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Cranbrook Herald Sep 2, 1920

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 TIE RATIONAL ADVERTISES
KNOWS THE BEST MEDIUM-
HE PATRONIZES THE HEBALD
TFEdQRANBROOK HERALD
Provincial library
A PAPER FOR Thi* ROME-
TOE INTERESTS OF CRAN.
BROOK   FOREMOST   AI.WATS
VOLUME      22
CRANBROOK, B. C, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1920
Mi SOON
SOUTH   EASTERN   IIHITISII
COLUMBIA BODIES MAV
MEET IN  PERNIE
MEETING MAV BE
KATE IN SEPTEMBER
Loral Board Falls of Quorum
— Executive Io Transact
BumIdchs
It .Is anticipated that a meeting of
tin* Associated Boards of Eastern
British Columbia will be held the lat-
ter part of the present month, possibly on Wednesday, September Mth,
the meeting to be held in Fernie. This
understanding was reached 'between
President G- J- Spreull and' other
officials of boards gathered at the
Imperial press Party's receptiou
held at Invermere last week.
President Spreull, anticipating this
meeting, bad a call issued by the secretary of the Cranbrook Board of
Trade for a meeting of the local
board Jn the City Hall last evening,
but the meeting failed of a quorum,
only President Spreull, the secretary
and the press being In attendance.
Mr. Spreull announced that the
meeting had been called for the pur
pose of electing delegates to attend
the Associated Boards' meeting to be
held in Fernle thia month, to pass
any resolutions to go before the Associated body, and to take action regarding increased freight rates; but
that it would be necessary because of
the meeting failing of a quorum,
for the executive of the local board
to name its delegates and transact
any business to go before the parent
body.
The Fernie meeting will be the
first business meeting of the newly
formed Associated Boards of Trade
of South Eastern British Columbia,
since its organization at Invermere
some months ago. Xo doubt when
the meeting assembles there wfll be
a representative number from ail
the boards embodied In thc organization.
Since the formation of the Associated Boards, the only board within
its territory which did not definitely
affiliate at the time of organization,
the Creston Board of Trade, has since
decided to become Identified wtth tlie
Associated body, aand may also be
represented at the forthcoming meeting.
LABOR DAY COMES
MONDAY;CRANBROOK
WILL TAKE HOLIDAY |
Monday will be Labor Day everywhere,  anil  Cranbrook  will  take
"day off."     Practically all business
houses wilt bo closed for the1 day.
No form of celebration hoe been arranged, but many hunting and fishing
purtleH are planning trips to the sections liiuuitied by large and small
game, for tho season opens fur all
game on .Saturday
limne Ih ro|K>rted pleutlful and some
good H|Hirt Is anticipated by the hunt-
tors.
Followers of Isaac Walton are likewise living in anticipation of having
a day of sporti ou the lakes and trout
st roams.
Tlie oponlng of the hunting season
on tlie fourth, Saturday, will find many
afield, according to reports.
OF
T PLANT
Chautauqua Will
Return in 1921
Necessary Contract Has Been
Completed and Accepted
by Calgary Office
FORMER ALDERMAN EAKEN
ACCEPTS POSITION OF
SUPERINTENDENT
IS GIVEN FULL CHARGE
OF ALL OPERATIONS
Has Had Years of Experience
and Should Give Satisfactory Service
AUTOMOBILES COME
EASY THESE  DAYS
FOR SOME  PEOPLE
Many people covet an automobile,
but the autos do not come as easy
for some a* others. Customs Officer White Is one of those who has
moro curs on hand than he can drive
ut one time.
His predicament enme nbout tn
this manner: Bootleggon aro pretty numerous these days in nnd around Creston, They like to get the
fire Wlter across the border, but of
late they havo met Up with some obstacles, Mie officers taking a hand-
During the past two works the local customs officer has been asked to
go there and get throe cars, and on
Sunday Customs Officer White was
presented with unof-her, au Overland,
which nuto was being driven by one
Tom McQuIre, of H]tuknnc, and In it
was four cases of Joy water- The
provincial policeman at Creston got
not only Tom, but the whlskoy nnd
auto nnd at tbe same time $50 and
costs was extracted from the boot
legger- For the use of the car for
Illegal traffic he was surprised when
ho had to hand It over nlso.
Customs   Officer   White   now
four nutivi on his hands.
The head office of the Dominion
Chautauquas at Calgary, J. M. Erlckson, manager, has accepted the preferred contract for a return of the
Chautauqua to Cranbrook next year-
The contract Is substantially the
same as in previous 3 ears, and affixed 1
to it as "parties of tbe second part" I
are the signatures of fifty local citizens who are standing as guarantors. The Chautauqua management
asked only for twenty-five signatures,
but In order to make it a more rep*
resentatlve undertaking, the local
of signatories should be doubled.
According to Chautauqua plans for
next year, there will be one or two
all-Canadian circuits in the West, and
from advanco Information gleaned it
is not probable that next year's programs will be any less pleasing on
the whole than those v/hlch characterized their engagement Just closed
In this city.
The list of guarantors appearing
on the new contract is as follows :
W. M. Harris, J. H. McQuaid. H.
[,. Harrison, P. Adams, A. A- Mackinnon, G- E. L. MacKinnon, F. W.
Green. W. F. Attridge, F. B. Miles,
Chester Staples; R. T, Tiffin, S-
F>ies, F. A. Williams. A- Raworth.
H. R. Hlnton. A. D- Bridges, A. P.
Noble, C P. MacDonald, Oeo. J.
Spreull. John Leask, Oliver Brlstow,
J. J. Bp.rrett, Norman Moore, J. W.
Spence, J. M. McCreery, Jos. L. Pal- ]
mer, W. S. Santo, J. T. Sarvls, N- A.
Walllnger, AE. Jones, 0. C. Robson,
Geo. B. Powell, A. C. Blaine, F. M.
MacPherson, W. I). Gilroy, Chas Albert Cock. H. White, H. S. Gamble,
W. G. Morton, W. A. Fergie, H.
A. McKowan, J. H. Spence, E. Pat-
irson. M. A- Beele, P. F. Adlard, Will
A. Elletson, G.. w. Patmore, Robt. w.
Leo, Strnley V. Redmond, Geo. T.
Molr, \V. 0. Haynes.
The; City of Cranbrook Ib now a
vendor of "juice."—not corn juice, but
tlie kind that illuminates homes, business places and thoroughfares.
At a meeting of the newly appointed Light Committee of tie City Council held last Thursday, at which His
Worship Mayor Genest and Committeemen MacKinnon and Flowers were
present, along with former Alderman
Robert Eakln, the newly appointed
superintendent of the city, who was
the unanimous choice of the council at
a recent meeting for the position, as
superintendent of tho works recently
acquired from the Cranbrook Electric
Light Company Limited, full powers
were given Mr- Eaken to direct operations.
Mr. Eakin has ffor a number of,
years been in charge of the plant as
superintendent and ls considered very
efficient and trustworthy, and patrons
are assured of a satisfactory service
at his hands
It ls expected at the next regular
meeting of the City Council that the
contract which the B. C and Alberta
Power Company proposes to supply
current to the City of Cranbrook, will
be for'hcomlng for the consideration
of the council-
Mr. Eaken has for a number of
Cranhrook, took change of the plant
yesterday.
Mr. Eaken has been given an office
In the city hall In the room to the
right of ihe main entrance occupied
until recently by tho Merchants' Association end Board of Trade.
REFUSED TO FIGHT
FIRE OR SUBMIT TO
ARREST; SIX MONTHS!
There wns a lively time in f:he vicinity of the Cunadlwi hotel one day
this week when Patrolman Johnson
ran across Fred Dimiftvitch, who was
evidently or the opinion be knew more j
about running Canada's affairs than!
the Canadians who made the laws, j
Dimidlvitch had been told to go out)
and ft#ht forest fires, hut did not respond Provincial Constable Kerr
gave him an Invitation in the form of
n "blue paper"' to call at the Court
house for a little session, but the fellow evidently did not care for such
form of entertainment The date for
his apparatus passed and it was after
this that P$trolman Johnson reminded
him of the arrangements, and when
the fellow became abusive "Charley"
took u hand and a teal rough and
tumble ensued, but after Dimidlvitch
was given a tap or two he changed
his mind. !
Instead of being received at the
Court house he was presented to Magistrate Leask later, who fn formed hinp.
that in his opinion ono montii at Nelson for refusing to respond to the
call to fight lire would be about the
proper entertainment; with another
six mouths added for resisting an officer,
NUMBER     28
E
ME pi
HOT  FIGHT IS PREDICTED
BETWEEN THE OPPOSING
FACTIONS
IS CERTAIN TO BE
VERV STRENUOUS
Farmers of Ontario Said to he
Exceedingly Strong ln
Organization
FORMER WALDO BOYS
WANTED BY POLICE ON
CHARGE OF ASSAIL'
Arisen Out of Death of Hindu
In July Following Assault
at Waldo Week Before
Charles and William Chouinard, aged nineteen and twenty-four, respectively, aro being sought by the police
charged with having inflicted fatal Injuries to Taihl Singh, a Hindu, at Waldo, on July 16. who died a week later
at Fernle- The boys nre half breeds,
und were last seen at the depot at
Waldo on tho day thc crime is alleged to linve been committed. On July
Iti last residents of Waldo found the
Hindu In a badly haltered condition
as tho resnlt of greviour*. assault, and
in an antemortcm statement he implicated the Chouinard boys, elulmlng
they hud beaten him up.
'DAYS OF REAL SPORT"
FOR KIDDIES ENDS ON
MONDAY—LABOR DAY
linn
COMMITTEE NAMED TO
PROSECUTE WORK
FOR AMBULANCE FUND
At a meeting called ln the City
hall Tuesday eenlng in the interest
of tlie Motor Ambulance fund to provide a motor ambulance for St. Eugene hospital, thero was a very poor
attendance.
Mr. J. H. McQuaid, manager of the
Canadian Bank of Commerce was in
the chair, City Clerk Roberts acting
as temporary secretary.
A committee composed of Messrs,
McQuaid, Beattie and Roberts was decided upon, the committee to take
tho necessary stepa to put the campaign for funds on a good working,
basis.
The committee will organise forces
and endeavor to complete ttie amount
necessary to secure tli* ambulance.
SUMMER SCHOOL WILL
CLOSE THIS WEEK
Cool weather has not lessened thc
enthusiasm of the campers at Green
it iy, where the annual Methodist
District Hummer School and C-amp
ban been In progress. Camp bon-
lires have supplied In some measure
tliu wu nn 1I1 that nnturu has been a
little sparing ln providing, and a
■tore or two has also been brought
Into use. The weather this week has
Changed for the better, but good weather or poor, a flue time fs reported
Trom the campe-TR. They expect to
break up on Friday.
With the close of the day on Mon-
doya— Labor Daay—"the days of real
sport" for the kiddles will come to
an end. for they will resume their
studies In the schools on Tuesday, this
being the date set for the reopening
of tlie institutions of learning
The children have had excellent
weater during the vacation period but
will now havo to "buckle. In" and be
punctual and studious or the teacher
or dad may have to take a hand—
or paddle.
RENOVATING OLD
HOUSE PROPERTY
W. W. Kllbey has purchased the
Baker  house property adjoining the
'. I). Hill store, and intends putting
the building in shape for residential
purposes. Mr. Kllbey has alreudj
renovated several otlier house pro
pertles in this way and sold them
when put into habitable condition.
BIRTHS
THOMPSON. - On August 28th, at
the Cottnge Hospital, to Mr. and Mrs.
J. H. Thompson, of Cranbrook, a
daughter.
DOUGLAS. — On Wednesday Hep-
u.nbtr lst, at the St. Eugine Bos**
I Hal, n son, to Mr- and M's. Joints
OougHts, of cranbrook.
Miss M. Rates of Klngsgate Is visiting with Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Jecks
for two weeks or so.
A mishap occurred to the Kimberley train yesterday, causing some little Interruption in the service, and
things were not qulto beck to normal
today.
The baseball boys are leaving today
to fill their engagement at Lethbrldge.
Their well-wishers hope to hear they
render a good account of themselves
on the diamond and return with more
scalps to their credit
An alarm of fire waB raised at Wycllffe one day last week-end when
it was thought one of the houses was
In danger. It proved of no magnitude, being easily got under control
before much damage was done. On
Saturday last the mill suffered a temporary shut down on account of the
bursting of a steam pipe.
TOURING PARTY FROM
WASHINGTON, D.C.,
ARE GUESTS IN CITY
A pary of autolsts arrived here sov-
real days ago from Washington, DC
and have been in this section for the
past 10 days because of a slight mishap en route here, having broken an
axel of their car which necessitated a
new one blng ordered.
The party waB composed of Mr. and
Mrs. F. F, Fletcher and two daughters. Mr. Fletcher said they left the
American capital early ln June and
hnd made u tour of the Yellowstone
and Glacier national parks, and had
enjoyed the entlro trip immensely, as
well their forced stay In this city.
The repairs to their auto were made
ns promptly as was possible by local
garago men, and they departed Tuesday, going (0 Spokane and from that
city will tour Southern California.
METHODIST CHURCH,
LABOR DAY SUNDAY,
SEPTEMBER FIFTH
11 a.m. — Divine service.
12 noon. — Sabbath School.
730 p.m. — Divine service. Subject of address "Carl Marx or Jesus
Christ?" Preacher, Rev. R. W. Lee.
A special Invitation to all men.
THE WEATHER
Officials thermometer readings at
Cranbrook.
Max. Kin.
August 25    73 47
August 26    71 64
August 27  '    70 40
August 28    70 46
August 20     6(1 31
August 30    M 44
Attfsttll    tt ti
DO HERALD ADS. PAY J
ASK "BOB" MOFFATT
If you are at all skeptical about
the "pulling power" of advertising,
especially in the Herald, just ask
"Bob" Moffatt, of the Moffatt Variety
Store. Mr. Moffatt carried a small
ad. In the Herald last week, advising partons of some specials, and the
next day gome of the lines were entirely rleaned up.
Another instaance of the efficiency
with which Herald ads- get results
was seen in the midsummer sale of
W. D. Hill, titc proprietor of the ladies' ready-to-wear store- Mr. Hill
used the Herald exclusively and his
sale was a whirlwind from start to
finish.
If you want to get results, get them
quick, and reach all the people with
money with which to buy, use tin-
columns of the Herald, tlie home paper.
KIMBERLEY MAN DIES
AT LOCAL HOSPITAL
Tho death occurred on Wednesday,
at the St. Eugene Hospital, of Char-
lea McCarthy, aged .14 years, of Klmberley. Deceased hud only been a
patient nt the hospital for a short
time, and while everything was done
to bring about bis recovery, Ills ailment would not respond to the treatment.
Deceased leaves a wife to mourn
his sudden demise. The funeral
took place here this morning from
the undertaking parlors of F. M. MacPherson Interment being made In
Cranbrook cemetery.
(Correspondence)
Ottawa, — A hot fight Is brewing
between the Government and the United Farmers' forces in Ontario. It
had tu come, and one muy be sure that
it will be strenuous. If the Government
cannot hold its own in Ontario, It has
little chance of success, and knows it.
Consequently there waa no help for it
hut to throw down the gage of battle
and go to it, Kast Elgin bolng the battleground. Tlie Govornment doesn't
fear the Liberals in Ontario; but it
does fear tho Farmers.
Tlie recent caucus of the Government supporters from Ontario was for
ihe purpose   of   devising ways andi
means for such u campaign.   Those In
charge of affairs know that little or no
progress can bo made without organ.
i/.atlon, and mutters have got beyond
tlie stage wliere merely talking organ
Ization will do.   Tiie Government supporters must get out and get to work.
The indefinite thing called public opinion will not man the polls or get out
tlie vote.   As announcements Indicate
the new Prime Minister has, during
the past  month, wrought    a    great
change in his own ranks.   Youth and
vigor is finding expression in a decisive action.
Some peoplo think that the prairies
constitute the main strength, as well
as tlie brain box. of tlie Fanners movement-   It certainly wns until a year or
ho ago; but ft IS not so today. A movement that can send about forty-five
members to the Legislature and form
a government is of some account, and
that Is what the Farmers In Ontario
can boast.     Nor have they been Idle
since they placed Drury In power. No,
that apparently was only the first lap.
Today thty are more vigorous than ev*
FERNIE COUNCIL
APPROVES AGREEMENT
WITH POWER COMPANY
At the last meeting of the Fernle
city council tho agreement between
the B. C. and Alberta Power Co. and
that city for the supply of power In
bulk was received and -ffinctioned,
und will shortly be put beforo the el-
ectors of tlie city for ratification. It
is substantially along the lines of the
contract that will be drawn up between the company and tlie city of
Cranbrook a little later.
Mr. Donald, manager of the company, gave the Fernie council un assurance that immediataoly on the execution of the formaal contract the
work of constructing the substution.
new lines, etc.. would begin. Mr.
D<m;-. id also advised that the preliminary activities of tlie company were
proceeding more rapidly than they had
anticipated and it was the aim of the
company to hasten all branches of the
work with a view to supplying power
at as tf 11 ly a date as possible.
IS THE REPORT
JUSTIFIES EXISTING CONFIDENCE IN BUSINESS OUT.
LOOK. AVERS EXPERTS
(.HEAT DIFFICULT! IS
OHTAIMM; LABOR
Condition!! Id This Respect May
lie Relieved However, by
Migration of Workers
New Manager for
Cranbrook Drug
J. Fred Srntt,    of Vanrouver,
Assumes Charge of H'eli
Known Local Business
BOYS WANTED!
VOUNG BOYS BETWEEN THE
AOES OF 16 and 18, FOR
JUNIOR CLERKSHIPS.
— Apjdy —
Manager,
Royal Bank of Canada,
Cranbrook, B.C.
In the matter of organlzaton ,the
Farmers in Ontario are exceedingly
strong. All over Canada they have
demonstrated their strength in this
respect both In politics and In business. In this province they nave a
membership of 60,000 and as it is estimated that theie ore fully 150,000
otlier farmers that do not belong to
tlie organization, It ls quite evident
that) there is a large field to work in
and which, moreover,, keeps them very
busy. Tlieir co-operative body in this
province is also of very great importance. Its turnover last year having
amounted to about $250,000, it having
among other things, marketed practically one-third of tlie livestock in the
province. Time was when the farm- j
er was prepared to leave the work of |
organization very largely to the city
man, and tlie latter fostered the notion
that he had special ability in this direction which was hardly possible
for the average farmer to acquire. But
this notion has long since been dispelled- This Is so well known that to
labor on the point is unnecessary.
J. J Morrison, the organizing gen
ins of the Farmers ln Ontario, ls t
power He Is so because he gets re
suits. In some quarters he lias come
In for much criticism, because he oc
easlonally tells Premier Drury and his
colleagues where they getofTat; but
the crowd stands by him. The rank
and file puts It this way: "It's all
right for you fellows in Queen's Park,
Toronto, to find fault with Morrison,
but if It hadn't been for him you
wouldn't be whero you are. Besides,
bear In mind that you want his nssls-
tance to send you back." Now the man
who delivers the goods cannot be dispensed with, and to date Morrison
has delivered them.
All summer long these Ontario farmers have been political plcniclng to
their hearts content. These events are
popular since they hold out something
for tho whole family. ■ Tlte husband
and father gets his politics and now
that woman*, suffrage has come the
good wife also takes In quite a little
political opinion. For the children
there are sports and a general good
time- Nothing could be easier than to
dress up, bundle the whole family Into
a Ford — it is usually something better, though, now — and head for the
picnic grounds where Premier Drury
nr somo of bis colleagues In thc Government or leading lights in the movement, aro to be beard.
Since the warm weather set ln this
Mr. J. Fred Scott, of Vancouver,
has arrived In Cranbrook and Iia*
assumed the mauagement of the
rrunbrook Drug and Book Co., Ltd..
tukiug charge of the business yesterday.        ,
Capt. Scott has had years of experience in tho drug business, and
will bo a worthy successor to the
late Mr. W*. J. Atchison. In Vancouver he lias been active in the busi
ness, social and fraternal life of the
city, being" president of the B- C
Drug Clerks' Association, and Pa«t
Vice-President of the International
Retail Clerks' Protective Association.
Victoria.
Before leaving Vancouver for Cranbrook he was the recipient of a handsome den clock from the Vancouver
Shrine Club Patrol, of which he was
captaln and which club, under his
direction, created so much favorable
comment upon their visit to Portland during the recfent Shrlners'
convention there.
Mr. Scott is also a Past Master of
the A. F. and A. M. and a Past Grand
of the I. O. O. F.
The newly appointed manager contemplates making improvements ln
the already well patronized business
which should merit an even greater
patronage than the old-established
firm has enjoyed In the past.
Cranbrook will extend to him the
hand of welcome and wish him ab-
undnnt success in his new undertaking.
LEAVES FOR CALIFORNIA
TO JOIN' HUSBAND
Mrs. J. P- Sinclair and family expect *to leave on Tuesday next for
California, to join Mr. Sinclair there.
Mr. F. Mill, father of Mrs. Sinclair,
arrived from Creston on Tuesday, and
has been visiting here this week* He
will accompany Mrs. Sinclair as far
as Yahk, and she will also break her
journey at Spokane aand Portland,
proceeding south from the latter
point by boat.
—■**- -— i* » • ■    .- -
THIN EDITOR IS LOOKING
FOR SOMETHING PRETTY SOFT
iBattleford Press)
A Chautauqua is a grand thing for
any cummunlty, but it strikes us that
the organizations want too much for
oven a good tiling. If we could employ their system, we could do thus-
ly:
Firstly we would convince a number
of patriotic citizens that a newspaper is an invaluable asset to a town
(which is true); on the strength of
that we would bind them up to assure
us a certain minimum revenue. Then
we would give ourselves over to leisurely grinding out bright gems of
thought and sparkling humor and
would leave to our guarantors all the
commonplace chores connected with
the operation of a print-shop. These
would Include hustling for news, writing kind words about people we don't
like, washing dirty ink rollers, setting type, getting ads. en lime, dlsin-
feeling the pastepot, running tbe presses, cleaning up pi, geeing up delln
quent subscribers, taking the office
towel out for its dally airing, collect
Ing accounts, apologizing for what we
said In error the week before, swearing at the office devil, cussing the profiteers over the weekly advances ln
paper prices, winding1 the clock and
putting out the office cat. If our
guarantois kicked against doing these
little cboies in their spare time, we
According to a report just issued
on "Harvest Prospects" by the Canadian Bank of Commerce, whose experts
have made a thorough examination of
conditions the crop outlook in all parts
of tlie Dominion le satisfactory and
justities existing confidence In the
business outlook. In the various re<-
ports received by the bank reference
is mode to the difficulty of obtaining'
labor. Conditions in Oils respect may
he relieved by the migration of labor
from sections where harvesting Is approaching completion* Nol only in
t-.e harvesting of cereals, but in fruit
gathering and pocking there is a brisk
demand tor labor.
Fruit growers arc having difficulty
*n securing baskets for small fruits,
<.nd barrels for apples.
As business conditions depend so
much upon the result of the harvest
operations which are now under way,
•t synopsis of the reports received by
the bank is given according to provinces:
Maritime Provinces—Crops are up
to the average, but the yield will be
tUghtty leu than the eifcptior.nl one
of !a«t year Hay and pv'itoes are
estimated to be 55 per cent, of a full
crop: apples and roots, average: grain
and dairy production, quite good- Apple crop in 1S20: New Bru"sw;~'- 70,-
'00 barrels  ($5*0,000);  Nc *a.
'..•sOO.OOO barrels  (I9.9SS.6S0-)
Quebec—Cereals, roots, corn or silage, and orchard fruits, good; small
fruits, excellent; hay crop, below the
average- Pastures and crops of all
kinds Improved materially as the re-
silt of abundant rain in the last two
weeks ot July.
Ontario—The bap crop was -light
and the weather unsatisfactory for
haymaking. Fall wheat is now being
cut and the yield is good; spring
wheat in some sections is below the
average. Oats, barley and rye are
good. Com Is late, but rapidly Improving Early potatoes are yielding well- Sugar beets and turnips
promise well but mangolds are irregular.      Pastures are generally good
would smilingly fold our -.rms and tell
picnicing has been going on all over them to come through then with ihe
(OoiUmfed oa Pace Three)        fQftrutse, felt i-nal
and the volume of milk has been well
maintained.
Manitoba— General rains falling
about mid-July repaired to a, great extent the damage caused hy the
drought of the preceding three weeks-
Although only local showers fell in
-jome eastern districts, it Is expected
that these will carry the crops
fhrough until harvest,
Saskatchewan — A good average
crop is now almost assured in the central districts. In the north the rains
wer just in time and prospects are
now greatly improved. In the northwestern districts nothing but front
can prevent the harvesting of a bumper crop.
Alberta—Plenty of moisture has
been received to carry the crops
through until harvest, and prospects
on the whole are now excellent.
British   Columbia—Crop   conditions
ry considerably according to locality. Hay Is quite hep.vy snd of good
juiillty, except In districts damaged
by excessively high water in the Fra-
zer and Columbia rivers. Cereal and
root crops promise, favorably. The
yield of strawberries was light; that
of ran. berries and large fruits average.
In all the western provinces the hay
crop ls beefy and pasture excellent.
Present Indications are that the yield
of the chief cereals in Canada this
year will be wheat, 250,000,000 bush-;
oats, 460,000,000 bushels; rye, 10,500,-
000 bushels, and flax 7,200,000 bushels.
(RANBROOK TENNIS
CUB MEMBERS PAY
VISIT TO KIMBERLEY
A delightful week-end's sport was
enjoyed by about a dozen members
of the Cranbrook Tennis club, who
went to Kimberley to match their
.skill against the players there.
Tlie sport was greatly enjoyed and
Cranbrook was well to the front in
the games played when rain marred
the sport
The Cranbrook tennis enthusiasts
are loud in their praise of the hospitality shown tben by the Klmberley FA8I     TW»
THE     CRANBHOOK     HEBALD
Thursday, September 2, 1030
just Yon Hear
,%\7grt
•77mv
Plays All Records at
Their Best
Concerts Dally
RAWORTH 13ROS.
JKWEI.LKI.S and
OPTICIANS
Next i" tin. Port Office.
Open ETcnlni-i
ONE ACCOUNT
The Joint Savings Account is the most practical arrangement tor conducting the financial
business of the home.
Should the husband be away, sick, or find it
inconvenient to get to the bank, hit wife can
make deposits or withdrawals without any
trouble. w
IMPERIAL RANK
OF CANADA
Cranbrook Branch,
W. R. Grubbe, Manager.
Sub.A-j-ncy at Kimb-tLy.
tbe Cranbrook Herald
Published   Uvory  Thill .-uhiy   by
WILL, A. liLLIiTSO.N Editor
sV.  A.  WILLIAMS Assistant Mgl'.
tiubwi'iiiUuii Price am t imt
SubnerltiUuu Vclsie, US, OJsD a Must
trustees and teachers school1
work will go all sixes and sevens. Some parents fail to realize thai there ought to be some
sort ot sympathetic relationship between themselveB and
the teacher. The average
hild ut school is very quick to
twini nm *••
Extract* Irom tb, Oranbrook
Herald ot tills dat,, 1»IM)
George Loltcli
tint upper mill.
Ih now stationed at
"Willi   it   "ILmIuik   Wltlioii'   m   Muule"
1'rU.lcd   bj   I ..Ion   l.Mbur
AdvurtiHluy Hutu* on Application.
Chauuun tur Adv-Mllalntf MUST be In
thin uih.:o VVuduuiiduy uoou tha current
w%uk lu Mcur* attention.	
No Ituma tu tliu tidltur will be Inserted except over the bioper elunulure
uud uddreeu uf Lhe writer. The rule
uduilu ot uo exception.
CRANBHOOK, BRITISH COLUMBIA
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2,  1920
SCHOOL REOPENS
Engineer  Frank Hobhlns     of tho
It is usually with very mixed
feelings Ihat children look upon the reopening of school at
ter lhe summer vacation. To
a few there is a genuine desire
to get back to books aud study,
to some more there is a genuine hatred of such a prospect,
but most of them with a profound childish philosophy accept it as oue of the inevitable
happenings of life, something
to be made the best of.
The idea mo longer holds
grounds us il. did that examinations tell the full tale of a
term's work at the schools. It
has been seen so often that the
brilliant scholar ou the school
bench has not in later years
fulfilled the promise of his
youth; and that the boy or girl
whose name was often to be
found nearer the bottom than
the top of tho examination list
is the one that in subsequent
years carves out
sence any discord in matters Xurtl; stur mtoe telmei yesterday
concerning sehooi government from a trip to Rossland.
without understanding it, and
is sometimes led to take advantage of It, though quite un-
maliclously. But whether
in mischief or not, such a
course does not commend itself in the interests of-discipline, and there must of necessity be some restraint placed upon the scholars, whether
they are in the beginnerB' class
or in the final year.
For the good of the common
cause then — and what bigger
is there, or more worth while?
—let a thorough permeation of
the "get-together" spirit be
the most marked characteristic of the city school activities
from the beginning of the new
term.
Fritz stick of the well known aud
popular Fort Steele Brewing Company
was In town this week.
Local Manager Rookes says the tel-
plione line has been supplied with
long distance truansniltters.
Mrs. Feter Lund and children have
returned to Spokane after an extended visit In Cranbrook with Mr. Lund.
A "company" of two advertised "A
Hot Time in Coon Town," at the Opera House last Monday, but Judging
from the size of the audience the showmen must have arrived at tbe conclusion tint It was "A Chilly Time in
Crunbrook" that night.
HAHIUTS, AT ONE TIME
CONSIDERED A l'EST,
RAISED PROFITABLY
FROM THE VIEW-FOIST OF
OUR C0NTEHF0BABIB8
Abolishing tlie Prison Badge
Prison stripes are to be no moro In
Canadian prisons It has taken a long
time to work this desirable reform,
but lt cornea belter late than never-
Many a good fellow goes Into prison
by a mere chance or accident of fate,
and through little or no fault of his
own. It ls unnecessary that he should
huve the stigma of tiio stripes forced
upon him.
Special Session Urged
Prohibitionists In New Brunswick,
which recently voted by an overwhelming majority    for total prohibition,
are now urging the government to hold
real record | a referendum on the Importation ot 11-
of achievement.     Apart from
quor Into the province   They are ask-
the fact Ihat I lie ability to read,
write and figure in a tolerably
good degree is practically indispensable in after life, no one
pretends that the actual problems worked out in school, or
the lines und forms committed
lo memory then have any resemblance to the real problems
that life will present for solution in the future.
Mental discipline is the goal
to be aimed at in education to-
day. To equip a boy or girl
with a keen aud penetrating
perception, an appreciation of
what is beautiful in life, and
to get a proper perspective on
things in the future — these
are some of the things that educationists arc holding up as
tlie newer and more desirable
ideal, rather than the mere
striding of apparently unrecep-
tivo heads wiih dates, figures,
rules and theorems. It is
freely admitted, of course, that
these things have their place
in tlie general scheme of
things, being un essential part
of the program ln the matter
of cultivating a retentive memory, but they are no longer regarded as being, the beginning
and ending of an education.
Vocational training, which Is
finding an expression in many
of the schools today in manual
training, domestic science, agricultural classes and other lines is another Indication of the
broadening tendency of endu-
cation in our day. A generation ago such things would
have been looked upon as un
thinkable heresies.
Cranbrook starts the new
school year very largely with
a new. slaff. But what results
are going lo beMiown does not
depend upon the teachers altogether, by any meanB. Un
less there Is a measure of cooperation    between    parent*,
ing the provincial government to call
a special session of Uie legislature to
puss the necessary resolution for this
purpose. They also urge the govern-
ment lo at once bring into force all tbe
sections of the amendments to the provincial prohibition act providing for
government control. — Manitoba Free
Press.
iletjiiIcHcn! In Face
They suy that the Lusitania may be
raised from her grave on the ocean
floor thut It ls practicable to hoist the
gloomy hulk, with her freight of death
und memories to tlie surface and the
sunshine, wliere she fllouted when thc
torpedo drove home. What purpose
would be served In breaking the sleep
of those who rest with the Lusitania—
the greut ship that suffered outrage
and became a cause celcbre, a symbol
of retributive justice against Germany? Irrevocably sho should be the
property of thut very tiea that swallowed her, the same that was to be
coursed by vengeful destroyers seeking the submarines. When tne Lusitania sunk she becamo a surety, held
in trust by the ocean, that thereafter
the seus should not he stained by murder The shuttered liner holds memory wltll a flrmer grip, thero on the
lloor of the oceun. than it she cruised
again. And an unimpaired memory
of the Lusltunia is wovtti lhe keeping.
—Portland Oregnnlan.
I oiiimiinll) Cunscliiusiiess.
The Lubor movement has many no
ble idealists In its ranks, but the tiou
ble at the present moment is that the
extremists are displaying exactly the
the same faults of arrogance and selfishness which they most loudly condemn when ver they find them among
capitalists. When we are told that
Labor charges the churches with fos.
tering class consciousness Instead ot
community consciousness we cannot
but reply thut there Is no such Intense
class consciousness in the world to*
day as thst. of Labor. In Russia,
where this class consciousness Is supreme, lt is a crime to be or to have
been a bourgeoisc, and the employer
of labor ls the one person who has no
voto or voice. Community consciousness is nowhere more completely Ignored than In communism as recently
exemplified, where the government of
the proletariat stands revealed as a
ferocious autocracy which brooks neither opposition nor criticism. — Los-
don Dally Telecrapk.
On this continent, the rearing of
rabbits Is mostly in the hands of fanciers und people who keep them merely as pets. In Europe, however, rabbits form an important item of the
food supply. In North America, owing to prejudice, dressed rabbit only
brings about half the price of chicken.
Rabbit fur is also low la price. Al-
Ihoug.i certain breeds of rabbits, e.g.,
the so-called Siberian hare, produce
fur which Is quite handsome, only
very low prices aro obtainable as compared with the price paid for tho fur
of the muskrat, etc.
lu New Zealand and Australia, wild
rabbits, which were formerly a pest,
are now a source of profit. At present prices, a hunter and trapper, with
o dog cuu mako from |20 to $40 a day.
In 1919, New Zealand alone exported
14,163,88!! rabbit skins, valued at $3,-
734,289, as compared with 7,854,152
skins, vr.lued at $1,458,806, In 1918.
Most of the skins were shipped to tihe
United States. In addition, 1,372,869
frozen rabbits were exported to European countries for food, valued at
$235,270. Some landowners find that
rabbits are mole profitable thuu
sheep. Winter skins have sold as
high as $2.15 a pound. Canadians
who raise rabbits In captivity, thus
have to luce competition from Australia and New Zealand.
Itabblt-reurlng ln this country may
develop: (1) By supplying choice
fresh meat aud skins of extra fine
quality; (2) by merely raising enough
for domestic use and disposing of the
skins for what they will bring. They
cun be raised In the backyards with
loss trouble and expense than are re*
quired by chickens.
Rabbits must have only clean food.
They thrive best on clover, alfalfa,
dandelion, oat and wheat straw, carrots and hay- They may also be given such weeds as coltsfoot, couch
grass, shepherd's purse, vetches and
plantain. Fresh water should be
available at all times. In winter they
may be given mashes of oatmeal, barley meal, etc., wltb milk, fed warm,
and potato peelings, boiled soft-
Voung rabbits, under two weeks old,
should bo kept from green food, grain
or roots.
Hutches are simply well-fitting box-
os, closed top and bottom, both ends
and back, and having two doors in
front. Ono of these will be a wire*
coven d door, the other of wood, the
hitter opening Into the sleeping chum-
ber, which should be partitioned off
from tho other portion. A smooth
round hole In the partition will allow
the rabbits Ingress and ogress. The
dimonsons of the hutch will vary wltll
the size and number ot rabbits but
should have not less than 12 square
feet of floor space and a height of 2
feet—-"Conservation," Dominion Oovernment bulletin.
Provincial Voters'
List Total Given
New Provincial Election Lists
Contain Over Two Hundred
Thousand Names
Over 200,000 electors throughout
the Province made application during
the recent registration to get their
names placed on the new Provincial
elections list. Returns which have1
been received from every riding ln the
province but one, bring the total registrations to 202,tm. Atllu's total
has not yet beeu received, tho scattered nature of thut riding, presumably, having delayed tho registrar
from making his Uuul report. The
total of names on tho new list will be
aproxlmatuly 45,1100 over that ot 1919,
according to llgures compiled by Mr.
W. W. liner, ut Victoria, from tho figures already received. Tho totals for
tho various ridings under the registration Just completed compared wltll
those ou thu 1919 list, arc as follows:
1920       1919
Albernl       2,586
Atlin   	
Cariboo    1.333
Chllllwack       4,234
Columbia       1J181
Comox       6,031
Cowlchan       2,624
leCrunbrook     2,250
Deltll     4,246
Dewdney    ;   4,018
Esquimau        2,914
Fertile       2,873
Fort Georgo     2,724
Grand Forkn        900
Greenwood        886
Islands      1,703
Kamloops      5,699
Kaslo        1,833
l.lllooet          908
Nanaimo     3,853
Nelson        2,557
Newcastle       1,983
Now Westminster     5,824
North Okanagan     4.866
North Vancouver    7,019
Oininecu     1,449
l'rlnce Rupert     5,061
Revelstoke     1,947
Richmond     10,117
Rossland        742
Saanlch     6,397
Slinllkameen     3,394
Slocan     1,584
South Okanagan     3,789
South Vancouver   12.772
Trail        2,692
Vancouver City  53,376
Victoria City   18,969
Yale     3.004
It will be noticed that in a number
of ridings the new regist'.ations shows
a total of names uctm.lly less than
that of the 1919 list. On the latter
were muny people who have left tho
province, died, or removed to other
ridings. On the other hand the new
lists contain only boaa fide electors,
und do uot carry the "dead wood"
which Invariably characterizes an old
list. The llgures given ubove are necessarily subject to tho findings of
the court--, of revision, by which the
totrls muy he materially altered.
2,200
1,375
1,1
3,488
1,460
4,830
2,386
2,251
3,812
3,593
3,276
4,139
2,728
1,408
991
1,361
5,671
1,732
972
4,300
2,761
2,258
6,608
4,832
5,001
1,611
6,117
2,143
1,184
5,329
2,455
1,991
2,817
19,486
2,
«.■?.:.;*■ ..
^'■W,
:;?;&...":;:
MACDONMD'S
Brier Plug
k   JMOKINC TOBACCO
1\ Afi«n*eai»ofdcmiiiiauti«Mi
;%, stillCanadaspreference
C%2
Our students are copying every day messages
From all over the Pacific Coast.
Wouldn't you like to bo able to do this too? Wouldn't you like
to travel und see all parts of tbe globe1 and get well paid for doing so
at the same time?
Scores of our students aro doing so at this moment.
JOIN THE CLASSES OP THE
SPROTT-SHAW
Telegraph School,
on September 7th
We have also the finest Railway Telegraph School in Canada.
Two chief despatchers on our staf.
TELEGRAPHY OFFERS FfrJER OPPORTUNITIES
than any other profession.
For further particulars write TELEGRAPH! DEPARTMENT of
SPHOTT-SHA \\    -   336 Hastings St. W-, Vancouver, B.C.
It. J. SPROTT B.A., Manager
MANY TRIBUTES
PAID TO MEMORY OF
LATE MRS COLEMAN
CONCERNING   CANADA
llmi Host of Friends Throughout the Wesl, hy Whom She
Was Most Deeply Loved
Lumber
Wholesale and Retail
FIR and LARCH
DIMENSION  and   TIMBERS
PINE and SPRUCE
BOARDS and SHIPLAP
SHINGLES, LATH,
MOULDINGS, DOORS.
WINDOWS, Etc.
CRANBROOK
SASH & DOOR CO.,
Telephone 66 Ltd.
/ When using x
WILSONS
FLY PADS
RIAD   DIRECTIONS
CAREFULLY  AND
FOLLOW  THEM/
~~ a      EXACTLY/
TIIK  SELKIRK  SETTLERS
The wrest is the scene of many a tra-
Keily, hut there1 are few of greater interest to the student of history In
Canada than the story of the Selkirk
settlors. Ix>rd Selkirk was greatly
enthused wtth the Idea of brnging
the people of the British Isles to the
new world, wliere they would have an
opportunity to secure farms and ln
otlier ways improve their lot ln life*
So after a great many difficulties he
led a colony to the new world. The
settlement was to be formed ln a territory where "religion is not the
ground of any disqualification, and an
unreserved r>artlcipation In every privilege will therefore be enjoyed by
Protestant and Catholic alike without
distinction-" Provision was made for
the maintenance of peace and order ln
the new colony and a governor waB appointed by the Hudson's Bay Company
and nominnted to the charge ot the
party by Lord Selkirk. The governor was Miles Macdonnell
In 1811 the party Athered from the
north of Scotland und the west of Ireland, embarked. In all lt comprised i
about seventy cotters from the highlands of Sutherland and fifteen or
twenty i>eople from SUgo, Ireland. The
band arrived at York Factory, on the
Hudson's Buy, too lato ln the season
to proceed any further that year.
There followed a hard winter. It
could not be otherwise for the newcomers. Rations were issued to them
by the company and everything that
could be done to make their lot easier
was done. The Hudson's Bay Company did tlieir bent to tide them over the long dreary winter ln the north
lands. Thc next year the party went
to Hed River, wliere a number of the
men who were laborers, had been en-
gnged on a three year contract to assist in the erection of houses and otherwise to prepare for the coming ot
other settlers that Lord Selkirk was
planning to send acrofis the Atlantic
that year. But only twenty settlers
arrived from Knglfind- These were
sent to Red River where the colony In
1813 numbered about 100 persons.
I tached to Calgary owing to her asso-
Iclatlons with the city, she was also
\ sorrowfully connected with it, for it
I was here that the young family loat
j their eldest son, Grant, a little lad of
tseven or eight summers, He was
| buried here aud one little plot In the
: Union cemetery was always visited
| whenever she happened to be staying here.
"Mrs. Coleman was the daughter
lu all sections of the West umny!(>( Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Grant, The
heurtfelt expressions of regret have-former waB tt contractor at Macleod,
been expressed at tlie untimely pas-. tater removin"g to Cranbrook, where
sing of Mrs. D. 6. Coleman at Lake lu, engaged in business for a consid-
WJndermerolast week. The follow-1 crabIo tfme in a ]arge way. it wa8
ing, from the Culgary Herald, is ty-;in t|,at town that she met Mr. Cole-
picul of the tributes that have heen so nian< wtl(, wa9 tilen private secretary
frequently noticed in the daily presB t0 George Bury (now Sir George), at
during the past few days: |tlmt tfme superintendent'ot the C.P-
"The late Mrs. Coleman had muny. it at cranbrook. Their marriage-
friends ln Calgary during her early look placo fourteen years ago.
days here, and later wheu her hus-| -*-Siie wJn ever ^ remembered as
band wus the general superintendent ■ one 0f t,he 8Weetest characters I have
of the Alberta division of the C.P.R,16Ver known,' says this friend, *and her
though she took but little part in^eadj ^u ^ mourned by all those
public again;. 'Ono of the true-, who knew her, u 1b terrn,le to think
hearted girls one sometimes meets,' j „|mt Buch ft flne llfe, „hould htve been
waa the way one of her friends put it. I so tragically ended. To hw hueband,
"This retiring trait In her character' ,0 wi,om ahe Wft9 *„ p^gBlonaitely at-
remained after her mairiage. ' 'She tached, her Iosb -will be a most ter-
was wrapt up in her home life and r|t>ie blow.
the care of her children; her chief j The fU*neral ot Mrs. Coleman took
Joy was ln the family circle,' says the -piaCfl on Saturday laat at Winnipeg,
friend-   Generous to a tuult, especial
ly ln succoring those in need. 'Her
many friends,' continued her admirer, hud ofttimes tried to draw her out
into the more public paths of life.'
To all ruch suggestions, however, she
turned a deaf ear. 'My little ones
need me,' was quite a frequent way
she met all such overtures.
"Mrs- (.olemun was cf u cheerful
disposition uud always looked on the
bright side of life. To her lntimuto
friends she was often quito an Inspiration' But on ull occasions aa already remurked, her chief Joy was at
home.
"While she was alwayu deeply ut-
7?
Tar moi
mote effective thin (Sticky Fly
Catchen. Clean to handle. Sold by
DrufiitU md Greet re evcrywhtn.
kmps\    SINCE flsTO     UB
Shilo
-^^KSKCOUGHS
Why?
Proof is positive when founded
upon facts plus experience.
BEECHAM'S PILLS have
been used for 60 years by
people all over tiie globe.
BEECHAM'S
PILLS
Mfhen  In Spokane Make
lt the
Hotel
Coeur
d'Alene
The Hotel With a Person-
allty.
Convenient to Every thing
Very Moderate Batei
4
OPERATIONS
UNNECESSARY
HEPATOLA removei Oall Stontt
oorraets Aptxndlcltll In 24 houra
without pain. Registered under
Pure Food and Drug Act. 16.00
Sole Manufacturer
ME8.   GEO.   S.   ALMAS
Bn 1071 HO 4th Ar*. B.
 gtahatoon, Haie.	
i TheLantestSnleof
.Any Medicine in
I the World.
1-U.nnab-itaC.adi. li!».--,«... Ha.
A Pleasant Drink
KKHNlli BEER is tiie beat beverage made, for business
professional men, for weak persons, everybody,
everywhere, this beer is hale refreshment for wholesome thirst.
THE ELITE IN BEER — *NUPP SAID.
Fernie-Fort Steele Brewing: Co.
WALTER HARWOOD    -    Manager    -    FERNIE, B.C.
•yttmm
esyf,sm.tr\fesm.eiytS)rm  sr\f.s» t,f\fsm i it\fsm   **VWQ
Cranbrook Cleaners and Dyers h
'   I'.  W.  WILLIS, Hanger.
Foremost Cleaners and Dyers of Everything
I Box »       I
e> —**< m-t%< titim
Phone 167
!»'■■»
CBANBBOOK, B. C.
itH>   u»t%> mmm>i**mmm
FOR PAINTING
-AHD-
PAPERHANQIN0
■to.
Telephone
JOHN CARD
Phone No. 401
Cranbrook,   ■    .    . B. C.
Montana Restaurant
Meeli al AU Hove
Olyari, Cliaretlee Hi Candy
ORANBROOK STREET,
ippoilti ih* Bank ot Commerce
GET YODK
Job Printing
AT THE
Herald Office Thursday, September 2, 1080
THE  CRANBROOK  HERALD
PAGE THREE
THERE IS
NO SECRET
Quaker Brand Jam is made from
freah, ripe strawberries and cane Bug*
ar, nothing o\m.
The berries are picked in tlir morn*
Iiik and wo have them In tiio cans the
(tunic day.
Thin accounts for Uie froBti flavor
bo noticeable in Quaker iirami Jam.
Vour grocer should have II.
Dominion Cannera H. (\f Md.,
II-Md OlUre:
Vancouver, ll. €.
Mrs.T.H.Dartt
Likes the
Flavor
Mrs. Dnrlt says they use Pacific
Milk for everything but ten.
She hail tried canned tufllt "as a
make do" nn several occasions but
could never learn to like It us she
thought.
Finally one day when they wero out
of milk she got a tin of Pacific.
Tbe flavor was so natural and u cake
turned out ho well .hat she tried ft
again.
Now they use about thirty cans a
month.
PACIFIC MILK CO-
LIMITED
Factor; at Ladner, B. C.
LODGES AND SOCIETIES
I.O.O.F.
KEV CITY LODGE, No 48
Meeta   every
Monday ulgbt
 at Fraternity
Hall.     Sojourning   Oddfellows
cordially Invited.
Noble Orand,        Rec. Sec.,
J. H. Cameron       W. M. Harris
KMGI1TS OF PYTHIAS
Crukreek, B. C
Meeti ererr Tueeday at I p.m. in
tka Fraternity Hall
C. O. Borgatrom, C. C.
C. a Collins. K. R. * 8
VlalUng brethren cordially In*
vtted to attend.
CRANBROOK i
FARMERS' INSTITUTE
Regular Meeting j
SECOND SATURDAY ol eaeh
month at « p.oi. In the City Hall
WOMEN'S INSTITUTE
Heets lu the
1'nrlsh Hall
tlrst Tuesday
afternoon of
every mouth
at S p.m.
  I*ros, Mrs. K.
11. Irf'itnsa
•aey, Mn. J. W. Burton. P. O. Boi em
All ladles cordially Invited.
The International
And OneBig Union
Will  Known  Trade  Unionist
Discusses thc Organization
Opposing Regulars
(Written by W. H. Hoop, Recognized
Authority on Trade Unionism-)
Tho 0, B. IJ. element were out to
Btnnah tho qtat-e nnd put in ittt place
llu. Russian Soviet ayi-Urni, and only a
fool would expect the atate to do oth-
orwleo, The Wi.rkora paid and will
do Tor Rome lime for monkeying with
tho 0. It. V. It haa but ono t.liuik ln
reality ami that Ih revolution. All
iho other sin ft' Ih <.anion flage, and tiio
world rn miphi an well know lt. When
lho worker limit* out Jutrt what iu ex-
poctod of hlin, it ia my opinion he will
i.'l'iiHi. to )>,<) out and deHtroy the stair
hy tofdo when ho can do ao by tho bal-
loti and ho ia very during, or indeed,
a luniaic, who will counsel nietlioils
ihat nni: i eventually dronch the
atroeta witli hlood. Tho KuhhIuii rait-
liatlon waa the direct outcome ol political repniKHlon. ('an lt be argued
ihat wo have any mich political re-
pfoBSlcn? la it r.ot a [act that wo
cannot get, lhe workers out to vote.
and until out proletarian vote has been
thrown hack in our faces by the capitalist class, wo would be foolish to
try to hand to the worker a dictatorship on a bloodstained platter.
Membeiship of the International
anil National Unions for 1919 on the
American continent affiliated with the
American Federation of Labor, 4,078,-
740. lucrease for the year, despite
0. H- U. und other eruptions, 818,172.
During HMD there were 943 charters
.soiled. Men stilt insist that tlieir id-
eae count in their contribution to or-
ganlzafton.
The Dominion Labor Department
published figures which show that the
Trades CougresB gained 58,815 increase in membership, while "Uie O.
H* U-, using their own bloated figures,
claim only 40,000, and this number is
not even missed. The O. B. U. Is a
dead letter off the railroads, and are
provided for by the. internationals.
Tiio membership of the O. B. U.
need to get wise to the facts- Joining the O. B- U. is like taking a course
iu "Bush and Bull Culture," which Inevitably leads to economic delirium
tremens. No. The liberty steak that
wus thc promise of the O. B. U. dictatorship Is too tough, lt was off the
wrong kind of bull, and now that lt
has failed, the O. B. U. seeks to make
a mulllgun stew out of the labor movement hy throwing the whole thing into
one pot, t.nd lt is a safe bet tbat tlie
workers will soon tire of this kind of
stew.
Let tho workers remember this,
that tlie 0. B. U, was never intended to
be nn industrial organization as tiiat
urni is understood. The British Col-
mnbiu convention crowd were responsible for four resolutions which they
fully discussed and passed on to the
Calgary western conference. They
Wert: First, the one ou the form of or-
GOVERNMENT
(Continued from Page One)
cede from the intern:.tional movement.
These resolutions are Inseparably linked up with each otlier. The sum total of the Calgary conference was the
putting through of these same resolutions- All otlier resolutions were tabooed by tiio i>olicy committee, and
when it was clearly Mated In the B-C.
convention debate that tlie O. B. U.
was not to organize by craft, or by industry, but for the purpose of rounding up tlie workers to pull oiT a coup
d'etat, I submit that it is a political
organization.
I submit thai it lias no merit, either
theoretical or practical, lis theory is
as old as the hills. Its theory or force
is an admission that a greater force
fs already in control. Its doctrine is
a negation of reason in ttie general,
and from a .practical standpoint it can
have no place In industry. The argument of craft versus the industrial
form of organization is its weakest
argument- Men in industry will conform to the development of the tools,
and their organizations change accordingly, and the foolish and Uie unwary in chasing after tlie 0. B. U- bug
will ultimately find their way back
when the diseaso has run its course-
Hence, I submit that merit being a
practical expression of achievement.
i ht. International form of organization supplies that merit which enables
the worker to pool and use his economic power within the limits of the
constitution, and carries with it the
dictatorship of the proletariat whenever they desire to express it at the
ballot box; whereas the 0. B. U.,
throwing aside ^11 weapons other than
tho big stick of direct action, treats
society as an enemy seeking to subdue various sections by tlie dictatorship, and is bound to fail, hence there
can be no merit in its form of organization.
PROVINCIAL LIVE
STOCK COMMISSIONER
VISITS THK DISTRICT
W. T. McDonald of Victoria, Provincial Live Stock Commissioner, accompanied by \V. Newton, soil expert,
wns in the eity the tlrst of the week,
having left Qolden early last week
on a trip of Inspection of this section
of tlie interior of ttie Province.
Mr. McDonald nnd Mr. Newton ar-
nlsaUon* bringing direct action into! rived in Cranbrook from a trip over
the labor movement; second, the resolution accepting tlie principle of the
soviet and the dictatorship) third, tlie
rtesolutlon calling the general striko
for the six hour day; and fourth, the
resolution calling for tho vote to se-
Quit Tobacco
So easy to drop Cigarette,
Cigar, or Chewing Habit
St. Mary's Prairie Saturday evening.
They reported having encountered
rain on their entile trip and that the
crops were looking exceptionally fine.
Tlie two government officials will
make a trip to Nelson and Grand
Forks, Kenmeos, Penticton and the
Boundary country before returning to
the coast.
THK  HOMK HAkKKY
ItobL Kre-«f, Prep.
Frc*h itmui, Cakes, ries
und ruslrj
Pboae 87
Norbury Ave.      Opp City Bell
F. M. MACPHKRSON
Undertaker
Pkeae IM
Norbury Ave, aest to Clly Hell
No-To-Bac has helped thousands to
break Uu cosily, nerve-shattering tobacco hiAlt. Whenever you have a
longing for a smoke or chew, Just
placo a harmless No-To-Bac tablet in
vour mouth Instead. All desire etops.
Shortly the habit Is completely broken, nnd you an- better oft mentally,
physically, financially. It's eo easy,
so simple, (let a boi of No-To-Bac
and if 11 doesn't release yon from all
t raving for tobacco in any form, your
druggist will refund your money without question* No-To-Bac Is made by
thu owners of Cam.arets; therefore ts
thoroughly reliable.
Drop'.Prices
Timothy and
Alfalfu Hay .. $28 down
Oats $25 down
Wheat, 2 weeks. .$40 down
Flour $25 down
Only hy Quantity Buying
nnd   Seasonable Kequlre-
menls ran Low Prices
he obtained.
JAMES~KERRI6AN
DISTRIBUTOR
COPIOUS RAINS DO
WORLD OF GOOD I\
TIIK SECTIONS VISI1
ED
The copious rains the first part of
the week, which are reported general
throughout this section and the Koo-
tenay country to the West, have done
a world of good in ninny ways, accord
to rc]H>rts.
Not only have tho rains checked Uie
menacing forest fires, but Iuto vegetation and pastures have been benefitted
greatly.
In tho mountain sections, however,
It is reported that considerable snow
has fallen and In some places Is quite
deep.
tlie country. Drury's audiences have
run from 2,500 to 5,000 people. One had
bettor believe that this lias brought results, the old parties having, until re-
ently, been merely standing by and
allowing tho^Fariners a monopoly of
tho fun. It is questionable whether
■ form of campaign is as effective
the rural portions as tlie picnic.
Certainly it is ttie mose easily run *nd
iti gets results. -Little or no funds
are required which is an important
consideration. There is not even the
exiien.se of hiring a hall.
Apparently   it   has   only   recently
dawned on tiie Liberals and Conservatives that, the Parmers in this province have been getting lu tho work
that counts. Early In August Ihe former also lml busy and have had some
refls. But they Started too late;
for while everybody likis a picnic,
still tlte average person can only be
epended upon tn attend a certain
number during a season, and it usually happens that the flrBt one gets the
arowd. Resides, it Is invariably found
that tho first sowing of political opinions yields the harvest-
Morrison has been promising about
fifty farmers from Ontario in the next
Parliament* should he succeed, oik
can well understand what a hole that
will make in other peoples calculate
ions. Naturally the Government does
not look on the situation with satisfaction, nnd as Kast Elgin offers the
first opportunity of a show-down, the
battle Is on. It will bo hot, because
neither side can afford to lose.
If Ontario were to send forty, or
even thirty-five Farmers to Ottawa It
is quite evident that It would bo tho
strongest factor In the all-Canada
Farmers movement, There are only
forty-three members from the prairies
and It is tern much to expect that live-
sixths or them Will be with the Farmers, so it cun readily be seen how
Important Ontario is from this standpoint. Now a big Fanners delegation
from Mils province would bo a big
factor in the selecting of a national
leader- Indeed, it might take things
pretty well into Its own hands; for as
yet there lias been no formal appointment.
Very few people at the capital think
that tho Farmers will come into power but a very large number look for a
government formed of Liberals und
Farmers. Should, however, tlie unexpected happen, as It did In Ontario,
many goojl judges are of tho oplnfon
that the Farmers' government would
he headed by Drury, rather than by
Grearer. At the present time It Is
Crearer first and Drury nowhere; but
these are days of lightning changes.
Even should Crearer become Prime
Minister it is possible that a strong
effort would he made to bring Drury
to Ottawa under him; for the Farmers aro admittedly short of men of
administrative experience. In Ontario
they have done very well so far; but,
after all,-provincial politics is a very
narrow field- compared with that of
tho Dominion. They would need all
tho strength they could command and
even then would be not too strong.
Iit Parliament their lack of experienced men ls one of the Farmers most
noticeable weaknesses. "Were lt not
for Mr. Crearer and Dr. Michael Clark
GENUINE ASPIRIN
HAS "BAYER CROSS"
3
SHOE POLISHES
THE  GREAT   HOME SHINE
Pastes for Blacl, Ten, OxMood, Brown |*»th«r Sb«*
Wbitt Cake end Liquid for White Shoe*
THE P. P. DALLEY CORPORATIONS LTD., HAMILTON. CAR   ,
they would not make nearly as good
showing us they do. If they adhere
to the policy of nominating farmers
only   they   will   much   reduce   their
huiiccs of success-   They could to a
onsiderable extent, make up for their
weakness in the Commons by engaging experts on political and social and
economic subjects, as some of the La-
l.i.r bodies do ia the United States;
hut this would involve an expenditure
if money, and there is no assurance
thut such money would be forthcoming.
The growth of Uie Farmers and La-
hoi* movements Is often attributed te
revolt against the old parties.   To a
crtuin extent this Is true, but they
are quite as much a revolt against the
lawyers in politics. The Cabinet tt-
self is un evidence of how the lawyers
ate being reduced In number- Wheu
Union tioverument was formed there
wero in It fourteen lawyers out -of
twenty membors. Today there are
but seven out of sixteen. In the last
eleven bye-elections only throe lawyers wero elected, two of them from
the province of Quebec In which .province alone the gentlemen learned in
tht/ law are holding their own- This
is (juito as significant as any other
development. No doubt Parliament
could do with considerably fewer lawyers than it now has; but If new men
are not to some extent, drawn from
tiie ranks of those who, because of
their vocation make somewhat of a
business of a political discussion, public life will very probably be the loser.
Above all tilings, those who sit in Parliament should know what they are
talking about; if they do not they art
sadly out of place.
With the Oovernment placing a
strong organization in tlie Held, and
there Is no doubt that it will be strong,
with the Liberal and Farmers' organizations already working hard, there
is no doubt about there being some
lively tiroes ln prospect, lt will be
a strenuous battle, because It will be
very largely directed by young men.
There is also good reason to think ihat
the country welcomes the prospect;
for as long aa there is politics there
will be controversy, and as long as
there are elections there will be con-
te.its.
ARE YOU NERVOUS?
Do Ym Jimp at Ike Least Noise?
Take VITAL Tablets
One whose nerves are unstrung, becomes Irritable and cross, and no one
can sympathise with you. Why don't
you try Vital Tablets, you will be Bur-
prised al the results- They make the
nerves strong and healthy. Vou will
be a different person In a few weeks-
Vital Tablets are a wonderful tonic-
They build up the entire system. Indigestion and all ot tts horrors will
eventually leave you if you persist using Vital Tablets. Go to your druggist and get a box today. Price 50c,
or 6 boxes for 12.50, or by mall. The
Scobell Drug Co., Montr AU.
The Cranbrook Drug and Book Co,
Cranhrook, B.C.
PROFESSIONAL  CAKDH
Dm. Oreen & MacKinnon
Physicians and Siirc.-.*n-
Offlc*   at   residence    Arm-1 r<-tig
Avenue
OFFICE  HOURS
Forenoons     9.00 to 10.00
Afternoons   2.00 to   4.00
Evenings 7.30 to   S.30
Sundays    2.30 to   4.30
CRANBROOK, B. C.
DR. F. B. MILES
DENTIST
Office ln Hanson Block
OrFICE HOURS
I to 12. a.m.
1  to    5  p.m.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
PLANS, SPECIFICATIONS,
ESTIMATES   AND
SUPBRIKTEMUNCE
Remodelling and Repairs a
Specialty.
J.    F.    HUCHCROFT
ROWLAND   KOG
MIXING ENGINEER
Vice-Presideot
The C. M. Fassett Co., Inc.
Engineers. Metallurgist!
Chemist*.  Ass*vers
Laboratory Supplies
S07.Mt.21I-i1t  Wall  Street
SPOKANE, WASHINGTON
-t
Jftethotitet Church
■■,■****■■■.■—-- |      ,,   .. ,■■****--,
SUNDAY NEXT
11 A. JI, DIVINE WORSHIP
7 ISO F. H-—DItIm Worehlp.
Preacher: BEV. B. W. LEE
Tou an Invited
jfr
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
Arrival & Departure of Trains
From Arrive
Montreal, Calgary ... dally 12.10 p.m.
Medicine Hat,
Calgary, Local dally ex. Sun. S.30 p.m.
Klmberley daily ex Sun- 3-10 p.m.
Golden and Lake
Windermere..Wed. k Sat. 3-30 pm.
To Leave
St^okane, Vancouver..Daily 1220 p-m.
Calgary, Med-
cine Hat Local Dally ex Sun. 6-45 a.m.
Kimberley ... Daily ex Sun. 7-05 a.m.
Lake Windermere
A Golden..Mon- 4 Thurs- 9.00 am.
NOTE*—Cranbrook time li one hour
later in each case of arriving and
leaving.
G. T. MOIR,
Agent
■*
Tablets   without   "Bayer  Crow"
• are not Aspirin at all
MONUMENTS
Kootenay Granite A Mon.
■mental Co-, Ltd.
Qtaeral Stone Contractor, ud
Monumental Worin
r.O.keiMt
* WATER NOTICE
IUVI.IIS10N AND USB
TAKK NOTICE that the Trustee, ot
Klinlwrlty School Dlatrlot whoee ad-
dress la Klmberley, B.C., will apply
for a lli'dimi to take and use M0 gallons iicr duy ot water out ot Sullivan
Creek, which Hows south-easterly
and drains Into Klmberley Creek
about south east corner Block li, Klmberley Townslte. Tke water will be
diverted (rom tha stream at a point
near the old dam on wagon road Lot
308(1 and will be used tor domestic
(School) purposes upon the land described as Lota 17, 11, 1», Block 11,
Klmberley Townslte. Thla notice
wus posted on tke ground on tke nth
duy ot August, 1920. A copy ot tbis
notice and an application pursuant
thereto and to the "Water Act, 1014,"
will be lied ln the ofllce ol tke Water
Recorder at Cranbrook, B.C. Objections to the application may be Sled
with tho aald Water Recorder or wltb
tho Comptroller ot Water Rights,
I-arllument Buildings, Victoria, B.C.,
within 30 daya after tke first appear*
auce ot this notice tn a local newspaper.
THU KIMBERLEY SCHOOL BOARD,
Applicants,
By N. W. Burden, Sec.-Treas.,
Agent
,   The date ot tbe Int pabUeette* tt
1 thi, notice le Aege* M, MM.
II Hill I Hill IS HK.MKVAI.IHS
(Ah recorded In the Nelson News)  .
"Kwrly widows In Enitlund wen COV*
-rod wltJi stretched hide."
"CORNS"
Lift Right Off Without Pair,
Get genuine "Bayer Tablet* of Aipirin"
in a '"Bayer" package, plainly marked
with the aafety "Bayer Cross."
The "Bayer Cross" is your only way
of knowing that you are getting genuine
Aspirin, prescribed by physicians for
nineteen years and proved safe by mil*
lions for Headache, Neuralgia, Colds,
Rheumatism, Lumbago, Neuritis, end for
Pain generally.   Made io Canada.
Handy tin boxes of 12 tablets—alto
larger sited "Bayer" packages.
Aspirin is the trade mark (registered
in Canada), of Bayer Manufacture of
Monoaoeticacidester of Sallcylicacid.
While it it well known that Aspirin
means Bayer manufacture, to assist the
public against Imitations, the Tablets of
Bayer Company, Ltd., will be stamped
with their general trade mark, the
"Bayer Cwmr
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
otCaMteM-alM
Offices, Smelting and Refining Department
TRAIL, BRITISH COLUMBIA
SHELTERS     AND     REFINERS
Purchasers of Gold, Sllrer, Copper and Lead Ores
Producers of Sold, Silver, Copper, Blaeitoae, Pig Load and
tine "TADANAC" i
CBASBkOOJ.   CORACI
HOSPITAL
Filiate Parsing Heme
Ucensad by Provincial Uort.
■aurall- aad Ueaeral Suralng
Massage and Rest Cure, Hlgnest
References, terms moderate.
Apply lira. A. Crawlord, Matron
Pboae IW P. O. Box 846
Aedraaa. Garden Are. Cranbrook
(HAS. S. PARKER
Forwarding  and   Distributing
Agent for
Lethbrldge and (ireenhlll Coal
Imperial Oil Co.
Distribution   Cars   a   Specialty.
lira)Int- and Transferring
Oiven Prompt Attention.
:     Pi.one €3   ::
DUDSVAN'SFEMALE PILLS ££■,$
medicine (or nil J>ma1t Complaint fi a box,
or thrte fcr flU, at drufr StOTCl Mailed tunny
kddrnitm receipt of price The EtCOMt DtOO
Co., st.o.thiirii.tv Ontario	
PH0SPH0N0LFOR MEN
itorej Vita
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ J Vilrtlily;
for Nerve and Brain:increanii '■f-r.y matter'!
aTouic-will build yon up   fa a box, or two for
tl, atdrufiltom or hy mail on rrc-ript t,1 price.
THK StUHKl-I. IJ U ■'■<:■. .SI   I ..:..;. nt.n   i ii, •::■.-,
Bold by Cranbrook Book A Drug Co.
Service
Agents
-UJ-1
Doesn't hurt a bit! Drop a little
"Freefone" on an aching corn, Instantly that corn atopa hurting, then
shortly you lift lt right off with fin
gera.    Truly I
Your druggist sells a tiny bottle ot
"Freeione" tor a few cents, sufficient
to remove erary hard corn, soft corn,
er eara tetwees tke toss, aad the eel-
Genuine Ford Parts For Sale
>r Tubes - Oil or Gasoline
-Call and See Us
of ACCESSORIES & REPAIRS
Always On Hand
FRANK DEZALL, Local Agent
Men Pkeae Re. M TAGF. FOUR
THE     CRANBHOOK     HEBALD
Thursday, September 2, 1880
Corporation of the City of
Cranbrook
TAX SALE
September 30.
PAY   YOUR   DELINQUENT   TAXES   BEFORE
THE ABOVE DATE AND SAVE YOUR PROPERTY.
A LIST OE PROPERTIES WHICH WILL BE OFFERED FOR SALE CAN BE SEEN AT THE OFFICE OF
THE CITY CLERK.
THE  LAST 1IAY  FOR  REDEEMING PROPERTIES
SOLD AT THE 1919 TAX SALE IS
SEPTEMBER 30th, 1930.
Social-Personal
Over tbe Cea Cup$
Monday in Labor Duy.
+   +   +
The  schools   resume   on   Tuesday,
September 7th.
+   +   +
Insure wtth Beale & Elweli-
+   +* +
Mason & Rlsch pianoforte In eplen-
did condition, for  sale cheap.    Star
Second Hand Store.
+    +   +
Tho Christ church sale of work advertised for Tuesday, Sept. 9th, hns
been Indefinitely postponed.
+   +   +
Sugar 20 cents lh.      "We huve aev
oral sacks of brown sugar at sell at
this  price.      Craubrouk Trading Co,
+    +   +
13. G.   Daniels, HA., a graduate of
Acadia University, lias been appointed
inspector  of   pubils  schools  for  the
Ferule district.
+ + +
Tho residence belonging to W. H.
Brock & Company on Garden Avenue
hus be»*n purchased by Mr. W- G. Morton, who will occupy the place for a
home '.Iter extensive repairs are made
to Hie property.
+   +   +
E. Orade linoleum, 11.40 per square
yard.
Cranbrook Exchange
Our low prices win every time.
+   +   +
FOCN1)
between the City Hall and the Old
Curosity  Shop,  110 degrees of heat.
Owner can have the Bame hy proving
ownership. 2t
+ + +
The Kootenay Pulp and Paper Co.,
Limited, with bead edicts at Nelson,
capitalized at $500,000, has been granted a certificate of Incorporation. An
effort has beeu made to have a good
proportion of the capital stock taken
up by Nelson people.
+   +    +■
Tungsten Lamps, 40w 460
Tungsten lamps, 60w BOc
Cranbrook Exchange
Our low prices win every time.
+ + +
Tom Richardson, who spoke hero
recently in behalf of the Prohibition
Party of B-C, ti former Labor member
of the British House of Parliament,
nnd who has been tendered tihe Social lst-Labor nomination for the federal riding of Yale In the forthcoming1
bye-election, was a visitor in the city
ths week, being billed to address a
meeting in Mat son's Hall on Tuesday
evening.
+    +   +
Rent a safety deposit box from
Beale & Blwell.
+   +   +
Flour cheaper — ?8.00 cwt-, Five
Roses, Royal Household, Quaker and
King's Quality. Cranbrook Trading
Company.
+   +   +
Already  the merchants  are  beginning    to    display    Fall and Winter
'goods, the summer lines being replac
ed by large stocks just arriving.
+   +   +
There will be a meeting of tho
Cranbrook Women's Institute on
Tuesday, Sept. 7th, at the Parish hall
ut 3 p.m. Thero will be a program
of good music and an address by Rev.
R. W Lee.
+   +   +
Special Labor Pay services will be
held in the Methodist Church on Sunday next, when the paslor, Rev. R.
W. Lee, will preach, his evening subject being "Carl Marx or Jesus
Christ?" A hearty invitation is extended to all, especially to men.
It is good to be safe. Complete protection against Fire, Sickness, Injury*
Auto Collision. Also Life Insurance.
Cranbrook Agency Co.
John Kllpatrlck, Wardnar, wag in
the city last week-end
V- Mawson, Creston, was here last
week-end on business.
Mr- and Mrs, Brain, Lister, were
guests in the city last Sunday.
C. B. Garlr.nd of Creston, was a business visitor iu the city Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Ross,Waldo, ar-
rived in the city the first of tbe week.
C. W. Boden and wife, Everett, Wn.,
were guests in the city last weekend.
Oeo. T. Carr, tbe Perry Creek mining man, was here the first of tlie
week.
James Bell, Lister, was among the
visitor.! to Cranbrook the flrBt of Uie
week.
Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Mortlmore of
Vancouver, were guests In the city on
Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Bennett and family of Creston, were guests ln the city
on Sunday.
A. M. Cameron of La Grande, Ore-
was among the new arrivals the first
of the week.
J. P. Lowe and W. Kerr, Fernle,
were visitors tn Oranb.ook the first
of the week.
A. F. Haskell and wife of Edmon
ton, were guests in the city the first
of the week.
Mrs. A. Scott and Urn. W. Scott, of
Lethbrldge, were guests In the city
last week-end.
A SNAP. — 40 acres improved, four
miles from Klmberley, good house,
hardwood finish, burn and outbuildings, 4V& acres cleared. Strawberries, currants and raspberries, several apple trees. Creek runs through
property, also good spring. Price
only IC50-00. Apply to Beale & El-
well.
A light frost is reported to have
visited this section during Tuesday
morning, but no damage is believed to
have resulted.
Beattie-Noble. Ltd., local agents for
Templeton's Rheumatic Capsules, and
RAZ-MAH for Asthma, say these two
standard remedies are selling better
every -day.
The Rev. Professor Barnard, of
Edmonton, will conduct divine service on Sunday next iu Knox Presbyterian Church at both morning and
evening services.
1600 REWARD
Above reward will be paid to any
person tbat will cause a good, heavy
rain, without hall. Full particulars
at the Old Curiosity Shop, Hanson
Avenue. 2t
Clean Sweep Sale
STILL ON TILL SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4th.
Everything in SUMMER WEAR Must Go at
ROCK BOTTOM PRICES.
COME IN NOW AND GET
CHILDREN'S STRAW HATS at 85% DISCOUNT
30% DISCOUNT on all CANVAS SHOES
in Ladles', Men's and Children's nizos.
.SACRIFICE IN BOYS' SUITS
Buster Suits, regular $3.00, on sale   ttS'u
Buster Suits, regular $2.00, on salo  91.S0
SPECIAL — CURLS' DRESSES, all Sizes
Gingham Dresses, regular |2.00, on sale   #1.65
PrinB Dresses, regular $1.75, on s,ale     91.&0
LADIES' WEAR
White Underskirts, regular $220, on sale   11.50
Nightgowns, regular $1.r,D, on sale   $1,00
WAGONS, TRICYCLES and AUTOMOBILES
20% OFF ALL WHEEL GOODS IN STOCK
CALL IN AND GET YOUR SCHOOL SUPPLIES
for the Children. OUR COMPLETE UNE NOW OJf DISPLAY
— AT 	
Moffat's Variety Store
Dr. Bonnell, M-P., passed through
Cranbrook last week-end enroute to
Spokane on business.
J. McCarthy and wife, Bull River,
wero among the visitors to the city
the first of the week.
K. D. rinnkett and wife nnd daugh-
ter of Pincher Creek, were autolsts
arriving here last Sunday.
P. II. Sheffield and wife of Baker.
Oregon, were guests ln Cranbrook on
Stiturdany, arriving by auto.
Joe Burko of Yahk, the railway construction contractor, was in the city
the first of the week on bflsiness-
Stanley Hill left yesterday for Vancouver, where he will visit with his
mother and sister for about two weeks.
James Grieves, who ls at Radium
Hot Springs, is -doing nicely ln recuperating from his rheumatic troubles.
Mrs. G. Moberley of Toronto, mother
of Mrs. Wllber Hill, will arrive here
today and will visit for some time
Willi her dauhter.
m H. Wilson who, with Mrs. Wll
rou and their daughter havo been on
a motor trip to Calgary, has returned
home. Mr. Wilson reports having had
a delightful trip.
James Greaves, who 1b at Radium
Hot Springs taking treatment for bis
rheumatic ailments, is reported being
benefitted and will make a visit to his
home ln a few days.
Among Uie autoists passing through
Cranbrook the first of the week was
a party composed of Mrs. Ralph Met-
calf, Mrs. Edward Fogg and Bruce
Keddrcl of Tacoma, Washington*
Patrolman Jno. Roberts has returned
from a vacation trip to Uie Coast, having visited Vancouver and other cities
He was also a guest of his sister at
Sapperton, who has been quite ill.
Dr. J. H. Rivers and wife and two
sons of Lethbrldge, who have been on
a vacation trip to the coast, arrived
here last week-end and were guests
of Mrs. Rivers' brothers, Messrs. K. A.
and W. D. Hill.
Hector Mackenzie, traveling auditor
for the Workmen's Compensation
Board, whose home is In Rossland, Is
ln the city calling on the various Industrial concerns coming under the
jurisdiction of the board.
T. Nelson, ot Chicago, who was accompanied here by his nephew, Dr.
Eagan, and who has been at Perry
Creek where he la Interested In the
Perry Creek placer mining operations
going on at present, has returned to
his home.
Miss Elsie Grlgor of- the clerical
force of W. D. Hilt's ladles' ready-to-
wear store, Is a guesi at her home In
Rossland and wlil return the first of
the week accompanied by her slater,
Miss Helen, who is a member of the
teaching staff ln the public schools.
A. W. Smith of Fernle, who baa been
the guest of Eneas and Thomas Hogarth, at the bom* ot Mr. Md Mm. O.
Hogarth, baa depart** tor Mb) !■»
with the B, C. and Alberta Power Co..
which company Is developing power
on Bull River and will study electrical
engineering.
E. J. Sylvester, Moyle, arrived hero
Tuesday.
J. Sanderson, Yahk, was a business
visitor In the city Tuesday.
Victor Mawson of Creston, was a
guest ln the city Wednesday.
Mrs. Robert Moffat, and son, Stanley, are on a visit to Calgary.
R. L. T. Oalbralth, Indian agent at
Fort Steele, was a guest in the city
on Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs- C R. Young of Nelson, havo been guests in the city for
the past few days.
Jack Moffatt Ls at Kitchener where
he has been fishing The young angler has reported excellent luck.
John Talt, Inspector of C-P.R. Telegraph offices, wus a business visitor in the city from Nolson last weekend.
E. O. Montgomery, superintendent
of tlie Wg Sullivan mine at Kimberley, was a business visitor in the city
on Tuesday.
A. R. McLean, accountant of Uie
Bank of Montreal, who has been on a
vacation trip to tho Coast, haa arrived
'Kick in Cranbrook,
Mrs. It. M. Young and daughter of
Ferule, end G. F. Johnson and wife
and daughter from the same city, wer*.
guestsc iu the city Sundry,
D. M. McEachran and wife and daughter, Miss Gertrude and Miss Zu-
bach of Seattle, made up an auto party
coming this way this week.
M. A. Beale departs today for Kaslo, where lie will remain until Tuesday and acornpany home Mrs. Beale,
who has been summering there.
P. A. Jones, Nelson i; relieving as
manager of the Bank of Montreal at
Klmebrley while Manager E. S. Shannon is on his honeymoon trip to the
Coast.
Wm. Lindsay of the Sullivan mine,
Kimberley, accompanied by Mrs.
Lindsay, arrived here Tuesday and
departed yesterday for a vacation trip
to Eastern Canadian points.
H. S. Shields, former principal of
the public school here, who has accepted a position at New Westminster
ln the schools there, left for that
city yesterday. Mr. Shields' many
friends here will wish him success ln
his new field of labor.
Rev. R. E. Pow, general secretary
of the Railway Y. M. C. A. here, returned from hte holidays on Saturday, having visited in Calgary, Moose-
jaw and Winnipeg. He reports having au enjoyable holiday, and the
prairie   provinces  flourishing.
R. M. Macaullaay, M.E., of Uie Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, with headquarters at Rossland, arrived here
Tuesday en route to the Sullivan mine
of the company at Klmberley, where
he will remain for a few weeks on
business.
E. S. Shannon, manager ot the Bank
of Montreal at Kimberley, was in the
city Tuesday en route to Rossland, at
whlce plr.se he will wed Miss Marjorie
Seaton iu St. George's church Friday
afternoon.   After a honeymoon  trip
WANT ADS.
STAB SECOND HAND 8T0BI
Phone t.
We per the belt price, going (or all
kind, of furniture. We buy any*
thing from a mouse trap to an automobile.
LOST. — On August 24th, between
Klngsgate and Aldrldge, an army
kit bag containing two pairs of
blankets. Finder will be rewarded by communicating with Thos.
Cavln. 9-2-21
LOST. — Hot ween Windermere and
Wasa, No. 3 Eastman Kodak. Suit-
able reward for returning to this
olllce. 2-»-2t
POR SALE. — Pour-hole cook stove,
coal nnd wood grates, good sized
oven, line baker. 117.60. Phone
.182 or Herald Olllce. tf
PIANO FOB SALE. — Full else upright grand by Mozart Piano Co.
mahoghany finish, very little used.
1350. Can be seen at Raworth
Bros.' Jewelry Store. 8-26-2t
AUTOMOBILE FOR SALE. — « cyl.
McLauglln, bought last year, A-l
running condition, new Goodyear
all-weather tires behind, three
spares. Call, write or phone the
Herald, Cranbrook, B.C.       H-J-tt
WANTED. — Man with good portable samwlll to take contract to cut
a million and a halt feet of lumber. Will glvo right party further contracts. Timber A-l. Interior Cedar Co., Ltd., il Central
Building, Calgary, Alta.       12-l-K
FOR BALD. — A house, eight i
Cloaela.
tn.
A watch combine*
beauty with utility and
long service with close
association. That ls
why a watch ls ono of
tho choicest gifts.
It may be beautiful-
useful — last long —
always carried and still
be purchased at a price
that cornea easily within range of your purse.
Buy a HAMILTON and
yon get accurate time*
W. H. WILSON,
Jeweler
House of Hobberlin
to Coast points Mr. Shannon and his
bride will take up tlieir residence In
Kimberloy.
C. E. McParlon of Waldo, was a
guest In tho city today.
R. S. Foot, Blalrmore, was a guest
in the city Wednesday.
A. M. Robertson and wife, Vancouver,  were here Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Swinburn, Ottawa, arrived tn the city Wednesday.
Lb-Col. S- Goods of Bonnington
Falls, was among Wednesdaays arrivals,
P. J. Aldrich and wife of Walla
Walla, Wash-, arrived here by auto
Wednesday. ,
Mrs. F. W. Westaway and son of
Revelstoke, were guests in the city on
Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. S. G- Erlckson have
departed for Invermere wliere they
will reside in future-
C. F. Buttriek and family of San
Francisco, were among this week's
autolsts  touring this  section.
J. Shaw Parker, rancher of Skookumchuck, was in the city this week,
and a caller at the Herald offico.
Donald Dallas, who underwent an
operation for appendicitis at the St.
Eugene Hospital last week, is convalescing.
Mrs. S. W. Ryekman returned on
Monday from an extended trip embracing eastern Canadian and United Stttes cities.
Rev. Oeo. C. Robertsqp, of Sinta-
luta, Sask., filled the pulpit at Knox
Church for the last two Sundays very
acceptably, and some adherents have
been heard to remark that It might
be well to extend to him a call to
the vacant pastorate.
Dr. S- Q. Reid of Reglna, accompanied by his wife, passed through here
today, Dr. Reid being en route to
Nelson to meet others of a party of
hunters who will go after big game
hereabouts. The party expects to
arrive here this week-end. Mrs.
Reid goes to Rossland    to visit her
Mr. Broley
who represents this well known Men's Clothing firm
will be here
Thursday, Sept. 2nd
with a
COMPLETE RANGE OF MOPICI.S AND SAMPLES.
Mr. Broley is an expert in Men's Clothing, and
the Clothing he sells needs no recommendation from
us, as It Is well known throughout Canada.
WE INVITE ALL THE MEN IN CRANBROOK
AND DISTRICT
to come and examine this well known line, and if
you require a Suit or Overcoat, will be very glad to
serve you to the best of our ability.
AGENTS FOR WILLIS PIANOS
SEE THE WILLIS PIANOS NOW HERE
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Will A. Ellet-
son.
Mrs. J. P. Leslie, who has been ln
Calgary for some time, arrived In the
city on Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Palmer expect
to leave Friday on an uito vacation
trip up the Windermere Valley.
Wm. M. Armstrong, B.A-, the new
high school prnclpai, is expected to
arrive this week-end from Hedley.
Mrs. Armstrong and two children will
not accompany him at this time, but
will come on about tho end of the
month.
Two plate glass show cases, about 25 grocery bins, 1 coffee mill
$12.00, one oil tank, and other store
fixtures, for sale cheap. Cranbrook
Trading Co.
The Askey residence, Dennis Strret,
together with an acre of ground, haa
been purchased by William Whiting.
Mrs. F. V. Harrison and Hamily are
expected home in a day or two from
Kaslo.
BAPTISn.lll.RCH
Rev. H. A. Baker, (rom Mount
Pleasant    Church,    Vancouver,
will occupy the pulpit morning
and evening.
11 a.m., Morning Service.
12 noon, Bible School & Claasee.
7.30 p.m., Evening Service.
Thursday evening, Prayer Meeting.
COME AND WELCOME
Our
School Supples
lines of School Supplies are Uie most complete to be found in tbe city,
SCHOOL OPENS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7th,
and you can have every requirement filled at our store.
-Free to the Kiddies-
EVERY PURCHASE OP SCHOOL SUPPLIES MADE HERE MEANS
THE CHILD WILL BE GIVEN AN
article useful in school work Absolutely Free
We Know the Requirements
WE HAVE THE LINES NECESSARY TO SUPPLY YOUR EVERY WANT.
Come here with your list and let ub help you in supplying tbe things necessary
for the school term.
CRANBROOK DROG & BOOK CO,
I
Day Phone 74
NlfhtFhoMM
ALL HAIL ORDERS FROHPTLY
ATTENDED TO
OUB SUNDAY HOURS ABE 4 to I P. M. •■« S to I P. X.
temMimAmtwmmmmtmmmttmmMitftam^^
l
-J

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