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Cranbrook Herald Jan 13, 1921

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Array Til NATIONAL IDYIBTISia
KNOWS THI BUST ■ KIIIOI-
HA I'ATHOM/.KNTHKHKHALU
THE CRANBROOK
\   I'APBH   FOR   TIIK   HOSE
TUB   IM'i:i(Ksrs   (il   CRAN.
IIIIIHIK    fOBKHOST   ALWAYS
VOLUME 22
CRANBROOK, B.C, Till HSDAY. JAN.   liltli.   11)20
NUNBEI
CRYING OUT
FOR HELP
A 1M.KA FOR THE LIVES OF
EUROPE'S STARVING
CllllllltlN
INNOCENT VICTIMS
(IF TIIE (IREAT WAR
I'riinliriiitk   (« bo  Askod   Next
«'t't>k to Alluvlate Their
Sufferlngg
At this momont, In the war-ridden,
famine stricken uroas of Central Bur-
ope, a ghastly tragedy, beside which
tho horror.-, of the world war pale Into Insignificance, Is being enacted.
Glancing back over the recent holiday season ln Cranbrook, one cannot
recall any child who did not have a
happy Christmas; probably there
were very few whose every Christmas
wish was not gratified. Certain it ls
that there were none but what put on
eutflcient warm clothing and played
securely guarded against the coi'd,
and ate to repletion of Christmas dinner and dainties.
And we are thankful that such
should have been the case.
But!
On that same day tens ot thousands
of innocent little ones, through no
fault ot theirs, were destitute of
homes in which to spend Christmas
In Poland atone, tens of thousands,
huddled lu bare and comfortless refugee camps did not even know whether their fathers and mothers were
olive; they cried with hunger and
shivered with cold in thin summer
, dresses ln a t'and where strong men
are chilled In their greatcoats. Cases
of starving and dying multiplied into
tens of thousands on that day that we
wished each other a merry Christmas
and a glad New year.
The mothers ot Central Europe love
their children lust as do mothers ths
world over. In fact tho fierce maternal Instincts of the Slav temperament
Is almost unintelligible to the cooler
Anglo-Saxon races. These mothers
suffer when they can only give their
children one meal a day—and tbat
not fit to eat; when they see them
growing daily a little thinner and
whiter, and, unless they are quickly
saved, a little nearer death. They
can get no work for no ono can pay
them. If they have money they cannot buy; the shops are closed and
empty. And the privations that many
of the mothers suffer that their children may hove what little there ls.
frequently causes tholr own death so
that even loving care Is denied the
sick and starving babios.
Small wonder that typhus Is taking
Its tremendous toll amongst these undernourished. There Is a danger felt
among eminent authorities who are
battling with the situation that the
aeourge may break lHiunds and overwhelm othor parts of the world. Most
of us ean remember thinking thnt the
Spanish Influensn. which seemed to
have lain Its hold on Europe, was a
terrible thing, but how secure wc
felt Ihat It could not cross oceans
and continents nml roach our secluded romer. We are not secure against
any disease that wo ali'ow to spread
on another cniitlitcnt. Somo of tho
strongest men In the British and American Expeditionary forces and Hod
Cross units in Siberia succumbed to
tho dreud malady.
But our immedlnlo charge Is the
Uvea nt Europe's destitute children.
Excellent organizations are In charge
of collecting and distributing funds.
Services aro being given free and
overhead charges eliminated so that
one hundred cents ot every dollar
given will reaeli s needy chli'd.
Tlie Save lhe Children Fund committee recently organized In Cranbrook will hold a house to house canvass on Tuesday, Jan. 18th, as well
as appealing to the various organizations of this city. If the opportunity
to save a life wiih at our Immediate
door not a soul In Cranbrook would
Vet it go by. The opportunities are
boundless and Just as urgent aa
though an ocean did not roll between
us.   Surely no one will shirk.
Couhl there come to us In Cranbrook a flash of Imagination in which
we could see our own children in the
ranks of this ghastly multitude, their
eyes hollow, wistful and wondering,
their bodies thin, poorly covered and
shivering, all gladness and laughter
stamped trom their lives by the hand
ot famine, perhaps uncared for ln
Illness or death, surely when we think
how we would long for the weli'-fed
people ot prosperous lands to send
them assistance, we will not fall to do
our utmost, and that at once, for
those who will die If we do not teed
them.
Let us give, evon when It means
sacrifice, aa a thank ottering that onr
own children are clothed, well ted
and cared tor.    ,
First Mooting t\t
Provincial Library I
mar 3.
tlub
Officers Elected for the Year •
About Seventy Members
So Far All Told
Tho first general meeting of the
newly organize*} Cranbrook Recreation Club wan held on Monday even-
Ing of thin week, when lt Ir estini-
uted thero wero about sixty-live ln attendance. Tho object of tho meeting
wan to elect officers and a Iwurd of
management to run the institution,
and generally get the thing started.
Ah ono who might wolV bo wild to bo
the [irlme mover In getting the movement afoot, MrB. IC. L. Staples outlined the .iirogroHH made up to the present, and the general plan upon which
It was proposed to organize. It hud
been felt, Mrs. Staples said, that it
was a shame to have such a splendid
building standing idle in the city.
They -felt especially grateful to tlie
eighteen citizens who had signified
their willingness to stand back of the
movement to the extent of a hundred
dollars apiece, and without this support it would have been impossible ta
have gotten started.
In regard to the question of voting
at the meetings, Mrs. Staples said it
had been suggested that only those
of twenty-one years and over should
vote. If some arrangement of this
kind were not arrived at it would be
possibi'e for a family membership
to have control of too many
votes. In regard to the Junior members lt was planned later to allow the
Juniors to elect two of their own number to act on the board of directors,
eleven In number, leaving nine to be
elected by the senior members, four
of whom were to be officers. An alternative suggestion was to allow two
votes to a family membership, and one
vote to a Junior member over fifteen
years ot age.
A suggested constitution, for the government of the club was read by
Mrs. Staples, and will b i taken up later by the directors, to be ratified or
amended at a general meeting. This
constitution follows pretty closely the
accepted rules of any well run city
club. A great deal of the club's success
Mrs. Staples thought, depended on a
determination to run It on the same
tines as any well organized city club-
One thine for instance, that it was
essential to know was what yearly income could be expected, and it ought
to be expected that when a membership Is taken out, it will be at least
for a year, to be paid either three
months or a year at a time. A fluctuating membership was a danger that
they sought to avoid, since It might
do more than anything ei'se to put the
club out of business. Whii'e the ex-
,penses might not be quite so heavy ln
the summer. It was hoped with a steady membership to be able to get far
Wedding of Interest
in Baptist Church
>ltss Bertha Brown,   of This
City, Becomes Bride of Mr.
0. it. Tapltn, of Yahk
Considerable local Interest waa ev-
tnced tliis week in the marriage of
Miss Bertha Miriam Brown, tho se-
cond daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W*
11. Brown, of Norbury Avenue, and
Mr. Oni Hay Timlin, uf Yahk, which
was solemnised at llT-tU ou Wednesday morning Infct, January 12th,
in the Cranbrook Baptist church. In
thu absence uf un ordained minister
of the Baptist Church, Principal W.
M. Armstrong, of ths High School,
formerly lu tho active ministry, performed tho Ceremony, There was a
largo number <■*' interested friends in
attendance to witness, the ceremony,
tho church being full. Tho Interior
of the building was prettily decorated
with green antl white streamers and
flowering admits, and abuvo tho bride
und groom wore hung three white
bells.
Tho bride has been resident in the
city for the past eleven years, and that
ill ting this time she has gathered
round her a warm circle of friends
has been manifested in the number of
functions at which she hus been the
central figure, during the past two
weeks or so. Ti'o groom, an American by birth, Is a naturalized Canadian who has boen at Yahk for the
past three years or so, being a scaler
in the employ of the C. P. R.
Tho bride entered the church on the
arm of her brother, Mr. Harold
Brown, to the strains of Mendelssohn's
Wedding March, which was played by
Mrs. Art. Wallace, She wore a travelling suit of burgundy shade, embroidered in black, with seal furs,
and a picture hat with pink plush piping. Carrying a bouquet of pink and
white carnations, the bride made indeed a charming and radiant figure.
'Acting as bridesmaid was a sister,
Miss Alice Brown, who wore a navy
blue serge suit, and an old rose embroidered hat. She also was carrying carnations of ,pfnk and white.
Mr. V. Samblos, of Yahk, a friend of
the groom, asted us groomsman.
At the conclusion of the ceremony,
and during tho signing of the register, Mrs. Wallace rendered a vocal solo, "I I-ove You Truly."
At tlte home of tlie bride's parents
a post nuptial reception was held, and
a wedding luncheon served. Pretty decorations were in evidence in a
scheme of pink and white. Carnations of these colors and streamers
and white bells ail contributed to the
very effective  result  achieved.
The bride and groom left on the
westbound train for Spokane and other American cities, to spend a honey-
I moon of about two weeks. At the
I end of this time they expect to return
I to Yahk, where they will mnke their
Wl»ERS IS THE
SAW LEAGUE
ESSAY COMPETITION
The local branch of Lhe Navy L*ag-
Ue has received from Victoria tbe results of the Sett-Power Essay Competition, organized litre by Lieut. H. P,
Heimsing, last fall for the Iavy
Loague of Canada, whtn he paid tin-
city a visit. Classes in both high
and public schools wrote essays, the
best of which wero judged at Victoria,
ut tlie offices of the B.C. Division of
the Navy League. The prize winners are as follows:
Third Year High School—M. Alma
Sarvls, first; Bessie Woodman, second; Lenore Hill, third. Theso aro
marked as being excellent essays.
Firm and Second Year High
School—Leonard Burton, first; Gertrude Chalender, second; Lona Brogan and Jean Wilson, third.
Entrance Class—Nora Hume, first;
Hester Thompson and Alex Slsbet,
second; Eustace I-.ee, third.
Junior Fourth— Norman Parker,
flrBt; Frank Hawkesworth, second;
Jack Dixon, third.
Extra, Dlvlst.i III.— WInnifred
Beale and V. Roy, first.
The first prize winners in everycaae
receive pook prizes, and in addition
receive a picture, which, with the
name of the prize winner, will
be hung in their respective class
rooms. In the case of the extra prizes
awarded In Division HI. tho first
prize winners wili' receive books, and
In addition a certifcate. The other
prize winners will also receive books.
1921 Council ln
By.Acclamation
Elections   for   Mayor,   School
Trustees    und    Police
Commissioner
Nouiinatiun  day  on   Monday    last
How Votes Went
in Recent Elections
Analysis of  Figures  Shows  a
SI nunc Vote Outside of
Old Parties
At   the   recent   provincial general
brought with it a certain stimulation | elections a total of I3ti,939 votes were
ast fur Liberals, 94,903 for Conser-
FORUM 18 ORGANIZED
Following a meoting held at tho
Y. M. C. A. last Friday attended by
a number Interested, it was decided to
proceed with the formation of an organization something along tho lines
of a debating club or literary society. Mr. G. J. Spreuli' acted as provisional chairman for the meeting aud
Mr. L. C. Eckhert as provisional secretary, the Intention being to effect
more permanent organization at n
subsequent meeting which was to be
held this evening, Thursday, when ft I and Mrs. E. Armstrong
in mutters municipal, with the.result
that tho voters wero called upon yesterday to go lo Uio polls aud fill lho
mayoralty chair by baliot, and the
three vacancies un the School Board
ami ihu ouo ou the police commission
in the sumo way. .Nu contest was necessary in regard to tho city council,
there being only six nominations [or
Lho six vacant beats uu thut body.
Outside ot the mayor, ouly two of lho j
11)20 council will bu found round tho
big lablu al tho city hail iu 1921, thuso
being Aldormen Jones and Flowers.
For the School Board two of tho throe |
retiring mombors were renominated,
these being Messrs, W- A. Nisbet and
W. Henderson. For the vacancy ou
the Pollco Commission two new names
wero advanced, both aldermen ot tlie
lio council, Messrs. A. A. MecKJu-
uou and A. E. Jones. The retlrinng
Police Commissioner. Mr. A. J. Balmont, uud ono other member of the
1920 Police Commission, Mr. A. Gen-
eal, ure contesting the mayoralty, st
that in any casa there will only bo
ouo uew mom her on tho Police Com-
mission.
Tho full list of nominations .presented to Returning Officer T. M. Roberts on Monday, and opened by him at
;; p.m. that afternoon, is as follows:
For Mayor
Alfred Genest, proposed by C. J.
Liltlo, und J. M. McCreery. Alfred
J. Balmont, proposed by L. Clapp and
J. P. Fink.
For Aldermen
James A. Arnold, proposed by A. E.
Jones und F. M. MacPherson. A. E.
Jones, proposed by J. U. Walkley and
\V. C. Marshall. Mrs. Annie M.
Laurie, proposed by Mrs. E. J. Ha;/is
W. J. Flow-
,    .     . , ,     ...      homo.    There was a large number of
enough ahead to make sure of getting i
through the winter, and nlso reduc
well wishers nt tho station to see the
Ing the Indebtedness.     With the debt
happy couple off. and they were sped
,    ,    ,,   „ .. ,  ,.    „.   , on their way with all the customary
wiped off. lt was quite probable that ,       .  , .
.      '    .        , .. .    , .   -procedure belonging to such ausplc-
memborshlp dues might be decreased.:,
, . ... .   : lOUS occasions.
A statement of expenditures up to]   ,.      .      ... .
. .    ., ,        Many beautiful presents were In ev-
the present time was read by Major
„, .       ., ,    .       . ..        ,    .,        deuce from friends and relatives, at-
Hleks. which showed the mem Items i,    . , ,   , ; .
testing   o the popularity enjoyed by
to ho nR follows: ", '    ,     , .   .,
too young couple.     Friends of both
Kopntrs to'building, Including
plumbing, painting, wiring
nnd lights, lumber and
labor   $1223.00
Printing, estimated     10.00
Ooal    260.00
Stoker, 19 days, estimated  20.00
Cleaner  T.  20.00
Total   $1533.00
A membership of seventy-five was
reported to date, assuring a monthly
Income for tho club of about $2B0.
It was expected that Mr. J. A. Mirams would have been present at the
meeting on Monday, but misBtng connections, he did not arrive till tho day
following. Mr. Mirams will take up
the position of Instructor, and have
charge of the building, and complelo
control In the matter of forming classes in gymnastics, basketball, etc. He
will also bo responsible for maintaining what discipline and ordor Is necessary In tlto building.
The election of office™ was then
proceeded with on the basts of two
votes for a family membership, and
ono voto for a junior membership over fifteen years of age. The following officers were elected: ,
President   Mrs. E. L. Staples
Vice-President ... Major H. B. Hicks
Secretary   Mr- A* Ashworth
Treasurer  Mr, J. McLennan
Directors   Mesdames Oreen,
O. O. Staples and O.
J. Spreull; Messrs.
Argue, M. T. Harris,
O. Bristow and J. M.
Clark.
the bride and groom at Yahk made a
presentation to them lu the shape of
a substantial cheque.
Their many friends in this city and
elsewhere will unite in extending the
Slncereet congratulations to Mr. and
Mrs. Taplin. and express tho wish,
tlmo honored, but rever more sincere,
tbat tbey may enjoy a lengthy and
a happy married Vifo.
G.W.V.A. ORCHESTRA
MAKES ITS FIRST
PUBLIC APPEARANCE
MAYOR GALE WINS
ON A TECHNICALITY
Mayor R. H. Gale was declared elected by acclamation In Vancouver
last Thursday when nomination officials on a technicality threw out papers tiled by ex-mayor L. D. Taylor,
mayor Gale's only opponent. This ls
tho second time ln the history of that
eity that % mayor has teen elected to
■er?• a fourth term.
Tho G-W.V.A. orchestra made Its
debut on Wednesday night at tho Lib-
oral rali'y In tho Auditorium by rendering tiio music for the danco program. The engagement was quite
Impromptu for the orchestra members
were not prepared to fill any engagements for n tlmo on account of the
non-arrival of tholr music, which ts
now on tho way. However, the affair
was successful nnd n great deal of
credit reflects upon the new orchestra.
Judging by Its tlrst appearance we
can expect It to bo a credit to the G.
W.V.A. and Cranbrok generally.
The orchestra Is composed of F. T.
O'Hara. pianist, Nigel Thompson,
drummer, and J. S. Thornley, conductor-violinist. Arrangements have
been made to secure the services of
one of tbe finest snxnphone players In
East Kootenay.
At a recent meeting of the G-W.V.A,
executive of that body made a grant of
$10,00 to the orchestra members to
defray the expense of the first consignment of music.
was hoped there would bo a number
of ladies present who might take some
part In the work of Uio new organization. A suitable name was also to be
selected at the same time. Fairly
frequent meetings will probably be
held of .a diversified nature when the
society la fairly launched.
At the meeting held last evening,
It was definitely decided to give thd
namo of "The Cranbrook Forum" to
the new body, and also to follow al
ong the lines of a debating or literary
society. Officers were elected as follows:
President   W. M. Armstrong
lst Vice-President .... G. J. Spreull
2nd Vice-President
Miss D.  Drummond
Sec.-Treas *.. L. C. Eckert
Member of executive with above
Mrs. F. B. Miles
Meetings will be held on Tuesday
evenings at the Y.M.CA,. On Tuesday
next a round tablo discussion will be
held on the subject of women in politics, led by Miss Drummond and Mr.
McLennan.
Membership In the Forum ls open
to any who may be interested.
80 MEN BUSY ON
ROAD FROM BANFF
TO WINDERMERE
Highway Will be Put ln   Good
Condition for Touring
Motorists
The business of tho 1920 School
Board was wound up at a meeting
last Thursday, A special vote ot
.thanks was tendered to Mr. It. White
for his long and faithful service an
the Board, extending over tho last eleven years, coupled with an expression of regret that he was this year
retiring.
ors, proposed by A. G. Shankland and
L, Cmpp. Robert J. Blnnlnng, .proposed hy 0. H. Ward and L\ H. McPhee. W. Stephen Santo, proposed
by 0. It. Ward aud J. P. Guimout.
Fur School Trustee
Wm, Henderson, proposed by J. B.
Beaton and L. Clapp. Mrs. J. Jackson, proposed by Miss J. Drummond
and Mrs. Clapp. 10. H. McPhee, proposed by A. Haworth and A. D. Bridges. W. A. Nlsbet, proposed by E. H.
McPliee and J. F. Guimont.
For Police Commissioners
A. A. MacKinnon, proposed by R. E,
Seattle and Kev. K. W. Lee. A. E
Jones, proposed by J. M. McCreery
and J. P. Fink.
Vatlves, and 123,314 Tor Independent
candidates of all shades of political
ideas. With Conservative-Independent
vote neurly double that received by 11|
tho government, the Liberal admln-
Istratlon was yet sustained, capturing
twenty-six seats against fourteen captured by tho Conservatives, and Beven
i by the Independents,
Tho government's aggregate vote
was 3D per cent, of the total polled.
In compiling tho abovo figures the
total's polled In Vancouver and Victoria are given, though, of course,
these totals wero greatly swelled by
the fact that in the former city one
voter could vote for six candidates,
and iu the latter four. Thus the totals are far in excess ot the actual
number of voters who voted.
Tho full returns for the election are
now available following the completion of tho cdunt of tlie absentee
ballots.
Below are given the complete detailed figures for the candidates In
tho thirty-nine ridings of the province:
Alberni
Burde (Independent)     841
Money   (Soldier-Farmer)        676
Langis (Liberal)        34S |
Atlin
Kergln (Liberal)      3901
RETIRING MAYOR ELECTED
FOR SECOND TERM BY
GOOD MAJORITY
TWO NEW MEMBERS
ON BCHOOL BOARD
lirht Agreement nnd By-Law
Carries—Police Commissioner's (oniorlul.lt* Majority
Figures   in   the   civic   voting   hei'd
yeetardoy:
For Mayor
J.  A.  Genest       203
A. J. Uulinent      Si)
Majority       128
For Police Commissioner
A. MacKinnon i"i
E. Jones   10S
Majority   63
For School Trustees
(First three elected)
E. H. McPhOO    1S4
Mrs. J. Jackson     15S
W. A. Nisbot   159
w. Henderson    11:4
Committee rooms on behalf ot Messrs. Genest mid MacKinnon In the
were the scene of considerable activity between nomination day and ei-
300
86
30
3b9
LOCAL BRH1E 18
MADE RECIPIENT OF
FURTHER "SHOWERS"
CAUJARY — Between 80 and 90 men
are now employed on the Banff-Windermere automobile road is the word
received by T. M, Tweedie, M.L.A.,
from Ottawa. The work of clearing
will be gone on with steadily during
the winter season so far as the weather will permit, and the work
ot building the bridges will ai'so be
proceeded with rapidly and, if necessary, there will bo placed at work
as many as 100 men.
During the winter thero will be a
number of bunk houses built along tlie
Banff-Windermere road for the convenience of tonristB during the coming summer. Should the clearing be
completed this winter, the work of
grading the road will be continued
along Into ihe coming summer, nnd
it Is hoped that the highway will be
available to traffic at an earlier date
than was anticipated by tho government.
In the meantime the president of
the Calgary Automobile Club has received a wire from Invermere Board
M Trade that there are probably about
SO men working on the road and that
there could easily be double that number kept busy. The secretary of the
board at that point also points out
that there ts no unemployment problem In that district, and tiiat should
all tlte men required for the Job be
given occupation, the unemployed
woui'd probably have to be drawn from
-fttlgary or some other point where tne
congestion in *bat respect Is more
acute than In the Windermere valley.
The question ot geUing tho funds
for the constructlln ot this road might
be an obstruction In going ahead
with the work, but It is the opinion of' Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Conrad, ot
the Calgary Autl Club and the Board Moyie, were visitors to Cranbrook du-
(Oontliutd on Pag* 8**- ring the week.
Miss Bertha Brown, whose wedding
took place this week, was twice during the past tew days the central fig'
ure ln pleasant s-clal gatherings;,
which took the form of "showers," to
mark her approaching marriage, and
she must surely enter the matrimonial state secure In the knowledge that
sho has indeed the best wishes of a
host of friends in this city with her as
she embarks on life's greatest adventure.
On Friday evening of last week the
spacious home of Mrs, A, C. Bowness
was the venue selected for about
twenty-live of Miss Brown's young girl
friends, when she was presented wtth
a miscellaneous shower. The house
wus prettily decorated in a scheme ot
red und white, cupids, kewpies and
the customary hearts being well ln
evidence as befitted the occasion. A
hugo pumpkin adorning the centre of
the table was tied around, and when
opened by the bride-to-be, there was
a literal "shower" of presents before
her eyes. It was a no\el method of
bringing about the happy culmination
of tho evening. Cards were also en-
Joyed for a time, and  refreshments
ere served before the guests dispersed.
The second function took place on
Saturday ovoning at the home of Mrs.
Woodman, when the ladles of the Baptist Church and friends, about forty
In all, participated In a kitchen shower In honor of Miss Brown, Music
was rendered during tho evening,
Mrs. Kuhnert rendering a vocal solo
anu Miss Q. B. Shields a piano soi'o.
A 'good deal ot amusement was derived from a floral love story contest
which was engaged in, the winners
proving to be Miss Eastman, first, and
Miss Larkln, second. The gifts for
the bride-to-be were brought in In a
urge decorated basket by little Missis Helen Oilroy and Hazel Bowley.
Even if some of the gifts were of a
strictly utilitarian nature, they were
nevertheless of tho essential type
without which no home can get aiong.
The house was very prettily decorated with streamers In red and green,
nnd also cupids and kewpies, and hefore breaking up about midnight, refreshments wore also enjoyed by, the
company.
Casey (Fed. Labor) 	
Ross (Conservative) ....
King (Independent)  	
Daiy (Labor)   	
Bush (Independent) 	
Cariboo
Yorston (Liberal] 	
Fraser (Conservative- ...
ChlUlwack
Barrow  (Liberal)   	
Coote (Conservative)  ....
Columbia
Buckham (Liberal)   	
Parsons  (Conservative)  .
Comox
Menzles (People's Party)
Anderson (Conservative)
Stewart  (Liberal)   	
Mclnnls  (Independent)   .
Cowlchan
Duncan (Independent) ..
Cheeke  (Conservative)   ..
Cranbrook
King   (Liberal)        941 ;
Caven  (Conservative)       905*1
Delta
Oliver  (Liberal)     1,334
McKenzie (Conservative)    1,116;
Payne (Fed. Labor)   1.107-
Dewdney
Catherwood (Conservative)    1.535j
Martyn (Liberal)    1,369;
Curry (Fed. Labor)    473
Esquimau
Pooley (Conservative)     1,158:
Helgeson  (Liberal)     685:
ection day. ami when tbe results were
i made  known   the  successful   candidates   wbo  wero  present  mado brief
speeohee thanking   their   supporters
The bylaw to ratify the agreement
I wiih tho B. C. and Alberta Power Co.
g,.j! also carried, having well over tlie re-
qured two-thirds majority.
The annual meeting of the Baptist
i Women's Mission Circle was held on
| Tuesday afternoon of this week at Uie
home of Mrs. Bas=ett. Officers were
| elected as follows:
President .. Mrs, F. L. Constantino-.
lst Vlce-Pre=,  Mrs. A. Bridges.
2nd Vke-Pres. .. Mrs. J. F. Bridges.
Secretary   Mrs. W. Haynes.
Treasurer  - Mrs. E. Birce.
Link SeCy Mrs. J. L. Palmer.
1145: Cr:itile Ro'' Sec'>"' -Mrs* w- D* Giiroy.
1,032:
1.911
1,084
.    5841
.    3301
1.354
1,233
806
,    751
KINERAL OF LATt
MRS. J. T. M1UAR
HELD Sl'M»A\ LAST
Much Sympathy Kelt for  Hus*
hand   and  Baby Bereared
Under Sad Circumstances
The hand of death seems to have
been resting heavily on the city of
i'ate. but It is seldom that such a
depth of sympathy has been aroused
as In the case of the late Mrs. J. T.
Gadsen (Soldier-Labor)      479  Miliar, whose passing last Thursday
Fernle I ft the St. Eugene hospital bereaved a
Uphill   (Labor)        926; husband and  left motherless a four
Herchmer (Conservative)       769; daya old baby.   Complications follow-
Fieher (Liberal)        719 ; Ing the confinement seemed to set In,
Fort George j and on the day following Mrs. Millar
Perry (Liberal)    1.140; showed some signs of falling, grad-
Cocker (Conservative)       708  ually sinking from then on, lapsing
Robs (Farmer)       139[into unconsciousness some hours be-
tWrnnd Forks j fore the end came.
Henninger  (Liberal)      393:    Mrs. Millar was a young woman of
McKie (Conservative)       384  thirty years of age. well known from
(ireenwood . a long residence in the city, having
MacLcan   (Liberal)        392 her home here both before and after
Jackson (Conservative)       292 her marriage.    She was formerly a
Pitman  (Farmer)        115   Miss  Hirtz, of Elko,  and  leaves to
Islands
Jackson (Liberal)       581
Ci'ark (Conservative)      481
Carey (Soldier-Farmer)     360
Kamloops
Anderson   (Liberal)       1.617
Stevens (Independent)    1,408
Crawford (Conservative)   1,295
Kaslo
mourn her untimely passing besides
her husband and young child, two
brothers and one sister.
The funeral was held on Sunday
l.i-t from her home on B-irwell avenue
to the Catholic Church, where Father
Murphy conducted the funeral service, and there was a large attendance
of sympathizing friends, many floral
Lister  (Conservative)        758' tributes being laid on tho coffin. The
Keen  (Liberal)        7391 pall Jwarers were    Messrs-    H.    A.
Llllooet j Brown, J. P. Fink, A.  Ingram,    J.
McDonald (Conservative)      335\ Jackson, A. Genest, and U. S. Collins.
Bryson (Liberal)       213 j Among those from outside pointB at*
Carson (Soldier-Farmer)      159 j tending the funeral were Mr. and Mrs.
Nanaimo \ Kay Hlrtz, of Elko, and Mr.   J.    J.
Sloan  (Liberal)       1,370 Pufour, of Fernle, a brother-in-law of
Barnard (Socialist)    1,1711 Mr. Millar.    Interment was made In
Gilchrist (Conservative)     785 the Catholic cemetery.
Nelson
Dr. Hose (Conservative)   1,232
O'Shoa   (Liberal)         763
Newcastle
Guthrie   (Socialist)        704
Fraser (Fusion)        424
Hawthornwalte (Socialist)      419
Bickle (Soldier)        125
New Westminster
Whiteside   (Liberal)       1,980
Sloan   (Independent)      1,611
Glfford (Conservative)   1,006
North Okanagan
Macdonald   (Liberal)       2,037
Laldman  (Farmer)     1,770
North Vancouver
Halhes  (Independent)      2,681
Vlnaon (Conservative)   1,180
Orchard (Labor)   1,129
Chubb  (Liberal)        918
Omlneca
Manson (Liberal)     630
Murray (Conservative)     273
Prudhei'mo (Independent)          79
Prince Bapert
Pattulo (Liberal)    1,601
(Continued on Page 1)
Among the floral offerings at tho
funeral were tlie following:
Cranbrook Trading Co., a cross.
Order of Railroad Trainmen, a
wreath.
C. P. Office Staff, cross.
Mr. and Mrs. Brault. star.
Mr. and Mrs. F. M MacPherson,
spray.
Beattle-Noble, Ltd., spray.
Mr. A. C. Blaine, spray.
Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Fink, spray.
Mr. and Mrs. Ingram, spray.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Jackson, spray.
Mr. and MrB. Beaton, spray.
Mr. nnd Mrs. A. E. FergiiHon, Fernle, spray.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Thels and family,
Spokane, star.
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Thels and family
of Spokane, cross.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Burton, spray.
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Chrtsler, California, spray.
Mr. and Mrs. Genest, heart.
Bowling Club Boys, anchor.
C.P.R. Conductor!, wrsath. PAGE TWO
THE      CRANBROOK      HERALD
Thursday, January IS, t»S0
■ a.B.ni-.aa.a
I   in-ani-litB
, -suit You Eear ."
; en mi** . /"•
.- ...-M--S .-GiKsasiOB-!*)   ■
« ■
,  Plays AU Records at  ■"
. Their Best _■
ZM
fPrf
Concerto Dally
RAWORTH BROS.
JEWELLERS and
OPTICIANS
Next to th« Font Offleo.
Open Eranln-fa r
■  ■.■■■■■■I
a  ■■■■■■■■■
Ok Cranbrook herald
Publflhed   K.ery Tliuraday  by
WILL A. BliLBTSON lidltor
F.  A.  WILLIAMS Assistant  Mgr.
Bub-criptioil Price, t'-M) t V.-ur
BnbHorlpUun Prico, r.s., sf!M u Year
'•Wll'*   a   MI.al.Mi)   Wllltout   a   "lu..1.-"
rrlutetl  lis   L'ulou  Labor
called upon to do its part
in this work of mercy.- A
campaign 1ms been organized
to cover the eity, and on Tuesday next canvassers will be out
soliciting for contributions to
the cause. The money to be
raised is for one specific object
and oue only — to save the children. The fund is to be sent
through direct channels so that
there is no doubt as to whether
it is used for its proper purpose.
Think on it for a while, and let
your heart feelings prompt you
as you go to your purse. Put
your own children over there in
Europe for a time in your mind
and retlect how glad they would
be to see succour coming to
them from across the sea.
Cranbrook Itas seen many a
drive for funds before, and lias
gone "over Ilie top" for many
a good cause. In Ihis case there
is no "lop," because the need is
greater than any definite calculation can figure il lo. Money
doesn't always buy happiness,
but in this ease live dollars is
going to purchase a lot of childish happiness.    So be ready.
"Inasmuch as ye have done it
unto the least of these   .   .
Slmllkameen
MacKenzIe (Conservative) ..
Chambers (Liberal) 	
Slocan
Hunter (Conservative)  	
Nei'son (Liberal)  	
Tlie second annual   Odd Fellow's'Smith (Labor)  	
ball' held TuoBday ovening at Wool-j                  South UkaiiiiRUii
worth bail, wus without doubt   tho -,0"°*1 (Conservative) 	
TWENTY Hill ISO
Extracts trom the Cranbrook
Horald ot this date, 1900
1,354
1,204
. COS
. 470
.    1128
PIMM   THK   VIDW*POINT  UP
Ul'B CONXEMPOBAltlES
Contrasts ot Jluiunii Nature
Tho brutal Nero and his fiddle; Uio
strenuous Hooaevelt with his lender
fondness for babies; the gentle Debs
with his Imaginary lovo for terrorists; the buoyant Murk Twain, who
lived and died a cynic; finally, tho
Poet-Scavanger, all bear evidence of
the duality of human nature. Nicholas LdngworUt recently defined an
optimist as a member of tho Bartenders' Union wlio Htlll keens Ills
union dues paid up, Wo would add
to the list tlie garbage collector who
decorates Ills cart with paper roses.
The lesson, we suppose, Is that there
is always a place ill the harness for
ii flower; thai a touch of relative
1,881!  beauty will aid ill (he most distasteful'
Nu letters to tho uJltor will bo Inserted exceu* over ttie proper signature
and address of tlie writer, The rule
uOnula of llu exception.
AdvorllsliiK    Rates    on    Application.
Cbaoges for Advertising MUST be lu
Una olllce  VVeuuead-iy noou Hit, cunent
week to secure UUeutton.
CItAiNUltOOK, BRITISH COLUMBIA
THURSDAY. JAN. Lltli, 11121
SAVE TIIK CHILDREN!
is there anything that strikes down to the depths of the
heart as the cry of a child? Is
there anything quite so poignant as childish grief? Stony
hearts obdurate to all other human appeals have be-jn melted
before now by the appeal of a
child, unspoken, but yet eloquent! It is because pain and
suffering seem so unnatural in
the life of a child that these
things arc so. The childish
mind cannot grasp the inevitability of cause and effect, has
no comprehension of the way
to a future comfort over a present road of pain. A child is so
wrapped up iu tiie occupation of
the moment that its joy becomes an ecstasy, and its sorrows
correspondingly intensified also.
Tlie war is over, but its af
termath is still with us, and
brings responsibilities that
ought to be faced just as squarely as the problems of the war-
years. Repeated evidences are
met with that Canada, of all the
belligerent nations, has been
making tlie quickest re-adjustment from tlie abnormality of
war to tlie pristine peace times,
That does not necessarily mean
that her re-adjustment prob
lems have been any less than
those of other nations at war,
llul there is a danger arising
from the speed with whicli Canada has been progressing back
to pre-war times and conditions
anil it is that we are liable to
lose the proper viewpoint of
what other nations have had to
contend with.
Is it not only proper that the
lagging ones should look for
help to those far ahead? That
is what some of the European
countries are doing at the pre
sent time. Thus it comes ab
out that lhe attention of all
warm-hearted Canadians is being directed to the pitiable
plight of thousands of children
at. tlie present lime in the coun
tries of Central Europe. They
cannot understand why their fathers and brothers were taken
from them to light, why there
should be no food in tlie laud,
nor why they should be suddenly deprived of tlie things that
go to put sunshine in their Iiv
es. They only know the
things that were now are not-
and a waii of woe arises to
which we ought not to deafen
our ears. It is a veritable miserere of pain and suffering that goes up from the little
martyrs of Central Europe—innocent sufferers from the effects of war. Famine and disease are stalking abroad in
their lands. Surely we can give
of our plenty to those which
have none?
A nation-wide campaign has
been carried on for the alleviation of these conditions in th.!
the war stricken ureas of Ceu
tral Europe, and Cranbrook is
ON ITS WAY  DOWN
Indications are not lacking
that the era of high prices is
due to pass out. The peak of
the abnormally high prices
seems to have been reached,
and now tlie country seems to
be making its way slowly down
Ihe opposite slope. It is just as
well that the descent, if it is
to become general, is made gradually. A sudden slump in
prices al! round would precipitate a disastrous stale of affairs
Infinitely worse than at present, and from whicli recovery
would undoubtedly be far slower.
In some lines there is not
much of a drop apparent up to
lhe present, and perhaps there
is not one commodity yet that
tan show a price level today
comparing with pre-war* condi
lions. Hut the ultimate consumer, Ihe lasl man in the pro
cession, tlie man who has had
after all to bear Ibe brunt of
lhe high cost of living, sees
many signs which almost make
him take hope again, and en
courage him lo show an added
interest in living.
There is in tlie situation
as it exists today a greater
need than ever for the closest
co-operation between capital
and labor. If a falling market
shows that the product of labor
is not bringing a return as great
as that which prevailed at tlie
time prices were at tlieir peak,
then the only logical tiding is
for labor lo bring its price down
in some fixed proportion.
There may be glaring inconsistencies in tho present day national economic system, but so
long as it is in vogue, the only
Ihing to do is to patch it up
till the time seems ripe to bring
changes into effect.
Upon the leaders in both
camps rests a heavy responsibility in this matter. There is
going to be a degree of moderation called for on both sides
Ihal will test the farsightedness
of the respective champions. An
uncompromising attitude on el
I her side will do more than
anything else to make conditions that are admittedly going
to be difficult absolutely Impossible, Step by step is the
only way down to economic
safety, however rapid was the
ascent. It is a long way down
and many of us feel we would
like to take the toboggan route
If we could see the end of the
slide, that would be permissible
perhaps, hut ln the meantime
it will be better to take things
cautiously.
MORE MEN THAN WOMEN
HAVE  APPENDICITIS
Medical reports shown men are
more subject to appendicitis although
many sudden cases occur among women. It can be guarded acuinst by
preventing intestinal Infection. Tho
Intestinal antiseptic, Adler-l-ka, acts
on BOTH upper and lower bowel,
moving all foul, decaying matter
which might cause Infection. It brings
out mutter you never thought was tn
your system and which may havo
heen poisoning you for months. Adler-l-ka Is KXCRI.LKNT for gas ol
the stomach.   IJeattle-Noblo, Ltd.
most successful event of   the    kind
er given ln town.
In a private letter to tho editor of
o Herald, Hon. Richard MoBrlde,
minister of initios for this province,
xteiuls lhe compliments of the season
to the people of Cranbrook, and expresses lils appreciation ot tho courteous treatment ho received at tholr
hands on lho occasion of his recent
visit hero,
l»r. lirccu, Clurenco Miner, P. J.
SmyUie, Tim Farrell and brothers
and Mr. Taylor, canio up from Moyle
lo enjoy the Odd Follows' danco.
Tho mines at Klmbcri'oy shipped ore
lo lhe vuluo of $105,000 to the smelter
ut trail during Uie year 1900, the total
tonnngo from all sources amounting
lo $9,000,000.
CONCERNING   CANADA
1,488
8,265
2,444
1,909
.    945
1,315
2I
Rogers ll.lberul)
South Vancouver
Neelands (Labor)	
Hoiif-son (Conservative )...
ltusscll (Liberal)  	
Mcintosh (Iudcpetidcnt)  ..
Trail
schofleld (Conservative) ..
Iieschuinps I Liberal i —    S4S
Vancouver ('ity
Smith (Mrs.)  (Liberal)   18.082
MacKenzIe   (Liberal i    14,322
l-'arris   (Liberal)     12.9S7
llainsey   (Liberal)    12,077
MacDonald  (Liberal)    12,045
llowser   (Conservative)    12,091
Dougherty  (Liberal)    10,730
llluck  (Conservative)    10,728
Warden (Conservative)  10,011
Howe (Conservative)  10,191
Patterson (Conservative   9,947
Martin (Independent)    9,407
Muhan (Conservative)   9,091
Woodworth (Fed. Labor)   7,074
Trotter (Fed. Labor)    7.007
Richardson (Fed. Labor)   7.386
Cotsworth (Independent)   5.021
tsk.   Brooklyn Baglo.
O.S, and lis Navy
ihitbly tho decision of the United
government to build lho larg-
ONE ACCOUNT
The Joint Savings Account is the most practical arrangement for conducting the financial
business of the home.
Should the husband be away, sick, or find it
inconvenient to get to the bank, his wife can
make deposits or withdrawals without any
trouble. tu
IMPERIAL BANK
Cranbrook Branch,
OF CANADA
W. R. Grubbe, Manager.
Siiti-Agency nt Kimberley.
Tin*
IT
Slilto:
OSt navy lu tlie world nood not ho
taken too aerloual? by Uio oilier luir-
ttoa iiitercsli'd, which seems ul |'ren-
ont to in- Groat Britain uud Jiiimn.
Tho malter simply has heen rocoiu-
meiidod hy Hou. JosGpllUB Daniels,
whom uohody hns accepted very seriously at any time, and who will have
to givo -placo to another naval necro-
tary within tho mmce of about two
months. Tho present Industrial' tendency in tho United States portends
a considerable reduction 1n tho federal revenue, and the expenditure of
billions of dollars upon a navy thut
never should be required may not
seem so desirable within the compass
of  six months.—Victoria  Colonist
When in 1G15 Samuel de Champlain
the ureal French explorer, decided to
visit the Huron Indians who dwelt in
the Georgian Bay area of Ontario, he
made one of tho itiost pleasant and
historic trips of his adventurous career. He was wearied witli the regular routine of his career as governor
ily tiio seventeenth of August of that
year he had reached the village of
Cahlague, where the thriving township of Orillia Is situated now. He was
greeted in a very varied manner. Tho
braves had heard of his prowess and
wero inclined to respect the great
white warrior; the children fled into
ihe forests witli shrieks because he
was the first white man many of
them had ever seen: wondering
squaws gazed motionless upon lhe
strange party.
. Chaniplain estimated that there
were 200 lodges in the savage encampment, but there were other
bands in the vicinity and they were
summoned by their chiefs to return
to their winter homes to greet tlie
visitor in savage state. In the meantime lhe explorer remained ln the
villago lie had entered first until tlie
time for tho slate visit to their ciilef-
lains had arrived. ,
When he was awaiting tills hour
he hunted and fished with the native
leaders and succeeded In establising
himself in tlieir good graces. They
regarded him as a wonderful stranger, his tales of life on the other side
of Uie ocean never failed excite their
keenest interest, while again and
again they were dumbfounded by the
things this great white man couVd do
with ease. Gradually he established
friendly relations between himself
and the children—almost naked—of
Uie tribe, so tbat In later years he
could look back with a grent deal of
interest to tho time lie dwelt in the
tent of the Hurons.
Crossflei'd (Independent)   4,SOS)
Ashworth {Independent).   3.3971 modules, including    labor   and
Harrington (Socialist)      3.104  product.* of labor Is   .passing.
Days of Honiljnslniciit
Whether It bo for good or ih',   the
war stni.iHra of v.ilues for all com.
the
The
Millar (United Veterans)     2,869 purrlif-slng public has determined
North (United Veterans)    2,091' vai'ue of products    by    setting    the
Smith  (Socialist)     2.41S prices,  to  some  exlent  at    least,  al
Stephenson  (Socialist)     1.9S2 which it will buy.   That action auto-
Barp (Socialist)    1,800 matlcally determines the prico of the
McQuoid (Socialist)    1,699 labor which enters into the produc-
Dennis (Socialist)   1,578 tion of the goods. Thus a law Is pro-
Thomas (Independent)    1,568 Claimed which cannot be'set aside by
SHIPMENTS   TO
TRAIL 8MEI/TEK
Tho following is a list of the ore received At Trail smelter during    tho
week ending December 31st, 1920:
Mine      location Wet tons
Bluebell, Hiondell        754
Canada Copper, Allenby      387
Horn Silver, Chopnka      50
■loslc,  Rossland          53
Molly Hughes, New Denver —       4
Paradise, L. Windermere       29
Xorth Star, Kimberley      in
Company mines   10202
Totn
.11570
Ore received at Trail smelter during
tho week ending Jan. 7th, 1921:
Mlno Location Wet tons
Paradise, L, Wlndemiero       25
Company mines   0233
Victoria
OViver (Liberal)   	
Hinchliffe (Conservative)
Hart (Liberal)   	
Olearihue (Liberal) 	
Stewart (Conservative) ..
j the decrees of any court in the land
C.49S or of tlie world. In some cases the
5,30a matter Is being adjusted by amicable
5,016 arrangement between employers and
4,5511 employees; in others hours of labor
1.170  are  being  reduced  or  manufactories
Northcott (Conservative)    4.111 are being closed temporarily.
Sutherland (Conservative) .
Hall (Dr. EO (Independent)
Hall (Hy. C.) (Liberal) ...
(Jlllespie (Independent) —
Bell  (Independent)   	
Ohristiun (Sol.-Labor)  	
Dakers (Sol.-Parmeri   	
McLeruan (Soi'.-Ubor)    1,202
Dooley (Soi--Labor)
Pierce (Fed. Labor)
Oiolma (Ind.-Sol.)
4.0'
4,010
3.868
2,466
2,045
1,716
1.318
,    Owing  to the conditions  now  pre-
I vailing in  tho industrial world there
' Is bound to bo a period of what is
'called "deflation,"   leading   to readjustment and resumption  of activity.
i Thero is a great scarcity on the con
ttnent of Europe of ai'most everything
L0M! produced in Canada. Be-establshment
8.14 j of credits Is the one thing needful to
77S  set the wheels of industry in motion.
Davles   (Independent)         47E. All these things will be accomplished
McDonald (Fed. Labor)    37S
Yale
McRae (Conservative!     913
Cameron   (Liberal)     737
Walter  (Ind. Liberal)     657
in duo process of time. Canadians
have no reason to peer into the future with misglvintrs. No country in
the worid has a greater assurance of
prosperity. -Victoria Colonist.
CONFIDENCE
The basis on which everything should he purchased—
be it what it may.
THE WILLIS
PIANO
is made in tlie largest exclusive piano factory in Canada, devoted solely to the manufacture of Willis Pianos
and Players.
Confidence in Hie Extraordinary worth of This Instni-
mi'iil has built up tliis big business. That should make
you confident in your choice of a WILLIS— tuneful
and melodious.
WILLIS PIANO STORES,
ii
Block, Lethbrldge
Sole Representatives for Knnlie, Chirkerlngr,
Autoplano und Amnio Rcprmlucinir Plaints
HOW THK PROVINCE VI
IN  RECENT ELECTIO
ITEI)
NS
)
697
661
matlon
2,863
2,712
1,499
266
.    272
269
239
180
1,858
(Continued from Page Ont
BeTelstoke
Blchmond
RosBland
Sunlch
1,766
1,037
SAVE THE CHILDREN!
THOUSANDS OP CHILDREN IN TIIE WAR RAVAGED COUNTRIES OF CENTRAL EUROPE ARE IN DISTRESS—AND THEIR OWN GOVERNMENTS UNABLE TO
PROPERLY PROVIDE FOR THEM. THE RESOURCES OP
THESE COUNTRIES HAVE BEEN SO IMPAIRED BY THE
RAVAGES OF WAR AS TO BE UNEQUAL TO THE TASK
OF CARING FOR THESE HELPLESS CHILDREN.
SO AN URGENT CRY FOR HELP COMES OVER TO
US. WHAT ARE WE GOING TO DO WITH IT? WERE
THERE MANY CHILDREN IN CRANBROOK WHO DID NOT
SHAKE QUITE GENEROUSLY IN THE CHRISTMAS BOUNTY? YET THINK HOW MANY OF TIIE CHILDREN IN EUROPE SPENT THE TIME IN MISERY, HUNGER AND
SUFFERING.
(IN TUESDAY NEXT, JANUARY ISUl, A CANVASS
OE TIIK CITY WII.I, BE MA1IK ON BEHALF OF THE SAVE
TIIK CHILDREN KUND. YOU CAN DO MUCH TO BRIGHT-
KN THK EXISTENCE OF THK l,ITTI,K SUFFERERS IN
EUROPE. THAT TIIKY ABE INNOCENT SUFFERERS
MAKES THEIR PMOHT AM, TIIK MOKE PATHETIC.
BE GENEROUS. CAN YOU TURN DOWN TIIE
PLEA OF THE CHILDREN? LET THE CITY MAKE A SUCCESS OF THIS EFFORT AS IT HAS DONE IN MANY ANOTHER NATIONAL CAUSE. THE MONEY RAISED WILL
BE SENT DIRECT TO THE COUNTRIES WHERE THE
NEED EXISTS. IT WILL BE USED ONLY FOR TIIE SPECIFIC PURPOSE FOR WHICH IT IS RAISED.
Will YOU help on Tuesday Next,
January 18th? Thursday, January 18,1920
THE      CRANBROOK     HERALD
PAGE THREE
LEARN TO I.AItN
NELSON BUSINESS COLLEGE
l-IIACTK'AI. COMMKIiriAl, (OIKS.. IN
SIIIIIITHVMi,   TvmVHITINt*,    BOOKKEEPING,    COSDTEBCLU,
LAW,   PENMANSHIP,   COMMERCIAL   ENGLISH   AND  SPELLING,
IIAV AMI NU-MT CLASSICS
NEW l'ERSI COMMENCES MONDAY, JANUARY 8rd, lll-'l
i'or Particulars Apply lo    C. «'. TYLER, Prlnelpnl
P. II. Box, 11, Nelson, B.C
REPORTS ON CONDITIONS
ENCOUNTERED IN
THE KOOTENAYS!
I ITALIAN COMMITTED
IN   III AIRMOKE
MURDER CASE
Mr. Walter Drlnnun. provincial sec- i Tlie adjourned .preliminary trial at
retary of the (J.W.V.A., who has re-' blalrmore ot Jim Zltto wlio Is held
cently returned to the Coast from a I on a charge of shooting Mrs. Olive
trip  through  the Kootenays and on j -McDonald on the night of December
STORn    DOORS
Wo are overstocked on these, and will sell at roduc
While Thoy last
Ponol doors 2 rt. s x t; fr, 8, Hi In. Codnr 	
l-nnol ii -s 2 ii. iii x li fl. Ill, ltd In- Cedar 	
tlluzed doors, 2 tt, 0 x 0 tt. n, 1% In. Cedar	
Qlnsotl doors 2 tt, 8 x 0 tt. 8, IV* In Colnr     	
Olttt-otl doors 3 tt. hi x 0 n. in, IH I". Codar     	
All doors nuiih' nt ,'li-ni-1 cilnr and nil itliiss doors itln/i-d li.li. Qplgn
$r,.sn
(0,80
$0.80
(7.00
(8.00
Cranbrook Sash & Door Co., Ud.
-llI:..ILli.l. . ;t.l.!tL'.\.L.J
1     A Pleasant Drink
FBRNIH BEER Is the best beverage mado, for business
professional men, for weak persons, everybody,
everywhere, this beer is hale refreshment for wholesome thirst.
through Southern Alberta, reported
that lie did not find anywhere, excepting perhaps ut Nei'sou, a really serious unemployment problem. At Nelson, he said, there is some need for
relief, a number of returned men
finding themselves in straitened clr-
cu instances. The demand for help is
limited everywhere, he says, and
what dues exist is (iiilckly satisfied,
hut. there i.- not a serious problem in
tlie Kootenays in this regard as tho
j Coast aud otlier places.
| The provincial secretary was much
: impressed with tiie provincial con-
j ventlon ot the Alherta G. W. V. A.,
which was held ut Medicine Hat. and
which tie attended. The provincial
members co-operate in u splendid
manner with Um association in thut
province, and a number of iii.-ui.mts
wero present ut the BMfetonB,
Contrary tu the general imptvs
son, Mr. liriiniaii points out that the
BOW president of the Aioerta provincial command Is not In favor ot the
riij.ono bonus scheme, but does favor
Hid Issuing of further gratuities
outlined in Lhe plan submitted at the
(i.W.V.A. Dominion convention at
Montreal.
Mr. Drlnnan rejiorts the different
locals of the G.W.V.A. to be in a
flourishing condition.
THE ELITE IN BEER — 'NUFF SAID.
Fernie-Fort Steele Brewing   Co.
WALTER I1ARWOOD
Manager
FERNIE, B.C.
-~":^^
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. [
of Canada Limited
Offices. Smelting and Refining Department
TRAIL, BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS     AND     REFINERS
Purchasers of Gold, Silver, Copper and Lead Ore*
Producers of ((old, Silver, Copper, Milestone, Pig Lea-rand
Zlne "TADANAC" Brand.
R
-jMCtijOHtfit CljUlTlj
li a.m. -
\'l noon.
SCNDAY NEXT
Divine Service.
■ School Session.
7:1111 l\ II.—Divine Worship.
Preacher: REV. I!. IV. LEE
— A hearty invitation to all -—
* fi*- ,: '-"-"--1-- ■-'-*■■* br"-^ i^*-3 *-*-! --.-3>J-ffi "^ ir-*"- t-^ - - -•'.    -.
MUNICIPAL REFORM
Representations have been repeat-
edly made to the provincial government by the Union of B. C. Municipalities, with a view to gain continuity of office in municipal councils.
It is unfortunate that they have
not yet received approval. A two
year term for aldermen, with rotating retirements, such as now occur in
tho personnel of school boards, is alt
that is asked. As things are, it is
possible to elect entirely new cuon-
clls. The sequel might not be happy
lor the ratepayers or the councils.
Two years ago, at the instigation
of the Union of B. C. Municipalities
the appointment of police commissioners was abolished and their election substituted. They now serve for
two years, like the trustees, instead
of one year, as do the councillors or
ul derm en.
Another suggestion is that the
mayors or reeves be elected from
tlieir own number by members of the
council, following the English custom.
In Kamloops the plan of appointing a city managet, with an unpaid
mayor and council, appears to be
successful. Tlie mayor "runs" the
city as a business und tlie elected representatives sit as a species of directorate. This scheme has attracted
much notice elsewhere, and otlier
municipalities are considering its adoption.— Cowichnn Leader.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
LODGES AND SOCIETIES
I •'■'•■* l'"*- Jl [tegular Meeting
1  Campbell-Manning Blorl. Ill s.xomi mhuiuy o( each
t '''"""' "' J; mniilli ut J|i.m. Iii Hi.' llll llnll
I Olflktl llojirt, '.i in R'i 1 in f> iun. I   I
Dr»i l.'ri'i'ii .V MacKinnon
PlifRlolani hihI Sin-it- "''*
Officii nt residence, Annitroos
Av.'nili'
OFFICII  IIOIII1S
l-'oii-imiills       0.00 10 10.(10
MliTiiimim   2,00 in   4.00
Htenlnji   7.80 to  8.J0
Sundan   2.10 to   4.80
ORANBROOK, B 0.
1
hit. r. II. MILKS
DR1TTI8I
Offlce in Munson Block
OFFICE HOUHB
9  lo   12.  a.m
1  to    6 n.m,
ORANBROOK, B.C.
HOW LAND   KING
minim; imunkku
Vies President
The 0. M. FaSBStt Oo., Inc.
QngltM ors.  Metallurgist!*!
CbomiebSi Assnyers
Laboratory Supplies
W7.20e.811.BI5   lVnll  Street
SPOKANE,   WASHINGTON
F. M. MACPHERSON
Undertaker
I'hone 8fit>
Norbury Ate, next to  City Hall
CHAS. S. PARKER
Forwarding and Distributing
Agent (or
I.clhbrldge and Oreenhlil Coal
Imperial OU Co.
Distribution   Cars  a  Specialty.
Dray Ing and Transferring
(liven Prompt Attention*
::   iv.one 13   ::
WOMEN'S INSTITUTE
Meets In the
Parish     Hull i
afternoon   of !
:ia   Tuesday
nt 3 inn.
Pros:   Mrs,     j
. Constautine    i
■•>■:  Mrs. s. Taylor, Box 745
aii ladles cordially Invited,
MAJOB BELL COMING
" TO BRITISH COLUMBIA
VANCOUVER,—Major Bell, assistant director of the Department of Soi-
illers' Ue-esiabll.*liraent at Halifax, has
been transferred to British Columbia.
« itli headquarters at Vancouver. He
will succeed Mr. George Dean, present
administrative head of the Soldiers'
Re-establishment work in this province, who is taking to otlier work outside tbe service. The change wilt "go
Into effect January 15,
Major Bell has left the East for
Vancouver. The now appointment will
carry administration of the consolidated body formed by the recent transfer
of Uio local offices of the pensions
commissioners to the department o the
sr.it.
Major llcli' has had a long and distinguished overseas record. He was
severely wounded, and is an amputation case. Ho has been very popular
at Halifax, where, however, there
were nol. so ninny cases to be handled
as In B.C., as this province has had
thousands of men undergoing treatment wlio enlisted outside.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Cranhrook, *-. ('.
Mr-'iH svery Tuesday st 8 pm ln
the Fraternity Hsll
O. O   HontHtrom, C C
C. H. Collins. K. R. A 8.
Vlsltlni -brethren  rordlslly lr
vlted to sttend
KASLO "KOOTKNAIAIN"
CHANGES HANDS
I, O. o. r.
KEY CITK LODGE, No 42
Meets every
Mondnr night
at Fraternity
Hall.   'Sojourning   Oddfellows
cordially Invited.
Noble Grand, Reo.  Sec.,
W. F. Johnson       W. M. Harris
FOR PAINTING
-AMD-
PAPER HANGING
Etc.
Telephone
JOHN GARD
Plione No. 409
Cranbrook,   •    .    ■ H* C.
.lini Crier, who has had the plant of
Uie Kaslo "Koot i-iialan" under lease
for some time past, Ib giving lt tip
nt tho end of tho month, and wili'
seek pastures new, he'says, where the
gong Is not qiilii> bo strenuous. He
UiUS breaks the news to his readers ln
tho lust Issue o tho "Kootenaiun.."
"Hy tho end of the present month
there will be a change in the control
nmi management of tho "Kootenalan."
II. W. Power has sold his plant to E.
Nf. Lockwood, of Saskatchewan, who
will cotitlnuo tho publication of the
paper. Tho present manager will'
ship his belongings to some quiet
spot, swear off on nowspaper slavery,
and run a job printing establishment.
Wo hope those indebted to us will
come through with the coin without
further notice," ^|
DIAMOND DYES
Crnnl.rnok Women Dye Finest
Materials Without Risk
the 13th, waB he.d on Thursday evening last week. Two new witnesses
gave evidence at this time and their
evidence followed much upon the
lines of the previous witnesses    who
were heard at the opening preliminary, Tlie new witnesses were George
Patton, brother of the deceased woman und Mrs. Fred Patton, a sister-
in-law, who both reside in Cranbrook.
Tho witnesses told of their visits to
Mrs. McDonald at the Blalrmore hospital a few hours before she died and
of hearing statements as to the happenings of the affair on the night of
thu nth ult, It will be remembered
that lhe dying statement of Mrs. McDonald which was heard at the opening of tho hearing told of the visit to
her home c Harold 1'inkney on business for the local G.Wt.V.A. and of
the entrance ot Jim Zltto, when Zltto
ordered Pfnkney ou oti the house with
a threat lo kill him, and that Pinkuey
loft ut once and did not hear the firing of the shot. Also that the^hoot-
ing was an accident on the part of
/.itto tlie gun sapixisedly going off In
his pocket. The only exception to
tho previous evidence was that the
witnesses on this occasion stated that
to must have meant to shoot her as
Mrs. McDonald said to them that Zit-
there was no hole lu the pocket In
which the gun wus supposed to have
been.
At the ci'ose of the hearing Justice
of the Peace Robertson ordered that
Zltto be taken to the Lethbrldge Jail
to await his trial at tho next session
of the dlsrict court ut Macleod.
».IHH»miHHIKffl».ISK^g
MACDCX
Brier Plug
SMOKING TOBACCO °
APPOINTMENT MADE
AS PUBLIC WORKS
ENGINEER FOR B.C,
Patrick Philip of Vancouver, formerly of Kamloops and Llllooot, has
been appointed public works engineer
of llrltlsh Columbia, Hon. J. H. King,
Minister of Public Works, has announced.
Mr. Philip Is to take charge of the
office held by A. 13. Foreman, until
he resigned in December to take a
nigher salaried office with a private
company.
The appointment of Mr. Philip is by
way of a promotion. In March, 1919,
he was made engineer of the Vancouver district and in that capacity had
supervision of ail pavement work over
the Pacific Highway.
Mr. Philip received his training in
general engineering work in Londonderry, Ireland, first as au articled pupil, and then in the Royal University
of Ireland, with the class of 1906. In
1907 he came to Canada and worked
on the Grand Trunk Pacific. He stay-
ed with tills for three years, when he
was appointed to the staff of the city
engineer of Vancouver. There he was
until 1917 when he was appointed
district engineer under the provincial
government for Kamloops and Lll-
looet districts.
Ho Is a member of the executive of
tho Vancouver branch of the Engineering Institute of Canada. ,
REAPPOINT MARTYN
DEPUTY MINISTER
OF    INDUSTRIES
Major Don. B. Martyn, who handed
in his resignation to run in Dewdney
in the last provincial election has heen
reappointed deputy minister of industries, -according t:> an announcement
last week from the provincial secretary at V'ctoria.
LIBERAL RETAINS
GRAND FORKS SEAT
Maintaining that his Jurisdiction
was limited to de'xrminlng whether
or not the ballots came under the
category of being rejected under the
act rather than determining the intent
of the voter, Judge Brown, in the
judicial recount at Grand Forks last
week of the votes cast ln the Provincial election, made Inly some minor
decisions, which reduced the majority
of E. C. Henntger, Liberal' candidate
over John McKle, Conservative, from
nine to six.
The Judge agreed that is was a
shamo ho was obliged to do this, as
24 out of 30 ballots In dispute were
clearly for Mr. McKle. The marks
had been placed Immediately after
the name of the candidate Instead of
In the allotted space.
An appeal will be taken.
CHOCOLATES KADE OF CLAY
Each package ot "Diamond Dyes"
contains simple directions to diamond-
dye worn, shabby skirts, waists dresses, coats, gloves, stockings, sweaters, draperies, coverings, everything,
whether wool, silk, linen, cotton or
mixed goods, new, rich, fadoless colors. Duy "Diamond Dyes," no other
kind, then perfeet results are guaranteed.    Druggist baa Color Card.
China clay Is often one of the principal ingredients of chocolate creams.
It is quite harmless, and even ln its
raw state has a taste that is not unpleasant. When refined and mixed
with sugar lt is a smooth white substance with just that "body" tn tt
which makes it so easy to "shape"
ready for a coating of chocolate. China clay is nothing but decayed granite, and Is dug up from big pits In
Cornwall. It ls mixed with water and
run into a series of ponds where the
heavy impurities sink to tho bottom, leaving a thin paste of fine day,
When this settles tt Is dried Into
bricks, ready to go to the potteries.
It Is also used ln many other ways.
The glossy paper used ln printing
pictures owes Its smoothness to china
clay. Calico bleachers use lt in large
quantities. Soap contains a large proportion of china clay which Is used
as a "filler," and a chemist has discovered a process by which It can substitute the fatty adds ot which thirty
to sixty per oent. of soap Is
CONFESSIONS OF
A REAL BIGAMIST
A bigamist, who is now serving his
sentence of five and a half years' Imprisonment In Sing Sing Prison, New
York, tells the following interesting
story of how he married seven wof-
men, and how he did it:
They Bay that a good wife is t
rare jewel.
I have been a collector of jewels
That is why I am now In Sing Sing
I have been married eng.it times-
Six of my marriages were bigamous,
Some curious persons size mo   up
critically and ask:   "How did you do
ft?"    More considerate    ones    ask
"Why did you do It?"
It is not difficult to answer the first
question. Winning a wife is about
the easiest thing I ever attempted.
They always did more of the courting
than I. In the logical mind of my sentencing Judge, there rose that question, "Why did you do it?"
My failure to answer satisfactorily
resulted in his handing out to me the
longest sentence that has been imposed for bigamy In the recollection of
any of the old-timers. One or two
years Is the usual penalty. I have
already served over three years, and
I have two and a half more to go.
But I am not complaining, for I am
guilty, and deserve the full measure
of punishment I am receiving. What
is more, I am contented and happy,
for I know that my punishment is going to make a decent, law-abiding
man of me, and tbat my self-respect
is some day going to be fully restored.
But to get back to the question,
'Why did you do It,"
Well, some kill the man; some kill
the woman; some kill both or commit
suicide. My anguish sought a different outlet. Instead of resorting to
violence I simply sought to produce
tangible proof to my misguided
spouse that other women could care
for me—that ls how it began.
My first wife, Bessie May, was a
talented musician, an excellent housekeeper, and a brunette.
My second wife, Mary Lucille, was
of artistic temperament, fond of trav-
works of great masters, a linguist,
and a charming eonversatlonalist, of
the brunette type. She was alflo a
widow, with two children, to whem
I gave music, high school and business courses, and they now occupy
excellent positions.
My fifth wife, Caroline, possesses
sweet, gentle, womanly ways; modest In her deportment and requirements, and with deep sympathies for
the oppressed or tho sick and needy.
She murr^ed mc because she loved me,
and I because I had a large earning
power. Sho is a woman of holy llfo,
whose faith in her judgment I hope
ultimately to Justify by showing her
by my life that 1 am tho kind of man
sho thought 1 was when she married
me.
Mf sixth wife, Wilhelmlna Christina, a widow, was of a care-free, unconventional disposition; and wltb
auburn hair and dreamy eyes.
My seventh wife, Fern, was an en-
thuiast on the subject of flowers,
singing birds, music and art, full of
energy, of modest, quiet ways, aud a
perfect Venus, of the brunette type,
altogether a delightful person.
A word about mothers-in-law. I
had four, all of them kind and considerate, always concerned about my
welfaro and interested in our success.
Mine were jewels of mothertlnes=. 1-
shall never again listen to unkind re-}
marks one so frequently hears about-
mothers-in-law.
It Is surprising to find so many of!
my companions here are In for blga-
my. I always had an idea that I was
something of a bigamist until I came
to Sing Sing and listened to other
men tell how many wives they have
had.
The sublimity of motherhood is the
inspiration that keeps the love fires
burning In the hearts of men. Bigamy discourages motherhood, and
should therefore be suppressed, and
those who indulge in it should be severely punished. In the entire cate-
gory of criminal acts, bigamy has the I
least excuse. Every bigamous marriage is a blow struck at the home,
the very heart of our social system,    j
Bigamy among women Is much,
more common than many realize.!
During the great European war many
women married half a dozen or more]
When   lu   Spokane   Make j
It the
Hotel
Coeur
d'Alene
The Hotel Willi a Personality.
] Convenient to BTerythlngj
Very  Moderate  Rates
Frame's Bread Ifl GOOD Dread
His Pies, Cakes snd Pastry are
made In a tasty ma.iner which
invites the most exacting  person to call acain. a*.
THE HOME BAKERY
Phone ST       -      Norbury Are.
el, modest in taste, and altogether ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
a charming little lady of the red hair,! of the brave boys who were bound
velvet cheeks, and sky-blue eyes!for the battlefield, expecting they
type. j would be killed and that the pusedo
My third wife, Ethel, a widow with' widows would reap a harvest ln pen-
a daughter of nine, was a woman of slons and Insurance.    Some of them!
culture and refinement.     She loved were found out and are now paying
travelling, was generous, thoughtful the penalty of their misconduct,
and industrious, and blonde. .    Does bigamy pay?
My fourth wife, Louise Frances, I am doing five and a half years
was a good housekeeper, fond of clas- for collecting my string of Jewels,
sical music, and familiar with the They were not worth the prico.        '
OPERATIONS
UNNECESSARY
HEPATOLA r«noT«5 Gall StouM
correct. Appendlcltli In 24 Iwurs
without pain. Re^Mi-red under
Pure Food and Uruz Act !C.»0
Sole   MMi:if:--'lit:<-r
MRS.   GEO.   S.   A I.MAS
Bei 1078 2:w ID' Ate. M.
gaifctlnon. S.<k.	
Montana Restaurant
■e«l< .1 IU Bout
Clfari, Cl»»ret.«« ind find;
CRANBROOK STH KET
Opposite iis, B*Dk ol ' ' nnierce PAGE FOUB
THE     CRANBROOK     HERALD
Thursday, .liimiiirj 1.1. 1930
Do You Keep*
a close tab on your digestion? This is important It will pay you well to do so. Digestion
is complicated andits processes often become
disordered. This brings immediate discomfort
—often severe pain.   Use
BEECHAM'S
PILLS
This valuable preparation has for years been
found to relieve indigestion, biliousness, sick
headache and constipation.    Thousands ot
\careful folks have learned to use Beechamj
Pills, which have proved both corrective and
preventive. Experience has taught them to
always have a box handy. Profit by their
example-always have Beecham's Pills
i   In Your Home
SOLD EVERYWHERE IN CANADA. IN BOXES, 25-., SOc.
Largest Sale of any Medicine in the World
BETTER PROSPECTS
FOR GOLD PRODUCTION
PRODUCTION IN
MESOPOTAMIA
Tlie first report on Mosopotuniiu
slnro Britulu look over tlie mandate
tor tlmt rei'lou lias just lieen Issuod
by Sir Joliu llevvctt. Tlie solicme for
the agricultural development ot the
country, lie says, was started In 1918.
The area sown tiiat year amounted to
nearly 00.000,000 acres, and the yield
of wheat and barley was about 300,000
tons, besides large quantities of fodder and vegetables.
Irrigation works ou the Euphrates
cost 3 million dollars; 5 millions
was spent on the liort uf Basrah.   A
50$
FOR A
PINE FOREST
People with bronchitis, asthma,
and lung troubles benefit very
much by living amongst Pine
trees. Why? Because they
breathe thc healthy aromtt of the
Pines. Peps contain beneficial
Plnecssences, together with other
medicinal Ingredients; and for
50c. you may bring Into your
borne a veritable Pine forest.
When a Peps is placed in thc
mouth the pine essences are turned into healing vapors. These
are breathed direct to thc
lungs, throat und bronchial tubes
—not swallowed down to thc
stomach which is not ailing. Try
Pepsfor your cold,cough,bronchitis or asthma.   50c box, ull dealers.
QUAKER BIIAND
JAMS AlIU PUKE
Ml fruits—strawberries*., raspberries, peaches, currunts,
plums, etc., muilo Into Quaker
llriind Jam ure picked when
ripe, full of juices and cooked
the same day hefore tiio delicate flavor lias time to deaden.
You'll like the richness and
fresh fruit flavor of Quaker
Jam.
DOMINION CANNERS
B. C, LIMITED
Head Office:   Vancouver, B. C.
comprehensive scheme of railroad construction has beon begun, telegraph
and telephone lines huve heen opened
and a fleet of light steamers is plying
on tho rivers. Sir John reports that
the Arab cultivators seem to realize
! that the new administration has Interested itself in tlieir well being.
There Is nu Rainfall
Mesopotamia, the Arak of tiie Ar-
aljs, tlie ilubylon of the Greeks, looks
to tho Tigris and the Euphrates for
its life, lrrigatiln Is the great problem, and thero is no rainfall. Every
drop of water for cultivation must be
led out of tlie rivers, but their discharge is extremely variable—about
eight times us great in April os in
October. They are always silting up
their bods and scoopinag out new
channels, leaving half the country a
desert and making the other half a
swamp.
Yet the soil is exceptionally rich,
tlie lower part of the country being
an immense delta, more than five
hundred miles long, which the Tigris
and Euphrates liavo deposited in what
was originally the head of tlie Persian
Gulf. Tlte Arabs call this fertile land
i im Sawad or Black Land, and it is a
striking contrast to tho bare ledges
>f Arabia and Persia, which Incloses
ts flanks.
A Land of Ancient History
The Sawad was first reclaimed by
men who hud a mastery of metals
and a system of writing. These Sum-
oriahs, about four thousand years before tho Christian era, lived on tells,
or mounds, heaped above the flood
level. Sargon of Akkad ruled tbe land
some fifteen centuries later; Hammurabi ruled it from Babylon ln or about
1900 B.C., and the capital haB never
shifted much more than a hundred
miles since then. Babylon on the
Euphrates and Bagdad on tho Tigris
control the Sawud. Prom these points
throughout the ages, Sumerians, Assyrians, Chaldeans, Persians, Greeks,
Arabs and Turks have dominated.
In tlie seventh century of our era,
a few years before the Arab conquest,
great fi'oods burst tlie dikes; the Euphrates brosdened into a swamp and
tlie Tigris deserted its former'bed.
In the thirteenth century the Mongols
finished the work of the floods, and
under the alien and deadly rule of
tho Ottoman Turk the Sawad had no
chanco of recovery. Can it still be
reclaimed
"The Tigris-Euphrates delta," wrote
Sir Willlum Wilcoks In 1977, "may be
classed as an arid leveling and reclamation. The presence of 15 ,per
cent, of lime in the soil renders re-
clamutlon very easy compared with
similar work In the dense clays of
Egypt. One is never fur away from
lho great banks of old canals and thc
rtiins of ancient towns."
CRArTBBOOH   COTVA-RI
HOSPITAL
Private Nursing Hone
Llcanstd by Provincial Oovt.
Maternity and General Naming
Uassage uud Rest Cure, Highest
References, terms moderate.
Apply Mrs. A. Crawford, Matron
Phone 169 P. O. Box 845
Address, Oarden Ave. Cranbrook
Mr. Lome A. Campbell Confident In Revival of Important
Mining Industry
Confidence that gold production ln
British Columbia wili resume Its former normal production wheu costs
of materials and labor are reduced to
a more reasonable level Is the opinion
of Mr. Lome A. Campbell, president
of the Kootenay Light, Heat and
Power Company.
Mr. Campbell, who was Minister of
Mines In the former Bowser cabinet,
■and is an authority on mining conditions In the province and especially
of the Interior, sees no reason for uneasiness in the present situation. In
fact, ho stated, the present situation
is tlie most favorable for the healthy
development ot natural' resources of
any time since 1914 when the outbreak of the great war created conditions under which, while the demand., for otlier material showed ti
tremendous Increase, that for gold,
owing to the conditions arising, resulted in an almost complete cessation of tho industry.
Peace time conditions having returned, the reconstruction of business
on a peace basis is now under way,
Mr. Campbell stated. Deflation will
mean that industries will require loss
capital to finance manufacturing or
any form of production. In consequence living costs will recede and
with them labor coBts must come
down. Credit conditions will become
more normal.
It is Mr. Campbell's belief that towards the end of 1921 there will have
been great progress made In establishing healthy and economically
sound business conditions throughout
the country.
Mining conditions in the Kootenays,
Mr. Campbell stated, wili' show improvement. The principle values of
the Rossland camp are gold, and,
during the period ot inflation, gold
wus tlie only dispensible commodity
which did not show an increase ln
price, due to the standardizing
through international agreements.
As a result, gold producers, faced
with huge Increases m wages, cost ot
materials and general overhead expenses, found that they were stilV receiving the same price for their product as before the war. Consequently
gold mining operations throughout the
province have been practically
at a standstill. Wtth lower costs as
prices of materials and wages drop,
the industry will resume Its erstwhile
activity.
The inactivity of the mines in tlie
Kootenays has resulted in considerable unemployment, Mr. Campbell
stated, but the situation is not serious. There is considerable activity
in coal-mining in Alberta and along
the Crow's Neet'Pass ln British Col
umbia.
jtfteto*
—any hour of the day—one of your
household comes along with a nasty cut
or bruise, a burn, scald or sure lis then
you realise how it pays to Imve /.am I.uk
always handy. Jii-.tatoucliai.il Zam-Buk
takes out all firry pain or smarting irritation. At the same lime it purifies tint: tissues, prevents dangerous festering or
ulceration, ensures speedy healing.
Zara-Buk's unrivalled antiseptic and
helling virtues are derived from a unique
blending of herbal oils and extracts,
Animal fats and cqarge drugs found in
ordinary ointments and salves have no
part in Zttmifuk. it's herbal throughout,
"For over ten years /..iin-lfnk bas
l«en our household reiiu'dv," writes Mrs.
S.U. Folkins, Snmervilk, Mass: "There
has never been a heaht made lo lake Us
place. Wawouldn'tbe without Zftm Uuk
whatever it cost. It never fails in hums,
scalds, cuts, dialing, and Innumerable
otlier skin troubles."
For Ii.m.i.iiJ wilii i6rni, er..- k<-.l hand*, tttteme,
mul cliillii-iiiis /.in, Huh i      is ,1 i .HI-     M'i> in
UI/liMATK FUTURE OF
GAMP IJNTtiie ASSURED,
SAYS BEEA-TOER-ELEC'I
BAPTIST CHURCH
W. O. ASHER    -    Pastor
Morning Service at 11.00
Sunday School at 12 noon.
Evening Servico at 7.30.
Voting People's Meeting on
Tuesday Nights ut 8 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Thursday at
8 o'clock.
Incubators & Brooders
Wo carry the largest and most complete stock In B. C, and offer
only the Best In roultry Supplies and Equipment.   Cash discount
on Incubators.       Write for Catalo-giucs,
Ae I. Johnson & Co.,
Nil (amble Ht.
Vaaeoaver B.C.
"Keep your eyes bn our settlement
at Camp Lister. It Is on the map to
stay. Eventually lt will he a wonderful producing area. And don't forget
the men nt present on it will make it
so."
In these words IJeiit.-Col. Pred
Lister, the soldier niember-ei'ect fur
Kaslo, voiced Ids confidence in the
future of tlie soldi*1!* community
tho Creston valley. ,
Colonel Lister intimated that progress at present was painfully slow
the government adding expense to
expense, and it almost seemed as II
it was tho desire of the provincial
authorities that the men should quit
If this really was the government's
desire, he predicted, it would not be
fulfilled.
At tlie official* recount in the Kaslo
constituency held last week, Col. Lister's previous majority of to was reduced to 1(1. In a statement given out.
at Victoria, John Keen has placed the
blame for his defeat in Kaslo upon
some of the deputy returning officers.
who, 1)3 says, failed lo endorse some
ballots properly tiiat had been marked In his behalf. ,
SPIKING'Wti.Ii See RUSH
TO THE OIL FIELDS
WINNIPEG.—Thousands of oil pros
pectors, scores of "whom already are
ta Winnipeg wfll IniaAe tlie areas in
the Peace RiVer' District; particularly
around Fort Norman- and in the vicinity of Danphln where oil strikes are
reported to have been made just an
soon as spring makes traveling easier.
Prospectors now In Winnlpegi come
from all- parts ot the continent. They
are looking up holdings on maps, dickering with lease holders and preparing outfits. ,
"There Is oil in the western country, no doubt of it," said P. L. Roach,
veteran oil prospector. "It might be
myself as easily as anyone else who
will find it In paying quantities."
Roach's attitude was typical, there
was not a single pessimistic individual and among them were three men
who had ransacked the world from
Mexico to Mesopotamia for oil.
Determined Prospectors
Fort Norman and surrounding
points such as "Windy" Point and
Pine Point, whero tlie Imperial Oil
Company has reported rich strikes ap
pear to be the magnets of attraction.
Prospectors will go Into this for north
district, transportation or no transportation, to find oil, and trusting that
future developments will bring means
of taking lt out of the country.
Peace River for about 30 miles below Peace River crossing is another
favorite territory. Prospectors have
confined' their search to localities on
the banks of the river because there
is no other highway in that country,
hut intend this summer to venture
further afield on the Idea that railway lines wlil be extended if oil Is
found.
A recent strike on the Three Creeks
property Ib reported. J. D. McArthur,
of Winnipeg, who is behind tho Peace
River Oil Wells Company, ls boring
Just across the river from Three
Creeks and reports favorable in die a
tions though a strike of water has
stopped operations for the time being,
Confident ef Success
"Oil will -be found In the Peace
River country within two years," B.
W. Thompson of Mr. McArthur's firm
has predicted.
Dauphin territory will be another
Mecca for oil seekers. Although recent reports have not been very encouraging many believe that there ls
something afoot which will reward
investigation.
The chemist who finds some means
ot extracting the olV from bituminous sands ln the Fort Norman district will Insure a permanent supply
for the world's use, gecAoglstB report.
There Is enough oil In tbe sands to
supply the whole world for 1,
years, H la Mid.
APIARY NOTES
Mr, lt. Qladwyn Newton, B-S.A.,
superintendent of the Dominion Ex-
perlmenal station at Invermere, B.C.,
gives tho following apiary notes,
Which are ot great iuterest:
The season i'j*ju clearly demon-
tratea how climatic conditions control the honey crop lu tliis province.
Our spring was long, eold and wet.
Tlie summer was comparatively short
uud dry. While tho yield was somewhat reduced this season, it compares
very favorably with the yields obtained throughout the Kootenays, und in
tho remainder of tho province.
Year No. of hives Av. yield per hive
lbs.
   117
     81.25
    118-9
    12G.4
     UO
1016,
8
11117,
12
WIS,
10
1018,
7
1880,
9
Average for 6 years   lUti.ti
Our results go to show that the Col-
umbia valley is admirably ado-plod tor
honey production, Our climate is
high and dry; our summer days are
bright anu warm, and our nights cool.
There is a great profusion of bloom
throughout tho season, aud wo are
fortunate in having ti largo und varied mountain flora. Agricultural development In tho district Is also opening ti'p largo new sources of nectar
for the bees.
Wo have obtained considerable data
ou the wintering of bees, and tlieir
care and management during tho sum
mor, iu order that tlie incoming settler may have something definite to go
by. Tho district U patrcuilarly free
from disease, and, duo to our altitude
aud climatic conditions, wc are not
so susceptible to disease as somo ol
tlto less favored districts of the province. Numerous local individuals have
made a start in bee-keeping this season, and more are contemplating making a beginning tliis coming spring.
It is not tho policy of the Experimental Station to sell colonies of bees,
but for any literature, bulletins or advice, write the Superintendent, Dominion Experimental Station. Invermere, B.C.
SMKLTKlt OUTPUT
WAS MUCH LAKGKR
ASPIRIN
Only "Bayer" is Genuine
Wnrnlugl Unless you see tlie name
"Bayer" pn package or on tablets you
aro not getting Aspirin at ail. Tako
Aspirin only us tolil In tlie Bayer
package tor Colds, Headache, Neuralgia, Rheumatism, Earache, Toothache,
Lumbago and tor Pain. Then you will
bo following tho directions und dosage worked out by physicians during
twenty-one years and proved safe by
millions. Handy tlu boxes ot twelve
Bayer Tablets of Aspirin cost few
cents. Druggists also sell larger
packages. Made in Canada. Aspirin
Is the trado mark (registered In Canada), of Bayer Manufacture ot Mono
uceticucldestor ot Sailcyllcacld.
HEAMVATKItS Ol' TIIK SILK
The search for convenient ways of
transportation by whicli tho products
of the Sudan may roach tho outer
world attracts attention to a remark
nblo phenomenon of vogctnblo life
In some ot the hondmnters and tributaries of tlie Nile. This consists ot
onormous growths of papyrus and
other plains, completely covering the
streams and tunning carpets of vegetation lino und Ihrco feet thick, bo-
nonlli which flows Iho wnter. Navigation by small bouts is, ot course,
prevented by this obstruction, which
Is In places supplemented by vines
and ovorhanglng plants that arch the
the streams from bank to bunk
Heavy floods occasionally sweop away
tho accumniulatlons of plants, but
they aro (itllekly reformed.
Have You Rheumatism?
IP SO, TAKE
VITAL TABLETS
Rheumatism is ono of tho most distressing aliments. We guarantee Vital Tablote will purify the blood.
They attack uric acid, and you will
bo benefitted by taking Vital Tabids,
the great French Tonic. They are a
wonderful tonic. Thoy build up the
entire structure. No more tlrod feelings. In (act Vital Tablets will put
you on your feet. Just go to your
druggist and get a box. Price 60c or
by mall. The Scoboll Drug Co.,
Montreal.
Crnnbrook Drag ft Book Co., Ltd.,
Cnmbrook, B.C.
Consolidated  Company's Trail
Plant Had Good Sized Output in Year 1920
Smelter Output, 1920
(December estimated)
Quantity        Value
Cold       42,030 ozs. $ 900,0.00
Silver       1.00S.014 ozs.   1,281.000
Copper       4,750,000 lbs.     913,000
Lead       25,723,000 ills.   2,130,000
Zinc    37,131,000 lbs.    2,937,000
Total  $8,101,200
Willi the third largest output in its
history, coming next to the banner
years of 1917 and 1918 of the period
of war stimulation, tho Trail smelter
has had an estimated output of metals for 1920 of }S,llil,200. The corresponding figure for 1919 was ?7,-
912.191. thero being a gain in vaiue of
output of a fifth of a million. If
the comparison were on a basis of
iiuaitity, tho showing for 1920 would
bo better still, says the Nelson News
Considering tho drawbacks of the
year. Including labor troubles In portions of tlie district, and the decline
of metal prices, the showing is particularly good.
The .precious metals and coppor
show a substantial' decline from the
1919 value of output, this being ac
counted for partly by tho shutting
down of the Rossland properties for
a period ln the fall except for development work, partly by tho shutting down of the Canada Copper
company's piant at Allenby, whoso
concentrates came to Troll, and partly by tho decline In Slocan output
More than offsetting this shrinkage
was tho increase in tho output of I'ead
und zinc, uccounted for by the great
Sullivan mlno nt Klmberley. Zinc
Iliis yenr contributed more than one-
tlilrd the total value of tho smelter's
output.
For tho sake of comparison, the
vaino of tho output of tho Trail
smoltor for oach yonr sinco the organizing of the Consolidated Mining &
Smelting cninpuny of Canada, Is given
below:
1900     $ 3,000,000
1907      3.78(1,140
1008         5.428,501
1901)         5.505.520
1010         5.911,7117
•OH         4,437,901
1012         6.083,078
013
1914
1915
1910
1917
6,335,1108
6,000,6611
(1.898.744
7,802,649
13,021,127
1918   10,633,3(17
1919 (15 months)
1920   	
0,501,681
8,161,200
THK MEANEST YET
The meanest Individual on earth,"
says the Blairmoro Enterprise, "now
lives at Blairmoro. He or she was
menu enough to stenl tho Christmas
toys Intended to cheer the orphaned
children of tho late Mrs. O. B. McDonald, Theso four little tots are
loft parentloss nnd pennlleBS, and the
individual who would be so low as to
appropriate anything intendod to make
llfo somewhat cheerfui' foi; these unfortunate llttlo ones deserves nothing
lens than years of Imprisonment, nnd
tho community should see that tho
party is brought to face Justice."
The gum with the
lasting flavor-wrap-    js
ped in the hygienic
sealed package.
A goody teat's good
for you. ("lid? appetite and digestion.
Keeps teeth ciean
and breath sweet.
11
i A boon to smokers.
| with its cooiing,
'"    soothing, effsct on
mouth and threat.
9 •* :;■■*■- ■■Htw
$1 \kn^^arM^m?d»--- ><■/ ?$ »
y.i i II III MJjp OV'hi i- n Hi ill -jr*,*-**,;.-■ ■"— fisg       T
.... ,^^   -^mM^i
S-'"-"       SEALED TIGHT-        *s«*^^'
KEPT RIGHT  .?}?.
<*■:.
THE ELECTION OF
UMVUKSITY SENATORS
The election of Chancellor antl fifteen members of tiie Sennta will be
held at the University of B.C. on
April 7th, 1921. As this election must
of necessity be carried on by mail, It
is essential that tho Committee in
Charge should have tlie correct mailing addresses of nil members of Convocation, Many members have moved
during the past threo years and have
not notified the University of the
change. Kvery member of Convocation is, therefore, asked to send in
his correct address at once to the
Registrar.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
CIUNHItOOK TBAIN TIMES
XO. 0. DAII.V—To Nelson, Vancouver, Spokane, etc. Arrive 12.10 p.
in.; leave 12.20 p.m.
XO. OS DAILY—To Pernie, Lethbrldge, Medicine Hat, Calgary, etc.
Arrive 4.10 p.m.; leave 4.20 p.m.
t'rnnkrook, Fernle, I.etlibrldtre, Cardston Servicet
SO. M—Leave 6.*6 a.m.; HO. 83—
arrive 8.30 p.m. Connection at
Macleod to and (ram Calgary; connection at Lethbrldge to and from
Medicine Hat.
Cranbrook, Wycllffe, Klmberley Ser-
vlcei
XO. 823—Leave 7.05 a.m.; NO. SSI—
arrive 2.10 p.m.
Cranbrook, Lake Windermere and
Golden Serlrw!
Mondny and Thursday, each week
-NO. 821, leave 9 a.m. Wednesday
and Saturday—NO. 832. arrive 1.30
p.m.
For further particular*! apply to
'iny llcltot ngent,
J. B. PROCTOR,
Iiistrlct  rattnengor Agent, Calgary.
Pacjfic
MilK
WATCH THK
MILK LABEL
Pacific- Milk Is tho only Mill,
put ti|i In thla Province — no
matter what the label looks
like or what it says—there ls
none but Pacific that ls Western
—and by western we mean west
ot Ontario.
Insist upon Pnctric, owned
and controlled 111 tho West.
PACIFIC MII.K CO., Ltd,
Factories at Ladner
and Abbotsford
DR.DoVAH'SFEKAIE PILLS,"
PH0SPH0N0L FOR MEN
for Nerve nml Hrrtin'i!ti4reuu,'ji
n Tonic  wllllmtltlyotiiip,  pin fib*; or two
if), .it -I; in:' Ion . ui 1.\  llmi i.-.i In) ni jir
I'm. Ke..iii-i.i. |>|ir(iC(>..Kt..'iilli.iHii.-* Untii:
*>1d by Crnnbrook Book A Drug Oft*
MONUMENTS
Kootenay Granite & Monumental Co., Ltd.
G-aneral Rtone Contractor! ud
MonutuoiLlttl Work*
Fnat It, Nelson   r. 0. -mi Mi
A™ WORRY as
FINANCIAL
A CANADIAN GOVERNMENT ANNUITY WiLL CO IT
Given a large* return lor life than is obtainable
from any other form of investment with absolute
security •
Frio from Dominion Income Tax.
Any person resident or domiciled in Cctiada over
t'*e a e o-" 5 may pure! ase, tobfel in at one., oral any
later i late desii < d nn Annuity of irom $5Q to $5,000,
to be paid in monthly cr quarterly insta'ments.
An1,' twi persons may p'uc'ipac joint y
Enlp'pyfcrs may p ifchar.e for t' cir employees.
Apply to your postmaster, or write, postage free, to S. T. Bastedo,
Swper'nti.ii lent of Annuities, Ottawa, for new booklet and other
Information rcqu.rr.tl.   Mention fiRe last birthday.
'.»' Thursday, January 13,1980
THE      CRANBHOOK      HERALD
PAGE FIVE
"O
The cream ot
the   Bargains
go to the flrBt
Customers.
SALE
STARTS
SATURDAY,
JAN. 15th,
SALE ENDS
SATURDAY,
JAN. 22ml
Be    on    band
the   flrst   duy
of the Sale
SALE
STARTS
SATURDAY,
JAN. 15th,
SALE ENDS
SATURDAY,
JAN. 22nd
Men, Look What's Here For You
SHIRTS and DRAWERS
Stantield's Red Label, worth $7.00 for  suit, $5.25
New Zealand, pure wool, worth $6.00 for mill, $11.85
Eureka, heavy weight, worth $5.00, for stilt, $8.00
Watson'B No. 722, pure wool, worth $7.50, for mill, $r>.»0
Fleece lined cotton, worth $2.50, for  suit, $1.50
Stanfleld's heavy grey, worth $0.00, for suit, $2.50
MENS COMBINATIONS
Watson's No. 734, heavy cotton, worth $4.00 for  $3,011
Tiger wool and cotton, worth $5.00, for $8.85
Watson's 722 medium weight wool, worth $6.50 for $1.75
Tiger medium weight wool, worth $7.00, for $5.25
Watson'B 809 heavy pure wool,   worth $8.00 for $6.00
Milton's wool, British made, worth $7.60,.for  $5.15
Dr. Jaeger's pure wool, worth $13.50, for  f.10.85
The famous WOLSEY COMBINATIONS, regular
.^    value $16.00 to $20.00, for $18.85
All odd lines at less than Cost.
BOYS UNDERWEAR
Regular $2.50 Combinations for   $1.75
Regular $3.00 Combinations for $8.00
iiiiii
X'SWCLOTHING
Buy Your Suit or Overcoat During
Stupendous January ClearanceSale
That Smashes All Records
Our Annual Underselling Event Prior to Stocktaking
The urgent need for Immediate reduction brings about a sale
abounding in economies. For bona fide bargains and money saving
that can lie figured In dollars nnd cents liy art mil comparison of valu-'s
this sale will stand pre-eminent an-iuur January events. To quickly
lessen stocks Is the sole aim of this sale. Extraordinary measures have
boen adopted to accomplish this end. Value has been lost sight of In
the under-pricing, supreme saving opportunities abound on every hand.
'Ibis sale will easily eclipse every value giving effort we have heretofore attempted and ls bound to create enthusiasm among all economically minded people.
Sale Starts Saturday Morning, January 15th
Extra Special!  Hgig
IN EACH DEPARTMENT, MEN'S AND WOMEN'S, WE HAVE PREPARED ONE HUNDRED PARCELS, EACH CONTAINING ONE DOLLAR'S WORTH, OR MORE, OP VARIOUS KINDS OP GOODS. IN
ADDITION TO THE GOODS TWO OP THESE PARCELS WILL
EACH CONTAIN A TEN DOLLAR BILL. TWO WILL EACH CONTAIN A FIVE DOLLAR BILL AND TEN WILL EACH CONTAIN A
ONE DOLLAR BILL.   TAKE YOUR  PICK FOR $1.00
These Goods Not Exchangable or Returnable.
Marvellous Values in Silk and Wool Dress Fabrics
Crepe de Chene, regular up to $3.25, for yd.
Georgette Crepe, all colors, up to $3.75, for yd.
Taffeta silk, 3i> inches, all colors, up to $3.75, for .... yd.
Taffeta silk, 3(i Inches, black, up to $4.o5, for yd.
Taffeta silk, 30 incites, black, up to $3.50, for yd.
Taffeta silk, 30 inches, black, up to $2.75, for yd.
Messaline silk, all colors, up to   $4.75, for yd.
Wash satin, white, up to $4.25, for   yd.
Maize and pink satin, up to $3.50, for  yd.
Habtttai Silks, white and all colors,   $3.00 for yd.
Nipon Crepe, maize, brown, apricot $2.05 for  yd.
Silk Poplin, $4.50, for   yd.
.. vd.
,. yd.
.. vd.
fllaek Poplin, worth $2.25, for
Charmeuse Satin, white, $5.50 for    	
Charoieuse Satin, Navy, Black, Niger $4.50, for
Striped Wash Silk, up to $4,00, for    yd.
Spun Silk, cream, worth $3.00, for yd.
Pongee Natural, up to $2.25, for yd.
Pongee Natural, uplo $2.75, for   yd.
CRETTONNE8
Shadow Cloth, reversible, up to $4.00, for !... yd.
Shadow Cloth, reversible, up to $2.25, for yd.
Shadow Cloth, reversible, up to $2.50, for yd
All Lilies, up to $1.60, for
$1.75
$240
$•'.25
$3.15
$2.5(1
$1.05
$3.25
$8.25
$2.45
$1.«0
$1,511
$2.50
$1,511
$8.25
$3.25
$2,511
$1.85
$1,511
$1.85
$8.76
$1,115
$1,110
tl. 85c
this Sale,prices will not be lower for ayear
Regular $32.60 .. SUIT .. for $21.60
Regular $35.00  for $28.86
Regular $37.60  for $25.00
Regular $40.00 ... OR   .. for $26.65
Regular $42.00   for $28.00
Regular $45.00  for $$0.00
Regular $50.00 OVERCOAT for $38.15
Regular $52.50
Regular $55.00 .
Regular $57.50
Regular $110.00
Regular $62.60
Regular $115.00
Regular $72.50
. SUIT
OR
for $35.00
for $36.65
. for $38.85
for $40.00
for $41.65
for $43.35
for $48.35
Regular $75.00 OVERCOAT for $50.00
IF YOU CAN BETTER THESE    PRICES WE WILL ALMOST PAY VOU TO PACK THE CLOTHES
AWAY.
NO FREE ALTERATIONS EXCEPTING LENGTH Ol Si.Kl.VE8 OR TROUSEKS
Women's VENUS & RADIUM HOSE, Sale Price   $2.25
Boys' HEAVY BLACK WORSTED HOSE, Sale Price ... $1.00
WOOLEN DRESS GOODS, atprices which
will commend them to your attention.
for
for
Grey Tweed Suiting, yer yd. $3.75,
Jersey Cloth, per yd. $7.50, for ...
Broadcloth, per yd. $5.75, for	
Grey Donegal Tweed, per yd. $3.00,
Tweed Coatings, reg. $9.00, for	
Tweed Coatings, light weight, reg $5.00, for
Tweed Suitings, purple and green, $4.50, for
Tweed Suit ings, purple and green, $3.00 for .
Tweed, grey and tan, reg. $4.50 for $3.25
Serge, green and brown, reg. $4.65 for $3.50
Serge, Navy blue, reg. $3.75 yd. for $2.65
Serge, Navy blue, reg. $2.75 yd. for $1.75
$2.65
$5.25
$4.50
$2.25
$6.25
$2.75
$3.50
$.2.50
Cashmere, red, pink and blue, reg. $1.65 for $1,10
All Velvets reduced to    1.45
Plaid dress goods, reg. $2.25 yd. for  $1.50
Colored dress goods, reg. $1.50 yd. for $1.10
2i;:, yd. Skirt Lengths, reg $22.50 for $16.00
1% yd. Skirt Lengths, reg. $15.75 for $10.50
2'4 vd. Skirt I-engths, reg. $18.75 for $15.00
1.6 yd. Skirt Lengths, reg. $S,00 for $5,511
Serge, Navy blue and black, reg. $4.50 for ... $3.25
Serge, blue, reg. $6.65 for $4.50
Serge, white, reg. $5.00 for $3.50
Serge, black and white check, reg. $1.60 for . $1.10
HEN'S DRESS FANTS HEN'S HEAVY WORK PANTS
Regular $4.50 for $8.00 Heavy Grey Tweed $5 for $3.50
Regular $5.00 for $3.50 Heavy grey tweed $6 for $8.75
Regular $6.00 for $4.25 G.W.G. grey tw'd $7.50 for $5.35
Regular $6.50 for $4.60 Heavy Bannochburn, reg.
Regular $7.00 for $4.76     $7.50 for   $5.75
Regular $8.50 for $5.75 G.W.G. Bannochburn reg.
Regular $9.50 for $7.25     $9.00 for   $7 ""
SWEATER COATS
Regular $5.00 for $3.50
Regular $ti.5o for $5.00
Carss Heavy Tweed, reg.
$9.50 for   $7.75
Black Mackinaw, regular
price $9.50 for $7.50
MACKINAW COATS
Regular $12.00 for $8.75
Regular $13.00 for $0.50
MACKINAW SHIRTS
Regular $6.50 for $4.60
Regular $9.50 for $6.66 Several colors to choose from
Regular $12.75 for $».00 Regular $17.00 for $11.90
Regular $14.00 tor   $9.85 Regular $17.50 for $12.25
pmtnvvn swfAtfrs      Regular *1800 ,or tliM
PULLOVER SWEATERS       Regular $19.50 for $18.65
Regular $5.76 for  $4.35 Regular $20.00 for $14.00
Regular $6.00 for $4.50 Regular $21.00 for $14.70
Regular $7.26 for  $5.45 Regular $22.00 for $15.40
Regular $8.00 for  $6.00 Regular $22.50 for $15.75
BOY'S SUITS BADLY CCT IN PRICE
$11.00 Suits   $ 8.60
$15.50, $16.00 and $16.60 Suits $18.86
$17.00, $17.50, $18.00 and $18.50 Suits $18.85
$20.00, $20.60, $21.00 and $21.50 Suits $16.36
$22.00, $23.00 and $23.60 Suits for .. $17.85
$25.00, $27.00 and $27.60 Suits for .. $20.86
BETTER THAN WHOLESALE PRICES
We have gone carefully through our Stock
of mens' shoes and have kicked out every
odd pair, these retail up to $13.50, you will
find them on a table priced $7.85
It nlll be m»nj mimlbi Mora this price Is nptsM.
TIES TIES TIES TIES
HUNDREDS OF THEM TO PICK FROM
Reg. $1.00 at 70c, two for $1.26
Rcg, $1.25 at 90c, two for $1.66
Rcg. $1.50 at $1.05, two for $2.00
Rcg. $1.75 at $1.25, two for $2.26
Rcg. $2.60 at $1.76, two for $8.26
Regular $8.00 for
Regular $10,00 for .
Regular $11.00 for .
Regular $12.50 for .
Itegular $12.75 for .
Regular $13,00 for .
Regular $13.50 for
Regular $15.00 for
Regular $ 17.50 for .
Itegular $18.00 for .
$6.35
$8.00
$8.25
. $0.35
. $9.50
. $9.75
$10.15
$11.25
$13.15
$13.50
Mens Pyjamas reg. 3.75 at $2.85
Mens Pyjamas reg. 4.25 at $3.20
Mens Pyjamas reg. 4.50 at $3.35
Mens Pyjamas reg. 5.00 at $3.75
Mens nightshirts 2.50 for $1.96
Mens nightshirts 2.75 for $2.10
Mens nightshirts 3.00 for $2.25
Mens nightshirts 3.25 for $2.45
Mens nightshirts 3.50 for $2.65
Mens nightshirts 3.75 for $2.85
Mens nightshirts 4.26 for $8.20
We Have Entirely Lost Sight of Profit in These Reductions
SILK DRESSES MUST GO     SERGE No LOWER for a Year THESE COATS DIRT CHEAP
Regular $27.00 for $18.90 Reg. $22.50 Serge Dress $16.95 Regular $25.00 for $17.50
$19.25 R*-S* $25.60 Serge Dress $19.15 Itegular $27.50 for $19.25
$19 95 Reg- S27-50 Serge Dr----*- $20.05 Regular $32.50 for $22.75
«o,'lift Re& $30-00 Serge Dress $22.50 Regular $34.00 for $23.80
*■,'*,. Reg. $35.00 Serge Dress $26.25 Regular $36.60 for $2545
J**** Reg. $36.00 Serge Dress $27.00 Regular $37.50 for $26.25
I,-»a Re6- *3"'*50 Serge Dress $28.00 Regular $40.00 for $2-*.00
Zi'ao- Reg- *38-00 Serge Dress $28.50 Itegular $45.00 for $3140
'*:! Reg. $39.00 Serge Dress $29.25 Regular $55.50 for $38.85
Regular $27.50 for
Regular $28.5(1 for
Regular $30.00 for
Regular $33.50 for
Regular $35.00 for
Regular $30.00 for
Regular $37.50 for
Regular $38.50 for
Regular $41.00 for
Regular $42.00 for
Regular $45.00 for
Regular $48.00 for
Regular $51.00 for
I'oi'il Reg. $40.00 Serge Dress
JSa i« Reg. $42.00 Serge Dress $31.50
$31 50 Reg' *43B0 Serge Dres8 *S2,65
EIDERDOWN GOWNS
%.«.(, Reg. $45.00 Serge Dress $83.75  Regular $12.50 for    $8.75
J,?*,X Reg. $46.00 Serge Dress $84.50 Regular $14.00 for    $0-80
Uvular 8BS 50 for $3675  Reg' *47'00 Serge Dress »85-*5 ReBular ?1500 for tl9M
Regular $66.00 for ..... $4540 ReS- *50'00 ***& Dress $37.50 Regular $23.00 for $16.10
Regular $67.00 for $46.90 ■	
Regular $75.00 for $5240
REN'S HOSIERY
Silk, .. $1.50 nnd $1.16
Jaeger Wool $1.50, $1.25
Black wool $1.25, $1.00
Heavy grey   $1.00
Two prs $1.65
Heavy grey $1.50
Two prs $2.25
Heavy grey    85c
Two prs $1.25
Heavy heather and
grey 75c, 2 prs $1.15
WINTER CAPS
HALF PRICE
Dojri 2.nu nlKlitshlrts .. $1.60
Boya 1.60 nleliinliirts .. $1.15
Visit the Furniture Dept.
A BIG BARGAIN
7 Only Ladies Sweaters,
worth up to 12.60 for . $7.85
14 Only, worth up to 20.00
for $11.15
One lot Child's Pull-Over
Sweaters for each, $2.95
One lot Child's Sweater
Coats going at .. each, $3.25
4 Only skating sets reg.
$9.00 for	
$7.25
LADIES WHITE WEAR
Combinations, regular $2.35 for   $1.50
Combinations, regular $2.00 for $1.25
Combinations, regular $1.66 for       90c
.'-Corset Covers, regular $2.25 for      90c
WINTER UNDERWEAR
Stanfleld's Combinations
reg.
Visit the Furniture Dept.
COMPARE OUR PRICES ON BEDDING AND FURNITURE WITH THOSE ADVERTISED BY TIIF. BIG
CITY STOKES—YOU WILL FIND OURS LOWER, ANB YOU WILL HAVE NO FREIGHT  TO  PAY
1 Only Shawl Scarf, regular
$12.75 for   $9.75
DON'T FORGET   THE
DOLLAR PARCELS
HERE IS A REGULAR BIG SNAP
Pieces, 34 Inch Heavy Flannelette at
35c a yard, 3 yards for $1.00
G Pieces, 30 inches, 30c, 3 yards for 85c
3 Pieces, 2S Inches, 25c, 3 yards for 70c
Silk and wool,
7.50 for ...
Silk and wool, reg.
6.50 for	
Two-piece, reg. 3.00
each for 	
$4.75
$8.75 jf|
'«
Printed Linoleum, 6ft. wide, per yard $2.90
Printed Linoleum, 12 ft. wide, per yard $6.26
7'/, x 9 Tapestry Rug, reg. $16.60 for $18.86
9x9 Tapestry Rug, reg. $32.50 for $24.25
9x9 Tapestry Rug, reg $34.50 for $25.76
9 x 9 Glengarry Rug, reg. $20.00 for $15.00
9x9 Axmlnster Rug, reg. $69.00 for $66.86
9 x 10'/2 Glengarry Rug, reg. $28.00 for $17.25
PURE WOOL BLANKETS
White, reg. 13.00 for .. $10.40
White, reg. 16.00 for .. $18-80
White, reg. 25.00 for .. $80.00
Red, reg. 22.50 for $18.00
Red, rcg. 28.00 for .... $28.40
COTTON COMFORTERS
Regular $4.26 for  $3.25
Regular $6.25 for $1.25
Regular $6.00 for $5.00
Regular $7.00 for $5.75
Regular $8.00 for $0.35
Itegular $10.60 for $8.50
9 x 10U Tapestry Rug, reg. $42.00 for $31.50
9 x lOWj Axmlnster, reg. $82.00 for $65.50
9 x 10$ Axmlnster, reg $U0.00 for $88.00
9 X 12 Glengarry, reg. $27.00 for $20.25
9x12 Tapestry, reg. $45.00 for $38.75
9 x 12 Axmlnster, reg $85.00 for $108.00
9 X 12 Axminstcr, reg. $125.00 for $100.00
9 x 12 Wilton, reg. $125.00 for ."... $100.00
HUDSON'S BAY PURE WOOL
Red, White, Green, Grey, Brown
Regular $24.00 for .... $19.20
Regular $30.00 for .... $24.00
Regular $36.00 for .... $28.00
MAT-
ONE-FIFTH OFF ALL FUKNITUBE NOT SPECIFIED HEREIN EXCEPTING   SPRINGS    AND
TRESSES ON WHICH A DISCOUNT OF TEN PER CENT WILL BE  GIVEN
$1.75 gi
Watson's All Wool Combinations reg. 6.00 for . $4.50 I
Vests only reg. 6.65 for , $5.00
Heavy Cotton Combinations, reg 4.50 for ... $3.00
Cambridge All Wool Combinations, 34 and 36, reg.
$4.50 for $2.50
Lined
Work  Gloves  &
Milts
at. ..Half Price
Wool Lined
Fine Gloves and
Mitts
1-3 off reg. Price
One-Third Off
all Heavy Rubbers, Shoe Packs
and Overshoes
BED SHEETS ARE ALWAYS WANTED—BUY THEM NOW
Heavy Eight Quarter Sheets, each $1.85, pair $840
Heavy Nine Quarter Sheets, each  $340   pair $640
FLANNELETTE BLANKETS Or SHEETS
Regular 4.50 for $3.65 Regular 6.00 for $4.85
Regular 5.25 for $4.35 Regular 11.50 for  $8.65
SEPARATE SKIRTS GREATLY REDUCED
One Lot 4 only Sirts, worth up to $12.00 at  $4,(5
One Lot 7 only Skirts, worth up to $13.50 at  $6.85
One Lot 6 only Skirts, worth up to $25.50, at  14,jj
ALL
GEORGETTE
and
CREPE de
CHENE
BLOUSES
HALF PRICE
BARGAIN-
SHOES
One Table of
SHOES
at reg. prices up
to $10.00
for   $4.85
Positively No Exchanges or Refunds Allowed on Sale Goods. TERMS CASH
STORE CLOSED ALL DAY FRIDAY, JANUARY, 14th PAGE FOUR
THK      CBANBBOOK      HERALD
Thursday, January 13,1920
You Can Do
Better in Your
Purchases
ot
Dishes,
Glassware,
Novelties,
If you shop at the
Cranbrook Bazaar
AKMSTllOXtl AVENUE
Next to McDuiinlil's Grocery
Your wants, It matters not
what ls required In onr line
can bo (Hied. It we haven't
got It, we can Ket it for you.
Call  and  Inspect  Our  Stock
Over tbe Cea Cups
IiiBure with Bealo &. Elwoll.
*'+   +   +
Boys" and Men's Hockey Boots.
Crunbrook  Exchange,
Our low prices win every time.
+   +   +
Hay choaper, three cars lu. No. J. oat
hay $31.00, No. 1 prairio hay $32.00,
No.  1  timothy  $87.00,    bran  $40.00,
shorts $12.00, flour $IJ.iJ0 cwt.    Cash
prices. Cranhrook  Trading Co.
+    +    +
Tungsten -tamps, 40w 45c
Tungrten lamps, GOw  60r
Cranbrook Exchange
Oa? low prices win every Ume.
+   +   +
Hugh MacDonald was taken to Nelson on Tuesday of this week, his departure being tlie closing incident in
the automobile case Which recently
excited a good deal of interest here.
+ + +
Mnruthon Oak Heaters
No. 17   12300
No. 16   $20.00
While they last, as we are clearing
out this stock.
Our low prices win overy time.
Cranbrook Exchange
+   +   +
Deposit boxes In ;ent from $3.00 a
year up at Bealo & ElwelVs.
+   +   +
Nathan  Earnhardt,    charged
Try a Safety Deposit Box In Beale
&. Elwell's vault and rollovo your
mind of worry,
+    +    -t-
Tlie .premises of Dan Yuien hi Chinatown were raided a few days ago
ami the iot.ee were rewarded for tlieir
efforts with a haul of drugs, which
Dan was according charged with being unlawfully in possession of, Tbe
case was heard on Wednesday morning, and the [jrisoner wus fined $200.
+ + +
The measles aro still going strong
among the children of the city, and
while perhaps not of a particularly
virulenL type, It is nevertheless bad
enough to C"'caaion some anxiety tu
parents in a few cases.
+ +  •;
The Ladies' Aid of Knox Church
will hold a Valentine tea and cookery
sale in tlie school room adjourning
the church on Saturday afternoon,
l-'ob. 12th, from 3 to (I. There will
also bo a candy boulh and a table
with a few fancy and useful articles
which were left over from the bazaar.
A very cordial invitation Is extended
to all.
+    +    +
Sugar $l"i.00 cwt.,  10c lb.,  brown
sugar lik- Ib     rrunbrook Trading Co.
+    +    +
1020 city council wound up Us
ANNUAL MEETING OF I
CHRIST CHURCH GUILD!
Tlie Christ Church Guild held their)
annual meeting on Tuesday Jan. llth
iu tho Parish Hall.
Aftor tlie secretary had submitted
thu annual report aud the financial'
statement, the latter accounting for
$1,849.76, he following officers were
olected:     ,
President, Mrs. W, E. Haslam, reelected. Vice-pres., Mrs. G. Thompson, re-elected. Sec-treas., Mrs. P,
H, Pym, re-elected. Sewing Committee, Mrs. (1. Thompson, Mrs. Robson
and Mrs. Uartncll. Sick Committee,
Mrs. Miles and Mrs. P, V. Harrison.
Mrs. P. J. Harrison undertook the
lea arrangements,
Mrs. Heale, Mrs. P. V. Harrison and
Mrs. Hartueli were elected to the executive.
After a very hearty vote of thank"
had been accorded to the offtcwrs of
tho i>ast year, and to Mr- Heale for
.igaln auditing the In-oks, a delicious
tea, provided by M"8. McCreery was
enjoyed by tho membero.
Social-Personal
\
Tli
business at a session held last Friday evening, but beyond receiving the
j usual reports irom the different de-
1 partments, little was done. Some bu-
I iuess was laid over for tbo new coun-
■ cil to take hold of.
*    +    +
Mason & Rlsch pianoforte in splendid condition, for sale   cheap.   Star
Second Hand Store.
+ + +
* Tho Ladies' Aid of tho Methodist
Church will hold a Cookery Sale and
servo afternoon tea on the afternoon
of Thursday, March 17th, in the Methodist Schoolroom,
+   +   +
CARD OF THANKS
LIBERALS ELECT OFFICERS
At the annual meeting of the Cran
brook Liberal Association held oi
Tuesday evening or this week ln their
committee rooms at lhe Hanson Block
officers were elected as follows:
President   It. E. Beattie
1st Vice-President   A. Genest
2nd Vice-President ... Ray Armstrong
L. Lowes, of Lister, spent a time
lu our fair city during the week.
Mr. and Mrs. P. G. Perry, of Pernie were iu the city Wednesday.
Mr. and Mra. Estrey of Port Steele
were in the city this week.
W. R. C. Anderson, Port Steele, was
in Crunbrook for a day the middle of
tho week.
E. W. and G. C. Evans of Marysvllle wero iu the city tliis week for u
while.
J. L. McKlnney, of Kimberley, was
In tho eity for a couple pf days this
week.
Rev. F. V. Harrison waB a visitor
to Michel aud vicinity thia week in
Anglican  Churoll  Interests.
Secretary .
Treasurer
Exocutive .
  W. D. Gilroy
  T. M. Roberts
.. Dr. P. B. Miles, J. F.
Guimont, E. Paterson,
C. J. Little, A. B. McDonald, C. R. Ward,
A. A. MacKinnon.
RETURNED MAX LAID
TO REST ON SATURDAY
Mr. J. T. Millar and relatives take
this wi'". imiiiy of- thanking all those
who assisted them during tlieir recent bereavement, and for the many
tokens of sympathy in the form of
floral offerings.
LA IIV MEMBER
HILL BE SPEAKER
OF NEW HOUSE
Mrs. Mary Ellen Smith, of Vancouver, according to reports from    that
city last week, lias been tendered the
with ' .speakership of the new    legislature
pulling Off a bold-up on two Chinamen | If this Is the case, tho decision will
in Chinatown somo time ago, was.be looked upon favorably from tt'i
tried last Friday aud sentenced to two] quarters, though it will remove Mrs,
months in jail, without tho option of Smith's voice irom all discussions In
a fine. He was taken to Nelson on. tliu House. If she accepts, a by-el-
Tuesday, [election would be necessitated in Van-
+   +   + | couver Illy. ,
^jfiil'-v
EYE AILMENTS
Seventy-live per cent, of
people have abnormal vision and only ahout 25%
veal glnsses to correct
the defects. The other
60% suffer from various
eye troubles. These have
a reflex action on other
bodily functions,  causing
headaches, indigestion,
dizziness and many other
ailments, Every person
should make it a point to
find out whether his or
hor eyes aro weak or not.
W. II. WILSON
Eye Specialist
-"    UH»
The funeral of the late James L
McLaren, who passed away on Wednesday of last week at the St. Eugene
Hospital, was hei'd ou Saturday morning last, at 10 o'clock, from the Catholic Church. The funeral was held
under the direction of the local branch
of te G. W. V| A., and the pall bearers wero aU returned men.
Deceased enlisted from here with
liie 54th Kootenay Battalion, and
white serving overseas developed tuberculosis, which may even have been
latent before his enlistment. He was
well known in the city, being employed at oue of the hotels before the war.
Since his return his precarious health
prevented him from taking u,p with
any very strenuous employment, although for a time he was engaged at
tho local (i. W. V. A. headquarters.
He was a man of probably something
over forty, and is understood to leave
a wife and child still in England.
Every t:me the fire alarm whistles,
bome onc-'r property is being destroyed, It miy be your turn next, are you
insured lully—If not—mako arrangements with Beale & Elweli.
+   +   +
Cranbrook poultry  will be in evidence at tlie Provincial Poultry Show 	
to be  held  at the  Coast  this  week, | Education, Minister of Health, or Mln-
Mr. P. J. Harbfnson having notified (i-^ter of Social'Service Legislation.
Prom tho time of the announcement,
of Mrs. Smith's great plurality In
Vancouver, it was on the carpet that
tho government proposed to recognize
Mrs. Smith's wide popularity and service In the House with some position
of dignity. Various rumors had her
entering  the  cabinet  as   Minister  of
the secretary of tlie West Kootenay
Poultry Association at Nelson of his
intention to send birds out to the big
Bhow. ,
+ + +
Rolled Oats, 20 lb. sack $1.30, or 8
lb. sack 65e. Crlsco 35c lb., 3 lbs $1.
B. C. Syrup, 5 lbs. 85c, or 10 lbs.
$1.80. Peanut Butter, 25c. Sunlight
Soap, 3 cartons $1.00.
butter 65c, creamery butter 60c lb., or
10 lbs. B8c lb.     Fresh Eggs 90c.
Cranbrook Trading Co.
+   +   +
The Incident at the open air skating rink Vast. Sunday was treated a
little incorrectly in au issue of tlie
The Premier, however, Is understock to have taken the view that any
increases in the cost of administration could not bo borne at this time,
Tlie defeat of Hon. John Keen in Kaslo lias opened up tlie Speakership aud
the concensus of opinion ln the cabinet recognized In Mrs. Smith an admirable successor for the Kaslo vet-
Brookfleldjeran*
Hon. Mrs. Smith, who had the distinction of being thc first lady member of parliament In the empire, may
thus have the much more novel distinction of being tlie first lady Speaker In the Empire or In Christendom.
Tho ofllce is ci'othed with all manner
Nelson News this week.     "Police at of flS^. the Speaker of the House
Cranbrook Take BVue  Law Vlow 0fj being the mouthpiece of the assembly
Sunday Skating," does not reflect at|In. its addresses to the throne,
all the rights of thc Incident.     Any
decision that was taken in tho matter was not arriveil at by the police
nor In fact by the police commission.
At the time tlie open air rink scheme
•was advanced the queston of allowing Its use on Sundays was anticipated
by tho committee ln charge, and if
thero was no rocorded decision on it,
there was a tacit understanding that
the best thing to do with the vexed
question would he to have the rink
ln operation only six days a week.'
The pollco commission, learning that
such an understanding undoubtedly!
existed, were unaiunonsi'y of the op-i
Inlon that it should be lived up to.     '
  British history is replete with instances
where Speakers have defied the Crown
under the protection afforded to the
holder of the oflce.
TENDERS WANTED
Tho following may be sold subject
to tho best offers received.
Ono watch, silver case, 17 jewel
Waltham. Ono watch, gold filled
caso, 17 jowel P. S. Bartlett. Particulars from tho undersigned.
P. ADAMS,
Chief of Poi'ice.
Cranbrook, B.C.,
Jan. 6th, 1921.
"The New Boy".
GIVEN BY
Cranbook Talent,
at
WYCLIFFE,
Saturday, January 22,
at 8.00 p.m.
For the Benefit or
THe Cranbrook Recreation Club
Admission 75 cents
WEDDING OF LOCAL
INTEREST OCCURS
The following regarding the marriage of a well known mining engineer who was at one timo stationed at
Kimberley and Moyie, Is taken from
the Victoria Colonist:
Kilburn-Inches.—At noon on New
Year's day a pretty wedding took
place at the residence of the bride's
mother, Mrs. Annie Inches, 164 Cambridge Street, when the Rev. Dr.
Campbell celebrated the marriage of
Georgo Harry Kilburn, mining engineer, and Miss Mary Jane Inches, both
of Victoria. The bride, wlio was given in marriage by her brother-in-law,
Dr. Proctor, was very handsome in a
travelling suit of dark blue gaberdine with hat to match, and carried
a bouciuct of pink roses. She was attended as bridesmaid by her sister,
Miss Agnes Inches, who was very
pretty in a dainty frock of taupe vel-
our and carried a bouquet, of pink
carnations. The bridegroom was accompanied as groomsman by Mr. A.
Ti. Inches. The bride's mother, becomingly gowned in embroidered
black silk, was matron of honor. After the ceremony, a buffet luncheon
was served. Tho house was artist!
cally decorated wilb flowers and evergreens. Mr. and Mrs. Kilburn left
by the afternoon boat for Vancouver
on their way to Calgary and Winnipeg. On their'return from their honeymoon they will make their home ln
Victoria, the Queen City of the West.
ASKING FOlt BUTTER
AUTOMOBILE KATES
ON KOOTENAY BOATS
Tho Associated Hoards of Trade of
South-Eastern llrltlsh Columbia is
adding its voice to thoso asking for
belter treatment from the C.P.R. in
the mailer of automobile tolls on the
Kootenay I-ake boats. B. O. Hamilton, of Invermere, secretary of the
Associated Hoards for this district,
has sent to the Nelson Board of Trade
a copy of a resolution on this subject
passed nt tho Inst meeting held at
Font to last November, and which is
to be taken up at a joint Board of
Trade conferenco to be held shortly
at Pentlcton.
The text of the resolution Is as follows: ,
"Whereas tho road to Kuskanook
will bo completed within the course
of another month, and the wharf
ready for uso whereby motorists will
bo able to drive their cars on the
steamboat and go to NelBon, and
"Whereas this will induce a great
number of tourists to travel that way,
providing the tariff is n it too high;
"Therefore be it resolved that this
association petition the C.P.R. to put
Into operation tho lowest -poaslble tariff compatible with adequate service:
"Further, that thoy be requested to
hotify each of the boards forming
this association of tholr plans as won
as Die same have been completed,"
II. M. Sparks, of the Remington
Typewriter Company of Caligary, was
lu Lho city this week ou business.
Alan Graham, O. U. Jackson and
A. W, Greenwood, ull of Fernie, were
registered in the city this week.
Dr. and Mrs. J. H. King arrived on
Monday evening from Victoria to take
part In the Liberal proceedings this
week In the city.
E. G. DanielB, of Fernle, has been
ln town this week on business in connection with his position of public
school  Inspector.
Mr. John Mueli'or, of Fort Steele,
who has been hauling ties from Maus
Creek, had tho misfortune to lose a
fine Clyde horse last week.
Tho dwelling of Robert Dixon, Burwell avenue, has been sold to James
and Kate Thomson. The deal was
made through The Cranbrook Agency
Company. ,
Major H. B. Hicks, of the Water
Rights Branch, has changed the location of his office from the Hanson
Block, and is now Installed in quarters in the government building.
Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Smith entertained a number of friends at home on
Monday evening last in the form of
a novel card party. The evening sped
ay all too fast, and the unanimous
sentiment of those present was that
tho function was one of the best of
its kind.
Tho resignation ot City Engineer
W. H* Eassle is iu tlie hands of the
city clerk and will' probably be dealt
with by the 1921 council. Mr. Eas-
was granted leave of absence for
some months to attend to Interests in
South America but finds it impossible
to return at any early date it Is understood and hence his resignation.
Mr. W. G. Asher, who has been acting as pastoral supply for the past
two months or thereabout at the Vocal Baptist Church, has tendered his
eslgnatiou to the church, which was
regretfully accepted at a meeting on
Tuesday evening. It is understood
that purely personal reasons are advanced by Mr. Asher for the step. His
future plans have not yet been made
known.
Evangelist Young, of the International Bible Students Association,
gave un Illustrated lecture in the
Edison theatre on Monday night,
about fifty .people being present.
"Millions now Living Will Never
Die," was his subject, and he dealt
very graphically with the hereafter,
as referred to ln the Bible, and In
accordance with tho views of his denominational body.
According to the Blalrmore Enterprise, the four little children ot the
late Mrs. Oi'ive McDonald, of that
town, have been taken in care by the
Calgary Red Cross, and are now In
that city being looked after by that
body. The Blalrmore branch of the
Hed Cross and the G/W[.V.A. brought
this about, and the provincial government of Alberta is understood to have
made a substantial allowance for the
upkeep of tho orphans.
$10.00
For You!
Wo will ali'ow a rebate of
*IO,.)0 off the purchase price
ot the next "KIMITKNAl"
KANUK sold within ten days
trom January 14th, 1921.
One llango only, firBt buyer gets the rebate.
The Kootcnay's -Vickie Steel Washable Oven, Semi-Steel Lined
Firebox and Fuel Saver
Attachment, make it
the Range of the hour.
Tlie Best Is always the
Ohcapost — the Cheapest Is
never tlle llest.
Patmore Bros.
Mrs. Hilton, Wuttsburg, was in the
city Wednesday this woek.
A. O. Wilmot and J. L. Abbott wero
in from Jaffray for a tlmo this week.
C. A. Klingingsmilh and wife, of
Elko, wero iu tho city during tho
woek.
Messrs. G. W. Donahus and Chas.
Howard, of Wardner, came in to the
city and spent a short time here this
week.
Hockey .practices have been going
ou at the open air rink this week, and
some games will probably be announced shortly, as a result of a meeting
of enthusiasts held this week.
The seasonablo winter weather of
the past week or two has given a
great fillip to winter sports, and curling, skating and hockey are attracting much attention these clays. So
far as weather goes, old-timers are
agreed that this has been one of tho
most enjoyable winters in the history
of the city.
As announced elsewhere "The New
Boy," who made such a successful debut in Cranbrook before Christmas.
is to mako an appearance at Wycllffe
on Saturday, January 22nd, in the
Y. M. C A. Hall, at 8 p.m. The performance is being put on for tbo befit of tho Cranbrook Recreation Club.
An ndmlsslon of 76 cents will be cliar-
ig«d.
Mrs. Mary Ellen Smith, member-elect in Uio provincial Legislature, and
upon whom the mantle of John Keen,
of Kaslo, is to fall as speaker in the
new Legislature, was prevented by
indisposition from paying an Intended
visit to tho city in connection with the
Lheral meetings held this week. M.
A. Macdonai'd, M.L.A., of Vancouver,
who was also expected to be here,
has likewise been unable to fulfill
his engagement, having heen called
to Ottawa.
Rev. J. Wlllard Litch, recently appointed Superintendent of Baptist
Missions In B.C., visited tho city this
week in his oilicial capacity conferring
with members of the local church. On
Tuesday evening ho addressed a meeting at the Baptist Church. Chiefly
on Mr. Litch's recommendation, a permanent pastor for the local church is
being sought in the person of Rev.
Mr, Tapscott, formerly of Calgary,
md now an evangelist at large in the
province of Alberta. He has signified his willingness to consider the
matter of a call, and could be here
in about six weeks or two months.
The big Liberal rally hel.l ln the
Auditorium on Wednesday night was
a signal success, judging from the
comments of a number who took In
the event. It was preceded early in
t''P e\?i-'iiK hy a meeting nt the District Liberal Association. A large
crowd was in attendance to take *:i
the later ] • ore flings, including a tn nl
many from outside points. Among
the speukers of the evening were Dr,
King, Mrs. V. H. Miles, and R- E,
Beattie, president of the district association. A substantial supper was
served during the evening, und music
and dancing wero also made part of
tlie evening's program.
A meeting of the teachers of the district Is expected (o take placo on Sat-
turday next, when Messrs. Prescott,
of Conl Creek School, representing
tho B, 0> Teachers' Federation, and
Mr. Sholnoid. of Fernle, nro expected
to bo present. Mr. Prescott was ox
peeled hero some tlmo ago, but indisposition prevented him from putting
in an appearance nt. that tlmox Al a
later date a visit from Mr. Charlesworth, secretary and organizer for
the B. C. Teachers' Federation, Is expected.
Mr. J. A. Mirams arrived in the city
this week from the Coast, to take up
work in connection with tho Cranbrook Recreation Club. The officers
of that institution, bearing in mind
Mr, Mirams' good work along the
same lines ln the city a number of
years ago, naturally feel that they
are extreniei'y fortunate to be able to
secure him. Quarters for Mr. and
Mrs. Mirams have been prepared In
the Club building, and the fact of having someone on the premises at all
times will be the means of keeping the
building In a far better condition. The
Recreation Club has spent a thousand
dollars In renovating and repairing
the building, a good deal of the dam
age undoubtedly arising from sheer
wanton destruction.
Extraordinary News
oi interest to the people of Cranbrook
and District will
be iound on
Page Five
AGENTS FOR WILLIS PIANOS
SEE THE WILLIS PIANOS NOW HEBE
THE WEATHER
Officials thermometer readings at
Cranbrook.
Max. Min.
Jan. 6     23 13
Jan.  7       30 17
Jan.  8       33 12
Jan. 9   28 4
Jan. 10   24 —7
Jan.  11       21 —11
Jan. 12   24 —3
Tho Methodist Church choir te
commencing practices on <a sacred
cautata by J. H. Maunder, "From Olivet to Caivary, which will be given
on Good Priday,
PIONEER ALASKAN
DIED THIS MONTH;
HAD RELATIVES HERE
The death occurred at Dawson, Y.
T., on Jan. 4th, of Emerson O'Neii,
eldest son of the late Thomas O'Neii'
and the late Mrs. O'Neii, of Oil
Springs, Ontario, and beloved brother
of Mrs. Campbell Lewis, of this city.
Mr. O'Neii was a .pioneer Alaskan
and Yukoner, having gone to Juneau
in 1893 and from there, about two
years later, to Dawson. He also had
Interests for several years in and around Fairbanks, Several times he
had taken eastern trips, but eventually always returned to the land of the
Ixmg Trail. On these occasions, his
experiences in the far north, which he
related in a pleasing manner, always
delighted his relatives and friends.
Mr. O'Neii lived for a whllo ln Spokane and was known among mining
men there.
Mrs. Lewis waB notified of her brother's death by his lawyer in Spokane,
who had noticed an account of his
death in the Spokesman-Review |of
Jan. 6th. Hopes were entertained
that tho press notice was incorrect,
as Mrs. Lewis and her little daughter
had received cheerful letters from him
on Christmas Eve—but a wire to a
brother In Tacoma a little later confirmed the Bad Intelligence.
Mr. O'Nell Is survived by four sisters and three brothers. Arrangements are being mado to hnve the
remains brought out when navigation
opens for Interment, at Spokane,
BUSY ON BANFF-
WINDERMEKE ROAD
(Continued from Page One)
of Trade which Instituted tho movo-
mont to have tho work completed at
once, that it should not stand In the
way at the present crisis of unemployment. It ls felt by these organisations that since it Is the Intention of
tho government to finish up the rond
in any case, that the money should be
taken from the unemployment funds
which tho government ls arranging
for, and that at the proper time the
money could be refunded to the proper
account.
It has also been announced from
Ottawa by the Dominion Parks branch
of the Department of the Interior that
the highway from Castle to Laggan
in the Rockies haa boon completed,
and is now open to the public, This
new road makes the Lake Louise region, recognised as one of the most
beautiful on the continent, accessible
to motorists trom the south and east.
WANT ADS.
STAK SECOND HAND STORK
Phone ft.
We pay the best prices going for all
kinds of furniture. We buy anything from a mouse trap to an automobile.
'Illustrated Sweet Pea Seed Catalogue" containing latest novelties
aud best Spencer varieties, and a
few excellent vegetable peas. Apply
Crosland Bros., Sweet Pea Specialists, Duncan, Vancouver Island.
, 13-l-4tp
MAY and FEED
Keith Bell Hay St drain Co.
Lethbrldge
Reference:   Union Bank of Canada,
Lethbrldge.
Reduced Prices
Our Timothy, Alfalfa and Blue
Joint Hay ls now Inspected by a
Government Official and graded.
Cheap Upland prairie hay, baled oat
sheaves, oat straw, Central Alberta
feed oats.
You can depend on  us—Wo want
your custom. 13-l-4tp
LIVE LADY OR GENTLEMAN AGENT
wanted la Cranbrook district, for
Supreme Watkins Products. Watkins goods known everywhere. Write
today Dept. C.50, The J. R. Watkins Co,, Winnipeg. 26-11-41
HOUSE FOR KALE Hig snap for
quick salo. Ii<)ta25, block 23, wost
sldo of Lumsdcn avenue, five rooms,
plastered, cellar, ono lot, foundations fixed lust year, connected up
with city sewerage system und fix-
turns left for Installation of bath
and toilet, water pipes never freeze.
Address letter to House, Herald
Office. 12-SO-St
Timothy and Prairie
Hay
Oreen Oat Sheaves
Paled
Alfalfa & Oat Straw
Grain and Mill Feed
at lowest prices
JAMES KERRIGAN
DISTRIBUTOR

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