of the C. P. Hill claims
at Iron Mountain, ten miles oast of
Creston, and situated near Kitchener, B.C., was completed at the end of
lust week by Wm. Wilson, well
known geologist, of Croat Falls, Montana, at the instigation of W. R.
W. R. Wilson, manager of tbe Crows
Nest Pass Coal Company, of Fernie,
who is now in England, conferring
with a small group of British capitalists, who are willing to start a small
Bteel plant at Fernie, it is understood, if a sufficiency of iron ore is
available to warrant such nn undertaking.
From what can lie learned it is
understood that the inspection made
by the geologist convinced him that
the ore body is ample, and on the
strength of this report it is most likely that the Hill claims will be explored further by diamond drilling. Tho
recent examination made of the
claims is nlso understood to confirm
the previous reports mnde thnt the
Iron Mountain ore is a high grade
hematite, low in phosphorous.
. ici
All state anil divisional chiefs in Gen. Lincoln C. Andrew's new FederaLDry Army were in Washington last week for a final council-t.*-war before the big drive which started this week. There are 22
district chiefs, unrestricted by stale lines, It is planned to "get tlie big ones"—cutting olf the liquor supply at the source.   No. L, Comm. Haynes; No. 2., Gen Andrews; No. 3., Comm. White.
Quebec Has Every Winter Sports Facility.
Looklnft down the Toboggan Chute towards thc Chateau.   Inset—E. Ties ilnlll
sport s^ rfho has been appointed,Winter Sports Director at thc Chateau Ff
nifuii-s, wm, .,..« u-cvii u,,,«ii,.«. ,,...,„ B|nn„ „««.„.  — . Quebec.   He wTll have churfte of activities
there for the coming season, and having had wide experience In promoting »»d conducllnit winter eporu lit Switzerland. Franca
and the United Stat ea, looks forward to a mast aucceaaful acaaon at Quebec, where, he says, there ta every aporta facility.
Quebec, "the grey old city on the hill," *ue Cradle of
New Franco, preserving the soul of tho Old Regime
in the midst of the Twentieth Century, Is one of the
most popular tourist resorts in Canadn. This is especially true in the summer. But lt is alf o tr«^ In the
winter. For Quebec does not permit tho heavy snow
of that season to become her shroud. Instead, sho
turns it into a cloak wherein to Indulge her passion for
winter sports. Hence it Is that visitors from all over
Canada nnd tho United Statet gather in the old city to
enjoy tho delights of ski-In? snowshoeing, and other
kindred sports which she has to otter.
Thc Chateau Frontenac, towering ibovo the BUrround-
Ing roofs, and looking down on Dufferin Terrace, becomes tho centre of all this activity. Everything possible is done by the management to give ample opportunities for play. There is a sports director, who is
'(■sponsible for tho general supervision of .ill arrangements. Under him is a staff of expert instructors, sov-
>rol of whom are famous champions   lo   their lines.
Equipment of every kind is available for the use o|
guests—skis, skates, suowshoes, curling stones and
brooms, toboggans and a fleet of bob-sleds from Switzerland on whicli gay parties dare the fast bills about
tho city. There Is a large skating rink on the terrace
and a curling rink beside It, under cover. A triple-
chute toboggan slide occupies one-thin! of a mile along
thc terrace and a speed of a mile a minute Is obtainable
upon It. A ski jump for tho use of more advanced
people Is provided near the hotel. Others less skilful
can tie themselves into knots with perfect safety and
Plenty of fun ou adjoining slopes. The snowshoe cluba
co-operate by inviting visitors to take part In their
moonlight tramps. Sleigh rides arc also very popular,
and besides all tbis, there is a dog team, which la at tha
disposal of thoso nt the hotel. Led by "Mountie," *%
real veteran witli 8,000 miles on Arctic trails to hla
credit, they are all huskies, and on Indian driver Ut
parka and blanket suit lends a further picturesque touch
]to the outfit _   , j       •     J Thursday, September 17th', 1925
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
PAGE     THREE
A Car Unequaled
InLooks, Price and Results
Read thc First Instalment oi This Exciting Serial
rni
ii * ii
ml   »
.iliiili
II
lull
'
••X11E
Copjriclit, ItU, Wnrucr Bros. ,,
LEHITED ilinf with Monte TlluD, I« a plttnrliaUMi tl U»U storj lif^
Wamor Brw. I'lctuits, Inc.
'
i*.i   i*,  I,
univitatcd
:i lhu -    Irani *
.   Ill
\* Iiert   1 *  1 ■ :    ■
:        Ch
(To  Ire
tiL'    llttlO    I'Ull
fight   againBl
did  nol   want
fell   quickly
1 -.    Af-
cnough that ho
i:.- the I'ny si'cm-
iil that tliey had
■mli other in one
nil outwardly 111-
f the dusly roads,
equired?
ibi
id)
rr.R
Consider thc Chrynler Four from any standpoint—of design, of craftsmanship and of
performance — and you readily find thc
reason forthe sweeping public demand for it.
Put the Chrysler Four through its paces.
Drive It in the thickest of traffic and you will
be delighted by Its lightning-like, effortless acceleration. Chrysler hydraulic four-
wheel brakes, now first offered on a car of
this price at slight extra cost, complete thc
feelipgof utmost safety andease of handling.
Take the open road. Step the Chrysler Four
up to your speed and keep it there. You
discover a tremendous energy and stamina, coupled with extreme quietness of per.
formance and marked absence of vibration.
You will find that the Chrysler Four gives
and does what no other car at its price can
equal in power, speed, fuel mileage, acceleration, smoothness, ease of riding and
handling.
All this is the result of a new application to
proven four-cylinder principles of the same
scientific engineering, and the same precision of manufacture with the same prodigal
use of fine alloy steels, so characteristic of
its companion car, the Chrysler Six.
Come in—we are eager to have you get
acquainted with this most remarkable
value In the industry.
CHRYSLER FOUR-Tourlng C.n.Sl 2.1(1; CM. I.omN.SHHS; Coach, $J460*S«-*lan,$lS35,
IIj(JhiiiIi. |iiui-.chi't-l brake, at illstit estja mul.
CHRYSLER SIX-PiWuiii. .-SIKftUr Couch, $I94S- Itimihu,, ,22711; Sedan, $2275- Royal
Co.pt. S24IO1 UriiMfhtini. $251151 linbeilal, J26911- Crown-Impcrlal, S2B2S.
All tuke, /. 11. l>. Windier, tax., extra.
Bodle. by Fi.h.r on all ClirjjU-r etidoieil moduli. All model. <-i-iii!-*t--<d wiih balloon tires.
We are blea.ed (o extend the i-nn.enlence 0/ iii*u*-Ji(i\mc-ili. Aik aboul Chr-yilcr'. attractive
f-lan. Chryiler ' '           ' r- -    l —
Tdealer, und (Uperior Chry.ler lervlce .*,vrvtihrrr
lountuins Heaven
ii showed, too—
re losl  hnpotent-
Id  of iii     .■'''
Wl) It'll     ht-     W-H8
ml trowa:-. l'i;;ui*
paying out 11 lim*
WILSON'S SERVICE GARAGE, Cranbrook
Jas. Mitchell, Agent, Kimberley
CHRYSLER FOUR
CANADIAN NATIONAL
HANDLES AN UNUSUAL
RUSH OF 1925 CROP
An unprecedented rush nf grnin
from elevators nnd loading platforms
in the three prairie provinces to the
hend of the lakes and Pacific coast
ia being handled this yenr by Canadian National Railways, according
to a recapitulation of grain figures
made by officials of tnat company.
With the earlier harvest this year,
grain has started moving in much
greater volume thnn   at   the   same
time in previous years, and total
loadings since August 1st, the opening of the grain year, nre nearly
four times heavier than in tho same
period of 1024. With the exception
of I'.)2l and 11)22, loadings at Canadian National points since August
1st this year have boen tiie heaviest
in thc history of the amalgamated
system. This year nlso, with 0,044,-
000 bushels loaded since the 1st of
August, tlie majority of cars have
been loaded during the lnst two
weeks, the 1024 crop having been
practically cleared away before the
opening  of  the  present   grain  sea
son.
Dnily landings at Canadian National points last week topped the
thousand car mark, and are expected to increase rapidly ns threshing
becomes general in Alberta, where
it has been delayed by rains.
C. P. R. Conductor Killed
K. Dean, C. P. K. freight conductor, of Vancouver, wns killed at
Ashcroft on Sunday afternoon last,
when in jumping from a moving
engine he failed to get clear. He
was mangled horribly beneath the
engine, and was instantly killed.
CHAP'
Out of the blustery i   ■:■• tl
steeped in the fabled St;     n
ness, a small bouldi i    **   I ■■:.
the    persistent   ruin—slipped    from
Old   Witch's  Mask,  on   thi    I
of Granite Gorge, an-! hurtled dowi
toward   two   unsuspecting   vagrants
at the lee base of n train trestle pier
The thin halo of (heir fire, filtering bravely ugainsi the impounding blackness, revealed ihe younger
tramp coaxlngly fei lin
keep off the windblown spurts •>!'
rain, a rusted wash boiler top thai
hud found its way Into this
hobo nest in the
alone knows how
before its rays w
ly in the black i
upon the edge o
kneeling—the I'ai
of the older tramji
of cord.
A trickle of pebbles, and a sudden ominous overtone to the weird
medley of wind and rain lhat thrash-
ed down upon tlie snnrling whirlpools in the bottom of the canyon,
warned the man at the five. But his
Instinctive yell to his friend \vqb too
late. Tho unwarned hobo, just rising to his feet and carefully commencing to draw in his string, was
still in a half-bent forward position
when the roek bounced like a petrified rubber boll on tin- ledge behind him, then jumped over him us
though in playful leapfrog, barely]
grazing the broadest and fullest part
of his frayed pants. Such, however, was the force of this glancing
blow that the trump wus knocked
flat on his face toward the brink of
the chasm, over which he now slid,
helplessly, his bunds clutching t'ulile-
ly at tbe empty air, his feet in their
toeless shoes pressing vainly on the
smooth ledge for u braking hold
that would slay his bulky body. Hi9
frightened shriek rose like a wail
above the tempestuous symphony of
primitive  elements  in  the  Gorge.
The lithe, young hobo, dropping
the boiler cover, mude n leap and o
grab, hut for thc second time in us
many instants he was too late. Iiii
pul disappeared over ihe cliff,
Outwardly numb, inwardly quaking, the young fellow crawled to the
edge and peered over, lie suw what
he had heen afraid to hope for—his
comrade entangled in a stout bush
a hare three feet below.
There was a precision and trained
skill in the physical strength of the
husky young trump tbat spoke of
better fed and rested dnys not far
behind ns he drugged his fat friend
to safety, guiding him to help himself by taking toeholds in lhe glacially vermiculated face of the precipice. Gasping, when safe at lust,
the older man seized bis friend'--
hands in sentimental gusto, and with
a great wagging of liis greasy head
ami wrinkling of bis rotund face—
which, in the dying light of tbe neglected fire, wus unmistnkenbly colored a boudoir green—he cried:
"My dear boy, 1 am eternally in-
debted to you. The cold fingers of
the Grim Reaper were in my hnir.
But—drowning is not for Potts!    It
■      ■
I     I
*
..     .
, 1 don't thii
Lhe 0
with   the
■
JMtun   of
|| , ■   ■
■    ■
*
- *.
.nil smclli      ;   .
*
il   the   top
H   i1
;o it -- ;H k(jpp oil the
n ]oi ' con
for oui
■
.   ahem!
*   nt  piece
g. repast.
:'   . nishap I
for me
, .
T \ PI"   VnTliT   ,1      .   .1        I'      *   V
I \KK \nri< l. thut the East Koo-
, tenay    Power    Company,    Limited,
■ ii   .   address is Fernie,  B.C., will
laconically
darknei
he
WATER NOTICE
*
*
apply for a licence to tuke and use
;:   200  cubic   feet   per  second  and   to
----   nteligl „_ ,.,.,.        '       .    ,
" ■"■",MI wl'c foet of water o«t
:. nf Fording River, which flows south-
'    erly  and   drains   into   Klk  River  in
lh<
...I
■
into a n ■■*'.■
■    ■    ■
bile;
■
gi i, it was
an in1;'' n       : ■
rts of !
i\ experiei
•d the
intly.
e large c
.
. '   :
■■  ;     .
..   '    .    ■ ■
■
■   ■
have oh-
■ I
! ...
^^^^^^T-rii:
■
■ ■
■
.   ■ ■
■
nt  .i somberly   wist ful: trampi
fffl.W& ,T"*'"" " "*"""•"■' ~7"
ou Id   youra
■
lie was I
■
.      :    T ■ ts   11
: lefinite
than hi-;
Pottw, he  had
I with tli" 1 hiL had
	
.'?
"
%
.
■'
:
ve yell to bii frifnd wai too lata.
I   •   7989.
The  storage  dam will  he located
ibout  2  miles  east  of  N.E, corner
I   : '.■''■'-,   Thi- capacity of the reservoir to be created h about  30,000
ere feet, and it will flood about GOO
men-[acres of land.       Tlie water will  be
diverted from tlie stream at a point
about  _  miles east  of N.K. corner
!...'.    8065   and    will   be   used   for
power purpose upon ibe undertaking
East   Kootenny  Power
!  ■■-     d.ot No. 4588.)
This  i.m!ice  was  posted   on   the
10th duy of August,
1925.
A  copy of this ni-lice and an application pursuant thereto and to tho
"Water Act.  It'll." will be filed in
he    ■ ffice    of    the    Water    Recorder   at   F<' nie   and   Crnnbrook,
";<   '    Objections   to   the   application  may
bc filed with the said Water Record-
frith the Comptroller of Water
Pari Buildings,   Vic
toria, B.C., within thirty dnys after
th firsl appearance t>* this notice in
a k local ni wi pa] ■ r«
. wi h Water Board by tho
Ea ■ K tena; P< wi - <'".. Ltd., power will ;" supplied within Kootenay
Di ti.  <'..  und if permitted by
! Ity, within Alberta. The
■  ■    i.    approval of the un-
ard in the office
of the Board of Investigation, Vic-
I torin.  11   <'..  at  ;,  date to be fixed
the I oiler und any mterest-
may file un obji ction there-
-1   i  of the Comptroller or
:■ r .  ut  Fernie,
B. C, ■      I rook, B, C.
Bast K i1  -ver Co., Ltd.
A. 13. Sanborn, Gen. Mgr.
(Applicant)
The ii." firsl  publication
Sept 3rd, 1925.
28-31
WAV
fff.::
MOYIE
H0TES
■.•fffff,,
f.i
Collossal in its Magnificence
All-Canadian Shows
Canada's Premier Outdoor Attraction
3    -    -    New and Thrlling Rides     ■     ■    3
8    -    -     Big Circus Side Shows    -     -    I
TWENTY PALATIAL BOOTHS, OFFERING
THE SEASON'S NEWEST NOVELTIES
CRANBROOK'S OUTSTANDING AMUSEMENT ATTRACTION
JUNGLELAND
FREMMINIS' TEMPLE OF MYSTERY
FEATURING ALBERTA JIM CARRY'S WILD
WEST ARENA, PRESENTING
CARRY'S COW BOYS AND COW GIRLS IN
FRONTIER PASTIMES
CONKLIN & GARRETT'S    .
WALL OF DEATH
THE   CRAZY   HOUSE
CRANBROOK ONE WEEK
Commencing Monday, September 14th
W.W.WAW.V.VAW
and Mrs. Allan Johns* n and
, .Mr, Frank Carlson ai d
erson, ail of Kimberley. viait-
Ir, and Mrs. Algol -:-
mny Side roach last week.
irkerandd
1 .Mt
■tli;   home of Mr.   and   Mrs. James
Whii ■■• ad    on    Wednesday.      The
hours were spenl   i:i   dancing  and
; singing  and playing games.       Rc-
j frgshments wm- served al twelve o'clock, then tin dancinp continued un-
; til the wee hours of Thursday inorn-
Douglas ;
I tored intc
Mrs.   Home,
,,l  I..,oil-  Home, all mo-
Cranbrook lasl   Po
Messr.-.   Dimock   and   A-:
I motoring in  froi i Creston, :
off at .Moyie on Saturday night,
.1'      ■ Wi ir went to i
Saturday,   taking   i;    the   dai
Smith's Lake thut same evening.
i
ii :
.  . ■
-   -
.  .. j
,.. .     . .     .
[* ... -.I
thul  ti:   ■ had  spent
■   ■   *
Mi. ;* ■■
■■*.:ie.
d Ca and  Mr.
■
Cranbn
:
man mt
Sunday.  _^^^^_^^^^^^_^^^_
*■- ■ l   *
ment in;
. .   i.
Mr. Yuell i Cran- j
irook Saturd
; '-  ■ ■
ored iii froi    Bea
NISBET & GRAHAM
Barristers, Solicitors, &c
Offices: Imperial Bank Bldg.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
OFFICES at KIMBERLEY
IN  K. of P. HALL
Open Every Thursday from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Mr. Fritz
pent the h<
n  Sunday.
*
hi
Vancouver   Expects   Record   Grain
Movement.—Al 00  bush-
sin have
lent 1
tver, i -        *     *   .
grain ti ad
porl ■ in li
i - - ■ 11 see an un-
through
the poi t ol
■
f
ALL-CANADIAN AMUSEMENT COMPANY HERE
ALL THIS WEEK
Conklin & Gnn "    Al  I
Shows are in town all this week.
The   plea ure   lovim        : I i
Cranbrook havi  the opp irtun
*i ■■; iriotis week.   T
varioui   attractions  would
mUCh   ti::
cover the show,  thei •■  i    the time
honored merry-go-round for the kid-
dh s, the giant fa i ii        11, and the
new   European   thi iller,
Thla i  tho first time I.
dispen er ha< evi r bei n "':;
Cranbrook. Chief among tho various
Ide show Al   pto Jim Carry's
Wild  West   Arena,   presi u'.-.i.g  the
pastimes and pleasures of the cow-
;
This ih ■■
*
: ■
rett's '•■'■ ■ I
■
in a ne.
■
nt a jn.i
'    •    -
eai ■.:■'.*
cum of freai    and .
luring tl i. .■ Lilt
Parker,
*
Then the ■ -    *
nun.   clown ,   hot   dl ■  fd
, in fact,
so mud'.
week  for all   '.he   lovOTl   of outdoor
amusements.
■"
ii
.y-y\
1
\*
i
"Tlm Wall of OcaUi" wiih Conklin and Garrttt'i Alt . ........ I..... Show*.
SAGELINA
THE VEGETABLE HAIR
CLEANSER AND TONIC
Remove, d.ndruff, .lop. hair
f.llinii out, promolc. growth,
tighten, lhc port, and make.
lhe     hair    .ilk)     »"d    Huffy.
GUARANTEED RESULTS
I ri.-il 8 oz, bottle, !0c
If vour dcalL-r cannot supply
VOU    **M    I"    A-   J-    ,ireI-
Fori  Steele, H.C.
SPECIAL VALUE IN
SCHOOL SHOES
Little Gent's,
B In II) $2-00
Youth's,
ii to i.i'.        $3-25 |
Boys',
i to » $3-25 J
Misses' High Cut,
ii i" -' $3-25
C. EMSLIE
Armstrong Ave.
OEMS' PUHMSHINQS
BOOTS, SHOES, Etc.
J PAOE   FOUR
THE  CRANBROOK   HERALD
Thursday, September 17th, 1925
tbe Cranbrook Kerala
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
F. A. WILLIAMS R. POTTER, B. Sc,
Subscription ITlea  -fiOO Fer Vear
Ta Oittai Statw ItW Per laar
AdTertlalng Rates oa Application, Chanjea ot Copt
tor Advertising should tw handed la aot later than Wednesday noon to secara att-mtlon.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER I7H1, 1925
Till-. GLOBE BREAKS AWAY
CONSIDERABLE interest lias been aroused in
the independent strain recently developed by
the Toronto Globe, regarded as perhaps the foremost Liberal journal in the country, and a vehicle
for the dissemination of Liberal principles whose
steadfastness lias become almost a byword. One
can imagine the indignation many hoary headed subscribers feel when they see their Globe slipping, and
no doubt there will be the usual shower of "stop my
paper" missives fluttering Globewards, such as very
often follow the manifestations of out and out independence in newspaperdom. But the Globe will
also likely gain a new infusion of blood from the
new and youthful body politic, who are not lo
be iron-bound iu Iheir thinking.
Under the heading "the Globe and Parties"
the Globe in a leading editorial recently, after outlining its relationship with the federal Liberal party
since confederation, set forth its attitude to the pie-
sent Liberal administration and the policy it will
follow in the coming Dominion elections.
The editorial accused the King government
for not accepting the "arrogant challenge" of the
Senate when the second chamber threw out government measures of social reform, of railway aid, of
relief lo the Home Bank depositors, of rural credits
and restriction of gambling, by the dissolution of
parliament on the issue raised by the Senate's vet
"The result would never have been in doubt" thc
editorial states, "self government is still dear to tin
people of Canada."
The Globe proposes in the coming election
"to advocate the principles of political Liberalism
as it has advocated them for the past eighty years.
That assuredly does not mean subservient support of
a politieal drifting, which involves the evasion of
issues which should be faced courageously."
Tin- editorial is of particular significance,
following, as it does, the recent resignations of its
chief aud assistant editorial writers, as a result of
a disagreement with the management over matters
of policy.
In the British press, also, the coming election
iu Canada is receiving some attention, and some
strong opinions are being expressed.
Discussing the Canadian Government railway
policy, the Financial News says that Premier King
places the problem of transportation in the forefront
of his political programme, on which he proposes to
appeal for a renewed vote of confidence from the
Canadian people. But "his reference to the subject
iu his speech at North York on Saturday were much
too vague and general to enable the public to understand exactly what his railway policy really is."
The paper asks what is "the regulated and
control competition" foreshadowed?
"Until the Canadian  Premier descends from
generalities," it says, "to details, his policy, whatever it may he, will hardly inspire enthusiasm or
confidence iu either this country or Canada."
*   *   *   *   *
DR. KING AND THK HOME RANK
IT is very easy for a matter such as the Home Bank
debacle to become a political football, as
each party would place the blame on the shoulders
of the other, and there is the inevitable criticism
offered as to what should have been done to avoid
the collapse that made such inroads into the means
of so many hard-working people, and very nearly
caused a financial impasse in the Fernie end of tin-
East Kootenay riding. The government of which
Dr. King is a member has taken some steps lo
alleviate theloss of the depositors, for which he is
naturally claiming some credit. At the same time
efforts arc being made to discredit the part Hon
Arthur Meighen took in the deliberations surrounding the measure.
Dr. King, in an address to his supporters, said
that Mr. Meighen took the view that any relief to
the Home Bank depositors should he viewed in tin-
light of what is termed—for want of a better word—
a compassionate grant. This Dr. King construed
into meaning charity, which he rightly says the
people of Fernie would resent. But what are the
facts ?
In the same speech Dr. King made the statement that when he interviewed some of thc depositors at Fernie. and they presented their case for
his consideration as their member, he made the replv
that they were not within Ihe law in expecting re
lief from the government.   In other words, it was
not, strictly speaking, a matter for government recourse.   This was Dr. King's reply to the depositors,
and  how  does  it  differ  from  the  views  of   Mr.
Meighen?    Its import is the same, but while Mr.
Meighen prefers to call  spade a spade, governments
have the habit of using somewhat more vague aud
cumbersome phraseology, so that what Mr. Meighen
called "compassion," the government preferred to
term "a moral claim in equity," a lofty-sounding
phrase that means the same thing.   Mr. Meighen
did not vote against thc government measure for tli
relief of the Home Bank depositors, but desired to
have it put up iu different form.
The accusation is also made that as the Conservative government of 1916 was presumed to have
some knowledge of the condition of the Home Bank
then, it should have taken steps to rectify the matter,
ergo, the Conservatives are ultimately to blame for
the whole situation.   Cases broughl in the courts
against the directors for alleged misfeasance have
been tried, and were dismissed on appeal. In other
words, the government could not hang anything
blameworthy on them. The bank was private property, and governments cannot step in and seize
I private enterprises operating with private money,
and close them up. There are regular channels provided for the winding up of insolvent businesses, and
apart from the impression that would have been
created just at a time when Canada was testing out
her war-time financial strength, there is a question
whether the government of that day could have
taken over the affairs of the bank and prevented any
loss. If, as governmenl speakers say, there would
have been no loss to depositors at that time, how
could il be said that the institution was threatened?
There would have been far more justification for
the government taking over the Canadian Northern
Railway, or the Grand Trunk Pacific years before
it did, because these institutions were showing
losses year after year, and public money was being
used to guarantee their undertakings, and carry
them on. Hut it is no part of a government's function to step iu and take over private institutions
that may not he any too sound. What limits would
there be to such a course?
If the government wishes the public to know
what it has done for the I lome Bank depositors,
why does il not tell the story of the ill-fated measure
it foisted upon the senate only a day or two before
the session prorogued, aud which even its own members in the upper chamber were not unanimous iu
supporting? Such an important measure as this was
deliberately left for the last few days of the session,
when by the exercise of machinery of which it had
full control the long-drawn out speeches on the reply lo the address and the budget could have been
curtailed—its owu supporters were the worse offenders, be it known—and the measure brought down
in lime for proper deliberation. As it was, the
senate refused to accept as workable the original
measure, anil instead of making this a point blank
issue with the upper chamber, the government had
to back down and compromise on the senate proposals, realizing the difficulties of its owu position,
and the iudefensahle dilly-dallying that resulted iu
delaying the Home Bank relief measure till the last
moment almost. Dr. King did go on record iu the
house as favoring one hundred per cent reimbursement to the depositors, but how hard he pressed for
this is not recorded. While endeavoring to extract
all the credit possible for its handling of the matter,
the fact remains that the government did nol do any
more than any other government would probably
have done, aud the impression prevails that it did
not do it as welt.
*****
NO doubt much criticism will be heard of the fool-
hardiness exhibited in allowing the two excursions in the air, whicli recently came to disastrous
ends iu the United Stales, one fatally, and the other,
happily, sparing the lives of the courageous aviators.
But this is how scientific advancement is recorded.
Someone has to lake the chance to prove the advances made. There are martyrs to human progress
whose deaths have brought achievements to light
thai have proved of inestimable worth to humanity.
It is the expression given to the eternal urge to get
to something belter that is responsible for these
seemingly foolhardy, and sometimes incomprehensible feals that are attempted in the name of science.
It goes without saying that out of the disastrous
end of the Shenandoah will be built up new principle!
to govern aviation lhat may have a far reaching effect on aeronautics.
BAPTIST AND UNITED
CHURCHES JOIN TO
HEAR H. L. PORTER
MakeBetter^
.    Bread  ,  ,
Ask your grocer for
ROYAL
YEAST
CAKES
-.STANDARD OF QUALITY^
"1-10VER50YEARS,
**************************
TWENTY
YEARS AGO
Extract! from the Issue of
The Cranbrook Herald of thla
Date Twenty Yeara Ago.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*•♦***+*****■>+****
Peace hns been declared between
Russia and Japan, officially bringing
to a close tbe Russo-Japanese war.
A scheme is being worked out to
irrigate 35,000 acres nl' Rood hind
east of Wilmer.
Involving a loss nf $11)0,000, fire
completely destroyed the plnnt of the
Elk Lumber Co., nt Fernie tins week.
Over 2,r>00 visitors cnme to Crnnbrook to participate in die big Labor Day celebration, there being
special trains in operation from three
directions.
Wm. Steward, of tlie Cosmopolitan
Hotel, is leaving this week on n visit to thc Old Country.
Tim Lebel anil wife, of Pincher
Creek, were visitors in the eity tbis
week. The Pincher magnate said
that his port of the country wns turning more and more In wheat growing, und big crops were being recorded.
torn Our^fwm&s
There arc undoubtedly critical daya and yeara in
store, for the country. Transition periods are always
marked by the strain of discomfort and loss that accompany processes of readjustment. But we believe that
there is no warrant for imagining that the country is
necessarily going downhill or that thc native virtues of
the people have deteriorated. If, in June, 1914, any aeer
hud predicted that this country would be capable of the
sacrifice and the sustained effort which it bore and made
between August, 11)14, and November, 1918—which, in
truth, many sections of the people are still bearing and
making with almost unconscious heroism—he would have
been laughed at as a dreamer of wild dreams. Little
by little, the people will realize what has to be don* for
their own and the country's salvation, and little by little
they will do it, grumbling or joking as is their wont, until other nations find that, in every branch of human
endeavor, Kngland still holds a place second to none.—
Review of Reviews.
WOOLEN INDUSTRY AND THE TARIFF
Market in Canada for woolen cloths and knit goods,
open to the world, has produced a situation here in which
closed factories, idle hands and unproductive capital prevail. Unless protection is given through the tariff this
almost unprotected industry faces disaster.
Unemployment in Canada in cloth manufacturing
industries is much worse than it was a year ago. In
March, 1925, the percentage of machinery in operation
in the United States was 78.9 per cent, which is about
normal. In Canada the percentage of busy machines
in 1924 was 50, and now it is not more than 45. Of 300
cloth and knit goods mills in Canada, 45 to 60 are closed,
and others are closing.
Of 22,000 hands engaged in Canadian factories,
from 5000 to fiOOO are either idle or working part time.
If this country gave its wool industry a protection approximating thut of the United States, employment
would be furnished for another 20,000 workers, turning I
out 80 per cent of the requirements of the local mar-1
ket.
If Canuda is to make headway against world competition in thc wool business, foreign goods must be
taxed. Last yeur the volume of imports was maintained,
in face of the fact thut ao many people left Canada for
the United States in search of employment.
Canada absorbs annually $59,000,000 of woolen
goods, of which more than $27,000,000 worth are imported.—Exchange,
Friday,  September   18th
With long life will I satisfy him, and
diew him my salvation.—Pms. 9I:lfi.
*    *    *    4
Saturday,   September   19th
The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord, nnd
of his Christ, und he shall reign for
ever and ever.—Revelations 11:15.
• * * •
Sunday, September 20th
Surely goodness und mercy shull follow me ull the days of my life: und
I will dwell in the house of the Lord
for ever.—Psalms 2.1:0.
• • i  *
Monday,   September   21 -*t
And we shull serve the Lord your
God, and he shall bless thy bread,
and thy water; and I will take sickness away from the midst of thee.—
Exodu.s 23:25,
• * * *
Tuesday,  September 22nd
For thou, Lord, will bless the righteous; with favor wilt thou compass
him as with u shield.—Psnlms 5: 12.
a   a   a   a
Wednesday,   September  23rd
And now also the axe is laid unto
the root of the trees: therefore every
tree which bringeth not forth good
fruit is hewn down, und cast into the
fire.—Matthew 3: 10.
• • • •
Thursday, September 24th
Heaven und earth sliull puss uwuy;
but my word shull not puss away.
—Luke 21:33.
Departing   Principal   Gives
Farewell Address on Sunday Evening Last
Sunday evening last there was not
a seat left in the Baptist church when
Mr. H. L. Porter, who for the summer during the ubsence of the regular
pastorj Rev. W. T. Tapscott, had conducted tlie services in that church,
preached for the last time. Out of
I'steem for Mr. Porter, the service at
lhu United church was cancelled, that
body attending the Baptist church.
On the platform with the speaker
were Mr. Tapscott and Rev. B. C.
Freeman.
When called upon to speak Mr.
Freeman paid high tribute to the
sterling character of Mr. Porter, who
wus fcpeuking to ut least some of them
for the lnst time. He referred to his
cordiality und the efficient, effective
manner in which he conducted his
service for Christ. He claimed that
we would do ourselves small credit
if we failed to recognize and pay
tribute to his manhood and sincere
Christian character. While he regretted his departure he was glad
to have known him. This union service was pleasing to him, and if, he
said, it was possible to unite in this
way on account of one who but in
a fractional way had expressed the
mind of Christ, how much more
should they get together for the worship of Christ himself.
Taking for the .subject of his remarks, "I am the Light of the World.
Behold I Stand at the Door and
Knock," Mr. Porter gnve an address
which will be long remembered by
his hearers. He appealed for on
abandonment of the doctrine of pessimism which is being preached with
regard to present dny conditions. The
greatest power in the world today
was the love and power of Jesus
Christ. Comparisons of conditions today nnd olden days favored the present day days, he thought.
With respect to the problems of
modern times which hnd to be solved,
lie gave some wise counsel. To
the members of the United chureh
he urged that when the time cnme.
as undoubtedly it would after the
glamour of union had worn off and
differences arose, they should get to
pettier nnd solve these difficulties on
bended kneos in the presence of the
light of Jesus Christ. Referring to
reproductions of a famous picture
whicli he had seen in Oxford university, and which he had on the
platform, showing the Savior stand
ing, knocking at the closed door, the
speaker made a strong appeal to his
listeners to open their hearts so thnt
the "Light of All Light" might shine
in.
During the evening the choir nnd
n quartette consisting of Mr. nnd
Mrs. Hinton, Mrs. Kuhnert and Mr.
Palmer rendered several pleasing
selections.
CRANBROOK PUPILS
SCATTER TO SCHOOLS
ALL OVER DOMINION
Thnt Crnnbrook will not bc lacking in representatives at tbe various
colleges and schools throughout the
provinces nnd the dominion mny be
judged from the list given below of
a number of Crnnbrook young people
who have either left for school or
college or will be leaving this week
or next.
Those in attendance at University
of British Columbia: Evelyn Anderton, Chester Roberts, Jimmy Taylor,
Margaret Johnston,   Hester Thomp
son, Edward White, Lee Davis,
(Bull River), George Hunter, William
Selby, Mildred Burdett, Winnie Burdett, Jenn Wilson, Otto Gill, Eric MucKinnon.
Those in uttendnncc nt McGill university: Betty Green, Norn Home.
Those in attendance at Normal
school are: Ruth Solderholin, Myrtle
Garden, Bertn Cameron.
Vernon Preparatory school: Master
George Roberts.
Brnndon college: Melville Lensk;
Montreal: Jnck Genest,
Pinal, Toronto College of Music:
Helen Worden.
University of Alberto: Mnc I-nrge.
Thc above list is not given ns com
plete but ore those that linve come
to thc notice of The Herald. Nunies
of others will bc published if handed
in or phoned.
LIBERALS ELECT
OFFICERS FOR THE
FEDERAL ASSOCIATION
Following the Liberal convention
on Satlrday evening lnst. nt the K. P,
Hull, the organisation for the federul riding was brought about, to <•
ry on the campaign. Officers were
elected us follows:
Hon. Pres  Premier W. L.
MaeKenzie King
Hon. Vice Pres  Dr. J. H. King
President   R. R. Bruce,
lnvermere
1st Vice Pres J. H. Buckham,
Golden
2nd Vice Pres. .. A. I. Fisher, Fernie
Secretary   F. M. MacPherson
Treasurer  G. J. Spreull
Executive 0  F. C. Lowe, Fernie;
Mrs. E. K. Stewart, Fernie; J. H. Cleland, lnvermere; J. W. Morland,
Windermere; Mrs. C. J.
Little, Cranbrook.
Liberal committe rooms will be established, it is understood, in the former forestry department building on
Baker Street.
Dr. and Mrs. King left on Sunday's
train for the Coast, where Dr. King
wns due this week at the conventions
of the coast constituencies. He was
accompanied to Nelson by Kenneth
Campbell, former Liberal member in
the provincial house for the city of
Nelson, who came to confer with Dr.
King relative to the West Kootenay
outlook, where nn effort hns been
mnde to have the Liberals unite with
the Progressives in the nomination
ngnin of L, W. Humphrey, the sitting Progressive member, in opposition to W. K. Esllng. the Conservative nominee.
E. Pnterson, of this city, also accompanied them tn Nelson.
Montana Restaurant
Meals at All Hours
Clgsra, Cu-u-.it.. «. ToImccoi
Cranbrook  St.    .    pfcOB, 201
Opp. Buk of Comawco
Experienced   Dressmaking
and Sewing
MISS   DINGLEY
— PHONE  S14 —
'*V*Vfffffffffff
C JOE BROS.
Ladies & Gents.' Tailors
Suits Made To Order
CLEANING  *  PRESSING
Cranbrook Si., Opp. Bk. Com.
*V*Vfffffffffffffff,
■WMWMWIWWWWWW
THERE'S  JOY
in dining at a Restaurant where
things are kept immuculate, the
service prompt and the food exceptionally tasty and wholesome. That's why you'll enjoy
dining here. Our daily menu
always includes many delightful dishes,
VICTORIA CAFE
f^^^ft-WWWWVWWWW^^
Timber Sale
2503 acres in Oold Creek
District held under perpetual license Nos. 12843, 12844,
I284S and 1299,1, held by the
Hoover estate, must be closed out in 30 days to settle
estate. Cruise estimate over
40 million feet, largely
spruce. Bids received by
John E. Brooke, Newgate,
B.C.
Radium Tavern
Late  Fairmont   Hot  Spring!
15  Mile.  North of Cranbrook,
on the Blue Trail to Banff
Open   Winter   and   Summer
Rates lowered after September  1st.
Sl.OO to $1.50 per day;
$6.00  to $7.50 per week.
$21.00   per   week   including   meals.
ACCOMMODATION  FOR 70
QUESTS
Curative Baths of Hot  Radium
Water
Warm swimming pool, 85.
Riding,   Fishing  and   Hunting
(White and Indian guides)
STATION, RADIUM; P.O.,
FAIRMONT SPRINGS
BUS MEETS ALL  TRAINS
Our Saturday Specials
Are From Choice Local
FRESH KILLED STEERS
GRAIN FED PORK
CHOICE SPRING LAMB
DAIRY FED VEAL
Onr Shamrock Hams and Bacon
ARE  THE  VERY  BEST
GLENDALE CREAMERY BUTTER
THE CLIMAX IN QUALITY
P. BURNS & Co Ltd.
Phone 10       ...       . Cranbrook, B.C.
ff*Vffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff.Vfffffff
NELSON BUSINESS  COLLEGE
Individual Tuition       - Commence Any Time
THE BEST EQUIPPED BUSINESS COLLEOE IN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Complete Commercial Course In:
Shorthand, Typewriting, Bookkeeping, Spelling, Penmanship,
Business Arithmetic, Commercial English, Commercial
Law, Filing and General Office Procedure
NEW TERM COMMENCES TUESDAY, SEPT. 1st, 1925
For Full Particulars Apply: P. O. Box 14, Nelson, B.C.
::    Phone 603    ::
Co-Operative
SPECIAL FOR SATURDAY
Snowflake Marlow Biscuits, per lb.   -   -   -   -   35c
Toasted Marshmallows 45c
Burlews Salad Dressing 45c
Chocolate Bars, 6 for 25c
Chili Sauce, per bottle -   -   - 25c
Local Honey, 5-lb. pail $1.35
Maple Leaf Flower, 98 lbs. $5.75
Perrins Sodas, per pkg. 25c
Crystal White Soap, 15 bars $1.00
Blue Ribbon Baking Powder, 5 lb. tin -    -   - $1.15
Wealthy Apples, per box $2.00
Sweet Potatoes, 2 lbs. 25c
Cranbrook Dist. Co-Op. Soc.
PHONE 104
WWWWWIAMWIAfWUIItlWIIWVWWUWWWMIWWlniWWIIW'V Thursday, September 17th, 192S
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
PAGE FIVE
ywwuwvwwwt-^MM-rww^w-^Mwvwwwi-ft-wtfwwuy
Kimberley and Wycliffe
Notes
fffffffffff*
■   KIMBERLEY
: NEWS NOTES
**************************
Mr. Leslie Hulpin left on Tuesday
for the Const, after spending the
summer months with his parents in
town, and will attend college at Portland.
Joe Scholl was a town visitor on
Wednesday evening.
Art Williams was a Kimherley visitor this week.
Men Keer, an oldtimer in this district has sold his ranch and all in
connection with it and will leave
shortly for the Coast, where he will
reside in the future.
Mr. and Mrs. Conover, of Spokane,
Wash., are visiting in town for a few
days, the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Medley McLeod; Mr. and Mrs. Conover
are well known throughout this district, hnvingly lived in town for n
numher of years.
Mrs. Boyd Caldwell, accompanied
by her sister, Miss Reid, of Toronto,'
spent a  few days  in  Spokane last
week.
Mr. R. Perry, of Vancouver, Deputy Grand Master for B.C. of the
Independent Order of Oddfellows,
paid a visit to Kimberley lodge Friday evening. Refreshments were
served during the evening, and a
very enjoyable time was spent by
all who attended. A number from
town motored to Cranbrook Saturday night to attend Key City Lodge
at the special meeting and again
have the pleasure of seeing Mr. Perry.
Mr. and Mrs. Reid and Miss Reid,
who have been guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Boyd Caldwell for the past
three weeks, left on Monday for
their home in Toronto. Robert Handy, who has spent the past year here
with his aunt, ulso returned with
them.
With the hunting season opened
on Tuesday, there was a large number of townspeople out to get some
of the first shooting. Dr. Hanington,
Jack O'Neil and party spent the first
few duys at Brisco, in the Windermere country. Several good bags of
game were brought in.
Mrs. (Dr.) Hanington and Miss
Ida spent a few days at Fairmont
the first of the week.
Mr. and Mrs. E. Louis spent Sundny nt Cranbrook.
Mr. Arthur Montgomery, of New
Richmond, spent a few days in town
the guest of hi« brother, K. G. Montgomery, superintendent of the C.M.
& S. Co., and left this week for the
("oast.
Hon. Dr. King was in town for a
few hours on Friday renewing old
acqalntances.
Mayor Roberts of Cranbrook was
a Kimberley visitor on Friday,
John McDougall, representing the
Vancouver Trunk nnd Bag Co., was
calling on a number of his old friends
in town on Friday.
W. II. Hrown, representing the
House of Hobherlin. was at Foute's
Store the end of the week.
A farewell bamiui't wus given Mr.
A. K. Hitiild Friday evening at the
Canadian Cafe before his leaving for
Kingston, Out., where he will attend
college.    Mr. Hauld has made many
friends during his stay at the Concentrator and will be greatly missed
among the younger set.
Mr. Geo. McKay, of Moyie, was
in town Friday and Saturday, and
attended the banquet in honor of
Mr. A. K. Bnuld,
Tom Summers and family motored to ('ranbrook Hunduy.
After several weeks stay at Fairmont Hot Springs, Frank Meesliaw
(returned to town the end of the
week, feeling much improved in his
health.
Miss Fletl arrived this week to
teach Grade <> at the Public school.
The new building not being completed yet, a junior grade is being taughl
in the other rooms for the present.
The nomination held in Cranbrook
on Saturday night was largely attended hy Kimberley citizens.
Combmtion Engineer Here
E. A. Jamteson, general manager
for the west for the Vickers Combustion Company, a branch of the well
known engineering and naval construction firm, was a visitor in the
district this week. Mr. Jamteson
was formerly a divisional engineer
in the Okanagan district for the C.
P. R., and much construction was undertaken in the way of wharves and
docks during the years of unprecedented expansion in tho shipping of
fruit in thnt district, which was carried out under his direction. Mr.
Jamieson is now particularly concerned with the development of steam
power facilities, the Vickers company having evolved a type of automatically fed boilers using pulverized
coal for fuel that Henry Ford has
taken into use at his model power
plants in the United States nnd Canada. Mr. Jamieson has not been
to Cranbrook for thirteen years, and
speaks highly of the apparent healthy business tone of the city nnd district. While in the city he renewed acquaintance with Major H. B.
Hicks.
THE WEATHER BULLETIN
Official
Date
September 2
September's
September <1
September 5
September fi
September 7
September 8
Thermometer   Readings
Cranbrook
Max,
Max.
82
81 " *
80
87
fift
75
7fi
At
Mln.
Min.
41
43
4G
48
43
34
38
Baby's restless nights
might be avoided
Scalded skiu aud other skin
troubles are comuiuu causes
uf restlessness, and often
could be avoided by careful bathing with Baby's
Owu Soap.
Uh fragrant lather cleanses nnd
heals llaby'a skin, and prepares
(or restful Bleep.
"tietljei *j*tu and Baay tao"   n.u
Seeking New Votes on Beer
New Westminster nnd one or two
•other places which are "dry" districts as determined by the plebiscite
held nt the time of the lnst general
election hnve nppronched the government with a view to getting n new
vote, nt whicb, no doubt, those making the requests would hope to see
the decision against beer parlors altered. On the other hand, thore are
those in "wet" districts who think
that a new vote there would also
demonstrate a change of view. The
cabinet has carefully considered the
matter and has come to the conclusion that if n substantia] proportion
of the electorate, as shown hy a petition from at least forty per cent.,
want a new vote they can have it.
but that as it is not desirable to
have the situation disturbed by frequent plebiscites this must end it for
three years in that locality.
Seeking Joint
Action on Road
Board   of* Trade   Proposes
Delegates Go to
Victoria
MONTHLY MEETING HELD
Doubtless, due to the many other
meetings called for .Monday evening last, the attendance at the meeting of the board of trade thai evening was not ns large as it otherwise would have been, there being
only six present.
After the adoption 'if the minutes of the lost regular meeting,
the following business was transacted:
A letter from Hon. John Oliver
was read, regarding the timber land
on the Windermere road, adjoining
the road, wliich it is hoped to save
for scenic purposes. A request
made in this regard for a map was
ordered complied with, and the letter filed.
A letter from the Nelson Board
of Trade, and also from Edgewood,
regarding the opening of the new
Vernon-Edgewood rond were received nnd acknowledged, by motion of
Messrs. Fink and Raworth.
In regard to a letter from Mr.
Phillips, provincial government engineer, re the Moyie-Y.ihk road, it
was decided to turn this over to the
roads committee and the secretary
foj* reply, nnd that Information be
obtained from the Customs Office
as to the number of cars passing
over this section of rond, nnd any
other Information thnt it may be
deemed ndvisnble to place before
the minister of public works.
It was also moved by Messrs. J.
P. Fink und M. A, Beale that the
secretary write the Kimberley
Board of trade, putting before them
the proposal that together with the
Cranbrook board they appoint delegates to wait upon the government
at Victoria to petition for a betterment of roads in this district —
particularly the Cran bro ok-Kimber-
ley road.
A motion wns mnde by Messrs.
C. J. Little and M. A. Beale that
Messrs. Fink and Spreull be a committee to investigate the possibilities of increasing the customs facilities at Kingsgate, for clearing tlie
tourist traffic during the summer
months.
It was moved by Messrs. Fink
and Santo that the secretary write
the various service clubs of the city requesting that they assist in a
clean-up day to be held at the Mt.
Bnker Park, on Wednesday, September 23rd, commencing nt 1.30.
Those assisting are requested to
bring axes nnd rakes along for the
work.
Accounts amounting to $33.21
were  presented,  nnd  ordered  paid.
W. S. Santo, reporting for the
committee in charge of the erection
of the mineral specimen case outside tho post office, stnted thnt it
was almost completed. It had been
satisfactorily completed, and was
fully up to thc requirements, The
press was asked to express the appreciation of the board for Mr. .Mr.
Santo's efforts iu connection with
the erection of this cuse.
M. A. Beale is to take charge of
one of the keys of the specimen
case, and the other will he
given to Mr. Santo. The present
case used for mineral specimens at
the C. P. R. station was disposed
of to Mr. Raworth. who will purchase it from tlio board for the sum
of  $10.
Inspecting Land Holdings.—Shaping plans for settlement, next year,
of :i2r»,t)(M) acres of laud in Alhertu
and Saskatchewan, Canadian directors of the Hritish Dominion Land
Settlement Corporation are now
louring the west in company with
Major-Cenernl the Hon. Sir Newton
.Inmes Moore. K.C.M.C, und former
premier of West Australia. Sir Newton spent a few days in Winnipeg
before starting on his tour, conferr
ing with officers of the organization
which has heen operating in the west
since last spring, nnd hns discussed
plans for future settlement of land
Prints NAVAL  ERf«
Big Attraction Coming to Star Theatre Soon
and immigration work. The land
settlement scheme instituted last
year hy the organization is nn ambitious project and has as its object
the locntion of British settlers.
Land to the extent of 1125,000 ncres,
chiefly in Alberta, hns been ncquir-
ed, nnd n fair amount of settlement
work hns been done this fear. It
expected thnt plans for next yenr
will be much more extensive thnn
those already carried out, Thc personnel of the pnrty which is now
touring western Cnnndn over Canadian National lines includes Sir Newton Moore, Robert McKay, W. P.
Dutton, W. H. Carter and M. A.
Brown.
I A Rattling, Good Railroad Story for Railroad
Readers --
And Others
Dr. King Named as Candidate
(Continued from Page 1)
B. r . through the posiblllty of making use of the Panama Canal.
Financial Aipect-i
Turning to the finances, Dr. King
said that the Meighen government
had failed to balance its budget by
eighty millions of dollars. In the
first year this had been reduced by
the King government to $50,000,000,
and at the end of the lasl fiscal year
Hon. Mr. Robb hud heen able to
charge to surplus $84,000,000, The
government had reduced the sales
tax and the income tax, and further
reductions were now promised.! The
Canadian dollar was now at par, nnd
amid cheers, Dr. King asked if this
seemed to bear out the assertion of
Dr. Tolmio nnd Mr. Meighen thnt the
King government hnd set Canada
back.
The national debt, Dr. King said,
wns now $2,400,000,000. The railway situation which he claimed had
been left to tlie government as a legacy, they had endeavored to solve,
and under the management of Sir
Henry Thornton, he claimed the National railways showed great Improvement.
He considered this election of the
utmost importance — the most important perhaps, in tlie history of Canada. There were three courses to
be followed: first, to accept the suggested policy of Mr. Meighen, which
would he to retrogress fifty years to
the policy of Sir John A. McDonald,
which be did not consider good for
today; secondly the policy of Forke,
free trndo in foodstuff's nud the free
return of implements; or thirdly, to
carry on the succesful plans of MaeKenzie King.
Mr. Meighen hnd done nothing but
tried to detract from the government, and his talk was the best kind
of propaganda for the U. S. immigration agents. Dr. Tolmie had said the
country was sick of hard times, but
Canada's foreign trade continues to
grow, Dr. King said, tho exports in-
ireusing nnd the imports decreasing.
Furthermore. Dr. King chnrged thnt
during the years they were in power
both before the war and subsequently, the Conservatives had not put in
to effect their high tarfiff policy. Furthermore, with her small population,
producing more than the country was
able to consume, he felt that the only
wny for Canada to pay off its war
deht was hy the development of its
natural resources, and selling their
products in the markets of the world.
The Liberal Platform
In closing his address, Dr. King
reiterated the four principal planks
of the government's platform at the
present time — the railway policy;
fiscal policy, including decrease of
taxation and national debt; an ag-
gressive immigration policy, especially of the better British stock, and
the hardy northern races, ns well as
bringing buck, if possible, thc Canadians who who gone to the United
States; and the reform of the senate,
which should be constituted so ns to
to give vent to the will of the people
as a concurring body. The best
interests would be served by returning the King government to power.
Dr. King referred to the friendly
relations existing between Dr. Rutledge and himself, and predicted that
the country was on the eve of better
times, and that the government was
entitled to a further term of office.
Mr. Bruce thanked Dr. King for
his able address, and J. A, Buckham,
M.L.A. for Golden, in a few words
described the convention as a most
enthusiastic one, Dr. King being in
his opinion one of the big men of
the country. A. L Fisher, K.C, of
Fernie, considered that Dr. King
could do more for the East Kotenay
in a second term thnn in his first. He
felt that they should get behind the
"four points." Other speakers in
brief addresses were G. J. Spreull,
of this city, Mr. Clements, of Kimberley;  and A. Barnhnrt, of Yahk.
'ZEEBRUGGE' SHOWS
DARING OF BRITISH
NAVAL MANEUVERS
Tlu- public ha
ecently soon re
constructions ot nl
nin*   naval war-
tare on tin- film in
tin- "Sea lluwk"
.-ind "Captain Bloi
i."
At Un- Stnr Tii
•iim   there   will
ho Oil view soon :i
ilmlsation nf one
of llu- greatesl   n
...I*in   naval  ex-
ploits.    Tin-  Brltis
i  patriotic   film.
"ZoobrugRe," on n
-curate and drn-
nuitic   i*( nstructl
ii   nl'   tin-   very
brilliant enterprise
vliioh in IHIS re
suited in tin- crippl
il!*, "f one of the
main   bflsca   Iron
which   Germany
concluded  hor  boi
barous   "U"-boat
warfare.   II was i»
i ■! i 1 from nin-
terlal supplied liv 1
imtn indor Bruce,
D.S.O., R.N., liv 1
■un*  Wool IV anil
A. V. Bramble, ;n:i
verified by offl-
cers wlio took  pa
t   in  tho action.
From start in finis
il i:* thrilling to
anyone.
Tins   picture,   In
io   from   ,*,   "tl"
boat, slum*--* amazi
!■* jeencs of the
sinking of  British
no ri'hiintmen.
The film  "Z • In
i ■*.*"   has   been
described by naval
experts as being
absolutely true lo
'In*   facts   "f  till-
raid as carried ou
mi tho morning
of si. George's l>.
v. Ill IK, mul lias
been acclaimed by
.-cry critic as the
greatest mastorpii
-,. evet> SP(,n  on
the screen.
The picture nl
holds Iln- unique
closciIptlon nf In io
tin* only film so
far that lias boon pi
u Izccl by Their
Majesties On*  Kin
*   oiol   (J 11.
in the making ol
tho film, the Ad-
miralty not only ■_■*.*
-i* the use of tin
films taken  :H  thi
time boforo the
"Zeebruggo" floi t
i •  out, but also
films taken of tho
h ol nn its return
to Dover mi tin* i
iqming nfter the
raid.
Everything   has
therefore   boon
done to mako  -'/.
ebrugge"   an   ae
curnte record   *l
on* of  tin*   most
glorious episodes
n tin- history of
any navy.
TRY THESE DESSERTS
MIDDLEWEIGHT WRESTLER MATCHED TO MEET
JEPSON NEXT WEDNES.
Wednesday next a wrestling match
which  will  doubtli       i f   interest
will take place at Vahk, when Nels
Jepson, of thiii place, will meet .Mike
Bilinsky, of Toronto, middleweight
champion of Canada, and contender
for the llghtheavyweighl crown, Jep-
son has successfully mel ;ili contenders, but will have to extend himself
to retain his laurels against the wily
Bilinsky. The mill Kail at Vahk will
doubtless be crowded when these two
kings of the mat meet. The match
will take place at 8 p.m.
Bilinsky wish'
is ready to meet
100 pound- to 1
on the usual am
now in training, i
A. his headquarters,
Another familiar figure in the
wrestling firmamenl has been in the
city this week, in the person of Jack
Milo, who is wrestling with tbe Conklin & Garrett show, meeting all comers. Bilinsky ha., expressed a wil-
Hngnes to meet Milo in a match, and
an interesting bout would he the outcome if if could he arranged,
it known that he
any wrestler from
'.1 piiumis or over,
ngements; He is
inking th- V. .M. ('.
See the Opening Instalment of This Clean and Exciting Serial in This Week's
Issue of
The Cranbrook Herald
^MMIIIMtMIIMMIMMMMMMMMOHWMMMMMMMMWMMMMmmmf
Hold-Up on C. P. R. Soo Train
A hold-up took place on Saturday aboard the Mountaineer, the
C. P. K. main line Coast to the
Soo train. The scene of the outrage was nt Minot, N. D., two masked bandits entering a smoking cur
with drawn revolvers. The conductor who offered resistance was
fired upon, nnd the pussengers were
lined up and forced to deliver their
valuables. Leaping from the moving train on the outskirts of Minn L, the robhlers disappeared and
as tho robbery was not reported till
thc train reached Velva, the robbers have n good chance of getting
away.
Orange   Custard    (serve!   7)
2    cups  Borden's St.  Charles Milk.
1 cup hot water.
S    tablespoons cornstarch.
y   eggs.
]4   teaspoon salt.
W   cupful   cold   water.
%   cup orange juice.
2 tablespoons lemon juice.
Grated rind of one orange.
1    cup sugar.
Mix cornstarch, sugar and salt, dilute with cold water. Add to scaldetl
milk and hot water, stirring constantly until mixture thickens, afterwards occasionally; cook fifteen
minutes. Add orange juice and
slightly beaten eggs that have previously been mixed; mix thoroughly
and lastly, add the lemon juice and
orange rind.   Cool and serve.
Caramel  Custard   (tervei 6)
1    tall   can   Borden's   St.   Charles
Milk with enough water to make
l quart,
5   eggs.
,i teaspoon salt.
I teaspoon vanilla.
!■■ cup sugar.
II teaspoon nutmeg.
Gradually sift sugar into a hot
skillet, shaking the skillet vigorously
all the time to prevent burning. The
sugar should melt about as fast as
it is sifted into the pan. When it
turns to nn amber color (a light
resin color) set on back of stove and
add milk, being careful that milk
docs not bubble over, as is liable on
account of the high temperature of
sugar. As soon as the sugar is melted in the milk, add mixture gradually to eggs slightly beaten. Add the
salt and flavoring to egg and milk
mixture. Bake in custard cups in a
moderuto oven.
Jor
Dalies health
and Strength*
FREE BABY BOOKS   '
Write to Tho Bonk-n Co.
Vancouver,  B.C.
1,000 Acrei in Sugar Beeti.—Arrangements have been made for the
planting next spring ot' 1,000 acres
of sugar beets in Manitoba, according to Michael Scott, who is secretary of the Manitoba Sugar Company, Limited. This firm has been
making extensive experiments in tbe
growing of sugar beet- in Manitoba.
Provincial G. W. V. A. Officers
The concluding business at the
provincial G. W, V. A. convention,
recently held at Victoria, was the el-
ection of officers. Col. C. K. Kdgett.
of Vernon, was elected president,
and the retiring president, T. M.
Harnett, Vancouver, was elected aa
the representative from B.C. on the
Dominion command of the organiz-
tion. A. II. Bryant, of Kernte, was
named as the East Kootenay representative on the executive.
*'*£d^:EYERY—
^MEAL
mam
makes your food Jo you
more pood.
Note how it relieves
that stuffy feeling
after hearty eating.
Sweetens   the     Vi
breath* removes *fijy—
food    particles    m\ c
from
gives
m the teeth, ^fi ~ .  *   \W
w new vigor J\ Tf   Cf
tired nerves. [*"^*v^   •->
'omes to you     V^ ^<^\
Comet .^^^^
fresh, clean and
full-flavored.
Making Terms on Reclamation
Guy Constable, provisional chairman of Creston Reclamation Syndicate, got hack on Sunday from Victoria, where he had been conferring
with the minister of lands and departmental officials for several days
in connection with the concession of
10,00 acres of Kootenay Flats lands.
We understand the terms given by
the minister were almost exactly
what the syndicate asked, and as
soon as the duly executed agreement
arrives from Victoria a meeting of
the syndicate will be called to arrange the next move toward getting
the acreage drained.—Creston Re-
View.
Wk*l Toi Think of Insurant*
— Call Up —
BEALE & ELWELL
Cranbrook & Kimberley
i.i. lf.au (or Klmberl.-f TowitKe,
FOR RELIABLE
Shoe  Repairing
Take Your Shoe, to the
— O.K. SHOE SHOP —
Norbury Ave.      -      Cranbrook
For Quality & Value in
Men's Dress & Work Shoes
SEE US   —   W. Nichol, Prop.
SHIPMENTS OF ORE
MADE TO TRAIL
SMELTER LAST WEEK
ZINC
Lucky Jim, Roseberry   57
Lucky Thought, Silverton   72
Silversmith, Sandon   100
Standard, Silverton   82
DRY
Knob Hill, Republic, Wash  Ill
LEAD
Duthie, Smithers   33
(.'ork Province, Zwicky   34
(■rand Forks Mining Syn.,
Humming Bird   28
Monitor, Three Forks   92
Paradise, Lake Windermere   40
Rambler, Rambler   30
Solly, Beaverdell   50
Silversmith, Sandon   10J
Standard, Silverton  38
COPPER
Allenby Copper Co., Allenby .... 47
Boundary Merc. & Equi. Co.,
Grand Forks  ind
Company Mines   (1,022
Total tonnage     7,103
Say "Bayer"-Insistl
Unless you see tlie "Bayer
Cross" on tablets you are not
gettin? the jrenuine Bayer product proved safe by millions and
prescribed by physicians for 25
years.
O  /hs*- Acccl1t onl-v 2
tjG*f^     Bayer package
which contains proven directions
Hanily "Bayer" boxes of 12 tablets
Also imttles'of 24 an>l 100—Droggilta
An-lrin   l.   th**-   IM.l-   mark   Ittttotttei   In
fonuitK ',( (iar-T n ■ . late et Mvao-
*«UciclJi*sti*r of gaUcllCKU.
Simply   to   sell you coal is one ■ CTUDRinpC
thing; but to sell you coal so that LtmDnlUUt
you are heartily glad you bought,
and have confidence in us and our
service is a far bigger thing.
Prompt Delivery  of  our Diamond
Lump and Egg Coal, in any quantity,
Fresh from the Car
DIAMOND
m^^_    LUMP
The CRANBROOK CARTAGE & TRANSFER CO.
TOWRISS * ROBERTS
VAN HORNE STREET      .      ■      ■      PHONE 63
A relative in Iowa pot address
enn!^ mixed ;i oka sent
17,01)1) oggi i.; .ir . ]*' T. Murphy
in Doston, To save her f:in a loss,
she railed n I tl ri room and Sola
tiiem all -al ::.". cent , r dozen
less than regular retail yiicc.
Consolidated Nining & Smelting Co.
ol Canada, Limited.
OFFICES, SMELTING AND REFINING DEPARTMENT
TRAIL,   BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS AND REFINERS
Pwchauri of Oold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Ores
Producer! ot OoM, Silver, Copper, Pin Lead and Zinc
TADANAC"BRAND
1 S-A-OB   aix
THI CBllfBKOOI WUkklM
Thursday, September 17th, 1925
tfi UNITED CHURCH
(In The Methodist Church Building)
REV. B. C. FREEMAN Pastor
"I am among ynu as he that serveih."
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th
31 -  lorning Service    -    ■      Junior Choir
iect: "The Church and the Community."
12.15      Sunday School and Adult Bible Class
.m. — Evening Service      -        Senior Choir
• M, Siegel will read "The Golden Rule Applied."
>l. .?! st—Aliss Siegel wlll give her dramatic rending, "Within the Law."
i ■: 15 |). m.       —       Admission, SOc
A'ILL   RECEIVE  A  CORDIAL  WELCOME  —
ffffffffffff.
F        erian
irch
SUNDAY, SEPT. 20th.
-
the    services
id evening
Blackburn
Morning Service  11  o'clock
Sunday School nt 12.15
i£      IZvcnifij;   Service  at  7.30
ffffffffffffffff.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
i
D R.   VV.   A .   F E R 0 I E |
NTIST
Campbc      lanning  Block
Phon,   r' Office  Hour.
9 lo 17: 1    i 5 p.m. Sat. 9 I
Drs.   Oreen   &   MacKinnon
HI   tl:   Surgeon.
Oiiw * * enco, Armstrong
A v. nue
OFFICE     1IOUKS
Aft--   ins   2 to 4
Event .. 7.30 to 8.30
Sun.hv*   2.00 to 4.00
CRANBBOOK,   B.C.
.    B.   AM LES
■ HST
■■: HOURS
t to 6 p.m.
H.n.on iibrook,   B.C.
Baptist Cliurrl)
Rev.W.T.TAPSCOH
213 Norbury Ave. . Phone 202
SUNDAY, SEPT. 20th.
11 a.m. — Morning Service
"Achieving the Impossible"
12 o'clock — Sunduy School
7.30 p.m. — Evening Service
The pastor will address lhc
order "i the "Daughters <-i
Rebecca."
IOC ARE  CORDIALLY
INVITED.
CRANBROOK
CLEANERS & DYERS
Every Garment sent to us to
be Gleaned or Dyed is given
Our Utmost Care
Our knowledge of the business
Is your assurance of satisfaction here.     I'hone and we will
coll, or bring us your work
We   Clean   a\  Dye   Everything
PHONE   IS7
I **************************
j    LUMBERTON
CHIPS
**************************
Tlie Lumberton Ladies' Aid Society held its regular monthly meeting the first Thursday in September. Considerable new business was
brought to the attention of the mem-
bers, among which was the preliminary plans for a sale to be held on
Thursday evening, October 15th, in
tlie Lumbertdn Hull. The articles
for sale will include needlework and
home cooking. Tea will also be
served by the ladies during the
eourso of the evening, for which a
nominal charge will be made. The
sales in the past have all been very
divided successes, and judging from
present plans, the one being arranged for the month of October will not
be an exception. Thai response of
tho Lumberton people will no doubt
bo as hearty this yeur, ns everyone
realizes that the Ladies' Aid Society
lias done very much good since its
organization two years ago.
Mrs, T. Gustafson, of Rose Lake,
Idaho, hut formerly of Lumberton,
spont last week at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Fred Sandberg, having returned with them from Rose Lake,
where they spent Labor Day.
Mr. II. P. Klinestiver left for Spo-
knne on Thursday of last week,
where lie spent a few days in the
interests of the Spruce MillB.
The regular weekly meeting of
the Lumherton Club was held last
Wednesday evening in the Lumber-
tun Hull. The early part of the
evening waa spent playing empire
whist, at which eight tables were in
play. Refreshments'were served by
the committee in charge of the program. After this dancing was enjoyed until midnight. A special feature of the evening's program consisted of a balloon dance, prizes for
which were awarded to Mr. and Mrs.
W. lt. Andrews. '
L. D. Cafe
(Little Davenport)
When you wiih something good
to eat, go to the L.D.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Harrison and fatuity, who have been spending the
past week visiting with friends and
relatives in the Okanagan, returned
to Lumberton on Sunday evening.
The tii)) wns made by motor.
Mr. E. D. Fox of Seattle, western
representative of several eastern
concerns, spent Monday morning in
Lumborton looking over the stock of
the Spruce Mills.
Mr. C. TT. Werden. president of
the Spruce Mills, Ltd., of Ashland,
Wisconsin, arrived in Lumberton on
Wednesday of this week and will
spend some time here.
\1RPLANE MAKING
TRIP FROM SPOKANE
DESCENDS NEAR WALDO
William Frank Krammer, pilot of
a Curtis biplane, was placed under
detention at Fernie and a seizure
has been placed on his airplane by
the Royal Canadian Mounted police
following a forced landing near
Waldo last Friday evening.
The airplane was sighted passing
over Cranbrouk, eastbound, about
noon that day.
When near Waldo, Krammer was
compelled to make a landing on account of fuel shortage. Constable
Brown of the Hritish Columbia provincial police, investigating, found
that the pilot wns from across thc
border nnd had not reported to customs. He communicated with his
headquarters ut Pernio, who in turn
notified thc mounted police. Sgt.
Hannu went to Waldo and placed
the plane under seizure and ordered
the pilot detained for violating customs nnd air regulations.
The statement made by Krammer
was to thc effect that he had been
hired nt Spokane to bring J. V. Murphy from Spokane to Lethbridge on
account of the sickness of Murphy's
son at Lethbridge. He had been unable to cross the sumit and had landed so that his passenger could get
thc evening train, and was on his
return trip to Spokane when forced
down. The police nre investigating
the pilot's statement.
The story the aviator put up to
the authorities, that he had been on
an errand of mercy, rushing a parent to a sick daughter in Lethbridge
was checked up, and verified, the
passenger being J. V. Murphy, a
lumber operator at Burns, Ore. In
order to get to Lethbridge hurriedly
he rad taken three autos to get to
Spokane, only to miss the train at
thut point for Lethbridge. He accordingly appealed to the airman
to help him in his journey, and the
train was caught in the Crow. The
aviator was accordingly released,
with a warning that entry cannot
be made into Canada promiscuously in this way, and he was also given information on the Canadian
air regulations.
*************************** i
WASA
CAMP NOTES
IMsTfeek
i tcPHERSON
Undertaker
Phone 350
Norhury   \ye.,  Next  Cily  Hill
fffffff •        .'ffffffffffffff,
H.       "erchmer
BARRISTER
and
SOLICITOR
CRANBROOK   -   B.C.
— I'HONE 61 —
ffff,        ' -ffffffffff,
JOHN GARD
PAINTER &
PAPBRHANQER
fill hint- ttt Wall
In Stock.
Btore. Hanson Atom*
Phon. ««» »t all
cm -   .
MNN SXD BOCHTUE8
wonira
lit
Pr.iid.nl:
Mn.
t
INSTITUTE
HmU In  Um
K.   of  P.   nail
afternoon of tba
tret Tueeday at
I p.m.
All ladlai are
cordially InTlted
GEORGE SMITH
Mra.    Finlayson
By Arthur Briibane
THE RADIO MIRACLE.
KILL AT 100 MILES.
MAN LIVLS LONGER.
MAUSOLEUM AND TRIPLETS.
I. O. O. F.
KEY CITY LODGE No. 42
Meets every
.-Monday ni^ht nt
"The Auditorium
Sojourning Oddfellows aro cordially invited
N. G.    -    - F. A. WILLIAMS
Rec. Sec. E. G. Dingley, P.G.
II
C.  P.  R.
Qeneral Change in
TRAIN
SERVICE
Elfccliv-, Sunday, MAY 17th, U25
Wtttb'nd --  Pac. Time — Kastb'nd
No. 07 Dnily No. 08
nr. 12 noon nr. 4.10 p.m.
lv. 12.10 p.m  lv. 4.20 p.m.
To Kimb.-i.i-v — No. 823 lv. 12.25 p.
m.s No. 8.SG lv. 4.30 p.nfl
From Klmborloy — No. 824 ar. 11.30
a.m.; No. :        -, 3.65 p.m.
CRANEROOU . LU. WINDERMERE
No. 822  t r       ■  .1.30 p.m. Wednesday & Saturday. No. R21 Leaves 9.00
a.m. Monday nnd Thursday.
TRANSCANADA   LIMITED, Nol. 7
and 8 (Standard Slopping Cara only)
between Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver will bfl resumed, first     train
leaves rncli of hese points on May
17th. 1925.
THE MOUNTAINEER, Trains Not.
13 and 14, I otwlan Chiongo and Vancouver v.ii: !,,* n* timed, first train
pnj.sir.fr thn ago fnlpiry westbound
Juno 3rd and rualhound Jun* 6th.
For furtlier purticulnra apply to any
tlrkrl ngont
1. E. PnOCTOR. D.P.A., Calgary
WESTMINSTER
IS
INTERESTING
At New Westminster this
year it hns been a treat to
stay In the booth •where
Pacific Milk is displayed.
We have learned from
the producers themselves
how careful all Ihe farmers ore to see thnt Pacific
Milk maintains ils position
as Canada's hest milk.
PACIFIC   MILK
Haai    Office:     Vancouver
Factories al Ladaer *k Abbot ■ ford
Tho world haa never known such
a miracle ns the miracle of the
radio. And no man living knows
what radio and moving pictures
:ombined are destined to do for
educations
As railroads shortened men's
Journeys, and telegraphy shortened transmission of messages, so
radio and moving pictures will
mako shorter hy more than nine-
tentlis thc journey along the tire-
lome road of knowledge.
MacMIllan, 8,700 miles away in
tho Arctic ice, is called up and Interviewed by radio, answering
tha Associated Press questions
with his own broadcasting apparatus.
Later, when he starts flying,
M-iicMillan will be able to answer
questions by radio while in flight
If men can do that now, how
toon will they talk through the
ether to those cosmic flying machines, the planets, floating in
-space i
No stntic or other trouble pre-
pumably, once you get outside thiB
earth's atmosphere, only about 600
miles deep.
An Invention from New Zealand
ponds high explosives through the
air hi torpedoes guided by wireless. These uir torpedoes operate
as do water-borne torpedoes used
to destroy battleships at sea.
And the New Zealand air torpedo can be launched against on
enemy, flying ship, battleship or
city one hundred miles away and
wreck the object against which
it is steered by wireless.
The United States should get
that Invention Mid be ready
withifc^
The moUo of this country
should be:
Be friend!} with the whole
world.
Be READY for lhe whole world.
All over the united States the
average age of man is increasing.
Every year saved in adult lifo
means an increase in the nation's
wealth, it costs money to bring
up children, as well as effort and
anxiety.
In the State of New York the
average age has risen from twenty-four years in 1840 to thirty
years now. This means that common sense, science and good doctors have added six years to the
average age of every individual.
The years are added in the
MONEY EARNING period. Suppose the average adult's work ii
worth to this nation $10 a day,
and that's a low estimate. You
can figure out for yourself how
much it means in money to add
six years to every adult's life.
Cut the $10 to $5. Cut that
amount in half to allow for
women and others not working,
and you still have a saving, an
increase of national wealth to the
tune of seventy-five millions of
dollars a year.
Ours is r civilization of interesting contrasts. For instance,, consider the father who lives in two
whitewashed rooms in Jersey City.
Out of work, he was worrying
about feeding seven children when
the neighbor, called in "to help
his wife," announced triplets,
mnking the number of his children
TEN.
That father, waiting for the triplets to be born, read about &
magnificent new mausoleum to be
built by a combination of churches, to cost three and one-half mil'
lions, and provide a resting place
for corpses, properly embalmed,
and put away in their little niches.
That mausoleum will not have
whitewashed walls, but a fine
marble finish.
When churches ask, "Why are
we not crowded?" one answer
might bc, "Because, while mothers
of children lack decent housing,
you build $3,600,000 mausoleums
for corpses that might as well bo
put in the ground to add to its fertility, or carried up the chimney
of the crematory, putting back into the air the nitrogen they took
from it." Would the Founder of
Christianity, who had not where
to lay His head, subscribe to Uat
mausoleum T
Surprise parties are in vogue in
the Wasa area, as a means of forming a better acquaintanceship and
making for better community feeling throughout the district. Last
week the Hannant home was the
scene of much merry making on
Wednesday evening, and the week
following found Mr. and Mrs. P.
Woods victims of the invasion of
several auto loads of merry-makers
from Wolf Creek ond Wasa. They
were accorded a delightful reception
by the host nnd hostess.
Much speculation is rife in the
Wolf ('reek district as to who will
be the next victim of the greedy
hand of petty thieving. So far, Mr.
Al. Doyle has supplied considerable
butter fat, as well ns to throw in a
Ci'w sides of bucon for good measure, und sometime in the past the
Kootenay River Lbr. Co. contributed
some hnmburger and also a quantity
of Concentrated Bovine oil as f
means to sustain someone no far unknown.
Mr. M, Horie was a business caller
to Cranbrook on Monday.
Mr. L. Magrath and son, Billie,
were Cranbrook visitors on Friday
and Saturday of last week.
Mr. A. McEachern and family
have removed from the Wolf Creek
plant, where Mr. McEachern has
been in the service of the Kootenay
River Lbr. Co. as grader and planer
man for some time. Mr. McEachern
is returning to Prince Rupert, where
he will again take up his duties as
mill foreman for a large concern.
The McEachern's have the good
wishes of all those who have had the
pleasure of their acqaintance during
their stay here.
Mrs. E, ChenuzTof the Rock Lake
farm district, was a visitor to the
Kootenay River plant on Monday.
Mr. H. McGillis, who has been
employed at the Doyle ranch, Wolf
Creek area, has left, and is now
camping near Sheep Creek, where he
has taken up quarters temporarily,
pending his ultimate return to his
former abode on Rock Lake.
Mr. Leask, Jnr., is spending a few
days at Wolf Creek. His father, Mr.
Tom Leask, proposes to commence
soon to make ready for his return
to the old location, to resume the
manufacture of lumber after several
months' idleness, since their mill was
destroyed last season by fire.
Mr. Frank B wen nan, who now
sports a Ford runabout, and Jack
Horie, Jnr., were motorists to Cranbrook over the week-end, and were
among those who were patrons of
the dance at Smith's Lake on Saturday evening.
Fred Micke has enlisted his services to the Kootenay River Lbr. Co.,
to load cars on the K.C. Ry. siding.
Mr, Micke has been with the Lovering people for a considerable time,
The hunting season is hailed with
some delight throughout the district,
judging from the gossip heard here
and there as to marksmanship with
rifle and shotgun in bygone days.
The fall Fair at Cranbrook this
week holds forth no end of pleasant
anticipations for a good many in the
East Kootenay district. Particularly is it to be noted amongst the
younger generation, who take a keen
interest ip live stock and other pro-
Bill McKetchnie, manager
Pittsburgh Pirates and "the wonter
man" of 1926 baseball. Insert is
Fred Clarke, who led the Pirates
in other penant days—and now
helps McKetchnie Keep the Pirate*
nut in foont.
WOULDN'T you be surprised if It actually did?
But no! a battery just goes on and on till one
day it quits—dead! Much uke a human being, its
span of life depends in a great measure on proper
nourishment as well as good treatment.
Let us examine your battery regularly this season.
For the trifling charge involved, you'll have the
satisfaction of knowing that your battery is ln the
best condition possible.
Ratcliffe & Stewart gg(fte
Cranbrook - B.C.
OATTERIEl
duets of the farm, which from n
logical point of view shows the right
spirit from which to form the basic
foundation.
Mr. Knight nnd daughter, Mabel,
of Fort Steele, were a motor party
to the Kootenay River Plant during
last week,
Mr. Henry Dryer, of the upper
Wolf Creek farm area, has enlisted
his services with the Jewell Lbr. Co.,
of Fort Steele.
Mr. Doyle has completed haying
on his Wolf Creek ranch, and has nn
excellent crop as to quality and
quantity.
The Hannant home wns the scene,
on Wednesday evening of a surprise
pnrty from the Kootenay River Lbr.
Co's. plant, in honor of Miss Betty
Hannant, who recently returned
from her summer vucntion on the
prairies. Games and dancing were
most enthusiastically indulged in,
and Jimmie Gordon, of the mill staff,
gave a good account of himself, featuring in games and jokes to the
amusement of all present. Mrs. A.
McEachern proved herself an enviable entertainer nnd a past-master
at merry-making. Refreshments
were served under the hospitable
care and direction of the hostesses,
Mrs. G. Hannant and daughter, ably
assisted by Mrs. G. Craig and Miss
Margaret Horie.
Mr. Charles Armstrong collected
his armor-plate on Tuesday and departed for Cranbrook, having completed his labors as blacksmith for
the Kootenay River Lbr. Co. for the
present.
Bessie M. Randell, 22, of Ft
Wetth, Tex., grew tired of "ths
pace" and was converted. At flan*
ta Anna, Calif., she organiied and
built a church — and took to the
pulplf. So great was her succeu
that now she is on world tour ai
on evangelist
**************************
mW
WeJt*
Hkwr
i   vi Li i **  1
TASTY FOODS
Carefully selected — prepared by Cooks who know how
— and served to you in an
appetizing and appealing
way — is what yoit get when
you dine with us. Krompt
and courtous servce.
\ CLUrTcAFE
nm*165
**************************
SEE US FOR—
YOUR NEXT SUIT
Latest sty'es * fabrics J40-J60
H. C. LONG, Van Horne St.
'fiactf'attbe
Old Home
k^-Sg?      1°9 untold
' '£Zm*-~i awaits your
C^t^P letter
fipCHOWDE.
Writing Paper    J
Bruce Robinson
Phone 295       TtMkw et Hwlt P.O. Boi  7(3
STUDIO - ARMSTRONG AVENUE
Third House trom Presbyterian Church
| BDBW501S BHCHESTBA-DWCES *HHMBED FOB Thursday, September 17th, 192S
THI  OliniMI OBUD
PAGE SEVEN
fffffffff.:
FOR ALL YOUR
REQUIREMENTS
—IN—
TRUNKS      -      VALISES
HANDBAGS
Or anything in Leather
Also for
Shoes,   Rubbers,  Socks, Overalls, Gloves, Etc.,
It will pay you to visit our store
THE
Cranbrook Saddlery Co.
Van Horne St.   Cranbrook B.C.
fffffffffff,
fffffffffffffffffffftVffftl
YUON   ROI
LADIES' & GENT'S TAILOR
1il.'l   Armstrong  Avenue
Next to VV. I''. Doran
SUITS
— Kit nnd Style Guaranteed —
Wo nro horo to cator to your business
an<l nt Prices Hint m-o Right
We l><> CIcauitiK and Pressing
Prompt Service
— P. <). 110X598 —
Canadian Cafe
and Rooms
YAHK, B.C.
Opposite Garage, Near Bridge
Com rot-table  Rooms  with !
Cafe in Connection
We Solicit Yoar Patronage j
A. Hjort - Prop.
Milk and Cream
DIRECT FBOM
Big Butte Dairy Farm
FHOHI 1«
***********
I
J See lis For Your
I School
I    Supplies
% Watch for arrival ol our new
iFALL   GOODS
Paul Nordgren Store
j       On Main Road, near hrliga
*
♦♦♦+*++*+
Apply RUnnrd'i nt onco. lt
lmlts nicpiiinnmlatopulnfiam-
tmtliim. RotnoTOa nil poison
from cuts and sores.
Keep a bottle on the $he!f*..
(Special tu the Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., Sept. 12.—The
local schools throughout the district
opened on Tuesday, the eighth instant, with a largely increased attendance. In the case of the local
consolidated school, as the new building is not quite ready for occupation, a readjustment had to be made
whereby some of the higher grade
pupils attend the Athalmer building
under the direction of Miss MacKinnon, while some from that place
attend the old school here, under
the direction of Miss LO. M. Brookes.
When the new consolidated school
opens it is expected that arrang'
ments will lie made whereby the first
DR.   LARGE
Dentist
C.P.R. Telegraph Building
Next to Y. M. C. A.
Office Hours
) to 12—1 to 5        I'hone 204
HAY  .
Timothy and Upland
Ready for Immediate
Shipment
Wc Specialize in all kinds of
Farm Produce
TIMOTHY SEED
3-1 Purity and No. 3
Prices on Application
Wire, Phone or Write to
PINCHER CREEK
CO-OPERATIVE   ASSOC.
Pincher   Creek,  Alta.
PHONE 27 tf
HURRY'S WHITE LUNCH
IS THE PLACE TO EAT. '■
White Help Only Ii Employed. !
Ten will Mad this Gale a Homer !
Place to Enjoy Yoar Heali
ALEX. HUBBY •   Prop.
J. F. SCOTT
Cranbrook Drug ft Book Co.
Sainsbury & Ryan
BUILDERS AXD
CONTRACTORS
CRAJIBROOK
OMb aid Wei*
Chuimatead
B.C.
STRIP TICKETS
With and Without Coupons
For Oeneral
Admission Purposes
For Sale at
THE
CRANBROOK HERALD
OFFICE
e.*^***********************
*
For Good Value in i
GOOD   EATS    j
Go to The J
ZENITH   CAFE      f
;  Cor. BAKER A VAN HORNE  *
**************************
THE
NEW HOTEL
Yahk, B.G.
J. MARKLUND, Proprietor
^"-vmiPii
When In Yahk make your home at
THE NEW HOTEL.
Tbla Hotel Ib new front bottom to top.   Twenty-five nicely furniihed roomi. AU are clean
aad comfortable.
, ,  , .  i 1 •<  'li'
BESTAUBANT Dl CONNECTION.
classes in high scliool work will bo
tuken on.
The many friends of Dr. Green
of (.'ranbrook werti distraught upon
hearing of his having to undergo a
serious operation recently.
On Wednesday of this week Lieu-
tenunt-Connnander .John Copley
Powles, R.N.K., returned to reside,
after an eight months' holiday spent
in England and Scotland. During
that period, in addition to the usual
festivities, he had the honor of at
tending a levee given by the King.
Commander Powles has brought
back with him a splendid little Springer spaniel, who rejoices in the registered name of Chetwynd Peter.
Mr. Ross Sutherland, of Foul Bay
Road, Victoria, Provincial Commissioner of the Boy Scouts, is a guest
for his health at the Sinclair Hot
Springs at the entrance to the Banff*
Windermere highway. I hiring the
week he paid a friendly visit to
Scoutmaster Rev. P, B. Atkinson at
the vicarage here.
The efforts of the Windermere
District Potato Growers' Association
to encourage the growth of a high
commercial and seed potato have
been much ^encouraged by the Department *if Agriculture, both of
the Dominion and of the Province.
Last week the secretary, Mr. T. W.
Turner, of this place, received a
most encouraging letter from Mr, C.
Tice, the chief agronomist of the
province, in which to quote in parti
writing from his offlce in Victoria,
he says:
"I have recently visited Ashcroft
and looked over some plots planted
with certified seed from your district. This wns planted next to
common slock by three Orientals
and two white men. In every instance the certified was far superior to the common stoek, and everyone was extremely well pleased with
the result obtained. 1 must say that
whenever I run across certified seed
from the Windermere District I find
it very superior to common stock,
nnd everyone is well satisfied with
it."
Mrs. Arthur Tegart is leaving for
a visit to relatives of her late husband's, who reside at Battleford.
Miss Emily Tegart has gone to assume her duties as schoolmistress at
Moberley, B.C. It was very gratifying to all friends and relatives of
the late Arthur Tegart to have present at the funeral Hon. A. M. Man-
son, who happened to be here paying
an official visit, and very kindly as
a member of the Masonic Lodge,
undertook to conduct the funeral obsequies of his late fraternal brother.
Another interested spectator was
Major Ed. Mallandaine, of Creston,
D.D.G.M., who has been a life-long
friend of the late Mr. Tegart.
Two of the especially outstanding
features of the floral display of the
late fall Fair, which has just been
held on the grounds at Lake Windermere, were the dahlias of Mr. E.
E. Tunnacliffe, of Wilmer, and the
roses of Mrs. .1. C. Pitts, of Windermere.
Colonel E. A. Moore, European
manager of the settlement and immigration branch of the Canadian
Pacific Railway, arrived by automobile over the Banff-Windermere
highway on Thursday, and is making his first inspection of the district since some time before the
world's great war. Colonel Moore
noticed a good deal of thc development which has taken place in this
part since that period, and speaks
for better things to conic.
Last week Mr. II. C. Rayson, manager of K2 ranch, the property of
Captain A. IL MacCarthy. left in
•ar with Mrs. Rayson intending to
.;pend a holiday at Ashcroft, journeying there by way of Kootenay
Landing.
REMARKABLE PROFITS!
Non-Profit Industrial Policies
Nearly Doubled by
Dividends.
(An unsolicited testimonial written by the editor of Canadian Insurance—Canada's leading general
insurance paper).
Eleven years ago, this paper pointed nut that the London Life Insurance Company was one of the
best life insurance companies in the
world. We had examined its statistics nnd learned how carefully and
economically it had been managed
since its start in 1874, and we were
probably the first newspaper to appreciate its qualities. Our judgement has since been overwhelmingly sustained. It is safe to say now
that while there are many bigger
companies than the London Life,
there are none better from the policyholders' point of view. Anyone
can see this from the dividends now
paid to policyholders. Here is one
example—an industrial policy issued
In 1002 at a premium of 5 cents per
week. The original policy was $125
and it was taken on the understanding that it, was not entitled to share
profits. Nevertheless, today the
policy is $219, the difference of $94
or nearly 80 per cent being due to
dividends quite unexpected by or
promised to the assured.
Here is another case. A policy of
$5,000 was issued three years ago
to a mnn aged SI at an annual premium of $94.25. This is a very low
premium for a policy sharing in the
profits. Other companies would
charge around $124.25 for the same
policy, so that it was $30 cheaper
to start with. Yet there has heen
a cash dividend allotted each year
which reduced the premium payments of the assured from $94.25 to
$90,10 for the second year, and to
$89.70 for the third year. So thnt
even in the earliest years nf this remarkably cheap policy the cash profit is substantial.
Why is the London Life able to
do these things? The answer is
simple. It is because it has been so
carefully managed for its whole 50
years of existence. It has never lost
money on investments, nor spent extravagantly in trying to develop at
too great a pace. Thc mortality of
its policyholders is well above the
average; and its expenses have always been moderate. Consequently it has un enormous surplus compared to its liabilities, and it can
boast that its dividends to policyholders are in many cases double
what the policyholders were originally led to expect. No other company has an equal record. We have
said enough to show the quality of
the London Life policies.
G. C. H. Coleman, of Windermere,
has been appointed recently as the
district representative for the London Life in the East Kootenay district.
L
T!
-.c
Order Which Started ft
re at
Cot)l
i
ttt
■   :. «.
li Stilks
President Juhn U Lewis, ot the
United Mine Workers, handing the
order to a messenger which resulted in the walkout of 1"0,000 an-
thricite miners, the biggest strike
In the history of mining.
itfm
Mr
WEIGHT LIMIT IS INCREASED FOR PARCELS
DESPATCHED IN MAILS
It is announced by the postmaster-
general that the postal service will
now accept parcels for transmission
through the mails up to fiftcn
pounds in weight. It has been found
there are a good many articles of general use slightly beyond the present limit of weight, which it will bow
be possible to forward by mail, and
this, it is felt, wilt be in the interests of the public, providing a convenience that will be appreciated by
both business men and those doing
business through the mails. It will
have particular value in cases where
it is desired to forward such heavier
articles to parts of the country to
which the post office is practically
the only means of convenience,
The limits of size for parcels accepted for transmission will remain
as at present.
NEW EGG SHIPPING CONTAINER SANCTIONED
FOR EXPRESS CARRIAGE
An improved type of 30-dozcn
egg case has been adopted by the
Express Traffic Association of Canada as a standard container. A model
is now on display at the local office
of the Dominion Express Co., for
the guidance of interested  parties.
Although eggs may still be shipped in other boxes only standard
ones are accepted at the half rate,
for return.
Your Fall Hat-Which Will You Have.7
JAWocA-fT?^
Above, three stunning American designed models, two of f
and thc third of velvet and ribbon. Below, the Paris desigr
thaoeaux, showing the attempt to bring back the picturesque moni
\bmii your
Health
Things You Should Know
by John Joseph Galnei, M. D
OUR INVISIBLE FOES.
A happy state of mind is that
in which we believe that we
haven't un enemy in the world.
There may be good reason for not
distributing such serenity. But
there nre, in fact, millions of
deadly foes about us, invisible, unrecognized, until it is forever too
late in many instances to check
their depredations.
The invisible foe is ever a menace to life. We may combat the
known enemy—or, if he is too big
for us, wc may beat a safe retreat; but the thug in the dark alley, reasons that deni) men tell no
tales. It is the concealed weapon
that does the harm. The deadly
submarine is an Invisible foe, ter-
i:iblc In action, and yet thc microscopic germ kills more!
It is my purpose in this series
of articles, to discuss "our invisible, foes'* from the standpoint of
one who has been for thirty-three
years an active clinician, and who
Is still so, engaged in thc honorable effort to keep men and women fit, believing that life may ba
prolonged, and the world be mads
better thereby.
It would be an eminently wise
measure if our Public School
Boards would add the subject of
bacteriology to the course of
study, providing at least a working knowledge of the subject,
which would enable the student to
defend himself against many of
the active foes of comfort and
health, which continually beset
him.
If   you,   dear   reader   of   this
{taper, are intersted in health and
ts consequent longer and happier
life, for yourself and family, wo
shall try earnestly to contribute
thereto, by kindly advice gleaned
^
1874-    HALF A CENTURY OF PUBLIC SERVICE   -1924
Low Cost Jubilee Policy
AFTER REDUCING
THE PREMIUM $70.00
ON THE OLD STANDARD RATES
As at age 46
The London Life Have Declared  a   Di vidend. or a Further Saving to Yon of
$25.00 THE FIRST YEAR (Actual results) $26.70 THE SECOND VEAR
Sample $10,000 Policy—Age 4-6—Old Rate S-4O2.0O
Age 46—New Rate $-"2.00
Sample $10,000 Policy-Age 35—Old Rate  $2;9.00
Age 35—New Rate   $214.00
Sample $10,000 Policy-Age 2?-01d Rate $222.00
Age 27—New Rate   $107.50
AGES 16 TO 65  PRO RATA-J5.000 POLICY HALF ABOVE RATE
As this policy participates in the splendid profits of the Company, your premium will he reduced each
year. You may also change it if you wish after five years to the 20-Payment-Life plan at a
lower rate then than you can buy that plan today—And no bulk sum is required then, because of
thc low cost premium paid during the first five years. Pay 15 more payment-, ami have a fully
paid-up policy for $10,000.
For a small additional payment this policy guaran tees to pay you. if totally disabled through any sickness or accident, $100.00 per month for life or until recovery. Also, the company will waive, nr
pay the premium each year and not charge them to you upon recovery, and $10,000 will l>e paid to
your beneficiary should you die by natural causes, hut should you die by any accident your beneficiary will receive $20,000—or instead of a )>ulk sum wc will pay to your Renftficiary a monthly
income lor life for any amount you wish to arrange.
THIS POLICY IS REAL VALUE
For thc Man Who Needs
PROTECTION with a PROFIT
s
Chatham, Ont., Nov. 1. 1928.
Editor Concerning Insurance,
Toronto Saturday Night.
Sir,—1 am considering taking on some additional life insurance 11ml tinning several policies
that have been brought to my attention is one put out by the London Life, known ns a Jubilee Policy for
five thousand dollars. What do you think of the London Life in general ond of tins policy in particular?
C. 8.
Mr. C    . ,     S .
Sir,—You will be well advised in taking out a Jubilee Policy fnr $5,0-00 with the London Life, if
you can get one of these low-priced policies. The London Life is one of our lending Canadian companies, and has always been carefully managed, and is accordingly in u very strong financial position.
EDITOR CONCERNING INSURANCE, TORONTO SATURDAY NIOHT
The London Life 1
■re
t
Insurance Company    [
London, Canada v   £
G. C. H. Coleman, Windermere,    B.C.
Showing the Orowth ol This
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Well Managed Company \\
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1924 1918 1913 1908 A CANAn|AN COMPANY WITH CANADIAN   INVESTMENTS   AND   SECURITIES ,908
New liunraiKO ■
,    IBS JUBILKK IB (HUNTED ONLY TO STRICTLY "SUPER SELECT" LIVES.
1913 1918 1924
nsurnni'c In
Force ^ P A a E   EIGHT
m cmmiBooi iuujl»
Thursday, September 17th, 1925
**************************
HOLMES 8 EDWARDSf
Super Plate
Inlaid
TWO NEW PATTERNS
HOLMES &  EDWARDS'
SUPER - PLATE
Inlaid Solid Silver Where It
wears.
lhe beautiful "Romance"
and "Century" patterns are
the newest in this splendid
fully guaranteed Silverplute.
Serving Pieces in (iift Ho>
\es, from $1..15
Tea Spoons   $.1.75 y2 doz.
A. EARLE LEIGH
Watchmaker & Jeweler
NORBURY AVE.
**************************
Imperial Radio Orchestra ut Star
Monday night at !l o'clock. Tuesday
night at 8 o'clock. 110
Mis Honor .lodge Thompson spent
a few days in Fernie last week and
left later for Ottawa, where he will
attend tlie Church of England Synod meeting.
Houses for Sale
MARTIN BROS.
$1800 Slatervllle, beBido former
Greenhouse, it rooms, '■'• bedrooms,
cement foundation, fine concrete
walled cellar. Interior plastered and
recently decoruted. Good condition
throughout. Garage for two curs,
woodshed nnd chicken house. Two
lots, area 80x100 and fine cencrete-
walled cellar ready for second house,
worth easily $700 alone. Musl he
suid quick.
$4000 s roomed house on two
lots, beautiful garden, Pour bedrooms, bath, toilet, hot water furnace,
concrete foundation and cellar, Good
garage al rear. Large front veranda
and screened veranda at rear. This
location- Kains ami Edwards—is the
best. In town. Terms helf cosh, balance arranged.
$3500 " lu""l"! house on three
lots. Nice lawn, fenced in, on corner
of Hyde and Burwell. Cellar with
cement flour, furnace, bath and
toilet, fireplace, finished with plaster
and wnlnscoatlng.ln good condition,
This place is a fine home and a snap
at the juice. Will sell for half cash,
balance arranged or accept a .smaller
house in good location as part payment,
$1200 v >"i"'"',l house, 4 bedrooms, at 220 Martin Ave., back of
Frank Parks' home. Half cash with
easy terms for balance.
$1700 ' ""•""''' house with %-
acre of fine garden lot, well fenced
am) in gnrden ami shrubs. Three bedrooms, cement foundation, y.umi
cellar, electric light and water, large
screened-ln veranda. Large garage.
Chicken houses with wired yard, Nice
lawn. A snap for anyone wanting a
garden planted with berries of all
kinds. Will grow anything. Should
be easily worth $8,000, Kiisy terms.
$2100 Aihworth House on Armstrong Ave. Seven rooms, three bedrooms, concrete basement, bath,
toilet, plastered. $liinu down, balance eusy.
Martin Bros., Cranbrook, B.C.
LISTINGS WANTED
Martin Bros, have a client fur u
modern, n ur ('■ room bungalow iu
good locution.
Phune 14. Cranbrook.
r1
MAR
LOCAL
>PEM2VG$
Insure with Beale & Elwell.
The glorious naval epic "Zee-
brugge" coming to Star soon.       30
E. G. Dingley returned on Sut-
Urdey from a holiduy spent at the
Coast.
Mrs. W. S. Johnston was taken to
the hospital on Wednesday morning
for treatment.
Mrs. J. P. Smith, who has been ill
ut her home for some days past, is
now reported as being on the mend,
her friends are glad Io learn.
For sales and service Nash and Star
cars.   See Ratcliffe & Stewurt.   33tf
Imperial Radio Orchestra at Star
Monday night at 0 o'clock. Tuesday
night at 8 o'clock. 30
On Thursday, September 24th, a
dunce will be held at the Mission
Road school house. Don't forget the
dute.
Rev. W. T. Tapscott returned to
the eity on Saturday last, along with
Mrs. Tapscott, and on Sunday next
will be tuking bis usual services in
the Baptist church.
Mr, and Mrs. O'Meurn and family
ure now occupying the Clark residence on Dennis street. Mr. O'Meurn
is one of the new members on the
staff of the high school.
The regular monthly meeting of
the Ladies' Conservative Study t'lub
will he held ut tho home of Mrs, W.
Steward, Lumsden avenue, Tuesday,
September 22nd, at 8 p. m.
Special prices on new Eateries at
Service Garage.   Phone 34 ltf
Mr. und Mrs. A. McEachern, of
this city und Wolf Creek, are leaving
the district, Mr. McEachern having
secured u position at Prince Rupert
again, lie left for the north the beginning of the week, and Mrs, McEachern and little one will be following in a few duys.
Mr. and Mrs. IL L. Porter left on
Tuesday evening for Brandon, Man.,
where Mr. Porter is assuming the
position of principal of the Brandon
College Academy. There wus u large
rowd of their friends ut the stution
to see them off. the high school pupils
turning out in force to extend ull
good wishes to their former principal.
Percy Adams Is leaving on Friday
for Calgary to attend u meeting of
the Carbondale Coul Company, in
which a good deal ot locul capital is
interested. Ile was appointed at u
meeting held on Friday night of last
week, when the affairs of the company were discussed, nnd the decision reached to huve u representative attend the meeting on Saturduy of this week.
Fred Archer, formerly of Cunul
Flat and Windermere, und recently
of Fernie, has left for the eust to
reside. He resigned liis position us
district representative of the London
Life Assurance Co. for the East Kootenay, and to this position the company has now appointed Mr. G. C. II.
Colemun, of Windermere, who hus
already taken up the work in his big
territory.
For first class automobile repairs
see Ratcliffe & Stewart. 33tf
Friends in this city have regretted
to learn that Miss Mury MePherson.
who left lust spring for Banff, where
she bud secured employment nt the
Y.W.C.A. hotel, met with n bad accident there, und has been confined
to the hospital in Calgary for a number of weeks past. It appears that
while out horseback riding u car met
the party she was with, und Miss MePherson was thrown off her horse on
to the cur, inflicting serious injuries
to her.
1!1]!<;-"lV:;l"i,,nU1;i,:i|i-lll |l|i::!ViM|H|i;t;!r:i;;,!HFiril'|IWIIIIir!|Milltll
Corporation of the City of Cranbrook
Policeman required for relief work during the
month of October. Applicanti will pleaie itate ex-
perience and salary expected. Application! will
be received   until   September 23rd.      Addrew D.
Halcrow, Chief of Police.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Mrs. T.K. Futa
is again conducting a Grocery Business at the old stand
on VAN HORNE STREET
The patronage of former customers is solicited, while
new ones will find Service and Satisfaction in
dealing with the
Futa Grocery- - Phone211
Jot it down—Rebeknh Hallowe'en /    The   glorious   naval   epic
dance Friday. October 30th. 30tf  brugge" coming to Star soon.
Alex. McLeod, of Moyie, is at present un inmate of the hospital, suffering from an injured foot.
Frank Leclerc, foremun with the
B. C, Spruce Mills, Ltd., Lumberton,
was brought to the St. Eugene hospital this week suffering from a cut
foot.
Miss Sarah McCallum has returned
from u visit with friends at Spokane
and other points. Miss McCallum
hus accepted a position as teacher
un the public school staff at Trail.—
Grand Forks Gazette.
The glorious naval epic "Zee-
hrugge" coming to Stur so6n.       30
At Fernie the school board has decided to make outside pupils attending the public und high schools pay
fees. They were fixed ut $35 per
year fur the public school aud -50
pur year for the high school.
See thc wrestling match at thc
Conklin & Garrett show an Saturday
night ut 0 p.m. Challenge mutch between Milo und Bilinsky of Toronto.
Good preliminaries.
J. D. S. Barrett, who has been assisting on the Herald staff for some
time, left on Saturday for Stuvely,
Altu,, where he has purchused the
business of the Stuvely Advertiser,
which he is now conducting.
Word has been received by the Noble Grand of the Rebekah Lodge
during the past few days that the
lodge will receive an official visitation
from the B. C. Grand President on
the evening of their regular lodge
flight, Wednesday, October 14th.
Our Low Prices win every time
For prompt repairs and satisfaction go to Ratcliffe & Stewart's garage. 20tf
The decision having been renched
to rebuild the brewery, the work of
re-construction is to be undertaken
Immediately, it is stated. The job
will be done by day labor, V. Liddi-
coat having charge of the work, and
preliminary operations were to be
commenced this week.
The condition of Dr. Green has
continued to show improvement this
week, following his recent critical
illness, and he is now convalescing.
It is expected as soon as he. is able
to travel, that he will tuke a holiday
of about two months, probably going to California for the winter.
SPECIAL: — Tungsten lamps, 10,
25, 40, 50 and 60 watts; 25 c each,
at — W. F. DORAN'S.
George Leask, contractor, has
been awarded the contract for the
erection of the new building to be
erected in Kimberley by the Kootenay Telephone Lines, Ltd., where the
exchange to be installed in thut town
will be located. The work is commencing immediately.
Hon. E. D. Barrow, minister of
agriculture ut Victoria, was a visitor
to the city this week. Having to
cnme as far ns Creston, he came on
to this city while the fair was on,
and took advantage of the opportunity to look over the livestock being
shown. He left again on the noon
train Wednesday.
BOYS' SUITS, five to seven years
$5.00. Boys' Two Pants Suits,
eight to sixteen years, $10.00. Our
low pices win every time. W. F.
Doran, Cranbrook Exchange.        tf
J. G. Cummings left on Sunday
morning for the Windermere district, having to visit some mineral
claims west of Wilmer, a few mil
es this side of the Lake of the Hanging Glaciers. He was accompanied on the trip by A. E. Leigh, who
took advantage of the opportunity
to secure u week's holiday. They
expect to return on Friday.
*w
B. A. Moorhouse returned to the
city the end of last week after his
senson of survey work, having followed the valley of the St. Mary's
river over the pass to the Kootenay
Lake slope. There is a possibility that Mr. and Mrs. Moorhouse
may be leaving the city about the
end of the month for Victoria, to
spend the winter.
The annual dance nf the Tennis
Club will be held in the Parish Hull
on Friday, October 2nd, when the
prizes won during the yeur will be
awarded.      Good music. 30
Lett Jecks. of the Herald staff, who
waited till the summer season was
over before taking his holiday, was
not able after all to enjoy his period
of leisure as he had hoped. After nbout a week's vacation he returned
from a day's fishing to find an urgent call waiting for him, and con
sented to postpone the remainder of
his holiday till a more propritious
liny, coming back on deck to cope
with a rush of work which developed.
BURNS CLUB MEETING
The Cranbrook District Burns'
Club Annual Meeting will be held in
the Maple Hall, on Friday, September 18th, at 8 o'clock. Business—
Election of Officers and making plans
for the ensuing year's work, and
other important business will be taken up. All members are earnestly
requested to attend.
JAS, F. LUNN,
84      V Secretary.
"Zee-
30
Don. Dallas, of the C. P. K. Natural Resources forces is visiting for
u few days in the city.
John Kerchan, of Lumberton, is
now at the St. Eugene Hospital, suffering from a broken leg.
F. W. Burgess, city clerk, left on
Wednesday for a short holiday, in
company with T. M. R. Stewart, of
the Ratcliffe & Stewart garage. They
will enjoy the sights of Banff and Calgary for a week.
Imperial Radio Orchestra at Star
Mommy night at it o'clock. Tuesday
night at 8 o'clock. 30
J. H. Dubois of the Standard Electric Co. hns this week been engaged
in putting in the lighting for the mineral specimen case erected by the
board of trade outside the post office. The case was built by George
Lensk, and has been designed very
substantially, and should serve admirably the purpose for which It is
intended.
Jot it down Rebeknh  Hallowe'en
dance Friday. October 30th. .'lllll'
Mr. nnd Mrs. C. M. Loasby of
Sirdar arc auto visitors in the eily.
They nre accompanied hy their
guests, Mr. Loasby's sister, Mrs. Mc-
Clenahan, und her daughter, Miss
McCIenuhnn R.N., of Ottawa, and
Master Billy Moore. They aro the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Moore
and are on a trip through the Windermere distriit.
We cany a full lint o! lien's Women's and Males' Shoes.
W. F. DORAN.
Our low prices win eTery time.
Mr. and Mrs. F. II. Dezall left on
Tuesday for Toronto, where they will
visit with relutives for a month or
so, expecting to rei urn about the
middle of October, It is the first
time in fifteen yeurs thnt Mr. Dezall
hus visited his former home. After
a trip across the lake to Port McNi-
chol, they will visit St. Catherines,
the former home of Mrs. Dezall, and
luter they will proceed to Dundnlk,
Ontario,
Imperial Radio Orchestra at Stur
Monduy night at 9 o'clock. Tuesday
night at 8 o'clock. 30
Followers of Association football
are promised a game of unusual in
terest this month, when on Friday.
September 25th, Trail and the Concentrator will play for the possession of the Blaylock Cup. which is
emblematic of the Kootenay championship, Trail ure the West Kootenay champions, und the Concentrator head the table In the East Kootenny section, so the game in which
tliey meet should be an event of more
than usual interest. The kick-off is
to tuke place ut 3.30 iu the afternoon.
Mrs. Wanda Fink. A. T. C. M., is
prepared to accept u number of pupils for instruction in pianoforte and
'cello. 30tf
Wrestling fans wlll be interested
in learning tbat Jack Milo, who with
Nick Bozinis gave some clever exhibitions of wrestling in Cranbrook last
winter, hus consented to lake on
Mike Bilinsky, of Toronto, the Ru-
theniun champion of eastern Canada.
The mutch will tuke pluce at the Athletic show tent ut the Conklin & Garrett show, nt 9 p.m., Saturduy night.
It will be catch as catch enn, Police
Gazette rules. The one who gets
the first full will be declared the
winner, who will tuke all the prize
money. Milo is in the best of condition, and Bilinsky, who was unable
to fill aa engagement to meet Milo
here last winter, is anxious to show
whnt he is mude of to the Crunbrook
people. Bilinsky nlso tackles the veteran Jepson nt Yuhk next Wednesday night.
Rebekah Anniveriary Service
Members of Mnple Leaf Rebeknh
Lodge will attend service on Sunday
evening at the Baptist church to
commemorate the 74th anniversary
of their order. Rev. W. T. Tapscott
will conduct the service. All Itebek-
uhs nre requested to attend nnd to
meet at the Auditorium nt 7:00 p. m.
shurp.
WILL GO TO MAT ON
SATURDAY IN MATCH
WITH JACK MILO
femi* A. Drain, of Washington,
D. C, b the now National Com-
raander of tha American Legion.
Ha aarved in tbe Spanish-Anicri.
*m anl Worid wart.   He wai •
ZSeSteTmrn*^* T**
■ ■ ■■' ^istl^-KSBlB
' '^ "If    im     Hi
**<■} SIKIi pm
^^tr
MIKE BILINSKY
Toronto wrestler, who will meet Ml
lo here ou Saturday evening, and
goes to Yahk on Wednesday to ful
fll a match with Nels Jepson.
Ii
ere an
dTh
ere
Mure lhan 100 persons joined tha
ride of the Trail Riders of the
Rockies on their horseback journey
from Banff to Wapta Camp, via
Miu-ble Canyon and Lake O'Hara.
The ride started on August 8.
Grain figures issued by the Harbor Commission of Montreal show
that on August 1st all grain shipment records were broken by one
day's delivery of 2,277,712 bushels
of grain to outgoing ships. Harbor
officials state that this Is the first
time that grain shipments in ono
day have topped the two million
bushel mark.
Installation of machinery at tha
new annex of the Dominion Textile
Mill at Montmorency Falls, Quebec,
will be started by January first next.
About 300 additional employees will
be required to operate the plant. At
present there are about 1,300 employed at the mills.
A prophecy that the Orient would
become in the very near future a
really large importer of Canadian
wheat was made recently by Hen.
Dr. J. II. King, Minister of Public
Works. In predicting increased
Orient trade in grain, Dr. King
pointed out that imports ef wheat
from Canada for 1023-1924 increaeed
by 400 per cent.
Over fifteen thousand men left tha
cast on the first harvesters excursion
from the east to the wheat fields in
the middle of August. Four other
excursions are to follow from Toronto later in August and September, when it is expected that tha
majority of the remainder of the 50,-
000 men required for the harvest will
travel west.
British teacheri touring Canada
under the auspices of the Oversea*
Educational League are now enjoying all the various forma of entertainment to be found in the Canadian Pacific Rockies. They have
been riding trails, hiking, fishing,
motoring, bathing in the sulphur
springs at the Banff Spring! Hotel
and were the guests at a dinner there
given by J. M. Gibbon, secretary ef
the Trail Riders of the Canadian
Rockies.
Confidence of United Statea capital in the Dominion, optimistic preparations for tha new Canadian
financing, prospects ef a good crep,
large United States purchasing In
Cunada, and heavy expenditures of
American tourists ln the Dominion,
were some of the reasons offered by
New York financial experts for the
consistent above par stand of tha
Canadian dollar on the New York ax-
change. The Canadian dollar is now
at a premium on the New York ax-
change.
The total number of students in
Canadian universities and colleges
in 1924 was 52,039, or nearly one in
eighteen of the total population, according to a bulletin issued by the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
Under the category of colleges, the
total number in 1924 was 13. Of this
totul six are agricultural, two technical, two law, one dental, ene far
pharmacy, one for veterinary science,
28 theological, 89 affiliated, ana
school for higher commercial studies,
one college of art and one military
college.
During the coming winter Canada
will see the debut ef a new transportation device known aa the Snow,
motor. This consists of two hollow
cigar shaped cylinders er drums ta
which flanges, resembling cork
screws, are attached. These drama
are fixed te ai, automobile er tractor in the place of the wheels and,
by routing actually float the machine over the snow. The snew-
motor Is regarded as especially valuable in the transportation ef lumber; it can negotiate anew of any
depth and can operate In countrlea
where other methods ef transport-
tion are impossible or too costly and
can also make roads which ether
vehicles can use. It Is manufactured
in Detroit and will bo en the market
in Montreal during Ha* etasjic tmt,
am. ^«^.^.^-..  . ~~. 3l
Corporation of the City of Cranbrook
TAX SALE
Pursuant to Section 252 of the Municipal Act, being
Chap. I79, Rev. Statutes, 1924, a Tax :ale will be held at the
Council Chambers of the Municipality of the City of Cranbrook, on Wednesday, September 30th, 1925, at the hour of
10 o'clock a.m.
All and every parcel of land and the improvements thereon, the taxes upon which are delinquent, will he offered for
sale by Public Auction	
A lisl of Ihe properties that will bc offered for sale may
be seen at the offlce of the Collector, City Hall, at any time.
P. W. BUROI-SS.
,30-31
Collector
Mr. nnd Mrs. W. II. Wilson, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Harry
McKowan, left on Wednesday by motor for tho coust. They formed an
accompanying party foc Miss Jeun
Wilson, who left to resume her studies at the University of B.C.
E
ere an
dTh
ere
This year's receipts from motor
vehicles licenses iu New Brunswick
already amount to (422,200. This
amount is larger than the Utal for
any year, except last year when the
gross receipts for the whole twelve
months were $452,489. The estimate
for the present year is half a million.
The mines and quarries of the
Province of Quebec produced to the
value of $18,952,896 during. 1924,
accuidiyj to the final report issued
by the Provincial Department of
Mines. Building materials account
for $11,380,977; other non-metallic
minerals $7,191, and metallic minerals $380,804.
"In the Cascades and falls of the
Canadian Rockies there is enough
hydro-electric power to supply the
American west with all the electric
energy it will need for ages to
come," declared W. Paxton Little,
treasurer of the Niagara Falls Power
Company, who recently visited Banff
with a party of distinguished American electrical magnates.
That the Province of Quebec
abounds in historic and romantic
material for the construction of
popular novels, is the judgment of
two popular writers—James Oliver
Curwood, author of scores of best
sellers, and Edwin Buhner, well-'
known short story writer—who have
recently toured the province and
Western Canada in quest of "local
color."
There has been an unusual distinction conferred upon Prof. Com-
ille Couture, a Montreal musician,
who, besides being a violinist is also
a maker of violins. He has been
honored with a medal and diploma
from the British Empire Exhibition
at Wembley for a magnificent violin
of his make, which he exhibited
there.
In order to dispel the existing
impression in England regarding
the coldness of the Canadian climate,
five thousand peony blooms are being distributed at the Canadian Pacific Railway Pavilion at the British
Empire Exhibition. These plants
were produced by W. Ormiston Roy,
of Montreal, who states that peonies
are the best landscape flower and
can be grown In all parte of Canada,
Irrespective of climatic conditions.
Hon. W. G. Nichol, Lieut-Governor of British Columbia, and D. C.
Coleman, Vice-President of the
Canadian Pacific Railway, opened
Crystal Gardens, the new and unique
indoor salt-water swimming pool at
Victoria, B.C., recently. This amusement centre, which has two dancing
floors, a gynaslum, art gallery and
tea-rooms, is regarded as the largest
and finest of Its kind on the continent.
Being exceeded only by Mexico
and tho United Statea, Canada now
ranks third among the silver producing countries of the world. Records of Canadian production have
been kept since 1858 and show a
total recovery of 451,000,000 fine
ounces to the end of 1923. ln 1024
production was slightly in excess of
20,000,000 ounces. During 1858-
1923 tho value of production totalled
$290,705,532, while for last year It
amounted to $13,619,043.
The first lot of buffalo, numbering some 200, to be transferred from
the Walnwright Park to the new
Buffalo Park, north of Edmonton,
left Wainwright, Alberta, recently.
For some time past the herd at
Walnwright had been growing too
rapidly and the Federal authorities
decided to ship a number to the
Buffalo Park to determine whether
or not they can acclimate themselves
In the new district aa they did in
the southern area. Altogether two|
thousand buffalo, In lots of two.
hundred sack, will ha shipped to Uw
Path.     .... _..._/
Theodore
Padburg, AX.C UL.
Teacher of Violin
— PHONE 502 -
Last Year's Successes in
1.. C. M. Examinations
INTERMEDIATE
Roy Henry Llnnell   Honors
Mary Wilson McDonald and
Willie Spence .... let Class Passes
ELEMENTARY
Allan William Patmore .. Honors
David Weston .... 1st Class Pass
RYLEY
DINING ROOM
and BAKERY
KIMBERLEY • B.C.
COMMERCIAL MEN
APPRECIATE
HOME COOKINd
WHEN AWAY FROM
HOME
All White Help
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
I    The   glorious   naval   epic   "Zee-
brugge" coming to Star soon.       30
A. W. Whittington, registered architect, formerly of Fernie. has returned to Duncan after u short visit at the home of Mr. and Mrs. R.
Potter.
Premier W. I,. Mackenzie King is
to be opposed in his home riding of
North York, by T. Herbert Lennox,
K.C, former representative for the
constituency in the Ontario legislature.
Subscriptions received at the Herald Offloe for the Winnipeg Free
Press, daily or weekly editions.
Phone 18, and let us put through
your renewal, or let us order the paper for you.
WANT ADS.
FOR RENT OR SALK—Furnished
0 roomed house, modern. Phone
210. 301f
MUSIC TUITION.—Lessons at pupils' homes. Preparation for examinations if desired. Phone Kin
luysun's Ranch. 2il-30p
WANTED TO RENT. — lluuscki-o-
ing rooms, or small collage.     Apply in Herald Olllce or Phono 372.
B9t(
FOR SAI.K -Heavy leam suitable
for lugging. Slamlard ranch,
Crunbrook. 'Jtilf
for sai.K—One Hundred Bw«i.
Apply W. (j. Bateman, Moyie,
B.C, 28-31
FOR SAI.K- Thru-speed bicycle,
ln good condition. Moffatt's Variety Store. 27-30
LOST—In K. P. Ilull Saturday night
a silk scarf. Finder kindly leave
it ut the lleruld office, or send to
Mrs. Brooks, Kimberley.
HEATERS
Heaters, Cook Stoves,
Kitchen Cabinets, Washing
Machines, Sewing Machines,
Remington Typewriters and
Gramophones, Dressers and
Buffets, Beds, Chairs etc.
Hundreds of other useful
articles at—
WILLIAM THOMPSON
Pkaaa7( P. O. Iss SSS

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