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Cranbrook Herald Nov 28, 1924

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Array THE CRANBROOK HE
i  ..
VOLUME    2 0
Gyros Give
Pierrot Show
Local   Club   Presents   Two
Nights   of    Fine
Entertainment
A VARIED PROGRAM
=E? WEST PACKAGES
PROBINCUL LIBRARY
CRANBROOK, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28th, 1924
•ity
it he
the
supporl
public
nl
though
lUllllHIll-
Thc Gyro, stopped Into tho front
rank nf local amateur entertainers
thin week with Uie presentation of
tholr pierrot show on Tuosdaj and
Wednesday evenings. Sandwiched
In botwoon a multipli
OVontS in tho eity, llu
who were afraid tint
glvon tu tlte QyroB by tho
might lie whnt their show I
hut it is gratifying Unit tin
on each ovenlng an audio
good numbers present,
more euulil have been
ated.
Embracing some musical talent of
tho first order within their own organization, the Gyros nevertheless immeasurably strengthened their program by the inclusion of a few others, and the result was a program
replete with interesting variety from
first to last. Enhancing it considerably were the perfected stage arrangements in the hands of Mr. A.
McD. Hogg which allowed no hitcli
in the program, and the music of the
orchestra of six pieces under the lea-
deship of Gyro Bruce Robinson,
which, in addition to appearing on
the program to good advantage also
supplied the orchestration for the
concert numbers. The costumes were
just what the occasion called for, and
the little stage details had been so
well provided for that there was not
a slow minute during the entire evening.
A program bubbling over with fun
and humor in ports was balanced up
with solos in a sentimental vein, given by thc president, Al. Knight, whose
"Sunrise And You" was probably his
best number, and Gregory Thomas, in
the "Wyoming Lullaby." Mr. McD.
Hogg's Scotch songs were justly very
popular, his "Photo of the Girl I Left
Behind Me" taking extremely well.
Of a little different nature were A.
W. McDonald's bass solos. Ile gave
"The Cobbler Song," a robust descriptive piece, and "The Floral
Dance," which made a very pretty
number with the execution of the
Cornish folk dance by the Misses
Harriet and Jean Home. This item
was most generously applauded, and
made a most novel ond nt the same
time effective number. I.. T. Dwelley of Lumberton, is a host in himself with his repertoire of comic songs
which he gives in an inimitable style
that never finis to take the house by
storm. Alan DeWolf, after giving
a very (lever exhibition of step dane-
clng, ought to have been rewarded
by a real bouquet instead of the
burlesque one made up of cabbages
and paper trimmings, and handed to
his fellow Rotarians—also
very well an inipcrson-
"Syl.il'' lhe heroine of Mr.
"Yum. Yum. Yum" song,
nu exceedingly daring and ultra-flap-
perish young thing who was Impersonated to perfection by Mr. DeWolf.
The Service reading by Mr. living-
stone, "Thc Shooting of Da" McGrew. " added variety t« the program
of which many would liked to have
heard more. "Bobbed or Shingled"
was n solo by .1. II* Hartley with a
rjunrtotto chorus Hint was literally a
■cream, and lhc sketch by the
inski trio, belter known ns
Francis DraiMiiond, Mr. licit
ami   Mr.   Itiliberis       wns      a
him   by
cnrried
iitinn of
Dwcllcy'i
Ski
Miss
Sang
ole-
thal
nkod
verly contrived 1
niilcl' laughter.
The playlet, written for the occasion by Mr! tlogg, entitled "Tlie New-
lywedl," Kim one of the besl numbers
of Ihe evening. Mr. Hogg, as the
groom, wns hoaxed lo a finish liy hi"
friends of tha bachelors' cluli. "Fred"
Burton, "Doc" Fergle nnd "Stew"
Black, who painted   hi-   unwitting
blithesome bride, Mrs. 1'. W. Willis,
in such distorted colors. Unit Ihe poor
groom felt himself lieing I ucccssive
ly gashed in the Ibloat, shot and poll
oned. The acting in lhe sketch wns
extremely good.
The Gyro chorus opened and closed the program with selections from
thoir club repertoire, nnd in the Intermission Rotary song sheet.-, were
brought into use, the audience joining in the chouses when some well
known Rotarians balked at displaying
their vocal talents—or some of them
did. The Rotarians also appeared as
ushers for the Gyros, u happy recognition of thc assistance the Gyros
were to them at the time of the recent playground carnival. Thc assistance given was much appreciated
by thc Gyros.
In addition to tho Inexpensive bouquets presented to the stars of tho
Skivinsky act and to "Sybil," moro
substantial and well deserved bouq-
ets were presented to the Misses
Home, Mrs. P. W. Willis nnd Fran
ces Drummond.
In addition to thc sterling work of
the orchestra under Bruce Robinson
Giro Ira McNaughton, accompanist,
tarried sut hi* onerous work axcead-
MINERKH
KIMBERLEY, BURIED
ON SUNDAY LAST
The funeral took place last Sunday afternoon of Fritz Stromberg,
of Kimberley, who lost hihs life last
week iu un accident ut the Sullivan
mine, 'fhe funeral was held under
Iho auspices of the Knights of Py-
thins of which deceased was a member. Services wore held at the Py-
Ihinn Hall, ul whicli llcv. E. W. MacKay officiated, and Inter at tbe cemetery lhc lodge burial service was
g  through.
According lo Charlie Johnson ond
(lust rlodquist, two miners working
neur deceiised nt the time of the aeci
dent, Ihey hoard a muffled explosion
ami found Stromberg with his head
terribly cut, evidently from flying
pieces of ji bouldor he hnd heen working on. Tiny carried him to thc
local hospital, where lie died almost
:.t once.
At the coroner's inquest held on
Thursday ut Kimberley hy Coroner
li. E, L. MacKinnon of Crnnbrook,
Hie verdict wns:
"That the said Fritz Stromberg
come to his death by drilling into the
powder in a cutoff hole, that it was
purely accidental, nnd that we attach
no blame to anyone for the accident."
Mine inspector Robert Strachan of
Fernie was present at the inquest.
Apr 1-1IM
IPLES0F01L
FROM FLATHEAD FIELD
TAKEN TO REFINERY
ADDITION AT
HOSPITAL ALMOST
COMPLETED
The three storey addition to the
hospital, built at what will amount
to a cost of close upon thirty thousand dollars, has now been practically completed, with the finishing up
of the heating and electrical installations. Mr. Geo. R. Leask was the
building: contractor, and the addition,
of three storeys, has been completely finnshed up in the first floor and
partially completed on the other two
floors. The first floor will be used
as extra quarters for the resident
nurses, but the top floor will not be
put into use immediately. The laundry on the gound floor has been
thoroughly modernized with electrical and steam installations. The new
addition also houses thc new hospital
heating plant, consisting of two low
pressure boilers and one high pressure steam boiler, and by forced emulation thorough satisfaction in the
heating of the big building is now as-
urcd in the coldest temperatures.
Upper corner rooms and the isolation
liospital rooms, formerly somewhat
lifficult to heat up properly in the
coltl weatiier will now always be
'omfortably warm. Steam will also
be available from the high pressure
Ier for thc mnny uses found for
ck ami intense heat, such as for
sterilizing, steam chests, warming
loscts, etc. Calgary firms are responsible for the beating installation
nd it is stated there are not mnny
iBtttutloilfl in the west as well equipped in this direction. A thorough
tryout of the system was given this
reek.
The Standard Electric Co. of this
ity, have now completed the electri-
al installation nf lights, motors, etc..
which has been carried out in thc
most npproved up-to-date fashion,
th every regard for permanency,
fety mid efficiency.
Ancient Order of Forcitera Dance
\ very enjoyable time wns spent
last Friday evening by the Ancient
Order of Foresters ami their friends
t the Knights of Pythias hall when
whist drive ami dance wns held in
aid of fttndl for lhe purpose of giving
the Foresters' children a Christmas
tree.    Whist was played until ten p.
m,( ihe sixteen tables showing n good
attendance.   At the conclusion of the
ve, prizes were distributed to '.he
lucky winners, after which dnncing
wns the order until midnight when a
dainty selection of refreshments were
served without stint.  Everyone sntis
tied, dancing was nguin indulged in
until two a.m. It wns evident from
the numerous encores thut Rohinson'H
orchestra was giving great sntisiji.-
tion. From the opening waltz until
Home Sweet Home, not a dull moment was spent, ami once again the
Foresters kept up their reputation,
making all feel that sociability is .the
keynote that makes these little
monthly affairs n success, and folks
ask, "When is the next Foresters'
dance?"
(Lethbridge Heruld)
Some time ago the Herald carried
a story of the discovery of oil in the
well of the Crow's Nest Pass Oil
Company, a company financed by
Vancouver and Fernie men. The
well, located at Corbin, has heen under way for a couple of years, progress being slow on necount of the
difficulty encounti red in hauling in
material.
The oil discov. ry is confirmed by
E. C. Gilhault, who returned to the
city frc i Cianbrook over the weekend. Mr. Gilbnult brought with him
u bottli it the -rude which he secured from VY. R. Ross, ex-M.L.A
Mr. Ross is heavily interested in thi
Flathead venture. The sample will
be tested at the local oil refinery.
The first oil was found at 500 feet
and the second at 900 feet. This was
a light oil and not present in commercial quantities. At 2,000 feet i
heavy flow of oil, similar to the Ke-
vin oil was brought in. It is a
dark green crude. Until the pump
can be put on the well the production cannot he curately determined
It looks like c good well, however, in
the opinion of o;l men.
GYRO LEAVING FOR
OLD COUNTRY IS
GIVEN PRESENTATION
IGOOD SUPPORT FOR
KIMBERLEY CHURCH
ENTERTAINMENT
A. McD. Hogg, Musical Director at Pierrot Show
Given Send-Off
METHODIST C.G 1.1 -'■:•     »• 4.
GIRLS MEET! ■' "Vr ■■■??. HTk
BANQUE'. ' A L      J
... ;^Ahead
MOTHERS & DAUGHTERS
HOLD ENJOYABLE
ban;uet& SOCIAL
A "Mother and Daughter" get together was held on Saturday evening
last at the Presbyterian schoolroom,
in connection with the C. G. I, T.
movement. There were about sixty mothers and daughters present,
and the room was very nicely decorated in the colors of the organization,
green and silver.
The following was the program for
the occasion, after a most satisfying
banquet had been partaken of by
those present:
Toast '"The King" Mrs. Dow
Responded to by "God Save The
King"
Address of Welcome to the Mothers
Jean Flett
Responded to by Mrs. McBurney
Greetings from Sister Churches
Address: "Mother, The Gift Bringer"
Mrs. A. A. MacKinnon
Piano Solo   Ethel Speers
Remarks by the Leader
Candle Light..g Ceremony
C.G.l.T. Closing Song:    "Taps"
Many thr ,ka are due to the ladies
under the direction of Mrs. MacKay
who helped to make ihe gathering
such a success. During the intermissions betwem the courses of the banquet, songs were sung such as the
Peanut Song," and the "Smiling
Song."
On Tuesduy last a "Playmeet" was
held in the Methodist Church schoolroom from 4 to 6 under the combined C.G.l.T. Keen competition was
evident in the various games. Potato race, needle threading, nail driving, string chewing, clothespin race
nnd scarf tying. The awards were
the    form    of   colored .ribbons
Is from 12 to 17 took part.
Mr. and Mrs. Allen, and Mrs, Allen's sister, Mrs. G. Burgess, will occupy thc Baptist Parsonage during
the winter.
ingly well, and hnd no small part in
the success of thc program.
Altogether thc Gyros achieved success in n notable degree in their effort, nnd it is hoped that the St,
Eugene Hospital, which is to be the
beneficiary of the resulting proceeds,
will receive a fairly substantial sum
from thc proceeds. Local talent
productions usually go over well, but
for variety nnd a thorough money's
worth program, the Gyroa have made
hlatory.
LODGES OF THE
THREE LINKS ELECT
NEW OFFICERS
On Monday night the Oddfellows'
Lodge held their semi-annual election of officers, the following elective appointments being made fo the
next term:
Noble Grnnd Bro. A. E. Leigh
Vice Grnnd     Bro. F. A. Williams
live. Sec. Bro. E, G. Dingley, P.G.
Fin. Sec. . . Bro. W. D. Gilroy, P.G.
Treas.      Bro, A. Burch
A pleasant feature of the evc-
n; :.'"s proceedings was the presentation to Bro. J. E. Beaton, a Past
Grrnd who frequently visits Key
C'.ly Lodge, of a veteran's jewel, de-
11• t ng thirty years' continuous connection with the order, the presentation being made on behslf of Eureka
Lodge No. 13, Nova Scotia. Bro.
Benton suitably acknowledged the
rnsentntion, reiterating the pleasure
it gave him to visit the local lodge at
all times.
The principal offices in the Rebekah Lodge for thc next term were
elected on Wednesday night as follows:
Noble Grand  Mrs. A. G. Hill
Vice Grand Mrs. A. Pantllng
Rec. Sec  Mrs. Liddicoatt
Financial Sec  Mrs. West
Teasurer  Mrs. D. Campbell
Elective officers for the coming
new term were elected on Thursday
evening by Durham Encampment as
follows:
C. P  T. A. Wallace
H. P.   F. Doodson
S. W  F. A. Williams
J, W  A. E. Bowley
Scribe  J. L. Palmer, P.C.P.
Treas  S. Fyles, P.C.P.
Following the Wednesday evening
performnnc of the Gyro concert a
very, pleasant little gathering took
place in the Auditoriun,, when the
Gyros and their wives or Lady friends
met to enjoy a buffet lunch prepared by mine host Alex Hurry, as well
us to take part in a little function in
which Gyro A, McD. Hogg was to
play a principal purl. All were in a
happy mood due to the fact that the
two performances wero over and all
were there to t:!' the tale. After
the tusty lunch had beer, partaken of
Mr. Hogg was called to Uie front and
Mr. Barberis of the famous Ski
vinski Trio, in a neat little speech
intimated to the audience that Mr.
Hogg was about, lo leave Cranbrook,
but under suspicious Circumstances,
rumor having it. that he was going to
the Old Country to take the leading
role in nnother sketch, "The Newly-
weds," in which there are to be but
two uctors, (Fred, Doc. and Stew
remaining in ('ranbrook by request),
Mr. Barberis said all sorts of nice
things about the departing Gyro
nnd ns o token of appreciation of the
boys, handed him a small package,
which on being opened was found to
contain a small drinking fountain
and a silk handkerchief. Mr. Hogg,
who was visibly affected, thanked his
fellow clubmen for their kind words
and said he was pleased that the first
Gyro show had, according to what lie
had heard, been a success. After the
mock presentation, Gyro Al. Knight,
on behnlf of the club read the following address to "Mac".
To A. McDougall Hogg:
'It is with sincere regret thnt we,
your fellow Gyros, have learned of
your impending departure from our
midst, for while our acquaintance
has been of short duration, its nature has been such as to form a
friendship, the personal touch of
which we shall miss.
As a club member you have carried out well the several duties to
which you have been assigned. Your
talents, some of when you have apparently been hiding under a bushel,
make your place among us a very difficult one ever to attempt to fill.
We deeply regret that our short
association is to be dissolved, nnd as
an expression of our feeling we
would ask you to accept the accompanying token as a symbol of our
respect."
Cranbrook, B.C.,
November 26*. 1924
Having made his reply to the presentation,  all  "Mac  could  say was
ditto."
The gathering broke up after the
singing of "He's a jolly good fellow."
Before   leaving,   all   present   bade
Mr. Hogg farewell.
The gift was a gold Eversharp
pen and pencil.
The bai
ers by tht
School or
uet tenderer    i
unlor and senioi t . ■;. [.[ ..
if   the Meth di
Saturday eve I
The   Orpheum   Theatre   was   jammed  to the  doors last  Monday  evening  when  the  management  of  the
theatre and the Union Church co-op-! charming fun.
crated in staging an  unique enter-1 on the leaders, Mrs. M. T. Han     ind
talnment.    The management of the Miss Donna Argue, b   well
theatre  provided  a   fine  comic  pic- girls themselves.      Tin     ci
ture ami a splendid feature, "The
Trail of the Lonesome Pine." The picture was intensely interesting owing
to the fact that a large number ol
people had previously read the thrilling novel from which tlie picture
was taken, Under Mr. Bailey's management six young ladies of Kimberley gave an Oriental number in cos
tume which won loud and continued
applause from the audience. Th.
same six young ladies and Mnslei
Kenneth Holt under the direction of
Mrs. Kvans, presented a Japanese
Fantasia, also in costume. Mrs.
Marsden also assisted by rendering
the song, "One Bine Day," from tlu
opera "Madame Butterfly." So ably
and so artistically was this rendered
that the audience heartily encored
and Mrs. Marsden responded with the
number, "1 Wonder If Love Is a
Drenm." The ensemble was exceed
ingly well received by thc audience
being a faithful portrayal of scones
from that Eastern country, Japan.
The receipts were surprisingly
gratifying, and the management of
the Union Church wishes to express
its appreciation to the theatre management, the assisting artists, the
ticket sellers nnd the public for so
heartily co-operating in making this
entertainment a most signal success.
Coming events*
in    charge,    banquet, protfi
decoration,    had
their share t" the evening i*   i
■table mannei.      Abi ul
ers and dau     ■       at down to th
tasty bi i am] le meal, aftei
program was rendered.
Patmore ably rilling the
mistress,     Thc numbei a
gram, a nicely balanced blei
serious ami frivolous,    were
lows:
Toast   "Th    KI
Chorusei  . C, G, I.   r.
Toast, "Our M ■
Proposed by Marl m Kum
Responded to by .Mis. Freeman
•Solo Jessie Brown
Candle Lighhting Ceremony
liy Jui i
Recitation Gertrude Pat) ore
eady rail  of Mo.--.
One   Mayoralty
Candidate
THREE TRUSTEES RETIRE
than a month now, the mu-
-i election pot will be bubbling,
  talk and questioning as
to who ma)  or may not be in the
nt. f"i the 1926 civic bodies be-
li-.ml on the streets and in the
-  whore ratepayers and  others
I ate.
ri nro not a few who ex-
the view that so far as the rec-
rd of iho present eity council goes
is little need to make a change
me   equally confident there
* test for the mayoralty,
most vi the seats that will
tor election on the public
■
*
tin-
oialtv
Proposi
Hi i
Duet      .1
Recitation
Choruses
Tmisl
"The Si
il !iy Aubrej
nl to liy Mj
:m McPhee
In
.Mis.
In-   I'.
Ki
Responded to
Initiation Ceren
Recitation
Choruses
is ond "Tai ," fi;: ■-.
Night Songs.
■
Ramova   From P.r,on.|.
Rev. and Mn. W. T. Tapscott are
not occupying the Baptist parsonage
this winter, but have taken up quartern in the home of Mrs. Robertson,
Nwkati Avmim.
QUEBEC NATIVE SONS
ENTERTAIN MEMBERS
WITH GOOD PROGRAM
The threat often made by the Sons
of Quebec that they would put on
provincial night nt the Native Sons
of Canada that would present many
novel features to eclipse that
given hy the other provinces, was cnrried out on Thursday last, at the
postponed meeting of the Native
Sons. Mr. J. A. Genest wns chairman of the Quebec committee, nnd
certainly no other province could
presented numbers of the nature thc
sons of Quebec did, Mr. Genest made
some opening remuks when the time
for tho progrnm arrived, and pointed
with pride to the illustrious Canadians Quebec had pm forth, and its
fame in other way... Probably for
the first time in the west, and certainly in these parts, the nudience
also enjoyed a novel treat when "O
Canada" was sung iu French by a
Quebec quartet consisting of Messrs.
J. A. Genest, J. II. Dubois, J. P. Oul-I
mont and H. Muller. This was thor-1
oufihly enjoyed,
J. F. Guimont was the main spen-1
ker of 'the evening, and cnrried his
hearers through the decades nf provincial and national history, showing
the prominent part it had always
played in thc development of the
country, nnd the place it had attain-
ed. It was noteworthy too, he pointed out, thnt gradually the feeling of
dlsscntion between Quebec nnd thc
remainder of the country, through
a lack of understanding, wns gradually being overcome and nullified
as a result of education.
A. K. Leiteh, another well known
son of the province of Quebec, was
another speaker durinc the evening,
and laid special stress on the development which had taken plnce in
its manufactures.
Another musical number was the
rendering of the well known "Allr-u
etto," by J. K. Guimont. Drummond
the poet nf the habitant, also had a
place on the program, ono of his
Incomparable compositions being given by H. Muller.   Musical numbers
Friday,    November    28:Opening    of
Arena Rink, Band in attendance.
Friday, Nov. 28: Shrine Club Dance
with Banff Orchestra, nt Auditor
Fri. & Sat, Nov. 28 &29:"Lilies of
the Field," at the Star.
Friday, November 28: Missionary
Concert by Marion Oliver Mission
Band, in Knox Church schoolroom
at 7.30.
Monday, Dec. 1: Recitnl by pupils of
Mr. Bruce Robinson at Knox
Church schoolroom at 8 p.m,
Mon. & Tues., Dec. 1 & 2: Jackie
Coogan in "Daddy," at the Star.
Wednesday, Dec. 3: Meeting of Cooperative Ladies' Guild at the
home of Mrs. J. Chester nt 8 p.m.
Wed. & Thur., Dec. 3 & 4: Tom Mix
in "MUe-n-Minute Romeo" at the
Star.
Wednesday, Dec. 3: Meeting to discuss formntion of Burns' Club, nt
8 p.m. in Y.M.C.A.
Sutuday, Dec. ">:Knox Church Ludies'
Aid annual sale and bazaar, at
K. I\ Hall.
Friday, December 5: —* 'The
Varsity Coach," presented by high
school pupils, at tbe Auditorium.
WELSH MALE SINGERS
CAPTIVATE AUDIENCE
IN CONCERT HERE
Appear Two Nights at Knox
Church in Delightful
Program
Cranbio-.k was \r. [.■ I -
Friday and Saturday        :.-■
when it was visited by the Rl   I
Welsh Male Glee Singers, who are
making a trlump]
The pre-.- coi tmenti  pre
had nothing but praise for them, and
the enviable reputation they had gained was not lessened by their appearance here, to judge by the fai
opinion1; heard, their reception here
being most enthusiastic.
Appearing here under thu auspices
of the Ladies' Aid of Knox Church,
the concert took place there, and a
nice sum wa- netted to '.;,
their work.     The progran
cteif from n large repertoire of vocal solos, choruses, quartette .
organ and piano solos, and .
much to the liking of the large audiences that comfortably    filled    the
church    on thc two evt
heard with increasing delight number
after   number   exqui-:' ly
Critics have gone so
the Rhonnda Bing ira form
perfect singing aggregati
day
A. J. Balment
' nersiooa   to   be   ready   to   act
'■'■■; ondlng to requests from
yers,   and   two   other   former
mayors hav.' also been approached by
iends and urged to run for the po-
the head of the council table.
U li rman J, P. Fink and
^ ■ 1" On the city council
stated that Alderman F. M. Mac-
i ■ . who has made    a   capable
of tlio  finance committee,
id who last year headed the poll,
ected \o be away in the east at
the time of the elections, but has not
consented to leave nomination papers
fiUed out, so that he will not be in
i* running again unless friends can
ladi   htm to recede from this de-
.    None of the other aldermen,
given the matter serious consi-
:: yet, though it is understood
■st of them would be willing to run
again, and it would appear to be a
opinion  that  a  worse  fate
could  befall  the  city  than   to  put
'     •: iv. a body to carry on for
i  year.
On ihe school board, the retiring
rustees are Chairman F. H. Desall
and Trustees Mrs. J. J. Jackson and
W. Henderson. Mr. Dezall, although
not definitely consenting    to    run
robably will as the demand
..-   supporters   becomes  insis-
..
On the police commission, the retiring mem be of the board is commissioner W, F. Doran.
LONDON COLLEGE OF
MUSIC APPOINTS LOCAL REPRESENTATIVE
committee of management of
the London College of Music, England, the largest examining institu-
the world, has added the city
I rook to the list of local cen-
r  examinations,  and  has  ap-
pointed Mrs, R.  W, Edmondson, local representative for this city and
district.
dnations are conducted annually at all the principal cities in Canada during the month of June.
All entries must be sent to the lo-
Prof. Thomas Morgan, si! ■   m tary by May 1, 1925.
hair, ruddy of countenance, with   a      SyUabua and forms of entry, etc.,
fine lilt and twist to hi it : ' had ,,n application,
an equally fine twist    to    hi ■ ••
though he uses his expi Child Mee,, With Aeeidtnt
nstead of the baton.    His leadership! ■■
of the choir plays no small part in I    Tuesday of this week. Miss Edna
the interest  in th.-  pn !:i" ot Marysvflle was the victim
the program, the response froi : accident    The little girl,
singers, perfection in attad . fa dtle •     ■' ]y nina >'ears ot age, was
poise and release being in thi      Ivea ' ;'] li,l] "f hil>' when she slip-
musical work of art. '■Il on t,J tne ic>' road way.
"Th.- Deeert," a baril ''  ffai rushed to Cranbrook and at
Walter Evans won the adml - ''-""l i{ WI,S found that the
were also given bv Bruce Robinson the audience,   and   equall wM ,,r'>l(f,n ul *• shoulder
nnd  H.  Muller,  duet,  nnd   a  saxa- waa "0  Peaceful  Night,' ■   w«   ;' ,,;"' break a per-
phone solo by Jack  Ward. versatility, delicate    pari **   n■:"1'* h>  lJr- (ireen «d
J.   Ii.  Dubois  was  another apea- much artistic appreciatloi '■i';,|'; «i.s able to return
ker on the merits of his native pro- onstrated, being handled wl '■■' *»J afternoon.
vince.   Tho' born in Terrebonne, the j ion and skill.  ■
town of famous orators. Mr. Dubois     Separating chorus from cl ■• thoughtful and sincere ao-
clalmed that he was a llttta ashamed linking thi program a  awl panlat.    His solo numbera on the
that he could not be classed in that | the solo number .    Every were    much admired.     The
national anthem, followed by
"God Save the King" made a fin«
i ndlng to the program,
At the concert on Saturday night
gel   were forced to repeat ma-
:.;.   of the selections given the prev-
■   onlng due to so many requests
being made. Tht' second evening more
Welsh selections were also given.
While the Welsh Choir were in the
city Mr. Bert Turner had the pleasure of renewing acquaintance with
Robert and Edward Hopkins, mem*
bera of the choir, with whom Mr. Tur-
ner was in association in choir work
in the Old Country.
Friday night the members of the
Welsh choir were entertained at the
li ■ of Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Paterson, when a very pleasant time was
spent. Saturday night, after the
performance, a number of the thoir
category, but il being Quebec night, the :holr [a   a   soloist, u
he could not let the occasion  pas- possible auch a range of off)
without calling the attention of thejfewchol - ean i    ant.
lodge to the names of citizens of j    Th.- tenon  wore Stephoi   ■'
Terrebonne who had made names for and Sydu.y Charles, with \
themselves in our national  political, tured, delicate and true.
affair
Te*reb'
-.ore public
Hopkins, baritone, in "I Wei a
Rose," snng with emphasis und skill.
His voice is warmly cohretl and melodious. Edward Hopkins has a baritone softness of quality in his bass
voice, and sang with splendid dramatic appreciation, "The Voice oi" the
Storm." David Rees, bass, made his
bow in a Handel number, which he
gave a musicianly interpretation, in
B mellow, roundeti voice.
The duets included a clever tenor
ment. The speaker also made refer-1 and baritone piece that lent a touch
ence to the great pulp mills and fac- of ItghtneM to the program, and yet
tories of the province and the number .served to display skill and sympathy
of men thnt they employed, the An-1 on the part of the singers, A cer-
gus shops alone employing more thnn tain fine youthful verve, n nicety of
three times the population of Crnn-' shading, a deep sensi
brook.
had      pro-
any one
other city. First there wr Adolphe
Chapleau, a most eloquent and pleasing orator, and first lieutenant of Sir
John A. Macdonald, the Massons
the Desjardins, the Forgets, and
others. Terrebonne had produced
three lieutennnt-jrovornors. two provincial premiers, seven federal ministers, two leading financiers of the
country nml eight members of parlia
Thc next big item on the Native
Sons program is the Ontario program, which the soiim of that province will put nn next week, December 3rd.
thered »t the home of Mr. and Mrs.
f the emotion- Norgrove, where needless to say, an-
I admirably restrained, and a awing- other good time was had. David
Ing rhythm thai permits twelve men Roea, bass soloist of tho chotr,
to sing as one — these are the things brought greetings to Mr. Norgrove
thai mako tin- choir a delight and from a brother, of whom he is a
u MttlfacUon to heart and intellect, next door neighbor in Mardy, Ola-
Kmhii JonSS, A.K.C.M., nl the pi- morgnnshire, South Wales. tk*a two
THI  CoUHBROOK  H1UU
Friday, November 28th, 19*1
.  - J
Ba    te.
5f
INTERESTING ITEMS CONCERNING HAPPENINGS IN AND ABOUT THE BUSY TOWNS ON THE NORTH BRANCH, WHERE MINING, LUMBERING AND FARMING INTERESTS ARE SUPREME
Shipping Concentrates to Montana
In addition to the usual heavy shipments of leatl and zinc concentrates
which are being mnde from tho Sullivan mine to the Trail smelter, and
10,000 or 15,000 tons of zinc concentrates shipped to the const
for water transport to Antwerp, Belgium, concentrates are also going
east to u new market, this time to
the smelter of the Anaconad Copper
Company, nt Black Kagle, .Montana.
The shipments are going by way of
the Crow's Nest and Coutts, Alberta,
llllllllHllltllllllillllllUlllllllllllltllllllllllllltllllllllllMltllllllllltltKlllll
I     KIMBERLEY
I      MEAT  MARKET
i
|
"GOOD   MORNING,   Mrs. |
Crown.     Can wc send you 1
up a Nice Steak today?"      a
□
WE CAN RECOMMEND IT    |
6
or our
FRESH HOMEMADE    j
SAUSAGE 1
All   orders   called   for   are |
carefully filled and delivered I
BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, §
■ nd  LARD   alway.   in   Stock |
SWIFT'S    PREMIUM HAMS |
and BACON .*
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THE GLEN
KIMBERLEY, B.C.
KIMBERLEY'S
LEADING CAFE
FIRST CLASS SERVICE
OPEN AT ALL HOURS
TABLES  RESERVED  FOR
LADIES
Your   Patronage   Is   Solicited
"I
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Morrison & Burke
Dealen In Co*! and Wood
TB1X8FEB WORK DONE
Tell your triree and till -four
Mull
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**************************
!   KIM BERLEY   I
f NEWS NOTES  1
* * * * * * * * * * * •'• '•' "'•' '•' * '*■' '■' '•'"»' * *•" *** v '** '■'
Mr. J. D. McBride, formerly ol
Cranbrook, but now of Loa Angeles,
Cal., was a town visitor on Wednesday.
Before deciding on tfiai new build-
lug or tliat repair work* see Geo. It.
Leask, the IMoneor Builder of Kim
berley and Cranbrook. ISt
Mr. E, Stromberg, who waa killed
at tho Tunnel on Wednesday morning, was burled In Cranbrooh on Sunday, under thc ausplcoe of the K.I',
Lodge. A largo number of citizens
from Kimherley attended to pay
their last respects, Mr, Stromberg
had lived in Kimberley for a number
of years, coming from Alberta, nnd
was well and favorably known and a
rospected citizen.
Hh-s. Boyd Caldwell entertained a
number of her friends on Friday
evening at her new home on Howard
Street.
List your property with Martin
Bros.     ' 28tf
Mr. McDonald and Mr. Bob Stratum, mining inspectors, wire in town
on Thursday.
Coroner Dr. G. K. L, MacKinnon,
of Cranbrook, was in town on Thursday.
Mrs. Alex Chlsholm arrived in
town on Saturday to join her husband, aud they will make their homo
in  Kimberley.     Mr.  Chlsholm  is  an
old-timer in Kimbeley.
Messrs. Woodlock and Rutherford
have opened up their new plnce of
business next to the Glen Cafe.
Dr. Wilson Herald, ear, nose,
and throat specialist, has been detained, but will be in Kimberley on
the afternoons of December 2nd and
dth and can be consulted at the Kimberley hospital. 40
Mr. C. Morrison has put in n new
plate gloss front to his store and the
Improvement certainly adds to the
apparance of the place,
Mr. V. Z. Manning, school inspector, visited the superior school on
Tuesday aud also took in thc social
given by the Elks on Monday evening.
Be at the Shrine Club Dance, Friday, November 28 th, Auditorium
Hall, Cranbrook. Secure tickets from
your Shrine friends or at the hall
door. This will be thc event of the
season. 38
When You Think of Insurance
— Call Up —
BEALE & ELWELL
Cranbrook & Kimberley
Sola Agents for KImherley Townsite.
MARTIN BROS. PAY FOR ASHESI
Better see them and get a fire in-
uranco policy in a strong Board
Company, before your turn comes toj
check up your ashes. Phone 14, |
Cranbro.de, B.C. 82tf
Mr. Charlie Harts left on Monday
for Spokane, where he will spend thej
next few days.
Mr. M. A. Beale was in town on
Thursday.
C, A. Foote was in Cranbrook on
Thursday evening and while there
attended   the  Quebec  night  of  the
Native Sons.
Mr. Granl Hall, one of the C.P.U.
officials, waa in Kimberley on Friday,
coming in his private car.
Mr. Jack Tuylor was in town on
Monday.
Dr, and Mis, F. \V. Green of Crnnbrook, were in town ou Friday night.
The Catholic ladies gave a social
dance on Friday night, and as usual
a very pleasant evening was spent by
all. Mrs. Holland won the prize at
thc whist drive.
A number of Kimberley young ladies were out on a tagging expedition
on Saturday, the proceeds to go towards the Christmas Tree for the
children. From all reports collections were gootl.
The picture given on Monday evening at the Orpheum Theatre, in aid
of the Union Church, was a huge
success. Tbe hall was crowded. The
Chinese 1'hantasy was a very pleasing
feature' of the evening. The members
of the chureh wish to thank all those
who helped to make thc evening a
success.
Mr. W. M. Archibald of the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. was
a Kimberley visitor on Friday and
Saturday.
Mr. Dan Cameron returned to town
last week, having spent four months
In the Eastern Provinces.
The Elks whist driven nnd dance
on Monday night was well attended
and a very pleasant evening wns had
by all. Mrs. P. Murphy won first
prize at the card tables, and Mr. C.
Ilarnard carried off gent's first. The
consolation prizes went respectively
to Mrs. Dr. Itice and J. McDonald.
(Received too late for last week)
The benefit dance last Friday night
was a great success in every way.
There was a good crowd and splendid
music.
The many friends of Mrs. Halpln
will be pleased to know she is home
again; greatly improved in health.
Mr. Simmons of Vernon, B.C., is
relieving at the Hank of Montreal.
Koseberry Surprise, Three Forks,
B.C., (zinc)) 29
Silversmith, Sandon B.C.,  (lead)  88
Company Mines   11,3511
SHIPMENTS OF ORE
RECEIVED AT THE
TRAIL SMELTER
Following ii ii Btatoment of ore
received at tho Trail Smelter for the
poriod Novombor 1st to Ttli inclusive-:
Name of Mine and Locality Tons
Cork Province, Zwicky, B.C., (pb) ill
Greenwood Smoltor, Groonwood,
B.C.,  110
Knobhlll, Republic, Wnsh., .   .... 117
Lucky Thought, Silverton, B.C.,
(pb)   .'If.
Molly HughoB, Now Denver, B.C.,    5
Ottawa, Slocm City, B.C.,   8
Paradise, Lulu- Windermere, B.C., -is
Queen Bess, Alamo, B.C., 85
Ruth, Sandon. B.C.,     -4*4
Silversmith, Sandon, B.C., (pb) .. HO
(zn) 104
Standard, Silverton, B.C., (pb) ....*M
(zn) .... 11-1
Van Roi, Silverton, B.C., (2n) .... 50
Company Mines 885S
Total
0,64b
For the period November 7th to
Mtli inclusive:
Standard, Silverton, B.C., (zn) .. . 50
Silversmith, Sandon, B.C., (211) .... 51
Lucky Thought, Silverton, B.C.,
(zn) .... 46
Knobhlll, Republic, Wash., (dry) 117
White Cat, lnvermere, B.C., (lend) 7
Central, Taghum, B.C., (copper .... ii
Company Mines   6,370
Total .
. 6,640
Knitting Up and Down
(True child anecdote from a Kimberley Correspondent)
"Say, mamma, are you knitting Sil-
verburst?"
"No, dear, ".Monarch Down."
Five minutes later a sleepy voice
from tiie bedroom said, I rather knit
"Monarch Up," mamma.
period November 16 to 21 inclusive.
Bell, Beaverdell, B.C., 47
Central, Taflium, B.C.,   8
Galena Farm, Silverton, B.C., (pb) 10
(zn)     25
Knobhiil, Republic, Wash.,   1)49
Providence, Greenwood, B.C 30
ffff.
KIMBERLEY     £
JEWELRY STORE*;
KIMBERLEY
B.C.
Six Crates New China Just
Opened Up
And priced Most Reasonably
Six Shipments Fine Jewelry f
Just Received S
Make Your Selections Early j
oVffffffffffffffffffffffff
**************************
I
For SERVICE —STOP J
at the
Dr. L. G. Rice
DENTIST
Office —
Over Kimberley Hardware
KIMBERLEY,    -    B.C.
Garasre
Kimberley's Leading Oil,
Gasoline and General
Service Station.        i
COMMODIOUS STORAOE 5
— 24 HOUR SERVICE —  j
Brown & Sutherland    j
PROPRIETORS J
i **************************
BURT WALLACE'S
-- and -
HAS
MADE
HIM
FAMOUS!
Just Try His COFFEE, CAKES and PORK PIES —
and you will agree with us.
-TRY OUR ELECTRIC BREAD —
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OUR WEEK-END SPECIALS
R0Y4L CAFE AND ROOMS
KIMBERLEY,   B.C.
If you wish Rooms that are Clean and Comfortable
TRY THE ROYAL
Our Cafe for Service and Excellent
Cooking   is   IWwrpassed
ICE CREAM IN SEASQN    -    •      CHOCOLATES
FRUITS   -   TOBACCONISTS
■i«VWAMItWW^WWWVWVVS«^WbW^V\W-^VAV.VAV.^V.".',".v.'
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
of Canada, Limited.
OFFICES, SMELTING AND REFINING DEPARTMENT
TRAIL,   BRITISH COI.UAIBIA
SMELTERS AND  REFINERS
Purchasers of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead and /.ine Ores
Producers ol Oold, Silver, Copper, 1'in Lead and /.im
"TADANAC" BRAND
WILL BE
REAL BARGAINS
Boiling Beef
Pot Roasl Beef
Stewing Veal
Veal Roast
Sc to 8c per Ib.
-     8c, 10c and 12'/* Ib.
3 lbs. for 25c
12Jic, 15c, 18e aad 20c lb.
Beef By The Quarter
TRIANGLE 8cperlb.
FORES      -      -       -       -       .      -8c per lb.
HINDS 13c per Ib.
P BURNS & Co. Ltd
KIMBERLEY, B.C.
Total
8,1130
*****************************************************-
FORD OR
PACKARD
WYCLIFFE NOTES '.
The keepers nf tho boar mascot had
tho misfortune lo bo lulled into court
luil Wednesday nn tin- ehargfl (>r
keeping said boar without a permit
entitling thorn to Ho ho. Tlu- affair
whs aired in tho Dally News, (Nelson)
bul the Eacts of the cftao were not
Minted,- As it happened neither ono
knew the law in thin respect, nor did
anyone else lu town as fur ob we
know, so it was just n cam1 of breaking the law unintentionally] therefore, when over a month nfter the
eapturo, the heavy hand of the law
fell, everyone wns astonished and surprised. Truly, the name laws are administered in a peculiar style in this
district. With regard to the present
bird season, the writer knows, and has
commented on in this column previously, the fact that duck -shooting
was started before the season opened
officially; that prairie chicken were
shot; that shooting at various places
was started before daybreak and continued long after sunset; that pump
guns were used in this district, and
other infractions of the law. The
aforesaid heavy hand failed to descend in these eases, which were flagrant enough, practically every hunter in the district knowing of them—
but managed to locate the bear and
the unsuspecting lawbreakers.
J. D. Brackett, of Cranbrook, was
a business visitor on Wednesday last.
J. Coutts, of Lethbridge, representing the Northwestern Rubber Co.
was in town on Wednesday.
Mr. W. RudellTrfected the transfer of his stock from his ranch north
of Edmonton, Alta., to the O. Crosby
ranch hei'6 on Wednesday. Mrs. Ru-
dell ami family arrived on Saturday
of last week.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Frederickson entertained several friends at a dinner
party on Wednesday last.
C. O. Staples made a flying trip to i
Fernie on Thursday last, returning on j
Sunday.
s-l
JEtaB
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socialist debate. Immediately he
thought of Moscow, or Ramsay Macdonald back in "Glesca." But some
radio dope is of tho stuff that dreams
aro made of, and investigation
brought the exultant fan right back
to the First Presbyterian Church in
Vancouver!   Such is the radio.
Mr. and Mrs. J, Anderson and little daughter Annette left for southern Idaho on Wednesday of last week,
where Mr. Anderson will take over
the management of a large farm bequeathed him on the death of his
uncle.
Yet another matrimonial knot is
to be tied in Wycliffe. The band instruments have been carefully preserved since the last meeting, altho'
n saw or two have been mislaid; nevertheless the serenade will take
place,
BORN—To MrTaml Mrs. A. F.
Charters, on Sal unlay, November
22nd, a daughter.
The dance held at the cluh on Saturday night produced an unexpectedly large at tendance; the orchestra
proved to have the right idea of
syncopation; the floor wns good, ns
usual, and the eats likewise. Thus
everyone who attended claims an enjoyable time at the first dance sponsored by the newly formed entertainment committee.
Local radio fans nre endeavoring
to tune in on tho distance tests that
are being cnrried out by all the
broadcasting stations in the United
States and Canada in an attempt to
pick up F.urope, I'orto Hico or tlie
Hawaiian Islands. So far there has
been no success reported, although
this week's prize joke is related of
himself by one (tf the Incal operatnrs.
In trying to tune iu on any program
that might be coming from over the
pond, he found himself listening In a
DAN'S TAXI
Stand;   WYCLIFFE  HOTEL
— Trips Anywhere —
— Prices Reasonable —
Special  Trips  Arranged
Can for Hire with or Without
Driver
W.  W.  PARNELL
PLASTERER
Lathing & Chimney Building
Fire Places
ROOM 2
DIMOR'S
t  * ■■*—i  *  ,—t  t  *  t—►—•—t-
S. R. WORMINGTON
— Painter —
KIMBERLEY   -   B.C.
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:j KIMBERLEY        :|
$ ATHLETIC and SOCIAL?
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I :   Kimberley, B.C.   :    >.
5    Under the Management of   5
$ J. LOMBARD! jj
t   Everybody Made Wei-   j
5 come. £
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A. Johnson
Mens' Furnisher
HOOTS AMI SHOES
Suit Cases nml Trunks
OVIHAI.I.S
Bootf and SI ner. N-Mtt? Repaired
(live —
MY VALET
A Trial
If Kill CLASS LAUNDRY
— Dry Cleaning ■& Prelsing —
Near Saili & Door Co. Office
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NEW YORK
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Kimberley, B.C.
Spokane Street
ROOA1S ARE CLEAN
and COMFORTABLE
— Hot and Cold Water —
CAFE IN CONNECTION
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CUT DOWN WINTER COAL BILLS.   Add
to the comfort of your home.   Install storm
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Fix all roofs,
— Be Prepared When Winter Comes —
We can supply you now with the needed
materials so you can do the work during \
Friday, November 28th, 1924
TMX  CBAHBROOI   HKHJJLB
PAflE     THREE
^wwwvwvwwwww^wwwwvw
THE
COLUMBIA FROM ITS SOURCE
IN A CANOE
Auspicious Start to Long Trip  Made  By  Intrepid
Traveller
(By li. G. Hamilton, lnvermere, B.C.)
its glory for the moment has departed but Ba a memento of the police
visit, at any rate, there still remains
tiie house of the commandant nnd the
old orderly room, with the harness
room at the back. Il was interesting
to visit this harness room anil to see
lbe rack for each saddle, with the
trooper's number above it, troopers
in many caaOB who have long since
bad Iheir "lasl post."
Burg gave me a favorable impres-
Isoti from tlie starl wiih his easy par-
sonallty, bul I was doubtful of his
ability tn
through tl
per Collin
By chance my work of historical
research covering tiie Windermere
District of British Columbia took me
down to Cranbrook, a little to (he
south of my field of exploration on
the 22nd of October. There, as a
complete stranger, I met Mr. Amos
Burn, Jr., uf Portland, Orogon, who
informed me that having resolved to
Ko down the Columbia river, "The
Kiver of the Wesl," ho bail made research and ineldontaliy had come
across my name as one of authority
on matters portalnlng io ihe upper
reaches of lhe Columbia. Me follow-
ed this up witli a sporting suggestion
thai, he would tie i;lad lo have me as a
passenger in his olghtoeu foot canoe
for the first log of ihe journoy Irom
Canal Flat on the south to Alhnlmer
on the north, i accepted off-hand
and so my association witli him came
about in his venlursome trip. We left
for thc north by train tlie following
morning he going the long way about
while part of my journey was by ear
to Fort Steele, where we later united
'and proceeded together t > Canal Flat
ECHOES OF THE PAST
My stny at Fort Steele gave mc an
opportunity for further examination
of points of interest about there. Under one name or another this locality
has been one of the strategic points
of East Kootenay. It is situated at
thc junction of Wild Horse Creek and
the Kootenay river. Here in 18(14,
miners from the worked-out hand
placer fields of California and other
parts of the Western States, met on
the trail to cross the Kootenay river
by Galbraith's Ferry to the alluring
claims of Willi Horse Creek, some
six miles up-stream. Here in 1887
the Mounted police, 'D' Company,
80 strong, under thc late Major-General Sir Sam Steele, hut} been posted
for a whole year to hold in check any
possible disturbance amongst the local Indians. Then, the settlement
was known as Galbraith's Ferry, after
the merchant brother? established
there, but with the establishment of
the police detachment there tiie place
was  re-named  Fort Steele.    To-day
who in  1882 had taken It up as a we passed en route, and as
Lift Off-Mo Pain!
Does'nt hurt one bit! Drop a Utile "PreOBOne" on an aching coin, instantly that corn stnps hurting, then
shortly you lift it right off with fingers.
Vour druggist sells a liny bottle of
"Freezone" for a few cent:
to remo'
or corn between Ihe iocs, nnd the foot,long sweeping    fields    of    the    Arm-
eallouses.  without lorenesa or Irrita-   Btrong   range,   called   after   the   late
lion. Captain Frances Patrick Armstrong,
ale his IS foot skiff
gii wators of the up-
lUCh as Surprise rapids, Death rapids, and Innumerable
other  places  of  white  water. At
Canal Flat wo took the canoe off tho
train, and afler launching her in the
Canal near lo the northern lock made
her fast foi" the night preparatory to
a start as goon after photographic
time as possible in the morning,
A GOOD SEND-OFF
Time was given to examine the
lock und the excavation which had
marked the canal, a wide diteh joining the higher waters of the Kootenay river across the mile antl a quarter stretch of land with the headwn-
ters of the Columbia. "Tho Canal,"
poor old thing. It bail been only used
once, and then a hout was brought
through by the late Captain F. P.
Armstrong with difficulty. It is a
wide ditch, possibly ten feet in depth,
constructed through the promoting
powers of the late Baillie-Grohman;
built by Chinese labor in the main.
It has two huge locks, constructed of
wood which were meant to control
the passage of the water. Both of
these are now ruins and the water is
held in check by a low earthen dam
across thc bed of the canal.
Next morning we were off. All
the settlement was down to see the
auspicious start, that is, all who were
home at the time, and a few casual
visitors. One and all, collectively and
individually we were photographed,
partly for the pleasure of the thing,
partly no doubt in the hope of some
day coming into prominence on account of the importance of the occasion when if the trip were run successfully we might be reproduced in
a photographic cut in a world-wide
magazine.
At any rate, wiih loud cheers from
the few assembled we were off down
i the waters of the canal towards Co-
jlmnbia Lake. This part of the journey was uneventful save for the paa-
jsing of obstructions placed across the
water with (he purpose evidently of
stopping  nny  unfortunate   fish  who
jmight wander lhat far.
; Burg showed his seafaring ability
from (he start by donning a pair of
hip rubber boots to protect himself
when it was necessary to push over
the shahllow parts of the embryonic
river. Hewn the stream we went and
out into Columbia I.ake. A fresh
win,! was whipping up quite a sea out
the shallows Which characterize the
southern end of the lake so we hug-
ged ihe western shore, being careful
nol to make short cuts across the
bays either. The scenery was grand
but the day was not of the best.
First we sighted tbe n mains, on thel
vs, i -huve, ui thc old Thunder Hill!
nine concentrator - this is replete
Later I
. sufficient  with mining adventure-history,
! every bard COW, SOfl corn, ■ OH,  uu   lho eastern   nldfl   WO saw the
When Stomach "Rebels"
Instantly!   End Indigestion, (las, Heartburn, Acidity
Correct your digestion ami quiet
your rebellions stomach by eating a
few tablets of Pape's IMapopsin —any
timet Nothing else relieves the distress of Indigestion, Gasses, Heartburn, Flatulence, Bloating or Acidity
so promptly — besides, the relief is
pleasant und harmless,
Millions know the magic of 'Tape's
Diapepsin," and always keep it handy
to reinforce the digestion, should
they eat too much or ent something
which does not ngre with them. CO
cent packages guaranteed by druggists everywhere.
MINARD'S LINIMENT
King of Pain
Jkt old nlitibk ttmrdjjiH Hhtumuliim imj N,-ural[ia, Snrr Hroal, Sfraim, Sim
Sinllitit nf nny iatl ami ilruiiti
REMKVEI) THK PAIN
Ml« Ruth T.itltlnKtoii, 12 Tr-ilalKir Sl„ St TNi>m.i«, Ont. "My urnnilmother wai
Mllijwttu thru mitt i-.ni mid ti-Jil In cill nie (rom my -jihymiili's i<> jjti to ijipdnig.
K' )• tU|rt Miiunl'i Ijnililiiil,   I wji ulti-n 'in.,lliiit  in.l .1*    u,.( I K.ili.) lim i.M ilull,
1 I «.inli>un.lcullni«,i.*.limj.. | Rolii.m .|.n. Orimlmi ,.m\t *illi Hi- I mini, til j,-l
■liflHIt t-nyht'-l'-trHtriirrri'iiiii-'iiiitiTi   n lnlli u iiiilittyllfllhrcwllhlplll
Mioard's  Liniment  Company
Limited
YARMOUTH NOVA SCOTIA
farming proposition, Long before
Captain Armstrong had thought of
them these fields had, by Rev. Father
P. J. DeSmet, S.J., been called the
Plains of the Nativity, this in 1845,
on his passage from the quiet Indians
of the Pend D'Oreille to the warlike
Btackfeet of the plains. Faint traces
could be seen even from that distance
of the old Indian pack trail which
later became the first avenue of travel for whiskey peddlers and traders
coining from Bonners Ferry, Idaho,
up to the main tine construction
camps of the Canadian Pacific Railway. Had we been able to go closer
and examine the ground we would
have found pro-historic remains such
as cairns, pictographs and pieces of
flint work.
MORE HISTORIC LANDMARKS
Towards the southern end of the
lake we crossed to the eastern side
in order to reach the channel. My,
how the wind did blow—almost as
wickedly as on Lac St. Pierre—but
we got over after shipping water and
being plentifully wetted from stem
to stern. On the other side we
beached the canoe and wrung out our
garments to half dry while the skipper wrote up his log. The wind was
still blowing big guns and a walk
along the beach to a secluded bay
showed thousands of wild ducks aud
a flock of wild geese in shelter. Thi
part has in years of the past been
favorite feeding and breeding place
of these birdB hut constant shooting
by parties from all manner of distances is making them gun-shy, especially the Canada goose, of which not
many were visible.
Over on the western side again
could easily be seen the turreted
walls, the yellow gumbo ruins of
"The Hoodoos" which mark the hanks
of Dutch Creek. Dutch Creek, by
the way, is the first main tributary
which enters the Columbia after the
passing of the source. On thc shore
ut the mouth of the creek could be
seen the ruins of the old wharf and
the landing for the tramway which
here had its southern terminus in the
days when an enterprising company
undertook to carry passengers and
freight through from Golden to Canal
Flat. The other end of the tramway is on Mud Lake, several miles
north.
The whole of the northern end of
Columbia Lake was shallow and covered with long reeds, a heavy sea was
running through them at the time
of passing so we daundered on. The
river leaves the lake near to its north
eastern corner and the portal is
guarded by a high cliff of rock. The
river takes form at once and runs at
a swift rate out of thc lake, this
varying according to lhe time of the
year both in pace ami quantity. A
short distance down and little riffles
ruffled the face of the water. On
making a turn we came across the
upper works of the S.S. Armstrong.
She lay in a heap, much awry, on the
eastern hank, apparently landed
there by high water, possibly having
floated own herself to that point,
Tho Armstrong, too. has a history.
She is the last propelled craft of the
teamer type to go under her
own power from Golden through to
the Columbia Lake. Brought up to
that point in l'.'1-l by Captain John
Hlakeley, she was used by her owners, Messrs. Burns & Jordan, contractors, of Spokane. Washington,
for the Kootenav Central branch of
thc Canadian Pacific Railway, in
conveying material along the shore
(tf the lake. The work being finished she wns tied to the shore and
there no doubt she remained until
her cables parted and she became a
derelict.
It was at this point of navigating
thai Burg showed his knowledge
which was to carry him through. The
passenger sat in the bow, and under
the direction of Burg as captain,
learned how to shout such directions
as "port your helm"; "hard a starboard;" or with an imaginary heaving of lead, to call out "one foot on
the port bow, eight inches" or, In
terms quite well understood, "bar
dead ahead." The oars had been
laid aside, and the captain, well up
in the poop at the stern was directing the frainl craft us the current
carried her.
ON TO MUD LAKE
The first bridge to cross the Columbia river, wan reached at one in
the afternoon, nnd here the voya-
geurs were met by Mr. Hartinnn. the
manager of the Holland estate of
Fairmont, who took them by automobile to headquarters, where they
were wined and dined and shown the
beauties aud wonders of the famous
Fairmont Hot Springs, springs noted in the early history of the Valley
as having medicinal properties, and
later named after Mrs. John Gal-
braith after her old home in the
Eastern States. After lunch the return journey was made to the craft.
Her nose was shoved into the stream,
a few more photographs taken and
then we cast off. This part of the
journey is more pleasant going down
at this time of the year, than going
up at any time or going down in high
water. It was quite possible to make
way without any serious inconvenience. The snags which hide their
heuds in high water waiting surreptitiously to rip a hole in any frail
craft, now hold their heads aloft,
and thc backwash under shelving
banks, such as is common to high water, had givon place to dry gravel
bars. The stream, for that is about
all the great Columbia la here, is
swift, harmlesa and burbling. Duck*,
travelling with the wind, and travelling rapidly, they rose towards us
and passed lowly over our heads.
Presently the first stretch of
the river was ended and we began
the entrance to Mud Luke. It is well
named. It is a small body of water
but very shallow and very weedy,
and having many rushes. The course
for the navigator is across to its
north-west side, where hugging up
closely to the right of way of the
railway, the lake passes out and becomes the river once more. This
part is locally called "thc channel."
Well it might be. It is a glorious
course about forty feet in width bordered on either side liy thick-growing trees. At intervals through
these again may be seen the wide
open expanses of sloughs on either
side. The flow is very slow, the water a greenish mud color, and as one
■lidos along on its surface it is easy
o imagine the thoughts of David
Thompson who wus possibly the first
and one of the few fur traders who
ever went over the course iu a canoe.
As far as can be seen from thc craft
those few miles are still in their pri
mitive state. Muskrats swam to and
fro across the channel, a horned owl
perched in the fading afternoon on a
near-by bough, two blue herons r
from the bank to wing tlieir way to
the outer slough, while a fish-
hawk's nest stood as a sentinel where
the waters of the channel gradually
spread them selves out on to the shallow flats of the southern end of Windermere Lake. Here lhc lake is all
filling up with weeds, aud judging
from cursory glimpses in the twilight
see.ms to bc filling up with silt from
the heavily laden waters, of the river.
It was just twilight when we entered
tho lake nud the breeze had again
freshened so there was a choppy sea
on the shallows. Thc lake is about
nine miles long but liy the unhappy
process of having to hug the shore
or make jsig zng courses this distance was considerably lengthened.
In this neck of the mountains thore
is but a short time between twilight
and darkness so though the captain
pulled a strong oar we had not gone
far before the barest outlines of the
high hills were visible on either side
of the lake. The lookout had now
taken the padlde as a helm and was
making a straight course down the
center of the lake reciting to his
partner the words of Sir Humphrey
Gilbert, who before the Golden Hind
made her plunge to the bottom, was
heard to remark, "We are as near tn
heaven by sea as by land." This
might be all right for the passenger,
but as Captain Burg had an ambition
to go the whole length of the river
his orders constantly were issued to
put the helm around and make for
the lee shore. It was heavy rowing
and as the night closed in the hills
gradually faded away until nothing
was to be seen save the white crest
of each wave as it broke under the
stern.
At last, a faint flicker, which was
taken to be from the village of Windermere was seen away over off the
port bow, but then the constantly
intervening trees on a far stretching
point hid the light betimes. At last
the point was weathered and the
brightly lit buildings were passed as
the craft was slowly propelled
through the rough sea at the mouth
of the bay. In daylight this bay
mouth looks narrow hut in the night
season, labouring iu the sea its width
seemed Interminable, Barely beyond
it, ami as a beacon light on a far off
shore there was picked up tho beams
which came from the library light
of Mr. James Sinclair, one of the
benchers, who resides at least a good
five miles from the spot in a bee line
but away up uloft. It was long after this that Invermere's flickers appeared ami then finally the dim
lights of the port of Athalmer. Presently and lnvermere was abeam.
Some more hard pulling, some two
thousand strokes thc log showed,
and the piles which marked the old
boat channel leading to the river outlet appeared dimly in the night. The
old breakwater was passed far over
on our left and with long, sweeping,
but weary strokes llurg brought his
little croft in the running waters of
the Columbia) a few strokes more and
the craft was beached for the night
d the first leg of the journey had
become local history. The journey,
which the log showed to he about
fifty miles, wns ended; begun at K.20
a.m. elided at EL80 p.m. was the official entry.
On lo Golden
That night Burg remained ni lnvermere and delayed his journey until noon the next day before starting
on the lap which was to end in Golden, some hundred miles furtlier
down the river. This he wns to make
alone, but given reasonable weather
no hardship could possibly come as
the stream is unruffled nil thc way.
There are settlers along the way
from whom help could be had, and
feathered game on the water to provide a livelihood. Not in the least
troubled about that part of the journey we bid him goodby the morning
following his arrival and commended
him to God speed and care of our
friends in Golden. The passage has
long since been run by Burg, not
only from here to Golden but more
dreadful still from Golden around
the Big Bend and into Revelstoke
nnd possibly before this reaches him
he will bc well toward his owu home
town of Portland.
This journey by Burg Ib not the
tint mt ita claaa whicb baa bean auc-
E
ner
in jfryd
A DA ILY cup of FRY'S Cocoa
will do wonders in giving that
ener^yoi hodyand clearness of mind,
you need for a  good   day's work.
To read the analysis of FRY'S Cocoa is
readily to believe the claims of Dr. Andrew
Wilson, KR.S.E., Dr. Kobt. Hutchison
and man;.' other scientists, that it is thc
nearest thirt* to "liquid energy" that exists
in the worla tO«day. Food for every department of llu' human body, and Nature's
kindliest stimulant (or heart ond nerve-
theobromine - is found in FRY'S, Tea
and coffee are mere Uavours but FRY'S
is a complete food.
FRY'S has thai delicate "chocolaty"
flavour  that  comes only from  a
blend of the c
and   tlie expel
lOiceSl eoeoa  beans
ience of  20U >cnrs.
Remember: "Nothing will do but FRFS*"
ccssfully made hiasfur as around the
Big Bend is concerned. Many, on
the other hand, have tried it and met
with failure, and sad to relate, in
some cases have left their bones in
some of the swift rapids which they
trove to run. Many, and nearly
every one of the strong rapids can
tell of its victims. The route from
the Bout Encampment to the south
was for many years the main artery
north nnd south from Fort Vancouver
to Rocky Mountain House to outlying
depots. From Golden to Canoe river
is different und hies never been so
much traversed. Many cases are on
record of people having ascended,
coming this way but it is not so
fraught with danger.
The round trip form Canal Flat to
Astoria has been made in its entirety
at least once before, that being by
Mr. M. J. Lorraine, of Alhambru,
California, who built a 17-foot skiff
at Canal Flat, and by himself went
through to Astoria. The trip took
him some five months in all. On
the way he made careful observations
and has now published them in a
book of some 4.'t5 pages, telling all
about it. Thc book is fully illustrated. He is the first known man to
have made the continuous trip, and
if Burg is successful the young navigator will have to his credit the fact
that he is the second to do this perilous trip.
Scout  Renchea  Mountains
Round-tho-world   hikers   have   become  so  common   that   they  attract
little attention as a rule.    An exception happened during the week, however, when a young "Excelsior" appeared on the scene, and despite the
recent fall of snow, was determined
to attempt the trail    from here    to
Hope.    He left  Princeton  with his
horse, which is made t" serve in the
double capacity of pack ami saddle,
on Sunduy afternoon,   and    opil
among experienced trail me!
about equally divided as to his chan-(
ces of getting through.   Bstitnati I '-:'
the depth of snow at the summit vary
from two to four feet, in any ea.-e ir
would effectually obliterate the trail:
and render the course difficult I    :" ..-
low.   This in addition to the hardship
of wading through such a depth of
loose snow, especially to n:it- who has |
never had any experience in that line, j
The fact that up to the present time!
the young man has not returned to
Princeton would  indicate that he is]
pushing on.    The name of this hardy'
(or foolhardy) youth is Helmer Stub.;
—Princeton Star.
recognise the possiblity thnt Ontario
may, within the lifetime of this generation, become the centre of one of
the irrcatest metal mining industries
En the world," stats the Londan "Statist," and the London "Financial
New*" follows this up with the ob-
"Look at the number of
ntatlves of the big London
Ri : • ■ Ial houses in the Dominion examining and reporting on the discoveries of prospectors in all parts of
Canada, and especially in Ontario and
«
W ALL
e\\Hofting
JiM
V.
Toronto.—Even  the moat conservative mining element is beginning t.j
*♦♦**♦♦**++*•>*•:
+
♦*♦♦♦♦ v -> V ♦ * *
DECEMBER ROD AND £
GUN MORE THAN COM-   I
UP TO THE MARK j |
Brimful of interest to every sports- ,J
man is the December issue of Rod.*
and Gun in Canada. Two especially!*
good stories appear in thc first sec-1 *
tion. I've Wandered In The Village, | *
Tom, by Geo. R. Helton, will touch a
chord of sympathy in everyone who
has returned to the home town after
years of absence. The Yellow Mink
is a thrilling mystery story in Will H.
Moore's best style. Bonnycastle Dale
upholds his reputation as a writer of
very interesting wild animal and wild
bird stories in The Canada Grouse.
Queer Ducks, by J, W. Winson, the
last of his series of duck stories, is
decidedly one of the best. It contains
information on the subject of these
wild fowl not often available. F, V.
Williams and Martin Hunter, other
regular contributors, hnve stories
that are worthy of their previous
ones. Besides other interesting and
instructive articles, the regular tie-
partments nre all up to the mark.
Guns and Ammunition comprises a
number of extremely interesting articles on n variety of subjects. In
addition to these features the winners
of the $&00 photo contest, which has
aroused such universal interest, are
announced in this issue.
w
%
The kP.frot and Best
Family Medicine
GIRLS! HAIR GROWS
THICK AND BEAUTIFUL
:c "Dandcrine"  Does  Wonders
for Liu-less, Neglected Hair
TASTY FOODS
Carefully selected — prepared by Cooks who know how
— and served to you in an
appetizing and appealing
way — i-% what yon get when
yon dine with n-. Prompt
and courtous servce,
CLUB CAFE
I'hone J65
•*".
A gleamy mass
of luxuriant hair
full of gloss, lustre and life, quickly follows a
genuine toning
up of neglected
scalps with dependable "Dan*
derine."
Falling hair, itching scalp and tha
dandruff is corrected immediately.
Thin, dry, wispy uz fading hair ia
quickly invigorated, taking on now
strength, color and youthful beauty.
"Danderlne is delightful on the hair;
a refreshing, stimulating tonic—not
**************************  itieky or greasy!   Any drugstore.
THE WEATHER BULLETIN
Official   Thermometer    Readinf.   Al
Cranbrook
Max. Mln.
November 13 23 3
November 14   27        18
November 15  30       24
November 16 38       22
November 17 86       30
November IR 35       20
November 19   41       18
Thawing
. e, ■   —•—
Knittint Up and Down
(True child anecdote from a Kimberley Correspondent)
verburst?"
"No, dear, "Monarch Down."
Kivc minutca later a sleepy voice
from tht bedroom laid, I rather knit
'Monarch Up," mamma.
"Soy, mamma, an you kailtiac Sil-i
THE CHRISTMAS BOATS
TO ENGLAND
"ANDANIA" from Halifax, December 8, followed by
The Wonderful Cunarder
"CARMANIA"
(20,000 Tons)
Due To Sail From
HALIFAX TO LIVERPOOL
Calling nt Queenstown
DECEMBER 14th
Due Liverpool about December 21st
Make   Your Reservations  Early Through
Local Agent, or
CUNARD  STEAMSHIP Co., Limited
622 Hastings St. W.,      -    -   -      Vancouver, B.C. PAOE FOUR
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
Friday, November 2Rth, 1924
.fffffffffffffffffff.:
,'fffffffffffffi
Let the G
fffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff,
i De a
or WRIST
WATCH I
POCKE
A solid gold or platinum Wrist Watch, artistically designed,will just make "Her" gasp with [j
excitement and pleasure ever your selection   g
Or, you'll surely male a hit with "Him"   if l\
you present him with one of our fine pocket
timepieces.   So step in.    See the Wrist Watches we've priced al $6.50 to $300.
And the Pocket Watches at $2.00 to $100.
RAWORTH  BROS.
TRY OUR REPAIR DEPARTMENT
,vwffffffffffffffff.:vf.w.v.vff,v."ff^
Appointed Director1   Crossed Atlantic
Canadian Pacific Unafraid
!""""" ' Bllll"mra"»' miNiiiNiiiiniiii irani nt,,,,, „„-, „ ■ „„, „ mmmm
the Cranbrook herald
Publlsheil Every Friday
r A. WILLIAMS - - It. POTTER, U. Sr.
Hubaci-lpUon Price  SS.00 Per Vcnr
To United States  *'■!••")<> Pw Year
Advertising Rates on Application. Change* ot Cory
lor Aclvertlsins ibould be hantleil In not later than Wednesday noon to secure attention.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28th, 1924
A MATTER OF ORGANIZATION
FRUIT GROWERS at Creston were brought face
to face with what seems an anomalous situation lately, when it transpired that tomatoes were
brought all the way from Ontario this summer for
sale in (ranbrook at a price which put them iu competition with thc product from Creston. It is customary to blame such incident- on to disparaging
freight rates, and without question tliey are responsible in some measure, But the mailer of organization also enters largely into it. The entire: fruit
industry of the interior of the province is in a state
of turmoil aud unrest. The unanimity between the
different districts so long sought for in tlie matter
of marketing still seems a long way off, and while
there is this internal strife there can never be efficient marketing, Growers in the east and in the
fruit districts of Washington and California seem to
have emerged from this stage, and are able to function harmoniously in the matter of marketing, tending to a far more thorough distribution ol their
product than thc B.C. growers can hope to obtain
till tliey settle their internal differences.
From an economic standpoint there i- no justification for Ontario fruit coming into Cranbrook-.
when it can be brought from Creston, the West
Kootenay or the Okanagan. but the facl that it is
done indicates that there is something
else besides freight rates to be considered. Creston
growers take no pains to advertise themselves in
this market, and the buyers of fruit al any store in
this city, unless tliey take the pains to examine the
original container, do not know whether the fruit
tliey purchase comes from Creston or the Niagara
peninsula. Perhaps the growers in tins province
feel that since the East Kootenay is so near, that the
people are going to buy B.C. fruit anyway, but such
haphazard guesses never work out. Cranbrook is
directly in the path of the fruit which enters Canada
from Oregon and Washington on ils way to the
prairies, and fruit from cars dropped at Lethbridge
and Calgagry will also naturally find its way to this
city in the course of distribution. If the Creston
growers want the Cranbrook market they must
make themselves felt here as a factor iu the fruit
business, and go after it. All other things being
equal people will buy B.C. fruit first, but if Ontario
or Washington fruit is put handy, the B.C. product
will have to take it*- chance unless it is pushed more
vigorously than its competitors,
*****
WALKING THE STRAIGHT PATH
as to encourage and develop that industry, but rather to hamper it. till today only tlu- larger operators lime tin* stability to carry on with the added
I burdens.
*        *!*        *        *        *
NOTE AND COMMENT
HERE IS MUCH JUBILATION in Liberal circle- over the victory it. West Hastings, where
(ins Porter, former Conservative member, litis banded over the riding to the government, after holding
thc seal fm upwards of twenty years. Ile made
lhe same mistake as Dr, K. C. Macdonald in
North Okanagan recently, nf attempting to pull a
grandiose political stunt lhal the people were not
in sympathy with. Mr. Porter staked his reputation
mi the charges he made against Hon. Jas .Murdock,
in connection wiih money the latter drew from the
lliiiue Bank shortly before its collapse, and when
his charges were nol backed up by a parliamentary
committee, he resigned. Government forces saw
their opportunity, put up the strongest possible candidate, and turned over the necessary number of
vole- lo u,.{ iheir man in. This does not prove that
Mr. Porter wa- right or wrong, but goes to show
llial the elector-, don't much care for grandstand
stuff in politics any more.
rom Our Exchanges
FRASER CaNYON park
The decision of lhc Dominion Government to create
a national park, BOO square miles in extent, with Fraser
Canyon as its center and principal attraction, is another
step in the direction of making Hritish Columbia the playground of tho continent. There are several national parks
in the mountains, some of them in Alberta and some in
i British Columbia, and we have, besides, a number of
provincial park reserves which have been set aside that
the natural beauty of the regions might be preserved unimpaired. But nowhere is there an area which should
appeal more than that which centers around Fraser Can-
' yon.
; The mountains there are not ao high or so majestic
| as in some other sections. But the region has a rugged
beauty, a loneliness and a mystery all its own, while the
tremendous chasm through which the river boils is one of
the scenic wonders of the West. There is a historic interest too, attaching to the section of the river between Yale
and I.ytton, the liniils of the park, for this was the country over which the argonauts poured in the Fraser gold
rush of 1S.jH, and every hill and bar and bunk in the 50
mile stretch, if they could speak would have strange tales
to tell of the lengths to which men will go in their search
for gold.
Not the least of the nttraetions of tlie new park will
be its accessibility. When the trans-provincial highway is
completed, the Canyon will be within easy reach of the
! Coast and the new road itself, in part, at least, a restoration of the old Cariboo trail, is likely, as an engineering
Teal, to add to the interest of the place.—Vancouver
Province.
litis*  UuimiiKiuii  McMmIrI
The recent election of Mr. Koas
Huntington McMastor to be a director of the Canadian Pacific, filling1
the vacancy created on the board
by the death of tlie late Lord
Shaughnessy, is a recognition on
the Company's purl of his long-
proved ability. Mr. MeMaster is
already vice-president and director
of the Steel Company of Canada
and director of the Northern Electric Company, as well as the Canadian Explosives Company. Born
in Montreal in 1SS0, he has lived
practically all his life in that city.
He was educated at the Montreal
High School and Collegiate Institute. His bu-iness career began
with the Sherwin Williams Co., of
whicb he became assistant to tlie
vice-president nnd general manager
in 1807, a posi he held until 1908.
In fhe latter year he was made
assistant to the vice-president and
genera, manager if the- Montreal
Rolling Mills Company. On the
formatini, -if the Steel Company of
Canada he 'vas Rpnointed manager
ut Montreal.
Cranbrook Studio
ll   r.AKliR STREET
Over McCreery Bros. Store
wmdir%kd
Fwmc
liydst
^^sii^i^^.        fig:
Utile   Samuel   Miilynriix   urtUr-t
Avery pathetic figure, as he
stepped off thc Canadian Pacific train, between the comluctoi'
and an official of the department
of immigration, into the noise of
^hunting trains, the confusion of
hurrying express trucks, ami thc
bustle that attends the arrival and
departure of friend.-, Samuel Moly-
neux, 898 Oakwood Avenue, Toronto,
ns the label on his little bag proclaimed him, paused for n moment,
and then, overcome by a sense of
lonllness produced by the loss of his
friends of ship-board antl train,
burst into tears. A second later
he was seized by his mother, from
whom he had been separated for
one and a half of his four years,
and sobbed himself to contentment
in her arms.
Samuel -prune to Canada on the
Mnntclarc, mnking tlie complete trip
from the old land to Toronto by himself. Samuel was a favorite on
ship-board, according tn reports. He
became particularly attached to the
ship's nurse but was the pet of all
the passengers and crew.
tsJS^I) Standard]
" of
EVIDENCES arc not wanting tlmt thc government at Victoria feels keenly its portion in
lacking a clear majority, ami is walking very circumspectly. Where formerly matters were railroaded through high-handedly with thc aid ol" a
majority, now there is a tendency to wait patiently
till the minority groups express their views, since
they must in case of a division he taken into account, This was especially apparent in the discussion uf the proposal of the premier to allow the I'.
G.E. to be put up for sale as occasion offered. The
Conservative amendment was to the effect that any
proposal should he ratified direct hy the legislature,
and should he ou record as such. The premier unbent sufficiently lo make a verbal promise that was
Sufficient to pacify llie smaller groups in the house,
aud so the government sailed safely through the
first rapids it met this session. There is a great deal
more robust and independent criticism being voiced
from the Conservative benches this session, the party obviously feeling its strengthened position
throughout thc province. The local member's voice
has been raised in an insistent criticism that tlie government's policy towards mining has not been such
LIQUOR ADMINISTRATION
The proposal that the authority over the administration of the Liquor Control Act should be vested in the
Legislature, instead of, as now, in the government, might
give the conception that such a change would lead tt) non-
political action, but it does not mean anything of the
kind. What it would mean is that grave and serious
responsibilities would fall on the shoulders of one man
for n period of nearly a year at c time, during which he
would be, in reality, answerable to no one. He would be
only answerable to the legislature' when that body is in
session. It would have the power to review his acts and
to cancel or approve them, but it would not be in a position to prevent regulations being put into force of a
character that might do a great deal of harm.
Tln> v.vw Liquor Commissioner is a wholly unknown
quantity in the matter ol the duties he is now called upon
lo perform. He may prove himself an excellent coinmis-
ilonor when he attunes himself lo u knowledge of what he
has to do and the best thing lo he done, It is quite another thing, however, to say that he should have sole
authority and be answorable only to a legislature which
is in session for less than one sixth of a year. If there is
any matter uf administration Upon which a constant check
should be kept it is thai of liquor control. Under the
Liquor Control Act, as it now reads, the making of regulations is not within the power of the commission in control, but of the lieutenant-governor in couneii. Tho
legislature is responsible now inasmuch ns it can reivew
acts of the cabinet and take action thereon. — Victoria
Colonist.
M
over     |M
50     \k
S^tetteS
i^rBIBLE
M -FOR TODAY— S
assi^fesae:
Saturday, November 29
FOR GOD SO LOVED THE WORLD
that he gave his only begotten Son,
that whrsoevcr believeth in him
should not perish, but have everlasting life.—John ;I:1G.
i • • •
Sunday, November 30
THOU SHALT LOVE THE LORD
thy God with all thy heart, and with
all thy soul, ami with all thy strength,
and witii all thy mind, and thy neighbor as thyself.—Luke 10:27.
a   a   a   p
Monday, December  1
LOVE. JOY, PEACE. LONOSUF-
FERING, gentleness, goodness, faith,
meekness,1 temperance, against such
there is no law.—Gal. 5: 122.2;J.
•   •   »   •
Tuesday, December 2
SEEK YE THE LOUD while he may
be found; call ye upon him while ho
is near.—Isaiah 55 :G.
a   a   a   a
Wednesday, December 3
LET THIS MIND HE IN YOU which
was also in Christ Jesus.   Let nothing
STRANGE & SCHIAVO'S
ELECTRIC
SHOEMAKING
SHOP
Boots and Shoes made lo order—by hand or by
machinery.     A pair of shoes made by us will outlast
two pairs that you may otherwise purchase.
WHICH  IS  THE  CHEAPER?
W}*£
Ti^S^,-
Prices for SHOE
REPAIRING
NOW LOWERED!
| Why not be represented al the Christmas parties of
1 your Old Folks and Friends by
YOUR PHOTOGRAPH
J Or, if you don't like lo "sit," send one of our pano-
| ramie views of your home (own. See the samples in
|  Delany & Sinclair's window.
| phoned       v. Van Braam
1 ■*•"» «' i»l 'iimiiiWH iiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiii iiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiii liiiiiiimiini minimi i nn
bo du
Inu ii
U'l-in
■thor bettor thnn thumaolvc
!..
through itrlfo or vainglory, I gold chnllongo cup glvon by the Au-
wllnoss of mind let onch ob. onta-Gonornl of the provinces of Un-
.— 'tish Columbia, Novo Scotia, Ontario
Phllipplans 2:1
....
Thursday, December 4
COMMIT THY WAY unto the Lord,
trust also In him: and he shall bring
it to pass.—Psalm :i7: :i,i,.
•   *   .   .
Friday, December 5
SHEW ME THY WAYS,    O    Lord:
tench me thy paths. Let integrity and
uprightness preserve mej for I wait
on thee.—r.salm 25:4,21,
ond Quebec, was won by tho Pacific
Province.
Winnipeg.—"I confidently predict
that the next ten years will be the
most prosperous in Canada's history,"
declared Hon. P. C. Lnrkin, High
Commissioner for Canadu in London,
Canada is in a far better position today than any other country in tho
world."
Victoria.— British Columbia made n
sweeping victory at the Imperial
Fruit Show held in London in October, according to advices received
from England. British Columbia |
apples were awarded twelve firsts and
one second iu the overseas section.
In the dessert class, British Columbia
won first and second prizes. First j
prize in lhe cooking class was also I
won by tho province. In addition, the
**************************
l DO CLASSIFIED ADS. J
| PAY?  TRY THEM! *
I   *
£ From  letter  in   Herald  mail J
* this week: *
ji* "Please remove my nd. "For *
* Sale," and if you will send me *
* my account I will remit. *
£ "If nny skeptical advertiser ^
* thinks   a   classified   advertise- *
* ment   brings   no   results—you *
% can lifer him to me." J
* The   classified   ads.   cost   so +
* little, and may do so much. +
Try them. J
NISBET & GRAHAM
Barristers, Solicitors, &c.
Offices: Imperial Bank Bldg.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
OFFICES at KIMBERLEY
IN K. of P. HALL
Open Every Wednesday from
10 n.m. to 5 p.m.
**************************
NELSON BUSINESS
COLLEGE
— LEARN TO EARN —
Shorthand, Typewriting, Book-
keeping, Penmanship, Spelling,
Rapid Calculation, Commercial
English, Commercial Law, Fll*
ing, General Office Procedure.
Individual Tuition
Commence Any Time
New Term Now Commencing
P.O. Box 14-Phone 603
CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF CRANBROOK
COURT OF REVISION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Court of Revision
for revising and correcting the Municipal Voters' List for the
year 1925, will sit at J p.m, on Wednesday. December 10th, in
the Municipal Buildings,  Norlmry Avenue. Crauhrook, B.C.
Crauhrook, B, C,
November 26th. 1924.
F    W.    BURQESS
City Clerk
40-41
'!"■&" :
"YimjL NI15 M<®rr FAIL
Tom Rankin was bom in the harness room of n stable on Monroe
street, in the hearl uf tlu- Chicago
stockyards, forty-nIno yeara ago.
His father, "Hull" Rankin, was u
blacksmith, town bully, ofT-and-on
prizefighter and a drunkard. His
mother was an outcast. He was
reared In filth, disease and lmio«
ranee and at 11 became a "killcr'»
assistant" in the steer pens of tha
atockyards. Because he didn't kill
fast enough his boss stabbed him
and Tom wbb taken to a nearby
hospital. Stubborn, brutal of instinct, dull of mini!, he was nevertheless touched hy the swcol appeals of a visiting social worker
and.aupon his release whk "pre-
■anted" to the worker by his father.
Um worker arranged Lo send him
11 a farm in Montpelier, Vermont,
and lie was "taken in" nn a green
farm hand by a family named Taylor. He rose hefore dawn and
wnrke-1 until long nfter dusk at a
monthly stipend of $12 nnd keep,
hul his life was made mellow and
soft and sweet hy the kindly treatment of the Taylors, especially
Mrs. Taylor. Encouraged to save,
praised for his work, watched over
and educated hy the farmer's wife,
young Rankin grew to manhood.
When he was .lfi years old he had
.$1,200  in the bank.   During tlmt
year the Taylors died of diphtheria
tnd the small farm they had left
t,i him he sold for $2,200. Witli
$8,000 he moved t(» Burlington, Vt.,
a city of IB,00uftinliabItantSi ami
there bought u small uhtckun furm
HADLEY
In the outskirts where bc began
specializing in white and black Leghorn hens and eggs. Five years
later ho owned 1,500 such hens,
seven Jersey cows and a few prize-
winning hogs. He had developed a
butter, cheese and egg trade not
only in Burlington-but in Boston,
lhat netted him $10,000 a year. Tour
years ago when ho was forty-fivo
lie was Sfttd to lie worth close on 1o
5100.000, the proceeds of the sale
of his buslnosa to a large syndicate
milk   content.
oe
At   the   prices   which
we quote below, it will
pay you to SAVE YOUR SHOES and have them
made   like   new   by   us
MEN'S RUBBER HEELS    -    -     -     -      SOc
LADIES' RUBBER HEELS       -     -     -     35c
MEN'S HALF SOLED & HEELED - - $2.50
LADIES' HALF SOLED & HEELED - - $1.75
OUR WORK ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED OR
MONEY  REFUNDED
ARMSTRONG AVE. Opposite Imperial Hotel
f***************************************************t
All Requirements Can Be Met For Your
Christmas
Gift Subscriptions
Are You Interested In—
The Ladies' Home Journal
The Saturday Evening Post
The Country Gentleman
These aro only three from n list we have (if over two thousand
periodicals, made up of the most  important  publication! iu
Canada, the United States and Great Britain
TWO OR MORE PUBLICATIONS CAN BE COMBINED
TO SAVE YOU MONEY
Let Us Quote You a Combination Price
The Cranbrook Herald
Phone 18
BAKER-STREET
Phone 18
CRANBROOK, B.C. Friday, November 28th, 1924
THE  CRANBROOK   II Kit AMI
PAflF FIVB
************************.
FOR GOOD MEALS
and Comfortable Rooms
GO TO—
The New Cafe
*************************
ANNOUNCEMENT
SEE
PATEY   BROS.
FOR MUSICAL
MBRCHANDISI
ACCESSORIES
AI.l. MUSIC
3 Sheets of Music for $1,00
Cranbrook   Bazaar
COLUMBIA      GRAFONOLAS
I It costs you nothing to try. When
ordering your bread to-morrow, just
ask for ono lonf    of    City Bakery
I Dread. S6tf
Mount Baker
Hotel
30 Newly Furnished Rooms,
All with running water (Hot
and Cold) some with private
baths,   sontc   with   shower
baths
BAKER ST., CRANBROOK
Only absolutely first-class fireproof Hotel in tho city.
tVffff.Vffff.Vffffffff fff
for all your        §
requirements \-
-in- ;!
TRUNKS      -      VALISES <,
HANDBAOS £
Or anything In Leather     f.
Also for £
Shoe*.    Rubber.,    Sock.,    Over-   J
..11.,  Gloves,   Etc., <-'
It will pay you to visit our Btore "J
THE 5
Cranbrook Saddlery Co. j;
St.    Cranbrook B.C.
fffffffffffffffff
NOTICE   TO
PLACER  MINERS
Offers will be received up to
January Ist, 1925, for the
purchn.se uf the interest of
the Estate of Robert Brown,
deceased, in the Lake Creek
Placer Mining Claim, situate
on Lake Creek, East Kootenay District, about four and
one-half miles from Lumber-
ton, B. C.
ALEXANDER BROWN
Administrator
Robert Erown Estate
Sussex and Portland Streets
3U-40      New Weitmintter, B.C
tpcai Happenings
Ttnor banjo,
by's
A bar (rain,
at Kil-
32tf
Insure with Beale & Elwell.
Mrs.  W.   E.  Worden  and  Master
Mrs.  Halpin,    of    Kimberley  has I Ernest were visitors to Spokane over
been a guest this week of Mrs. G. E. the week-end.
I„ MacKinnon.
Piano in Walnut, in splendid condition, good as new, $295 at Kilby's.
32tf
An alarm of fire on Monday evening took the brigade on the tuii up
to the corner of Martin Avenue, to
the J. E. Beaton house, where there
was  a  cMnwey  blaze.     Nu   dumagc
For first class automobile repairs
and winter storage, see Ratcliffe &.
Stewart. 33tf
One Fairbanks-Morse <i h.p, engine,
as good as new,  for sale at   iH-zallV
Garage. 38-39
BORN—On Wednesday, November
2C>th, at the St. Eugene Hospital, to
Mr. and  Mrs.  G. Swope, of  Elko, a
The Marion Oliver Mission Bund
will give a Missionary Concert in the
Presbyterian schoolroom on Friday,
November 28th, nt 7.30 p.m.. Admission: Adults 35c; Children 15c.
39-10
Mr. F. E. Tilly of Penticton, B.C.,
wus in the city over the week-end on
business with the Imperial Life Company.
resulted
quickly t
PIANO
$245 ut
fire,   which   was; age.
For  prompt  repairs  and  satisfaction go to Ratcliffe & Stewart's gar-
-tli:
Uriili nt tone,
for sale
32tf
nHisKiiaiuiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiini mm
1
j Only 22 More
Shopping Davs
To CHRISTMAS!
Have you made up your mind what
you are going to give your
Friends or Relations?
WHY NOT MAKE IT
A DAINTY PIECE of CHINA
OR A
NICE DINNER SET
Have you seen our New Christmas Range ?   Our Stock
is complete so don't hesitate.   Buy early and
get the pick of the stock.
John Manning
PHONE 173       ....        OFFICE 93
M^niiiimiHHMwwwwiiiHB|iiiiiiiiMmwir nifiif ^ rWWWIIHIIIWnilWIgllWWWIinilllWSWWHW
/*VaVA\WaV.V.V\W.WA%%SSS\%\SVS\Wta^AWW3
NOTICE!
See Drake's Prices Before You Do
Your Christinas Shopping.
DRAKE'S VARIETY STORE
16 Armstrong Avenue
Dr. V '''i I' aid, of Kelowna,
medical i.,. ialUt was in the city the
early part of this week, and went on
to Fernie, intending to return her
the end of this week, to spend some
time in Cranbrook and Kimberley.
Be at the Shrine Club Dance, Friday, November 28th, Auditorium
Hall, Cranbrook. Secure tickets from
your Shrine friends or at the hall
door. This will be the event of the
season. 38
Tourists are till going through on
their way bicK U) the United States,
3. 0, Sinclair, of Winnipeg, £
Treas. of the Elk Lumber Co., was
in Fernie last week on business in
connection with the company. Rumor
has it that there is a deal mi to dispose of the company's property.
Violin, bow and case, good as new,
$12.   at Kilby's. 82tf
.(rt are as many as se-
enrr. The roads, after
hid   nro  comparatively
i. toil- '., grind through
.ew  Eateries at
i iione 34 ltf
Some da<-
ven or cii
Elko  is  i
good, but i. :■ i.
the Pass.
Special price;
Service Garage.
The cost of the late provincial
election in the Fernie district was
$2,314.50. The cobI in the Cranbrook district was $2,172.85. The
cost for the entire province was
$215,892.21. This information was
given out in legislature last week in
response to opposition members'
questions.
W« carry a tulMin* of Men's Women's and Children's Rubbers.
W. P. DORAN.
Our low prices win every time.
W. E. Worden, who hns been confined to his home for about ten days
recently, suffering from a bad cold
that he contracted, was able to be
around on Tuesday, better but still a
little shaky.
Floor Covering — Congoleum —
75c per square yard at Kilby's.
30tf
Mr. and Mrs. U. \, Moorhouse,
who left las* Thursday for California, will make their h<-i i in Long
Beach fu- ('"■ u»-*:t thn months or
}so. Thiv ntendetl to spend a few
days with ly'alivis in Seattle on the
way. Their I me here is now being
occupied l>> Mr. snd Mrs. J. E. Warren.
Personal Christmas Greeting Cards
I*ast year we had a very fine selection
of cards to choose from, which met
the approval of a great many. This
year the selection is a little larger and
is the beat we have ever had. Call in
nnd inspect them. The prices are
still lower. It is now time to place
your order for cards for the Old
( ountry. — The Cranbrook Herald,
33tf
Real Bargains on
SATURDAYJPECIALS
Choice Bocf, fore quarter 6c Ib.
Choice Beef, hind quarter - - - 10c Ib.
Choice Pot Roasl Beef - 10c to i2'k lb.
Prime Ribs of Beef, Boned and Rolled - 20c Ib.
Choice Round Steak - - - - 20c lb.
Choice Boiling Beef     -     -        -     3 lbs. 25c
GRAIN FEDPORK
Special Pork Loins    - 22c Ib.
Special Pork Legs - - - 18c to 20c lb.
Special Pork Shoulders - - 16c to 18c lb.
Special Side (Belly) Pork    -    -     -    18c Ib.
DAIRY FED VEAL
Fore Quarters Choice Veal
Special Veal Roast    -
Choice Round Bone Roast
Special Stewing Veal
-   6c lb.
12'k to 15c It.
-    18c Ib.
-    3 lbs. 25c
CHOICE SPRING LAMB - GRAIN FED MUTTON
CHOICE SPRING CHICKENS, FOWL, Etc.
P. Burns <& Co., Ltd.
— PHONK     10 —
Cranbrook, B. C.
DEPOT   ROOMS
tj    VAN HORNE STREET
CRANBROOK, B.C.
Opposite South cm! of C.P.R.
Depot
A   Comfortable   Home   for
The Working nun
OKOROH MASSEY
Bos 249 Prop. 39
Mrs. M. O. Finnis left on Friday
of last week for Vancouver to be
with her daughter, Mrs. Dan Kvans.
whose husband had passed awnj
there the previous day, Lhe funeral
being held there on Sunday.
For sales and service Nash and Star
cars.   See Ratcliffe & Stewart.   38tf
On Saturday afternoon last the
Salvation Army held tlieir annual
sale of home made goods, bazaar,
etc. A number of ladies were assisting; the Army officers at the various booths, and in addition to thc
supply of hand made needlework
goods offered for sale, there was
home cooking of all kinds, candy, afternoon tea being also served. The
proceeds of thc afternoon in all
amounted to close upon two hundred dollars.
White cups and saucers at 20c per
cup and saucer, at Kilby's. 36
On Monday evening of nexl week
the pupils of Mr. Bruce Robinson,
teacher of pianoforte, will give a recital in the Presbyterian schoolroom
commencing at eight o'clock. A number of parents and friends are being
invited, and diplomas won by pupils
in connection with tbe McGill Conservatory examinations are to lie presented at this time. A very interesting program has been prepared for
the occasion.
SPECIAL: — Tungsten lamps, 10,
ib, 40, r>0 und 00 watts; 25 c each,
at — W. F. DORAN'S.
Our Low Prices win every time
It may he of interest lo people
who nre not aware of tbe fact, to
know that a will wholly in the handwriting of the person making it is
no good in the province of British
Columbia, unless witnessed in the
manner required by law. Tbis was
made clear last week by Ilis Honor
Judge Thompson In connection with
the estute of the late Duve Black.
Dave made a will in 1916, hut shortly before his death wrote out another
will which was different in many
respects to the 101--') one, and included in it bequests to the Swimming
Pool fund and the United Church of
$500 each. Although it was admit
ted that the will was entirely in hi;
hnndwriting and signed by him, the
Judge held that according to B. C
law it was ineffective on account of
not having been witnessed. Tbe result is that unless the beneficiaries
under the 1015 will decide to carry
out thc wishes expressed in the handwritten will, the bequests to the
Swimming Pool fund and the United
Church will not be made, — Fernie
Free Press.
Saturday last Cranbrook was visited by a number of officials of the
C.P.H. who were on a tour of inspection of Western ilnes. The party
included the following: D. C. Coleman, vice-president Western lines.
Winnipeg; Mr, Grant Hall, vice-president, Montreal; Mr. C. A. Cottrell,
Assistant General Superintendent,
i Vancouver. The party arrived on
- j Friday night, went to Kimberley nn
Saturday morning, and returned in
the evening, leaving on the east-
bound train. Several eastern business men were also in the party.
All those interested in the formation of a Burns' Club are requested
to meet in the Y.M.C.A. on Wednesday, December .'Ird, at 8 p.m.     38-40
********
*
Stati
After tbe city went to the trouble
if closing off a block on Fenwick
\vo., from Louis to Edwards Streets
i'or the children to use as a toboggan
slide, the children took it upon themselves to remove the barrier at the
top end of the bill, making it dangerous foi* passing cars when the
roads are so slippery that it is not. always easy to pull a car up short. The
children havi' been starting their
slide across the road to get a longer
tide, but this is a dangerous practice
and it is hoped there will bo no mis
hap before they are made to realize that it is safer to keep the sleds
strictly within the block intended for
their use.
We curt y a full Mae ol Men's Women's and Misses' Shoes.
W. P. DORAN.
Our low prices win every time.
At a conference held nt Creston
last week by the board of trade,
when W. L. Humphrey, West Kootenay M.P. was present, it was pointed
ut by manager Vance of the Co-
Operative Fruit Exchange that this
year in ('ranbrook, under tiie freight
rates permitted by the present status
of the Crow's Nest Agreement, Ontario tomatoes were placed in Cranbrook this season to compete with
the product from Creston, only 80
miles away. Mr. Humphrey was
urged to look further into the matter lo see if any relief could not be
bad from such a situation.
I'm glad you liked that bread. No,
I did not make it myself, we get it
from the City Bakery." I'hone 23
and have the boy call. JIGtf
II. L. Harrison, nctlng vendor at
the government liquor Btore at Kimberley, has been at home in the city
this week, being a witm ts in the
Wilson liquor appeal case from Kimberley,     which    is    before    Judgi
MINERAL ACT
(Form F)
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
! Save Money
; 1RESH MILK 10c Quart
GODDERIS'   DAIRY
k Rural Telephone
MMMM MMMM»MWMM«»M»
■■WdVWWWWWWWWWW*
"Watson" and "Kootenay King'
mineral claims, situate in the Fort
Steele Mining Division of East Koote
nay District.
Where located:—Near the headwaters of Victoria Creek, a tributary of
Wild Horse Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John G
Cummings, B.C.L.S., F.M.C., No.
76880C, acting as agent for William
Myers, Free Miner's Certificate No
7484SC, intend sixty days from the
date hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above
claims.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE
that action, under Section 85, must
ho commenced before the issuance of
such Certificate of Improvements,
Dated this 5th day of October, A.D.
1024. 39-47
lonery
FINE    LINEN   STATIONERY
is what you want to give that
lady or gentleman friend. It's
a very appropriate and thoughtful gift.
Select from one of these Christmas offerings, one of
Warwick's Christmas Papetries
50c  to   $8.50
Warwick's Red Gifts
delightful small gifts, very
suitable  for bridge prizes
etc.        etc.
Beattie Noble Ltd.
THE REXALl. STORE
Druggists     - - -     Stationers
PHONE 11       ■       ■ P.O. llo\ 1;0
***********
t*************
***********
VISIT
OUR
TOY
LAND
UP
STAIRS
+
Thompson this week. Ed. Duthie, of
Fernie, who ha? lately been at Yahk
in the liquor store there, is now relieving f.>r Mr. Harrison at Kimberley.
10 Only, 30 x 3;j. regular JU.00
guaranteed tires, while they last,
$11.00.
WILSON'S VULCANIZING WORKS
33tf
QUALITY —
CRANBROOK
- SERVICE —
CO- OPERATIVE STORES
SODA BISCUITS, per packagi   2Sc
STRAWBERRY JAA1, in  S1.2S
CHERRY JAM, in gl  1.25
PRESH APPLE Cllil-ik, -   i gal  75c
BEST CHOCOLATE BISCUITS, per lb -45c
ATLANTIC KIPPERED HERR1NQS, per Ib  20c
SMOKI-.I) SABLE FISH, ■ er Ib   25c
HEAD LETTUCE, per head ._.   20c
FRESH COCOANUTS, each   20c
Heintz' Bulk Dill Pickles. Sweet Chow Pickles
and Sweet .Mixed Pickles.
Bulk Olives
Moil's Fancy Boxes — Best Chocolates for Christmas
The Ladies' (iuild will hold their Regular Meeting at the home
of Mrs. J. Chester, Wednesday, December 3rd, at H p.m.
Election ol Officers.     A good attendance
requested.
Cranbrook Dist. Co-Op. Soc.
,,,..	
wbu» min. * m*iu,i:u:ifiii!i]iiiii!.i.iii[]i kiiiiiiiuiiiiu iminiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiitgniii im i tm-imimiKitniniiiiL
in dining at a Restaurant where
things are kept immaculate, the
service prompt and the food exceptionally tasty and wholesome. Tl . a why you'll enjoy
dining hcio. Our dally menu
always Includes many delightful dishes.
VICTORIA CAFE
SOLVE A DOZEN
CHRISTMAS  PROBLEMS
with the Gift that only You can
give-
Your Photograph.
MAKE YOUR APPOINTMENT NOW.
Phone 56
NELSON STUDIO
 Mount Baker Hotel
CHRISTMAS  PRINTING
Christmas Curd*, your own
Christmas Cards -- witli your
name and any greeting ynu dr-
tire on them — wr are in a position to tupply you witli them,
in a big range of styles, made
up aa you direct, from sample*
you can see at any time. We
can print them up quickly nnd
reasonably. Call and lee the
samples, or phone or write for
i     Sample  Booka.
Printing with a punch — tbat
!• the kind of printing we are
producing every day. We hart
a reputation for turning out
fint  clan   work. Hav*  you
let   ui   do   yours? An   unti-
■ t-llcd illustration service is a|.
so at the command of adverti-
lltt and others who desire
to add their cumulative value
to their printed messages to tha
public, Phone ut for particulars, or let us suggest something
appropriate.
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
Bruce Robinson
Phone 295        Teacher ot Millie P.O. Box   762
STUDIO      ARMSTRONG AVENUE
Third House from Presbyterian Church
ROBINSON'S QRGHESTflA-OANCES ARRANGED FOR PAQE    SIX
THE   CRANBfiOOR   HERALD
Friday, November 28th, 1924
m«bodi$tCburcftBKV-B-c-lfRK,Sr
SUNDAY,  NOVEMBER 30
"The world sits at thu feet of Christ,
Unknowing, blind and unconsoled;
It yet shall touch Hid garment's fold,
And feel the heavenly alchemist
Transform its very dust to sold."
—Whittier
1 1 a.m. - "RUNNING TO WIN" Junior Choir
12.15-SUNDAY SCHOOL
7.30 p.m. - "AN EVIL WOMAN" Senior Choir
VISITORS AND STRANGERS CORDIALLY WELCOMED
CO-OPERATIVE WOOL GROWERS RECEIVE 10
CENTS MORE PER LB. THAN OTHERS
Progressive Organization Adds Another Year to Its Re-  :|
cord of Satisfactory Service j
(By Goorge Hay, Secretary) «
**********************************************$**$*
imately 10 cents in favor of co-opera-
. PB.W.A.rEBGJE
f DENTIST
J Camphell-MannlnR Block
I Phoie II.    OSes Hoars i
} 11( 11,1 to I p.m.   Bsts. I to 1.
\_-rx-Txs h'm"   * tm  '■
W. R. ROSS, K.C.
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR, Etc.
209   ROGERS   BUILDING
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Drs. Green & MacKinnon
I'tifBlclam »nd Surgeons
Offlcs  st  rssldsnce,  Armstrong
Avenue
OFPICB HOURS
Aftornoone   2.00 to 4.00
armings   7.30 to 8.30
land.?!   2.00 to 4.00
CRANBROOK, B.C.
DB. F. B. MILKS
DENTIST
OFFICE HOURS
I to li sn.     1 to I p.m.
Blk., CRANBROOK, B.C.
T. JLMiCPHEBSON
Undertaker
rhoneKO
lUAirj ire, next to CHj H»U
LODttES AND SOCIETIES
WOMEN'S INSTITUTE
Meets In ths
K. ol 1\ Hali
stternoon ot ths
Orst Tuesilsy st
I p.m.
Saptisi: &1jiut1)
Rev. W. T. TAPSCOTT
SUNDAY, NOV. CJ
10 a.m.   Brotherli 1   Bible
Class conducted by Mr. II.
I...   Porter.
11 a.m. Sermon by thc Pastor
"The  First  Requirement  in
Stewardship"
12 noon Sunday School.
7.30 p.m. Sermon by llu* Pastor.   Subject:
"The Obedience of Faith"
YOil   UIE   COIflllAI.I.V
1.WITK1).
llllliBiiiiliMiilulliillilliliaimuliiniriKiiiiiniiiciiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiimii
| C. JOE BROS. |
|     LADIES' and GENTS'     1
TAILORS
g - SUITS MADE TO OltDER - s
CLEANING -Ji PRESSING       I
Cranbrook St, Opp, Ilk. of Com. =
uoiunuiiu]iijuiiiuiiniit!!i<imiuuiiiiiiii!:uiiui)Ui!ituiiHjia¥r
CRANBROOK GLEANERS
AND DYERS
Irory Qarment nent to us* to be
Cleaned or Dyed Is given
Our Utmoet Csre.
Our kno-wledte ot the bualnesi
Is your sesurancfl of eatlsfuctlnn
here.    Phone, snd we will ct.U,
or bring us your work.
Ws Clean and Dye Everything.
PHONE   If?
AU lsdlss are   —
cordially InTlted
President:  Mrs.   VT.   Vi.   Wolfer
8fc..Trennreri    Mrs.    Finlayson
I. 0. O. F.
KEY CITY LODGE, No. it
Meats svsry
iMondsy night st
 PThs Auditorium
Sojourning Odd Fellows srs cordially Invited.
N. G.      ..     -      A. Burtch
Rao. See.  B. O. Dingier, P.O.
Montana Restaurant
■Mil at AU Honrt
aggers, CtfUKMss s«4 Gaailet
Hi    ■     tttme Ml
Opp. Bssk st Ooaua-sras
Established llll
Geo. R. Leask
rroirm lCILDBR
Ain»   COITRACTOB
OsMutWsrk. Ptotan tntsltg
■stlutas fives em
all -' ef work
OBsei Owuc Herkory Avails
u4 Ilwarll MM
CLEANING — PRBSSINO
— REPAIIIING —
Yon Will Mako No Mistake
In Ordering that
NEW SPRING SUIT
(III OVEKCOAT
— From —
H. C. LONG,
The Tailor
Van Home Street
Opposite C. P. R. Depot
Phone 410     ::     Phono 416
JOHN QARD
PAINTER &
PAPERHANQER
rill line of Wall Paper
Ia Stock.
Store, Hanson Avenue
Phou -Ml st sli boara
CtiNBBOOI    .    •    •    M.
Sainsbury&Ryan
BUTLDERg AND
CONTRACTORS
Qlvm and Work
Onarutsad
Velephoiei Mt aid Mt
CBAlfBBOOK      -     B.C.
<£_".„,_., Z^J
4 in 5
WANT
PACIFIC
SlF'K
.  tn   jmno
\-*   ■•*"■,
[Ksyivy
;  tV4H)HATfn
Mt!>
For   a
seemed to
long   time   there
)e almost a preju-
dice again
B.C.    Tha
'.i  things made in
t has changed as
folks came
to realize that we
do some 1
hings better here
than  anywhere  In  Canada.
Grocers
tell us that four in
five   customer:;   for   canned
milk ask f<
r
PACIFIC
MILK
Pacific Milk Co., Ltd.
Head Office, Vancouver, B.C.
Fnctorles  nt  Abbotsford  and  Lndner
With the exception of the last car
shipment, which includes arrivals of
wool, final returns arc being sent nut
lo nil patrons of tho British Columbia
| Wool Growers' Association.
w returns genernlly are most
| satisfactory and are decidedly in advance nf average prevailing prices
throughout tho province during the
pant season, Tho association keeps in
touch with the prevailing local niur-
keta and usually there is a great
range of prices paid. During the sen-
n of 1024, dealers' prices ranged
From 10c to 20c per pound, a fair average being IBc per pound. Calculating the association's average iipt
price on tho wind already sold, which
includes the big proportion uf the
years' volume of business, works out
at 25.0 cents per pound. This price
represents tho actual returns to patrons f.o.b. their shipping points, after
all expenses of freight, association's
charges, etc., have heen deducted.
Therefore :i dear margin of 10.0 cts,
por pound over and above the prices
received by non-co-operators represents the 1024 actual value of the B,
C. Wool Growers' Association to its
patrons in the matter of wool selling.
The quantity of wool handled by the
Association amounted, in round numbers to 88,000 pounds, therefore the
saving to wool growers who availed
thomsolves of the opportunity of selling their wool co-operatively
amounts to 88,000 pounds nt 10.0 cts.
Provincial statistics for 1023 estimate the sheep population at 58,386.
The.se at a conservative average of G
pounds of wool per head would produce a wool cliii of .■320,010 pounds.
The difference between the estimated
provincial clip and what the association handled, (820,010 — 88,000)
equals 232,010 pounds, represents the
amount of wool handled by other
trade channels than the co-operative
wool growers' agency. The margin
in favor of co-operative selling, namely 10.11 cents per pound, also repre-
ents the average loss to the grower
who sold outside thc co-operative. In
dollars and cents this loss to growers
selling outside the association
amounts to $25,280.74.
Nat Exceptional
Tlie success attained by the Wool
Growers' Association this season is
not unique in ils history, rather there
has always been an average margin
In favor of co-operative selling since
the inception of the organization. In
spite of this fact there still remains
a large proportion of growers who
prefer to bargain with the buyers of
wool in respect to the sale of their
own product. As long as the organization continues its present policy of
allowing growers to sell their wool
of their own free will without binding contracts we can expect a percentage, large or small, to be joining and breaking away from the association.
However, it still remains the concensus of opinion of those in charge
of Canadian co-operative wool markets that the best policy of that organization is to continue to stake its
chances of success on its efficiency
which is judged by the wool growers
themselves. "The organization has
made continued progress attaining a
strong financial position and during
its development has always been able
to pay a higher average price than
any wool buying concern functioning
throughout the province,
Not infrequently attempts nre
made to beat the association's prices
and this thc association considers
quite legitimate nnd quite In order.
The association's purpose is lo sell
and as already stated the belief ex-
wool to the growers' best advantage
ists oa the part of those in charge
of the affairs of the association thnt
no better medium exists than the B.
C. Wool Growers' Association for thc
B.C. wool grower to market his product, An interesting attempt to sell
wool in better advantage than the as-
Bocintlon was undertaken by a number of growers in the vicinity of Knm-
loopa this season when a carload was
assembled and sold after careful Investigation of the wool market for 20
cenls per pound. Tbis shipment included some of the very best wools
in the province. In comparing this
price with the association's price of
20.(1 and .'10 cents per pound to two
neighboring growers with a very similar wool we find a margin of approx-
live selling. This also represents a
loss to the seller outside of the association of $2,100 on a 24,000 pound
car—surely a good profit for the wool
dealer. Mention is made of the occurrence simply to exemplify still further the belief that the Wool Growers' Association is the best marketing
agency.
In conclusion il is the writer's opinion that agriculture's greatest need at
the present time is efflctont and reliable marketing agencies to lake care
of the different lines of agricultural
production. Agencies, which, through
proper connection with outside markets and together with efficient administration, aro able to return producers the greatest value for their
product,are to bo desired.
In respect to wool marketing, the
Wool Growers' Co-Operative agency stands out in the Canadian wool
trade as the growers' most efficient
and reliable wool selling medium.
SCOUTS POINT OUT
SOME TYPES OF CHEAP
RIFLES ARE MENACE
'/alb.80<f
also inpacfi<t<jes&£.20$
gercus. The rifle
shooting bore the
Werke Worker furt
A test of rifles .
made in the presei
Provincial Commlss
ronto showed thnt
charged
concerned in the
name   "I'eillsehe
all three types
of Assistant
or Irwin of Toll could he dis-
t least five ways without
the trigger being touched—hy closing the bolt sharply (as is done with
any good bolt rifle); by allowing the
bolt to slip from the fingers while
drawing; by striking the butt on the
ground; by striking the end of the
bolt against a fence or similar obstacle; hy catching the rear action of
the bolt in a wire fence. Another
feature of all throe rifles was the
very light "pull-off" each discharging at a very light pull on the trigger. It is not possible to discharge
any properly constructed rifle in any
of the several ways mentioned.
Another defect of the rifles demonstrated during the test was an
occasional back-tire from the cartridge, this being serious enough to
burn the face of a shooter in the
usual position.
Accompanying the letter from
Assistant Provincial Commissioner
Irwin were three cartridge shells, all
showing thc black stains of a backfire, one in addition showing a
"burst" in the head of the cap.)
It was stated nt the inquest that
ace even in Hie hands of scouts who
have not taken up marksmanship and
have been as carefully Instructed and
caulioned as all scouts are supposed
to lie.
Warn your boys.
Have them warn as many othoi
boys as possible.
LAKE I
WINDERMERE^
NOTES £
The following article was referred
to by Scoutmaster .1. M. Clark at the
recent meeting of tbe Boy Scout Association, and as a warning to Cranbrook parents, it is requested that the
article be reproduced. It is as follows:
WARN YOUR BOYS
To the list of 1024 shooting fatalities was recently added one in
Toronto with a sinister aspect which
should be brought to the attention
of every Boy Scout iu Canada, and jtho dangerous character of the rif
les bad been brought to the attention of the authorities but thnt the
rifles were still coming into the coun-
through them to as many other boys
as possible. The ease was tbe shooting of 10 year old Russell Guppy by
a compnnion of the same age by the
discharge of a .22 rifle by the striking of the butt upon the floor.
At the inquest it was stated by a
firearms expert that the rifle used,
which sold for as low as §2.05 in
Toronto and had absolutely no safety features, was one of a shipment can be purchased apparently quite ea
of more than 15,000 arriving in Mon-1 slly by hoys unskilled in the use of
treal  from  Germany  in  March  last. | firearms."
Further that two other low-priced im-1 The boys concerned in the Toronto
ported rifles, the "Kimson," also from j shooting were not scouts. Unques-
Germany, and the "Bayard" from | tionably, however, so dangerous arc
Leigo, Belgium, were similarly dan-  these rifles that they would be a nieu-
(Specfal to the Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., Nov. .2!!. — The
annual celebration of St. Andrew's
nicbt takes place this year on the evening of Friday, the 28th, in Wilmer.
Full preparations have long since
heen under way.
On Thursday evening, the 4th of
December, the Windermere District
Agricultural Association and Farmers' Institule hold their combined
annual meeting in the schoolhouse at
lnvermere. This will be followed by
a sale of home cooking and confections in the same building on the afternoon of Saturday, the Oth,* under
the auspices of the Women's Auxiliary.
The annual meeting of the shareholders of the Lake Windermere
Creamery, Ltd., will be held on the
afternoon of the 20th of this month.
The report of tlie directors, which is
already out, shows that in the past
year, which is their first, that tht
creamery manufactured 23,080 lbs. of
f $10,054,318, and providing employment for 12,000 people. Tlm report shows that during 1023 the sum
of $3,010,822 was paid in salaries,
To its verdict the Toronto jury added this:   "We most urgently recommend that the attention of the authorities be  brought to the unsafe |initter j-or which they received  an
class of rifles which sell at a figure avorage price «f 38.G cents per pound.
iiMle n,...- <:■:    n-.-tt for a toy, and The average price paid for crea* was
'* 84,6 cents, totalling in all for that
product of the cows 50,772.71.   It is
encouraging to note that the number
of producing cows throughout the district is steadily increasing.    Mr. \\
G. Wainwright Sr., recently laid in a
foundation herd of Holstetn and Ayrshire  grades which  came  from tin
famed fields of Golden, on the north
BY
Get Your
Reservations
FOR
CHRISTMAS SAILINGS TO THE
OLD COUNTRY
SPECIAL
TRAIN
From Winnipeg lo W. St. John N.B
9.30A DEC. 2nd & 9th
DIRECT TO THE SHIP'S SIDE
For Sailing S.S. Montclare Dec. S for Liverpool
For Sailing S.S. Montlauricr Dec. 12 for Liverpool
THROUGH TOURIST SLEEPERS
To W. St. John N.B. Leave Medicine lint 8.10 a.m.
Dec. I for S.S. Montclare  Sailing Dec. S to Liverpool
Dec 6 for S.S. Minnedosa Sailing Dec. 10 to Cherhourg
Southampton, Antwerp
Dec. 7 for S.S. Metagama Sailing Dec. II to Belfast, <ilasgo«-
Dcc. 8 S.S. Alontlaurier Suillng Dec. 12 to Liverpool
Dec. 12 for S.S. Montcalm Sailing Dec. 16 to Liverpool
FULL INFORMATION FROM ANY AOENT OF THB
Canadian map
IT SPANS THE WORLD
.17-10
This Lassie Has Her
Colds "Rubbed Away"
The mother of tins ft tractive little girl,
Mrs. E. E. Emmans, of 215Seventh Ave,
N. F... Portage La Prairie, Man., is one
of the many Canadian mothers who are
enthusiastic about thc vaporizing salve,
Vicks VapoRub, for treating children's
colds, Mrs. Emmans writes: "My little
girl had croup at night pretty badly and
\ icke did hev a lot uf good. I have also
used it with wry satisfactory results for
head nnd chest colds."
Vicks is just "rubbed on" for sore
throat, tonalitis. bronchitis, croup or
deep chest colds. When so applied,
\ Icks has a double direct action: internally medicated vapors nre inhaled while,
at the same time, externally, it is absorbed through aud stimulates the skin.
Mrs. Walter Jones, who has boon
on a visit to Lethbridge, has returned home.
The bridge and whist drive given
in Windermere last week by Mrs. A.
IM. Chlsholm".and her sister, Miss
Istoddart, was a great success.
1     Mr. A. J. T. Walker left this week
to attend the provincial potato show
i at Vancouver.
Winnipeg.—As a result of thc sur-
' vey conducted by the newly formed
] Graphic Arts Association printing and
'allied trades are now shown to constitute the .second largest industry in
Winnipeg, representing an investment
************
I HURRY'S WHITE LUNCH
I IS THB PLACE TO EAT.
* White Help Onlr I, Employed.
* Von will find this Cofo a Homer
%     Pluce to Enjoy Vour Meal,
% ALEX. II UHItY   •   Prop.
**************************
L. D. Cafe
(LIIU, Davenport)
When you wiih eomethlng food
to Mt go to the "L.D."
Milk and Cream
DIRECT FROM
Big Butte Dairy Farm
rno>E 10
A. E. Jones
Contractor & Builder
CRANBROOK, B.C.
Plans Drawn & Estimates
Furnished
Phone 386 :
ALL   WORK
P.O. Box 192
GUARANTEED
fffffffffffffffff
l   Canadian
Cafe & Rooms
JOE UTEMATSU, Proprietor
Van Home St. Opp. C.P. Depot.
NEWLY RENOVATED
THROUGHOUT
Comfortable Rooms
First Clans Cafe Service
PHONE 98
CRANBROOK - B.C.
fffffffffffffffffi
CRANBROOK CARTAGE & TRANSFER CO.
TOWRISS & ROBERTS
Agents for Hard and Soft Coal.     Distribution Cars a
Specialty.   Excellent Warehousing.
SAND and GRAVEL
OPPOSITE CP.R. DEPOT
Telephone 63        .:.        .1.
■HBHHsa ma
CRANBROOK, B.C.
.:. P .0. Box
3MMBBMB-W
/ You LENION     A
I       THAT'S    A t   1
V  fish eowL.'y Priday, November 28th, 192-t
HI 01AHBBOOK HEKALB
PAOE SRVRN
8^rirjflB3K«i8i
*m¥^rfri\k
.....    <        '.;''"*0
At Star Theatre Monday and Tuesday, December 1 and 2
JACKIE COOUAN COATING
TO STAR AGAIN AS
YOUNG HERO IN "DADDY"
Movie fans, juveniles as well as
grown-ups will receive with enthusiasm the news that Jackie Coogan is
again coming to the Star Theatre,
this time in "Daddy." This will be
the big attraction on Monday and
Tuesday of next week, December 1
and 2.
The story of "Daddy" deals with
a precocious genius of the violin
whose mother deserted his father during the infancy of the bay. After
a fruitless search for his wife and
baby, the father, Paul Savelli, goes
abroad to win a European reputation
as a violinist. During the years of
his absence the baby grows to boyhood, his mother dies, and the boy,
unwilling longer to be n further burden on friends, runs away.
Many adventures await "Jackie"
Holden (as the hoy is known) in the
big town. Ilis unusual genius for
the violin brings him in contact with
Cesare Gallo, a broken-down maestro
who now earns a scant living by
playing for heedless passers-by on
the  street.    Gallo  takes  him  to  his
humble attic home and becomes his
pal and protector, teaching him, in
tbe meanwhile, how to play the violin
with technical skill. Humor and pathos abound In these scenes between
Ihe little fellow and his aged friend.
Finally.J'aul Savelli returns in triumph to America. Gallo, rapidly
ageing, now, is determined to hear
him anil see him again, Ihey having
been friends in the long ago. But,
Savelli, passing hurriedly into the
stage door on Ibe night of his concert, didn't recognize liis old friend
whom he unwillingly insulted by offering him a coin. Crushed and broken-hearted, old Gallo is led back to
their s-qimllid home by his little friend
who has not failed to pick up the
discarded coin and witli it to buy
needed but futile medicine.
One day, while playing on the corner, Jackie Holden'a music is heard
by Paul Savelli. He stops, listens,
and recognizes thc tone ns that at
once of a "Strad" and a little genius,
He asks thc little virtuoso where he
got his violin. On hearing Gallo's
name he demands to he taken to him
at once. A scene of exquisite pathos
follows and then Savelli, still ignorant of the boy's identity, takes him
to his hotel apartments. A photograph of Paul Savelll's wife, Jackie's
mother, on Paul's dresser, serves to
identify the lad and a joyous reunion
follows.
TOM ATIX AND ACTION A-
PLENTY TO BE SEEN IN
"MILE-A-MINUTE ROMEO"
Before saddles became a curiosity
in our West, there lived a hardy cow-
puncher named Matt. He nnd Cal
Landry were rivals for the hand of
Molly Aiken, a beautiful girl in her
early twenties. Old Aiken, the girl's
father, favored Landry. Although
Molly felt no love or even affection
for Matt, she would rather have married him than the undesirable Landry. Accordingly she sent a note to
him, asking him to call for her at
midnight, promising to marry him.
Meanwhile, Lucky Bill, notorious
for his ready trigger finger, rode into town. Landry framed a scheme to
get Matt and Lucky Bill in a gun-
fight. A meeting of the two men
resulted in Matt receiving a wound
in his shoulder. Both realized it was
a frame-up, and, in remorse. Lucky
treated tlie wound Because of his
wound Matt found himself unable to
meet Molly as he had promised.
Lucky, eager to atone for the wound
he had Riven Matt, went in his stead.
He   promised   to   bring the girl  to
Matt, who would wait in his hill cabin. At the uppointed time Lucky met
Molly. She refused to go so he forced her. Aiken was awakened by her
screams. With his men he followed
their trail into the mountains. Hidden from the posse Molly and Lucky
stumbled across Landry. Lucky offered to shoot it out for the girl but
the other, formerly a prizefighter
cowardly suggested a fight without
weapons. A terriffic fight ensued.
Lucky finally knocked Landry out.
Meanwhile Aiken had enlisted the
aid of the sheriff in locating his
daughter. Mutt told the posse that
Molly and Lucky wero bound for his
cabin—but he hadn't gone to meet
them as he believed that Landry had
killed Lucky and returned home with
Molly. Thus the posse went to
Matt's cabin. Lucky meant to keep
his promise to Matt and only after a
great deal of persuasion did he decide to take her message to Matt.
The entire posse waited under cover
for their man while Matt waited inside the cabin. Presently Lucky entered the cabin and delivered Molly's
message. Matt's jealousy and hatred
got beyond him, warning Lucky of his
danger. Lucky immediately set the
cabin afire. He went out through a
window and when out of shooting
range pulled astride his horse and raced to town for a marriage license
and justice of the peace. Lucky forced him to go with him and meantime
Morgan rushhed after Molly desiring
to reach her before Lucky arrives.
Lucky presented the marriage license and the Justice performed the
ceremony saying the last few words
as Aiken and the sheriff entered.
WILLIAM FOX
presents
"MILE-A-MINUTE  ROMEO"
At    Stnr   Theatre   Wednesday    and
Thursday, December .T and 4
Ml
o
m
..'/LILIES OF THE FIELD"
Coiiime Griffith & Conway Tearle
IS A PICTURE STRONG IN  DRAMA, RAW-   IN  UKAUTV
Comedy! "BARNUMJR." Johnnie Fox
MON. S TUES.
MATINEE TUESDAY, 3.45
DECEMBER 1 * 2-    If
JACKIE_ COOGAN
"DADDY"
JACKIE AT HIS BEST IN A PINE COMEDY.   COME EARLY
Pathe  News Matinee Tuesday, 3.45
Special J.icl: While Comedy:  "Midnight Blues" with Lige Conley
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY DECEMBER 3 ft 4
T0M.MIX
"MILE-A-MINUTE ROMEO"
With TONY, The Wonder Horse
A MKiHTY WHIRL OF ACTION.     A REAL WESTERN
Fox News
Comedy: "THE COWBOYS"    Imperial
illUBtlllt,lHkooloohoei.o,BlooHDitlbllat^oU'iiin^oAo^ooh^o6HHI,ooonontioon~
lil,bill,z,omooo,Me,ej^,,eoorlMin™n<>°°'','''n-^t
MWffl.W.iHf^.i,.>.....iaioSnaOQt..tllll
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COMMUNICATION   ||
■V.VW.W
CHURCH     UNION     FROM     ONE
PRESBYTERIAN ANGLE
Editor, Cranbrook Herald,
Cranbrook, B.C.
The Rev. W. F. McConnell, Dominion organizer for the Presbyterian
Association, who is in British Columbia in connection with the eluirch
union bill, stated in an interview that
instead of effecting union the church
union movement in Canada lias re- j
suited in disintegration and tho disruption of the Presbyterian church
tn Canada from the Atlantic to the!
Pacific, and a wave of bitterness
which has not been paralleled in the)
history of the religious life (if our|
fair dominion.
Mr. McConnell stated that by tho'
action of the Union committee in refusing to recognize the well known
pledges of that committee as to unanimity in 1005 and of such leaders an
Principal Patrick in 1015, President
Falconer in 1900, the General Assembly In 1912, and Dr. W. J. Clark
in 101-4 the church anion leaders
had succeeded in forming the church
into two opposing parties. The one
contending that the people are the
church, the other contending that the
church courts arc the church. The
unionists never seriously contended
against the former conception, said
Mr. McConnell, until 1010 when the
vote of the people went against them
by 23,000 more than in 1912 when
the assembly halted the movement
and agreed to wait for more practical unanimity. That unanimity never came, so they discovered the new
principle enunciated by such well
known leaders of the union movement
as Dr. John Pringlo and Dr. C. W.
Gordon, that the church courts are
the church, and that the only mistake
they (the unionists) ever made wns
in ever submitting thc question to tho
people at all. Now they must admit
thnt in the last analysis the people
will decide theSnatter iu the coming
vote.
In speaking of the present status
of the church union hill before the
legislature and the parliament of
Canada, Mr. McConnell said that th
bill hnd passed with amendments in
five of the legislatures, but it had not
passed in Prince Edward Island. Que-
bee, Ontario or British Columbia
The Ontario legislature absolutely re
fused to concede the principle of tin
bill to the unionists which was
to legislate nil tlie people and the property of the churches into the union
as churches and then allow the people to escape ns Individuals or if thoy
could get u vote ami secure a majority they might take their local property with them but minorities in concurring congregations would be absolutely unprovided for, .Because of
this refusal the unionists withdrew
the bill in Ontario.
Thc present phase therefore of
Church Union in Canada is interesting, said he, because three-fifths of
all the membership and property of
the  Presbyterian  Church  in  Canada
are In Ontario and Quebec, and the
action oi' British Columbia and Prince
Edward Island l< r; lature will play
ao small pari In the i tttement of this
in portant and mui ii vexed question.
.Mr. McConnell staled that when
the private bills committee of the fed-
iral house of parliament had heard
:il) the evidence they decided at first
in postpone the date of its coming
Into force for two years, until the
jupreme courts had decided the legal
questions Involved and not at all unless it was proved that (he General
Assembly had powor to consummate
th i proposed union. Hut the bill was
ultimately passed with amendments,
;■*.■ rliamenl protecting itself hy the
insertion of :. clause specifying that
.he provision of thc act were passed
inly in- t ir n   it waa competent for
'I he mosl important amendment,
however, so far ;.-■■ the church is concerned, i' thai which Provides for the
aklng of a vote hy ballot betwon
he 10th of December, 1024 and the
10th nf Juno, 1925, as to whether or
nol th- : bc si ip <»r the three
churches   hall ) nl ■   in the union.
(ii- thing i c rti in, said Mr. Mc-
i'; <■:.'. ■ tl -t ia, that tho Presbyterian ■. ■. . Ill continue in Canada and its doctrinal standards and
syat) ta ef goi ernment maintained
just as they are by over thirty mil
lion other Presbyterians in othei
ports ot thc world, who have refused
to join i:i any such movement but
aif Willing to remain united as they
have always been witli all other deno-
minations in the one great common
purpose of establishing the Kingdom
of God on earth, which alone can
unite us as nothing else can.
11. G. McBETH.
Vancouver. B.C.,
November 16th.
I    LUMBERTON    ij
\ CHIPS j:
MV.WAVAV.VAVAWWVW1
For the past two months, Dr. MacKinnon, of Cranbrook, has been giving lecture.; or. first aid work in Lumberton to a 'I: i '.i' ten, preparatory
to the examination which was conducted hy Dr. Green at tho St. Eugene Hospital a week ago last Sunday. Tlie following men from Lum-
berton too!-, the examination and pas-
it
effli
,y: Messrs. Sam
rt, und Major Col
; W. Hutchison of
d Bob Fraser of
tie, D. Kydd, Art
Walker and I.yle
i Klug of Lumberton also took the ex-
jam. The low requires ihe company
to have a first aid man in each camp
and from all Indications the B. C,
j Spruce Mills will not he found wanting.
The regular meeting of the I.urn-
j bet ton Club was held on last Wednes
day evening in the club looms. Seven
tables of whist wore in play during
the early part of the evening. It had
been previously decided to combine
the regular social gathering and an-
Insist on BAYER TABLETS OF ASPIRIN
Unless you see the "Bayer Cross" on tablets you are
not getting tlie genuine Bayer product proved safe
by millions and prescribed by physicians 24 years for
Colds      Headache
Pain       Toothache
Neuralgia
Neuritis
Lumbago
Rheumatism
cW<
;>> ^t* *££££>   only
f^S which contah
Accept  only   '•Bayer"  package
tains proven directions.
luihiy "Bayer" \toxcs of 12 tablets
Alio bottles of 24 and 100— Drui^iits.
Adiilrin U ihe trad* murk (refUter-wl in C-anaiU) ->f Barer MMiu'a.-turv -.-.r UomutvU-c-
ucWi-Iit nr Bnllcylienclil (Anrtjl "all rile ArW, "A. s. a."i. While it ia wii kn.-wn
Unit A-iilriu tneiuiM Barer manufacture, ia taalat Ibe public agaiuM ImltaUooa, :■.,,- i'iMrt»
ut Bart* Company mil Ik tumj^i wiui tbelr general trade mark,  ,..,■.- "Barer Otvu."
nuol business meeting and hold both
on the same evening. The plan was
decided sUCoeSB as there was a large
attendance out. Tlie following others were elected for thc ensuing
■ear:   .Mr.   1„   T,   Dwelley.   president;
Mrs. J. Walton, vice-president; Mrs.
It. B. Mitchell, treasurer; Mc .1. Har-
Ue, secretory. The financial report
md minutes of the last meeting were
read before the election of officers.
The financial report indicated that
thc club is in a healthy condition financially but is by no means opulent.
The  members of the  club  feel  very j
much indebted to the retiring officers
for having conducted the affairs of.
thc club in such a commendable man-
ner during the past two years.
Lumberton was the scene of nno-
ther serenade last week when Mr. and
Mrs. W. 1,. Hunter returned to Lumberton after their wedding trip, which
was spent in Borwcll and Spokane.
Everyone in the place was out fer
the occasion and anything that could
be made to produce a noise was put
in action. After the charivari was at
an end the newlyweds invited their
many friends in and treated them as
befitted the occasion. It was supremely evident that Mr. ami Mrs.
Hunter have many friends in Lumber-
ton who wish them the very best.
The regular bi-monthly meeting of
Lumberton L.O.L. 21* 15, was held last
Tuesday evening in the Lumberton
Hall, Considerable new business was
brought up for consideration, important among which was the receiving
of eight new member.- into the order.
The local order has enjoyed a steady
growth since its formation a little
over a year ago, and has established
Itself as one of thc permanent orga-!
nidations  in  Lumberton.
Rev. B. C. Freeman, pastor of the'
Methodist church of Cranbrook, conducted the services in Lumberton on
Sunday afternoon.
The hockey rink is beginning to
look as though it will see some action
during the coming winter, for last
Sunday morning a number of skating
enthusiasts spent several hours in
making the place ready for the first
flooding when the weather warrants
it. The low Bpots w-ere filled in with
sawdust, which occupied most of the
time. The light poles will be placed
some time during this week os it is
planned to have the rink illuminated
this winter which will permit of hockey being played.
Mr. Harley Minor, who is in charge
of one of the Holt caterpillars on the
logging operations for the li. C.
Spruce Mills, left for Spokane on
Monday in which city he will spend
several days.
Mr. C. B. Simpson, better known
as "Charley," among the logging fraternity   of   the   Lumberton district,
who has been employed ns logging superintendent during the past four
years, handed the reins over to Mr.
Norman Moore, who will hnve charge
in the future. Mr. Simpson will occupy a similar position for the Crow's
Nest Pass Lumber Company, beginning in the near future. Inuring Mr.
Simpson's connection with the B.C.
Spruce he has made many friends
among the men who have been em-
ployed ia the woods and it is with regret that we see him leaving Lumberton. The people of the town and
thc men in the enmps wish him success in his new position.
A number of Lumberton people
were in attendance nt the concerts
held in Knox Church. Cranbrook, on
last Friday and Saturday evenings by
the Welsh Male Choir.
The cookhouse at camp two was
completely destroyed by fire early
la-t Wednesday morning, the cause
of which has not been determined.
When the blaze was first noticed the
. whole kitchen end of the place wu
in flames. Mr. Beale. who is employed in the capacity of flunkey at this
j camp attempted to make his way to
the kitchen and received very severe
burns about the face and arms, which
necessitated his immediate removal to
the St. Kutrtr.e Hospital, where he is
[etting along as well as can be
expected. The cookhouse is rapidly
being replaced by a larger building
which will be more conveniently arranged.
Mr. Johns, of Seattle, spent several
days of last week in Lumberton in
the interests of the Martin General
Insurance Agency.
I   PAUL   NORDGREN
*
* When You
% CALL AT YAHK
•:•        Do Lot forget to visit the
! Paul Nordgren Store
* On Main Road, rar brldf*
*
* New   Shipment,   of   Seasonable
.;. Good. Alwaye Arriving.
*
******
msl
Canadian Cafe
and Rooms
YAHK, B.C,
Opposite Garage, Near Bridge
Comfortable  Rooms  with
Cafe ln Connection
We Solicit Tonr Patronage
A. Hjort - Prop.
THE
NEW HOTEL
Yahk, B.C.
S. MARKLUND Prop.
tod U Rocque, Julia. Rye .uul Ricuxlo Cortei, in Ccc-i
r^Jfrodvction .'Feet of CUy •   A P-xiunount i
At Star Theatre  Friday and  Saturday, December 5 and 6
1R Dr.Millrii
Picture
When in Yahk make your home at
THK NEW HOTEL.
This llolel Is new from linttom to top.    Twenty-fly* nicely furnished rooms. All are clean
and comfortable.
KKNTAI IIANT IM CONNECTION. PAGE EIGHT
THE  CBANBROOK   HERALD
Friday, November 28th, 1924
\\  Early Xmas Specials in Fee rl Beads   \\ j
S French Indestructible, Mon - Tarnishable
24 inch length $3.50
30 inch length $-1.00
NEW COLORED PEARL NECKLET
With BRACELETS to match at
$17.50 per set .;
To Our Out-of-Town Customers- Our Special GIFT CATA- ^
LOGUE is now ready and will be sent free of charge on receipt %
of Post Card. j!
THE GIFT SHOP
A. EARLE LEIGH, $
WATCHMAKElt * JEWE1LEB Korbnrj Atc.   r,
CHR1STA1AS CARDS AND GREETING CARDS 'f
a,
fffff fffff .'fffffffffffffffffff
LtOCAL
Cranbrook    TAXIDERMIST!!
Stafford Wilson uf Fernie was in
I Cranbrook on Wednesday, on his way'
I to Vancouver In his new Studebaker
\ thoroughly good program, more
than worth the price of admission, is
elng given by the high school pupils
ii December Bth, when they are
resenting the play "The Varsity
Coach" aL thc Auditorium, ns well as
i pageant, Britannia," glees, etc.
40-41
; *************************
ANOTHER   SPECIAL   \
SHRINE CLUB
Friday November 2
IS{\\
ftilL
I
AUDITORIUM - CRANBROOK
Music By
BANFFDANCEORCKESTt
DRESS: As You Please. Refreshments
Get Tickets From Your Shrine Friends
BORN— On Saturday, November , Whoa .-ill ready to leave on Wednes-
22nd, at the St. Eugene Hospital, to clay, it was found that .Master lln-
Mr. ond Mrs. A. F. Charters, of Wy-|bort bad chicken pox. Mr. Pollen
cllffe, a daufthter. had   made  all  arrangements   for  :t
— I home in Santa Barbara for the win-
Support the high school pupils in Iter,
their presentation  of  "The  Varsity j — .
Coach," at thc Auditorium on Friday      Th» Proceeds r™m tlu? <««" «'<*'""
next, December 5th.
-10-41
Mr. nnd Mrs. C. II. Pollen have
beon forced for the time lieing to
postpone their trip lo California on
account    of    sickness in the family.
play next Friday at tho Auditorium
are lo bo used towards defraying the
cost of studonl activities, principally
sport of various kinds. A worthy
cause—Will you do your part to help
it along,
40-11
THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT
Has Taken Possession of This Store
3 Weeks Only To Xmas
Special liberal discounts given to all Sunday Schools
and Christmas Trees.   Come in early and
do your shopping
Wonderful Display of Toys
Mechanical nnd Electric Trains, Elephants, Sewing Machines
Moving Picture Alachincs, Steam Shovels and
Hundreds of other Toys
Beautiful Line of Dolls
Dressed Dolls, Mama  Dolls,  Kid Body Dolls, Teddy  Hears,
Kiddie Kars, Tricycles, Sleds and Hundreds of
Picture Books and (iames
Wonderful Values in China
21 Piece Tea Sets (Lustre) per set,  $H.SO
43 Piece Dinner Sets  $17.50
')/ Piece Dinner Sets $2,S.(>()
Crown Derby Cups & Saucers, each $N.(K>
Grosvenor Cups & Saucers, each  $1.25
Nippon Cups & Saucers, each 35c and 25c
And Hundreds of oilier beautiful piece*. o( china trom
25c tn $2.00 each
Fancy Goods
Neckties, Shirts, Scarves, Suspenders, Collar Boxes,
Shaving Sets, While Ivory, Fancy Handkerchiefs and
Hundreds of other useful presents all in Xmas Boxes
A small deposit will secure anything.
We will put it aside till Christmas
Moffatt's Variety Store
Mail Orders Promptly Filled      -      -      -Phone 393
Rev. P, V. Harrison has been in
Nelson this week attending » meet*
■■•: of the diocesan synod,
A. I. Fisher, K.C, from Fernie,
has been in the city this week ap-
ring for the crown in Borne of the
liquor appeal cases beforo Judge
Thompson this week, W. R. Ross,
K.C., has been defending.
Dr, Wilson Herald, ear, nose and
throat specialist, hus been doubled, but will arrive in the city on
November 30th, remaining for some
days, and can be consulted at the
hospital. 40
Thursday morningi while working
at one of the B.C. Spruce Mills Co.
camps, Mr. A. Gordon, a resident of
Cranbrook, had tho misfortune to
have one of Ids legs caught between
two lops on the skldway, causing a
breaking of tlio hone below the
knee, lie was brought down with
as little delay as possible to Lumber-
ton and from there to Cranbrook by
the ambulance. Mr. Gordon had returned to the woods after an absence
of some months, during which time
he had been working for the City
Transfer Co.
Hand made Christmas gifts at sale
prices. ..Candy nnd afternoon tea,
Home Cooking nnd Orange Tree at
Knox Church Bazaar, Saturday December 6th, Pythian Hall 40-41
Mrs. W, K, Haslam will hold a sale
of fancy and useful articles of needlework, suitable for Christmas gifts,
at her home. JJlii Durick Avenue, on
Wednesday afternoon, December 3,
at .'1. p.m. -10
An addition this week to Cran*
brook's places of business is the Bluebird Beauty Parlors, which are being opened on Norbury Avenue in
the store recently occupied by A. E.
Leigh, jeweller. It will be in charge
of Mrs. G. Burgess, formerly of Waldo and Cranbrook.
The Kootenny Loaf made by the City Bakery is making a great hit among the lovers of pood bread. Do
not lake our word bul try a loaf for
yourself.     Phone 23. 36tf
This time in a pocket wateli
size 12, thin model, gold filled open case, 17 jewels, 3
adjustments, Swiss lever
movement, with gilt dial.
We Have only eight of
these und will dispose of
them nt the remarkably low
''     price of
$12.00 EACH
: W.H.Wilson
*♦****+♦*+•:•■:•■!••!•*<■ *♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦<
WANT ADS.
FOB HENT — Light housekeeping
rooms to let. Apply corner Garden Ave. ami Louis Streets   .10-41
FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE — Pair
of heavy lofrtfiny sleighs cheap, or
trade for lighter set. Also horsepower wood cutting machine. Cheap
for cash. Apply C. Wallace, Box
723, Cranbrook, B.C. S9tf
FOR SERVICE — First class Yorkshire boar, shipped into district by
Dominion Livestock Branch. This
boar stands for service at W.
Selby's and the charges are $3.00.
38-40
&
8
i
I
8
A
1
«
>•■.■;
IW
| >*■■■;
85
i,
?■■:
WmKAWnEAW
ier Si
O F
tCbrietmae .;
3-umtture ..
FOR SALE—Lee-Enfield rifle.   Apply B. Weston. 37tf
FOR SERVICE — Pure bred Yorkshire boar, Apply: Hughes, Wycliffe. 40-42
FOR SALE—One steel bottom, top,
and front Queen Heater, with
hearth and guard rails. Apply to
Box 458, or Mrs. A. H. Blumenauer. 34tf
SKATES & RIFLES
Rubben,    •    Overcoats, Heaters
Dining Room Suite    •    Davenport
Chesterfield    - Dressers    - Tab'es
Chcffonier    -    Cook Stoves
All  Kinds  of  Clothing
If you have anything to dispose of
please notify us
WE   BUY,  SELL,  OR   EXCHANGE
THOMPSON & HARROP
Second Hand Dealers
Cranbrook
GRAND
OPENING
ARENA RINK
TO-NIGHT
BAND in ATTENDANCE
Admission . . 50c and 25c
Get your Season Ticket'which
will admit you to all Band
Nights Free.
has just arrived. This contains CHAIRS,ROCKERS, PEDESTALS, DINING ROOM
SUITES, BEDROOM FURNITURE, LIBRARY TABLES, CHESTERFIELD
TABLES, CHESTERFIELD SUITES.
We believe thai our
stock and prices on Furniture will compare very
favorably with any west
ol Winnipeg, even the
larger cities. We have
had occasion lo prove it
by attempting to secure
ailicles which we were
Let us tell you how our
i
temporarily out of, but in no case were we successful
We invite your inspection of prices and quality.
Goods are made. The outside of
some Furniture, like Men's Suits,
look fine, but tlie inside will not
stand inspection. We don't buy-
that kind. We must have quality. We know that we have to
charge more, but we have no
come-backs, and we know, too,
that you want Quality, not just
Price.
Another Big Shipment of Christmas Wicker Goods Will
arrive in a few days - also Kindergarten Sets
and Wicker Doll Carriages
i
9
5
ti
■»'
t»
i
■
%
i
■■&
^>^^^^^^^^^^w^^^^^^^^^^^^^g
One of thc best programs yet pre-!    Wycliffe contributed to tlie tiiun- Chow Sue has worked in the district
sented  by  local  talent  is  promised ber of accident enscs on  Thursday for over fifteen years,
when the high scliool students take j last, when u Chinaman  who for u j _
the platform at thc Auditorium on; number of years has been engaged Knox Church Bazaar, Pythian Hall
Friday evening next. Thore is to be a| with the Otis Staples Lumber Co. Decomber 6lIl> Whltew<ia Chr| '
play, a pageant, glee flinging, orches^ got his glove caught in the rollers m„   „    Cook d |f
tral numbers, etc.   Over sixty pupils of the  resaw,  pulling  in  the  hand'
aro taking part, 40-41   and severing three  of thc  fingers.
MEN'S UNDERWEAR. — We carry a Full Line of
Men's Underwear, Pants, Boots & Shoes, Dress Shirts,
also a Full Line of Ladies' & Children's Apparel.
See the Latest Styles of Ladies' Dresses.
WE SELL FOR LESS — Quality Guaranteed nr Vour Money
Refunded.
If You Want Vour Money's Worth, Call al the
Kootenay Trading Co., Ltd.
CRANBROOK.
ACTOjf Ihe Street from I'. Burns & Co.
******************************************************
l    ANNOUNCEMENT!
! On Monday, December First,
JThe Bluebird
|   Beauty Parlors ||
I WILL OPEN ON
i        Norbury Avenue
j     IN THE PREMISES FORMERLY OCCUPIED BY
| LEIGH, the JEWELLER
i Mrs. G. Burgess.
***************
"THE VARSITY
COACH"
A COMEDY IN FOUR ACTS presented by the
High School Dramatic Gub
Auditorium
Cranbrook
FRIDAY, Dec. 5
Overture at 8.30 Sharp.
PLEASE BE SEATED BY THAT TIME.
High School Glee Club of
25 Voices
High School Orchestra of
Eight Instruments
ALSO     A
PATRIOTIC
PAGEANT
BRITA.NNIA
35 Students in Costume
TICKETS: Adults  $1.00 and 75c
(Back of Row "H")
CHILDREN: SO cents
(let Tickets from and High School Pupil, anil
exchimgo same lur Reserved Seal Ticket at the
Cranbrook Drug and Hunk Go., Store, on or
after Monday, December 1. 1924
A Real Treat By
Local Talent

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