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Cranbrook Herald Feb 5, 1925

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Array TE
^ CRANBROOK HERAIJ
VOLUME    26
CRANBROOK, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5th, 1925
N U M I! E R    5 ii
Address On
Education
Brotherhood Meeting Hears
Trend   of  Modern
Times Discussed
PoHHibly the most. Interesting
meeting yet held hy the Cranbrook
Brotherhood took place nt the Methodlat church Sunday school room on
Monday evonlng last, The attendance considering other attractions
at the hour of meeting, wns very
K«od. Following the supper, which
wan enjoyed by nil, and which reflected much credit on the cooking
ability of the committee, Messrs.
Moir, Hayward, Klnghorn and Harris, the guests were favored with a
selection from the Sunday School
orchestra, consisting of a medley of
populnr airs. So much was their
good work appreciated that they
were obliged to respond to an encore. The lender, Mr. P, J. Lodge,
has every reason to feel proud of his
little band of musicians.
The speaker of the evening wns
Mr. H. L. Porter, principal of the
Cranbrook High School, who had
been asked to speak on some educational topic. His remarks were based on "The Trend of Modern Edu-
cation," on which he spoke lucidly
and forcefully. It is understood to
be Mr. Porter's intention to speak
further on the same line at another
meeting next week, when a further opportunity will be presented
for giving out a synopsis on what is
really a vital topic.
Mrs. James Hartley, who for the
past two weeks has benn visiting in
Macleod, returned to the city on
Wednesday.
Miss Ethel Nicholso nof Fernie,
was a viflitor over the week-end at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ira Me-
Naughtan.
Mibs Alice Wood, of Canyon, B.C.,
was successful in the Provincial
Nursing Board /examination, taken
in November last at the St. Eugene
Hospital.
BORN—On Wednesday, February
3, at the St. Eugene Hospital, to Mr.
and Mrs. Omer Fontaine of Kimberley, a daughter.
The case of Rex vs. Rogonovich
was concluded on Wednesday morning before Judge Thompson, when
the prisoner was sentenced to eight
months in jail. This was the shoot
ing case that caused so much disgust in Kimberley recently.
Miss Laura Hill, of Reginn, left
last week, nfter spending a month or
ao here on a visit at the home of her
sister, Mr. C F. Collins, procedlng
on to California points en holiday.
Mr. Pierce received thc intelligence by wire of lbe death of his
fnthcr in Vancouver on Tuesday of
this week, nnd left for the Coast
immediately.
Mat Nolan, nn old time resident of
fitat Kootenay, lias been confined to
the hospital for the last few days.
Mr. Nolan's condition is such that it
will he necessary to take him to thc
Const for treatment.
At the time ef going to press it
is learned that Phyllis, the 10 year
old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E.
Home has passed away at thc St.
Kugene Hospital. Attacked suddenly on Monday with appendicitis, medical aid wax at once given, two operations since that time being deemed
necensary. The little one made a
strong fight and many friends were
pleased to hear this rooming thai
her ease was considered more hopeful* Death, however, overtook her
nt about noon. Thc funeral, which
will be of a private nature, will be
held from the family home on Friday afternoon at 8.80, Friends arc
asked not to send Mowers.
MOTHER OF CRANBROOK
CITIZEN PASSES AWAY;
LIVED LONG IN LONDON
The following from the London
Free Press of January 24th, lust,
refers to the mother of Mr. W. S.
Santo, of this city. Mr. Santo lust
year spent a visit of some weeks at
London, al bis former home, having been advised then of the somewhat precarious slate of her health,
due lo advancing years.
"Ml'S. Mary Santo, one of London's gland old women, died at the
homo ol lur son, Dr. A. E, Santo,
Craig  Street,   this  morning. The
late Mrs. Santo had lived in this city
foi1 throo-quartera of a century, and
bad seen London grow from the village slate tn tlmt of a flourishing
city of 00,000 people, Her life in
London has won for her a large host
of friends, both old and young, and
ber death, while not unexpected,
comes as a great shock to all those
who knew her.
Born in Devonshire, England, 87
years ago, the deceased came to
Canada when 12 years of age, taking up residence in London with her
parents immediately on arrival from
the Old Country. Her husband,
John Santo, predeceased her some
years ago.
The late Mrs. Santo is survived by
eight children, five sons and three
daughters.
The funeral, which has not yet
been definitely arranged, will be
held   probably   on   Monday."
EVANGELIST OPENS
CAMPAIGN OF TWO
WEEKS IN CITY
Sunday evening a large audience
greeted Rev. II. Arthur Barton at the
opening meeting in the Methodist
Church of thc two weeks' evangelistic services which ure being conducted under the auspices of the united
churches in the city. The speaker
did not take long to convince his
hearers that he was an orator of no
mean ability, and held the interest
of all during an enlightening discourse.
To repeat the whole of the 65th
chapter of Isaiah without reference
to tho text was a feat for which his
previous experience on the stage had
well fitted him.
At the beginning of tht service
Rev. Mr. Freeman stated that the
speaker came to Cranbrook under
the auspices of the Department of
Social Service and Evangelism of
the Methodist church, and made reference to his special qualifications
for this work.
Rev. Mi-. Barton chose as his text
the verse of Proverbs, "As a man
thinketh, so is he." Many apt illustrations were cited in support of his
arguments. Thc speaker's description of the three divisions of the
mind, the spiritual, the conscious
and lhe Bubsonselous, and their interrelation and functions was extremely interesting.
Following the meeting there was
a meeting of workers for tho campaign, and this was well attended.
BIG FATHER & SON
BANQUET TO BE
HELD FRIDAY EVENING
Full Preparations Made For
Unique Event in Baptist
Church Basement
Thi- Father nml So;
will bc held in the Baptlit Chureh j
basement,  on   Friday  evening,  iln* *
nth insl., at 0.80 o'clock. +
Everything is  ready for tin- big- t
geat uml beat Father and Son Qet- +      ,'    , ,    .
.. .    , .   .     r,        , ,     -n     '+ Wl-   lllll-     to     I Klllk     S'OU  fill*
together ever held in ' ranbrook, rhe * .    ,
...    ,   ' * your marked copy received, dis*
:■ .;• *•:••:■ .;• * * * •:- * * * * ** * ** * * * * •:-
Advertisers Appreciate
Herald Linotype
Service For Display
I      Tlu- following entirely unso-
i £ licited appreciatii n    from   the
* secretary oi tin* Revelstoke Si:i
I •:■ Carnival    came    t..    hand lust
j £ week-end, uml Bpeaks I'm- Itself:
Revelstoke, B.C.
January 211. 1026
brook Herald,
unl.roi.k,  B.C.
nr Sil-.s:
! MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION HOLDS ANNUAL
MEETING AND DINNER
Re-Elect Officers & Hear Re-
;  ports on Past Year's Work
And Plans For Future
Baptist church basement will be
packed to the doors at fi.:{l), when
lads and dads .--it down to cat.
Invitation  cards have been  distributed and acceptances are coming in
ploying advertising relative to .•,
tournament, and to *;'
tliat of \he many co- *
• *   veil
fast.     A   splendid   program   is   pre- j +
Jadvis   	
* plea of the Interior press recc
pared—speeches, sonirs, yells, etc.,
with Lou Buckley un tup, with ;i
ringing message to all. Lots uf eats
provided by the ladies. Oh, Boy!
Come prepared to have a good time
or don't come at all.
An outline of the program for
"Father nnd Son Week," February
16-22 will be published next week.
February is Home Month, and altho"
the Y.M.C.A. is pushing the Father
and Son part of the program, let us
all pull together, Father, Mother,
Brother, Sister, to make our homes
count for all that God intended them
to be. The moment that home.losea
its power Canada is domed. God
bless and make nur home a sine
foundation df a God-fearing people.
GET BUSY
In the Kansas State  Reformatory
for boys, at Hutchinson, there were
370 boys at a recent survey.       Of j MAIL CONTRACT FOR
these, 73 per cent, came from homes
late carrying BimUar material, your arrangement, space
* given,   and   accuracy  is  by  far
% the best.
* We feel that our appreciation
* in this regard deserves your no-
% tlficatlon.     Thank you.
* The   advertisement  in  ques-
+ tion  was  not given  any specal
* dressing up for the occasion. It  *
£ was set on the Herald linotype, ^
* in the usual run of work.       It *•*
* does indicate, however, that thc *
% linotype equipment nf this of- *£
* fice, allowing of nine different £
* sii-.es of type heng set, and no *
* less than fourteen different fa- *
* ees—all from the one keyboard, *£
* gives   a   variety   and   emphasis *
* that will   fit the  most exacting .;
*;' advertising need. *i
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ** *** ** * * .•.
that were blasted through divorce or
other infelicity. They were the victims of a faulty home life. They
suffered from lack of thc very ideals
that "Father and Son Week" will
help create. In helping put over the
Father and Son idea in Cranbrook,
you are helping to depopulate the
reform schools of tomorrow.—All
Together.—Help with the Father and
81    KIMBERLEY & CRANBROOK UNDER REVIEW
Tenders Call For Two Round
Trips Per Day, To Connect With Trains
.1. P. Scntt
.1. P. Bridges
A. I'. Noble
11. li. Hlnton
of the three
Considerable intrn ft him been
uroused in both Kitbberley and Cran-
Son Get-together, Friday night, Feb-j brook by the announcement uf the
ruary Oth, in thu Buptist Church | call fur tenders for mail to be carried
basement, and "Father and Son between the two points. The adver-
Week," February 10 to 22. tlsement appears in this issue of the
 ' ■ ■  Herald    The contract calls fur two
LOCAL BOARD OF r"umi triPs Per '■"-- f,'um *• cran-
TRADE INTERESTED IN    £& £*££,11\ ESS
GAS CAR SERVICE j ate   points.    The   first  is timed  to
  leave Cranbrook about tha middle of
Is Innovation Shortly   To   Be:t,lt' corning and to return just be-
Tried Out on Cranbrook-
Kimberley Branch?
The board of trade has been in
touch with officials of the C.P.R.
with respect to the proposed trial of
a gasoline car service on the railway,
which it is understood the company
is to give a try-out in the West Km>-
tenny.     The   ear   is   being   brought
I fore tbe arrival of the train from the
east. The second is similarly timed
in the afternoon, so as to make connections with the train from the
west. This wil! mean that the mail
will be handled a great deal more
expeditiously, obviating the necessity
nf holding over mail from the two
trains until the following morning.
It is stated that the Kimberley mail
usually   runs   to   about   forty  sacks,
from the east, and was understood at from which it will be son that the
the beginning of the week to have contract will be a substantial one,
reached Calgary, where it was ex-' and will call for fairly heavy truck
pected it would remain for a few equipment. A number of bidders are
days, till favorable weather condl- j already in the running for the con-
tions permitted it to  make the trip! tract it is understood.
ANNUAL MEETING OF
KNOX CHURCH HELD
WEDNESDAY LAST WK.
The annual meeting of Knox
Presbyterian Church was held In the
Sunday school room of the church on
Wednesday night last and consider-
ing the other attractions on that evening the attendance was good.
Tbat the various organisations of
the church had been active in their
respective fields was shown by the
reports of their various leaders.
Approximately $8,000 was collected ami disbursed bjf thfl church and
it.-- several organisations, and of this
amount 1808 went to missions from
the Mission Hand and Missionary Society. The receipt* of tho various
church  In.dies  were as  follows:
Hoard of Managers. |4,086,B0| I.II
jdics Aid, $2,896*78; Sunday School,
1080.88; Missionary Society, $40:1.10
and the Mission Hand, $400.fill, making a total of IJ.086,16.
The election of olllcers resulted in
the election of the old board, Mr, 3,
I,. Walker being elected as chairman.
through the Crow under its own power.     Efforts   have   been   made   by 11
INCREASING IN POPULARITY AT THE STAR
b>| LOCAL TALENT NIGHT
the board of trade to interest the
railway company in an undertaking!
of (his kind for the Kimherley branch
out of the pity, and some are optimistic enough to think that this car
after a thorough tryout may be put
into service on the Kimberley branch
later, if conditions warrant it. Some
profess to believe that the change
is being considered by the railway
company in readiness to be able to
bid on the proposed change in the
method of handling the mails between the two towns. *
The board of trade are considering taking the matter up with a view
if possible of getting trial trips run
when the car is in tbis vicinity.
GILL — ANTHONY
On Saturday last, January 31st,
Hiss Elsie Mac Anthony and Mr,
Carl A. K. Gill were united in marriage, the ceremony taking place at
3 p.m., at the home of the parents
of the groom, Mr, and Mrs. T. Gill,
Garden Avenue. The officiating
clergyman was Rev. P. V. Harrison,
rector of Christ Church. The wedding was a quiet one, only members
of the family being present, and one
old friend of the bride, MrB. K. C.
Horne, of Kimberley, by whom the
bride was given in marriage. Mr.
nnd Mrs. Gill will make their home
ln Kimberley, where the heartiest
wishes for a long married life of continued happiness   will
BORN—At the St. Eugene Hospital, on Monday, February 2, to Mr.
and Mrs. Stanley Quaffe, of Cranbrook, a son.
BORN. — On""\Vednesday, Feb-
ruary 4th, at the St. Eugene Hospital, to Mr, and Mrs. Ashton Powers, of this city, a son,
WANTED—Girl to assist in general
housework, apply Mrs. Thompson,
North Star Hotel, Kimberley. 60-1
Calgary.— According to estimates
of locul grain men $25,000,000 worth
of wheat has passed through Calgary
since the opening of the shipping season on September 1st last. The ac-
follow them j tual number of cars inspected   was
from their many friends in this el-118,165.    Vancouver is absorbing alty, where the groom has grown up most all tho wheat routed through
during the long residence of thu fa-
■fly ton.
this city, shipments ranging from 70,-
000 to 100,000 bushels daily.
Min   Meeting  in  Auditorium
A mass meeting will he held in the
Auditorium nn Sunday evening, beginning at 7.HO, conducted by Evan-j
gellst Rev, H. Arthur Barton, whose
success with thc campaign of united
services has been so phenomenal. Regular evening services are being
withdrawn by the co-operating churches for Sundny evening in order
that'they may throw their full force
into the meeting in the Auditorium,
The united choirs will lead the music, A packed house is anticipated,
[The united services In the Methodist
| church have been steadily growing in
interest and power and give early
promise of remarkable success.
The local talent night at the Star I
is proving more popular each week, j
l.asc night there was a very crowded
attendance.
After a very pood film show, thej
first number was a pianoforte solo |
by Ray Brown, which showed him
to have marked ability us a piano
player. His -election was much enjoyed.
Miss Marguerite Caven captivated
her audience uitli her Irish dance, to
which she was obliged to respond
three   times. The   vociferous  ap
plause placed her in tht- first prise
class.'
Cecil Reade's work on the xylo
phone met with great applause and
many were glad that constant practice on his Instrument had been re-
I warded with this public recognition.
I With Miss CaVOl he shared first and
second prize money, the two being
tied for first  place.
VV.   Livingstone's  reading  of  Ser-1
vice's poems met  with loud applause
also, he being obliged to respond
with an encore.
Little Miss Bowloy was in a class
hy herself, cute and dainty, no one
could help likiim her. Her dancing,
considering the fact that she has had
j no practice since coming from Victoria, was wonderful, and her mechanical doll act was very good.
Cranbrook nudi-'nees will look forward to seeing lur again.
Mr. Blaine should get another pro-
jctionist, and gel Harry Lee to do a
stunt each night nt the ••how, for
from the time ho came on tho stage
to the accompaniment of the Star or
chestra, which by the wny added in
no -small measure to tho success of
the performance, ho had the crowd
In laughter. He has a Inrge bump of
comedy in his mftko-up, and bis songs
wore the hit of the evening.-
The'work of Mr. I'udherg and Mrs.
Kdmoudson  was of invaluable assistance tu thu artists.
Tiie anual meeting of the Retail
Merchants' Association was held on
Monday evening, being held at the
V..M.C.A. As is customary the meeting proper was preceded by a sup-
| pei'. About twenty merchants, members of the association sat down and
. njoyed tbe menu provided by tbe
White   Lunch  Cafe.
Following the meeting the tables
were cleared and the buslnes sof the
nulling proceeded. The minutes of
Uie last annual meeting were read
by the secretary, C. J. Lewis, and
adopted. J. F. Scott, president for
ihe past four years, gave a comprehensive report on the work accomplished by the local body in conjunction with the provincial and Dominion boards, and outlined further
work which might be taken up locally. The treasurer's report, prepared by II. R. Hinton, was read,
showing a fairly substantial balance
in the treasury, and Mr. Hinton was
tendered the thanks of the associa
tion for his constant work in connection with the finances of the assoc
iation.
The election of officers resulted
in the following being named to take
the various positions:
President	
1st Vice President
2\ul Vice President
Treasurer      	
Executive:— Chairmen
classifications:
Class I  A.  I).  Bridges
Class II.        A.  Raworth
Class HI  G.  W.  Patmore
Arising out of the matter of some
stores with the privilege of remaining open after other stores had closed, ami selling lines conflicting with
the stores coming within the half
holiday act, it was dcided to leave the
natter subject very largely to ar-
anircment between the stores affected, though it is probable that any
y flagrant violations of the law
will be taken up later. The merchants reaffirmed their decision to
lose on Wednesday afternoons, ex-
eptlng in such weeks ns a public
holiday occurs. The stores of members of thc association will also close
at ten o'clock on Saturday venings,
promptly, this being later than in
most other places apparently. The
(uestion of opening the stores at
ill on holidays was not dealt with.
On behalf of the Board of Trade.
\V.   II.   Wilson,  the  president,  outlined    the     undertakings  which  the
oard expected to have on hand this
ear, the outstanding one being the
ntertainment  of  the   delegates   at
the  convention    of    the   Associated
Boards of Trade of Eastern B.C., to
take   place   here  probably   in   April.
The further development of the tour-
t park was also touched on, and the
publicity  work which the  board expected to undertake for the city. For
this work, Mr.    Wilson    hoped    the
board of trade would have the fullest
upport of all the merchants.
Methods of doing business in the
city, ami in reference to trade from
outside points were also discussed.
and will be gone into further.
It was nlso decided to appoint a
committee of three to look up fully
the ordinances on the statute hooks,
local as well as provincial, that most
vitally affect the carying on of business in the city.
Coming events!
EVANGELISTS ADDRESS
ON "DR. JEKYLL" IS
GREATLY APPRECIATED
According in the Creston Review.'
Rev. il. Arthur Barton, evangelist
and elocutionist, who this week commenced a campaign in connection
with tiie Methodist, Presbyterian and
Baptist, churches of this city scored
a distinct BUCcesE in Creston, where
he was conducting a campaign last
week aim! previously. His address on
"Dr. Jekyll and .Mr. Hyde," which it
is hoped Mi-. Barton will repeat here.
was particularly well received.
Concerning thi,s, tiie Creston Review last week said:
"Anglican, Baptist, Catholic, Lutheran, Mormon, Methodist, Presbyterian, Round, and every other
church had one or mure representatives iu the gathering that packed to
capacity both the seating and standing room at the Grand Theatre on
Sunday night at a community service
at which the feature was H, Arthur
Barton's address on "Pr. Jekyll and
Mr. Hyde."
It was the biggest turnout ever
seen locally at a church service, and
the evening exercises were participated in by Pastors .lames aud Knox of
the Presbyterian and Baptist churches, witli ji united choir furnishing
the music.
After sketching the
Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,"
sional finished resort t
to heighten the effect of Stevenson's i
well known tragedy, Mr. Barton proceeded to apply this &tory of double j
living to present day lif» . taking for
his text, 'O wretched man that I am,
who shall deliver me front \he body
of this death?' In business, in society, in every phase of human activity, the speaker emphasized the all
too prevalent tendency for double
dealing and double living and in elo-
quent and practical terms expounded
the gospel of time for a chan
en']-
cu
Jan. C
School
Promotion  List  Fc
Grades.   Division I, W
Attendance Shield
ort
Lower
DIVISION   I
Thy attendarici i .
Division I. with .i
tendance uf 99.9 ;  :
tendance in  Divi
tlonally jriujii thi-   *
were ^7 pupils out
attendance.   Only i   ■
st-nct.' by one pui-..
75 per cent, an i *
Miles. Ernest  \Yordl i..  i
son, Mildred Bridges
GO per cent. ..   i
Gregor, .Madeline   fl
Kvans. Audrey Coll
The at-
- exeep-
.-- there
. perfect
lay's ab.
I!
Nora
r*. Pater-
Be.
. ..  Mc-
David
.   Mar
tin. Paul Harrison. Mario)
Arthur Sakagulchl,
chiaon, Solveig l.iu-
Hendi: son,   D   i 1
Hall. Norma Si*-:,
tiarnet Patmbre, Mabel I .
t «rr and
la „ At-
Kathleen
:. Laura
.Ison,
N , I
story
ivith tt
of  Dr.
dramatic
aid Mot..ut
Below r.o pet ,
DIVISION  !
Attendance, 96
Horis  Hyai-intl*
r
i. equal;
Lebeau,
nio.'s.
.AND
. * > Ban Quan,
.Nellie Sakaguichi, R rl Willi-. Ha-
zel Will-am,. Katl Ii Haley, Mary
Huchcroft, Reta Stn ban, Jdan McPhee. Nellie Miller. Kl-io Wood,
Grace McClure, Rut!   Chalender, So-
That such an address will have
a Instinj: effect on all who heard it
there can he no reason for doubt.
Creston is Indeed fortunate to have
had a visit from an evangelist of th*. ,
Barton type, with his unusual abil- j
ity to point out the way of life in I
terms that impress ail who hear hint.
The attendance was easily 400, i
three-fourths of whom were adults.    :
phie   McGr -
Gordon Brun by,   -
Macdonald.       Billy
Horie.      Warren
[ball, J io Little, R -
Gartside, 1-7-el I
son, Walter Fa- n -
Jessie Brain and \
(Continued on ''
I
Ranklns,
-<t. Bert
.lack,
George
i, Evelyn
l! Simp-
Cox, missed
Seven)
ANNUAL MEETI7 fCi OF
CHRIST CHURCH HELD;
ELECT NEW OFFICERS
jmw.w^«mw«v/^ Members Undertdre to Shoul-
§        OBITUARY        \
\\*f*rWf*rWVfgtV+fsr*AWMW$ |
JOHN HOWIE CASSIDY
der Deficit Ar d This is
Wipea Jut
The  annual   meeting    of    Christ
It   is   with   deep   regret   that  the jChurcn was ntl'J m the  i,J'rish. IIal!»
Herald  records  this  week  the death   "n -^nda-v t'veni^- the 2nd inst.
«f a much respected resident. John'    After f°n--i(i<'I;i' Ion, the
H. Tassidy. who passed peacefully ' financiaI report, which shmved a de-
away on Thursday morning of last 'ficit °' J"i'" ' accepted.
week   at   the   .St.   Kugene   Hospital. I following    this die   - an    un-
Two weeks previously he had been1"""™ meml>er (,f t! cqngi»gation
admitted to the hospital suffering p"ered t0 Kive one-fift* of tho de"
from what was commonly called sto-j
mach flu. Soon, however, the case jfifths could be raiwd amongst the
assumed  a  far  more  serious  aspect
ficit. provided the remaining four-
fifths could bc ra
congregation. Arfothi r member then
made ar, offer to gi« one-twentieth
of the balance if ten other members
would do likewise, l: d th< balance
be rai-ed amor.fr *h< .'...■■.■ .nn ot
John Howie 'Cassidy was born in!^* church.   Before the meeting do-
Glasgow,   Scotland,    in    IS72,   and
when the patient lost consciousness,
a state from which he never revived.
Death   being   due   to   sleeping   sick-
came to Canada about twenty years
ago, settling first at Xelson, beinp
employed by the C.P.R.    About eight
*ars ago he came to Cranbrook,
where he has since held the position
of boiler Inspctor, Mr. Cassidy's devotion to his work at all times has
meant much to the company, one of
who.'-e official- stated to a Herald
representative that in .Mr. CoSflidy'l
death the company bad suffered s
severe los«. as mechanics of such
thoroughness arc seldom   found.
To the Borrowing  family the sym-
ed. tight other members had agreed
to this.
The following churci officers were
elected for the cominjr year:
Delegates to the Syno . of the Diocese: Judge Thompson, .'■ A. Wallin-
ger, M.L.A., and Mr. C.   •.. Cock.
Substitutes to the S; nod of the
Diocese: Messrs, Beale, Grubbe, and
Major Hicks.
Tbe following w< d church
wardens  for  the sr:  Peo
ple's Warden; Major Hli ks. Rector's
Warden, Mr.  .V. g. San1
Ths following membei   of th'1 eon-
pathy of a large number of cltisens ■Tre*TItJon wew elected to the church
iday,   Feb.  0l   Curling   Club   Hall,
Auditorium, Robinson's Orchestra.
Friday, Feb. fi: Father and Son Banquet in Baptist Church school
room.
Sundny, Feb. 8:— Meeting for men
only. Auditorium, H p.m. Evangelist Barton.
Sunday, Feb. 8: Mass Meeting in the
Auditorium, at 7.HI) p.m. Fvan-
gelist Barton.
Monday, Feb. 9t*Smoker at Oddfellows' lodge room, Auditorium, after usual meeting.
Thursday, Feb. l'i: Cranbrook Football Club general meeting, in (i.W.
V.A. Hall at H o'clock.
of Cranbrook c^es out in this their
time of bereavement.
Besides thi- widow, there are left
to mourn his pssstng, four pons,
lack, Andy, Alex and James, and I
daughter( Jessie, n^ well a- one bro-
jther, Ab-x, who resides at Vancouver, and who was here at the tlnw
of Mr. Cassidy's death.
The funeral, despite the fact of
its private nature, was largely attended, Rsv. B. C. Freeman conducting the isrvice.
FUNERAL OF YAHK
LOGGING WORKER
HELD MONDAY LAST
Wednesday,   Feb.   IH: Tennis
I Dance in Parish Hall.
Friday, Feb.  18: Valentine Dl
Auditorium*
Club
White working on the log trail at
Camp 1*«, Vahk. Brewar Jonas Marklund, on   Wednesday  last got CSUght
in a run of logs, receiving injuries
which proved fatal within a day. The
unfortunate man was brought to the
hospital OH the evening train but passed away at 2 n.m. on the following
morning.
The funeral took place on Monday
from the undertaking parlors, a large
number  of  friends  of   the  deceased,
who  was   well   and   favorably   known
in  Crnnbrook   being  in   attendance.. her
Itev. K. W. MacKay officiating, [where sh
The deceased was horn in Sweden ■ daughter.
ommittee for thfl CO Messrs. Home, Grubbe,    Collier,    Foot,
Fergic, Roy, Harrison, Pelton, Weston and Mrs. GUI,
Following   the   n refresh-
menti wers  isrved b; ladies of
the congregation.
WOMEN'S INSTITUTE
HELP DESERVING CASE
TO HAPPY ENDING
Thr Women's Instil il ■   been
Interesting themselvi ca e of
an old lady, a Mrs. Il -.-.'•<. who wns
greatly run down In health, Through
the kindness of the Ir ; tute members and very effective help from
Mr. Y. >n all, | igi nt, tbe
old lady has b-  i tho St Eu
gene Hospital for nearly six months,
where her health ha bi ■ built up
and her life made happy.
Having no  frii nd ihe has
been constantly visited b; members
of the Institute, led by their president, Mrs. George Smith, and comforts and delicacies such ;is women
know how to provide,       ■    to her.
Finally, the government,  through
the Influence of Mr, ovided
railway  fare  to  :; '-.a.
will reside w ried
Mrs.    Hlndla left ( ran
brook   feeling grateful
who had so helped ber.
Ion   December 8th,   1NH3.    Besides a!
[number of relatives in  Sweden, one
[brother, (J.-tlford O!«on, of Calvary, ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
I was here  for  the  funeral,  nnd nno-jlimd, Leva Marker on.  Andrew Don-
ther   brother   resides   in   Kdmonlnn.' atdion  and   Axi-1   Mogri n      A   large
The pall bearers were Bert Mat     number of friends wore here fruin
Wednesday, Feb. 2fi: I..A. to B.R.T
Whist Drive and Dance,  K.IMIall ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Admission 76c. Ladies 60c. sou, Magnus Mngnuaun, Jas. Hark-   Yahk to attend tho funeral PAQE    TWO
THE  CRANBROOK   IIKRALI)
Thursday, February 5th, 1925
HiW'JJ-*-' *~*Sff. jnci
FEBRUARY 9th IS THE CLOSING DAY   OF THE LAST THREE SPECIAL PRIZES
AMOUNTING TO $50:00
a
iti*
i
Vl
It*
1
If you have a winning solution why not get your answer in before February 9th and win some of this extra money
HOW MANY MILES CAN CANADA'S MOST POWERFUL BROADCASTING STATION BE HEARD?
FIRST   PRIZE
$575. oi) Wcstinghousc Radiola
Super Eight, plus 20 times the
amount of money sent in up to
$30.00.
START COUNTING NOW
Take a pencil and put down the
numbers as you .stroke them out,
then add thorn up. We would
suggest that you cut the chart
into dozens of pieces then check
them from all sides.
SAVE THIS PAGE
It may mean $1270.00 to you.
One Hundred Free Prizes. This is
not a trick puzzle but merely a test
of patience and skill. Surely your
chance for winning is as good as
anyone else's.
$5,000 in Prizes
FIRST PRIZE Has a Value Up to $1,270.00   Choice of—
$G70.00 Ford Touring Car, plus 20 tims amount sent in up to $30
$575.00 Radiola Super 8, plus 20 times uniount sent in up to $30
$450.00 Cash. plus 20 times amount sent in up to $30
'SECOND PRIZE Has a Value Up to $650.00—
$350.00 Radio Super-Heterodyne, plus 10 times the amount sent
in up to $80.00
THIRO PRIZE Has a Value Up to $475.00—
$325.00 Radiola No. 10, plus 5 times amount sent in up to $30
FOURTH PRIZE Has a Value Up to $325.00—
$205.00 Radiola KeKcnoflex, plus 2 times umount sent in up to $30
FIFTH PRIZE Has a Value Up to $110.00—
$80.00 Radiola 3-A, plus the amount sent in up to $30
SIXTH TO FORTY—
$45.00 (each) Radiola 3. or $45 (each) Bicycle.
FORTV-ONE TO FORTY-FIVE Choice of—
$35.00 (each) Radiola Loud Speaker or $25.00 (each) Cash.
FORTV-SIX TO SEVENTY-FIVE—
$14.00 (each) Brandos Table Talker or $10.00 (each) Cash.
SEVENTY SIX TO ONE HUNDRED—
$7.00 (each) Hcodset or $5.00 (each) Cash.
SPECIAL PRIZES
SECOND   PRIZE
$.150.00 Radio .Super-Heterodyne
plus tO time, tlte -ininunt lent in up
to  $30.00.
THIRD   PRIZE
lfP§Wir
$325X0 Radiola No. 10, plus 5 timet
the amount sent in up to $30.00.
35 BICYCLES GIVEN
Contestants .standing from Sixth to
Fortieth will be given the choice of
$-15.00   Bicycle    (Men,   Women,
Boys or Girls), or a $-15.00 Radiola
Three.
THE  PROBLEM
To encourage contestants to send
in Iheir solutions as soon as they
have finished them, wo have decided
to give other special prizes, amounting to $50.00.
The one thnt has sent the correct
or nearest correct answer of the puzzle to the eontesl ofllco "n or before
February Oth will receive a special
prize of $25.00. These prizes are
additional to special prizes offered
for correct or nearest correct answers sent In on or before January
10th, thi1 winners of which will be
announced at the close of the contest
FOURTH   PRIZE
as correct answer will not be known
before that time.
Tho person Bending in the next
nearest correct answer will receive
a special prize of $15.00.
The person sending in tbe third
nearest correct answer will receive
a special prize of $10.00.
In ease of n tie, this special $50
will be cfimdly divided among those
t icing.
The wfnning of n special prize
does not interfere in any way with
you winning one of the other prizes.
FIFTH PRIZE
$265.00  Radiola  Rege-
noflex,   plus   twice   the
amount   tent   in.
$80.00   Radiola   Three
A,  plus  the  amount
•ent In.
The problcm is to find the turn total of the figure* in the two circles, which, when
added together, represent the total number of miles that Canada's most powerful1
broadcasting station can be heard. Every figure is complete and the drawing is entirely free from tricks and illusions, but like a lot of other things, it is not as easy as
it 'ooks. Figures raqge from two to nine, each standing alone thus, two, three, four
five, six, seven, cir.hl, and nine. There are no ones or cyphers in the chart. Tbe
topi of the -.ixcf- arc curved, while the bottoms of the nines are straight. By looking
at any figure carefully you can easily tell what it is. However, to pick out all the
figures and add them together correctly is a task tbat requires both patience and
skill. This is one of the most attractive figure puzzles that has ever been produced,
and it would bc worth while to solve, even though no prizes were offered. In the
event that no one obtains the exact answer, tbe prizes will be awarded for the nearest
correct solution. Accuracy and patience are the main factors for arriving at the cor*
rect or nearest count. Those who display these qualifications to the best advantage
will solve tbe puzzle best.
$5,000 in Prizes FREE
" No One Knows Correct Answer
To make sure that no one knew the exact or correct answer to the problem, or
how many mlles*CFCN can be heard, Mr. It. W. Wood, president of the United Farmers' Association of Alberta, Mr. W. M. Davidson, member of the legislative assembly, also editor and publisher of the Calgary Daily Albertan, and .Mr. J. I. McFarland,
president and managing director of the Alberta Pacific Grain Company, Limited,
kindly consented to erase one or more figures from the puzzle chart. This was done
at different times, consequently no one knows just whnt numbers were taken out.
Notes of these figures were made by Mr. Davidson, Mr. McFnrlnnd and Mr. Wood,
sealed and placed in a safety deposit box, where they will remain until after the close
of the contest.
Bear in mind that the correct answer was known before the judges erased some
of tbe figures. After tbe contest is over, the judges will inform the Contest Depart*
ment ju.it whnt numbers they erased. These number! will be subtracted from the
origin'*! correct answer, thus giving the present correct answer.
SOLUTION AND REMITTANCE BLANK FOR CONTESTANTS
This contest is being run in conjunction with CFCN^ Radio Broadcasting Station,
All Contestants must use this blank when sending in solutions. Calgary.
My answer to the problem is  ;	
I desire to enter your Figure Puzzle Contest, and herewith remit, |q nccordunco
with conditions of same, the sum ot *}  which please place to my credit.
Subscriptions collected from the following: Naw
THIRTY-FIVE
$2,190.00 IN CASH
Name   Address	
Name   Address 	
Name   Address 	
Name  Address .....'.	
Name   Address 	
Is this your first remittance on this puzzle? .
Total nmount of money sent to date $	
Renewal
 i	
Amount
■*i»	
-i *	
-i $	
-i*	
-i»	
General Rules
1. This contest is open to everyone except employees of The Cran-
biuok Herald.
2. Additional puzzle charts on a goud grade of paper may be obtained by writing to this office. They will be mailed to you free
of charge. — -
3. Competitors must fill out tbe entry blank and enclose a subscription of not less than $2.00, which will be credited to their
accounts, both as entrance fee to the contest and as a prepaid subscription to the Cranbrook Herald, which will then be sent at the
regular rate until the subscription expires.
4. The full amount of your subscription must be sent direct to
Contest department of the Cranbrook Herald.
5. You have the same chance of winning a prize hy paying a $2.00
subscription as you would have by paying a larger amount, but the
amount of the first five prizes depends greatly upon the amount of
subscription money you send in to the Contest Department.
G. The contest is open to both old and new subscribers alike, anyone may help you in collecting subscriptions or solving the puzzle.
7. Subscriptions for $2.00 and over are transferable, a subscription makes a very acceptable birthday or other present. The
Cranbrook Herald will be sent to any address specified by the contestant.
8. In case of n tie for nny prize a second puzzle will he presented,
which will be ns practicable and ns solvable ns the first. Only those
tied will be permitted to solve Puzzlo No. 2. Should two or more
persons be tied for any prize, that prize nnd as many other prizes following as there are persons tied, will be reserved for them, before
any prizes will be awarded for less correct solutions.
0. One person cannot win more thnn one Regular prize.
10. The Contest Department will be more than pleased to answer
all questions regarding doubtful figures in the puzzle.
11. No entries unaccompanied hy a cash subscription will be accepted.   No solution can be changed after it is once registered.
12. If a subscriber, who has given his subscription to some other
contestant to send in, desires inter to send in a solution to the puzzle,
he enn do so. He does not require to send any further payment on
subscription unless he wants to.
13. All cheques, Postal notes, bank, postal, or express money orders, etc., should be made payable to Tbo Crnnbrook Herald,
14. Only those tied will be permitted to solve Puzzle No. 2. Thero
will bo no Third Puzzle, and no remittances will bo accepted on Pui-
zle No. 2. •
IB. The Contest will close in February, I026j but sond In your solution as soon as possible uh there are some special prizes for early
solution senders.
1(1. The Contest Department of The Cranbrook Herald reserves
the right to alter the ruled aud regulations. Also to refund subscriptions and disqualify any competitors whom tliey consider ineligible.
Also to finally decide all questions which may arise. Competitors
must abide by their decisions.
FIRST   PRIZE
If this a winning solution, send prize to .
RADIOLA THREE, valued at $45.00
cash,   will  also  be  given.
The cash prltes to be given away
in the contest have a va'ue up to
$2,100.00.
(Please print Name and address and city plainly)
IMPORTANT:—BE SURE AND ANSWER ALL QUESTIONS, AND
ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO
The Contest Dept., THE HERALD,
Cranbrook, B.C.
'>,™..:"'*r?v'- ?I7i&>*yf
fe!:;'%
*AV\«WV>
$670.00 FORD TOURIN-fl CAR plus 20 times the amount ol
money aent in, up to $30.00.
I\ Thursday, February 5th, 1925
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
PAdE    THREE
ffffffffffffffiffffffffffff.
I    LUMBERTON
5 CHIPS
M rs. It. J. Issler entertained a
nunibcr of her friends to tea at her
home on Tuesday afternoon of last
woek. A most enjoyable afternoon
was spent by all the ladies.
Tbe Lumberton Club held its regular meeting on Wednesday evening
of hist week in the Lumberton Club
rooms. The first part of the evening
was spent in playing empire whist
at  which   nine  tables  were  in  play
The persons making lhe highest
number of points in the month of
January wore lhe following: Mrs. H.
,1. [bbIoc, ladies" 1'iiT.t; Mrs. A. Kole-
Miir. Indies' consolation; Mr. tlus
Woodske, gent's first, ami Mr. Pal
Woyonburgh) gent's consolation.   A
VOry line lunch was served by the
coin mil let' in chargQ of arrange-
inonts, following lbe lunch tbe rest
of tho OVQfling was spent in dancing,
Mossrs Wilson ami Woyonburgh furnishing the music. This was tne
largest turnout of members that has
taken place, and everyone seemed
lo have n good time. Dancing came
to a close shortly after twelve. The
following committee was appointed
to have charge of the entertainment
Canadian Cafe
and Rooms
YAHK, B.C.
Opposite Garage, Near Bridge
Comfortable Rooms with
Cafe in Connection
We Solicit Yoar Patronage
A. Hjort - Prop.
and refreshments during the month
of February: Mr. and Mrs. ,1. A.
Jones; Mr. and Mrs. .1. Kossen, Miss
A. C, Johnson und Mr. CJus Woodske.
Miss Lily Griffiths was hostess to
a number of her little friends last
Wednesday afternoon, the occasion
being the celebration of her eighth
birthday. Games were played dur
ing the course of the afternoon and
all the little tots enjoyed themselves
most heartily. A  very  delightful
dinner hud been prepared by tbe little hostess' mother, Mrs. C. Griffiths
and needless to say none of the titll
guests were found wanting when th
dinner was announced. The little
guests deported at an early hour
after wishing their hostess many
happy returns of tho day.
he
la
Another   car   bus
been   added   tu
the   Lumberton   list,
the   latest   pur-
chaser being one of
oui- well known
and  popular    young
 n,    Mr.    P.
Walsh, belter known
as "Pat."   The
make   of   lbe   bus   h
I   Ibe   Universal
variety,  so   there  ai
0   no   especially
noticeable   Identifies
lion   murks   by
which lu tell the ear
from a distance.
**************************
I   PAUL   NORDGREN
When Ton
CALL AT YAHK
Do not forget to visit the
Paul Nordgren Store \
On Main Road, near bridge
New  Shipments of Seasonable T
Goods Always Arriving.
* AJ^AAw
I'at has it stored away till the weather aud the roads clear up a bit,
and as soon as conditions are favorable the road from Lumberton to
Cranbrook will see some exhibitions
of speed, if it has never seen anything of that sort heretofore.
The regular bi-monthly meeting
of the Lumberton L.O.L., 21)15, was
held on Tuesday evening of last week
the Lumberton club rooms. Considerable new busbies was transacted
at this, meeting and five new members were also received into the work
of the order.
*m%
Miss Hattie Auger and her brother Herbert, who have been visiting
for the past two weeks at the home
of their sister, Mis. A. Christenson,
departed for their home at Eholt, B.
C, on Thursday of last week.
Mrs. H. Stevens entertained a
number of her friends at her home
on Friday afternoon of last week.
The afternoon was spent in social
converse.
Mr. B. Sternberg had the misfortune to injure his band on Monday
of last week in thc planing mill of
the B.C. Spruce Mills, Limited. Mr.
Sternberg was able to resume his
duties on Monday morning of this
week.
Mr. Fred Thomas, who is employed
at camp No. 3, spent several days in
Spokane, and Wallace, Idaho.    Fred
needed a change, as camp
not what it was cracked up
Maybe now he can stick it
out for another month or two, although he thinks he won't leave
again for another four months.
Mlsa A. Allen and Miss Mae Kennedy, both of Boswell. B.C. are at
present spending several days ut the
home of Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Hunter.
HOW MUCH DOES IT
COST TO PRODUCE
The
Correct Your Disordered Stomach
Instantly!   End Indigestion, Gas, Heartburn, Acidity
Tin' moment your stomach rebels, such comfort ns this pleasant, harm-
chew up and swallow a little Tape's less corrective, digestive ami antacid.
Diapepsin.    Distress goes at once. Millions of the best of families al-
I'ni   Indigestion, Dlapepsln, dastri- ways keep a large sixty cent package
tis. ll.ilub tne. Heartburn, or any dis- at  hand—they  know   its  magic  and
tress in stomach, nothing else gives druggists guarantee it.
The average uf a number of /ormolus set up by those engaged in the
study of milk costs in various districts where the range and variety of
both mill feeds and runt;!!;'"", cor.
respond to those in use here, give us
as a basis of calculation tbe following
as the Immediate eoBt elements for
the production uf a hundred pounds
of milk coming within the test established here.
Hay. 126 lbs.; Grain Feed. 41 lbs.;
Man Labor, H hours.
Actually calculated at the prices
paid bore in December, this is, Hav,
MILK IN THIS DISTRICT?; -«■ per ton; Bran, $36; Shorts $88;
'Oats, ¥40 and Cake $65, Wages
$100 per month, or say $8.80 per
day, which is nbout 27c per hour or
even less at dairymen's hours, par.
Now it has been commonly stated by
dairymen, and many uf their customers have asserted that they were
lying or joking, when so slating, that
if they can manage to break even on
winter trade it is all that tliey ran
expect and they must make their
year's profit during the summer
when pasturage keeps down feed
costs. Last year there was almost
no range feed as everyone knows, so
it is evident thai lnst year's profits
were microscopic in extent
We hnve, before this, ventured to
ussert that no dairy maru here in recent years has ever broken even on
his winter trade to individual deliveries of family quantities in glass
but we hnve never completely analyzed the situation out before, and
the summing up as set out her
proves tbat the situation is even
worse than tbe most pessimistic had
suspected;
The feed costs above are in hay
very close and only obtained in large
purchases direct from prairie points,
other feeds are as close as can be
got at present in ton or car lots.
Tbe formula quoted is au average
of all formulas produced by a number of conferences at which not only
producers, but feed supply men and
milk distributing heads as well as
scientific authorities on milk production were called Into consultation
and may be accepted as being arrived at in gootl faith.
Deducing from tbis formula at local rates this winter, one hundred
pounds of milk represents in direct
make-up as follows:
Hay, 125 lbs.—$1.25
Grain feed—14 lbs., an average of
Here i
of actual
ol    milk
which mi
Ing I'l'n
I...nl.*.
gel o n*i
placemen
in buildli
insurance
where th
cutting?
- have
1 I -I-
naked
, nt.- in
I   and
whal ;i man hnd t*- pul
vnuld have remained in
prod
vers only feed and labor
that   milk  antl  cost  of  milk
Where  then  do   these   men
urn un depreciation and
t  of live stock, investment
■■*. equipment, power, light,
! and water charges?      And
en   is  there room  fur  price
following statement mi tbe
milk situation in this district has
been prepared for publication by
one thoroughly acquainted with dai-
rying conditions in this district, coupled with training at an agricultural
college. It is commended to the attention of milk producers and consumers in the Cranbrook district.
—The following study uf the fluid
milk situation here hns been worked
out at the request "!' a number of
the locul dairymen to present their
side of the question to ilmse consumers who are assuming that because
Mime local producers have engaged
ill a price reduction, and have lowered their price.-, that therefore
those who are maintaining their standard price must be profiteering on
the job.
This study of items entering into
local costs has been prepared in accordance with the methods used and
tbe results obtained in the most up-
to-date investigations in North America and the findings arrived at are as
nearly correct to local conditions as
we can honestly make them.
We believe everyone agrees tbat
no man should bc asked to supply
what is the most Important article
in the diet of a growing family at a
less price than one giving a living
wage after he has complied with all
the municipal and governmental
regulations concerning his business,
and so standardized his outfit, premises and methods as to bring his
product above the slightest suspicion
of being other than a clean, high
class food, and we believe the men on
whose behalf this is prepared have
spared no effort to this end.
As a preliminary statement, it is
generally accepted as approximately
correct to estimate the cost of preparation after the milk has arrived
at thc bottling room from the stable
and of distribution in glass to private consumers and collection of accounts as nearly or quite equal to
cost of production. This leaves cost
of production as the pertinent fact
to be deajt with iu deciding whether
the producer is holding up the public.
For this purpose, after the study
of "Cost of Milk" tables accompanied
by feed indices as prepared by competent authorities in this province
and other places the following comparatively correct statement relative
to local costs has been arrived at.
who   In
have c
themse
busines
their -
tern
ch for the question as to
tbe established dairymen
. long course of years here
ie tt) an agreement among
g ns lo a living wage in the
are asking too much for
ices. Tiie other question
in its application,
n certain standardized sys-
lroduction, supply and de-
ni: Ml. and developed under that a
group oi* producers endeavoring tu
live up lu drastic regulations and to
fill the demand at as moderate a rate
as they have found themselves able
to get ji living wage from, a newcomer set- up competition and iii order
to cut in and being in the fortunate
position of ability to command most
of lhe required labor without regard
to a standard of wages, with no experience of local cost of production
and overhead on a term of years, re-
luces prices, a thing likely to do little harm if stopped there.
Hul when another large
producer declares be has a thousnnd
dollars to lose in breaking the newcomer, and being tbis year in the
comfortable position of having more
home grown feed than his competitors, he proceeds, regardless of cost
of production, to undercut the newcomer, he thus produces a disorganization of the whole business, and creates un the part of the unthinking,
the idea that heretofore the charge
has been extortionate.
Almost exactly comparable is the
situation lu that of the established
merchants with their permanent investment, family homes and standard
lines of goods at living prices, having
to meet the fly-by-nlght competition
of   itinerant   purveyors  of   the   pro-
iivestmeiit j adequate fi
oach quart in it, they
delivered, J the bui ine s.
In reply lu enquiry we uml
that Nelson prices are six quai
a dollar, Fernie, si ■■■ en
Since   writing   abo^
bran has advanced from      ■
per ton, other mill feeds following.    I
The men presenting Ihi   nppi
the consideration of the buying pub-,
lie welcome, at any convenient hour,
visits from  patrons nnd  will  | ladl]
expose all their methods and opera
tions to those Interested.
LAKE $
WINDERMERE ij
NOTES        ;i
Your Grocer
IsABoTcfe^
Milkman
Free Recipe Book-Write
Borden Co, Ltd,, Vancouver
(Spt
In vermei
has   been
Chlsholm, (
ronto, that
ial t
. B.i
lie
ducts of  bankruptcies  in  other  pint's and thc ability by working wife
nd family to avoid hiring clerks and
in this view of the case it is rather
surprising to see the stable element
of the city fall for such tactics.
Those dairymen competing against
local rations would place this at |thiH unfair competition  have confi
r.. .Ian. :::. a., i
ved by Mr.-. A. M.
indermere, fn '1
sister, Miss Stoddart,
who had bad a Berious operation performed while on a visit to that city,
was making satisfactory progress.
A correspondent here ■■:  I
Jeffries, who spent some years for
his health near tn Sunshine ranch.;
on Lake Windermere, Btatea that he
is now in Northern Rhodesia, hunting >
big game, among other amusemen
He expects in time tu return to Hritish Columbia.
Tho members of the St
Society gave  a  public  da
Kay's Hall at Athalmer,
Night. The features wei
on and a most enjoyable e
spent by alt in attendant'
The whist ami bridge t
by   the    Women's   Auxiliary   of   the
district, in Hotel lnvermere on the
evening of Saturday was a great success.
Lift Off-No Pain!
KOOTENAY ORCHARDS
SCHOOL REPORT
FOR JANUARY
if at en dance, i'5.P.
-Mary   Richmond,  Ed-
bran or shorts, or a mixture of
both, 22Ibs„   $.500; Oats, 22lbs.
or a mixture of oats and other
feeds, 22 lbs., $.800.
For easy figuring 60 Wi cents and
89 Vk cents each orfOO cents for concentrates, plus $1.25 for roughage,
plus labor 3 hours at 27 cents, which
is 81 cents, a total of $2.90 for 100
pounds of milk, or forty quarts,
which is 7 4-10 cents per quart, add
another 7 4-10 cents per quart for
bottling and distribution gives 14 4-5
cents, for the immediate cost per
quart of milk, which is being sold at
14 2-7 cents.
deuce in their product. It is produced
in locations that are above the slightest suspicion of taint from any cause,
They are maintaining large staffs
of paid labor at living wages, have
highly efficient equipment, and most
of them have been here for years
serving the public satisfactorily.
Cranbrook has never profited by
holding milk production down to a
bare bone existence as can be proved
if anyone will ask why the many engaged in it at different times during
the past twenty years, one by one
quit in disgust, it does not need anyone to observe that had returns been
Ferecutage
Grade   VI.-
die Gartside.
Grade V.—Marion Richmond, Jim
Stone, Frank Hern.
Grade IV.—lack  Th< •'
kNoyce, Rose Noyce. Hyp
Grade Ilia.—Dick Thexl
Richmond, May Stone.
Grade Ha.—Bertha Garti
bel Sakata. Jack Lantrin.
Hern.
Grade     Ia.—Dorothy     Thompson,
Ernest Ruault. Arthur Hem.
Grade   Ib.—Alice   Noyce,   Agr.es
WINNIFRED  LIVPITT
Doea'nt hurt one bit! Drop a 1
tie "Freeione" on nn aching corn, instantly tbat corn stops hurting, the*
shortly you lift it right off with fii-
gers.
Your druggist jells a tiny bottle #f
"Freezone" for a few cents, sufficient
to remove every hard corn, soft con,
or corn between the toes, and the foot
callouses, without soreness or irritation.
Canada's Smaller Wool Crop
Affords Food For Thought
THE
NEW HOTEL
Yahk, B.C.
J. MARKLUND, Proprietor
When In Yahk make your home at
THK NKW HOTEL.
Thla Hotel is new from bottom to top.    Twenty-five nicely furnished rooms. All are clean
and comfortable.
RESTAURANT IN CONNECTION.
CRANBROOK CARTAGE & TRANSFER CO.
TOWRISS ft ROBERTS
AgenU for Hard and Soft Goal.    Distribution Cars a
Specialty.   Bxcdlent Warehousing.
SAND and GRAVEL
OPPOSITE CP.R. DEPOT
Telephone 63       •:.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
P .0. Box 216
partus in the British Isles support 24,000,000 shorn
sheep, while the whole Dominion of Canada supports but 2,000,000, one twelfth as many. Yot during
tho fiscal year ended March. 1924, woollen and knitting mills imported into Canada some 1U.U75.925
pounds of raw wool.
In Canada, in 1922, according to the Census of
Industry figures we had 277 woollen and knitting
mills, which employed some 22,000 workers. Vet In
1922, countries abroad sent into Canada $38,000,000
worth of woollen and knitted goods, and tn 1923,
$41,000,000 worth, representing employment for some
17,000 to 20,000 workers. Although during the past
year the wool and knitting industries have expanded
to some extent and, particularly ln the Eastern
Townships of Quebec, have new mills opened ap, It
ia seen that only about half of the woollen goods aold
in this country could have been produced here. Raw
wool, grown in Canada, comprises but a small fraction of that which is used by the mills that are operating In the Dominion.
There is not enough wool grown to supply the
demand of thc world. Japan and China, tbe staple
elothing and bedding materials for which countries
were formerly silk and cotton, are rapidly becoming
great wool consuming countries, imports to Japan
alone having jumped 700 per cent in ten years.
Thus it ib seen that the Canadian wool grower
has not only a growing domestic market, but an ever
Increasing foreign market for his clips, yet sheep
are rarely given dut consideration by Canadian
farmers even though they have been dubbed "mortgage lifters" In the West.
Col. Robt. McEwun of London, Ont, president ef
the Canadian Co-operative Wool Growers' Association, who won the championship for a car-load lot of
Canadian weather lambs, "Southdewna," at the
Chicago International Show, has said, "taking Canada aa a whole It has been proved that climatic oon-
mmmm mm favonhW to afcaat taUa*  H* '
ing disease baa viahed our flocks. Yet today wa
find ourselves up against the aermus economic condition of consuming more wuul thnn wc produce, and
for a comparatively new and fertile country Uke
Canada to have reached tbe stage of deficient supply for such an essential as cloibing should surely
demand the serious consideration of ua all."
But although wool growing as an industry in
Canada docs net comu up to what might be expected!
of It, those who are lOgaged in it are highly and effectively organized as regards marketing In 1914
those in charge of the Dominion Live Stock Branch,
Ottawa, began to urge that sheepmen be more careful in putting up their fleeces and that they stop
selling at any old price which might be offered
locally. Following their efforts various sheep breeders and wool growers' association! throughout Canada
began to collect wool from their members, this wool
being graded in turn by expert graders supplied by
the Dominion Government and being sold on tba
graded basis. As more and more local associations
were formed, It was felt thut all should be affiliated
under one central selling agency with the result tbat
Id 1918 tbe Canadian Co-operatrve Wool Growera
Limited was formed with headquarters tn Toronto.
This ts a commodity marketing organization handling wool only, having about 2,5*00 shareholders and
approximately '12,000 shippers of wool throughout tha
Dominion, li* virtual clips are collected at various
points for shipment in car-toad lots to the central
warehouse at Weston. Ont. for grading and sale.
At the present time this organization, which
operates from coast to coast, is handling from a quarter to one third of the Canadian clip reaching the
open market Its influence ir- being extended nsor*
and mora each season as will be noted irom the tact
that in Ontario alone the number of shippers has increased from 3,200 In 1922, to 4,000 hi 1924. Tha
various grades of woel are sa\fi to equal advantage in
Canadian, American and English markets, and it li
perhaps noteworthy that during the past two yeara
approximately three-quarters of a million pounds of
Canadian graded wools have found a aurkai with
EnrMah mlla.
Treat Colds Externally
For sore throat, bronchili= or deep
chest colds, rub Vicks VapoRub I .
over throat and chest and cover with
warm flannel.
Vicks acta in two ways—both direct.
abkmrbtd like a liniment and iwJtattd as
a vapor. A quick relief tor tiie cold
troubles of all thc family.
**************************
FOR GOOD MEALS   |
and Comfortable Rooms   *
The New Caf
e
***************************
Mount Baker
Hotel
30 Newly Furnished Rooms,
AH with running water (Hot
and Cold) some with private
baths,   some   with   shower
baths
RAKRR ST., CRANBROOK
Only absolutely first-claas fireproof Hotel in the city.
nsist on BAYER TABLETS OF ASPIRIN
Unless you see the "Haver Cross" on tablets you are
not getting the genuine Bayer product proved safe
by millions and prescribed by physicians 24 years for
Colds
Headache
Pain
Neuralgia
Toothache
Lumbago
Neuritis
Rheumatism
Accept only "B;twT" pncb.:uv which contains proven directions.
Rand; ••Bayer" bovn of IS I iblots- -Also bottles ol 2-1 and LOO—Druggists.
A«|iirin in Uh tfwto n :L ((vglsttrrd la Osfiads) of Dtyti Vssofsetun «' Ito-mestte*
■MdMlrt »r nalicj i (Art-vl Aallejrllr AoM, "A. *  a."i.    Walls » ■-» w*ll kimm
(Im i'l'in" «(.■«.■ ItUtfJpMlltwtl-lf*, Ui emmrt lift- [.ul.Ui r.ln.i ImlUtluBi, IM TMhWa
«■*«<.( UMtuv will *» *»*4**1  ».Uj  u.«..   Mvm<i«i inia uatfc, Uw ' BMvr Um*." FAtlE   FOUR
TBI!   CBANBKOOI   RIKALB
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^♦♦♦♦♦-♦♦♦♦^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦'^♦^
IfYouBRp^
DON'T WORRY!
Pick Up The Pieces. We can match them |
—and possibly improve on them.     Our %
experience with thousands of eyes has
made us experts in that condition of
yours.   Come in today and let us have a |
confidential chat about your eyes.
RAWORTH Bros:
NEXT DOOR TO THE POST OFFICE
********
************
CU Cranbrook herald
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
r A. WILLIAMS - - ll   POTTBB, B. Sc
UulJ.crlptlon Price  SiM Ver Meat
le Culled Stolen  KiM 1'cr Year
idv-BrtUlai; Rata, on Application, Cbangea of Copy
lor Ad-, ui U..&.. ihoulcl bo humitid lu not later than Wednesday nooi. to -secure attention
FEBRUARY   1925
MM   M0»   .Ul   WtD   THU   HI   JAT
12 3 4 5 6 7
R 91011121314
5161718192021
K 23 24 25 26 27 28
i
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6th, 1925
THK ROAD PROGRAM
IF all that is promised or projected in the way of
mad improvement is carried out in this district,
Cranbrook district will be more than pleased. Perhaps it should bc .satisfied with hall of what is spoken of, There is no question but what the work on
the Kimlierley road is an absolute necessity, and the
fact that the government seems to be Willing to
work the matter out on a thorough scale seems to
indicate that the prestige of the town of Kimberley
is reaching even the ears of the powers that bc. The
stretch on the Windermere road that is to receive
attention is also most urgently needed, being now
the only questionable part of the long scenic drive
through to Banff. Thc Hoard of Trade should carry
this just a little farther, and sec if steps cannot be
taken to perpetuate the primeval parklikc beauty of
that part of thc road by protecting it from the inroads of the lumberman, whicli must come in time.
With this piece of road straightened out and widened, that part of the drive north will be wonderfully attractive, and no effort should be spared then
to sec tliat its original beauty remains unmarred,
*     *     *     *     *
LIVE AND LET LIVE
contemporary would not find it necessary to air an
opinion on the point ><> much. The insincerity of tlie
Courier on this phase of things is apparent, when it
i> stated that for many months past the Courier
has had before it in writing a suggested basis for a
consolidation, and on at least tun occasions, he
fore the plans of the Herald tu establish itself alsu
at Kimberley were consummated, attempts were
made by the Herald to get a refusal ur otherwise
of the proposals which it had made. But the advances were never received with any enthusiasm. Un tlie contrary, the Herald is satisfied
that au excuse that it was necessary to refer
them to a mysterious third party was absolutely
nothing but a flimsy subterfuge. Accordingly the
Herald proceeded on its own initiative, and issued
the Kimherley Press, lt thereby forestalled by only
a Sev*' days others who were prepared to enter the
field at short notice. The Herald desired to protect
its- Kimberley interests, and followed the perfectly
legitimate method of doing so by establishing itself
there as it has done. The Courier, therefore, stands
convicted of insincerity aud inconsistency tu say the
least. What is meant by "probably a fourth," with
reference to the East Kootenay, is beyond us, unless the Courier intends taking heart and starting
up a paper at Moyie or Fort Steele. Certainly it
cannot, without the most barefaced effrontery, al
tempt to establish itself at Kimberley after expres
sing so candidly personal opinions in regard to the
place. Does the editor of tlie Courier recall speak
ing of the possibilities of Kimberley as a newspaper
field with a member of the Herald a few months
ago? We must refrain from reproducing the lurid
embellishments used iu describing just what kind of
a place Kimberley was said to be, but it was not at
all complimentary to that town, nor did it indicate
in the editor of the Courier any undying faith iu this
part of the Kootenay as a business centre.
The Herald does not contemplate retiring from
tbe newspaper field in Cranbrook, nor has it ever
done so. Neither is it the intention of the proprietors to concentrate more on its Kimberley business
than in Cranbrook, as the Courier intimates. Doubtless the wish was father lo thc thought when the
editor of our contemporary penned that phrase.
There i.s, however, one field that the Herald intends
still leaving entirely to the Courier, and that is thc
realm of cut prices. This office will continue to di
red to the Courier, as in the past, users of
printing who offer their work on a cut price basis
though it welcomes at all times legitimate competition, and i.s not afraid to have its prices made
the basis for comparison in larger city shops. It
is obvious tliat people have not much confidence
in sheer low prices, or they would not turn round
and ofTer the other fellow the business next time.
But that is incidental alongside of the other facts
mentioned.
As to any journalistic funeral which may take
place in this district, the Courier need harbor no
false notions, it might like to see one, bul that
will not bring it about, and neither will the cultivation of false impressions or half-baked truths pub-
lished'in regard to competitors,
*****
THE ESSENCE 01" BUSINESS
WHEREVEU
you buy it
and whenever you
1» tt y i t, M n g i c
Making Powder is
always entirely
dependable, because it contains
no alum or adult-
erants of any
kind.
MADE IN CANADA
E.W.CILLETTCO.LTD
TORONTO
WINNIPEG MONTREAL
MONARCH  LIFE   '
PRESENTS EXCELLENT
ANNUAL REPORT
THE somewhat surly welcome accorded by the
Courier to the Press at Kimberley, thc newspaper now bcing published in that town hy the proprietors of the Herald, is nut at all surprising,
though it contradicts the customary amenities of the
newspaper fraternity. There are oblique references
and inferences made in the Courier editorial of last
week however, which indicate the methods that
journal follows in disseminating information, particularly as regards the newspaper situation in this
di-trict, are nol adhering as rigidly to the truth as
Dne would expect from au editor who can claim
men bership in si rvice clubs, merchants' and newspaper associations, all of whom emphasize fairness
and truth in business as basic tenets. The Herald
believes lhal ' ih the public is not much interested
in local newspaper squabbles, it has a decided right
to compare standards nf newspaper ethics, so it can
form judgment "f tin- motives behind them.
The reference the Courier makes to the entry of
a third papi r into a field "already too small for two"
is at least a recognition that there have been two
here hitherto. Tliat is something of an admission
to come from that Bource. lint as a matter of fact
Cranbrook is not quite as unique in the Western
newspaper field, in having two papers, as the Courier would make out. There are many places in Alberta and Saskatchewan, of fewer population thin
Cranbrook, supporting two weeklies, and at least
one other point iu B.C. Reference to his copy of the
newspaper directory for last year would give this information to thc editor of thc Courier if he wanted
to make sure of his facts. Drumheller, Estevan,
Yorkton, Weyburn, Battle ford, Melfort,—these are
a few places in thc West that arc* now supporting
two weeklies, and have been for years. So Cranbrook after all is not very unique as a town, though
ona of its editors may bc.
Furthermore, it cuts no figure whatever whether the Courier thinks the Held too small for two
newspapers or not. This is not a question for the
Courier to decide, any more than it would be in any
other line of business, and nothing is gained by continually harping on it, except to make it char that
the Herald must hnve some hold on the field, or its
THE problem which the milk producers are wrestling with in respect to the price at which tliey
shall .sell their commodity, is one that is just as old
as the present competitive system of carrying on
trade. Every line of business has to meet it —
the dryguods merchant and the grocer no less than
the printer. It's the same competition in principle,
differing only in application. There isn't any remedy for it. The only way to meet it is to entrench
oneself more solidly behind sound and recognized
business principles, and build up a connection in the
constituency of buyers who believe that success
in business is not always to be found through the
avenue of low prices. What is called the business
world is a queer sphere to move in. A firm will
complain because a competitor has the opportunity
to do another dollar's worth of business when he
hasn't, and will then proceed to shop around with an
order for printing or something else on a cut price
basis, without any regard to the fairness or otherwise of it. When the shoe pinches, squeal; when it
hurts the other fellow—never mind—that's the glorious slogan actuating the business world of to-day.
Education and co-operation are the only hopes for
(•hanging the system, but they arc at best slow-moving forces, though appreciable advances are being
made.
(tOm Our Exchanges
DOMINION LIQUOR LAWS OS NOT?
Rev. Ben Spence i» afield with the ilogan "On to
Ottawa, A National Prohibition Law," Why not? It
only means taking the right of the other provinces to
legislate for themselves on this subject away from them.
Anil later, we suppose, if our laws respecting education
do not please Ontario, some doughty wight from that region will on-to-Ottawa to bring in a Dominion education
act to please Ontario. Is it not true that Ontario has
the wisdom and the righteousness to devise laws for all
of us?—Calgary Herald.
WHAT IS A CANADIAN?
Writing in Sarcastic vein, the Manitoba Free Press
•ays: "Government officials who have to do with the
mnttcr have now, apparently, laid it down that Canadians
of the third generation are Canadians. If your grandparents were born in Canada, and your parents were
born in Cnnada, and you were born in Canada, the Ottawa department allows you, officially, to wear a badge
with the word Canadian printed on it; all others remain
English, Dutch, Galicians, or whatever they are—but
not Canadians; and your father and mother were not
Canadians, nnd your grandparents were not Canadians
cither; just you, officially, nre the new rncial amalgam
from which will spring thc future true Canadian stock.
It ia a wonderful decision.—Manitoba Free I'ren.
**************************
TWENTY        |
YEARS AGO     |
Extracts from the Issue of      *
The Cranbrook Herald of this      *
*        Date Twenty Years Ago. *
**************************
C. D. Corbin, railway magnate of
Spokane, has at last announced the
completion of his plans to build the
railroad up from Spokane to the
B.C. line. It will connect at Yahk
with the Crow's Nest, C.P.R. line,
and thus give Crunbrook direct communication  with Spokane.
There has been a big increase in
the value of assessed property in
(.'ranbrook this year. The valuations have been raised from $251,-
000 to a total of $604,000
Senator and Mrs. King, of Chip-
man, New Brunswick, are in the
city this week on a visit to their
three sons here.
Fifty-six members were this week
initiated into the Emu of Eagles
formed in the city this week, incul-
ding some from Kimberley anil Wycliffe.
Between six and seven million fe*t
of logs will be cut this year in the
Kootenay Valley mills, it is stated.
Substantial Increases in All
Departments; Remarkably
Low Mortality
The Directors' Nineteenth Annual
Report, of the Monarch Life Assurance Company, indicates an improvement in Western financial
conditions. The assuruneo in force
reached approximately forty million
dollars at risk. The company's assets have always been creditably
commented upon as to quality; these
now reach the substantial figure of
$4,2a;i,()(l0. The average rate of
interest earned was 7.0(1 per cent.,
exclusive of profit on sale of securities, thus continuing the substantial
average of 7\ per cent for the past
sixteen years.
The exceedingly low mortality, BO
per cent, of the usual tabular provision of expectation, which was 17
points less than I'or the same period
last year, indicates a continuation of
care being exercised in the selection
of physical risks.
The company continues to pay
liberal profits to its policy holders.
The general increases were, Assurance in force, 11.24 per cent.; New
and revived, 18.6 per cent.; Assets,
115 per cent; Policy Reserves, 14.9
per cent.; Cash Premiums, 11.40 per
cent.; Cash Receipts, 11.5(1 per cent.;
Surplus, 28.lit per cent.
The following directors were reelected for the ensuing year:—President, W. A. Matheson, Winnipeg;
Vice-Presidents, P. W. Adams, Toronto, and J. W. W. Stewart, (Managing Director) Winnipeg; Col. H.
A. Mullins, H. W. Kcblin, W. L. Parish, R. J. Gourley; all of Winnipeg;
W. W. Evans, Toronto, and W. J.
Blake-Wilson, Vancouver.
The annual statement shows the
sum of $898,358.80 having been paid
in claims and dividends to policy holders in the last eighteen years.
The meeting was presided over by
the President, Mr. W. A. Matheson,
and the statement was presented by
Mr. J. W. W. Stewart, Managing Director,
CHAMPIONSHIP HOCKEY LINED UP FOR
NELSON THIS MONTH
Win or lose in the season's hockey, Nelson will enter the championship charmed circle, for it is
practically assured that tho amateur
championship of the province will
be held in tbe Kootenay city at the
end of the season, according to word
from the west.
President L. C. Macken of the B.
C. Amateur Hockey Association
states that Vancouver is not likely
to see any of the championship games unless the unexpected happens
and mild weather should make It
impossible to secure ice in the interior.
The presvnt arrangements ♦all for
both the senior and intermediate
playoffs to be held in the interior.
Last year the interior champions not
only had to play here, but also to
play in Victoria—an arrangement
that was not at all popular with the
interior hockey interests.
President Macken has written the
different groups, instructing the
winners to get ready for the playoffs. The Vancouver senior winners
are due to play al Victoria,  Febru-
ELKS OFFICERS FOR
NEW TERM TO BE
INSTALLED THIS WEEK
The regular meeting of the Cranbrook Lodge, No. 80, B.P.O.E., to
be held this week, ,on Thursday evening at the K.P. Hall will see the installation of the new officers for the
ensuing term. These have been
elected as follows;
Exalted Ruler   S. G. Clark
Est. Leading Knight ... P. W. Willis
Est. Royal Knight .... B. W. Johnson
Est. Lecturing Knight J. Jones
Secretary  H. S. Laker
Treasurer          R. W. Edmondson
Inner Guard   W. K. J Ii 11
Squire   E. Searle
Tyler   G. ffirt
Trustees:—A. Hurry,  P. Adams, A.
Lebeau.
Annapolis, N.S.—The growing of
strawberries in the Annapolis Valley
has been placed on a more stable basis during the past few years. During
the year 1924 there were 15,500
crates shipped by growers, as compared with 15,479 crates for the year
1923. The crops during the past
two or three years have been more
than double those grown during thc
years 1921-1922.
Thursday, February 5th, 1925
Lethbridge. — Co-operative shipments of poultry to New York City,
sponsored and handled by the Dominion Poultry Service, Albertn
branch, brought encouraging results,
Tbe shipment, consisting entirely of
turkeys, and cnrried in two special
refrigerator ears, netted the shippers
25 cents a pound for their birds, the
selling price in New York being 41
cents.
THE
MONARCH LIFE
ASSURANCE COMPANY
(Incorporated by Si inl An ofDomlnlan Parliament)
Hcud Olllce—Winnipeg
Comparative Synopsis of lflth Annual Report
Assurance—In Force
New and Revived
Assets
Policy Reserves
Cash Premiums    	
Cash Receipts
Surplus    (includinu paid
up Capital »10O,793.38! 434,074,
Interest Rate—'KM. 7-«»%-     Average
Mortality Claims—
Oocurring during 1924, boirtg 29% of t.ibul
Dscronso, $35,(H4.87, or 28.05",, legs tb.in i
1924
$80,742,884.
0,942,857,
4,238,817,
3,7:14,281.
1,145,506,
1,330,828
Increaso ",
00   $4,460,070.00 11.2
1,298,748.00 13.0
071.618.35 15.0
550,088.00 14.8
130,639.74 11.4
153,853.23 11.5
02       122,488.23   28.2
last   16  yeara  over Tii'/..
ar expectation $80,887.10
1 1923,
LIBERAL  PROFITS  PAID TO  POLICYHOLDERS.
Our Record of Progress by Five Year Periods.
Claim, and Dividend.
I at Deo, St.    Aaauriuiee In Force. Aaffcta. Paid I.. I'mleyheldera
nioli tt,USAsilM 198-1,108.11 *l4,3el.sa
1914 7.427.697.00 6P9.072.70 67,964.13
1910        20,129,349.00 1,341,366.63      375,357.19
1924     39,742,334.00   4,233,317.91   898,358.80
J. IV, W. ST-KWAJ-tT.
Vlce-Prrtli mi nml
>ln 11:11; I ni;    Ulri'Clwrl
C. R. WARD, District Manager, Cranbrook
W. J. BLAKE -WILSON, Resident Director, Vancouver
Complete Report Mailud on Request.
J
rt»^^.vvw.^s^^^VA^^VA^VAV/.%^svwvv,ww,/wv^•.vww,vvv■
.BIBLE THOUGHT]
-FOR T0DAY-J
•JSsussMk.'Sjr
—Sk**m—
Friday,   February   6
THOU HAST    A    MIGHTY ARM;
strong is thy hand, and high is thy
right hand.    Justice nnd judgment
arc  the  habitation   of  thy  throne
mercy and truth shall go before thy
face.—Psalm 89: 13,14.
+   4-   +
Saturday, February 7
THR SPIRIT OF THE LORD GOD
is upon mc: because the Lord hnth
annotated me to preach good tidings
unto the meek; he hnth sent mo to
bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim   liberty   to  the  captives,   and
the opening of the prison to them
that nre bound.—Isniuh 61:1.
+   +   +   '
Sunday,  February 8
ASCRIBE VE GREATNESS unto
our God. He is the Rock, his work
is perfect: for nit his wiiys Are judg-
ary 10 and the return game hero on I ment: a God of truth and without
February BO. The provincial final* j iniquity, just and right is he.—Pout.,
will be played the next week, tWo|8Bt8,4.
games, total goals to count. Nelson, -f   4.   4.
Klmberloy or Fornlo will be the win- Monday, February 9
tiers in the Interior. According to IP THINE ENEMV be hungry, give
past custom it is Alberta's turn to him bread to eat; am! if he he thirsty, give him water to drink.—Prov.,
2f>:21.
+    +    +
Tueaday,   February   10
LET US NOT BE WEARY in welldoing for in due seoBQjp we shall reap
if we faint not.    As we have therefore opportunity, let us do good unto
all men, especially them thnt are of
the household of faith.—Gal. 0:9,10.
+   +   +
Wedneaday, February 11
EYE   HATH   NOT  SEEN  nor  ear
heard, neither hath it entered into
the heart of man, the things which
God  hath   prepared   for  them  that
love him.—1 Corinthians 2:9.
+   +   +
Thursday, February 12
OWE NO MAN ANYTHING, but to
love one another: for he that loveth
another hnth fulfilled the law. Love
worketh no ill to his neighbor: therefore love is the fulfilling of the law.
Romans 13: 8,10.
QUALITY
SERVICE
SALLY ANN
Is making; a great hit with the people of Cranbrook
Made in Calgary.   2 tins      25c
CO-OP COCOA ... '  25c Ib.
ONTARIO CHEESE, per lb  30c
BROOKFIELD BUTTER, peril. 45c*
10 II). hus       42c
GINGER SNAPS, 5 lbs     $1.00
PREMIUM  BACON, Sliced, per II.  50c
UPTON'S TEA. per lb    80c
P. & G. WHITE N'APTHA SOAP. 15 bars $1.00
HEAD LETTUCE, FRESH APPLES,
BANANAS AND ORANOES
Cranbrook Dist. Co-Op. Soc.
Phone 104
Phone 104
come to Hritish Columbia for the
Allan Cup elimination Her it's.
Vancouver Intermediate! will travel to the Okanagan during the week
of February KI. Kimberley lookn
like the winners for the East Koote
nny, and will play Fernie. Trail is
lending in West, Kntoenay ond will
do battle with the Bast Kootenay
series winners nnd thc winners will
then take on the winners in the Van-
couver-Oknnagan -scries for the
championship.
Bobbed heads
may be washed
It's easy to wash mul dry the
bobbed heads- A Iree lather of
Baby's Own Soap Inn basin of
hot water is n simple nnd Inexpensive sliampooam! the lingering fragrance as of roses in the
hair is very appealing,
Baby's Own Soup is sold in
individual cnrtoiis 10e.—Everywhere
"Usst/ai y*tu uiJBaby taa"   „+,
Sun Life Assurance Company
of Canada
HEAD OFFICE    •    MONTREAL
ASSETS
Two Hundred Million Dollars
YOU  CAN  REST  ASSURED
KIMBERLEY   REPRESENTATIVE
F. W. ADOLPH, District A (tent - CRANBROOK
'f.V.V.Vfffffffffffffffffffffffil
"This ia the worst jam I ever not
into," said thc fly na he crawled out
of the preurvee.
Special Bargains For
Careful Buyers
ON   SATURDAY
Choice Pot Roast Beef    -
Choice Boiling Beef 3 lbs. for
12! ;c |b.
■    25c
Grain Fed Pork
CHOICE
LEGS, per lb.    -    -
LOINS, per lb.      -•** -      -
SHOULDERS, per lb.     -     ■
25c
28c
22c
CHOICE FRESH  LOCAL VEAL
HEINTZ' SWEET MIXED, CHOW AND
DILL PICKLES
P BURNS & Co Ltd
Phone 10        ...       . Cranbrook, B.C. Thursday, February Slh, 1925
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
PABB FITS
A^*AV.V.VA*JV-/W%V.V"AVW\WrtNV«AWWAW^AWflMAHVWA,,AW
KIMBERLEY
AND WYCLIFFE NEWS
ffjvfffffff.
**************************
f   KfMBERLEY   ii
I NEWS NOTES ii
**************************
Mrs. Hedloy McLea
daughter returned hon
brook nu Saturday lust.
ami  young
from Cran-
Mrs.   Sieve*
and
visitors
daughter, of
ni the home
of Mrs. Molster this woek.
A good slued cri
bonofll tlanco held i
aUondod the
■ Oddfellows'
W. R.  ROSS, K.C.
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR, Etc.
CRANBROOK
and KIMBERLEY
hall on Friday night.
Mr. Collins of tho Western Grocers, Crnnbrook, with Mrs. Collins,
were in town on Priday.
Dr. Tiffin ancT~Mr. Rubu Tiffin,
wore Kimberley visitors on Saturday.
Mr. Marsh, of "the Royal Bank at
Cranbrook, was a visitor in town on
Saturday.
Thu carnival which was to have
tuken place on Priday night, has
boen postponed until colder weather
sets in to mako Ice.
All i
i event)
havi
tho
boon culled off
extromoly  mild
wonthor.
Mr. W. (i. SJoigloi',
Saddlery Co. Ltd., mt
in town on Sal unlay.
was in town lnst week.
Mr. McDonald) of Fernio, assistant
mining inspertor, was a visitor to
the Consolidated on Thursday last.
>f the Calgar
doing buslnei
NISBET & GRAHAM
Barristers, Solicitor!, &c.
Offices: Imperial Hank Bldg.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
OI-FICES at KIMBERLEY
IN K. of P. HALL
Open Every Wednesday fr-.ni
10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
DAN'S TAXI
Cranbrook - Phone 534
— Trips Anywhere —
— Prices Reasonable —
Special  Trips   Arranged
Cars for Hire with or Without
Driver
The Ladies' Aid of the Union
Church have beon successful In Belling a largo number of tiekets for
[Tuesday night, when Jackie Coogan,
Jin "My Boy," will bc shown at tho
.'Orpheum Theatre.
W. Lindsay and Art Higgins were
visitors to Cranbrook on Saturday,
Mr. Carl Gill and Miss May Anthony, both of Kimberley, were married in Cranbrook on Saturday.
Dr. Hanington was a Cranbrook
visitor on Monday.
Thu monthly meeting of the Board
of Trade was held in the school house
on Monday evening last.
Miss Grey, of thu Concentrator,
and Mr. Miles, were married the end
of last week, and are receiving congratulations.
A well arranged banquet was given
on Monday evening at Ryluy's Dining Room, by Dr. Hanington, for the
St. John's Ambulanco Asociation
First Aid. About 30 were in attendance. Addresses were given and a
very pleasant evening spent.
When Vou Think of Insurance
- Call Up —
RFAI  F A   Fl \A/PI  I      Mrs* M°reen arrived in town on
,,      u      s    .   ..... Sundai' evening to join her husband
Cranbrook & Kimberley        and sons here.
Sole Agents for Kimberley Townsite, —
assasi :-^~=~==^ ^r* Diamond of the Consolidated.
Nearly two hundred couple.*: attended the benefit dance given in
the Oddfellows Hall on Friday evening. The music, furnished by the
Kimberley Kiks' orchestra, was of a
high order. A pleasant evening was
had by all.
There is a movement on foot to
organize a branch of the Boy Scouts
in Kimberley.
A. J. Dunnott. manager for the
district for the B.C. Fire Underwriters' Association, was a business visitor to Kimlierley on Friday.
The engagement of Mr. C. Lane-
tot and Miss C, Wizriowiek is unmuin
ced, the wedding to take place ii;
the near future.
Messrs, Beule & Elwell, with Mr,
c. n. Phillips as manager] have already opened their offices just west
of the North Star Hotel,
VV. VV. Parnell left on Saturday
for Elko, where he has a ranch and
several head of live stock.
The American Consul at Fernie,
announces that, beginning February
1st, thc fee to shippers for the certification of Consular Invoices wfll
be reduced to $2.55 per invoice.
been spending a few days wiih  Mrs. I
Moore's parents here.
Mrs. G. Hodgson entertained
number of her friends to supper i
cards on Suturday evening.
fmmmmmmmM
Mrs.   Ernie
brook visitor
Bi
this.
diler   was
week.
a   (
ran-
BORN
Brown.
January
—To
of   M
20th,
Mr.    and
arysviile, on
a daughter.
Mrs.    K.
Tuesday,
Mr. and Mrs. Steve Wails of the
Sullivan mine, are visiting with Mrs.
Waits' sister here.
Mrs, Fred Sandberg of Lumber-
ton, who has been visiting for the
past two weeks with her sister, Mrs.
B. Lundeen, returned to her home on
Thursday.
INSTITUTE REBEKAH
LODGE AT KIMBERLEY
THURSDAY LAST
WYCLIFFE NOTES
*************************************************
*
j
EAST OR WEST- |
HOME IS BEST   £
*
*
*
*
*,
*
?!
Mr. Lund, association bureau inspector of grades, was in Wycliffe
on Tuesday last, making the usual
monthly inspection of lumber grades.
The unusual wenther of the last
few days has again played havoc
with the Sawdust League hockey
schedule, the result of the play-off
for the winners of the first half still
remains in doubt. On Tuesday last
the Radiolas quite literally mixed it
with the All Stars in a roujrh and
ready game, winning by thu scoru of
6-5. This win put thu teams into n
three cornered tie, so arrangements
were made for the play-off Wednesday night. The Bearcats drew a bye
so it was left to the Radiolas and thu
All Stars to again purform as on the
preceding night. Tho resulting game
was fast and the play generally
clean, a welcome change from the
game of the night before. After
about eight minutes of overtime play
with the score tied 4-4, the Radiolas
slipped in the counter that decided
the game in their favor, and thus
won the right to fight the final battle with thc Bearcats. Up to the
present time, however, the weather
has been such that a play-off has
been an impossibility.
Kimberley was slated to appear on
the local ice against the home squad
Ion Sunday afternoon, in the last lea-
\ gue game on schedule, but  this also
i had to be cancelled.
The usual ice harvest from the river will be more or ]e<s a failure, it
j is feared, unless a sudden and com-
! plete change in the weather takes
i place, as thu ice has commenced to
break up.
Mrs.
Roberts
Tuesday
Simmon   aud
were   Khiiberh
Miss   Bertha
f  visitors  on
On Thursday evening uf last week,
a strong representation uf Maple
Leaf Kebekah Lodge, Cranbrook,
went up to Kimberley, and assisted in
the institution of a Rebekah Lodge
there, and in the installation of the
Officers. About thirty-eight members were present from Cranbrook.
Sister Hankin, of Adinah Lodge,
Trail, was the instituting officer, assisted by Sister Barnes, District Deputy President, of Trail, anil Sister
Drew, of Maplu Leaf Lodge, District
Deputy President of Cranbrook.
Following the institution ceremony, the installation of the new olllcers took place, this being under the
direction of Sister Drew, of Cranbrook, assisted by a staff of Past Noble  Grands  from  Cranbrook  Lodge.
The officers elected and installed
were as follows:
w»s**skw*aw*M
THE  FIFTH
n*a*sasaai
ANNUAL
H
BALL
Given By The
CRANBROOK CURLING CLUB
Will Be Held in the
AUDITORIUM-CRANBROOK
Friday, Feb. 6th
GRAND MARCH AT TEH O'CLOCK
ROBINSON'S 4-PIECE ORCHESTRA
•m*
*0m0tiWrifWtmrkfk0t\a
0*0*0*3
N. G	
  Sis. Andrews
V. G	
      Sis. James
Secretary 	
 Sis. Angove
Troasurer 	
  Sis. Sargeant
Warden 	
  Sis. Bidder
Conductor	
  Sis. O'Brien
Chaplain 	
  Sis. Clemens
R.S.N.G	
  Bro. Andrews
L.S.N.G	
  Sis.  Weaver
R.S.V.G	
  Sis. Johnson
L.S.V.G	
  Sis. Lemon
TTHF. yearning to possess a home is an instinct.
* It is not peculiar to men. Birds and beasts
have it.
Till* HOMEBUILDER AND HOMEOWNER
IS \ SOURCE OF PROSPERITY, ONE
HOMEBUII DER IS WORTH MORE TO
His COMMUNITY THAN TWO RENTERS
Decide 10-DAY to pet more enjoyment
onl of life, and to lie woi tli moro to your
community     yourself.
Tho OTIS STAPLES (.UMBER COMPANY will help
you with your plana in n wiy thm will make Homebuilding
n ptoatanl experience,    CALL TO-DAY.
! THE OTIS STAPLES LUMBER
| COMPANY,   LIMITED j
! Kimberley   and   Wycliffe t
* I
*■•■■■'■■*■-. ■:■***■-.■*:****+***********************************f
******** ********************************************+
DR. C. W. HUFFMAN,  Chiropractor
I Mrs. Prod Houle. for sev-
: resident in Wycliffe. have
■cattle. Mr. Houle will en-
farming  near  that   city,  it
Mr. an
eral year
left  for !
gage  in
is reported,
Mrs. R. Hastings Trew and bahy
son, returned from Cranbrook on
Saturday last.
Staples has returned from a
sines* trip to the city of Cal-
C. O.
short bt
gary.
.1. R. Torrance, western superintendent of the I.C.S., wns here on business on Tuesday of last week.
The Rebekah degree was conferred
on nineteen candidates seven sisters
and twelve brothers, and with others
affiliating, the new lodge starts out
with a membership of about thirty.
The degrees were put nn by the
degree team of Maple Leaf Lodge,
Cranbrook, and the efficient manner
in which the work was done without
reference to the ritual was a great
credit to those taking part.
The meeting nights for the new lodge
have been fixed for thu second and
fourth Thursday evenings of the
month. It will go under the title of
Kimberley Rebekah Lodge No. 48.
On such an auspicious occasion,
naturally social relaxation formed no
inconsiderable part of the proceed-
ngs of the evening, ami a very enjoyable social inturlude was had, refreshments being served by the members of the new lodge.
GAS CAR SERVICE
MAY BE TRIED OUT
ON NELSON BRANCH
KIMItliRLIJY
(Over Kimberley Hardware)
Mondays, Wednesdays tk
Fridays
10 to 6
And by Appointment
CRANBROOK
(Hnnson Block)
Tuesdays, Thursdays &
Saturdays
11-12 and 2. 5
Also by Appointment
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
of Canada, Limited.
OFFICES, SMELTING AND REFINING DEPARTMENT
TRAIL,   BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS AND REFINERS
Purchasers ol Oold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Ores
Producers ol Oold, Silver, Copper, Pig Lead and Zinc
"TADANAC"BRAND
**************************
MARYSVILLE j
NEWS        j
**************************
A number of friends gathered at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. Bennett
on the evening of January 23rd, the
occasion being Mr. Bonitstt'l 81st
birthday. A very pleasant time was
spent hy all in games, dancing and
music. The step-dancing by the little folks, grandchildren of Mr. and
Mrs. Bennett, was especially enjoyed hy all. A delicious supper was
served at midnight. All went home
wishing Mr. Bennett muny more
birthdays.
Miss Conduer, of Colville, Wash.,
is visiting her purents, Mr, and Mrs.
J. Bennett, at Marysville.
Warrjen Keer, who is attending
school in Cranbrook, spent the weekend at his home here.
Miss Rnnka Lundeen left on Sunday for Spokane where she will spend
a short holiday.
Mrs. F. Caire, of the Sullivan mine
is visiting relatives In Marysville this
week.
Mrs. F. Tihbets and Miss Grace
Tibbets returned from Spokane,
where they have heen spending a
few days,
Mrs. Dick Moore and little daugh
According to official reports from
Nelson, the Canadian Pacific Railway
Company is contemplating the putting into service in that district in
thu near future, a self-propelling
gasoline car. The car will be used to
handle passengers on certain of its
branch lines in the Nelson district.
According to information the car
will arrive at Nelson from the east
within the next few days. It will
then be given some trial runs and if
successful will be operated on a regular schedule from Nelson.
The car has u seating capacity for
44 passengers and has a small baggage compartment ami engine room.
It is also capable of handling another
small car behind it. The time tnbh
or the run on which the car will he
assigned is not yet known, but an
announcement will no doubt be made
after the ear undergoes the neces-
sary trials.
Thu car is the only one of its kind
in British Columbia, and it is believed, in the west. A car similar to it
was operated on the Co(|uitlam-New
Westminster branch some time ago,
but was withdrawn.
This is similar to the proposals
which have been made from time to
time for a solution of tlie passenger
service bctwen Kimberley and Crnnbrook. The Cranbrook Board of
Trade have taken the matter up be-
fore now, but the C.P.R. has never
given any encouragement to the idea.
there are seven flower beds of varying desings, in which asters, zinnias,
snap-dragons, petunias, verbenas,
stocks, lobelias and sweet peas vied
with each other in beauty and perfume. Needless to say Erickson garden carried off the "hest new garden" prize for 1!)24.
Kriekson is in the fruit growing
district and the surroundings are
planted out solidly to orchards. It
is 370 miles west of .Medicine Mat
and V.i east of Kootenay Landing.
Mr. Bundy was formerly agent at
Wardner, B.C., and his beautiful
station garden at that point was featured in Bulletins 98 and 109.
THE CITY BAND CONCERT
Seats lo the right of them,
Seats to the left of them,
Into the body of the Auditorium
Marched the four hundred.
There, dressed In their full uniform]
There, iu  full view on the platform,
Sat the City Band:—and in admiration
Gazed the four hundred.
Every number the band did play,
Every person was heard to say,
How it had won the gratitude of
All, the four hundred.
Now the bund gives a blast,
Now the audience gives a gasp
As the music, in volume swells,
Listen, the four hundred.
Now the band it plays divine,
Now the drums beat the time,
As the plate moves slowly round,
Testing the four hundred.
Though the concert it was free,
Though it looked for some charity,
Only a few cents could he extracted
From the four hundred.
Seats to the right of them, .
Seats to the left of them,
Out of the body of the Auditorium,
Dashed the four hundred.
Bandsmen, once in front of them,
Bandsmen now in rear of them,
All in mad haste to save themselves,
Stampeded the four hundred.
Now the band counts the foes,
Now the band's ill nt ease,
As they figure up the slim donation
Of the four hundred.
Figured nt nine cents a head,
Figured just as we have read,
It will always remain a blot
Upon the four hundred.
Some one hnd mude a mistake,
Some saw it when too late,
Now  the   band   in   rage  volleys  and
thunders
At the four hundred.
Citizens—of our city so fair,
Citizens—who did so ill prepare
To do their duty to the band, were
some
Of the four hundred.
WILLIAM STEELE
Crauhrook, B.C.
January 23rd, 1026
REGULATIONS FOR
BEER LICENSES
EXPECTED SHORTLY
THE WEATHER BULLETIN
Victoria.—A good deal of mystery
surrounds the issuance of the new
beer licenses, and little information
can be gained from the attorney-
general's deportment with regard to
the time when the sale of beer by the
glass in licensed premisoa will commence, Hon. A. M. Manson statis
emphatically that "everything i> being left in the hands of the new liquor   commissioner,   Mr.   Davidson."
However, it is expected that the
new licenses will be issued in about
a month. The new regulations will
be considered by the executive council and will be gazetted next week.
According to the provincial law. applicants must advertise their applications in the newspapers for one
month
Thu fee for licences to sell beer
will likely vary throughout the province, as high as $1,000 to be charg-
ed in Vancouver. Tom Uphill i- al-
ready on thu warpath for Fernie, and
states he will be satisfied with noth-
thing less than eleven licenses there,
one for each hotel. In official quarters it is stated there will bt- less
than eighty licenses all over the province.
FORMER WARDNER
C.P.R. AGENT WINS
STATION GARDEN PRIZE
(Fr. C.P.R. Bulletin 102, Montreul)
Erickson, B.C%, Thos. W. Bundy,
Agent. 1924 was the first year for a
garden at this station, and the results
obtained were such that passengers,
who admired the showing, would
hardly believe that so much had been
accomplished in one season. There
wns a beautiful patch of grass, splendid flowers, and a 22(1 foot hedge of
sweet peas called for special admiration.    The whole extent under eul
ter and son, Eileen and Dermot, have tivatiun  was 270 by 30 feet, and
CANADA'S MINERAL PRO-
OUCTION THIS YKAR IN
ADVANCE OF YEAR AGO
Preliminary estimates prepared by
the department of mines at Ottawa,
show lead, zinc and gold productions
in Canada were a record in 1924, and
that silver nickel and copper showed
gains in output. The total output of
the metal mines is estimated at $98,-
000,000, an advance of nearly $14,-
000,000 over that of 1923.
The silver output was 20,363,500
ounces, a gain of 1,700,000 ounces.
About half the output came from
British Columbia, and most of the
balance from Ontario.
Lead established a high record of
108,713,500 pounds, and zinc a now
level at 90,000,000 pounds.
The total estimated value of alt
mineral production in Canada during 1924 was $205,402,009, according to a preliminary estimate just
Issued by the Dominion bureau of
statistics.
Thermometer    Reading*
Cranbrook
At
January 27
January 29
January 30
January 31
Februarj
!■■•;- mrj
February   ;
41
4;<
-il
40
45
42
33
33
34
34
Henry Ford has annexed a railroad, a coal mine, and a glass factory. All he needs now is a rope mill
and a mule factory with plenty of
jacks.
Mother!
Clean Child's Bowels
"California Fig Syrup" is
Dependable Laxative for
Sick Children
The regular Women's Institute
monthly meeting was held in the K.
Hall on Tuesday, February 3rd, at
3 p.m. The president, Mrs George
Smith in the chair.
After the rending of the minutes
of the last meeting, a letter wai read
stating that the Crippled Children's
Hospital at Vancouver, which is
maintained hy funds from the various Institutes, is to be called the
Women's Institute Cripple Children'*
Hospital as a memorial to the work
done by the ■ Institutes during the
war.
After other husiness of the meeting had been finished, Mrs. Parkin
favored the members with a solo,
which was greatly appreciated and
an encore had to be given.
Afternoon tea was served at the
doae of the bUllnea of the meeting.
Vancouver. — Building statistics
for Greater Vancouver Indicate tha*.
2,032 homes were built in thfl pear
just past. The total value of thfl now
construction was ftfl,882,474, The
figures for 1024 exceed by nearly
ten million dollars the value of building! constructed in 1922.
Hurry Mother! Even a fretful,
feverish, bilious, constipated child
loves the pleasant taste of "California Fig .Syrup" and it never fails to
rweeten the stomach and open the
bowels. A teaspoonful to-day may
prevent a sick child to-morrow. It
doesn't cramp or overact. Contains
no narcotics or soothing drugs.
Ask your druggist for genuine
"California Fit' Syrup" which has directions for haloes and children of
all ag« printed on bottle. Mother!
you must say "California" or you
may get an imitation fig syrup.
CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF CRANBROOK
Court of Revision
Public Notice is hereby given that the Court of
Revision, for correcting and revising the Assessment
Roll of the City of Cranbrook and the Cranbrook
School District, as prepared by the Assessor, will sit on
Monday, February 9th, at 7.30 p.m. at the Municipal
Building,   Norbury Avenue. Cranbrook, B.C.
F. W. BURGESS,
« Attestor
4u-r>o
■S PAQE   SIX
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
Thursday, February 5th, 1925
Uicthodist Church
REV. B. C.
FREEMAN,
Pastor
SUNDAY, FEB. 8
11 a.m. MORNING SERVICE
Junior Choir
Evening Service withdrawn for United Mass Meeting
at Auditorium,   7.30 p.m.
VISITORS AND STRANGERS CORDIALLY WELCOMED
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
(l»R.W.A.FEB8IK (
/ DKHT18T )
J Campbell-Manning Block (
| pkoit tl. 9Hee Hotni 1
) I to 11,1 to I p.m.  Hats. • to 1. I
L_n_rx.j-i.i~i r-1« - f~   *ew
Mr*. Green * MacKinnon
I'hjili'iwis and Snrgeoni
Ofllce  nl   rtHitd.nee,  Armstrong
Atohu.
OPFICB  HOURS
Afternoon!    IM to 4.00
■nnlnfi   7.M to «-3»
iumkTf   SOO to 4.00
CRANBROOK, B.C.
DR. F. B. MILES
DENTIST
OFFICE HOURS
• to 11 i.m.     1 to I pm.
■MIOl Blk., ORANBROOK, B.C.
T.
M.
MACPHEBSOK
Undertaker
Phono CM
—rt* j AT*, mt to CMj HaU
JOHN GARD
PAINTER &
PAPERHANQER
Fill Line ot Wall Papor
Ia Stock.
Btore, Hanson Arenue
Pkoat 4H »t til bona
CUKBBOOI     ...    Ml.
CRANBROOK CLEAMERS
ANDJJYER8
Wterr Osrauot Mat to u to e*
Cl-aasod or Dyod to glrec
Oar Otmo-it Can.
Onr koowlada* ot tho toiluu
It yeur tiioruct ot nttitteUoa
ktrt.   Flioat, tod wi wlll -toll,
or *rto( u jam trttg.
We Clttt ttd Dr* ■nrrthlM.
raoin ui
Baptist Churrfa
Rev. W. T. TAPSCOTT
SUNDAY, FEB. 8
II  a.m. "What a  Revival
Will Do"
7„i0 p.m. Regular Evening
Service withdrawn to join
with the Union Revival Service, in thc Auditorium at
7.30
YOU   ABE   CORDIALLY
ISVITED.
DISTRICT AGRICULTURIST TELLS METHODS USED
IN TRAINiNG  FOR JUNIOR STOCK JUDGING
Points Out Difficulties Under  Which Teams From Cranbrook District Have Worked, But Gained Successes Nevertheless
The following article from the pen
of Mr. Angus Hay, district agriculturist, is taken from a recent edition
of the Agricultural Gazette, issued
by the department of agriculture,
Victoria. Inasmuch as the successes
gained by the teams trained by Mr.
Hay have been very creditable, bis,
article will be read with interest.
Thc art of live-stock judging is the
foundation of all stock shows and
is largely the means ol' determining
the value of live stock offered for
sale. The line of breeding ami fhe
pedigree enter into tiie value of
breeding animals, but tile individual
should be a good specimen of tho
breed from tiie utility standpoint as
well. Therefore, breeders, in order
to attain tbe greatest degree of success, must be good judges of live
stock, so that they may lie able to
MID-SUB AND BOCDCTIIS
WOMEN'S INSTITUTE
Uteu la tht
E.  ot  P. Bali
ttttraooD of tht
lilt Tutadtr at
I p.m.
AU Itdltt ut
cordially Invlttd
Mn. GEORGE SMITH
Mrs.    Finlayson
President:
(tM.-1'reaiireri
1. 0. O. F.
KEY CITY LODGE No. 42
^smmm&.       Meets every
^^JBjWC Monday night at
HWwBBKp The Auditorium
Sojourning Oddfellows are cordially invited
N. G.     -       -     A. E. LEIGH
Rec. Sec. E. G. Dingley, P.G.
•fffffffffffffffffffffffff
Save Money
FRESH MILK 10c Quart
CALL —
L-   GODDERIS'   DAIRY
Rural   Telephone
rVffffff.VfffffmVffffff
B-aMiu»ii«i«iD«iiNiiii-iuiJiiimiiiioiiiiinm»i:«pim
C. JOE BROS. |
LADIES' and GENTS'     1
TAILORS |
- SUITS MAI>E TO ORDEB -
CLBANINO £ PRBSHINQ
Cranbrook SU 0pp. Ilk. of Vem.
ANNOUNCEMENT
THE
Alberta Rooms
Van Home St., Opp Fgt. Sheds
ARE NOW OPEN.
If you want m home thtt ii comfortable and clean, call  at  the
ALBERTA
Hot & Cold Water on all FloorB
SANDY    (jRENUIK, Prop.
Jack Atchison, of Cranbrook,
a member of the East Kootenay
Junior Live-stock Judging Team
at New Westminster Fair. This
team stood fifth in competition
of ten teams,
readily recognize the faults in their
own breeding stock and mate the
individuals that will dive the best
possible offspring.
Team Selection
Realizing the importance of tbe
above facts, and with the aim in view
of having East Kootenay again represented in the district team livestock judging competition at the
Coast fairs, live-stock judging demonstrations were held as often as
possible during the summer months.
The demonstrations were all well attended and the desire tn make the
team   for   either   one   of   the   Coast
Montana Restaurant
(Ml. at AO Hoiri
0*.-*.,  Utwt«tf Ui Otatiti
Mi
0»». Bttk ot
name M
JL.. D. Cafe
(I Jttlo Dar-MptX)
—w» rot wtth toantblni goo*
* «t no u Ih! "L.D."
NELSON BUSINESS
COLLEGE
— LEARN TO EARN —
Shorthand, Typewriting Boole-
keeping, Pcnmamhip, Spelling,
Rapid Calculation, Commercial
Enzli.h, Commercial Law, Filing,  Cenetal  Office   Procedure.
Individual Tuition
Commence Any Time
Ne'* Term Now Commencing
P.O. Box 14-Phone 603
THE
PEOPLE
MAKE
PAYROLLS
Wc need the energy ol
fresh payrolls nnd thc power of larger ones. But the
people must help themselves.
In thc case of Pacific Milk
the patronage given here Is
a factor in keeping two farming communities going.
Let this patronage be extended to other B.C. manufacturers.
Pacific Milk Co., Ltd.
Head Office, Vancouver, B.C.
Factorial at Abboliford and Ladner
Stewart McClure, of St.
Mary's Prairie, a member of the
East Kootenay Live-stock .Judging Team at the Vancouver Fair.
Stewart won the prize in li»2:t at
New Westminster Fair for the
highest Individual si-ore in tin-
judging of dairy cattle.
Angus L, Hay, District- Agriculturist at Cranbrook, who acted as coach for Junior Live-
Stock Judging Team from East
Kootenay.
stock. After the cards had been gi
en in for a class and the proper placing anounced, along with the rea
sons to substantiate this placing, the
class was open I'or discussion and th>
points of tiie various individuals wero
fully discussed. This is a very
sential feature of any stock judging
demonstration, as it brings out the
various faults and tlie emphasis that
should be placed thereon, which
valuable because, after judging
very few clasess, the majority of pupils recognize a fault quite readily,
but the question is which animal carries the most serious fault.
grade beef herds and also heavy
draft horses. It is therefore possible
to give the pupils 11 fairly good idea
os to what is meant by dairy, beef
and heavy horse type, but tho fancy
points characteristic of tlie different
breeds have to some extent to be
overlooked or explained as well as
possible from live-stock books and
the use of lantern slides.
Gaining Experience
It can be easily understood that the
greatest benefit can be derived from
tliis live-stock judging work by having as many teams as possible visit
the larger fairs after they have been
property prepared. In tbis way they
will he given an opportunity of working over some really good individuals of the various classes of live
Btock, Tliis not only gives the boys
ami girls au opportunity to familiarize themselves witli the various breed
types, but it also gives them the desire lo see a better class of live-stock
kept on the home farm, aud they
have gained some information that
should prove of valuable assistance in
solocting nnd brooding better stock
Many of the hoys who are to-day taking pnrt in these judging competitions will no doubt be among the
prominent live-stock exhibitors in future years.
Outstanding Winnings
At the Vancouver Exhibition, Lawrence Foster, Stewart McClure and
Warren Keer made up tlie East Kootenny team, and were successful in
winning first honors, Warren Keer
making the highest individual score
in the competition.
At New Westminster Lawrence
Foster, Warren Keer and Jack Atchison represented Eflat Kootenay and
stood fifth in a competition of ten
teams; Lawrence Foster winning the
$10 special offered by Dean Clement,
of the University of British Columbia
for the highest individual score in the
judging of dairy cattle. This is the
second year that this special has been
won by the Eust Kootenay team,
Stewart McClure winning it last year.
SULLIVAN LODGE
INSTALL OFFICEFS
FOR CURRENT YEAR
GIRLS! HAIR GROWS
THICK AND BEAUTIFUL
Sullivan Lodge No. on, I.O.O.F.,
recently held quite an interesting installation service, when the following
officers were installed for 1925:
W. S. Green  J.P.G.
J. W. Blezard   N.G.
F. Willis   V.G.
A. Wntkins   Treas.
L. Ilillier   Fin. Sec.
E.  Dickinson     Rec.  Sec.
I). Morrison   Chaplain
J. Sargeant  Warden
Daniel Morrison   Conductor
35c  "Danderine" Does Wonders
for Lifeless, Neglected Hair
M
L.
I'. Jo
Lawrence Foster, of Wycliffe,
who won the $10 special prize
offered by Dean Clement, of tbe
V.H.C. for the highest individual
score in the judging of dairy
cattle at New Westminster Fair.
Model Animals
in all boys' and girls' live-stock
judging contests animals should be
selected that are, as near as possible,
ideal representatives of the breed to
which they belong, as it is important
to impress as perfect a picture as
possible on the minds of the pupil.
It is difficult to hold absolutely satisfactory judging contests in this district, as up to the present time purebred live stoek breeding has mn been
practised to any great extent. There
are, however, in Enst Kootenay. some
very good herds of dairy cattle of
mixed breeding as well as some good
fairs was a great incentive for the
members of the class to do their best
at all times ami to miss as few periods as possible, as the three individuals having the highest total
score at the end of the season are
those selected to make up the team.
System of Trnining Pupils
At these demonstration the members of the class were given four
animals on which to place and write
their reasons in each class, in tlie
same manner ns they were asked to
do in the final competition, as it is
a recognized fact that it is almost if
not altogetther impossible to acquire
the art of judging live stock in any
other way than through actual experience  in  judging or  handling of
Warren  Keer,  of  Marysville,
wh ado the highest individual
score in the Junior Live-stock
Judging Competition at Vancouver Fair.
Beduz 	
Bonnell  	
ohnson 	
J.   Hutchinson
E.   Mines   	
S.  Smith  	
It, Johnson 	
It. Clements
Although only
ing instituted bul a y
van Lodge is om- of th
A gleamy mass
of luxuriant hair
full of gloss, lustre and life, quickly follows a
genuine toning
up of neglected
scalps with dependable "Danderine."
Falling hair, itching scalp and the
I.G.   dandruff   is   corrected   immediately.
   O.G.   Thin,  dry, wispy or fading hair is
It.S.N.G., quickly invigorated, taking on new
L.S.N.G. strength, color and youthful beauty.
R.S.V.G. I "Danderine is delightful on tbo hulr;
L.S.V.G. I a refreshing, stimulating tonic—not
. K.S.S. j sticky oi' greasy!   Any drugstore.
Is  infancy,  be-
\-enr ago. Sulli-
,1 success-
if Oddfob
ful and progressive bodies
lows in ll.C. Already over (10 citi-■
zens of Kimberley have been initio-
tod under its tricolor banner, ami ■
the degree and general work is on a i
par with lodges tliat have seen many
years of active work.
**************************
!    FATHER AND SON   |
I J
**************************
It is proposed to observe "Father
and Son" week in Cranbrook, February 15 to 22.
An evening together with Father and
son,
Would easily prove the greatest of
fun,
And those who have tried it, will say
I am right,
That  no other pastime is up to it,
quite.
An outing together for Father nnd
Son,
Affords loads of pleasure, 'fore even
begun,
For in planning the trip, is found
half of the sport,
And when it is finished, seems always too short.
Thc   Father   who   shares  some   time
with bis son.
Not only at meal time, but with him
in fun,
Will certainly find it is time wisely
spent,
And have cause    to    rejoice, much
more than repent.
A Son needs his Father for his best
chum,
In order to cement the two lives into
one,
And  the  happiest  couple you  ever
will find,
Is a couple made up of two of this
kind
Happy the boy whose chum is his
"Dad-
Nothing on earth can make him more
glnd,
For the "Dad" who is "Pnl" to his
hoy,
Gives to his son, one greatest joy
Since every father is a grown up Son,
And climbed up a ladder his boy is
now on,
What   better  companionship  can  a
boy find,
Than  that of a "Dad" who  is the
right kind
—Louis T. Wood
MAIL CONTRACT
SEALED TENDERS, addressed to
the Postmaster General, will be received at Ottawa until noon on Friday, the 13th Mnrch, 1925, for tlu
conveyance of His Majesty's Mails,
on a proposed Contract for four
I years, 12 times per week on the route
Cranbrook and Kimberley via Marysville and Wycliffe, from the Postmaster Gcnernl's pleasure.
Printed notices containing further
information as to Conditions of proposed Contract may he seen and
blank forms of tender may be obtained from tbe Post Offices of Crnnbrook, Kimberley, Marysville and
Wycliffe, and nt the office of the
Post Office Inspector.
D. A. BRUCE,
Post Office Inspector
Post Office Inspector's Office
Cnlgnry, 30th January,  1025     50-52
Ottawa.—Canada's purchases from
thc United States were $528,000,000
during the twelve months ended November, a decrease of $KH,000,000
from the corresponding 12 months
previous. Canadian exports to the
United Slates were $-108,000,000, np-
proximately $ 11,000,000 less. Co-
nadiau exports to the United Kingdom wen- $:i78,000,000, an
increase of $.'11,000,000; imports
from the United Kingdom were
$ 148,000,000, a decrease of $0,000,-
000.
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
the undersigned and endorsed "Tender for construction of Public Building, Kevelstoke, B.C.," will be received until 12 o'clock noon, Tuesday
February 17, 1925, for the construction of n public building at Kevelstoke, B.C.
Plans and specifications ean be
seen nt the offices of thc Chief Architect, Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, the acting District Resident
Engineer, Victoria, B.C., the Superintendent of Dominion Buildings, De-i
partment of Public Works, Vancouver, B.C., nnd the Postmaster, Revelstoke, B.C.
Tenders will not be considered unless mnde on the forms supplied by
the Department and in accordance
with the conditions set forth therein.
Each tender must be accompnnied
by a certified cheque on a chartered
bank payable to the order of the Minister of Public Works, equal to 10
p.c. of the amount of the tender.
Bonds of the Dominion of Canada,
and Bonds of the Canadian National
Railway Company will also be accented ns security, or bonds and a cheque if required to make up an odd
amount.
By order,
S. E. O'BRIEN,
Secretary
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, January 12, 1025.     50-51
Sainsbury & Ryan
IIIIILDEBS  AMI
CONTRACTORS
I'Vlii-*-*!.-* DIt-mi and Work
Quar-Mlt-Md
M»|iho«.» id aad Mt
I'ltAMtROOK      •      B.C.
fMSIIMHIfSMI
CLEANING - PRESSING
— REPAIRING —
You Will Hake No Mistake
ln Ordering that
NEW SPRINU SUIT
OB 0VERC0A1
— rttmt —
H. C. LONG,
The Tailor
Van Home Street
Opposite C. P. R. Depot
Phone 410     ::     Phone 41«
% Carefully selected — prepnr-
* al by Cooks who know how
* — and served to you in an
% appetizing   and    appealing
* way -    is what you yc-t when
* you dim; with us.      Prompt
.* and courtOUS servce.
* ____
I CLUB CAFE
% Phone 165
**************************
Milk and Cream
DIRECT FROM
Big Butte Dairy Farm
FHO.N'E It
WHY OPERATE?
i<>r Appendicitis, Gallstones,
Stomach nnd Liver Troubles,
when HEPATOLA dors tbe
work without pain nnd no
ri.sl: of vour life nor loss  of
time.
Ci>nl.iii*sni>po1*nti.   Notfrnlilbydnigjlid.
Mrs. Geo. S. Almas
330 Fourth Aw. B. I'h..nr UM
SASKATOON
Bruce Robinson
Phone 29fi        Teacher of Minle I'.O. Hoi
STUDIO — ARMSTRONd AVBNUB
Third Houmi from Presbyterian ('liurcli
ROBINSONS ORCHESTRA-OANCES ARRANGED FOR
CONTINUED
FROM LAST WEEK.
"mrs. gallagher
had it twice in
Succession and
doctor lowell
had it three
times But twice
as bad behind
as before "
CAN  VOU GUBSS WHAT
IT   IS   ? —
ANSWER NEXT WEEK a
Thursday, February Sth, 192-5
TUB   CKANBROOK   RIBALD
PAGE SEVEN
HAVE VOU
BRONCHITIS?
Sufferers from deep-seated cough
and broi ehltls find wonderful relit
in these bro.it lie a hie P( ps tablets
their medicinal fumes passstraigh-
Into the inflamed bronchial tubes.
Delicate lining membranes art
soothed und healed by Peps, air
pussies nre quickly cleared ot
phlegm and the cough
& breathing difficulty
overcome.
OWNER OF SINCLAIR
HOT SPRINGS PUTS
CASE BEFORE PUBLIC
The   followin
,■  p-oniniunicivlion   ap-
pe&red recently
in the Victoria Col
onist, and will
ic read with interest
here in view ol'
the recent hearing of
the case between the Dominion government and Mr. Stuart, as to the
value to be placed on the well known
Sinclair Hot Springs property.
Kootenny    Radium    Natural    Spring!
Sir,—In  reply    to    the statement
which you published in your issue of
General Change
in
Train Service
yesterday's date,
ject, I bepr that
enough to contri
Contained  therein
Your article bo
known as tho Ri
Sunday,  Jununry   11,   1925
r Trains tit Crunbrook  will
Efftetl
Times
be:
Westbound) No, 67.
Arrives   12.05  p.m.  daily;   Leaves
12.15 p.m. dally.
Eat tbound) No. 68
Arrives   '1.10   p.m.   daily;      Leaves
4.20 p.m. daily.
CRANUROOK - KIMBERLEY
No. 82J Lea
Sunday.    No
(OCttUSi
an
ie above sub-
will be kind
several errors
"The Springs
Hot Springs,
waled radium
in the-waters,  v
prospector some
As a mutter ot
had    nol    diBcc
llM-nverc
n.v a
hirly years ago."
I;ni, .Madame Curie
ered radium thirty
years ago, nor waa thero any prospector in the case. I w;ts ihe first
person to nttuch ail] value to these
Springs. In 1888 I applied for, and
after fulfilling the requisite formalities, obtained a crown grant to this
properly, consisting of 160 acres, lot
140, East Kootenay. I have paid
taxes on this laud ever since, and
imve done tho necessary development
to insure possession. It wns I who
had analyser made by Si. Bartholo-
taa 7.05 a.m. Daily ox-f mow's Hospital, London; by the Lan-
824 Arrives 1.10 p.m. j cet- of London, and by the McGill
CRANBROOK - Lit. WINDERMERE | University In .Montreal, and it was
No. 822 Arrives 3.30 p.m. Wednea-! by these various analyses that the
day & Saturday. No. 821 Leaves 9.00 presence of radium emanations and
a.m. Monday and Thursday. , rare gases were found in these \va-
(Pacific Standard Time) | ters,   which   elements   undoubtedly
For further particulars apply to any
ticket agent.
J. E. PROCTOR,
District Passenger Agent
47-50 * Calgary
******* ****
| HURRY'S WHITE LUNCH
I IS THE PLACE TO EAT.
* WW-.! Help Onlj Is Employed.
* V.mi ivill find this Cafe a Homey
* Place to Enjoy loan Meals
| ALEX. HURRY  .   Prop.
*****************Ay******i
ffffffff.Vfffff\Vfflffff*Vf
jj   For   Fir.t   Cla.s
I     LAUNDRY WORK
|j     Call: QUONG   CHONU
£    Opposite W. D. Hill's Store
•I   11     ARMSTRONG
f.-f.'.'.".'fuVfffffffffffffff.
Established IMI Fine IU
Geo. R. Leask
flONXIV BUUSIB
AXD   tt* TBA CTOB
Cal> 1 net Work.   Platan liMln-r
Eotltaatw gtreo as
•11 rhwiw ot wark
OMce: Corner Harkvy Artaio
• ml tittee-ie ntnet
*************************
For Good   Value in .J.
ZENITH    CAFE
ti.. t,. The
EATS     |
VAN   HORNE   J
■***"-.■**■******
GOOD
ir. BAKER &
*y.\\"ff.\\'.\\v.v.'v.v.vffff
% FOR ALL YOUR
$ REQUIREMENTS
s   rRUNKS     -      VALISES
s HANDBAGS
j.     iir anything In Leather
K    Slim*.,    RultliiT.,     Soclti
V "Hi. Glove, Etc.,
j It \i Ul pay you to visit out- store
*l THE
:■ Oanbrook Saddlery Co.
H|   Van Horn,. SI.    Crunbrnok B.C.
*Vf*V*V*V*Vff*v*V.V*VtVff.'
WHEN YOU REQUIRE
RAIL OR   OCEAN
TRANSPORTATION
ASK
Information    cheerfully    furnished,    and
details arranged on application to
G.   T.   MOIR
Ticket Agent
Cranbrook
50-1
iM.vmttui'mmumtiuttiiitti-.tiiitiiiittittiaiuu
fOH4>
-TJa^
- The Great Herbal Healer for
SKIN DISEASES & INJURIES |
gave thetn their wonderful curative
powers, which are now so fully recognized.
In 1912, when the Kooienay Central Railway was building, I set to
work to start development, and with
this .view I bought sum 500 acres of
land in the vicinity of the Springs
for hotel site, golf links, etc., paying
i'500 in cash for this land and jiving a mortgage for the balance of the
purchase money. I also incorporated
the Sunset Irrigation and Power Co.,
for the purpose of electric light,
pumping, irrigation, etc.
In 1914 I bought out Mr. St. John
Harmsworth, who was enthusiastic
over the enterprise, when a large cement swimming bath was constructed, with bathhouse, store, etc., and
elaborate surveys were made for n
pipeline to the hotel site, dam for
power company, etc. The war broke
out and put a stop to further development. After the war .Mr. HarniK-
' worth, being fortfod to abandon the
enterprise and to devote all his efforts and energies to rehabilitating
his Perrler Water, which industry
had been much crippled hy the war,
a well known financial man in London, formed a company to develop
this property, and in November of
liiliO he floated it with a nucleus of
some 400 shareholders.
Unfortunately the promoter died
early in 1021. Jn the autumn of
that year 1 had interested an influential syndicate in New York, who
were prepared to take over the property and develop it on a large scale.
The papers were in process of preparation for signature when in February, 1922, the Dominion government passed an order-! n-council expropriating the whole property, lock,
stock and barrel.
You state that the government offered $22,000 and actually paid Mr.
Stuart this sum several years ago."
I beg most emphatically to state
that no government has ever offered
me or my company one five-cent
piece for the property, and I challenge the Dominion government to
produce either a copy of their offer
or my refusal thereof. In any case,
had such an offer been made it would
most unquestionably have been refused, such a sum not representing a
tithe of what has been spent on the
enterprise.
What did happen was that in 1922
the Dominion government unbeknown to me, paid off my mortgage
of $22,000, including interest, on the
land which I had bought for a hotel
site, some mile and a quarter away
from the Springs, and which laud as
I have stated above—has nothing
whatever to do with the Springs, or
with my crown grant to lot 149,
which is the crux of the whole situation
I may add thut since 1922 the government has been taking the revenues from baths has let leases on my
lands, and has built upon it themselves without the knowledge or consent of the owner.
On Sunday. March 6th, 1!»22, you
published in your issue of that date
a very full and fairly accurate statement of the facts, and you wound
up your article with the following
words:
"Undoubtedly it would be a splendid thing for the representatives of
the people to perpetuate these won-
rful waters for the benefit of the
! Canadian people for all time; but let
jthis be done with every due consid
eratlon, however, to the parties who
were instrumental in making known
, the value of these springs at a time
when the hunt for radium is engrossing the attention of the whole scien-
i tific world,"
j I mn perfectly willing, on behalf
of myself and my shareholders. to
abide by this conclusion; on the oth.
er hand, if due consideration is denied us, for the sake of property
owners and investors in British Columbia, like ourselves. I shall carry
this case to the highest court of j'ub-
tice if need be,
On June 2, 1028, the magazine
Canada, published an article entitled
"Safety in Canada," from which I
quote the following paragraph:
"As to the safety of capital, it is
only necessary to point to the steadfast and consistent policy of the Dominion and Provincial governments
to encourage and protect the investor and to call to mind the fact that
no country is so scrupulous and
careful of the rights of property as
an agricultural nation where the
people own the land. In Canadian
cities the houses are more usuully
owned than leased. These things
all encourage the confidence of outside capital, and if reliable advice is
sought and suitable care is exercised
in the kind of investment selected, it
can be claimed that no country offers better or safer investments than
Canada."
If a government can wipe out a
crown grant of nearly forty years'
standing, pay off a mortgage without the knowledge or consent of the
owner and so dispossess him of his
land, build on his property, lease
portions of it, confiscate the material that was on it and pocket a
handsome revenue which the property is ubout to produce, after years of
patient labor and large sums of money huve been spent on it, I leave
it to the public to decide whether
such action on the pnrt of a government docs not savor more of Bolshevism in Kussia than safety in
Canada.
ROLAND STUAKT,
59 Cook Street, Victoria,
Jan, 20, 1226.
JANUARY Rlil'ORT Ul
CENTRAL SCHOOL IM
from
One)
(Continu
the tests.
M. GRACE JOHNSTON
DIVISION  111., Grade VII.
Attendance  percentujje.  97.5.
Margaret Henderson, Winnifred
McQuaid. Mae Gooderham, George
Futa, Kathleen Dezall and Irene Mc
Innis. equal; Clifford Haynes. Sheila
Paterson, Katherine Martin, Molly
Johnston. Donald Macdonald, Harold
Holdener. Victor Galbraith, Dorothy
Bridges. Elmer Holm, l.orna Barber.
Grace Flett, Nellie Owen. Helen
Campbell, Leslie Kuhnert. Elsie Parker, Jim Drew, Harry Fanning. Sultan Randall, Kathleen McFarlane,
Florence Pattinson and Mnry Genest, equal: Grace Pritchard. Betty
Lunn. Ida Lancaster.
Absent from one or more exams,
Eileen Gray.
RUBY J. GLASER.
DIVISION IV.
Percentage of attendance, 9r>.
Jean Warren, Leslie Lai th waite,
Barbara Beale, Mary Robertson, Marion Gill, William Harrison, May
Strachan, Ruth Bond. Jack Farreli,
Mary Macdonald, J<mn Mackay. Aloe
Dalziel, Chrissie Charboneau, James
Huchcroft, Helen McGill. Bud Parker, Roy Linnell, Leslie Phillips Annie Harbinson, Dobie Macdonald,
Wilfred Pocock, Douglas Patton,
Beulah Hill, Enid Shankland, Luceille
Rosling, Laura Andeen, Willie Cox,
Carmella Naso, Charles Allen, Geo.
Pelton.
S. D. WHITE.
DIVISION V.—Grade VI.
Attendance,  95.0.
Dorothy Brown, Olive Norgrove,
Kathleen Edmondson. Margaret
Johnson, Arthur Lodge, Lillian Dale,
Robert Muirhead, James Brookes,
Mary D'Hondt, Ruth Fanning, Emily
Taylor, Margaret Farreli, Garnet
Blaine, Robena Miller, Jean MacDonald, May Russell, Treso DcLuea,
Malcolm McPhee, Billy Crawford,
Alex Laldlaw, Jean Niblock, Walter
Barrett, Lloyd Burgess. Eveard Lewis, Henry Taylor, Joe Genest, Album Haddad, June Collins, Eddie
Leonard, Walter Aglaud, Edna Shepherd, Gladys Partridge. May Neily.
K. WRIGHT.
DIVISION Vl.—Grade VI.
Attendance. 98.80.
Rosaline Weston, 79; Lillian Webster, 68.8; Ruth Nicholson, G7.9;
Mike Frost, fi0.5; Madeline Wise, 6)1;
Jack Parker and Sidney Weston,
04.7; Bob Reichardt. 63.9; Norman
Galbraith, 03.3; Vincent Ljungquist,
03.2; Ellsworth Ryan. 03; Donald
Mclnnis, 02.7; Alex Williams, 00.9;
Dorothy Flett, 00.4; Stanley Porter,
00; Maurice Godderis, 59.0; Elva
Turner, 59.0; Pauline Wise, 59.4;
Jimmie Dixon, BD.Sj Eugene Kennedy, 58.0; Patrick Harrison, 58.1;
Wright Speers, 5ti.fi; Bertram McLean, 56.0; Berta Jones 55.9; Reginald Shaw, 54; Jean Rutledge 53.8;
Nancy McCrindle, 53.4; Hilda Robinson, 68; Kathleen Nisbet, 51.8; Joe
Walkley. 51.7; Bert Pelton, 50.2;
Dorothy Steward, 49.3; Evelyn
Smith, 43.
Ruth McKowan nnd Marshall
MacPherson,  unranked.
M. McCASUN
DIVISION VII.
On Roll, 38; Attendance, 96.2,
Jessie South. Evelyne Eley, Winnifred Pelkey, Beverley Collier, Vera
Sadler. Phyllis Home, Edwin Haley
Mary Roberts, Rusk Randall, Helen
Gilroy, Edna Taylor, Florence Johnston, Evyonne Williams, Gordon Dezall, Edna Collier, Mnry Fyfe, Vivian Kemp, Marshall Russell, Jim Atchison, Winnie Steward, Cyril Harrison, Marie Collins, Edna Baxter,
Hazel Clapp, Betty Genest, Willie
Steveley, Dorothy Worthington, Helmet- Erickson. Willie McCoy, Andrew
D'Hondt, Bill Gordon, Gene Ingham,
Richard Ban (junn.
Absent from exams; Gladys Brain,
Gladys Burton, Jessie Cassidy.
M. C. BANNERMAN
DIVISION VIII.
Percentage of attendance, 96.32.
On Young, Donna Leiteh, Ethel
McGee, Norah Simpson, Asenatb
Leiteh, Jane Nisbet, Hilda Gillis, Jas.
Halcrow, Buaye Futa, Hazel Bowley,
Mike Kolisnek, William Howe, Herbert Potter, Pearl Friewalt, Mary La-
mont, Sadie Gibbs and Murray Rombough, equal; Rosie Alagro, Mary
Small, Lillian Russell, John Magro
and Elliot Harris, equal; Peggy Reid,
Margaret Partridge, tJeno Bigattini,
Francis Curie, LouU Holm, Norman
Blaine, Kva Kilby, Leona Small, Florence Bolt, Clarence Johnson, Ben
Walkley, Ernest Kennedy,
Absent for three examinations;
Evelyn Holdener, Eunice Moore.
MURIEL L. BAXTER.
DIVISION IX     Grade   V.
Grade V., first term, to Grade V.,
second term in order of merit.
Ira McNaughtan, Elizabeth Stewart, Margaret Rutledge, Edgar Offin,
Billy Whiting, Owen Haley. Jessie
McKay, Harvey Blrce, Robert Steveley, Theo Laurie, Jas. Lunn.^Clara
Gordon, Hnrry Walkley Gordon
Speers, Allan Patmore, Harold Howe,
Jack Pattinson, Robert McGregor,
George Haddad, Frank McClure,
Richard Slye, Christine Williams.
Yuel Guthrie, Florence Steward, Edna Shaw, Allan Downey, Elizabeth
Godderis, Mary Pritchard.
On trial; Edward Donesky, Edith
Walker, Josie Blefare, Harvey Moir.
Percentage of attendance, 96.06,
P. G. M. C, MACDONALD
DIVISION X     Gr.d. IV.
Number enrolled, 45; Percentage
of attendance, 98.05.
Kudie
fare,
Karl
Heise.
nard,
ingtoi
a Walker. Edith Faulkner, Jack
Auley, Percy North. Kenneth Hay-
I, Billy Saunders, Alberta Nicholson, Angelo Provenzano, Roberta
Collins, Georgina Haddad. Joey Berkin, Edythe Wells, Genevieve Saunders. Kichi Maigawa. Edith Sullivan,
Kozak, Doris Haley, Mimi Ble-
Dolly Johns, Norman Hall,
Brennan, Joe Ward, Stanley
Grant McGregor, Esther Leo-
Biltie Burton, Barbara Worth
, Thomas, Young, Muriel Wor
thlngton, Edward Romanuik, Jack
Parkin, Barbara Patton, Kathleen
Haynes. Hilda Smith, Harold George
Jack Roberts, Ada Gammon, Clarence Barrett, Thomas Miller, Carrie
Spence, Marguerite Walkley.
FLORENCE PAUL.
DIVISION XL—Grade III., Sr.
Promoted to Grade IV.
Eunice Lake, Barric Hill, Fred Kolisnek. Hubert Linnell, Olive Sadler,
Stanley Williams, Stanley Weston,
Georgina Cox, Frank Morro, Eleanor
Green, Mary Lee, George Carpenter,
Elliott Dale, Gladys Ratcliffe, Elliott
Taylor, Joe Ban Quan, Cecil Morri
son. Steve Romanuik, Sheila Bonnes
soy, Betty Brown, Donald Gill, Leonard Porter, Irma Taylor, Helen
Haddad, John Niblock, Florence Jordan, Faith Ryan, Willie White, Cameron Macdonald, Alhin Erickson, Ethel Lewis, Alan MacPherson Annie
Prost, Patricia Parker.
Percentage of atendance, 95.
FLORENCE E. BEST.
DIVISION XII.
Number enrolled, 39.    Percentage
of attendance,  95.12.    Promoted to
Grade III. 2nd Term.
Yan Young, Barbara Muirhead,
Ruth Lundy, Mary Romanuik, Sherman Evans, Sam McCreery, Ina Col-
:!ge. Agnes Gray, Clyde Colledge,
Frieda McGee, Phyllis Wallace, Donald Vance, Helen Spreull, Dorothy
n, Douglas Paterson, Jessie
Magnet, Louise Bridges, Ellaine
Leiteh, Leighton Warren, Willie Bon
Quaii. Archie Roberts, Henry McMurrin, .Mary Sautter, Margaret
Carpenter, Claude Jordan, Raymond
Burgess, James Adams, Hunter McClure, Graham Patton, Muriel Little,
Tony Naso, Sybil Norgrove Marguerite Morro, Pearl Steward, Lee Gammon, Bernice Coleman, Stanley Whit-
taker.
HELEN FREEMAN.
DIVISION XIII.—Grade II.
Number enrolled, 41;    Percentage
of attendance, 96.28.
Promoted to Grade III.
Gertrude  South,  Bertil   Erickson,
Florence   Stender,   Harold   Coutts,
Earl Whiting, Alice    Mah,    Walker
Willis,   Frank   Rhodes,  Gwen  Johns,
Joe Provenzano, Myles Beale, Hazel
Reid,   Evelyn   Whitter,   Enid   Home,
Queenie Chow, Sheila Stewart, Geo.
Wilson, Eddio Frost, Dermot Moore,
Herbert Conroy, Ruth Briggs, Gladys
Milne,   Stewart   Flett,  Frank  Jones,
Ella  Bigattini, Teddy  Smith, Adol-
phus  Burton, Leslie Sadler, George
Faulkner, Wilfred Griffin, Fred Pattinson, Gladys DeWolf.
Passed on recommendation; Phyllis Ward, Phyllis Macdonald.
Promoted to Grnde IL, 2nd Term.
Sebastian Flagel, Mabel    Griffin,
Bernard Niblock, Charles Dickenson,
Matthias Flagel,  David Miller, Gordon Russell.
SARA McCALLUM
DIVISION XIV.
Number enrolled, 44.    Percentage
of attendance, 95.68.
Promoted to Grade II., 2nd Term.
Eugenie McGruder, Arthur Hinton, Duvid Brown, Helen Sutherland,
Edna McPhee, Henry Mah, Esther
Weston, Henry Anderson, Margaret
Smith, Phyllis Wilson, Jack DeWolf,
Lillian Sadler, Amy Offin, Phyllis
Ryan, Frank Harrison,, Hedley Bax
ter, Charles Warmington, Winnifred
White, Lloyd Corry.
Promoted to Grade IL, 1st Term.
Charles McQuaid, Edward Flower,
Lawrence Gillis, Lloyd Colledge,
Sandy Halcrow, Margaret Scott, Leslie Colledge, Esther Gibbs, Dougald
Steveley, Sunny Wise, Fred Lancaster.
E. B. PATERSON,
DIVISION XV.
Percentage of attendance, 96,1.
Promoted to Grade I., 2nd Term.
Frances Parks, William Harvey,
Peggy Hayden, Margaret Leonard,
Christine Paterson, Selmn Lunjquist,
Annie Lee. Willis Wolfer, Jack
Neily, Nellie Burton, Barbara Rutledge, Harold Milne, Hazel Sinclair,
Margaret McCrindle, Robert Collins,
George Sutherland. Theodore Johnson, Renee Young, Wilson Lee, Chas.
Donesky, Warren McKee, Pauline
McDonald. James Wheaton, Alex La-
moht, Mary Branch. Fern Simpson,
Thelma Roberts, Margaret McLaren,
Norman Rowe, Edwin Erickson, Aul-
der Conroy, William Hill, Willie
Mah, Gilbert Barker, Richard Wallace, William Flagel, Patricia Ran-
kins, Bertha Ban Quan.
L. C. HENDERSON.
JANUARY PROMOTIONS AT SOUTH
WARD SCHOOL
TO GRADE IV.
Doris Eley, .Margaret Dalziel, Violet Miller, Albin Keegan, Victoria
Pascuzzo, Bud Sullivan, Violet Keegan, Franklin Wood, John Pascuzzo,
Nooch Tito, Mabel Atkinson, Clyde
Williams. On Trial, Ivor Barrett,
Bob White.
TO GRADE III. 2nd TERM
Albert Russell, Bernard Pelkey,
Lily White, Edward Looney, Jack
Reynolds,    Harold    Curie,    Edward
<Q Ml
Avoid colds arid sickness by
i-'iving the children a cup of
Bteaming hot FRY'S Cocoa
twice a day. Its rich, concentrated nourishment is
just what growing children
need, so its daily use is true
economy in the home.
J. S. 1 Rl a, SONS  Cuada  Ui
MONTREAL
Margarot Cassols.
TO GRADE III. Iti TERM
Mnry Cameron, Sevllln Rosevoar,
Julia Mohs, Katherine 'Ukrainets,
James Haley, Blly McNeil, Bob Pattinson, Edwin Berrington, Nina -Gordon,   Paul  Solicki,  Eileen   Pantllng,
Freddie Shaw,    Ivy Si i-.,    Frank
Blefare.
Percentage ot attendance 97.8.
ELINOR II. CURLEY
udd to South Ward Sc! 1 Rl ;     I
DIVISION II.
Grade Lb. —r Stanley Saunders,
Irene Curie. Franklin Eley, Stevi
Chiptuk. Malcolm Sanderson, Alt \
Blefare. Jimmy Shaw. Maurice Haley, Milton Solecki. Buddie Brehmer,
Mike Tito. Billio Yadernuk.
Grade La,—Munel Miller. Frances Looney, Camilla Romano, Geo.
Strood, Joyce Bond. Qerald Keegan,
Eddie Wood. Velda Coleman, Billy
Sissons, Herbert Borrlngton, Margaret Russell, Betty Berkln, Frsnkie
Romano.
Grade 11.h. —- Catherine Kosling,
I Marguerite Pelkey, Walter Cox, Ag-
>. - Moore, (iertir Dalziel, Helen Uk-
rainetx, Connie WorthMijrto-n. Philip
Rombough, Mllllcent Pelkey, Ellen
Saunders,    Tiny    Sullivan. Angelina
j Blefare.
■     Percentage  of attendance.  96.
MARY RICE.
EXTRAM
Vancouver Daily Province
Adds Sunday Edition
High Orade Magazine Section.    Colored Comic Section
Numerous Special Features
ALL OP PROVINCE STANDARD
INTRODUCTORY  RATE
Daily and Sunday Province By Mail
To any address in British Columbia outside Greater Vancouver
4 MONTHS $1.00
—Yearly Subscriptions not accepted at this rate—
Rate From Agents, 25c per month
Sunday Edition 5c per Copy
SUBSCRIBE NOW
THROUGH LOCAL AGENT OR POSTMASTER
SPECIAL NOTE— All regular subscribers will receive Sunday edition with no extra charge, if subscriptions were
paid in advance al 50c per month, proper credit will l>e
applied to their ai i ount in due course. 49-51
' -Walsh, Atlnifl  Berkin, Jolando Matin. Stornr, Eileen Moore, Don-   fro, llary Solicki, Bonnie Caiman,
TRAPPERS!
I am paying to-day for
Fresh
Trapped
Muskrats
clear of kitts and damage, from One Dollar and
Twenty-Five Cenls up, for average lots
RUSH THEM TO ME
J. H. MUNRO
REVELSTOKE, B.C. PAGE   EIGHT
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
Thursday, February 5th, 1925
*****************************************************
OUR SPECIAL CHINA SALE ENDS SAT., FEB. 7th
You still have time to get some choice selections at a   +
25 to 50 per cent REDUCTION - at j
-THE GIFT SHOP- !
A.EARLELEIGH    -    -    -    -
NORBURY AVENUE
JEWELLER
*
*
*
*****************************************************
Insure with Beale & Elwell.
J. L. Palmer will be spending this
week-end in Calgary, attending the
annual conference of agents of the
Imperial Oil, Limited, which is being
hold then*.
For sales and service Nash and Star
cars.   See Ratcliffe & Stewart.   33tf
A fallen tree at about mileage 40
delayed the eastbound train on Tuesday evening, so that it was about forty minutes late in reaching this city.
Ask for City Bakery Bread.   We
know you'll enjoy it. 48tf
Hugh Davidson, provincial liquor
commissioner, is making a tour of the
B.C. interior and is expected in the
Kootenays next week. As Cranbrook
is one of the ridings proclaimed as
entitled to beer licenses, it is expected he will bo paying a visit to points
in thc district.
Special prices on new Eateries at
Service Garage.   Phone 34 ltf
Friends of Miss Helen DeCew, formerly of the local school staff, and
lately ot Fernie, had tho opportunity
of greeting her a short time here,
last, week-end. .Miss DeCew left on
Sunday for Vancouver, where she is
taking a position on one of the city
school staffs. While in the city she
wus a guest at the home of MrB. Carlyle.
Lady Belle Oxfords, black and
brown, salo price ?,r>,00 per pair, all
sizes, at
A. STRANGE, Armstrong Ave.
Inttitut  Dance,  March  6th
The Women's Institute Whist
Drive and Dance, which has had to
be postponed twice on account of
other events conflicting with it, is
now to be given on Friday, March
fith, Fuller announcement will be
made later.
For first class automobile repairs
and winter storage, see Ratcliffe &
Stewart. 33tf
A. K. Leltch, well known local
lumberman, and now engaged in the
wholesale lumber and pole business,
has been in Calgary this week on
business.
Valentine Dance, given by Maple
Leaf Rebekah Lodge, Auditorium.
Friday, February I3th. 48tf
Frank Murray, aged 54 years,
employed as engineer ut the Canadian Pacific Railway Company's coal
chute at Fernie, wus accidentally killed while at his work on Monday afternoon or evening, Murray was
alone in the chute when the accident
occurred, but it appears that he had
loaded the bins with coal, and had
shut off the engine, then went to
throw in thi' clutch to stop the hoist.
In doing so, his clothing hud caught
in the still .spinning shrift, and before he could do anything to help
himself, he was whirled around the
shaft. The accident wus not discovered until after the departure of the
evening train at eight o'clock. An
inquest is to be hold on Thursday.
Deceased leaves a wife und family of
three.
NOTICE
A general meeting of Cranbrook
Football Cluh is to bo held at the G.
W.V.A. Hall, on Thursday, February
12th, at 8 p.m., city time. All followers are requested to attend.
Business.— Election of officers
and prospective  players. 60
The Guardian Brogue Oxford,
brown, all sizes. Sale price $6.00
per pair, all sizes, at
A. STRANGE, Armstrong Ave.
A car of beef cattle was shipped
on Thursday last from the Reclamation Farm to Joe Walkley, the Cranbrook butcher. Mr. Blair's winter
herd is smaller than usual as quite a
big sale of animals was made late in
the fall to A. K. Klockmann.—Creston Review.
Lumberinf Concerns.—And others requiring the services of a harness maker may write W. Chisholm,
Cut Knife, Saskatchewan.        48-50
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon McTeer are
back from Calgary again, and Gordon has taken up his old position
with the Coal Co. To baseball fans
the return of Gordon is the most
cheerful news they have had for some
time and it is to be hoped that Manager W. R. Wilson will take the same
keen interest in baseball that he did
last season.—Fernie Free Press.
It costs you nothing to try. When
ordering your bread to-morrow, just
ask for one loaf of City Bakery
Bread. 36tf
One of the farces the Musical Society is now working up is the ever
popular "Ici On Parle Francais,"
which is a rival in its class with the
well known "Charley's Aunt." This
production, along with the other program items which the Musical Society iB working up, will be awaited with
a good deal of interest by local people.
SPECIAL: — Tungsten lamps, 10,
25, 40, 50 and 60 watts; 26 c each,
at — W. F, DORAN'S.
Our Low Prices win every time
H. L. Grady is expected to return
from the Coast this week-end, where
he was called last week by the death
of his father, Captain Albert Grady,
which took place there on the 20th
ult. Until about a year ago, the late
Captain Grady had been on a vessel
on the Coast run, retiring from marine service at that time. Besides Mr.
H. L. Grady, the only son, four
daughters survived him, one resident
at Vancouver, two at Boston, and one
in Prince Edward Island. The late
Captain Grady was formerly from
Summersido, P.E.I.
We repair HoT Water Bottles,
Rubber Footwear, or anything made
of rubber.
WILSON'S VULCANIZING WKS.
42tf Cranbrook
After a controversy extending over
quite a long period, the curfew seems
to have been rung on the slot machines which have been operating in
the city, or at least those which have
been played for money. The small
slug machines which yield cigars or
some other merchandise, seem to be
immune under some kink in the law,
but one of the first acts of the new
police commission in the city was to
ban the bigger ones that have been
operated on a straight money basis.
The old commission had the matter
under advisement and got data on
the legislation covering these machines late in the year, leaving the
new commision to carry out its conclusions. Accordingly, the end of last
month saw most of the machines op-
crated principally in the pool rooms
put out of use.
The L. A. to the B. of R. T. will
hold a whist drive and dance in the
K.P. Hall, Wednesday, February 25.
Cards 8 to 10. Dancing 10 to 2.
Robinson's orchestra. Admission,
75c. Ladies 50c. Refreshments. 40tf
••******+++.M-+4mH'+++*+++***
II ±1
\jkms
J. R. Walkley left on Tuesday evening on a business trip to Calgary
and other points.
The Kootenay Loaf made by the City Bakery is making a great hit among    the    lovers    of    good    broad.
The premises of the Commercial
Club on Baker Street were closed
this week for about ten ilays, while
alterations and Improvements to the
interior ure being cnrried out.
Girls' Patent Leather Slippers,
Goodyear welt, sale prices, 8 to 1054
$3.00;  11 to 2 $3.50, at
A. STRANGE, Armstrong Ave.
A meeting of the Methodist Ladies' Aid will be held at tho homo of
Mrs. G. T. Moir, Burwell Avenue, on
Tuesday next, February 10th, at 3
p.m.
J. D. Brackett, Mutual Life representative in this district, left on Wednesday of last week for Waterloo,
Ontario, to attend a mooting of representatives of the company.
Miss H. DeCew, of the public
school tonching staff, has resigned
her position and is leaving to-day for
Vancouver, where she has accepted a
position on thu staff of that city.
Fernie Free Pres.
For prompt repairs and satisfaction go to Ratcliffe & Stewart's garage. 20tf
A meeting of the works committee
of the city council was held on Wednesday night, Alderman MacPherson
being elected chairman and Aldermen Genest, Cameron and Fink being appointed as heads of sub-committees on streets, sewers and water
respectively. This should prove a
good workable arrangement.
The Board of Trade were this
woek endeavoring to get in touch
with Mr. F. A. Pauline, who was recently appointed Agent-General for
B.C., in London. Mr. Pauline is
understood to be leaving shortly to
take up his new post, and it is the
intention of the Board of Trade to
invite him to break his journey here
to be the guost of tho board at a banquet.
Wednesday night there died at the
St. Eugene Hospital, Hannah, the 12
year old daughter of John Johnson,
of Canyon City. The little girl was
born at Canyon City and hud only
been in the hospital for five hours
previous to her death. The body was
to be shipped to Creston for burial
and the sympathy of a large number
of friends goes out to the bereaved
parents.
Alderman and Mrs. F. M. MacPherson returned to Cranbrook on
Sunday last after forty days spent in
the chilly east. Mr. MacPherson reports a most profitable and enjoyable time, visiting the larger points
of interest in the United States and
Canada, finding out all there was to
know of the now things in the automobile world, not forgeting to spend
a fow hours with friends nnd taking
in the best of the shows that were
going. Besides the big auto show in
New York, Buffalo and Detroit were
also visited, where exhibitions were
being held. No new innovations are
expected this year, freak coloring of
the bodies of curs being the only
point wherein difference migth be
noted.
FREE PREMIUMS
We Have Just Received a Large Shipment of
Robin Hood,
Quaker and  Tillson's Oats
packed in an attractive package, and every package
guaranteed to contain a handsome premium
These are the Finest Oats Procurable and cook much
quicker than the ordinary oats. Give them a Trial
Order a package with your next grocery order
SEE WINDOW DISPLAY
The American Consul at Fernie,
announces that, beginning February
1st, the fee to shippers for the certification of Consular Invoices will
be reduced to $2.55 per invoice.
We cany a full line ul Men's Worn*
en'i and Misses' Shoes.
W. F. DORAN.
Our low prlceB win every time.
Two more Presbyterian churches
have decided against entering the
union in British Columbia, Chilli-
wnck Presbyterian Church, minister,
Rev. Duncan Campbell, voted 150
against and 40 for, and Livingston
Mission Church, South Vancouver,
showed a voto of 11 against nnd 2
for. Reports whicli gave a majority
for union in the First Presbyterian
Church, Edmonton, of which Rev. D.
G. McQueen, one of the leeaders
against union, is minister, are incorrect, it is stated. The figures show
an overwhelming ihajority against
union, and are as follows: Against,
421; for, 172.
Boys' Shoes, goody ear welt, solid
leather insoles.      Sale price, sizes 8
to 10%, $4.25; 11 to 2, $5.00. at
A. STRANGE, Armstrong Ave.
At the regular meeting of the Native Sons on Wednesday evening,
it was decided that the club would
this yoar sponsor the Easter Ball. A
Kimberley night is being arranged,
when the society will take a special
train to Kimberley and put on their
regular meeting there. A large class
of candidates will be initiated at
this time. There is a possibility that
the Saskatchewan Natives, headed by
Father Ehman, will put on their provincial night on this occasion.
The city fathers will not have that
nightmare, the Elk River crossing, to
worry them this year, but they have
a very important problem to grapple
with in connection with the paving
of Victoria Avenue. The sample cement work done at the south end
three years ago has appaerntly stood
the test of time,, and un effort should
be made to continue the pavement at
least as far as the public school. The
main street has been a disgrace to the
city for a long time nnd if it is possible to finance the work at all it
should be done this year. If, as everyone expects, the government makes
good the Home Bank losses, the city
should bc in good shape financially.
Some statement of the intentions of
the government regarding the Home
Bank affairs is expected early in
February.—Feme Free Press.
We carry a rull lino of Men's Women's aad Children's Rubberi.
W. F. DORAN.
Our low prlceB win every time.
Poor Eyesight!
Is a drain upon your
nerves,  your health, and
your disposition.
WHY SUFFER?
*|     When the remedy lies |*
I* in correctly fitted glasses? **
|* Superiority is character- £
*t istic of our service.     We l
ll guarantee  you   help  and I
** satisfaction             |!
**
** 	
11 W.H.Wilson I
Optometrist
CRANBROOK    -
B.C.
*****++H+*44WW*-m4****
I. O. O. P. Smoker Monday Next
Dr. Jekyll And Mr. Hyde
Stevenson's story of Dr. Jekyll nnd
Mr. Hyde—with variations—will he
dramnticaly presented by H. Arthur
Barton, actor-evangelist, in the Auditorium, next Sunday evening.
Power Off  Sunday  Next
The city has received notice that
on Sunday afternoon next the power
from Bull River will be off between
the hours of 1 and 4 in the afternoon
Users of light and power during those
hours are requested to take notice,
nnd govern themselves accordingly
PUBLIC NOTICE
HEREAFTER — In any week in which a public holiday
occurs, stores in the City of Cranbrook will remain
open on Wednesday afternoons. It has also been
decided to close stores promply at 10 p.m. (city time)
on Saturdays.
CRANBROOK RETAIL MERCHANTS' ASSOCIATION
The Oddfellows are holding an informal Smoker on Monday evening
next, after the regular lodge session,
at the Auditorium. Each member
hns the privilege of bringing a male
friend, and an interesting program of
addresses, songs, etc., has been arranged. Every Oddfellow, including sojourning brethren, is cordially
invited to attend.
.■WWWMV.W.W.W
PHONE 82 PHONE 82
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
We Have Now Opened
At the Former Building of the
DOMINION MEAT MARKET
With a First Class Stock of
FRESH MEATS,, SMOKED MEATS,
POULTRY, BUTTER, EGGS, ETC.
Big BuUe Dairy Fresh Milk and Cream
\ H. D. KEMP
l PHONE 82 PHONE 82
J ARMSTRONG   AVENUE
Meeting For Men Only
A meeting for men only, will be
held in the Auditorium on Sunday
afternoon, at 3 o'clock, at which
Evangelist Barton will speak on a
topic most vital to our social and national life. The Baptist male quartette will render special musical
numbers.   All men are invited.
Owing to the occurrence of other
dances and engagements next week,
tho Tennis Club have decided to postpone their dance which was to have
been held shortly, until Wednesday,
the 18th, in the Parish Hall, when
Robinson's four piece orchestra will
supply the music. 50
Don^ReadThis
TINTING
Brim; Your Favorite
SNAPSHOT
• -■ oi*: —
PORTRAIT
in black and white, and
have them
TINTED
by a good artist
Prices   Reasonable
SEE   OUR   WINDOW
Beattle-Noble
Limited
— Where It Pays to Deal —
WANT ADS.
WANTE0— lieliablo representative
wanted in this district to sell dependable family knitting mnchines.
Apply in first instanee to Creel-
man's, Limited, co Herald, Cranbrook. B.C. 50-62
WANTKD
— Filing Cabinet, one or
two sections, for letter
size docu-
monts. 1
eavo particulars
at Herald
office.
50-51
SELLING
CHEAP— Billy
goat and
three bi
ed nannies.    W
G. Bate-
man, Moyie, B.C.
—
50-1
■ffffffffffffffffffffffffff]
COTTAGE HOSPITAL     3j|
Maternity   &   General   Nursing   f
Tonus Moderate Ij
Airs. A.    CRAWFORD      i
an-ilMM
J. F. SCOTT
Cranbrook Drug ft Book Co.
.    ..!...  'tfI. 16
3fa
Garden Ave
ffffffffff
Cranbrook B.C. ^
ffffffffffffff.
BLUE & COLD DINNER SERVICE
i Fifty Pieces
FOR SALE—Lota 5 and 6, Block 13,
I Townsite ot Elko. Best offer
I above S 10.110 each takes them. Ap-
I ply P.O. Box 150, Richmond Hill,
I     Ontario. 49-51
FOR SALE—In hill residential section of Cranbrook, on two corner
lots with Rood garden. Four or five
bedrooms, large dining and sitting
rooms, bathroom, etc., cement
basement, hot water heating system, large kitchen. Price, $4,000
Could not be duplicated for double. P.O. Box 745, Crnnbrook,
B.C. tf
Z Macl.i
Victoria & Record.
Dressers Table!
Etc. Etc.
hand & foot powm- F<)R EXCHANGE—Clear Title, 182
THOMPSON & HARROP
Phone 76 -        P. O. Bos 238
Second Hand Dealer.
Cranbrooit
acres   of land.
Crunbrook, B.C.
W.   Doherty,
48-50
FOR SALE—One steel bottom, top,
nnd front Queen Heater, with
hearth and guard rails. Apply to
Box 458, or Mrs. A. H. Blumenauer. 34tf
f*Vffff*V*V*V*Vfffffff\
John Manning
PHONE 173
OFFICE 93
What Do You Think?
A Real, Living, Breathing Horse
and a Genuine
COLUMBIA CABINET GRAPHONOLA
For Only $99:00
K you want a hone, and if you want a Gramophone
SEE US —
PATEY  BROS.
Next to Beale tt Elwell Opposite Post Office
\Vffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff*f.'tVfff*
Announcement
We Wish To Announce to the public
that we have been appointed
Cranbrook District Agents
FOR-
Oldsmobile Cars
a number of which are now at the
showrooms and will be demonstrated at any time.
The   Hanson   Garage

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