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Cranbrook Herald Dec 2, 1926

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Array THE PRANBROOK HERALD
volume as
CRANBROOK,  B.C.,  THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2nd, 1926
NUMHER     41
STAR
THEATRE
FRIDAY
and
SATURDAY
Mary Pickford in "LITTLE ANNIE ROONEY"
DECEMBER
3rd and 4th
TWO SHOWS EACH NIGHT-AT 7.30 and 9.30
Speaks Against
the Plebiscite
Mn. L C. McKinney Marshals
Argument ior Keeping
Beer Out
SAYS BACKWARD STEP
Sunday evening.last the mass meet
ing advertised for the Auditorium, at
which Mrs. L. C. McKinney, M.L.A.,
was down to speak in the interest of
those opposed to the opening of beer
parlors in Cranbrook, was held in
the Star Theatre, following the regu-
- lar evening services in the churches,
the change being occasioned by the
fire which took place in the I.O.O.F.
Hall at noon on Sunday,
The meeting was attended by a
good number of those interested in
the points at issue.
The speaker opened her remarks
with what she considered to be an
acknowledged fact that all agreed
that the excessive use of alcohol was
a menace, but how to curb the ravages of this menace was a matter in
which many differed. Claiming that
the anti-alcoholic movement was a
world-wide one, she stated that
groups large and small throughout
the world were working for total abstinence. She felt that in the past
the forces opposed to the liquor traffic had made the mistake of dealing
with the question as a local instead
of a world-wide one. The extermination of the drink traffic had to become
an accomplished fact and the matter
settled right. The defeat of prohibition In some places she attributed to
the power and influence of the great
forces lined up aguinst them which
could be concentrated on any one
point, in support of which argument
she cited the report of the Wines Ex-
poitaiion Commission of France,
which took no small degree of credit
for the increase of the value of the
liquor exported to Canada; how this
was accomplished by them was to bc
gathered from the same report, which
intimated that it was through literature and contributions nt the right
time.
With regard to the remedies thut
have been advanced as a "something
in place of prohibition," she referred
to the proposal of moderation and
liquor control, both of which she suggested were very much like opiates
and were not advanced in sincerity.
She deprecated the position thst
Canada held with respect to the position that the States were in while en
deevoring to enforce their prohibition
laws. She was of the opinion that
the United Stutes would never repeal the eighteenth amendment, and
that the result of the recent elections
in the United States showed thul the
dry forces hnd not lost ground. She
claimed that the drink traffic wos
linked with other forms of corruption,
as the recent customs probe showed.
Alberta, she felt, was more fortunate
than B.C., Insofar that Alberta could
control their importation unci R.C.
could not.
With regard to the local situation,
the return of the beer parlor wos but
the old bar in another form, it was
but the thin edge of the wedge, us
might bc shown from the develop-
ment in Manitoba, lt was to her bul
a step tn a backward direction. They
were but centres of corruption and
were the means of increasing the liquor consumption. She clnimed thnt
the people who were most anxious
for the establishment of the parlors
In'Cranbrook were thos*1 who stood
to gain by their institution, and not
those whj) they were supposed to
benefit.
ln conclusion she related how the
beer parlors were working out ir
Alberta, giving the result of a survey In Edmonton showing thut ac
tual conditions were not what the ad
vocates of the beer parlors would
have the public believe.
With an appeal for support for
the cause which the prohibition party
were advancing, she concluded her
address.
Rev. V. H. McNeill, Baptist Church
pastor, acted as chairman, and on the
platform with him were Messrs. F. L.
Constantine and G. T. Moir, representing the Social Service League,
with-a number of local ladies supporting them.
Both Mr. Constantine and Mr. Moir
•poke briefly at the close ot Mrs.
McKinney's address, urging as much
FIRE ON SUNDAY
DOES DAMAGE TO
AUDITORIUM BLDG.
Arising from sume defect in the
pipes from the furnace, or the overheating of the pipes, fire was discovered early on Sunday afternoon
last in the basement of the Auditorium building, George Stevely, the
janitor, had lighted a fire in the furnace that morning! In preparation for
the anti-beer moetlng to be held in
the hall that evening, and returning
shortly after ono o'clock to the building, discovered smoke in the place.
Going to the basement, he found the
furnace room filled with smoke, ond
quickly returned and gave the alarm.
Within two minutes the fire department were on the scene, but it was
difficult to get water to the seat of
the flamps*, which had apparently
eaten their way up between the walls.
The basement was filled with dense
smoke, so that nothing could be seen
there, and it was necessary to chop
holes in the east side of the building
high up, in order to get the water on
to the fire.
Some members of the Odd FellowB'
lodge were soon on hand and hastily
gathered up some of the regalia used
in the lodge room, to salvage what
was possible if the building should
be badly damaged. The lodge room
upstairs was filled with denBe smoke,
thick that it was impossible to
move about in the room. The smoke
filled the space between the inner
and outer walls, and filled the building from any outlet that it could
find. In the basement the heavy
joists under the floor were burned
through, and it is stated that only the
three thicknesses of flooring probably held the fire back till it was discovered. Had tho outbreak come at
night, there is little doubt but that
it would have had a better start, and
there might then have been small
chance of saving the place.
The fire was an obstinate one to
subdue, and much water was put on
it before the firemen were satisfied
that there wns no further danger.
It was found necessary, after an
inspection of the basement where the
fire had,been, to call the meeting for
that evening off, on account of the
floor being unsafe, but temporary
•e pairs were effected on Monday and
Tuesday that permitted the plaee be-
ng used for the big curlers' dance
that evening. The building, which
belongs to the Odd Fellows' lodge, is
valued at about $12,000, and while
t is not fully insured, sufficient is
arried to more than look after the
oss in this case, which will probably
un up close to a thousand dollars.
In addition to the burned timbers in
thfl basement, some damage was done
the floor, and the walls, and the
oke and water were also responsible for further damage. The work
tf thoroughly repairing the place
vill be put in capable hands as soon
is the adjustment is made on the in*
U ranee.
At their meeting on Monday even-
ng the lodge passed a resolution that
the secretory write the city council
and express their appreciation of the
prompt and efficient work of Fire
Chief Percy Adams and the firemen
in coping with the outbreak, which
undoubtedly saved them from a further heavy'loss.
TWO SPEAKERS AT
BROTHERHOOD MEETING
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
Principal Buck and G.  T.
Moir Give Addresses
Tuesday evening the meeting of
the (.ranbrook Brotherhood took
place in the United Church schoolroom, when an interesting meeting
was held.
After a most delightful supper, the
members had the pleasure of listening to two speakers on subjects of
interest to all.
The first speaker, Mr. G. T. Moir,
asked the members to consider well
the matter upon which they were asked to decide on Saturday next, when
the beer plebiscite was being voted
upon. He appealed to the members
to votq aguinst the institution of parlors in Cranbrook on the ground that
they were not in the best interests
pf the boys nnd girls. With regard
to the economic aspect, he stated
that from this standpoint it would
be detrimental to Cranbrook's best
interests, as might be judged from
statements of Kimberley business
men with regard to collections since
beer parlors were put in there. He
claimed thnt Kiniberley merchants
would vote it out if they got a chance.
High School Syatem
Taking as his subject, "The High
School of the Future," Principal Buck
of the high school gave it as his opinion that the present high school sys-
**************************
WEDDINGS
*****+******<**********+******
TURNER—MORRISON
(From the Fernie Free Press I     i
Christ church was the scene of ni
pretty  wedding  on  Tuwdaj  afternoon when Miss Nellie Morrison, tlio
only   daughter   of   Mr.  ami   Mrs.   E, j
Morrison of West Fernie. was joined
in holy matrimony to Douglas Turn
er, of Cranbrook.    The nuptial knot
was tied by the Rt. Kev. A. J, Doull,
Bishop of the Kootenays, assisted by
Rev. H. U. Oswald.    The duties of
groomsman    and    bridesmaid   were
ably carried out by James Clarke and
Miss Ethel Cartmell.    After the cer
niony a sumptuous repast was served
at   the home of the bride's parents.
The happy couple were the recipients
of many valuable and useful presents.
After a brief stay  in  this  vicinity
Mr.  and Mis.  Turner will take  up
their    residence in Cranbrook.
GYROS JOURNEY
TO KIMBERLEY FOR
JOINT MEETING
RETURN FROM BIG
"RLY. Y" CONFERENCE
HELD AT OMAHA
Friday last Mr. and Mrs. T. R.
Flett returned to the city from Omaha, Nebruska, where as a delegate
with Mr. C. Stockdill, assistant to the
vice-president at Winnipeg, Mr. Flett,
divisional superintendent here, represented the Canadian Pacific Railway
at the big Railway Y.M.C.A. convention held in thut city from the
10th to 21st of November.      Here
tern was by no means a perfect one, 800 railroad men, including younger
but possessed many glaring weak-1 employees and high officials, met to
nesses.   As an example of conditions,- discuss mutters pertaining to the In
he took the case of the (-ranbrook
high school, where of 100 pupils 90
were enrolled in the first year, or
Grade 9, 40 in Grade 10 and 30 in
Grade 11. It was thus seen that 50 ",
drop out in the first year. He concluded that any system that took in
ternational Railway Y.M.C.A, work.
Mr. and Mrs. Flett report a most
enjoyable and profitable time, speaking in the highest terms of the wonderful reception which they received
and of the great interest displayed
by all delegates in  the convention
10 pupils and only graduated 'd wav the many valuable addresses given by
not perfect by any means. The pres- \ prominent men in all wulks of life
ent system does not provide for the; being of much interest. A visit to
student who possibly is below normal Kansas City was one of the pleasures
or who has  not the ability, or as is  of the meeting.
ofton the case, is not financially. Brief reference to a few of the
able to continue with the higher edu- more important contributions to the
cation. In the present system all. discussions are given herewith from
avenues led towards tlie university Omaha papers:
and the professions, and should one "Prohibition was not carried in
for nny reason be unable to continue1 this country by the moral forces as a
there was a keen sense of disappoint-! moral issue, but was carried by busi-
nunt, as they felt themselves strand-' ness and economic forces, with railed as it were along the wayside, j road mun iu the van," declared Dr.
Palpably wrong was a system wherein [.John Timothy Stone, of the Fourth
over 60 per cent, dropped out, the j Presbyterian Church of Chicago, ad-
reason, he felt, being that while it; dressing the conference early in the
was more than adequate insofar as [program.
its cultural influence went, it was [ "Railroads were the first institu-
nf little value as a source of supply  ti„ns to My ^ mun who drinks, even
PROCEEDS FROM
UN-CHURCH BAZAAR
CLOSE TO $600
for the needs of life. It was not
sufficiently related to life's necessities.
The   Middle    School
The speuker took up the matter of
retardation  or the repeating   of   a
year's  work,  and   in   an   interesting
moderately, cannot remain on their
payrolls." he declared. "It was not
ministers or the social economists
who brought the fight against liquor,
but the men who carry othei s from
one station  to another."
Dr. Stone declared that he is not
manner showed how the curriculum always in sympathy with the matter
failed to take into consideration the
physical and psychological phases of
childhood. Having in mind the fact
that there are different periods in the
child's life, he felt that the school
should be so graded as to suit these.
This would Involve an intermediary
high school to take care of the Tth,
8th and Uth Grades. Where such a
system had been tried in certain
schools  in   the   States,   it   showpd   a
of safety first, saying, "Who
wouldn't put himself in u place of
danger in order to save another's
life?*' He urged the importance of
character as an element in safety,
the value of speed, sympathy, efficiency and security.
"In Common  Service"
Dr. Stone told the conference that
its meiiibors were united "in the fact
of common  service   for   mankind."
in the grades in which there is now
a tendency to drop out. The cost
of such a system might be more, but
■  the returns were greater.    How such
The annual bazaar of the United ■ system should be carried out, and
Church held on Saturday last was an the subject taken up wus given by
unqualified success. The Ladies'Aid'th*' "Peuker. Its many advantages
committees al the various fancywork were also pointed out. He hoped that
marked increase in the holding power |jje lauded the spirit of brotherhood
among the railroad men. "I never
saw railroad men who didn't root for
one another. This isn't true of some
other vocational groups. But there
i.s nothing today more prevalent than
tables had reason to be proud of the
display of pretty things contributed
by the ladies of the congregation!
while the candy and cookery tables
simply overflowed with good things
to eat and were speedily cleared.
The newly organized Young Women's Auxiliary used their clever fingers to make attractive articles for
the gift table, and some of their number were kept busy serving refreshments during thc nfternoon to a large
number of visitors.
When the returns are alt summed
up thc proceeds will be close to the
$600.00 mark, and the Ladies' Aid
wish to express their thanks to all
who helped to make the bazaar the
success it wns.
act would soon be so amended that
it would provide for the possibility
of a school district adopting such a
system.
A hearty vote of thanks was tendered the speaker at the conclusion
of his address.
WOMEN'S INSTITUTE
SOLARIUM FUND
MOUNTS TO OVER $1000
Following is a  statement  of  th
fund being raised hy the Cranbrook
Distrist Women's Institute on behalf
of  the new   solarium   for
children, recently opened nn Vancou
ver Island:
Amount received and already
published   $1000.00
B.C. Miners' Assoc, Michel        r.0.00
support as possible for the movement' Dr, Hanington, Kimberley 10.00
opposing the opening of thc beer parlors here.                                                     Total 	
District Governor Ned Hanley
of Nelson is Guest at
Meeting
The Gyro Club of Kimberley held
a special session on Saturday evening
in conjunction with their follow Gyros from Crunbrook. The occasion
was to welcome the District Governor
of Xo. 8, Ned Hanley, of Xelson,
who is making an official tour of his
territory.
Thc meeting was held in the 1.0.
O.F, Hall, where a tasty supper sup
per was served to a good number of
Kimberley and Cranbrook Gyros.
President Burdett vacated thc
chair in favor of President Dr. F
gie, of ('ranbrook, but was called upon to resume his place during the
evening.
Governor Hanley gave a brief resume of his tour to date, nnd spoke
of the cordiality of his reception by
the various clubs, thanking the clubs
of Kimberley and Cranbrook, pnr-
tlcularly, for the friendship exhibited, and assuring the members that
his desire is to be of service at all
times. The importance of every club
keeping its own house in order wus
emphasized, and the members were
assured that by living up to the ideals
of Gyro they will become better citizens. In this connection the work of
the clubs at Xelson, Cranbrook, Edmonton, Lethbridge and Calgary was
spucially mentioned, as was Kimberley's part in the inception of a playground. Members were urged to attend the convention at Denver next
year if possible, und at any rute to
be nt the District Convention at Lethbridge.
President Burdett thanked the District governor for his address, and
welcomed the Cranbrook Gyros, Dr.
Fergie making a suitable reply for
tlie visitors, in which he thanked the
local club for hospitality extended.
Major McDougall spoke a few
words of appreciation and threw out
a challenge to a curling match, which
wa« accepted by Dr. Fergie on behalf of the Cranbrook Gyros. Gyro
Bert Collins, a past president of the
Cranbrook club, also made some appropriate remarks expressing his
pleasure at being present.
Sergt. Greenwood, Fernie, and
other visitors ulso tendered thanks
for hospitality and testified to their
gratification in the privilege of attending.
Gyros Les Dwelley and Ira McNaughton entertained during the proceedings, as also did Gyro Fred
Brady and Mr. W. J. C. Cleave. The
itar turn, however, was provided by
the ladies of the Kimberley Gyro
Vanities, who with song and dance
costume enhanced the reputation
gained at the Gyro dance last week,
and delighted the audience on Saturday. The Gyro Vanities include
CharlotUi Rutherford, Jackie Pascoe,
Elsie MsSporran, Ena Wik, Marguer-
i Lamar und Margaret  Duplet-.
After the singing of the National
Anthem tho executive of the two
clubs had a consultation with the District Governor.
The function was in every way a
success und similar joint meetings
are anticipated with much pleasure.
A good number of Cranbrook Gyros
came  up to attend  the meeting.
fraternity iu school, college and business. The truth nnd power of God's
word stands out in the fraternalism
of today. There is no higher fraternalism than that bearing the name of
Christ."
Keynote of Conference
The koynote of the conference WOI
delivered at a joint session addressed j
hy G. K. Roper, senior secretary of
transportation depurtment. He declared, "Much us I love the Y.M.C.A.,
this gathering is not for the promoting of the Y.M.C.A., or its prestige,
or advertising it. If thut comes as a
by-product, well and good, if not we
will he just as much gratified." He
expluinod that the younger men's
crippled conference wus an important activity
advising thc men on ways and routes
to reach their ambitions for work
luter.
Curl Grey, president of the U.P.,
declured that amazing progress
in railroading had been mude in the
last six years, since the public-forgetting   period   of   construction
Mayor   nt   Vancouver
T. M. Iloberts left the end of last
week for the Coast on a business trip,
expecting to be away about a week or
KIMBERLEY MAN
PROVES LUCKY WINNER
OF BIG RAFFLE PRIZE
Today the Cranbrook Ladies' Hockey Club are doubtless feeling much
more carefree as a result of the successful conclusion to the strenuous
campaign which they have been wug-
ing for the purpose **f putting themselves in funds so that they could:
get away to a good start towards the
goal set by them of sending a girls'
team to Bantf to compete in the an-1
nual carnival there. Now that this |
is accomplished all that remains is
for them to apply themselves to the
job of getting themselves in trim
for the affair.
Lnst evening there was a packed
house to greet them on their appear-!
ance as concert artists at the Star
Theatre, part of thc program of
which wus the grand drawing for the
Orthophonic, for which everyone,
from coast to coast held tickets. Sol
great was the crowd, many in fact |
had to leave without gaining adinls- \
sion.
Tin* young ladies .-bowed that they
were right there when it cnme lo entertaining, and if they play lhe game
as well as they did tbe res)H*ctive j
parts in the show, their success is j
assured, and us Mr. MacPherson saidj
in congratuluting the girls, there will
be reason for Cranbrook lieing noted
for something besides elephants.
The drawing wus conducted by Mr. *
F. M. MacPherson, who placed thej
coupons in a Maytag Washing machine, and after it was revolved a
numbei' of time-', a little boy from,
the audience was called up, and with
bared hands and arms drew out the
ticket, of whom the fortunate owner
was Mr. W. Oliver, of Kimberley.
its number being :i020. Mr. Oliver
was present to claim the much coveted  prize  after  the  performance.
The program given by the young
ladiea, all of which was good, was as
follows:
1.—"Where'd You Get Those
Eyes," Miss Fiances Drummond and
Chorus; 2.—Comic Reading, Miss
Louise Robinson; 3.—The Jazziest
Band, Miss Marjorie Burton and
her stxtette; 4.—"Katinka." Mis
Irma Ward and Miss Ila Slye; 5.—
"The Village Celebrities," Mutt and
Jeff; 6.—Closing Chorus. Hockey
GlrlB. Accompanist — Miss Delia
Greaves, Grand Drawing.
The feature, "Syncopating Sue-,'*
with Corrinne Griffith, Tom Moore
and Lee Moran in the leading roles,
rounded out a very pleasant evening
at the Star.
All Ready
For Polls
Beer Parlors or Not for City
it Question on Saturday Next
CLOSE VOTE EXPECTED
INVERMERE POTATO
GROWERS SCORE HIGH
AT COAST SHOW
When the city voters express their
opinions on Saturday next by means
of the plebiscite being taken by the
government, as to whether there shall
be beer parlors opened in the city of
Cranbrook or not, the most reasonable gui-s.- as to tin* outcome is that
whichever way the vote goes there
will t-nly he a narrow majority. A
dose vote is for.otsted, and both
sides will probably see to it that the
maximum  vote possible is polled.
W, P. Guthrie, the returning officer, states that the 1926 revised
provincial list is being used, for tlie
Cranbrook polling division, including
in all about 1680 names. While the
lust dominion list contained upwards
of two thousand nanus, it is pointed
out thnt the fact of being on the
dominion list does not mean that one
is necessarily on the provincial list.
Efforts were made to get every nume
possible on the dominion list, but
with no election in sight there was
little interest taken in the revision
of the provincial list, so that many
ore likely to find their names ure not
on the list of those entitled to vote
im Saturday next.
Five booths are being arranged al
tin K. I'. Hall, where the voting is
to take place on Saturday, between
the hours of nine and eight, local
time, and it is expected that the result will be known shortly after that
time.
The full text of the question to
lbe voted on is as follows: "Do you
approve of the sale of beer by the
| glass in licensed premises without a
i bar under Go"$emment com nil and
I regulation?"
Voters will be required to place
their crosses in squares that indicate either "Yes" or "No" as an
answer to the question.
Both .-ides have been circulating
literature thi.s week, and while the
dry= have been busy in their rooms
on the ground floor of the Hanson
block, the wets have been directing
their campaign from the basement of
the same block, formerly used as the
labor committee rooms.
ODD FELLOWS NAME
NEW OFFICERS FOR
NEXT SIX MONTHS
$ioiu;.po
ante-bflllum days was gone.
Character   thc   Foundation
"Nothing helps the young man as
much as a fund of character, pur-
ticulaily the railroad man," he said.
"I never saw a successful man who
didn't hnvo strong foundation of
character, If you think you may not
have it associate with those who do,"
Rail  Bodi*> Justify  Thcmsalvta
"Railroad organizations have justified themselves many time* over,"
declared A. T. Wright, of Cedar
Rapids, la., vice-president of the Order of Railway Conductors, addressing the evening session of the convention "n "Transportation's Contribution to Humun  Welfare."
"Today the leading, thinking railroad executives, many of whom formerly were in our ranks, would not
have thesi- nrgunizationx done away
with. Some have opposed them, but
now practically ull of them are with
of us."
(Special to the Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., Dec. 1.—The
Lake Windermere district of East
Kootenay has again been declared a
heavy winner in the annual potato
how which has just closed at Victoria, B.C., and the Potato Growers' Association is once more the potato king
of the province, having for the second time in succession brought home
the championship shield for the best
sample of potatoes grown in the potato province of British Columbia.
Mr. A. John Walker, the only
grower from this part to make an
exhibit at the Pacific Coast fair in
Spokane, is also a winner, huving
carried off the fourth prize in that
big exhibition with his Wee McGregors.
Mr. Harry H. Peters, of Athalmer,
won third prize in his exhibit of field
peas at the seed show in Victoria.
Amongst the other locnl winnurs
from this part were Mujor F. B.
Young, Selkirk Ranch, second for
Eurh Rose; Messrs. A. .1. Walker and
A. J. Walker, father and son, Won the
third and fourth prize- n*-p<*ctively
in this class.
Mr. A. J. Walker also won first
prize with his Burbank potato exhibit.
In   the   Netted   Gem   class  the   district   took   first,   second    and    third
I prizes   respectivelv,   thev   falling   to
II.   1..   [fuller, .1.  S.  Johnston   und
Harry H. I'eters in the order shown.
Mr. Hugh I.. Fuller also won fourth
| place  with  his  Netted  Gems in  the
: commercial cluss, and the same position   in   his   exhibit   of   seventy-five
| pounds of seed  potatoes of the same
'variety.    These  prizes  came  to  Mr
jFullor in addition to the distinguished honor of winning tbe provincial
iGrand Challenge Shield for the h
exhibit of any individual putting on
'an exhibit.     This is the second tini
In succession thut  Mr. Fuller has in
succession hud this honor conferred
upon him, und if he wins it next year
it will enable him to retain the shield
' us  his  personal  property.
Mr. Percy G. Docking won first
prise and champtoiixhip in the gar
denors' rlass wilh his exhibit.
On Monday night, at their usual
meeting. Key City Lodge, No. 42, I.
O.O.F., elacted their principal officers
for the next term, commencing in
January, the following lieing named:
N.G. Bro. G. Sinclair
V.O, Bro. F.  Doodson
Rec. Sec.       Bro. E. G. Dingley, KG.
Fin. Sec Bro. W. I). Gilroy, P.G.
Treas. Bro. W. V. J. Leigh
The remaining officers are nominated at thc time of the installation in
January.
Encampment   Officers
The election of officers took place
at the regular meeting of Durham
Encampment, I.O.O.F.. held in Cran-
hrook on Thursday of lait week, th»
following   being   elected:
r\ 1'.
K. W. Leonard
11. 1'.
1). W. Morrison
s. ff,
A. K. Bowltj-
Scribe
.1   I.. Pulmtr, P.C.P.
tree,.
S. Fyln, P.f.p.
I. W.
ff. MMUfitld
Con|rcf«tionil Social
Thur-day evening at the bittenient
of the Baptist Church, there was a
very well attended congregational
rally, which was the means of bringing together members of the church
and congregation for social intercourse, und to become better ac-
quuinted with each other, and also
the new pastor, Rev. V. H. McNeill.
There were very few vacant places
when the company sut down to a very
sutisfying supper served by the ladies,
and following this there were short
addresses by the heads of some of
the lines of church activity, and wmr
interesting lantern views of the lo-
culity were shown hy H. R. Hinton.
Rev, V, H. McNeill, as pastor, also
spoke during the evening, thanking
the church for the support that waa
being shown him.
Annual NEW YEARS BALL
GIVEN BY B. OF R. T. AND L A. TO B. OF R. T.
AUDITORIUM, CRANBROOK, FRIDAY, DEC 31*. P A 0 B -T W 0
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
Thursday, December 2nd, 1926
CUNARD
ANCHOR-DONALDSON
Christmas
Sailings
From Halifax to
Plymouth, Havre  and London
S.S. Antunia  Dec. 13
Belfait-Liverpool   and Glaigow
S.S. Letitia  Dec. 12
Prom St. John, N.B, to
Brlfait, Liverpool  and Glaigow
S.S. Lotitln  Dec. 11
Prom New York to
Cherbourg and Southampton
S.S. Berengaria   Dec. IB
S.S. Aqultania        .   , Dec   8
Queenttown  and  Liverpool
S.S. Alaunia Dec. 11
Kull information from local
agents or Cunard S. S. Co., 622
Hastings St.   H\,   Vancouver.
^GOLDEN CO£O0N
SYNOPSIS Molly shook her head
Molly Cochran, now doing dramat- not jealous.   He's net anyt
ic writing in New York, goes to
Washington to see her husband, former Texas Governor, whom she left
when fearful she would imperil his
political future. He is now engaged
in war work. But Cochran pretends
not to know her. Ilis wife, he says,
was drowned, as newspapers reported. Molly's mission is to warn Cochran of another danger threatening
him, but he refuses to listen.
jNW^W-V.V.W'MWyW.W
St. Joseph's
Academy
- NELSON - B.C. -
BOARDING SCHOOL
FOR (URLS
Complete Primary, Elementary
and High School; also Commercinl and Music.
For particulars apply
Sister Superior.
CHAPTER  XXX—Continued
He put her into a taxi, gave some
order to the driver. After a time
she told him incoherently, a little
here and there—everything. It was
mercy and sulvution to hnve him to
tell it to—to be able to talk about
it.
"You must let me go to him," he
said at last. "You see, you didn't
really explain anything."
"1 coudn't—ho wouldn't let me."
"I'm the logical one to do it, anyhow. He's probably jealous us the
devil."
STRIP TICKETS
With and Without Coupons
For General
Admission Purposes
For Sale at
THE
CRANBROOK HERALD
OFFICE
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For Hire throat, bronchitis or deep
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KKHTAITBART IH COKKECTIOII.
^WWWWWWWWWW^tf*-^WWV^^^^W^W
ike a dog in the manger—as if I'd
only come back to stop him from
marrying her? No. I shall never tell
him. Anyway, it doesn't matter
ahout me. I want only his happiness."
And I want only whnt Is for your
happiness . . . ."
'I know."   She laid hor hand'
u moniunt over his.
what   I  should   havi
hadn't come."
pieces and put  them  together again
He crushed the hands between bis,
got lo his fei't. Tbe train was beginning to move. "It's nil right."
he said, and with nnothev abrupt,
hurtful pressure of ber bands, took
himself off.
Her last glimpse of him was from
the train window—head bare, smiling
and waving to her—that veiled, boyish eagerness in the ironic, old-yountt
eyes, the seamed   and   corded   old-
how—she was really fond of him
Molly   was   going   home—honn
not to Laws' Chapel, but to her na-j
live state, the, Capitol, tbe university
—tbe Gothic spires Stephen bad maligned.
Stephen — she    shuddered    awuy
.from that thought as from too many
others.    Stephen had paid his debt,
I can't think if  debt  he  owed.
done    if    you|c"on0fltl on ">B ,K,n
him I simply don't exist, that's all.
Eldredge   bad
n a column of
hundreds dead.     It  seemed he bad
found work in an ammunition factory
CHAPTER XXXI -—some last spasmodic twitching per
il   was  not   until  she  wan  laying) hnps   nt'   solf-reBpect,   some  genuine
good-bye to Eldredge at the station shamo of her having
lum as a
uniform. There
1091 on. Such tilings
lappening now, She
ImpulBQ t"> send the
on the ove of sail-
:mco. EldrodgO had
infoimatlan, too, '
formation not trusted, of course, to
in New York some weeks later that waller, a flunky
she remembered to tell him iust how nad been an ex|
much his coming hnd meant. There were constantly I
was something beautiful and rare JfjJ fcslstod the
about this affection which bad sprung M'l'l'.ng tt> I U£
gLiT thfl m°Bt Pr0mi8!ng °f ^ l^uXherthh
Eldredge had .lone everything in ft"""1'"" JL ,,,
his power to induce her to let him tho neWBpapora
ast as mediator between her mull Once across the border into her
Cochran; to bring about some basis own state, her heart stirred faintly
of understanding if not of reconcllln- to great stretches of black-land
tion. Having failed, be held bis eon- prairie with tho corn showing new
science   clear.     He   had   hoped   that  nnd sketchily green; to oil derricks
■■ — bristling on'every hand like a par-
tieularly dusky variety of cactus; to
blue-bonnets sheathing hill and plain
with dazzling, far-flung scurfs of
lapis lazuli; to sand and heat and
yellow April sunshine; to ugly little
towns with the assembled populations
crowded round the ugly, yellow-buff
stations to watch the "Limited" go
through.
What struck her most as she step,
ptd nt last from the train at the little
red brick capital station was that
everything seemed so unchanged. It
was like nn enchanted city, drowsing
there in the late afternoon ""—the
Avenue, tbe Capitol, the "Mansion,'
the Gothic spires—waiting, perhaps,
for her return .  . .
The campus was changed most of
nil. Several fine new buildings, i
dozen sprawling wooden "shacks,1
huddled the bluebonnets, once un
disputed April monnrchs, into pitiably cramped quarters. They were
there, though, still—thousands of
(piaint, wise little blue hoods, nodding and swaying to the wind, plunder for greedy herds of pollen-gilded
bees, Molly waded out halfway to
her knees in them, glanced round,
dropped quickly to the ground. She
smothered her face in the blossoms,
pressed her lips to the fragrant,
warm earth beneath. Her earth
. . . She remembered tliat other
homecoming so long ago. Autumn
it hnd heen—and how she had longed
then to stoop ond kiss the earth beneath her feet.
The sun hid itself over behind thi
Gothic towers, unci the Southern dusk
did cool, scented penance for the
heat and burden of the day. A slim
new moon lifted its silver horn above
the chapel's ivied buttresses, and still
Molly lingered on—to think and to
dreain. . . . The past rushed over
friend like you. You've lifted me op'her like the first deep whiff of ether,
times without number—picked up the bore her down, blotted out new Innd-
Her last  glimpse of him was fron
the train window.
she would come back from this absurd pilgrimage at least resigned,
ready to take whnt life still held for
her nnd make the hest of it.
1 'Two nre better than one,' you
know," he reminded her in the last
half minute before the train pulled
out. His mouth twisted a little with
the effort to keep it casual and humorous. "For if they fall the one
will lift up his fellow, but woe to
him thnt is alone when he falletb . ."
Molly bent forward and put both
her hands uver his. "Myron, I can't
count myself alone when  I hnve a
How to Play.
BRIDGE
A new series oflessonsbf
Wynne Ferguson
Author of 'PRACTICAL AUCTION BRIDQB*
koL>yri«bt 1916, by Uoyk. Jr,
ARTICLE No. 5
What are the requirements (or a
acund no-trump bid by dealer? Practically all of the authorities agree that
one no-trump may be bid hy dealer it
he holds t wu or more sure tricks divided
among three suits. There isn't much
difference ol opinion as to these reiiuire-
i.itMils but there is considerable differ-
race of opinion as lo huw these requirements should be applied. As an example 1
ol the difficulty, a correspondent has
iu.ii written for enlightenment as to the
meaning of "two tricks divided among
three suits." In order tu make tbis
phrase perfectly clear, an analysis ol
..ml Valuation is necessary,
'The only cards sure of taking tricks
are the four aces. A guarded king, t. e.,
h king and one ur more of a suit, takes
a trick just half tlie time, so is clearly
worth one-half tlie value uf an ace. A
guarded queen, i. c, a queen and two
or more of a suit, will take a t rick about
half as often as a king, so i.s worth one-
quarter trick. There are four aces, four
kings  and   four ipi'ens. K;nh player
li entitled to one-fourth of these cam*,
or tu one are, one king, and one queen,
which is called an average hand. Aa
uverageband, therefore, containing one
aa*, one king, one queen, is valued at
one ami three-quarter tricks. These
\ dues aw: nut enough tn wairant a bid,
the toast required being one queen mors
than average, or two tricks, ll these
values are divided among at least three
suits, a nu-lnimp may be bid; if the
values are confined to one suit, the suit
may be bid. It should bc nutcd (lut if
two honors are held in sequence, the
lower honor takes the value of tbe higher. Thus, an BCC anil king in one suit is
valued at two tricks] a king, queen at
one trick; a queen, jack at one-half
trick. An ace, queen, jack combination,
and a king, queen, jack combination
arc each worth two sure tricks. Please
note that these values are all defensive
or so-called "Sure tricks;" that is, their
values as trick lakers when the opponents are playing the hand. Tlieir value
in support of their own or part ucr's best
bid is approximately double their sure
trick values.
Iu order to apply these instructions,
note the following hands, iu which is
indicated, alter each suit, the value of
lhat suit in sure trick*:
Hund No. 1
Hearts— A, K, 7,6,2
Clubs — IU, 8, 6
Diamonds—-J, 8, 7,6
Spades — 8
Hnnd No. 2
Hearts — A, K, 4, 2
Clubs —J, 10,7,4
Diamonds —■ A, 7
Spades — 7, 6, 4
Hand No. 3
Hearts —K, 10,8,3
Clubs—K, 7, 4
Diamonds—-J},;, 7, J
Spades — J, 9
Hand No. 4
Hearts —K.Q. 1,7    ,
Clubs —0,7.0
Diamonds — K, J, 4, 2
Spades — A, 4
When the trick strength is confined
louncMiit, bid the suit, aa one heart in
Hand No. I. Where the sure tricks are
divided among three or more wits, as
iu Hands No. 2 and No. 4, bid one no-
trump. Where the sure trick strength is
less than two tricks, aa in Hand No. 3,
pass,
Here is a hand in which the proper
lead is a very doubtful question. Think
it over and compare results with the
analysis that will be given in tbe next
article.
Problem No. 9      *
        Hearts — K. 0. ft fl, 2
Y     i      CloU—8,7,1
A       Dl       Diamonds—1,10,7
i —A,J
(2)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(2)
(0)
(1)
(0)
88
(0)
(2)
H
8)
(i)
Spades-
No score, rubber game. Z dealt and bid
one heart, A passed, and Y bid two diamonds. If all passed, what should B
open?
Here is .1 problem hand that involves
a principle lhal iromes up very frequently. It is tricky but easy ll you just thkk
it over carefully.
Problem No. *
Hearts — none
Clubs —10
Diamonds —A, K, 7,1
Spades — none
Hearts — » 	
Clubs —none : Y 1
Diamonds —9,8, 6,3 :A B:
Spades —none : Z 1
Hearts —none
Clubs — MM
Diamonds —10,4
, Spades—10,1,1
Spades are trump and Z ia in thc bad. Hns MB IU
any defeoae? Solution iu tlu ettx art-ids.
Clata — none
ls-Q.J.1
-M
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In the modern vacuum conSWMJ
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VACUUM PACKED  -   STEEL CU
marks. Faces, voices, scenes—Borne
long forgotten. She thought of Mrs.
Parker, Mrs. Parker with her llttlo
pine-knot body, her humor-wrinkled
face, her heart of gold—gone long
since to her reward. A rich and
generous reward it must bo,
Sho thought i>f her mother in tho
faded calico wrapper, thrusting hack
the dump tendrils from her face with
the worn, harassed motion. Her
mother—she had spent, herself, her
youth, her strength, her very bone
and blood, to bring them forth. She
hud shriveled and fallen 'n»n -*•>«■-♦ lllro
a dried seed pod after the seeds are
scattered. And what had tliey done
for her?    Nothing,  nothing at  all,
She thought of her father, blond
and beningant in his unpaid for pine
coffin—of Larry.
On the Avenue, she had noted a
handsome black-and-gold sign, letter
ed "Judge .lames Larrnbee Shan
non." She had passed and repassed
it—lingeringly; old ties, old affections, straining fiercely at her heart,
But, no, it was better not—better
always the dead should remain dead,
better the ghostly should not intrude
their ghostliness on the living. He
was prosperous, successful—with a
position to be maintained, no doubt,
There might bo bitterness and re
crimination, the old flame of intolerance breaking out. Strange they had
nil been like that; deep down, perhaps, affection, but at the surface
reacting on one another like vitriol
and corrosive sublimate. Strange
thnt the mildest and gentlest of worn
en should have brought forth such n
quarrelsome, contentious brood.
Stephen—the thought of him per
sisted, too. Stephen strolling round
the coiner at dusk with his inimitable
leisureliness. Stephen smiling at her
his sphinxlike God-out-of-the-machine
smile, Stephen glorious and beautiful
to her as a god. Stephen in flunky's
uniform, hurrying to help Eldredge
with his coat, accepting his fee—
Stephen of the trembling hands aud
twitching muscles. Then Stephen-
torn, mangled, blown perhaps to
atoms—dust to dust. It seemed too
cruel, too dreadful.
That Molly he had feigned to hive
—that violent, headstrong Molly.
She could all but see her swinging
along the path now between the blue-
bonnets, with the buoyant, never-to-
be-mistaken stride of one predestined, born, nnd steered toward freedom. She wore a gingham frock
faded from many washings. There
were books under arm. From a ribbon dangled a floppy, home-made hat.
(To be continued)
Al.   Phillips  i>n  Thursday,  and   thoy
attended tho dance  in  the evening.
Mrs. II. Lundin and Mr. Ed. Lundin were visitors at Bartholomews
on  Sunday.
STOMACH MISERY
ACIDITY, GAS, GAS
INDIGESTION
MARYSVILLE NOTES
A fine, delightful crowd attended
Mr. Bartholomew's dunce, which was
held in the old post office on Thursduy the 25th. The proceeds, after
the musician and hall were paid for,
amounted to $25.00. This, with the
$4.CO accruing from the previous
dnnce, which wns held on Armistice
night, makes a total of $29.00, which
was given by Mr. Bartholomew to
the Children's Christmas Tree Fund.
We suroly had a joyous time. Muny
thanks to the kindly friends of
Marysville und neighboring towns,
who are always so willing to lend a
helping hand to mnke the dance
swing along to a triumphant success.
These dances nre strictly speaking
cosmopolitan; there are no cliques
here, und this gives all a "square
deal." On leaving, our neighbor
friends from the Concentrator and
Kimherley gave three cheers for
Marysville, which was very much appreciated, and this speaks well for
the dances. Come again friends-
The next dnnce will be held on Wednesday, December ISth.
Mr. Rout and family have moved
into the hotel.
Mr. Albert Hall was down from
above St. Mary's Lake, but he has
now gone bnek.
Mr. Jimmy Miller was down from
above St. Mary's Lnke, where he ami
his buddy are trapping, and he has
now returned.
Mr. Harold Bidder's hand is getting hetter after his accident at his
work.
Mr. E C. Roberts* children are very
sick with severe colds.
Mr. Ed. Frieake leaves Saturday
to sail on the Melita for the Old
Country. "Bon voyage!" Ed. is
well liked and wil] be missed while he
is away.
Mr. Jimmy Woods went to Cranbrook on Mondny, returning on Tuesday.
Mr. John Hormnn's foot is mending nicely after his accident while ut
work. Good doctoring alwuys shows
results I
Mr. and Mrs. Wallace, of Cran-1
brook, were guests of Mr. nnd Mrs.
Get Born Early ■    "Tape's Diapepsin" ia the quickest,
'■What do you believe, is the reason * surest relief for indigestion, gasses,
for your long life, Uncle Aaron?": flatulence, heartburn, sournoss, fertile reporter asked the colored centcn- mentation or stomach distress caused
fxrian, , by acidity.    A few tablets give al-
"Becoz I was baWn a long time, most immediate stomach relief. Cor-
bnck, I guess," said Aaron reflective-trect your stomach nnd digestion now
!»» I for a few cents.    Druggists sell mil-
Jj  i  , , lions of packages.
BOWL
m
at the
VENEZIA
ALLEYS
ill-Hi..
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"""■     MR. HAROLD V.
And
erson
L.   MUS.
McGill Conservatory of
Music - Montreal
will accept a very limited
numher of pupils (or
PIANO INSTRUCTION
— Address —
Qeneral Delivery, Fernie B.C.
Sainsbury & Ryan
1CILDER8 AMD
C0KTRACT0E8
■sUaatas OItbii .at Wert
QuruMsd
talsphaaat m sa4 M
CRANBROOK      •      I.C.
Milk and Cream
DIRECT FROM
Big Butte Dairy.Farm
raoin it
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B. C. ROOMS
Clean and Comfortable Rooau
Bot and Cold Water
50c per Night
Durick At*., opp C.P.R. depot
Next  F.  H. Detail Oarage
Cranbrook, B. C Box 68
fffffffffJlffAA-'-'-'-VAfffff
CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF CRANBROOK
COURT OF REVISION
NOTICE is hereby given that the Court of Revision for revising and correcting Municipal Voters'
list for the year 1927, will sit at 7.30 p.m., December
10th, in the Municipal Buildings, Norbury Avenue,
Cranbrook, B.C.
Cranbrook, B.C.
November 24th, 1926.
F. W. BURGESS,
City Clerk.
Proved safe by millions and prescribed by physicians for
Colds     Headache     Neuritis        Lumbago
Pain       Neuralgia      Toothache     Rheumatism
DOES NOT AFFECT THE HEART
Sn*'
Accept only "Bayer" package
which contains proven directions.
Handy "Bayer" boxei of 12 tablets
Also bottles of 24 and 100—Druggists.
Anplrin to thf trade mark <r*fUttn4 la Canada) ot Bam Mamifaetora of IfoBotcct-le-
acMMtar of lallcyllcactd (Acttfl ■allejllc Add. "A. 8. A-">. Wblle It la well known
Ikat Aiplrtn mesas Bant ramfactaf    '" --..--
pf Uettsi OMBfaaj *IU ta   '       '
», lo Mitt tk* public anlaat inltatlom, tb* .
wta ttrir patfal inaa Mrt, tka "Bajref < Thursday, December 2nd, 1926
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
PA OE  THRBf!
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Co.
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On All Lines of
General Hardware
Cutlery
Stoves
.SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
Tools
Ranges
OR MONEY REFUNDED
1
REDUCED PRICES FOR CASH ONLY
Sale Lasts Dec. 1 - Dec. 31 1' A « F.   FOUR
THB  CRANBROOK  HERALD
Thursday, December 2nd, 182«
OUR AIM IS TO PLEASE
GIFTS
THAT  LAST
— We Solicit Your Patronage —
RAWORTH BROS.
—  JEWELERS   —
Ok Cranbrook Gerald
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAV
MEMBER B.C. AND YUKON PRESS ASSOCIATION
r. A. WILLIAMS R. POTTER, B. Se.
fabtertplloa Prlea HM Par ten
Ta llallad SUIaa  HM Pea leu
AdtarUaleg Rataa oa Application,   Ckantas of Cofj
Ier Advertising should ba handed ll lot later thai Wet-
sender noon to eeeare attantloa.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2nd, 1926
WITHIN'   DISTANCE
THERE is only room for one line of thought in
the average mind when the calendar shows the
year is on thc last lap, and December is here. The
weather may seek to put us off the track, and in
various other directions there may come influences
lhat tend to make us forget that Christmas is coming, but there is a penalty attached to such forget-
fulness which tbe procrastinating individuals pay
when they arc compelled to engage in an unholy
scramble in tbe last day or two to get remembrances they know should be sent before Christmas,
a condition which does not leave the mind in thc
state of desired complacency in order to let
the leaven of the true Christinas spirit get in its Ixni-
eficeut work.
Christmas is even now only just round tbe corner. Tlie time to do Christmas shopping is now.
Merchants have their stocks of holiday goods on
display—they have them very complete, and welcome the opportunity to show the early Christmas
shopper thc advantage of not putting off till tomorrow what can be bought today. Thc merchants
of Cranbrook do not have to do any apologizing for
the displays they are putting on view, or the goods
they have taken into stock. A round of the stores
reveals tbe fact tbat never in the history of tbe
city have there been such opportunities for advantageous Christmas shopping as this year. Heavier
ami more varied stocks than ever are thc general
rule, and it only remains for the people of thc city
and district to do their part by at least inspecting
the goods offered in their own home town, before
sending the dollars that this city needs so badly to
distant shopping centres. Mail order values always
look good from a distance, but the very fact that in
the same cities where these mail order stores are
situated there arc hundreds of other stores doing
business just like those in Cranbrook, would indicate
that the mail order stores are not offering values
that are beyond comparison iu the home stores.
Cranbrook has first claim on that little sum
that is going to bc spent on Christmas shopping.
It can bc made to go farther, in purchasing the utmost satisfaction if the Christmas shopping is not
delayed till stocks are depleted, and the big rush is
on, and when the same degree of shopping service
cannot be expected.
*****
A QUIET ELECTION"
IT cannot be said that there has been any undue
excitement in regard to the beer plebiscite to
be taken this week-end. It is a contentious question, but not one that is approached in quite thc
same way as on other occasions when the voters are
called to the polls. On one side of the question
there has been an active organization at work, placing ils viewpoint before the electorate, while the
opposite argument has not been quite so decidedly
advanced.
There is a lot to bc said as to whether the
means being taken to get an opinion is thc best way
of approaching the question, and whether the government has or has not done thc wisest thing in
endeavoring to treat the liquor question in a de
tached way, as it is doing. Plebiscites have their
limitations, in that il is difficult to embody in
single question thc entire breadth of treatment that
is necessary for such a matter as the sale of liquor.
lt is important, however, for every voter to
go to the polls and express his view on the question,
to the best of their understanding. There is no way
in which future policy on such a matter can be
guaged if no adequate expression of approval or
otherwise is given. An uncast vote is no help to
the situation, but simply adds to the difficulty of
dealing with it. It is everyone's duty to cast i
vote, as they honestly believe, in order that senti
ment may be judged.   Apathy is worse than opposi
tion.
*    #    +   *   *
THE CONSERVATIVE LEADER
MANY a worse choice could have been made in
selecting a leader for thc Conservative party
in this province, is the general opinion bcing expressed. Dr. Tolmie is not to bc classed exactly
as a compromise leader, put up simply to break an
impasse between other men. Ile was. in fact,
advanced right after thc last provincial election, but
he declined then to entertain the matter, for what
seemed to be legitimate reasons. These Iw has
since been prevailed to put aside, to take up tin
responsibilities of the leadership.
Dr. Tolmie is a hundred per cent. British Columbian, born and raised in the province, and there is
no one better informed on the agricultural possibilities, and thc opportunities for development pre
scuted by some sections of the province where settlement is at present sparse. He is an experienced
politician, hut has proved iu recent years that he
moulds his partyism by his principles, and not vice-
versa, as so often proves the case.
Most satisfactory of all, is the fact that his appointment has closed up the ranks of the Conservative party, and at the time of the next election
in the province, there will be lacking for thc use of
the Liberals the strongest weapon they have had—
the disscntion that has been rife among the opposition forces, and thc divided allegiance of those who
have been opposing the government.
*re*:~
fcJM©
Staff Captain Dray, young peoplee'
worker for thc Salvation Army, will
give un illustrated lecture to the
children in the Army headquarters on
Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock. He
wil) be the speaker in the United
Church on Friday evening also. This
meeting will be held at 8 o'clock.
Everyone is cordially invited.
■*■*■■*
A most instructive, addtess Was
given hy Principal Buck on "The
High School of thc Future," to the
young people of the United Church
Inst Tuesday night. Thc necessity
for a "middle school" was stressed,
while the Inadequacy of the present
system was pointed out. By very
little expense, the present buildings
in Cranbrook could be utilized, if
the authority to do so could be given
the local school trustees, to have a
middle school here, the speaker pointed out. Several members took part
in the discussion which followed. Arrangements have been made for a
mock trial next week. Later a play
will bc presented by the socity.
+ ♦ ♦
Mrs. L. C. McKinney was the speak
er ut the Sunday school of the United
Church Inst week. She gave a
strong message to the boys and girls
on temperance. Definite temperance
and missionary instruction is given every month in this school. Last
Sunday the maximum attendance for
this winter was attained, 245 boys
and girls being present. It is especially encouraging to note the regular
attondancc of the older boys and
girls.
*■•*•*■
Dr. Frunk Adams, of the faculty
of science of McGill University, has
recently paid a tribute to the value
of Christian missions, after a trip
through India, Burma and Ceylon*
He said in pnrt: "Many aspersions
have been cast upon foreign missions,
largely by persons who are entirely
ingnorant of their work, or who op*
pose them because, among other reasons, they set up a standard of Christian life, to which their own performances are in striking contrast. Altogether apart from the actual conversions, the Christian missions exert
an elovnting nnd purifying influence
upon the whole community. In my
opinion the Christian missions are one
of the most important factors in the
final solution of the great problem
of Kast and Wast"
There is only one "Road of Loving
Hearts" in the world. It was built
by the natives of Samoa for Robert
Louis Stevenson, from his home on
the island to the sea he loved. We
all help to pay for the road we travel
over — but that does not finish our
duty and our privilege. It is ours
to help make the path through life
for those who will follow us, and for
our fellow travellers, a "road of loving hearts." Perhaps you may do
this most effectively by your ballot
on Saturday by voting "No."
■*•■*■■*■
The annual bataar of Knox Presbyterian Church Ladies' Aid Society
trill be held on Saturday, December
,4th, from S p.m, to 6 p.m.
+ ■♦■ +
Knox Church Sunday school will
hold its annual Christmas tree and
entertainment on Monday, December 20th, at 8 p.m. Part of the program will take the form of a white
gift service. Each child is asked to
bring a gift which will later be turned over to those in the city who are
In need. All those interested in the
work of our Sunday school please
take note and keep this date open
+ ■► ♦
The election of a member to the
boys' parliament will be held on Saturday, December 4th, from 4 p.m. to
0 p.m. Polling will take place in
Knox Church vestry. The candidates
are as follows: Murray Garden, of
the Baptist Tuxis square, and Sherman Harris, of Knox Church.
IMPERIAL BANK OF
CANADA FIFTY-SECOND
ANNUAL STATEMENT
Reflects Improved Business
Conditions; Deposits Pass
$100,000,000 Mark
The figures given in the annual
statement of the Imperial Bank of
Canada, as compared with last year,
show marked increase and reflect improved business conditions. The
profits for the year amounted to
91,205,776.31 nn increase of over
9100,000 as compared with 1926.
Deposits during th* year have in-
creaacd by $(,000,000 wid for tto
firat time in the history of the Bank
exceed 9100,000,000. The total assets have grown from 9124,870,000
of a year ago to 9131,032,000.
Cash assets stand at slightly over
927,000,000, an increase of approximately 91,000,000 during the year,
while quickly realizable assets are
$69,372,575.02 or sixty per cent, of
the bank'B liabilities to.thc public.
Current loans have grown from $50,-
226,000 to 955,186,000, reflecting
thc increased commercial business
handled by the bank during the year.
After paying the usual dividend of
12-7,-, plus a bonus of 1%, making
the usual contribution to officers'
guarantee and pension fund, and after reserving $100,000 for Dominion
Government taxes, the bank was enabled to carry forward $1,252,148.23,
or 9163,000 in excess of the amount
carried forward in the previous year.
In every particular the statement is
a most gratifying one and will doubtless prove satisfactory to the shareholders.
The statement of the Imperial
Bank of Canada is always of peculiar
interest to the public, as its figures
cover 12 months up to October 30th
and is the first indication from chartered banks of thc trend of Canadian
business.
but was eventually "turned down;"
are we to suppose thnt the majority
of Canadian voters are "profit mongers" or "beer-philosophers?"—perish the thought!
Under existing conditions nny citizen who cares to buy a permit can
get not less than 6 bottles of beer
at any time; but the money thus expended goes to Victoria, why should
he nob be able to get a glass of beer
—spend the money right in Crunbrook; surely tbts would be the leaser
evil.
I am not a drinking man—I think
1 can claim to be a Christian—but
this is how the matter appears to
me.
I am, sir,
Yours faithfully,
A. B. LONGMAN.
i   KIMBERLEY
| NEWS NOTES
+++++++♦♦++->+*♦+♦++♦+■*++**
Mr. nnd Mrs. Hush Hutherford were
visitors to Nelsun this week.
Quite a large number of citizens
from town took in the big Curling
Club dunce in Crunbrook on Tuesday night. Klmborloy kilties also attended the dunce.
Miss Eileen Montgomery spent the
week-end in Crnnbrook, the guest of
the Misses MvCiowun, returning home
Sunday evening.
A good time wiih hnd at the Scandinavian dance lust week, and as
usual a good crowd turned out for
the occasion.
Miss Margaret ScOWil left last Sun
day for her home in Drumheller.
Mr. and Mrs. Fortier were Cranbrook visitors on Thursday last.
At the whist drive last week given
by the Caledonian Society, Mrs. Jack
Holland was fortunate in carrying
home the ladies' first prize, and Mr.
Muddyman the gent's first prize.
The Fraternal Order of Eagles was
formed in town on Saturday night,
over 150 being put through the initiation and installation of the lodge,
under the direction of W. J. S. Laurie, of Vancouver. Officers from other
lodges were in attendance. After the
installation of the new lodge in the
Oddfellows' Hull, the members adjourned to the K.P. Hall, where
banquet v/as served by the lady
friends of the members. The officers
of the Kimberley aerie are as follows:
W. P. PrcB'dent, R. E. Burke; W.
President, H. M. Tlolicsen; W. Vice-
President, J. A. Booth; W. Chaplain,
H. S. Nordlund; W. Sec, H. Booth:
W. Treas., J. A. McGuire; I.G., A.
Richmond; O.G., P. Paul; W. Conductor, J. Johnson: Aerie Physician,
Dr. M. E. Tiffin.   Trustees—A. John-
WANT ADS.
STRAYED—To   my   premises,   one
Holstein calf.    Owner may hnve
same   by   proving   property,   and
paying expenses. Mrs. J. Brennan.
41
IF THE PARTY known to have removed the sheets, pillow cases,
etc., from the clothes line of Mrs.
I. Moore, Edwards Street, will return them, nothing further will be
done in regard to the matter.     41
FOE SALE—Geese, 25c per Ib.
Also Buff male turkeys. Mrs. J.
Brennan.   . 41*
BOOK OF KNOWLEDGE—for sale,
hnlf morocco, cost $97.00, cheap
for cash. Apply olllce of this
paper. 41-42
COMMUNICATION
ECONOMIC ASPECTS OF
PROHIBITION
P.O.  Box  711,
Kimberley, B.C.
Nov. 30th, 192(1.
Sir:
I must confess thnt ur, article under
thc above heading which appeared in
the "Herald" of November 26th,
made me feel a little sorry that a temperance organization (for whoso
efforts when rightly directed, I have
always felt respect) should go to such
trouble and expense to confuse the
citizens of Cranbrook.
I would certainly bc in favour of
prohibition if It prohibited—but docs
it?
We aro told to gaze in wonder
and admiration at thc shining example Bet by our neighbors across the
line, where prohibition has been in
vogue for a sufficient length of time,
one might reasonnbly suppose, to
have passed tho experimental stage:
yet in spite of thc sizable army of
"dry agents," I have heard it said
that "one can always get a drink—
if one haa the price."
No one would seriously deny that
excessive drinking is a real source
of crime—still if prohibition Is such
a huge success in the U.S.A. how is
It that we read of the great increase
In crime there now?
Prohibition waa tried out in B.C.,
WANTED—Three- or four-saw lumber edgers, second hand. Must be
in good condition. Johnson Bros.
Stavely, Alta. 40-42
son, F. Valentine and A. Skribe.
Mr. Cameron, of thc C.M. & S. Co.
staff, left on a business trip to Montreal the first of the week, in connection with the C.M. & S. Co.
Mr. Bob Crerar returned to town
the first of the week on business.
Mr. Jack Gardom, who hns spent
the week here in connection with
the Automobile Club, having about
70 members from Kimberley, left on
Monday for Yahk.
Deer are quite plentiful this year,
and   a   good   number   have been
brought into town, nlso there were
lota of disappointed hunters.
A curling meeting was held Tuesday night in the new rink, for the
purpose of the skips picking thc rinks
for the season. The rink is completed, ready to flood; cold weather is
all that is needed.
in   Cranbrook
Kiniberley was well represented at C.A. team in the first. As will be
seen from thc score below, Don Dallas was thc high scorer, both for individual games and strings of three.
Considerable interest is being arous-
edin the bowling game, a number of
new bowlers are getting their arm
in. Mr. Anderson, of the Venezia
alleys, looks for a busy season.
Y.M.C.A. T.am—
Geo. Simpson .. 167 160 129
Bush   146 164 148
F. Hartnell   118.119 106
W. Taylor   186 162 168
Lundy   144 128  162
tho Golf Club dance
last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Lindsay were
among those who took in the Curlers'
dance  in  Cranbrook Tuesday night.
The ladies are looking forward to
the big sale at the United Church on
Ilecember llth, where a big display
of foncywork will be shown, also
home cooking and candy.
CITY BOWLERS COME
OUT ON TOP IN
GAME WITH
«Y»i
Taking   measure  of  their  former
conquerors  in  the  Y.M.C.A.  alleys ChrlBtophorson
the City team defeated thc "Y" bowl- A.   Andersoi
ers on Friday last.    As on the two I). Burto
previous occasions the city tenm lost I>.  Dallas
Mr. Wilson,   of   thc   Vulcanizing"11', tlrst SL''' l,ut won the lMt two    w- Johnson
Works, Cranbrook, hns sold out his    ''-v 'Unlotont pins to far more than
interests in Kimberley. , off-sot the gnme made by the Y.M.    Totals    6111  81(1 782
462
467
343
466
434
Totals    710 729 703
City  Team—
166 126 167
148 182 105
107 152 137
124 199 105
150 157 148
2142
449
495
396
488
401
22811
GIFT SUGGESTIONS FOR XMAS
GOODS WE ARE OFFERING FOR THE XMAS TRADE
— We Invite Your Early Inspection ■—
Toilet Goods Sets, complete range  $1.50 up.
Compact, all the popular makes $1,00 up
White Ivory, full selection Low Priced
Moir's and Rowntree's Chocolates, fancy Boxes
The Purple Gift Line, Gifts for all 50c up
Xmas Papeteries, exclusive line 50c up
Leather Goods and Purses, new stock
WATERMAN'S FOUNTAIN PENS, EVERSHARP PENCILS,
TOYS, GAMES, BOOKS — Kiddies' tales and latest fiction.
THE ORTHOPHONIC VICTROLA - the gift that keeps on
giving, 4 models — Consulette, $115.00; the 4-7, $160.00;
the Granada, $200; the Credenza, $385.00.
BEATTIE-NOBLE LTD.
DRUGGISTS and STATIONERS
FANCY GOODS      -      SPALDING ATHLETIC GOODS
FOR SERVICE—Young registered
Yorkshire boar; J4.00, payable at
service. Apply R. Benbow, Cranbrook, second railroad crossing off
Lumberton roud. 39tf,
FOR RENT—Log house, Armstrong
Ave., large living room, kitchen,
2 bedrooms, bathroom, hot and
cold water. Partly furnished.
Apply Box H, Herald. 38tf
FOR SALE—Girls' small-size Red
Bird bicycle. Apply Mrs. E. Williams.    Phone 234. 40-41
VALUABLE WATKINS TERRITORY—open for real good man;
includes City of Crnnbrook. Exceptional opportunity. Apply the
J. R. Watkins Co., 1150 Hamilton
Street, Vancouver, B.C.       41-42
STORE FOR RENT—with four or
more living rooms, situated near
great industrial activities. Apply
Box W, Herald Office. 40-43
FOR SALE—Urge size coal heater
in good condition. $16. Phone
382. tf
BOARD AND ROOM—for two girls
can be had. For particulars apply Box G, Herald Offlce.        29tf
FOR SALE—Piano, aa good as new.
Mason and Risch. |360 cash. Enquire Box L, Cranbrook Herald
olllce. 2ltf
OAKLAND CAR
Powerful engine, good tires;
would make a good truck, $85.00.
in  good  running  order
also — SLEEIMPNQ   BAQ
Two rolls of new Chicken Wire.
Household Furniture ot every
description.
WILLIAM THOMPSON
Pkaaa 76      .      .      P. O. Baa ISS
S«mb< Haad Daalar
Ctaakr-Mk
We Bay, Sell aad Pxrl—«i
VOTE
AGAINST
Parlors
VOTE
NO Thursday, December 2nd, 1926
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
PAO E   PI V B
— SPECIAL —
About 40 Ladles' Flannel
Dresses, well designed. Special price, $4.50 and up — a
real bargain.
Good assortment of Children's Flannel Dresses, nifty
styles and fresh stock, very
reasonable — Special, from
$2.25 and up.
Ladles' Klmonas and Bath
Robes, Evening Dresses — a
good selection to choose
from for your Xmas goods.
We have a few Ladles Hats
to be sold at 25% off. Latest style Ladles' Shoes jusl
arrived and priced reasonably,
Ladles' Coats, trimmed wllli
fur, marvclla, vdour, etc.,
dainty styles; priced reasonably,
Our   Method—Small   Profit
and Quick Turn-over.
KOOTENAY TRADING
CO., LTD.
-THE REASONABLE STORE-
daughter, Mis Lnrabec, of Wilmer.
The interment took place at New
Wesl minster.
A sail death occurred at the (len-
eral hospital here on Thursday afternoon, when Mr. Roy MacDonnell, lato
of Plnchei* Greek, Alta., aged 24,
passed away after a shu-t illness. Mr.
MacDonnell has resided in this neighborhood for tho pasi three seasons,
during which time he has been acting
as guide to parties in the mountains
under the direction of Mr. Walter
Nixon. Mr. and Mrs. MacDonnell
ond yc linger brother of the deceased
made every effort to be present as
soon as the serious illness of the late
Mr .MacDonnell was known, only to
arrive a few hours after he had passed away.
**************************
I LAKE
IwiNDERMERE::
NOTES
**************
(Special to the Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., Nov. 27th.—Mr.
Frank Craig, of Vancouver, who far
the past summer haa been in Wilmer
directing the work which the Silver
Spr#y Cprppration have been carrying Dn on their mineral claims, left
thu week for hia home at the Coast
metropolis.
Telegraphic advice was received
this week by Mr. Alfred Larabee, of
Wilmer, stating that his mother, relict of the late Gilman Larabee, had
passed away. Mrs. Larabee wns
amongst the old time residents of thia
district, having come up from thc
United States with her husband and
young family. Besides relatives in
the U.S. she leaves behind her sons
Alfred GUman and   Philip  and  her
*************
Messrs. Pym and Orchard, of the
forestry branch, were visitors in
Lumborton last Saturday. They
wont through to tlie various camps
in tho afternoon,
A mooting I" appoint n committee
for tin*  local  Scout troop was held
on Friday evening,    Mr, Fred Scott,
pf Crnnbrook, who is district commissioner, attended the meeting und
gave a fine talk on the principles of
scouting and the work expected irom
jn   troop  committee.    Those  present
I wore Mrs. Trusler, Messrs. Fred Scott,
John Kosscn, Jim Hurtle, Jake Jacob'
I non and Allan Mc Broom.
Thc Scout troop organized a few
weeks ago is coming along in fine
shape, some fourteen boys now being
in the ranks. Good headway has
boen made in the work for the tenderfoot test, and oight of the boys
have completed it and are ready to
be sworn in. Two of the boys have
hnd previous experience in Scout
work and proved a great help in
getting the others trained in the
knots, etc.
E, Dobson returned to Lumberton
on Wednesday nfter making a trip to
Vancouver.
Gus Krigsman brought in his second buck this season on Sunday last,
a five-point black-tail.
Frank MacPherson and Mr. Christmas, of the White Truck Co., were
here on business last Saturday, and
sold the B.C. Spruce Mills three
White trucks for spring delivery.
they will be used in the lumber yard
to replace the horse teams now handling the lumber. One of the trucki
will also be used for freighting supplies to the camps, and will be equipped with a special body for this work.
The weekly meeting of the C.G.
I.T. was held on Monday. The main
program of the senior group for the
evening was a debate. The subject
wns, "Resolved: That country life is
more beneficial than city life." The
debnte was won by the affirmative
team,    Viola    Corrigal    and    Doris
FOR SALE
FINE FULLY  MODERN
RESIDENCE
with three bedrooms.   Own-
era leaving town.   Price low
and terma attractive.
— Apply to —
BEALE & ELWELL
.*************************
*.
THE
fTrue Gift
We have a few modern rati
4»cm  TO LET.
Safely Deposit Vault and Boxes
$3.00 per ••■am.
WALTER H. FORDI;
A. a*.,., L.C.M. - Cold Medal     S
Piano Expert, 5
Tunings  and  Repairs       %
—   VOICE  —
Pianoforte   -    Harmony
Counterpoint
—  VIOLIN   —
Organist    and    Choirmaster
Knox Church.
22S Burwell Av. - Cranbrook
SW
Money    can't    buy   a    gift*
* mother    would    appreciate j
* more than vour photograph.;
* It', not too early lo think
f        of aitting for your Christ*
* mat   portrait..     Make   tha
* appointment today.
If
jf NELSON STUDIO!
11   I'hone 56     -     •     Box 2(5]
+ ♦
■.•..;..;..:.****+*+♦♦++♦♦♦+♦+♦++♦
GIFTS FOR THE TRAVELER
Tha Waal Christina, fift combine, beauty with practicality —what,
thea, could ha mora acceptable than a gift of leather?    Such a gift
will prove useful  for a  period  of  many   years.
For something particularly uaelul we recommend our
Ensemble Set — consisting of   HAT   BOX,   OVERNIGHT  CASE   or  SUIT  CASE — in exclusive and
distinctive designs.   These may be purchaaed singly or
Inset.
— OTHER SUITABLE XMAS OIFTS ON SALE -
Warm Wool Socks — Underwear and Pants
— Complete Outfitters to the Woodsman  —
The Cranbrook Saddlery
■Hutchison. The negative wns taken
by Margaret Hutchison nnd Florence
Parent. Tho Golden Keys group
started their Christmas work for the
missionaries, making up scrap books
and dressing dolls.
Mr. Corbett's brother, from Calgary, spent a couple of days in Lumberton last week. He was on his
way to Vnncouver by motor.
Leo. M, Kilburg. general agent of
the Chicago nnd North Western, was
a business visitor in Lumberton last
Tuesday.
Bill Andrews' father and sister,
from Tisdale, Snsk., arrived In Lumberton on Tuesday last, to spend a
few dnys here.
Mrs. Benson und baby arrived
home from Rossland last Saturday,
accompanied by .Mrs. Benson's futher,
Cl. Ai Scriven, travelling freight
agent of the Minneapolis & St.
Louis Railway, arrived here on business last Tuesday, He wan the
guest of Mr. nnd Mr.*. Dwelley while
here.
The annual business meet inu of
the Lumberton Club was held on
Wednesday, the 24th, for the election
of officers for the coming year. The
officers elected are as follows: VV.
Andrews, president; B. Sternberg,
vice-|>residcnt; J. A. Jones, secretary; und K. Hallmark! treasurer.
The following were i-lected on the fi-
nunce committee; Mrs. Jones, chair-
mun; Mrs. Harold Piper, and Alex
Stewart. It was decided t0 hold the
meutinga twice a month instead of
weekly us formerly, on tbe first and
third Wednesdays of each month.
Card prizes will be niven at each
meeting in futuro. The committee
for December was elected as follows:
Mrs. Harold Piper, Mrs. Joyce, Miss
Emily Gregory, B. Sternberg, W. McRae, and H. Mc Master.
The local Orange Lodge held their
annual business meeting on Tuesday,
the 23rd. Officers elected for the
year are as follows:
Master   E. A. Cook
Deputy Master   Ed. Woods
Fin. and Rec. Sec  W. Barter
Treasurer    R.  Henson
1st  Lecturer       A.   Kolesar
2nd Lecturer   W. Melntyre
Tyler    R. Joyce
Sentinel   Gus Woodske
Chaplain   E,  J.  Dobson
suddeTdeath
of eastport lady;
funeral friday last
Kingsgate, B.C., Nov. 27.—A cloud
of sadness hns been cast over the
commnuity of Eastport and Kings-
gate by the sudden passing of Mrs.
Frederickson, wife of A. E. Frederickson, of the Boundary Cnfe ut East-
port, Idaho.
Mrs. Frederickson was in their place
of business as late as Saturday evening, and then appeared to be in fuir
health and cheerful. She left the establishment for home about (i.30
p.m., and after renchinf home she
complained of feeling ill, took to her
bed, lingering on until Sunday, the
call coming at about 12.30 noon.
The deceased lody, who was in her
39th year, had been a resident of
Eastport from July, 1925, coming
with her husband from Corvallis,
Ore., at which place they had resided
for the previous six yenrs, to take
over the business of the cafe. Although having resided here but a
short time she had won many friends
by her affable manner and kindly disposition, taking a pleasure in helping
others, and hnd endeared herself to
tho children, of whom she wns very
fond.
The late Mrs. Frederickson was n
native of Birmingham, England, and
came to Canudo\ in 1907, residing at
Calgary, Altn., Inter moving to Spo-
knne, Wash., at which place Mr. and
Mrs. Frederickson were married in
1911'
Besides leaving a sorrowing husband to mourn her loss, there is her
little girl. Leah. The deceased is also
survived b'* two sisters, Mrs. L. Walk-
r and Mrs. M. Smith, both of whom
reside in Birminghum, England. Tha
sympathy of many friends goes out
to Mr. Frederickson, little daughter
nnd relatives who are left to mourn
the loss of n loving wife, mother and
ntTcctionote  sister.
The funeral took place on Friday,
November 26th, service being held
in the chapel of the Crouch undertaking parlors. Rev. Mr. Mason,
officiating, took for hia reading the
llth chapter of St. John, the 20th to
28th verses. During the service, led
by the choir, the following hymns
wvre sung: "Rock of Ages'1 and
"Abide With Mc;'" a solo, "Within
the IVnlls," was rendered by Mrs.
Mnsun- Mr*. Burcham presided at
the organ.
Mnny friends who gathered to pay
their last respects followed thc remains to their last resting place, including among thore present being
friends nnd relutives from Eastport,
ldahc, Kingsgate, B.C., Portland,
Ore., Corvallis, Ore., Roscburg, Ore.,
and Salem, Ore. Pall-benrcrs were
Messrs. W. C. Reid, Herb Carlson,
Gua Anderson, Tom Lynch, Chas.
Spoor nnd E. K. Saunders. Interment took plnce ut the Grnndview
cemetery,  Bonners Ferry,  Idaho.
Many tokens of remembrance were
laid on the bier, among them being
a pillow from the family; wreath,
Miss Nettie Blair; wreath, Mr. and
Mrs. Crabtree; wrenth and bouquets,
friends of Eastport und Kingsgate,
and emblem, Elks' Lodge No.  1370.
KIMBERLEY AUT0ISTS
ALSO JOIN BRANCH
OF B, C. AUTO CLUB
dett, E. G. Montgomery, Hoy Stephens, J. A. HiKKinx, Frank Carlson,
W. N. Donaldson. Kev. Father llnrt-
mann, G. C. Saunders, 11. L Grady,
A. R. Mclnroy, E. 11. L. Attn--?, Lloyd
Crowe, Dr. Hanlngton, .1. S. Kisher,
E. S. Shannon, ('. A. Foote, R. E.
Crerar, Wallace Lloyd, Thomas Summers, W. J. Garbutt, A. R. Lilly,
Dr. Davis, J. U. Harris, A. Hill, Rex
Bidder.
Mr. Gardom is also visiting Chapman Camp, the Townsite and the Top
.Mine, and anticipates the same measure of success.
KIMBERLEY 1 OF P'i
ELECT OFFICERS FOR
COMING NEW TERM
On    Thursday    evening    of    las'.
week   thc   members   of   North   Star
Lodge, No. 5-8, K. of P., Kimberley.
held   their   semi-annual   election   of
officers.
This event was well attended, each
office wus keenly contested with the
following results:
11.   Blumenauer       C.C.
Leo. Mawson   V.C.
s. Fleming   Prelate
M, Beduz   M. of W.
A. Watkins            K. of R. and S.
W.  Turnbull          M. of F.
J.   Lelghton      M.  of  E.
Len. Mawson   M. of A.
G.  Rebaglati       I.G.
J. Aldridge  O.G.
H. E. Nelson—-Deputy Grand Chancellor and representative to Grand
Lodge.
STORY OF ELEPHANT
ESCAPE APPEARS
NOW IN EUROPE
Through the medium of thc escape
of the Sells-Floto circus elephants
here last summer, and the publicity
which attended their hunt and subsequent rounding up dead or nlivc,
Cranbrook has been receiving some
free advertising in continental Europe. George Huyaer, a member nf
thc Herald staff, hns received copies
of a daily, published at Haarlem, Holland, which devoted about half a page
to a story of the escaped elephants
here, accompanied hy three pictures
taken of them while at large. Thc
article wns written by Mr. Huyzer
and published under thc heading of
"Kiekjes uit Canada" —Pictures
from Canada. Mr. Huyzor hns contributed other articles to the same
paper, on thc editorial staff of which
he has a brother. One of hiii articles
showed some pictures he had taken
at Macleod, Alta., amom; them being a reproduction nf a pen and ink
sketch he made of an Indian teepee
in that vicinity.
IMPERIAL BANK
OF CANADA
CONDENSED BALANCE SHEET
AS ON 30th OCTOBER, 1926
LIABILITIES:
Notes of thc Bank in circulation  $10,092,033.00
Due to other Hunks  3,755.304 37
Letters of Credit outstanding  804,397139
Dividend and Bonus Due November lat, 1020  28o!oo0.00
Unclaimed Dividends  751.75
Capital, Reserve aud Undivided Prulita  15,752.148 23
_ $31,045,294 74
Deposits   100.787,014 91
$131,832,309.65
ASSETSs
Cash on hand and in Banks  $10,347,745 03
Notes and Cheques of oilier Banks  6,530,300 35
Deposit in Central Gold Reserves.,,,             4.004.400 BO
Deposit with the Minister for purposes of Circulation Kund... 332,730 45
Dominion and Provincial Government, Municipal and other
Securities                ... 21,606,880.70
Call Loans in Canada aud abroad      13.427.522 09
Other current Loans after making full provision for bad aud
doubtful debts    ... 02.309.S31 02
Bank Premises  4,921.000 21
Ileal Estate, Mortgages and other assets   1.534.83197
Non-curront Loans, estimated loss provided for  251.874  IS
Liabilities of customers under Letters of Credit as per contra.. 504.397 39
PELEG HOWLAND,
Vretiiletit.
$131.832.3(19.05
A. K. PHIPPS,
General Manner.
AUDITORS' REPORT TO THE SHAREHOLDERS:
Wc report lo tlift Bhnrc-holders of the Imperial Hs.uk of Canada:—
That we huve audited the above Balance Sheet «» nt October 30ih. 1926. and compared it
with lhc hooka nnd vouchers at Head Office and wiih tlte certified retunu from the Branches.
Wo linve obtained nil the information ami explanations thn wa bare required, and in our opinion
the transactions of the Hank which have coma Undef onr notice have l*rn within the powers of the
Bank. '
Iu our opinion the Balance Sheet dtictoaea ihp true condition of 'he Bank, and i* aa shown
liy the books of the Bank.
The above Balance .Sheet does nol include money which ha* been t*t uide by the Shareholders from time to time for the purpose of a Pension Fund, a portion ol which is invested in sharta
of the Batik.
A. U- Shepheku, C.A.,
of Pt«t. Marwkl. Mitchell & Co.
D. McK. McCuuxahd. K.C.A .
of Pri'.*, Waierhoupe A Co.
Toronto, November 19th, 1926.
Delany &
Sinclair, Ltd
ARE QUITTING BUSINESS
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦+.
Mr. Jack Gardom, organizer for
the Automobile Club of British Co-
] lunibiu, has met with 100 per cent
' support during his stay in Kimberley,
! securing no less than fifty members
in that brief period, whose names arc
'at under:
I James Holt, II. P. McMurray, Dr.
E. L. Rowland, J. Whalley, Malcolm
McKay, Jack Sanderson, Dr. M. E.
; Tiffin, W. C. Bennic, W. M. Young,
A. B. Jackson, W. K. Kettlewell, Tom
Whlttinghnm, A. Marsden, Tom Caldwell, P. J. Gougeon, Tony Skoff, Tom
P. Oxlcy, 11- V. Mcl,cod, Pontus
Johnson, J. I,. Munro, 1). Pierce, W.
Green, M. M. O'Brien, S. T. Alrxan
iw, H. Grant Henderson, N. W. Bur
SALE STARTED TO-DAY
DECEMBER 2nd
EVERYTHING FROM END TO END AND FROM TOP TO BOTTOM OF STORE IS TO BE SOLD.    I
Space available will not permit us to list all the many  lines with prices that we, are offering to the public
for complete information see our large posters.   The following are a few of the lines: —
ALUMINUM WARE
GRANITE WARE
TIN WARE
STOVES and RANGES
CROCKERY
MOPS and POLISHES
WASH BOILERS
TEA KETTLES
CURTAIN RODS
WASH TUBS
BEDS and SPRINGS
CONGOLEUM RUGS
ELECTRIC LAMPS and HEATERS     BABY BUGGIES
REFRIGERATORS
BUILDERS' HARDWARE
PAINTS and VARNISHES
BOYS' WAGONS
GASOLINE LAMPS
HOUSE BROOMS
AND   HUNDREDS   OF   ARTICLES   THAT   CANNOT   BE   LISTED
All Priced At From 25 to 40 Per Cent. Reduction 1
PAQE  SIX
THB  CRANBROOK  HERALD
Thursday, December 2nd, 1026
THE UNITED CHURCH
REV. BRYCE WALLACE. B.A.. B.D., Minister
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5th
11 a.m. — "The Man From The Sea." —Junior Choir
12 a.m. —Sunday School and Bible Class
7 30 p m   —   "Question Night."   (Questions which Youth Is
asking the Church ol today).    —Senior Choir
"THE CHURCH OF A CHEERFUL RELIGION-
SALVATION ARMY
CITADEL
Hanson Avenue
SUNDAY
Morning Service   11 a.m.
Sunday School    3 p.m.
Evening Service .... 7.30 p.m.
TUESDAY
Young  People's
Meeting   4 p.m.
Public Meeting  8 p.m-
THURSDAY
Services at Kimberley
Home League Sewing
Circle  2.30 p.m.
FRIDAY
Band ol Love -a1 p.m.
Public Meeting   8 p.m.
All   Are   Cordially   Invited.
PROFESSIONAL CABDB
W.   A .   F E R Q I
DENTIST
Campbell-Manning  Block
Phona 97        016c. Hears
9 to 12;  1 lo S p.m. Sat. • to I
Drs.   (ireen   &   MacKinnon
Phy.iclao. * Sarfooas
Offire at Residence, Armstrong
Avenue
OFFICE     HOURS
Afternoons  2 to 4
Evenings   7.30 to S.B0
Sundays 2.00 to 4.00
CRANBROOK,   B.C.
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
Mr. E. A. McEachern, of Lethbridge, enjoyed the last week-end
here, meeting his old time Moyie
friends.
Leonard Eckford took Monday's
train to Spokane, spending severul
days over there.
DR. P.   B, MILES
DENTIST
OFFICE HOURS
9 to 12 a.m.      1 to 5 p.m.
Hum.  Bib.,  Craabrook,  B.C.
fffffffffffffffffffffffff*'
Wkaa loo Think ot lasaiaaae
- Call Up -
BEALE & ELWELL
Cranbrook & Kimberley
Sola AgaaU lor Uabarlti Tawn.Ha.
•Baptist Cfourrt)
REV. V. H, MacNEILL
SUNDAY, DEC. 5th
11 a.m. — Morning Service
12 a.m.-Suiiday School and
Brotherhood.
7J0 p.m.—Evening Service
I0U   1KB   CORDIALLY
UITITIII.
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
MOYIE   NOTES
Tlio 10c ten in aid of Moyie Pres-
byteHan Church, held ut tho home
i>r Mr. and Mrs. Cameron, was a
brilliant e\en\ and largely attended.
Music was played throughout tht-occasion, ami vocal solos by Miss Kuth
Baillie, Mrs. Taylor and Gregory
Thomas were greatly enjoyed. Mrs.
Nicholson sat at the tea urn, while
other lady members served in their
turn. The tidy sum of $55.05 was
realized. Om little community surely bears the good name of generously responding to all benefit
causes.
Many young children here huve
been sutl'eriny from pneumonia for
some time.
The young child of Mr. and Mrs.
Phillip Conrad was taken to Cranbrook hospital on Tuesday,
Mtissrs. Tom und Rube Shore ure
here from Saskatchewan visiting wilh
Iheir sister, Mrs. A.  Weir.
Thc Moyie Orioles will play for a
week-end dance this Saturday, the
4th. While the roads are still open
come  and  swell  the  crowd.
The Dramatic Committee held their
evening of entertainment on Monday.
Their program, though Bhort, was
thoroughly enjoyed. The progrnm
was as follows: opening address, Ks-
ther Desaulniers; recitation, Albin
Danielson; VOCftl duet, Mis* Mail!it*
and Mr. (irimmctto; recitation, Louis
Desaulniers; sketch, "Courtship Under Difficulties," Miss M. Dakin,
Cordon Armstrong, Ernest Danielson.
Bill Patterson acted as chairman.
Miss Whitehead rendered severul
musical numbers, and refreshments
were served. Proceeds of the evening
amounted to $15.OS,
Divine service wus held by Rev.
Bluckburn in Moyie Presbyterian
Church on Sunduy ufternoon. A
special choir was in attendance. Mrs.
Taylor sang a very pleasing anthem.
A meeting of the Catholic Ladies'
Altar Society wus culled to order on
Sunday nt .'1 o'clock. Preparations
by the choir are under way for High
Mass, which will be sung on New
Year's Day at 10 o'clock hy Rev.
Father Cullinan.
The Presbyterian Ladies' Aid has
been again organized: President, Mrs,
A. Cameron; vice-president, Mrs.
Taylor; secretary-treasurer, Mrs. R.
Burch.
In view nf the Xmas Community
Tree, various committees were named on Monday evening. Mr. Grimmette, as the chairman, touched on
all details in th:.- respect. Further
comment will be later mnde on this
subject.
Harry How is home again from a
prolonged visit to Kimberley.
FOR  SERVICE,   QUALITY
AND   CLEANLINESS   THE
L. D. Cafe
CANNOT   BE   EXCELLED
Saaitary Electric Relrifcratioa
MINUS AMD BOGUTUI
WOXMC8 IKSTITHTB
la
PrcMnl
Secretary
al r. HaB
afternoon of tba
■rat Taeadar at
I ML
AU ladiea are
aordkllj totted
Mn. NORGROVE
Mn. J. COUTTS.
F. M. MacPHERSON
Undertaker
Pkoac 350
NorW.r, Ara„ Neat City HaU
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
H. W. Herchmer
BARRISTER
and
SOLICTOR
CRANBROOK   -   B.C.
— PHONE 61 —
effefffffffffffffffffffffj
NISBET & GRAHAM
Barristers, Solicitors, Ac
Offices: Imperial Bank Bldg.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
OFFICES at KIMBERLEY
IN K. ol P. HALL
Open Every Thursday from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
I. O. O. P.
KEY CITY I.ODOE No. 42
trmrgli        Meeta ovary
gTE*S.M,.„,l»y night at
«HP>EF5* The Auditorium
Sojourning Oddfellows are cordially Invited
N. O P. RUSSELL
Rec. Sec. E. G. Dingley, P.G.
For Good Valae la
GOOD   EATS
Go to Tha
ZENITH   CAFE
Car. BAKER ft VAN HOME
M.MIIH. IM.
FOR RELIABLE
Shoe Rep airing
Take year tkeat ta tka
-0. K. SHOE SHOP-
Norbury Ave. — Cranbrook
For Quality and value In
Men'a Dreai and Work Shoei
SEE US — W. NICHOL Proa.
*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦+
— For —
OYSTERS SERVED
la any .tyle you wi.k try the
VICTORIA CAFE
FINE
FLAVOR
AND
PURITY
In Ihe many lettera Paeilie
Milk haa received Irom the
women ol thla province
mention haa been made ol
Ita rare flavor by several
hundred. The point haa
interest ior two reasons.
A lovely flavor is popular
and secondly, In the case ol
milk, It is a sign ol absolute purity and thia la thc
Icature ol Paclic Milk.
PACIFIC   MILK
Head OSIce    ■    Vaacaner
Fa-riatiee at Ledaer ft Akkulard
YAHK NOTES
;• ***************** ********
Mr. Harry Erskine returned home
on Tuesday from Vancouver, where
he spent a week or so.
Mr. and Mrs. Coffee and family
left on Tuesduy for Wardner, and
later left for Cranbrook, where Mis.
Coffee wns confined in the hospital
for a few days lnst week. Mrs. Coffee  and   family   returned  on   Satur-
ROYAL
YEAST
CAKES
For Perfect Bread
NOTE:
If you take YEAST for
your health, try this:
Souk n ROYAL YEAST
cuke over night in tepid
wuter with n little sugar.
Stir well, strain and
drink the liquid.
Delicious when taken
in orange juice.
STANDARD
OF QUALITY
V FOR HORE THAN
50 YEARS
day.
Mr. Appelt passed through town
on Tuesday en route to his new field
at Wetaskiwin, Alta.
Mr. Adam Dalziel has recently
rented the house formerly occupied
by St. Clair and now owned by Mr.
.). Matson.
The homo of Mis. W. Crowe was
the scene of n merry time on Thursdny, when Mrs. Crowe invited a number of hor friends in for the afternoon. The patty was on honor of
Mrs. Haney, who recently moved into
town from  Bull Kiver.
Miss Tieira Carlson, of Rossland,
who has heen attending Mrs. Murray
for the past week, accompanied Mr.
and Mrs. Murray to Cranbrook on
Thursday, where Mrs. Murray entered the hospital.
The shoemaker shop was closed for
a few days last week, when Mr. J. E.
Anderson, proprietor, was ill.
Mr. Newby, Anglican pastor, held
church service in the new church on
Sunday at 11 a.m. Before the commencement of the service the Anglican Chureh Board presented Mr.
George Warren with a handsome
club-bag for the work which he did
on the new church.
The Ladies' Gui'd held their usual
meeting on Wednesday at the home
of Mrs. A. E. Lythgoe, when Mrs.
Royal and Mrs. Erskine were appoint-
ed to see to thc getting of the articles for the fishpond.
Misses Sylvia Baker, Helen McGrath and Mr. Joe Brogan spent the
week-end with their parents in town.
Misses Grace Baker and Mildred
Edwards and Mr, A. Vircjie spent the
week-end with friends in Cranbrook.
Rev. Mr. Fleming held church service in the Mill Hall on Sunday morning. __
Miss Gorman, of South Dakota,
spent the week-end with Mrs. A. Rut-
tenay, while ne route to Idaho,
The girls of the C.G.l.T. held their
weekly meeting at tlie home of Mrs.
Bert Setter. The girls are very busy
preparing for tha bazaar. The next
meeting will be held at thc home of
Mrs, Hugh Mclnnis, when all members are asked to attend, as it is the
moeting before the girls nre to be
appointed for their different booths.
Please send or bring all contributions
of work.
A whist drive was held under the
auspices of the Ladies' Guild on Saturday evening. Prizes were awarded
to Miss Ethel Brownrigg, ladies' first;
Mrs. Herman Peterson, ladies' consolation ; men's first, Mr. Gorman,
and  men's consolation,  Mr.  Newby.
Don't forget the big bazaar to be I
held on December  llth in thc  Mill 1Q
Hall.   Don't forget its held under the ' |
joint nusplces of the Ladles' Guild 13
and C.G.l.T. group.
The mothers of the children who
have little helper mite boxes will
meet in the Mill Hall on Friday,
when the contents will be returned to
Mrs. J. Hamilton.
Mr. McGloughlin, of camp, spent
a few days in town and out of town
points last week, returning on Sunday.
>llllllt1llllllllil)IC]|llllllillllt]||||||||||ll[lllllNIIIIII[llillllllllll[]lllllllllllltlllllllllllll[ll< llllUliiilliilll|[aill!lllllll[)IIIIIUIIWtllHIHIHUK»ll
Recollections of Octogenarian
Reminiscences of John Fi ngal Smith, of this city, as
Recorded by Himself.
*****************************************************
Red  River  Expedition
(Continued)
Little attention was paid to the
subject until 1808, when the road
was begun. In the following year a
better pass over the hill than that by
Dog I^ake was discovered, necessitating, however, a lengthening of the
road from Thunder Bay to about 48
miles. And the word "portage" will
frequently be met with in all narratives of North American travel. The
reader should remember that it
means a break in a chain of water
communication, over which canoes
and stores have to be carried nn the
men's bneks. It took men of great
physique and strength to perform this
duty. An Orking Islander, himself
a man of gigantic fraine, describing
these toilsome labors, told me when
in Victoria more that 45 years ago,
that a French-Canadian in thc party
could carry on his back a load of
Hudson's Bay muskets weighing seven-hundred pounds! He was asked
how much he could earry. He smiled, "Not as much as that." The
story of the extraordinary endurance
of the company's servants would read
like a romance. One of these
French-Canadians, who was upwards
of ninety told me on his way out at
Quosnel, that he had been for three
full years without seeing wheat-flour
bread, and when sitting at the table
had to look ut thc person next him
to see what he would do with it. His
description of many things were very
interesting. He left Quebec on a
raft, running awuy at the age of seven, and lost all trace of his people.
Hazards   of   the   March
The new route was, therefore, 48
miles by road thnuiirh the forest to
Shebandowan Lake, and from thence
ubout 111 ii miles by river and lakes,
with 17 portages, to the Lake of the
Woods. Some of these portages
were more than a mile in length, and
when it is remembered that all the
bonts and stores, etc., required for
the expedition hnd to be carried by
the soldiers over these breaks in the
navigation, an idea can be formed of
the physical labor which such an expedition would entail.
From the Lake of the Woods to
Fort Garry was about 100 miles in a
straight line by land, but there wns
only a road made for about 60 miles
of that distance, the unmade portion
beinn- laid nut over most difficult
swamps. If, therefore, the troops
could not advance hy that route, as
was subsequently found to be the
case, the only other way or Touching
Manitoba was by the Winnipeg River,
the navigation of which was known
to be so difficult and dangerous that
none but experienced guides ever attempt it. There were about .'10 por-
tags to he got over in the 100 miles
extra thus added to thc total length
of the distance to be traversed.        .
In 1801) ahout twenty miles of thel
Thunder Bay road   had   been   con-1
structed.    During    thc    winter   of
I siUi 70   bridges   were   constructed
over the two largest rivers which
crossed the line of rond and in the
following spring the road was pushed
on still further some six or seven
miles.
When early in 1870 arrangements
were being made for the despatch
of thc expedition, the Canadian Ministry impressed upon the military au-
tho i* iti os responsible for its success,
thus, by the time the troops had been
collected together on the shores of
Thunder Buy, the road from thence
to Shebandwan would be fit for traf.
fie, and that good roads would have
been constructed over all the portages by the public works department.
The country lying between Lake
Superior and Red River was known
to be a wilderness of poor timber,
lakes, rivars and rocks, and uninhabited except by wandering tribes
of Indians. The waters, it was safd,
abounded in fish, but the woods were
almost destitute of game.
Indian  Territory
The Indians were the Chippewnhs,
a tribe (hat occupied the islands in
Lakes Huron and Superior, and were
scattered along their shores. They
were essentially wood Indians, and
ventured hut seldom on to the plains,
being in mortal dread of their hereditary enemies, the Sioux—the most
war-like tribe then in North America.
As long as the rivers were free of
ice these Chippewahs almost lived
in their canoes, roving about in the
localities where fish was most plentiful. Their canoes were small, and
so light thut a woman could ensily
carry one over the worst portaite
On the shores of tne grent lakes,
where tlu'se Indians had long been
in contact with the white man, many
of them were Christians; but those
in the interior were still heathens and
would not submit to having missionaries settled amongst them. In summer they got blueberries, but their
chief articU- of food was fish, al
though here and there on fertile
spots, they grew a few potatoes and
a little Indian corn. They were an
extremely dirty race, the men were
very lazy and could not be depended
upon to continue nt any work they
might he employed upon, although
they were suid to he truthful and
honest. They were polygamists, and
the morality of their women was not
of u high order. They were very
improvident, and could not be induced to lay by provisions in case
of want, so that u winter seldom passed that some did not die of starvation.
As they were all armed and capable
of greut endurance, and as the country generally wus a net-work of lakes,
where they could go in nny direction
for hundreds of miles in their, light
canoes, they might cause endless
trouble and great loss to any military force seeking to push iU way
through the country without their
permission.
(To Be Continued)
**************************
WYCLIFFE NOTES
**************************
Mr. J. Brnckett, of the Mutual Lifo
Insurance Co.. Cranbrook, wns n
business visitor to Wycliffe on Wednesday.
Miss E. Curley attended the dunce
in Cranbrook on Friday evening,
Mr. Drayton, of Fort Steele, was
a Wycliffe caller on Sunday.
Miss Ruth Greene, of Wnnklyn,
spent the week-end visiting with Miss
Jean  MacDonald.
Mrs. R. H. Trew was in Cranbrook,
shopping, on Saturday .
Mr. J. Parker and family have moved down from Marysville and taken
up residence in Wycliffe, where they
will reside in the future.
C. Mawer was a Cranbrook visitor
on  Saturday.
Engie Johren was among the Wycliffe visitors to town on Saturduy
night.
Grace and Same McCreery, of
Cranbrook werJ guests at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Stnples on
Saturday. .
Mrs. Gust. Johnson and daughter
were Cranbrook visitors on Saturday
night. 	
Miss Mary Taylor has returned
home after an extended vacation
spent visiting with relatives at Van>
couver.
Mr. C. O. Staples went out hunting
on Friday afternoon and returned
with a fine black-tail buck, weighing
about 150 pounds.
W. J. Cox was a Cranbrook visitor
on Saturday evening.
Mr. J. Nordgren moved his family
in from Cranbrook during the week,
intending to make their home here
for the future.   	
Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Clark motored
into Cranbrook on Saturday.
The Misses Jean MacDonald and
Ruth Greene were Cranbrook shoppers between trains on Friday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Piper were
Cranbrook on Sautrday.
Mr. J. Coutts, of Cranbrook, was
a   business  visitor  to   Wycliffe
M on-day
New  HATS  and  CAPS,   New  GLOVES,
New SCARFS, New SOCKS, BELTS, New
NECKWEAR,    New   Smart    and   Warm
OVERCOATS and UNDERWEAR.
Now ii the time to make your reservationi
for Xmas.
ii    in    ii    ii
E. A. HILL
-   Men's Store   -
'3iiiiiiiiiiiu>iiiiiiiitj,iEaiiiiiiiiititcaiit,i.iari,icii]iari.iitiica.iai,iiiiiiiciiiiiii,iiiiicaii,iaiiiiiirc3aiiiiiiiiitic3iiiiiiiJtii,E3ii«i*iii-iiriCHHHataiiHCMUia«uu
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—   WE STILL HAVE SOME   —
USED LUMBER
Alio SHINGLES - If Requiring Any - SEE US
Oet   Your Orders  Now.
DORIS   CONSTRUCTION   CO.
PHONE 101 P. O BOX 70S
SNAP   in  Dancing
Our litnplified mail ayitem make, the mo.t difficult   step. EASY.
Special Offer:—Send thii Advert, and $5.00 and we will mail you
a full course in any of the following DANCES:
(Mark with X the Dance you wiih lo LEARN)
Ballroom Waltz  (     )i     Ritz Waltz  (     ):     Toddle.   ( )l
Ballroom   Blacltbottom   (       )| Merry Widow  ( );
Foxtrot.   (    )|     St.   LouL   Hop   (     );     Valencia   ( ).
Record or Music suit-able for Dance supplied for $1.00 prepaid
VAN'S DANCE  SCHOOL
422 Richards Street, Vancouver, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENT
MRS. JAS. ALLEN has taken over the BLUEBIRD
BEAUTY PARLORS, and will be glad to welcome all
former patrons.
Norbury Avenue—Next Star Theatre        Phones 17 and 21S
**************************
RAW FURS
MINK - WEASELS - COYOTES
—have a good demand on the market.   By shipping your fur
to ua you receive PROMPT REMITTANCE.
Fura will be kept separately for 10 days.
B. WESTON
BAKER STREET        :        :        :        CRANBROOK, B.C.
Buy Grouse Mountain Bonds
On Wedneiday, December lit, We Will Place on the Market
$250,000
Grouse Mountain Highway
and Scenic Resort Limited
6" per cent. First Mortgage Bonds
~ Write For Prospectus Today -
ROYAL FINANCIAL CORPORATION, LTD..
E. B. McDERMID       ManaginK Director
840 Haitingi Street Weit,
Vancouver, B.C.
— Local Agent —
T. M. ROBERTS
Cranbrook, B.C.
TO
ROYAL FINANCIAL CORPORATION,
Lin-iit.d,
840  Ha.tinfi   Stmt  Watt,
Vaacouvor,  B.C.
Dear Sin:
Please send me particulars of the Grouse Mountain bond issue and oblige.
Namo
Address . Thursday, December 2nd, 1926
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
PAQE SEW
BaVetWKKmWSa^tWaWla^etWLataaW^
OUR   REPUTATION  AND   OUR
PRODUCT ARE INSEPARABLE
THE ONE DEPENDS ON THE OTHER
cWlu6/oy-,
AND 'QUALITY" GO TOGETHER
(WnB^M***^'*1'*'^^^**
Thin advertinemiMit Ih not inserted
by tliv Govornmont of the Provlnco nf British Columbia
THE   FAMOUS
Afler reducing the Premium $65.00 the
London Life Announce a substantial Increase in dividends.
— SAMPLE POLICY —
$10,000; Age 35; Old rale   ■   $279.00
New rate   -   $214.00
Policy in Dividends Dividends
Force Old Scale New Scale
1  110.30  $13.20
2     11.50     15.80
3     12.50      18.60
-4     13,50    21.60
8     14.50      24.60
A London Life policy is a profitable savings acount — pays you months If disabled,
keepa you In old age, protects your family,
educates your children, preserves your
business,
ondotiUfe
MOTHER:-   Fletcher's
Castoria is especially prepared to relieve Infants in
arms and Children all ages of
Constipation,   Flatulency,  Wind
Colic   ami   Diarrhea;   allaying
Fevcrishncss arising therefrom, and, by regulating the Stomach
and Bowels, aids the assimilation of Food; giving natural sleep.
To avoid Imitations, always look for thc ilgnaturc "i -^.lATvSe**
Absolutely Haiml-M-No Opiate   Physicians everywhere recommend it.
InBriti
Columbia Beera
■Ttt IE finest ol' grains anJ hops ar
made into the most delicious and
healthful and purest beers for tlie people
of British Columbia.
Bl itish Columbia beers are carefully anJ
continuously analysed by the Government   for   your  protection and tlie
Amalgamated Breweries take
every step necessary to meet
the high standard required.
Oder Christrtuu
Special Brews Early
Auoelltcil in the AnuliUMlfJ BftwtflM ot
Biiii-.li I', .liiuil'i. lie: Vuk-uiivrr Btfwtrif*
1.1*1 ..Wtitmlnlttf Bi(w,ryLiJ..Silvtt9(Hin«
Brewery l.i.l., Rat-lief Bttwlnl Co. of CiuJt
Ltd., Vkw,, PWnii B«wn| Oo, Ltd.,
X
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4^"»»4^-»*4-*-»-<"l"i-»
|    WARDNER NOTES    {
***************************
Mr. R. Harrison plans on leaving
this week to spend a fow days in Spokane on business.
Misses Astrid Johnson, Vera Ken-
strum, Isa and Grace Taylor, Teresa
Helman, Jennie Eastwood and
Messrs. E. Renstrom. Harold, Morri:-,
Corsan and Bernard Anderson, Ben
I Embree, Harry, Sam and Rollie
i Thompson, Gust Edwardson, F.. Mich-
: elson, D. ElderliiriK. A. Marflae, A.
'Welsford C, Baren Jr., Frank, John
■ and Harry Moore, were among the
j Wardnerites motoring to Jaffray on
i Saturday evening lo attend tin* dance
given by the Farmers' Institute, The
! music was furnished \>y [he O.K.
j Trio, of Fernie.
I Mrs. DeSero and son. Sydney, of
j NVlson, are spending a few weeks in
j Wnrdner, visiting at the home of her
sister, Mrs. Jack Trainor, and family.
Thii »dvertiieraent it not published or displayed by the Liquor
Ctatrot Board or by tlu Government of BritUh Columbia.
. The funeral of the late Mrs. Knbt.
Dormer took place on Friday afternoon in the presence of many of tho
friends of tin* family. The" funeral
service was conducted at the Dormer
home hy Kev. Mr. Rowland, of Wardner, ut 2.30 p.m., and, following the
service, those present joui neyed to
the local cemetery) where the burial
service was read, and the body interred. Mrs. Waters, a daughter of
Mrs. Dormer, and her daughter, Miss
Ivy Waters, were the chief mourners,
it being a very sad incident that, after years of untiring devotion, Mr.
Dormer was not present either at the
death or funeral of his wife, owing
to his illness which has kept him confined in the St. Eugene Hospital,
Cranbrook, for the past two months.
While the late Mrs. Dormer was a
bed-ridden invalid during the past
six or seven years of her life, she has
resided in Wardner for ahout twenty
years, and possessed many firm
friends among the older residents of
the town, nearly all of whom were
present at the services on Friday afternoon. Messrs. Scanland, A. Welsford, A, McRae and B. llargreaves
were pall bearers.
A social evening will he held in the
Club Halt on Tuesday evening of this
week, under the auspices of the Parent-Teacher Asociation, of Wardner.
An invitation is extended ity the Association to all of the townspeople.
The meeting will serve only as a social gathering, und no charge will lie
made. A short program is being arranged by the convenor, to take place,
and for those who wish cards and
tables will be on hand. Refreshments will also be served.
Mr. Theo. Thompson left on Sunday for Yahk, where he will spend
the next couple of week visiting at
the home of his daughter, Mrs. Howard Haney, and family.
Mrs. Fred Harris has turned iu her
resignation as postmistress of the
local office, nfter a term lasting four
and a half years. Applications for
the vacant office are being issued and
it is stated that several applications
have been forwarded to Supt. J. B.
Corley, of Calgary. The resignation
of Mrs. Harris becomes effective after the New Yeur.
Mrs. Waters was a visitor between
trains on Monday in Cranbrook, paying a visit to her father, Mr. Dormer.
at the St. Eugene Hopltal.
The staff of the company store are
working overtime this week at their
stupendous job of stock-taking, in
order to get the thing off their minds
before December 1st, and be able to
I prepare for the Christmas rush a
week or so before it starts.
A catchy revue is being put on
next week by the Wardner Black and
White Pierrott Troupe, under the auspices of the Wardner Athletic Association, taking place on Thursday
evening, December tUh, in the Club
Hall. The revue is composed of
songs, sketches and character hits in
true pierrott style, given in snappy,
vivacious fashion by the nine members of the troupe, assisted by the
pianist. The troupe, with the exception of the pianist, Mrs. Paul
Storey, is composed of local gentlemen, their personnel being Messrs.
C. M. Pennock, F. Harris, I.. Miggins.
J. Gordon, A. Kievill, S. Thompson,
I W. Harris, P. Storey nnd J. E. Scan-
I lund. Practice has been progressing
| for the past two months under the ex-
j pert direction of Mr. Pennock, nnd
i the troupe has achieved a concert well
worthy of a large attendance. Tickets for the concert are now on sale,
the reserve seat chart being on view
at the company store, and since the
chart is rapidly becoming filled, it behoves those wishing to purchase reserved seats to get busy immediately if they wish to avoid being met
with the S.R.O. sign. Prices are: reserves, 75c; balance, SOc; children,
25c. The concert is being put on in
order to raise fundK for the local
"community sport" program. Since
this is of much Interest and a good
program is asured, the ticket sale is
also assuring a good house.
Mr. Wm. Greep was a Cranbrook
visitor on Saturday evening, visiting
Mrs. Greep, who is reported ns being
soriously ill in the St. Eugene Hospital, suffering complications following the birth of her infant son last
week. Mr. Greep remained in Cranbrook over the week-end, and again
journeyed to town on Monday, in
order to be with Mrs. Greep.
Mr. Mindlin, of Cranbrook, spent
several days in town this week on
business among his clients of the
Crown Tailoring Company, of Montreal. Mr. Mindlin did a targe
amount of business in town, selling or
taking orders for about twenty-five
suits and overcoats.
Mra. Paul Storey has been slightly
Ul during the past week, suffering
tonsilitis.
Little Billy Daye was host to a fow
friends on Wednesday afternoon in
honor of his sixth birthday. Games
filled the afternoon very enjoyahly
for the party, the tea table making a
splendid climax, the four-storey birthday cake evoking jovous exclamations
from the kiddies as thc hunt for the
conventional ring, button, thimble
and coin went on. Among those
present were Billy Daye, Fee Helman, Alfie Daye, Roy and Keith
Thompson, Jack and Betty Trainor,
Donald Hamrin and Freda Daye.
Mr. Tom Coffee, of Yahk, arrived in
Wardner an Tuesday evening, accom-
pait*4 by hia two daughters, Myrtle
and Kathleen, whom he placed in the
tat af iW ftMAaother, Mra. Ole
Renstrom, during thc absence of their
mother, Mrs. Coffee, who is at present
a patient in the St. Eugene Hospital,
'ranbrook, suffering a slight illness.
Mrs. Coffee left on Thursday again
tn take up his work in Yahk.
Many of the local hunters have secured  fine animals this week, ranging all the way from two-year- olds
to a nine-point buck.    Tony Thomp-
?tarted the ball rolling no Thursday, when he we** fortunate enough
to kill n fine animal of medium size, j
Later in thc day Bill Holtom brought |
in   the   largest  kill   of  the   week,   a.
nine-pronged buck,  with a  magnifi-j
'■ent  head, which  Bill is considering
having mounted.    Both of these anl- !
mal:; were secured over by the Mac- j
Glnnis ranch. Messrs. G. W. Donahoe
1 Alec  Daye also managed to get
eer, while out in the hills on Sat- |
managed to get a deer, while
urday. On Sunday C, Napoleon,
Frank Fitzsimmons and John Moore
each got a deer, Napoleon bringing
one in with a nice head, the antlers
carrying six points on the one side
and ►even on the other. Of course,
we can't get everything at once, su,
of course, on Sunday evening a fast
thaw and warm rain set in, and unless a frost comes along, the hunters
n't have quite as much venison as
they expected to. By the way, a doe
and fawn appear to have again taken
Up their residence close to town. It
i.s imposible to go to Cranbrook nowadays without running into them a
mile or so along the road. The animals are not afraid in the least, and
at times it is necessary to almost 'I'ep
the ear to prevent colliding with
them,  especially the- fawn.
Jack Dow left last week for hii
home in Cranbrook to spend the next
few weeks, following the closing of
the sawmill for the season on Thursday last.
Mrs. Tom Coffee, of Yahk, arrived
in Wardner on Friday evening, Joining her children, who have been visiting at the home of their grandmother,
Mrs. Ole Renstrom, during Mrs. Coffee's illness of the past week, during
which he has been a patient at the
St. Eugene Hopltal. Mrs. Coffee wiil
remain in Wardner for a week or so,
visiting friends before returning to
Yahk.
Alec Daye was a busy man on
Thursday last, putting up aerials and
ground-wires, etc., and installing his
new radio. The machine is a <•!:;-
tube Nustrand, and is reported to be
giving splendid service, although
some little difficulties were experienced at first owing to defective plugs.
These heing remedied, however, the
stuff came over fine.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Mindlin, of Cranbrook motored to Wardner on Sunday for a few hours' visit with
friends.
Mrs. J. K. Scanland has been ill
during the past couple of weeks with
a serious attack of tonsilitis. Although Mrs. Scanland is still confined
to her bed at her home here, it is
stated that she has now become well
started towards complete recovery.
Work on the skating rink is pro-
gresing much faster than was expected, this week, since by the closing
down of the sawmill the numbei- of
workers has been considerably swelled, while most of them are also working nearly ull day in an effort to complete the rink. Actual work, It Is
expected, will be finished this week,
nnd, providing the necessary frosty
night come along, the rink will soon
be  ready for use.
Leslie Munn Itift this week for
his home near Wetaskawin, where
he will spend the time visiting at the
ranch home uf his muther, Mrs. John
Nielson. expecting to return to Wardner when the sawmill re-opens after
the New Yenr.
Mrs. Emil Johnson left on Thursday of this week for her home in
Granum, Alta., after spending the
past month in Wardner visiting her
brother, Jack Hafstad, and Mrs. 01-
Mr. A. C. Cook, official grader of
the Western White Pine Association,
spent Monday in Wardner inspecting
the grades in the yard of the C. N.
P. Lumber Co.
Fred Babick left on Friday for
Cranbrook, where he will visit friends
for the next, week^
Mr. John Lawson, of the Wardner
Hotel, Miss Louise Lawson and Miss
Laurlne Corbett were visitors in
Cranbrook between trains on Saturday last.
Mr. Fred Ryckman, of Cranbrook,
motored tu Wardner on Saturday
evening to spend Sunday with Len
Elesberg. The two men took a hunt-
ing trip on Sunday, but neither experienced any luck with the rifle this
week.
Mr. and Mrs. E. Shelborn and Mr.
and Mrs. John Anderson, who formerly managed the cookhouse, removed
from that place of abode on Friday
last, Mr. and Mrs. Shelborn taking
up residence across the track and
the Andersons moving into one of
the Moberg houses.
Mr. and Mrs. Milter have taken
up residence in their new house, by,
the station, this week. Mr. Miller
is night operator at the station.
Mr. Tanner, of Waldo, who has
been spending the past few weeks
engaged in building the residence of
Mr. Miller, has now taken up work
putting on the roof of the Hicker &
Miggins new garage.
Saturday •Visitors to town included
Mr .and Mrs. B. Daye* Mr. and Mrs.
Alec Daye, Mr. and Mrs. F. Thompson, Mr nnd Mrs. C. MaeKenzie, Mr.
nnd Mrs. G. Renick, Messrs. Gus B.
Carlson, B Johnson, E. Carlson, A.
Asvold, B. Hargreaves and H. Thomp-
More Destructive Thai War !
In a story of the increasing death
rate due to automobile operation in
the United States, a committee of
the national conference on street and
highway safety haa estimated that
doaths from this cause have exceeded
American army losses in the world
war. '
Approximately 105,000 persons
have lost their lives in thia manner
in the last 20 years, and is estimated
that if the present rate should continue for the next 20 years, the death
losses from *uta operation will ha
■440,000
BUY BONDS —
NEW ISSUE BEING PLACED ON THE MARKET WEDNESDAY MORNING NEXT, DECEMBER 1
We Own and Offer:
$250,000.00
Grouse Mountain Highway and Scenic
Resort Limited
Q Per Cent. First  Closed Mortgage Bonds
Dated December 1,1926. Maturing December 1, 1946.
Principal   and  Semi-Annual   Interest payable at the Bank of Montreal in
the Cities of Vancouver, Victoria and Edmonton.
Denominationi, $100, $500 and $1,000
Registerable  as  to  Principal  only.    Callable in all or in part for Sinking
Fund or otherwise on due notice at 105 and interest.
Price 98': and Interest
, Yielding over 6.60'.
TRUSTEE
THE TORONTO GENERAL TRUSTS CORPORATION
CAPITALIZATION
(On completion of this financing as at October 16th, 1926)
_,*.,.                , Authorized Issued
First Mortgage Sinking Fund Bonds   $250,000 $250,000
I'-  Participating Preferred Shares     450,000 293,610
Ordinary Shares  300,000 130,005
DIRECTORS
fre.ii.nl V;cPt«.i*Jt«l
W. C SHELLY w. R. W. MclNTOSH
President,  Shelly Broa., Ltd. Manapnj Director. Kelly Dootlu 4 Co., Ltd.
President, Canada Grain Export Co., Ltd.
Chairman, Vancouver Parks Board.
M. H. LECCAT, R.t„,d
Formerly of Wood Vallance 1 Leggai, ltd.
a. i. McDougall, B.m.t.r donald Mcleod a. s. Williamson
The Financial Position of the Company
as certified by Helliwcll, Maclachan & Ok. Chartered Accountants, as at October 16,
1926, and after giving effect lo this Financing, show-;:
Fixed  Assets   $513,457.49
("ash on hand      232,978.46
Liabilities, other than the bond issue      111,812.25
November 22. 1926.
Royal Financial Corporation. Limited,
Vancouver, B.C
Dear Sirs:
With reference to vour purchase of
$250,000 6}-$% Bond, of tiie GROUSE MOUNTAIN HIGHWAY AND SCENIC RESORT  LIMITED,   I  have pleasure in  giving you  the  following  information:
The above Company was organized ior thc purpose of constructing a road to
the top of Grouse Mountain, directly acros, the Inlet from Vancouver, and of locating thereon a pleasure resort. This work has now been about completed. The road
up the mountain is owned entirely by the Company, as is also 1500acres oi land whicb
is available for pleasure resort and other purposes. The Chalet has been constructed
at an elevation of 3800 feet and can be reached from the centre of Vancouver, in
less than an hour. Parking space adjoining the Chalet has been provided (or about 2500
automobiles, at a cost of $45,000. The cost of the entire work, when completed, will
be over $600,000.00
In my opinion a very conservative estimate oi the number of eu, making
the trip each year will be 100,000, from each of which we will collect as eutrance ^
fee of $1.50. I base this estimate on the fact that, although the Park has nol yet
been officially opened, we have on several days had several hundred cars up tbe hill
at one time, and, moreover, on the tact that over 600,000 vehicles have cro-sed the
Second Narrows bridge during the past vear.
t
The interest and sinking fund on the bonds amounts to $28,750 for the first
year with a decreasing amount each succeeding year. It even half of the automobiles m Vancouver alone—to say nothing about tourists—make only one trip a year,
this will give us sufficient revenue for interest and sinking fund. Operating expenses will he extremely small.
Although the bonds are issued for a period of 20 years, yet the -inking fund
of $12,500.00 per year must be used to buy bonds at the market, but if none are
available, then we are required to rail bonds for redemption at 105 and accrued interest.
As an additional protection for the bondholders, thc Trust Deed provide, that
we cannot pay over 7% per annum on the Common or Preferred Shares SO long as
any bonds are outstanding.
I believe the assets of the Company provide ample security for tbe bondholders
and that our annual net earnings will be several times thc bond requirements. Consequently, I have no hesitation in recommending the purchase of these bonds to your
clients.
Your, faithfully,
(Sgd) W. C. SHELLY,
President.
If interested in these bonds, we strongly advise you to make your reservation immediately as we have every reason for beleving the entire issue will be sold very quickly.
Call, write or phone for application form.
Royal Financial Corporation Limited
E. B. McDERMID, Managing Director.
Hud Office:   840 HASTINGS STREET WEST, VANCOUVER   B. C.
— Local Agent —
T. M. ROBERTS CIWM00M.C »»AOE EIQH1
THE  CRANBROOK   HERALD
Thursday, December 2nd, 1926
,fff.f.f.ffffjfff.f.ffffffffff^^
Xmas Suggestions
*:. - at -
THE GIFT SHOP
HEADQUARTERS FOR  OIFTS THAT  LAST
Lndlee 15-jcwel, fully guaran-
teed W.lcli — in 14-kt., White
or Green Gold case $22.00
In White ur Green gold-filled
....           $15.00
Bracelet!   — St.rlin,  Silver
filigree, from   S4.75
Stone Set, from    S6.75
French Enamel, from        $8.00
Other bracelet, from $1.00
BAA
LOCAL    t
fPEMNOf
Cult    Link.—101
14-kl.     White    ut
..Id, from
Special   valuo   in
Gold-filled    Cuff
at........
Other l.inki,  trim
$5.00
Heavy
Linki
$2.00
50c
SPECIAL—Men'a 16 ill,,
7.jewel   Watch    in    gold-
ftiled ease, fully guaranteed  •io.*0
Other reliable Time-piece.
from
$5.00
■'-1:\.:l
)P
■'    10-kt   white
ring    »et    w'*h
l.adi
gold
Aquarmorine,   Am
thyat, Sapphire, Ruby:,   etc $3.00
Waldemar Knives, in
10-kt. gold, from $5
White or green gold-
filled from       11.00
A email depoiit will
hold any article
till Christmas.
Ladies' U.kt ring
with Diamond s«t
Ruhr   IIW»
10.Lt. Ring with Dia-
mend sat Amethyst
at   $2«.B0
The Gift Shop, A. Earle Leigh
WATCHMAKER   and  JEWELER
Martin  Bros. Pay for Aih«.      tf.
Mrs. W. P. Attridge left on Wednesday for an extended visit to the
east, during which time she will visit
for a period at her former home in
Pittsburg.
Don't forget Knox Presbyterian
Church Bazaar, December 4th, to be
held in  schoolroom. 41
as & 40
Rev. V, 11. McNeil, Baptist Church
pastor, is at Nelson this week, attending sessions of the Kootenay Baptist
Association, at which he will be one
of the speakers. Mrs. K. Bine is also
attending from the local Baptist
Church.
W. F. Doran has just received a
car load of Simmond's Beds, Mattresses and Springs. Our low prices win
every time.     W   F. Doran. 38tf
The local Loyal Orange Lodge ova
huldiiu; their first annual banquet
in the Maple Hall on Friday evening,
December .'Ird. A number of brethren from Lumberton and other outside points aro expected to be present.
Call and see the new designs in
Sitnmonds' Beds, Mattresses and
Springs in the car load of same just
received at W. F. Doran's. Our low
prices win every time. W. F. Doran.
38tf.
For prompt repairs and satisfaction go to Ratcliffe & Stewart's garage. 20tf
Staff-Captain Dray, of the Salvation Army, Divisional Young People's
Secretary of B.C., will conduct a
meeting in the United Church on
Friday evening of this week, at 8
p.m. He will also give a Lantern
Service in the Army Hall on Saturday afternoon, at 2 p.m. Everybody
will be heartily Welcome.
C. B. GARRETT
CRANBROOK TAXIDERMIST
Mr. Bmborson Walker, formerly of
Ihis ctty, and now C.P.H. Itoadniaster
at Fernie, with Mrs. Walker, is leaving in a few duys on a holiday of
two or three months, during which
time they will cover Eastern Canada
and the United States pretty thoroughly. They expect to spend Christmas in New Orleans, aud will return
by way of California.
The home-made candy made by the
Patricia is absolutely pure und
wholesome. A trial will convince
you. tf.
Mr. and Mrs. Denzil Maxwell returned to Cranbrook on Saturday
last after a pleasant honeymoon trip
spent at Vancouver und other Coast
points.
A large selection of Christmas
Curds, from 6c each, ut LEIGH, thu
Jeweler. 4 ltf.
Delegates to the Conservative convention at Kamloops returned on Sunday, from what is deirribed as one
of the most outstanding political conventions ever held. Particularly
dramatic wns tho scene when W. J.
Bowser, with the immense audience
held breathless, announced that for
the sake of harmony in the party, he
was going to withdraw his name from
consideration as the possible party
leader. Friends and opponents alike
joined in cheering him to the echo.
Dr. J. »W. Rutledge, of this city, wasj
ippolnted to the provincial executive I
for East Kootenay. .
Wait for Knox Presbyterian
Church Bazaar, Dec. 4th. Sewing,
cooking, candy, tea. To he held tn I
schoolroom. *11
phone 93      G, s _ The Hou,e fot Xn>  PH0NE m
Mi**    "'"ie.
Pineapple, Golden
Tine brand: lurge
tin each      15<
Apricot Jam
Malkin's Best_
4-lb. tin
70*
Date   Bon-Bons
Whole  dntes wrapped In cream
por lb  35$
FRIDAY
and
SATURDAY
SPECIALS
for
Toilet  Paper
8 Rolls
25*
North West
Soda Biicuit.
per pkt 25*
Jelly Powder.
Sherriff's Potty
Deal;   6   Jollies,  2
fruit dishes .*. 55*
ffff
**************************
I WOMEN'S INSTITUTE |
**************************
Te  regular  monthsly  meeting of
the Women's Institute will be held in
the K. P. Hall on Tuesday, December 7th, at 3 o'clock. A full attendance is requested. An election of
iflker:-) will take pluce. Musical program and afternoon tea will be served. (
CRANBROOK TRADING
COMPANY
It Pays to Pay Cash.
— WE DELIVER FREE —
The,, price, are for Ca.h Only.
We believe the cash CUBtomet
should not pay credit prices.
Theso are a few of uur regular
rash prices—credit prices are
slightly higher.
NICE FRESH  PRUNES,
largo size,   lb         13c
KING OSCAR SARDINES   Me
MALKIN'S BEST COFFEE,
tin-     . . 70c
PURE I'l.U.M JAM, 4'«       55c
BEEKIST MONEY, 6'a    $1.00
(This Is fancy Clover Honey.)
AUNT DINAH MOLASSES,
,r. lb  tins 45c
PINEAPPLE MARMALADE,
■I'm ............... 85c
The Knox Church W.M.S. held :
very successful thank offering meet
ing in the schoolroom of the church
on November 10th lnst. The offering, which amounted to $73.:i5, included life memberships in the society for Miss Emslie and Mrs. John
ston.
CITY OF TRAIL
WHEAT, per cwt.
$2.45
SPECIALS  POR   FRIDAY
AND SATURDAY
Ca.h   Only   —   Free   Delivery
NOTICE TO WORKMEN
Workmen coming to Trail are hereby
notified that there is already ti
considerable surplus of labor in
the city, and anyone coming is
liable to disappointment and useless expense. Wm. E. B. Mony-
peny, City Clerk. -11-4:1
s
Five   Roie
Flour—
CWt. $5.10
60 lbs.     $2.60
Shelled
Almonds—
Fresh stock,
lb 65c
Apricot Jam—
•I's 60c
Swiff • Lard—
Htb tins $1.10
P & S Soap—
per bar . 7c
Mackintosh
Orange
Marmalade
•I's .       57c
C
ft
ft
f
8*5:
9
m
*R!
ft
i
i
to
■■Kr
I
I
I
%
VETS/
Christmas
Tree
w
ei
sw
i
m
ti
W
'sw
CHILDREN OF
EX-SERVICEMEN
tn*
are requested to send In t¥
their names and ages to tw
The Secertary, 'j£
Canadian Legion,        tw
Cranbrook, B.C., j*
not later than DECBM- R
I1PR 15th, in order that jg
provision may be made for fW
ths purchase of gifts. ii
•ll'll* 1
- PARENTS-'**
A meeting was held nt the city
hall on Mondny evening when the
mutter of the formation of a local
brunch of tht* Kootenny Credit Bu-
reau wns gone into more fully by the
organizer, C, Worthington, with the
local merchants interested in the matter.
Buy the haroe a Brunswick Phono,
graph at Cranbrook Drug St Book
Co. -lltf
Of interest to admirers of china
nud pottery ware is a shipment just
•eeelved by W .11. Wilson of Baleek
china from Fermanagh, Ireland.
Some of the pieces which arc on view
at tho store resemble lattice work,
and carry with them a very brilliant
lustre.    They are well worth seeing.
A Brunswick Phonograph will
please the home all the year. Buy
one for Christmas. Order early, we
have the stock now. Cranbrook Drug
A Book Co. 4ltf
Mr. W, A. Drayton, of Fort Steele,
left on Wednesday evening for the
mat. After a stop of a short time
in Calgary, he will proceed to his
home in Tuxedo Park. New York.
Mr. Drayton expects to return to
Cranbrook and district in nbout
April.
Renovation dance in the Parish
Hall, Wednesday, December 8th;
dancing 9 to 1. Come and enjoy this
dance, now that the hall haa been
beautified. Gentlemen $1.00, ladies
SOc. 41
Insure with Beale & Elwell.       *
On Saturday evening while Mr. J.
B. Beech was cranking the car of Mr.
S. Taylor in an effort to get it started, it suddenly took fire. The blaze
was extinguished without any dam-
uge resulting, but had it not been for
the quick work of Mr. Percy Adams,
fire chief, the consequences might
have been fnr different.
Saturday last tho many friends of
Mr. Percy Foote were ut the depot
to bid him farewell on the occasion
of his departure for Penticton, to
which city he has been transferred
to the Provincial Government agency
there. During his stay in Cranbrook,
Mr. Foote has made many friends
who regret his departure, but are
pleased to know that the move means
a promotion of which he is well deserving. Mr. Norman Connolly, of
the local office has been promoted to
the position of assistant assessor,
while Billy Tuylor has taken Mr. Con-
Holly's pluce.
The most personal gift— your portrait. Russell's Studio and Art Store.
Prices and styles to suit all. tf
Mr. J. Fiorintino, of the Zenith
Cafe, is the proud designer and build
er of the most elaborate Christmas
cake ever made in Cranbrook. The
cake, which is a four layer one,
stands enrobed in its coating of elaborately worked icinp, over three and
one half feet in height. The total
weight of the cake is over one hundred pounds. It is now on display
at the Zenith Cafe, ami is causing
much favorable comment on the part
of those who have Men it. 11 will be
raffled, and already the sule of tickets has started, nnd from the way
they arc being bought up, it will not
lie long before the cake is drawn for.
| TAKE NOTICE^
TOYLAND
/
CRANBROOK
DRUG & BOOK CO.
Come and see the biggest display we ever had.
- NEW SHOW ROOM -
Special Discounts to Christmas Tree Committees.
Buy early and secure the best.
Cranbrook Drug & Book Co.
SCOTT.   Managing-Director
Keen regret was expressed in the
■ity when it became known on Tuesday that Mrs. Louisa Leiteh, widow
of the late Archibald Leiteh, had
passed away at Vancouver on Mon-
lay, after a long illness. The remains are being brought to Cranbrook, where they will be interred
beside those of her lnte husband, the
funeral taking plaee on Friday afternoon. A. K. Leiteh, Colin Leiteh,
and Mrs. E. Paterson, all of this city,
— _ members of the family, and nn-
other son, George Leiteh, along with
daughter, Miss Leiteh, reside at
Vancouver, Mrs. Watson Hall, formerly of this city, and now of Winnipeg, is another daughter. The family wore among the pioneer residents
of this city and had extensive interests throughout the district, and the
word of the passing of Mrs. Leiteh
was received with keen regret by alt
those who knew her.
Anything you want welded, take it
to the Service Garage. Work guaranteed. 22tf.
This seems to bc a season of fairly
heavy mortality among some of the
ilogs in the city. About two weeks
ngo A. J. Chisholm learned of the
death of his fine collie, "Laddie," a
fine looking young dog, and one that
everyone would turn round and look
at again. He was apparently run
ovor on Cranbrook Street by a car.
Then on Saturday afternoon last another collie, "Jimmie," owned by
.lack Farrel, and one of the contestants in the the dog derby last yeur,
wus killed from taking poison in some
form. He was seen on Norbury
Avenue while Jack was at the Star
Theatre, obviously suffering from the
iffects of poison, and it was not long
before he was past help. "Jimmie"
was an inoffensive, gentle dog, nnd
outside an nccasionnt scamper after
a passing car hnd no vices that had to
be apologized for.
Knox Presbyterian Church Baiaar,
December 4th. To be held in school*
room. 41
Word was received on Sunday lnst
at Fernie thnt the Great Northern
railway depot at Elko, 22 miles west
of that point, was in flnmes. Simultaneously with thc breaking out of
fire at y.50 o'clock, explosions, presumably from ull and gasoline drums
stored in the building, were heard.
The building waa used as a storage
place for fuel for the large tractors
at norh near Klko in connection with
railway work. Some men were seen
in thc vicinity of the building an
hour before the outbreak, but it Is
not known if anyone was trapped in
the building. Provincial Constable
Sharp, investigating the fire, found
some charred bones in the ruins of
the building, but on investigation it
was thought thnt they were animal
remains, and not human.
The completion of the Fernie swinging pool aud the installation of a
filtration plant in connection with
it has been taken Up by the Fernie)
Kotary Club and they will endeavor
to raise sufficient funds this winter to
complete the project. Plans are under way for the holding of a program
of winter sports. The date announced is February 2nd for dog racing,
ski-jumping and othor happy events
for the kiddies, followed in the evening by a great masquerade moccasin
dance at the skating rink. Suitable
prizes will be awarded. During tho
succeeding week for three days in
February 7, 8 and 9 the club propose
putting on a winter indoor carnival.
Murray Saunders, well known j I
hardware traveller, who was here j §
last week on one of his periodical §
visits, pnssed through Coleman, Alia., |
on his way here, the morning thel
ixplosion had taken place in thc Mc-
Gillivray mine, which took the lives
of ten miners. There was a series
of explosions, followed by fire in tbe
lowest level of thc mine, and all work
was suspended in the International
Mine adjoining, the workings of
which are separated from the Mc-
Gillivray by a sixty-fool wall. In
order to recover the bodies of the
entombed men, the lower workings
have been flooded to extinguish the
fire, and all danger to the adjoining
property now being considered over,
work was resumed later in the International mine. Mr. Saunders sny<
Coleman was a distressed looking
town ufter the disaster, which is one
of the most serious in mining history
in thc Crow's Nest for some time.
—o
Shelled Walnuts —  clean,
sweet; quarter! lb     SOc
Shelled Almonds—
fresh Spunish: lb. .     75c
Pineapple Ring!—
per tb 90c
Bowes' Bulk Mincemeat—
per   Hi.    25e
Manning's  Perfection Coffee
always fresh: per Ib.    65c
Orange   and   Lemon   Peel—
per  tb. 30c
fresh Fruits and Vegetables
APPLES —
Wagners, No. I $1.85
Northern Spy, No. 1 ........ 2.00
ORANGES — New Navals
Per  doien SOc
Per  2  doten    75c
Sweet   Spuds:   .'1   lbs. 25c
Cranberries:   2   lb:
Sweet Cider:   per gal.
Honey,   in   comb
Grapes:   2  lbs.
Table   Raisins:   pkt.  ...
4 Be
1.00
35c
35c
25c
r ri ■ i ■::'::!■■!   ■..;■..';: : i;   ',:;<-■ ;j:.;:.ll!rrn[lJTmrtni[l|][riur!r[!1TnirUEI^IElilinc:!    ■
P. Burns C& Co., Ltd.
Service   -   Quality   -   Satisfaction
I :  IH il
MILK FED VEAL SPECIALS
FILLP.TS OF VEAl  25c pep Ib.
LOINS ROAST VEAL   25c per Ib.
ROLLED SHOULDER ROAST VEAL    25c per Ib.
Prime Young Pork Shoulder (Trimmed .... Whole, 23c per Ib.
Prime Young Pork Shoulder (Trimmed)       Cut, 25c per Ib.
-FISH-
— We Have.—
HALIBUT, SALMON, CODFISH, FRESH  HERRING,
SMELTS,   SOLES,   CRABS,   SHRIMPS,   HADDIES,
SADDIE   FILLETS, SA10KED  COD, SALT  ACADIA
COD, SALT HERIRNQ,   DIGBY CHIX.
— TRY OUR HANDI-PAT BUTTER —
CARD  OF THANKS
Mr. und Mis. Ben Macdnnuld and
sons. Ralph and Edwin, wish to express their thanks and appreciation
for all kindnesses and expressions of
sympathy extended to them in their
recent sad bereavement, in tho loss
of their dear son und brother. Roy;
especially to the members of the Mas
onic Lodges of Windermere and
Pincher Creek, to Mr. Fred Poysten
of lnvermere, und for the beautiful
floral tributes. 41
P. Burns C& Co., Ltd
. ,. i, iik,.:„„. :,!:!;i;;iiii;,iL;i;];:!i„i;ii;.i;ii .;j..:i;i iiittiiiiJii,:^..„!.::j ■ ;.::;;■ ri; .a;! iLfliMir^
On Tuesday, November 30th, the
lung people met again. Mr. Buck
gave a very interesting und instructive address on "The High School of
the Future." This was followed by
sing-song, and excellent refreshments were served by the ladies after
both meetings. The meetings closed
with the singing of "God Save the
King."
THEODORE    PADBERG,    piano
tuner,   player  expert.     Phone   602.
31-tf.
A case of theft of clothes from a
line in a yard on Durick Avenue came
to light lust week, a form of petty
thieving that seems alt too prevalent,
and yet pretty low. The best thing
for the culprit to do would be to
make restitution by returning the
clothes, so that such a petty theft
i would not hang on their conscience.
For first class automobile repair*
■e« Ratcliffe & Stewart SStf
Charlie McCarthy, alias .Jarvls, wus
arrested on Saturday lust by Chief
Halcrow. McCarthy wus wanted by
the police since Mny 21st, 1921, on
which date he escaped from lawful
custody while working on u rond
gang in the city. On Tuesduy, November 30th, he pleaded guilty to
the offence and wus sentenced io
twenty days. It is believed McCarthy
is wanted by the police elsewhere for
offences eommittcd since his escape
from here.
See Ihis special. Simmons' two*
Inch continuous post bed, coil sprint
ond cotton mattress at $26.50. At
W. F. Doran's. Our low prices win
every time, tl
Considerable interest was taken in
the tax sale of mineral properties in
the Princeton und Kettle Uiver districts held at Penticton Inst week.
Of the sixty-three claims offered in
the Princeton list, thirty were sold;
while in the Kettle River district, with
ninety-nine claims up- eleven were
sold. The Consolidated Mining &
Smelting Co. of Trail was the largest
purchaser, taking over twenty-one
claims on Copper  Mountain  in  the
Princeton  district,  nnd  two   in  the  .
Kettle Hiver district. The purchase' Renovation dance in tho Parish
of the large number of claims on Cop- Hall,. Wednesday, December 8th t
per Mountain by the Consolidated dancing 9 to I. Como and enjoy this
Company would indicate that it is dance, now thai tho hall has boon
planning   considerable    development  boautified.    G—thawa $1.00, laaUee
SWEEPING ENDORSEMENT
FOR FERGUSON GOVT.
IN ONTARIO ELECTIONS
As a result of the Ontario elections
held on Wednesday the Ferguson
government goes back into power
more strongly entrenched than ever.
Shortly before midnight the returns, with twelve seats to report, the
results were:
Conservatives   70
Liberals   12
Progressives     0
Lib. Prog „     4
Independent   Lib.        3
Labor        1
Prohibitionists        1
Total
100
Y. P. S. HOLD
INTERESTING SESSION
OF MOCK PARLIAMENT
On Tuesday, November 23rd, the
Cranbrook Young Peoples' Society
met at the United Church schoolroom
to take part in one of the most inter-
.esling meetings of the year, which
jwns in the form of a mock parliament.
There were about forty in attendance
ami these were divided into sections.
The Bolshlviks were the party in
power and the Conservatives and Liberals were the other two parties represented.
Thc Speaker's position wos filled
very ably by Miss Brander, nnd .1.
Barber made a very formidable ser-
geant-nt-arms.
The party in power brought in a
bill to put a tax on "Old Maids," and
Mr. Buck, as Prime Minister, brought
forward some very convincing arguments on the bill. Vernon Carlyle
leader for the Conservatives, and
Graham Dale, leader for the Liberals,
brought out some excellent points
against thc bill. Mr. Wallace, min
ister for tho Brewery, wns convinced
and went over to the Bolshiviks
Other members spoke on the bill, r
vote wns taken and the bill defeated.
The Prime Minister moved thnt session adjourn, but this was defeated,
so the government resigned. This
was followed m few minutes later by
NEW SCOTCH DANCE
INTRODUCED BY
CALEDONIANS HERE
The Cranbrook Caledonian Society
held their monthly meeting in the
K.P. Hall Monday lust, president D.
Halcrow in the chair. After then
usual business wus dispensed of, Kev.
Bryce Wallace gave an able and instructive address on St. Andrew, the
patron saint of Scotland, which was
listened to with rapt attention. Mrs.
G. E. Macdonald, Mrs. Coutts, Mr. I.
Hannah nnd Miss Jeun Patrick rendered appropriate songs, which were
well received.
A vote of thanks on motion of Mrs.
Coutts, seconded by Mrs. H. Brown,
was awarded Rav. Bryce Wallace for
his address, as ulso to the musical
contributions by Messrs. Strachan and
McDonald.
Thereafter, n dance was held, Alan
Graham on the great Highland bagpipes supplying appropriate music
for thc latest dance imported from
Scotland, known us the "Call of the
Pipes." This highly artistic and elegant dance is becoming very popular
throughout the world.
Kenny  Euglesome and  Bill Smith
on the piano, with Hughie McGill as
director   of  ceremonies,  contributed
to a very successful evening,
■o—•
was kept up until 4 a.m. with still a
large number present, it can be readily judged that a good time was being
had.
Contributing possibly larger than
any other feature in the success of
the evening was the wonderful musk
supplied by the Bluebird Orchestra.
During the dance, and since, the leader, Mrs. Art. Wallace, has been the
recipient of many expressions of commendation for the class of the program which she presented and the
manner of its execution. The success
attained by this home-town orchestra
was the means of convincing many
that it is not necessary to go outside Cranbrook to get good music
providing the parties hiring same
were willing to pay a price suitable
to engage the necessary number of
musicians, it being unfair to compare an orchestra of three pieces with
that of one of five or sometimes
more.
Another most enjoyable item in
connection with the dance wns the
buffet supper served by a committee
of the ladies. This lunch was most
enjoyable, and appreciated by all
those present. As a result of the
affair, a nice sum of money was collected for thc exchequer of the Curling Club.
Leading the grand mnrch was Mr.
W. F. Cameron, all decked out in
highland regalia. Thc dancing of
the Misses Alberta Jones, Lorna Barber and Glen Bowness wns watched
with interest, to the playing of pipes
by J. Ewan and J. Scott, of Kimberley, and wos a source of much enjoyment, particularly to the Scotch
admirers present.
work iu that field.
50c
41  tha adjourniMnt af session.
CURLERS' DANCE
GETS SEASON AWAY
TO GOOD START
Tuesday evening the annual cur-' f
Ion1 ball, h Id this year nt the beginning instead of the end of the
urling season, was undoubtedly a
unique success. In every way the
1080 bull of the devotees of the
"stune and besom" outclassed previous events. It is true that the
crowd was not as large us on some
former occasions, but it should be
considered thnt the comfort of the
dancers would have been jeopardized
bad there been any more, and thc
pleasure of those in attendance would
huve been   lessened.
Thc hall, despite the fact that a
fire had taken place in the Auditorium but two days previously, never
looked better, this being largely due
to the energetic work of Mr. McGregor and n committee of curling
assistants. Indicative of the nature
of the occasion, the platform was
decorated with a number of curling
stones nnd brooms, together with
evergreen, behind which the orchestra was seated.
Ytom tha fact that the lUncia*
LTHil^.ilT^■r;: hi"vi-.;:::,';.rr!i:i'.il ?:HL'r^:ii:|-.r;!:il iu,liu
Baleek China i
Wo have just  received
a shipment ol the above
China direct (rom Ireland
CREAM and SUGARS
CUPS and SAUCERS
SALT and PEPPERS
PLATES, TEA-POTS,
BON DISHES and CAKE
TEA KETTLES, BON-
PLATES
| Priced from 75c to $6.50
,W.H. Wilson
i — JEWELER —

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