BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Cranbrook Herald Aug 18, 1921

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cranherald-1.0069689.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cranherald-1.0069689.json
JSON-LD: cranherald-1.0069689-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cranherald-1.0069689-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cranherald-1.0069689-rdf.json
Turtle: cranherald-1.0069689-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cranherald-1.0069689-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cranherald-1.0069689-source.json
Full Text
cranherald-1.0069689-fulltext.txt
Citation
cranherald-1.0069689.ris

Full Text

 TNE NATIONAL AOTBRTUU
KNOWS THE BE8T MEDIUM—
HE PATRONIZES THE HEBALD
THE
hera;^
, -   FOB  THE   BOME-
*J*i»iy     j,Crests or cran.
••T It xjfg    ORtMOST   ALWAM
VOLUME 23
CRANBROOK, B.C., THURSDAY, AUGUST 18,1921
NUMBER -Ji
Does Not Satisfy
Soldier Settlers
Statements,.)! Minister of Agrl
culture at Lister Ho Not Hear
Out Earlier Promises
WYCL1FFE BEATS
COLEMAN-HILLCREST
IN SHUT-OUT GAME
i;ami> LIBTBR.— Tho following
Hntomenta have heen issued by tho
aottlora' committeo, respecting the In
torvli w recently wllh Hon. El. li. Bar
row, minister or ngrlculturoi
"During tint lasl week Camp Llstor
was honored with a visit from the
llmi. IS. I). Harrow, mllllBtor ol ngrl*
culluro, mnl ],ii<ut.-('oi. it. l>. DavldSi
iii'iui ur iin> iinivinciiii land Bottlomonl
iniiiiil. Tin visit iiml been looked forward to hy the sottlers, as It wiih hoped Him the difficulties oxlstlng ho-
twoon the provincial land settlement
board and Uo Bettlera would be satisfactorily arranged.
"Mr. Harrow did not address tliu
Bottlers ns ii body, ns has been his
usual custom, but on Wednesday al-
temoon ho met lho soitlers' committee, mid the executive of tlie local U
W. V. A. The meeting brought none
of the good results anticipated nnd
looked for by all.
Why Dereleiimeiil Work Has Censed
"Regarding the sudden close down
of development work In tlie settlement
recently, Mr. Barrow stated It was necessary on account of shortage of
money, and lie could give no hope of
tills work being carried out In the
near future.
"In reply lo a request that he assist tho settlers In their claim for a
decent road into the settlement, Mr.
'•Harrow-was emphatic that nothing
can be done, as all road work Is held
up. the money nlloted for such work
being necesnry to help the unemployed this coining winter. Mr. Barrow
made no reply when it was pointed
out that tlie road work Is out of the
question in tliis district in the winter
time. . '
"Mr. Barrow claimed that the roads
here are boulevards,, compared with
some otlier parts of tho province.
While It is difficult to Imagine that
anything entitled to he called a road
Is worse I linn tho roads of this'area,
our sympathy goes out to settlers of
other districts who suffer from the
same condition-
Interest Kate Stumbling Block
"The question of tlie rate of Inter
est to he charged ou ftans in the ag-
I'eenient of sale remains a stumbling
bloCS to uny agreement satisfactory
to the land settlement board and to
the settlers.
"Tlle settlors claim, nnd have every
evidence to prove, that they were
induced to come to this area and take
up land by the directors nnd officials
of the land settlement board, who
personally stated to the settlers that
lhe land would be sold when cleared
and developed on a 25-year loan at
S per cenl., terms lo bo similar lo
Ihose under lhe Federal soldier settlement board. When an agreement ot
salo wns put up to the settlors a year
ago It wns found that lhe rati of In-
Icresl to be clinrged was 7 per cent.
This Increase has always been strenuously opposed, nnd nt presont Is Ihe
main obstacle lo any satisfactory soi-
lli ment.
Solllers Hnro Improied Plots
"Tlle soliIcrs look upon this matter
as a breach of contract by Ibe government, and as prni'lloally all of them
have spent considerable money and
mil ii great ileal of llmo Improving
tholr allotment's, they feel ihey have
been mado in play Inlo the government's bands,
"Kr. Harrow added I it t In now to the
former discussions on this matter,
I bough he made one rather startling
Binioinoui. This was ihal the difference betweon 7 and 5 por cept. wns
very sllghl and that if a mail could mil
mako good on wild land al 7 per cent.
he couldn't make good al ri per cent.
"Altogether the results of tiie meeting are mil likely to give much en*
oouragoment to soitlers, as. though
Col. Davles slated, Hint lho govcrn-
inonl might perhaps look a Utile more
favorably on Hie settlement If tin settlors would sign ibe agreement, the
general Impression given out by the
Visitors was Ihat settlement nrons
form the leasl of ■ tie government's duties nnd thai little encouragement will
he given such iiuilcrtukug lu Hie full're.
"Tn tlie returned Hcitlors of Lister
this attitude has a rather serious as-
,peot. The heavy work of clearing
and stumping in the area ls now practically finished. The majority of the
Bottlers had the cleared portion of
their allotments—five acres— turned
over to lliom this spring and summer.
Thoy are now fneed wltll the task of
getting Iliis Into a fit atato of cultivation ns u means to help make a livelihood.
"Now Is tho tlmo every encouragement should bo given to assist tho
men to get a start on the land thoy
have workod hard to clear. Tlle .present situation brlngH 'o mind an article
which appeared in tho Vancouver Province nf August 6, 1919, which stated: 'There must bo no exploiting ex-
sorvlee men for the purpose of developing certain areas.   The men must
The Wycllffe baseball team played
a combined team of Hllerest and Coleman at Coleman ou Mouduy evening.
There wus a big attendance or fans
from nil over the I'nss. The brand of
baseball tho Wycllffe .players are serving is tlie very host and the players
themselves aro the sort of sportsmen
ono likes to look nt. Ault and Mc
Lean was the W-ycllffo batti ry ml ivu
dergust mul Clarke for Hie united
loam.
It was a fast game but Hie finish
and quickness or the Wycllffe boys
wero loo much fin* tbelr opponents.
II wus u walk-over for Wycllffe mnl
iiiiled lu a clean sliut-oul againsl llu
united mint, thu score being Hillcrest
Coleman 0, Wycllffe ll.
FORMER PASTOR HERE
CELEBRATES SILVER
WEBBING IX ONTARIO
Had Great Time
At Boy's Camp
Tho Boys' Camp at Premier Luke
came lo n successful conclusion   on
Saturday laut, and (lie 56 boys and 12
adults returned home proclaiming It
one*, of the best events of its nature
ever held in this section.
The men in charge of the camp,
Messrs, J. M. Clark, P. G, Morris, E-
A. Leigh, W. M. Harris, and E. Young
of Wycllffe, report that the morale of
the boys was excellent throughout
the whole time.
Owing to the departure of Mr. J,
M. Clark, early this week for the
East, it is imposible to give a full account of hte sporting events and results. However, one athletic and two
aquatic meets were held, also a volley
ball tournament, and many other events of like character. Points were
awarded In the various contests, totals
deciding the prize winners. Camp
fires were held nightly which Included sing-songs, stunts, tales, dramatic
plays, etc., etc.
Out of the twelve boys who went to
the camp that could not swim a total
of seven came borne masters of the
manly art. Not a single accident occurred during the whole camping .period.
HARVESTERS CROWDING
PRAIRIE CITIES; POLICE
WATCHINfl TIIE I.YV.vV.S
The following excerpt from tlie
Stoutfvtlle, Out.. Tribune, refers to the
silver wedding of Rev. and Mrs. King
who were formerly residents of thie
city at the time Mr. King was pastor
of the locnl church, Rev. \V. T. Taps-
present pastor her , Is a cousin
of Mrs. King:
Following n recent young people's
Lawn  Serial on .tlie Baptist    PaJflOD*
age grounds the married people of
ihe congregation were the guests of
Hiv. mul Mrs. King last Friday evening when 11 delightful time was spent
111 a program Of mUBlC, readings umi
an Informal social lime with refreshments served hy the ladies at the
dose. Pastor King Interested tho
party by I In news thai it was the eve
or his Silver Wadding Anniversary
mnl thai be and Mrs. King were glut)
to have them celebrate with them.
Instead of as planned for the next
day wltb their relatives, some of
whom were unable to attend owing to
serious illness. He referred to the
years of blessing it nil happiness that
hud passed in their married life and
uffirmeTI it as his conviction that marriage was not a lottery unless people
made it so by a careless, Christ!ess
choice and life. At tho close of the
program, Mr. and Mrs. King were
called to the platform when un impromptu but happily worded address
of congratulation and good wishes
was tendered to them on behalf of the
people by O. M. Forsyth. Tlie "bridal
pair" were tlie recipients of a number
of hearty greetings by wire and mail,
also of valuable silver and other gifts
from friends far and near. An excellent .program was presented by the
male quartette, the Orchestra, cornet
solos by little Miss Chilstena Anderson of Richmond in remarkably fine
form, piano duets and solos by Mrs.
King and Misses Stark and Paterson,
and readings by Mesdames G. M. For-
,syth, Coates and E. Ward and Miss
Stark. The function was pronounced
a delightful affair by everybody present.
HAY INAUGURATE
COLONIZATION POLICY
FOR THIS PROVINCE
Lax If) mi Part of Govommeni
Jn Regard to Grand Forks
Irriunliu-i .Projecl
Acct
Victor!
nlgcr.
IMPORTANT PUBLIC
MEETING ON AUG. 29tli
Unwilling; to  Accept  Rate
Pay Which The Farmers
Are Offering
Winnipeg— A very considerable
number of the 25,000 harvest excursionists from the East are reported
lingering in tho cities and towns of
the prairies, some nnwillng to accept
the $4 per day offered ns the standard prico by tho farmers.
in some sections tt is reported that
I.W.W. cards are being displayed,
but it is believed these are carried by
harvesters wlio came in from south
of tho line. On tho whole, those harvest excursionists are reported orderly und tho police have made very few
arrests.
Tho Mounted Police secret service
department is paying strict attention
to known I.W.W. agitators who are
iiild to have como In from North Dakota, whero the harvest is practically
ver. The prairies have been very free
from I.W.W. disturbances since 1918,
when agitators of this type concentrated on the coal mine regions of Alberta and made trouble.
A number of citizens have determined on a public meeting to be held
in the city hall at 8 o'clock, ou Mouduy evening. August 28th, to discuss
Hi? .edibility of erecting a Library
...eiiioria. CO Gin*-Aldiers ■* To be assured of a representative meeting, a
notice is being sent to every organization in Cranbrook with tho request
that it e'ect at least one delegate to
this meeting. It is hoped ihut in tho
interest of Cranbrook, and out of respect to our dead soldiers, all who possibly can will attend this meeting.
rding   lo   §ord   received   from
i lasl week-- tid Mr. K- C, Hen-
Liberal  member    for   Orand
■'orks, may resign or at least cense
0 Ruppori the Oliver government be-
atiso he objects to lho treatment rc-
elved by his oonstltui ncy al tha
hands or the admin 1st ration, which ho
intimated following it conference witii
e Premier.
Mr. Henolger staled that "the poo-
b of my constituency'iBmdoubtedly
will demand my resignation on ac-
ount »of the government's decision
got to go ahead with the Grand Forks
Irrigation project Ihis summer."
"The governmeni," ht added, "bas
ost   tlie   Grand   Forks   seift  already.
1 could not elect a member there
at another election now."
"I may not be down to the fall session at all," Mr. Uennigcr remarked
significantly, und later added: "Any*
way, they can move my desk over
rrom tho government to the opposition
side of the House.
"I am certuinly not going on the
P.G-E. excursion," the Grand Forks
member declared. "It is tlie P.G.E.
which is eating up the revenue of tne
province, and while benefitting only
a few people up north, Iu keeping the
rest of British Columbia from getting
what It needs. It was a mistake In
the first place and is just being perpetuated."    ,
The Art Of
Being Married
FIRST REDUCTIONS
IN RAILROAD WAGES
CARELESS FISH FitM FN
MAV COMPEL DRASTIC
FOREST PROTECTION LAW
Serious consideration is bolng given
by tho administrators of the forest
resources in the various provinces to
a scheme for curbing the gross carelessness of camping parties in needlessly starling forest fins. The Job
of extinguishing timber conflagrations
resulting from the fires set by campers and elragottos smokers has caused ti.o public treasuries such a sum
of money that some moans of curbing
the evil will have to be devised.
Already the provinco of New Brunswick is considering the classification
of Its woodland area witli a view to
prohibiting the entry of fishermen and
others who ir.ny employ camp tiros or
drop lighted tobacco -ind mutches.
Such a regulation might work a hardship on many sportsmen, but as a
class, fishermen, hunters and campers
generally would have only themselves
to thank for whatever .penalties might
be Imposed upon them in the interests
of foreBt protection. To lenvo the
camp fire burning has been shown
over and over again to havo vicious
possibilities. Tho vnluo of the forest
resources Is such that not nn acre ol
timber enn be burned without thc
people as a whole paying u serious
penalty.
he placed, on laud under conditions
that will ensure their buccchh with
tbe Least possible delay.'"
MONTREAL, Aug. IB.— More than
ten weeks after the preliminary Intimation of a decrease lu wages. 140,-
ooo Canadian railway enployees today
txperienced the first practical effect
of n reduction. Cheques distributed
ull over the Canadian Pacific and
Canadian National systems curried
tho first application of the cuts. Pay
given out today was for tlie July IB
to August 1 period, tho first fn which
Iho average Vi por cent, reduction
was effective.
While detailed figures nre lacking,
it is variously estimated that the reduction amounts fn actual figures to
from $1,000,000 to $1,250,000. Negotiations, which are pending relative
to tho wages nnd working conditions, have not yet commenced,
though it ts staled that 0e preparation of liriofs. which will he carried
to the conferences by both employers
ami workers, is well advanced.
CARPtiNTIER WILL
RETIRE, FIGHT WITH
4-ilHltONS TO HE LAST
Georges Curpoiitler will bid farewell
to tho fighting ring after ho meets
Tommy Gibbons, the St. Paul llght-
heavywelght, In the Slates next January, according to M. Deschamps, the
French champion's manager. Ho said
that Carpentler would fight an English boxer not yet designated in London somo time in October or November, then he will meet a- French heavyweight In Paris, previous to meeting
Tommy Gibbons for tlte llght-hcavy-
welght championship of the world.
KING PETER IS READ
News has just boen recelevd from
Belgrade, Jugo-Slavia, that King Peter of Serbia Is dead.
UIHRONS-LEVINSKY
BOUT FOR LA1IOR DAY
Tommy Gibbons, light-heavyweight,
of St. Paul, will meet Battling Levin-
sky, light-heavyweight, at South
Bond, Ind., on Lnbor Day, lt was announced recently. Gibbons is to get
$10,000 for bla end.
The following is lhe Vancouver
Sun's opinion ou the above subject:
Nowadays newspapers are full of
stories about marled men who run
away with other women. It is not
likely that theso Incidents are more
frequent than ever beforo, but today
they get more publicity, because the
pitclic mind lias boon saturated with a
lot of vicious theories like "free love."
Divorce doesn't remedy the -situation nt all. ri;e results of spoiled
marriages are the samo whether a
law court ratifies tho break or not.
There Is no difficulty about getting
married. Anybody can find a mate in
this country. But to stay marled, in
the full sense of tiio* term, is another
matter.
Staying married is an art in itself.
But the art of slaying married is a
very simple affair if a few common-
sense rules are observed.
Marriage is founded on attraction
between a man and a woman. To stay
married, then, all one has to do is to
keep oil being attractive.
No woman can stay in love with a
man who thinks ahout nothing but his
business and talks ahout nothing but
the weakness of the coffee. No man
enn love a woman whose only topic of
conversation is tho plugged up condition of the stovepipe, who never heard
of n caucus, and who thinks disarmament is a new washing machine.
To keep marriage going tlie minds
of the high contracting parties must
bo kept clean, fresh, and up-to-date.
Thoy must have continuous common
interests.
If they don't have common Interests
some sympathetic young fellow or
some bright young Miss is going to
como along and break up the family.
This Inevitably brings tears, heartaches and sorrow. It ruins the lives
'of llttlo children nnd the lives of
grown-Up children.
Just because two maried folk think
It Isn't necosary io interest each other nny more. When, as a matter of
Tact, each should spend more time
Improving his or her mind Tor the
other, than mi preparing speeches for
ii directors' meeting or the ladles' aid.
The visit of Hon. T. D. Pattullo to
the Old Country at this time lends
utrength to the statement thut tlie provincial government will shortly initiate u determined colonization movement along really comprehensive
lines.
it is well known the Hon. E. D. Barrow has long favored the careful selection of British settlers, men who
have $2,500 or so to start with. Such
men, with poor opportunities in the
crowded districts of the old laud,
would find tho rieh valleys of British
'■'liimblu a profitable field.
British Columbia has never witnessed a determined colonisation
movement along comprehensive lines.
Spasmodic attempts have been made
during the past ten years, chiefly by
speculative land companies, but the
results achieved have brought more
harm than good- The prico of lands
-.oared beyond reason, with the result
Mint tens of ihousands of acres of the
finest lands iu all the province acquired such a high, fictitious value,
that genuino settlers wero unable to
occupy them with any hope of financial success, and these lauds, selected
us far back as 1907 to 11H0, remah
Idle to this day.
Information fiirnlsheil by the mln
ister of lands during the recent session of the legislature showed that
over 2.000,000 acres of surveyed land
had beon returned to the government
under the proportionate allotment legislation of 1910,
Colonization is, without question
the greatest problem before the country. Only ono acre in 808 of the province's total urea Is now under the
plow. Labor has always opposed immigration becuuso the vast majority
of the new-comers have flocked to the
cities. With the new settlers going
to the land no such opposition would
be set up.
British Columbia has no equal among the provinces or states of the union agriculturally. Tlie climate is
unequalled, and tliere is so much farm
land available that not one-quarter of
it will bo cultivated within two generations.
Colonization should bo made the
chief aim of the government.— B. C-
United Parmer.
SAO ACCIDENT AT
LETHBRLDGE)  MOTHER
SEES HER SON KILLED
According to word received from
Lethbrldge a sad fatality occurred in
that city on Monday, shortly before
five, when little Frank Baker, a boy
of three years of age was run over by
an uuto und killed in the presence of
his mother. Tho child was holding
the hand of his mother, Mrs. Fred
Baker, who was wheeling a carriage
with a baby, when he broke away, apparently being attracted by a pup on
the street, and wus rrushed under the
auto.
The driver had waited for a numlier of people to take the crossing
where the avenue joins the main
itreet In the business section and had
lust started his car when the fatality
occurred, The little fellow died very
shortly after he was rushed to the
iloctor.
Meeting of
City Council
Water Regulations Will Be En-
forced—City May Buy Old
fuir (-.rounds
MANY SMALL HOTELS
IN D. C. MAY CLOSE
Unless something is done ininied
fatoly to enable hotels to sell beer
by the glass, the majority of small
hotels will have to close down, was
tho conclusion reached at a meeting
of the B.C. Tourist Hotel Protective
Association at Langley Prairie.
The following officers were elected: President, H. H. Jones; vice-
president, J. S. Donnelly; chairman
of committees, J. S. Turner, W. B.
Stlno and J. C. Webster; secretary-
treasurer, S. Durham.
DRUG ADDICTION IS
TREBLED UNDER DRY
LAW, SAYS REPORT
NEW YORK.—Statistics from city
hospitals show that drug addiction
has trebled since prohibition went Into effect, according lo a report made
public recently by the department of
public   welfare.
"Iu 1918 hospitals treated 116 cases
of drug addiction," the reporl said.
In 1919 this number Increased to 339,
nnd In 1920 493 drug addicts were admitted. These figures represent only'
a small portion of the totat number of
Irug addicts treated. For instance,
the 1920 figures are for Manhattan alone, with no totals for other boroughs.
Prohibition bus not perceptibly lessoned the number of alcoholics treated In   hospitals, the report stated.
0. IL C.  NOTES
BOYCOTTING P.G.E.
EXCURSION
VICTOHIA.-Xo definite arrangement has been made among Conservative members of
the legislature to boycott tho
Pacific Great Enstcrn Railway
excursion planned by the premier nml oilier directors of the
lino, W. -.1 Bowser, K.C., leader
of the opposition declared recently. Mr. Bowser himself will
not take part in tlie tour, but
ho asserted that he did not
know whether his opposition
colleagues would mako tho trip
or not.
The C.R.C. hns acquired five lots
on the street directly behind the club
building. Theso lots are being fitted
up for tennis courts and a voile;? ball
courl which will be turned Into u
large skating nnd hockey rink during
the winter months. There will be two
double tennis courts and u volley ball
court and tho sknting rink will be approximately 150 feet long- It Is quite
evident that a good time is in store for
all the club members, both junior and
.enlor.
Mrs. Elmore Staples, president of
the C.R-C. and family, are spending
a two weeks' holiday at Premier Lake
whore they have built a summer home.
Tlie swimming pool is being patronized this warm weather, the juniors
linving the use of tlie pool from 10 to
12 a.m.. while the seniors linve the
use in tho afternoons and evenings.
The C.R.C. boys returned from the
enmp at Premier Lake last Saturday
night and all reported having had a
whale of a time. It Is lo be hoped
that tho boys will bo given a simitar
opportunity next summer.
Mining Engineers
Visit Postponed
It Is to lie regretted that the proposed visit here of the American Mining Engineers has been postponed indefinitely. Word to this effect wus
received by Col. c. M." Pollen this
freek from Mr. L. K. Armstrong,
secretary of the Columbia Section of
the American institute of Mining Engineers, Spokane, who stated that owing to the absence of many of the
mining experts at tlie presont time,
and the geenral depression fn mining
circles, thut it would be advisable
'.o cancel the meeting for this season
Unfortunate though this is then i
ao reason to become discouraged, for
the cancellation of the visit as planned
will no doubt be overcome by a bigger
and better gathering here it some future date.
Mr. J. F. Huchcroft. secretary of
thc local Prospectors' Association, remains quite optimistic and stated that
ho bad received a good collection of
ore supples and 'hat he still wanted
i large number, for although they can
not now be used for the expected visit of the engineers they would mater
ially help our exhibit at the 1922 con
vontion at Nelson. Keep up the good
work for It will certainly not be In
vain.
to look into the
Workings of aid to
industries act
The first, but perhaps not the last.
of the chickens of the provincial government's aid to industry legislation
has come home to roost. This in itself
is no cause for alarm, but it is feared
when the, searchlight of Investigation
s turned on to other assisted compan-
os. there will be further disclosures
of knock-kneed concerns v.hich ought
never to have been bolstered up with
public money.
The concern over whicli a financial
postmortem is to be held fs the B. C.
Yacht and Boat Builders. Limited, a
Victoria concern, which was given -
loan of $10,000 besides getting other
assistance. The provincial government has decided to take steps to have
a receicer appointed for the firm,
and will ask tbe dominion government
to earmark for repayment of the loan
certain monies said to be due to the
ompany by the dominion government.
There will shortly ne held a full
meeting of the advisory numbers of
the industries department and members of the government at which the
matter of other loans made will be
gone into, and the activities of the
new department reviewed.
FRKIGHT RATES ON
LIVESTOCK IS DEBITED
MONTREAL, Aug. 12.—The freight
rates on livestock will bo reduced to
practically pre-war levels when the
new tariffs of tho Canadian Pacific
Railway go into effect on Monday
next, it was stated by the transportation bureau of tho Board of Trade today. Last January 5 per cent, was
cut off the 30 per cent, increase granted a year ago, and tho new rates will
wipe out the other 25 per cent, It
was stated.
It was also stated that tho reduction was part of the goneral  policy
f the railways to reduce freight rates
wherever poslble, and It Is antlclpat-
d that before long there will bo similar reductions in other products.
The  rates  now published  are  for
Ivestock, with separate rates for
horses, mules and ponies higher than
those on Other livestock, but nevertheless considerably lower than they
were. The substantial nature of the
reduction, it was said, will be    seen
n comparing lho new rates with the
lid. For Instance from 10 to 15
miles tho ralo Is to be 7 l-2c per hun-
Irod pounds, against the old rate of
10c.
From 17 to 200 mnos It waB 29 l-2o
iind It will he reduced to 22c. It was
pointed out that thoso reductions will
ho a groat help to farmers shipping
tork Into Montreal nnd (hat It might
have -somo effect In Hllghtly lowering
market prices.
The city council met in regular session In the city council chamber on
Thursday evening last and several
rather Important matters cunie up for
discussion.
Three returned men applied for a
loan under the Better Housing Act,
hut (15.000 Is the amount alotted to
Cranbrook and the full $15,000 must
be taken up before work can be proceeded with. However a committee
composed of Aldermen Santo, I^aurie
and Flowtrs was appointed to go Into
the question.
The council aproved of the plana
of the proposed I.O.O.F building presented by Messrs. Qtlroy and Morris.
w. Soden, foreman of works, presented his recort, which showed that
only about one-half Inch of water was
now going ever the reservoir dam.
The council endorsed Mr. ESakin'a action in regard to enforcing the water
regulations. It was stated that some
water users left hose limning all
night, which the council did not think
fair In the face of existing conditions,
so it is now a case of one thing or tho
other with careless water users.
A communication from tlu Crauhrook Agency was rend which offered
to sell tlie city the old fair grounds
and buildings for the sum of $0,000.
Considerable discussion ensued but no
action  was definitely taken.
A long discussion took placo in regard to purchusing a hronzo tablet,
and ultimately it was decided to purchase one to be hung in the council
chamber, its siie to be about 24 by 36.
Council then adjourned.
PRETTY VANCOrVER
GIRL  MISSING:  FOrL
PLAY IS SCSPECTED
With the mysterious di.-ap[>earance
of pretty Ethel Wolfe. 17-year-old
Vancouver girl, in that city baffling
tlie einhV' Vancouver Police Department, clues traced down Monday night
by Detective George Mclaughlin and
a score of private investigators lead
the authorities to believe that the
missing girl has been ab-iucted by
"wi;ite-si.»vc*rs".aTid ii b<u*ag held outside tbe city.
According to the authorities the
girl left her home to go swimming
Thursday afternoon. She left a short
note to her mother stating that Bhe
would return late In the afternoon.
Sunday afternoon it was erroneously
reported that the young girl had been
located, according to the police.
George Haut=-Defres:e. a Frenchman, said by the police to be a friend
of the missing girl, was interrogated
police headquarters on Saturday
by Sergeant George McLaughlin.
Hauts-Defreste could give the police no clue to the possible whereabouts of the girl. He stated that he
knew her well, but had not seen her
since the day previous to her mysterious disappearance.
Sergeant McLaughlin then took J.
Addison, a cabinet maker, into custody Monday night. Addison is also
said by the authorities to be a friend
of the missing girl. He ia said to
have resided at the Wolfe house last
year and to have been in the girl's
company shortly before she disappeared.
Addison could throw no light on
the whereabouts of the missing girl.
He told the police that lie had eeen
her several days before ibe disappeared, but knew of no friends Bhe
ould have visited. He was later released by the police.
Benjamin Wolfe, father of the
mlsing girl stated that he could think
of no reason why his daughter should
leave home. Mr. Wolfe aided lo the
search and visited all the hospitals
In Vancouver and Now Wm*. minster.
Irene de Presto, at whose house
Hauls-Dcfreste is staying, was alao
closely questioned as to her i>oslb1e
knowledge of the missing girl, but
though she admitted knowing hor well
and bad gone out wit., tier und llauts-
Dcfreste for motor rides, sho denied
hnvlng seen her for somo tlmo or
knowing anything about tho case.
Numerous bits of information were
given to the police by parties interested in tht search, but when these
were followed out there was no result.
Late Monday night added Information was received and the police officers extended their search to outside
points and the police at points in the
Fraser Valley were requested to make
enquiries at farms in their vicinity
for a girl answering the description
of Ethel Wolfe, as they wore led to
believe that she might bb there.
The missing girl Is 17 years old,
fivo feet six inches in height, dark
complexion with pronounced Hebraic
features. When she disappeared from
home she was dresHed In a plain green
gingham dress, black shoes and stock-
Inge and wore no hat. PAGE    IWO
THE      CRANBROOK      HEBALD
Thursday, August ISIh, 1021
PRE-WAR PRICES Ity
COLUMBIA
Table Model, formerly tSE.OO
Now   148.110
Cabinet Model In Mahogany,
formerly (130.00
Now $1111.00
The first high grade machine
tu go back to pre-war price*.
COME IN AND SEE THEM
Also Hie latest lu Records
RAWORTH   BROS.
(Next Post Office)
Ox Cranbrook Gerald
Published every Thursday.
A. WILLIAMS..Editor tt manager
Subscription Trice .
Tu United Mates ..
Mill per year
-.50 per year
«W1U  .  US..I..L  »nbout  • Baulc*
Pri-*.<4 hi V.I.. Labor	
No Utten to tho -aMor will bo Insert-
ad oxoopt o»or tlit proper signature
ud addrtsa of ths writer. Ihe rulo
admits of bo exception.
Advertising Rates on Application.
Chans"■ for Advertising MUST be In
thla office Wednesday noon ths current
wees.,to secure attention.
CltANBROOK,  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
THURSDAY, AUGUST Utll, 1921
GOOD THINGS AHEAD
The cancellation of tlie proposed visit of (lie American
Mining Engineers, details of
whicli appear in our news columns, will no doubt come as a
disappointment to the people of
Cranbrook. However we cannot say die, for another event
of great importance is now in
the offing, the International
' Mining Convention, whicli
takes place in Nelson next
Spring. East Kootenay and
West Koolenay ought to work
together in this undertaking
and see to it that the best ever
is the outcome. A proper and
thoroughly representative i
hibit from the East Kootenay
will doubtless be there, aud indeed is now in course of pre
paration. The entire responsibility ought not lo be left to
the Prospectors. Anything that
tends towards the development
of mining in this section is of
great moment to the city at
large, and hence matters of this
kind cannot be said to be the
particular concern of any one
section of the city.
Here is a great opportunity
for the cultivation of thc work-
together spirit. The greatest
good for the greatest number—
make this your slogan and do
what you are asked to do in the
interests of any public-spirited
movement and do it thoroughly, as though you were paid for
it.
TRIVIALITIES
AND IMMENSITIES
After a more or less prolong
ed period of wrestling with the
affairs of a mundane world,
even thc most unruffled dispo
sition usually needs a little ov
erhatiling. The temperament
which seems to be so even is
liable to get a little out of gear
without attracting iis owner's
tltention. The human mechanisms get In such a state that
adjustment becomes necessary
to keep it up to the highest
state of efficiency. Like the
sea-going ships we gather barnacles through the years and
need to be dry-docked periodically to undergo a sort of mental overhauling and refreshing.
At such times the trivialities
of life become magnified. One's
outlook on life seems to suffer
some distortion. A succession
of little difficulties, ordinarily
to be regarded as petty and trivial, seem to roll themselves
into a worry of some dimensions—the molehills become
mountains and the little dales
precipltJeB leading into dejection. So the pristine optimist
finds himself degenerating into a less cheerful individual
whose onl look on life isn't
what il used lo be—and wonders at the change.
That is the stage at which to
combat the trouble. Taken
early it can be dealt will; very
simply and effectively. The
best remedy is large and copious doses of the great out-of-
doors. Get back to nature.
Away from the artificialities of
every day life, thc straining atmosphere of business, the pettiness and Inconsistency of
man's dealings with his fellows, back to nature where
there is no pretence and no
sham—this is the remedy all
the world ought to employ
when things get out of joint
and all the world seems lo be
going wrong.
Fortunately a dimensity of
interests which envelopes the
city and district is sufficient to
preserve Cranbrook people from
any danger of cultivating an
unconscious provincialism in
one's outlook on life. Its interests are far wider than many
another place of its size, and
moving about in the life of this
city there is little danger of becoming set or narrow. Nevertheless one must maintain
some touch with the outside
world fo keep things Ii> their
proper perspective. Fortunately right close at hand and easily accessible are the means
whereby one can get right into
the heart of the immensities of
nature, finding footing again
after getting out of one's mental depth, as it were.
We all need to do It, though
we may not be willing to admit it. I don't need a holiday,
you say, and can't take one
anyway. It isn't true. We all
need one, and can all take one,
short or long. The next time
someone tells you proudly Ihey
have not had a holiday for ten
years, tell them its nothing to
lie proud of, and they would
be better off if they had.
A few hours In the heart of
the Canadian Rockies in the
course of a short and hurriedly
snatched holiday sufficed to
straighten out some kinks in
the editorial viewpoint. Everything is on an immense scale
in the mountains, and man
himself seems the only insignificant consideration. Consequently his problems and menial wrestlings suffer a toning
down process that tends to put
them where they belong. lv
due course we shall return re-
FROM THE VIEW-POIM
OE
OUR CONTEMPORARIES
energized and revitalized, ready to take up the burden of
things once more, and lo push
the load slill further up the
hill.
TIIE ALTERNATIVE
If Ireland does not waul
peace lei her formally declare
otherwise. Hacked by Irish-
American twisters of the British lion's tail, long distance revolutionists and hot-headed, irresponsible rebels, De Valera
has broken off peace negotiations with the British government and is seemingly standing
pat for Irish independence.
Dominion Home Rule has
proven satisfactory for Canadians, but it is not good enough
for the Irish. Canadians are
free men but not free enough
for the sons of Erin.
By rejecting the Dominion
form of Home Rule, De Valera
is inviting civil war in Ireland.
And the only view loyal Britishers can take now is that if the
Irish want to be rebels the law
must take its course.
It is utterly out of the question to establish Ireland as a
country independent of the Em
pire. Canada, Australia and
Africa are just as emphatic on
this point as are the people of
the British Isles. Ireland must
not exist as a potential fortress
for the Empire's enemies.
Ireland must remain within
the boundaries of the British
Empire if civil war be the only
means of keeping her there.
Plenty of Work lur The
Full Session
The government hus a grave problem lor consideration In the unemployed question. Thu present c.urlu:l-
nient in .public works is stated lo he
due to u desire that employment will
he available for the winter months.
So fur as thai goes the idea is laudable, but lt will be useful, also, to
bear In mind thai tho steps taken last
winter were wholly Inadequate i'licro
is a nils'akon impression abroad that
the Autumn session will he of short
iluraton.mml thai ii is merely an emergency gathering of lho members
On the contrary all Indications are
that It will he of fur greater Importance Ihan thai hold last spring.   Os
tensility the session is being culled 1
pass legislation dealing witli financial
relief to niiimipnlitlcs. In realty
what tlie government proposes shall
he done In tliis regard is largely problematical, and tho course which tlie
people had hoped for, in order that
a remedy might hu fullnd, is nut hong followed. In view of tlie Importance nf tlie session, und, moreover,
because 11 is going lo create ti precedent, lt would lie good policy ou the
part of the government to mako its
plans respecting the fiscal yeur known
to the people.—-Colonist.
OTTAWA, Ont.—A nine million dollar Increase In dairy products (for
1020 over tho previous year is reported hy ttie Dominion Bureau of statistics. Creamery butter in 1920 witli
au output of 110,030,898 pounds showed un Increase of tl.139.ti9L' pounds over 1919 and cheese made in factories
aggregated 149,621,008 pounds, a decrease of 111,000,000 from tliu previous
year. Tliere were in operutlon in
the Dominion 8,166 dairy factories
with a capitalization ol (88,767,817.
Canada has 5,000 miles or Atlantic
coast lino, 7,000 of the Pacific, and
220,000 of Inland waters. Production
value reached $00,000,000, halt of
which ls exported. Tho Industry employs a hundred thousand men, and
represents a capital Investment of
W.000,000. British Columbia leads
tho provinces In fishing production,
caused hy the salmon fisheries.
Dniplnycs' Itespnnslbilllies
Organized labor should develop a
policy for increased output; the attitude of the opposition or indifftronco
to proper standards for production
should be changed to u frank aud aggressive insistence on such standards;
tliere should he a scientific examination of the basis for wages; certain
union rules should be modified in regard to machine operation, apprentices
and craft workers aad distinctions
whicli which result in restrictions of
output; individual workers should realize their responsibilities for waste
resulting frnm ill-health and disregard of safety measures—Exchange.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
OBAimUOOK TRAIN TIMK8
NO. (17 DAlLY—To Nelson, Vancouvor, Spokane, etc. Arrive 12.10 p.
m.; leave 12.20 p.m.
NO. IIS DAILY-To Pontic, Lethbrldge, Medicine Hat, Calgary, otc.
Arrlvo t.10 p.m.; loavo 4.20 p.m.
I'ranliroiik,  WycllAo,  Klmberley  Her.
sleei
No. 888—Loavo 7 a.m. Ne. KM-arrlve
2.10 p.m.
Cranbrook, Lake Windermere and
Golden Serin*?:
Monday and Thursday, each week
—NO. 831, leave 9 a.m Wednesday
and Saturday—NO. Hit. arrive 8.3C
p.m.
Frame's Dread Is GOOD Bread
His I'ies, Cakes nnd Pastry art
made In a tasty manner which
Invites thu most exacting person to call again, at
TIIE HOME BAKERY
I'hone 87      .      Norbury Ave.
V. M. MACniKRSON
Undertaker
Phone Ut
Iferkiry Ave, nit to Clly Ball
Por further  particulars  apply  to
any ticket agent,
J. B. PBOCTOR,
District, Passenger Agent, Calgary.
=?,
Nelson Business College
I.FAIIN   TO   FAUX
NEW    TFKM    t'OMWFMKH    AI'til'ST   '.'IITII,    I Ml
COMI'I.KTK COMMEltCIAI, COUHSK IX
SIIOIITIIAMI TYI'KWKITIX.. IIIIOKKFKI'IMI
FKX.llA.XSllir SI'FI.MXIi RAMI) CALCULATION
COMMERCIAL ENGLISH COMMFIU'IAI, LAW
HAY   AXII   NIGHT   CLASSES
For Particular* Apply I'. O. Ilex II
I'XIXE lillll NELSON, B.C.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
Office Clonic SMI
lies. I'hone •.'111
I'.O. Ilex lillll
B. A. MOORHOUSE
Assoc. Mem. C«n. Soc. O.E., & U.C.L.S.
PROV.   LAND   SUUVKYOH
Office - - lliiiiMiii Muck
I'm ii bro uk     -      -      .     H. c.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
Extracts from tiio Cranbrook
Herald of this date, 1901
One hundred and twelve pupils were
enrolled at the Cranbrook School hist
Monday at the opening day after tho
holiday. A third room has been added,
but it will soon be crowded out.
The King sawmill located south of
town is nearly ready for operation.
The machinery has been put in place
and tlte plant will be started up at
the latter part of the week.
msmt
Mrs. J. O. Rnwlinson has made arrangements to open up a private primary school at her residence on Mon*
day next.
It Is generally understood that the
trackman's strike, so far as the Kootenay seel ion is concerned. Is about
ovor.
Mrs. Joseph Jackson was thrown
from a horse one evening last week by
the saddle slipping. She struck a
stump ns sho fell and for a few minutes wus unconscious.
P. Burns, when ho was hero last
week, gave his cheek for $100 to the
St. Kugono hospital, and increased hh
donation to the band-
NOTICE TO PROSPECTORS
With much regret we have to announce that the visit of the American Mining Engineers, advertised as to take place on August 21-24 and for the entertainment of whom all arrangements had heen made, has been cancelled.
Regarding samples of ore from mining prospects which prospectors have arranged to
bring in for exhibition purposes it is desired that same be delivered as arranged for the visit
of the Mining Engineers, Such samples as may be received will be placed on exhibition,
taken care of and assembled for exhibit at the 1922 sitting of the International Mining Convention to be held in Nelson, B.C.
The lectures by Dr. S. Schofield and others will be delivered at a later and more suitable date.
Hon. Mackenzie Kimr
Whether or not Mr. King was Sir
Wilfred Laurier'a candidate for the
Liberal leadership, it is certain that
Iiis unfailing loyalty to Laurier de*
cisively influenced the judgment of the
national convention hy which he was
nominated. Ho had in great degree
the support of Quelicc and of tlie dele
g^.tes from o'her provinces who were
most devoted and unwavering iu their
loyalty and attachment to the old lea
der. Among the elder statesmen or
Canada no one commands more
general respect and affection than
Mr. Fielding. He is peculiarly influential in .parliament. Iffs courage is
unfailing- He has a graceous dignity
and an integrity beyond suspicion.
Moreover, lie Is a singularly effective
parliamentary debater, and is wlseaml
prudent In council. But in 1917 he
gave hts support to the Union govern
ment which was organized undor Sir
Itobert Borden's leadership, nnd hii
passing'defection from Laurier un-
q lestionably affected his strength in
the convention. Mr. King might have
been chosen In any event, for nge
creeps upon Mr. Fielding, but the issue between Mr. King and himself
would have been more doubtful If he
had maintained an unbroken allegl
ance to Laurlor. Ono feels, too, that
Fielding's heart was with Laurier
even during the few months that he
gave his support to the coalition. —
London Times.
VICTORIA, B.C.—Federal and provincial government reports show that
British Columbia contains approximately half of the saw-timber of Canada. The total value of tho forest
products of the province for the year
1920 was ?92,C28,807, as aftainst $70,
285,094 for the previous year. The
value of the lumber cut advanced by
nearly sixteen millions, while the increase In the value of pulp and paper
amounted to over nine millions.
23-25
J. F,
IIUC1-MHOPT, Sec.
llox
B. 0. P. A.
6*1, Cranbrook, B.C.
Of ull the boasts which man has
long tamed, the cat appears at first
sight to have the least trace of occasional relapses Into barbarism, i-ays
the London Times. But It ls truer to
say that lho cat hns lost none of hor
primative instincts than that she retains none. Cats are essentially un
domestfeatod, though for their own
good purposo they condescend to use
our fin* ides and tnblts. Thoy were
originally solitary animals, as the wild
cat or the lynx is today; and white
tho grcgarfousness of the dog and
horse enables them to transfer their
affection to mankind, the ent makes
no such deop friendships. What dog
could have endured the* desolation of
the ruined and deserted villages of
France? Yet when all else had left,
the cats dwelt on, ln lairs among the
felled fruit trees; because at heart
they are Indifferent to man.
CAUSES OF FOREST FIRES
Campers, prospectors, surveyors,
river-drivers, and others who use the
woods, cause thousands of conflagrations in valuable timber by dropping
matches or pipe ashes or cigarettes in
tho dry duff, or leaving their camp
fires half extinguished. In dry weather tho floor of the forest is like the
fuse of a powder barrel. A moment's
thoughtlessness may cost a fortune.
Let all Canadians who go Into the forest show that they are both good
woodsmen and good citizens by bolng
careful wltb flr»
Drs. Green & MacKinnon
Physicians and Surgeons
Offlce at  residence,  Armstrong
Avenue
OFFICE HOURS
Forenoons   9.00 to 10.00
. A f tern (Sens   2.00 to 4.00
Evenings 7.30 to 8.30
Sundays    2.30 to 4.30
CRANBROOK, B. C.
NOTICE TO CONSUMERS OF WATER
DR. F. B. MILES
DENTIST
Offlce ln Hanson Block
OFFICE HOURS
I to 13. n.m.
1 to    5  n.m.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
On .luly :15th an order was issued restricting the use
of lawn services to the hours of 7 a.m. to !) a.m. and 7 p.m.
to !) p.m. This action was found necessary in order to conserve water and maintain our fire protection.
We find that in a good many cases waler users are
not co-operating with the council. Whether from an oversight or intentionally lawn services are being used and
in some cases hose are allowed to run all night. Several
customers have heen warned but apparently do not appear
to consider the water shortage as being serious.
It is not tlie wisli of die council to work a hardship on
any customer but in order to maintain our water supply
and fire protection it is an absolute necessity that the consumption of water he cut down as low as possible.
lt is the intention of the city to put men on to inspect
lawn services and if any water is found running outside
the restricted hours the service will be cut off without further notice and application will have to be made at the City
Clerk's office for reconnectiou and the connection fee paid.
By Order of the Council,
R. C. EAKIN,
Supt. of City Works.
24tf
The   Totems   At   Alert
A pleasant run on the Ala
Route, a summer holiday bv w>
irom Vancouver brings one to A
Bay at the north end of Vancou
Island,
At Alert Bay a.-e to be seen
Totem Poles and Indian Communl
Houses and the remains of the ei
ous tree-burials, popular till reiei
with the Siwashcs.
Tho Totems here have long si
come to be regarded as one of
wonders  of   the   world   as   insrr
able in their way as  Pyramid  I
Sphinx.   And   so   It   is   little   wonder that not a week goes by, in sum
mer,  but  groups  of   visitors   from
every corner of the Globe may  be
seen landing here from both North
and South-bound boats  to  view  at
tjjlose hand these "Sphinxes of Am
erica."
The world has always had wood*
carvers. But never anywhere at itliy
time "carvlnga" like unto these Pacific Coast Totems.
The  outstanding "points"  of  the
totem,    which    strike    the    vtiltoi
ashore for a  few hours, are over
whelming.
One   questions:
Who carved them?
Who conceived the idea?
How old are they? etc.
Wo know it was not till very lately
that the Coastal Indians posse-..el
any steel tools.    How  then  was it
possible so long ngo for them to cut
so  deep and  clean  a  line as  here
gives decision to tho totem-face?
All of these questions, and hun-i
dreds of others of like nature, after |
all theso years since first the Totem
was discovered by tlie white man
still remain without a definite an-
BWer It Is more than half the
charm of the Sphinx thnt she has
never spoken. Indeed, hnlf thr
charm and spell woven of the Toten
lies ln the stories thot every visitor
beholding them, Is free to weave t:
fancy, aided and guided by Tradition,
; *,, n--lr #•&$?..>*
near Totem Tele.
For though the written word may
be wholly lacking "Tradition-" has
never anywhere woven prettier stories, clinging like graceful draperies
trailing off in to these Northern
mists, than about these wooden figures of the wonderful Totems, thai
wind around the shore-road at Alert
Bay.
Hera is that marvellous figure.
the Thunder Bird, with its eagle-
eye and hinged beak that drops open
through which entrance was mnde to
tho feast-hall In timea nf Potlach.
Tradition has been very busy with
the Thunder-Bird. Something about
it makes it "tho king of the Totems."
The story of tho Tnundcr-Ilird that
lets most light on the Indian character of other days is a gruesome tale
»f treachery   «n  tht  put al   the
Alerts toward their anrient foe the
tribes of Ilie Nlmpklsh.
Pile Nimiikish folk were invlled to
a ' Potlaeh' and burying the hatchet,
lliey came. Only to bo murdered one
at a time as ihcv wriggled through
ii ■ m! '™'s boal< ,0 ""' '•»•'*
hall,    The entrance  was so narrow
and  lhe blow from  within  so swift
ami unexpected that not even a aoun.l
escaped to warn tho   men   waiting
outside.   Thus, tradition says "Wa-
done to death every Nimpkish who
eame to the feast."
Next In importance to the Thuu
dor-Lird romes The Bear, frank-
eyed and sporty, carrying between
powerful paws the "copper" symbol
of Chieftaincy among the Indians t.
this day.
The chief whom tho Boar svtu
bolize* was evidently a hunter—pre
eminently of hears. And so clever!)
did he hunt and study Bruin's habit-
that in time he himself eaine to havf
melhing of the nature of the ani
mil he hunted. The whole make-up
of "The Bc.ir" bespeaks gonialitv
and good-humour. No one could
think of him giving The Potlach that
annihilated the Nimpkish.
Aa a true snort, ever) visito. U
acknowledge thai
"The  Bear"  *
Alert   Hay   will
TJic   Whale"   runs
close  second.
And as you look at the harpoo
conceived of the artist astride thi
gliinl sulphur-bottom you know tha
whatever may have been the fault
uf tins scion of the house of Slwail
•'cowardice" was not one of them,
Uf all the steeds of fancy or ambition.
ean one be Imagined that supplies!
nnre sport for the money than "ThW
Wliulo* over an open course! Yel
•our Coastal Indian of these nartj
was evidently not afraid to ride.
Eloquent Indeed is the simple!
whale design which sparing tt
wholly unnecessary the written
word, mounts guard over the time-
worn mound ln the graveyard.
To discover tke remaining Inter-
osting Totems in the Alert Bay gal-
lery It is desirable that yourself
make the trip. Otherwise to jot la
altogether lost the unique pleasure
experienced by the visitor fo these
parts of piecing together the vari.
ous "designs" sliown In tht Totem*
and  making  them into tht living
'designs"
making
hapten of the life that at one'tinS
had its being hen la this put ejfl
our Canada. ~ ursilny, August istli, 1921
TIIE      CRANBROOK      HERALD
PAGE THREE
World News As Recorded by Photographs
X*tE3*Bfc-fiKr=-«.
m'
Mi :><rr
S"l
"■      "*:-,if*t/    .
'■"'?■?  ''■■-•    i***5"">■''    *-%»;
■ '■tl
w   L
\ZSMmmWste
lYteu/trtsYOfces
(1) Huge crowds assembled in Downing
St., London, to witness the arrival of
De Valera fnr his Peace Conference
with Lloyd George. Some knelt in
prayer.
(2) Interesting moments in the victory of Yale and Harvard athletes over
Oxford and Cambridge. Scene is finish
of the 100 yard dash, awarded to
Gourdin of Havard; on the left, Abrahams, of the Cambridge English Team,
afterwards made 25 ft. 3 in. in tha
long .lump, making a world's record.
(8) Thc sinking of a German battleship by United States bombing planes
. at sea.
(4) The unveiling of the Canadian
Memorial Cross on Vlmy Ridge by Sir
Arthur Meighen, Premier of Canada.
(5) King Aifonso as he appeared in a
Polo Match. Tlie Prince of Wales
played on thc opposing team.
(0) Canadian Premier's arrival in
Liverpool. The Lord Mnvor of Liverpool, Aid. Russell Taylor, the Hon.
Arthur Meighen, Mrs. Meighen, Hon
Dr. S. F. Tolmie and Capt. E. Griffiths
on board Canadian Pacific Liner Empress of Britain."
(7) Miss E. Nor'O'Brich, a fouriem
year old Oakland, California, girl wl.i
recently won the Pacific Association
Junior 100 yard breast-stroke championship, held in Alamoda, California.
(8) Vincent Richards, of Yonkers, who
swamped W. T. Tilden, holder of tha
world's championshin in tennis. "
ALONE    IN  THE    ASULKAN
twtvttmrttr *rc*t% .
CtMHtrtVCtte m
■-nrr*.   i      ■BMaiiiiiiiOTrr^^
Around Glacier, the highest village
In the Selkirk Mountains of Brlriih
Columbia, the peaks sheer up into
the sky one after tho other like thc
fingers of a huge half closed h*>rd,
with humanity and the railroud away
down in the depressed palm of it.
Sir Donald is the middle finger, Terminal Peak is the first finger. Ther,
there's a great swinging curve-snace
for the Illeeillewaet and the Asulkan
Vallevs, and Mt. Abbott is the
thumb.
The Asulkan trail begins easily,
like an old-fashioned and leisurely
novel. The introduction is full nf
slow grade;: and big trees, hanging
with grey green mos3 nnd carpetted
between with star-eyed bunch ber-
rie#. There is just enough movement to keep you interested as you
work your way in a great sweep to
the left. On the map it looks straight-,
but you can feci the pull of it, as
though the trail were a vibratimr
ribbon with the Glacier coaxing on
the far-off end of it,
Once you leave the hotel, there's
nothing to remind you that vou
aren't Simon Fraser or Christopher
Columbus — no railroad, no houses,
no people. Once in a while, of course,
you'll iind a rustic seat, mush-roomed out of the earth beside the patli
,thai is leading you. but ynu jusi
accept it as yov. would a flower.
A mile out, the chatter of a lift1
rlvec comes to you as the tree-
lighten a bit. " No, chatter hr.'t the?
word. A sophisticated brooklet 0:1
a country estate does that. Thii
unchained white-maned thir.p. ooM
and clear and eng^r, sings, shojts.
ilunta if you like.   You   meet   It
Tladly, for you ean cup your hand
and drink from it. It's as pure as
the snows it came from, and the
most satisfying draught in the
world. The scarlet heads of the
Paint Brush think so, hardy with
the breath and the spray of it on
their unquenchable torches. Here
and '.here a quick-darting bird comes
to drink too, but he eyes you ask
ance find says nothing.
The trail beckons. You can al
most feel ;t pull awuy under your
ket! The lure of the unseen, the
unci Imbed, is railing to you.
The big stream is dividing into four.
You're coming to th*- sources of all
thinps. The [>:it!i takes the leftmost,
rise-i quickly, leaps away from you.
Here the flowers begin—the snow-
carnival wonder-flowers. The Taint
inrush was a lure further back. But
there were many bunches of Paint
Brush at the hotel, for the flaunting red of them splashes all the
ower reathes of every trail. But
vhen you get within breath of the
snows, the real charm-blossoms begin.
I wasn't a bit surprised when I
looked un ant) saw a wise furry head,
inped sideways while two bright
cyr-s took me in. I wouldn't have
i::mped if he'd talked to me, this
>ther worshipper whose name I
lidn't know. He wrs bigger than
,iie biggrst cat you ever saw, and
■rpy, and bushv, and he stood up on
his hing legs with his front pnwt
hangin;:, When I got back to civilization I nsked and thoy told me
-is name was Rocky Mountain Marmot. I'm ritlier glad I didn't know
it then.    He waa mora tntereating
for his vagueness and I talked to
tim as to a representative of aU
beastiedom, for — well, five minutes
anyway.
Then I went on to fresh fields to
gather little blue Veronicas on delicate Alpine stems, Arnicas, red and
white heather on the dizzy edges of
a ledge, and other tin;; fragile bits
of bloom. At first I didn't want to
touch them. And when 1 wondered
if perhaps their vivid little soula
wouldn't like to see where I lived
in the big hotel, quite as much as I
enjoyed seeing their habitat.
The snow banks grew more frequent. The trail was steeper. Bot
the heatening breath of thc glacier
was drifting down the valley. I
couldn't see It, but the thrill of lt
drove all thought of weariness away.
The little stream—it waj- tiny now,
a baby of a river—disappeared under a great arch of snow, or rather
it dashed sparkling out from under
the bank that ran un, up without
intermission to the top of everything. To the right, however, two
hundred yards away, there wai an
Island of grass and stunted tree*
that steen-sloped up out of the
smooth whiteness.
You can stand on the steepest of
snow surfaces. But I defy you to
remain upright on water-soaked,
slithery-smoothed grass, when first
uncovered for its brief five or six
weeks' summer. It was onlv after
three falls that I reached a big
boulder and climber up to look b-tek.
The earth seemed to breathe, and
rest, and breathe again, like soma
great satisfied   creature   that   yam PAGE FOOT.
THB     CBANBBOOK     HERALD
Thursday, August lSth, 1931
A- .1 *5T, -*-|>-*S*'*?■>,?■ -IW
•^LdtgAfli., aip£crim;'.p<;
^'-^myy.myi
3Z&
>'.V>
mini. i:siAiiLisiu:n
RECORD BROKEN IIV
HTUUEBAKER OAB
23
v \i*   rt> '-I V
^f tote:--;*!
This 18 it—Darken the room as much as possible, close the
windows, raise one of the b\i<~ids where thc sun shines in. ;*bout
I eight inches, place as many Wilson's Fly Fr-ds as possible on
expiates (properly wetted with water but not flooded) on the
window ledge where the light is strong, ir^vc the room closed
for two or threo hours, then sweep up the Mas and burn them.
See illustration below.
Put the plates away out of the reach of children until required in another room.
ne rtgn?
way to use
Wilson's %
Fly Pads
Breaking a record established by a
professional roail racer In 1917 a
Studebaker Light-Six driven by Leonard r.nd Wesley Train set a new speed
record between Toronto and Kingston,
Ontario, by covering 163.5 miles between tliese points in exactly It hourB
and 45 minutes. This time is 59 minutes faster tliun tlie schedule of the
International Limited, the fastest
train miming between theso two cities. The average speed of tlie Light-
Six was approximately 47 miles por
hour.
Tbo Light-Six, which was a stock
model and did not differ from any
car of lis design savo in that the top
lmd been removed, left ^Inln Street
uui Kingston Hoad in Toronto at 4-30
a.m- July 2^. arriving at Kingston nti
8.15 a.m.—itlireo and three-iiuartor
hours later. Tho record was accomplished despi.o the fact that the first
hour of driving was done in darkness,
and that considerable bad    roadway
neS
rms&pp
FOREST REVENUES
Revenues from Crown forests are
playing an Increasingly importunt
part in the several proivnees. In New
Brunswick, for tlie fiscal year ending
October 31, l'J^O, the forest revenues
to tlie provincial treasury aggregated
$1,387,000, or more that) double those
of the previous year. Tliis increase
was duo partly to an increased cut,
partly to increased stumpago dues,
and partlyto a closer scale.
In Quebec, for ttie year ending June
30, 1020, tiio forest revonuo amounts
to ?li,004,450.20, of 28.6 per cent, greater than during tlie previous year. It
is estimated that during the current
flBcal year the forest revenue to the
provincial treasury will aggregate around $3,000,000, which may be increased to $3,500,000 during tlie fiscal year
following.
In Ontario, for fiscal year ending
October 31, 1920, tho forest revenue
was $2,684,843, au increase of nearly
50 per cent over the previous year.
During the calendar year 1919, tlie
British Columbia govornment received
ill forest revenue a total of $2,755,739.
The importanco of perpetuating
theso revenues, to say nothing of increasing iliem, is obviously so great
that all of the provinces would be am-
pty justified in expending larger sums
than at present upon the protection of
Um forests from fire, insects and disease, upon reforestation, and upon an
administration calculated to ensure
cut-over areas being left in the best
condition to produce continued crops
of the moro valuable tree species, so
far as that may be consistent with the
economics of the situation.
was encountered for the first 40 miles
of the run.
Tho drivers immediately returned
to Toronto, making tlie ieturo trip
over the samo road In 3 hours and 46
minutes. While this time was one
minute slower than tlie trip from Toronto to Kingston, the running time of
tiie* car on the return was actually
faster than the first half of tho run,
for a tire blew out as it was speeding
over a rough stretch of road near
Toronto, aud a stop of several minutes was necessitated in order to re-
plaee it by a spare- ,
EXTENSION    OF
CANADA'S SEED TRADE
DURING PAST YEAR
During tlie year*1920 Canada's export seed trade made a considerable
advance, owing in no small degree* to
tho efforts of the 001111111011 Department of Agriculture and tho Department nf Trado and Conimerco. Tho
Canadian Trude Commissioners supplied lists of prospective customers
abroad for Canadian seed. Theso wero
A tree will make a million matches;
a match may destroy a million trees.
When in tlie woods take no chances
witli lighted matches, tobacco, or
camp-fire.—Uot the habit. Be careful
wtth fires in the: woods.
FERNIE SUPREME
ITS BEER HAS NO EQUAL
It has been in evidence the past few weeks, as the
most popular appetizer of the day.
Why swelter In the hot sun, witli your throat
parched from thirst?
WE ARE IN A POSITION TO
SUPPLY YOU
THROUGH YOUR VENDOR
this decidedly cooling, wholesome aud palatable drink in
any quantity.
We have just bottled a brew of especially hopped
beer, which has had our attention for the past three
months. We can guarantee Ibis brew to satisfy the palates
of those who desire a medium hop flavored beverage. It
has all the superior qualities of our other brews, which
have stood the tests so long.
When ordering do not overlook our POIITKR IN
PINT BOTTLES. You need Iliis in your home.
It has all the nutritious qualities of Ihe greatest bodybuilder known. We recommend this as an invigorater
and tissue builder.
PHONE 116 — DRAWER 1175
I
COMPANY, LTD.
—Also—
MAM IAITI l.l'ltS    OK    AERATED    WATERS
• CANADA'S WONRERFOT* EXPANSION
• SINCE CONFEDERATION
18C5
Paid-up Bank Cmiltal  $30,888,048
Population  :i,37i,riM
Dunk Deposits   87,678,571
Flro Insurance in force  188.359,809
Life Insurance In forco  •  86,680,082
Post Otfices    3,038
Railway mileage   -,278
Hallway Gross Earnings   12.116,710
Total trado  •  131,027,532
Immigration  None
Government. Revenue  (Consol. fund)  13,687,928
Govt. Expenditure (Consol. fund)    13,480.092
Customs Duties   8,S91,440
Vessels Registered   5.693
Mfg. Capital (1807 and 1918)   77.964,020
Employees   187,942
Salaries and Wages   40.851.009
Values of Products   ■  221,017.773
Public debt   75.757,135
Agricultural Exports   12.871.055
Animal Products Exports   6,893.167
Mineral Production (1871)   10,000.000
Fishery Products (1870)    6.577.391
Forest Products   None
Manufacturing Exports   2,100.411
Telephones  None
Elevators   None
Water-power Development    None
1921
8 128,460,163
8,836,000-
1,897,119,680
4,585,928.017
1,765,376,691
12,251
38.896
382,976,901
2,450,563,176
147,000
451,366,020
357,615.278
102,812,951
8,568
3,034,301,915
077,787
(129.960.863
3,458,036.675
2,311,294,443
416,122.771
314,017.944
217,000,000
60,508.479
140.333,192
403,132,161
724.500
4,000
2.417.8961i.p.
FATHER   POINT
Father Point Lighthouse, Kog home Station and Keeper's
House.
Father Point ia a tittle Quebec
capo jutting out into the St. Lawrence where it la still an ocean. It
ib here that the immigrant from
European countries during tho sum
mer months gels hia first human
touch with Canada ami Canadians.
Father Point would not appi'iit to
the ordinary tourist or holiday mak
cr. It ia off the bjflton track and
only reached by car from Rlmouski
Its charm is merely that of hun
dreda of other French Canadian vii
lages which are more ftCCeifdblc. Tin
frctth breezoi blow from off the Si
Lawrence aa they do upon counties*
other Hailing villages along the rivet
shore, Thia place i.i a haven for the
tired, thc brain -taxed, the over
worked and neurotic in its modi t a
Hve calm and Itrooding hush.
The great interest in the little
hamlet ia for those who go down to
the Bea In ships. Near the extremJU
of thu point a modern lighthouse hat-
beon erected which each night flash-*-
its warning light across twenty mile-
ot water. In close prov! ml ty is thi
giant foghorn blasting its messag.
when fog enshrouds the light. Upor
tho hill stands a wireless statioi
which receives advice of every vessel
entering tho Gulf before it proceed.-
up the river. A coastguard and life
saving station completes the prccnu
tions for tho preservation of vessel
and man upon tho water.
But greatest interest centres lr
the "Eureka," the sturdy little gov
ernment pilot boat which leaves iu
pier on tho point to take out a rivei
"tiido for nll vessels going up t.
Quebec or Montreal. When the wire
lesa report is received of the ap
proach of a vessel all eyes are turned
riverwards and glasses nnd tele
scopes focusscd upon the speck on
the horizon following It as It takes
shape over thc rim of the sea.
Larger and larger looms up what
turns out to be ■ giant passenger
liner of the Canadian Pacific bound
with a heavy freight of human souto
for the St. Lawrence ports. When
[•out half a mile awny or so tho
(lot boat leaves its pier and steams
out to meet its mammoth sister. 'Ihn
pilot is, however, not the only mult
to go on board. There is the Inspector nf Immigration, the Colon-
'/.ation Agent of the Canadian Pa-
■ific and the representatives of lho
laakenger1 department of the samo
company, all having lho samo object,
tssiating the steamship paascnger-s.
.reparing them for debarcation. nnd*
ineilitating the actual landing. Ami
-to It Is a gundIy little number tho
pilot bunt takea out on its short
voyage.
It takes thc speedy little craft hut
i short time tn reach the big liner
now merely drifting with the tide and
.vaiting its arrival, and with a deft
little swing she glides gracefully
alongside, the incongruity of the pair
forcibly suggesting another Interpretation of "Dignity and Impudence."
All the while the passengers are
crowding the decks, and hanging in
a dense mass over thc side eagerly*
watching, wondering, and appraising.
The rope ladder is dropped from
the liner and swings out from tho
side at each heave of the vessel. The
pilot seizes it and climbs up hand
over hand to be followed by the oth*
ers who are to make the trip with
the newcomers up the river. Remarks and light banter are Interchanged, there Is much waving ot
hands and fluttering of handkerchiefs, and the cheeriest of spirits
prevails. Then the little boat nulls
away, the Titan of the seas appears
to recede, and tn the echo of shouts
and cheers the pilot boat turns ber
nose to the shore and faces and
figures become obscure blurs. I
.._   1.1*0. J
Elite Cut
FOR THOSE SMOKERS WHO LIKE
|   MACDONALD'S CUT FINE, OR
I   WHO "ROLL THEIR  OWN"
m
»^r°'*
>f2lb-15*
&<mmmm... ^*\t.
HAmniVtllfu    III .%:'■
.IrVfitAiDONAlD.tU(■ n ::■?;>"■
***-R»Ck\vsc\_-c>*--.
communicated with und tlieir requirements placed before Canadian exporters. In this way un increased export of seeds was brought uhout to
the* United States, Great Britain,
France and Now found la ml. To Ireland
alone approximately 100,000 bushels
of fibre flax seed, worth about $1,000,-
000, was exported. In British Columbia, field root and garden vegetable
seeds, amounting to 150,000 pounds,
wero marketed through tho United
Seed Growers, Limited, Penticton, B-
C. Some 75,000 pounds of mangel,
swede turnip, and field carrot seed,
grown by tho Experimental Farms,
were sold at current wholesale prices
to farmers' organizations and indiv-
WAYS IX WHICH
HtODUCTIVriY OF SOILS
MAY UE ltmtKASKU
A soil ts productive in proportion to
its ability to supply to growing planta
the,elements required for the plants'
development. If we look upon a soil
! aa a bank or storehouse from which
something may be drawn, we will realize that tlie producing power is
largely in proportion to what is on deposit. Every atom of phosphorus or
potash that we remove from a given
area of soil -vaves the soil just so
much poorer. So if we keep on taking the essential crop limiting elements from the soil by means of crop
removal the producing capacity of the
idual farmers.   It was deemed advis-1    ,..,,. ,   .
u,   .        *, «     st    ~   ,  *    soil will be reduced, Just the same as
able to confine to confine the market- ,  .     ,   , '   ,„ ,L s
.... , .    „     a *i   *' u Cllflh bank deposit wil  be reduced if
nig of this seed  to Canada, so that. ..   * *
- , ,. ,        ., ,   ,       j    .something Is drawn out and no corres-
farmers might have the exclusive ad-'
mtage nf using this high quality seed.
Circulars detailing the available seed
potato supplies in Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick,
and Quebec proved an important factor in relieving the shortage ln Ontario. Demonstrations conducted on 117
farms In Ontario and Quebec with
mangel and swede turnip seed resulted in showing the superiority of home
grown seed over foreign. Seed laboratories aro now maintained by the
Dominion Department of Agriculture
at Ottawa, Winnipeg, Calgary, and at
those points some 28,000 tests were
carried out. Samples of wheat, oats,
barley, timothy, and clover were tested for vitality and at Calgary, investigation was mado into the effect of
frost on germination.
HOW REDISTRIBUTION
WILL AFFECT WEST
AFTER CENSUS THIS YEAH
Unofficial figures isued at Ottawa
state that the census now being completed will show a population in Canada of 9^00.000. This will give western Canada 79 members in the Dominion parliament when re-distrlbu-
tion takes place, made up as follows:
Manitoba, 18; Saskatchewan, 28; Alberta, IS; British Columbia, 19; and
Yukon Territory, 1. Eulom Canada
will havo 172 members, as follows:
Quebec, 05; Ontario, so. Prince Edward Island, 3; Nova Scotia. 14; New
Brunswick, 10.
It will ho seen from this that the
West has still n long way ;o go before
It will equal the East In the m-'ttor of
parliamentary voting strength, but
that day will surely come.
In tho meantime the Wait is making Itself In thc affuirs of the nation,
and there is no real reason why it
should uot continue to dn to, provided
the people take an active and upbuilding Interest in public affairs, a thing
that tn?. larg-e a percentage of Ihein
do nut do.
CORNS
Lift Off with Fingers
Doesn't hurt a bit! Drop a little
"Freezone" on an aching corn, instantly that corn stops hurting, then
shortly you lift It right off with fingers.   Truly!
Your druggist sells a tiny bottle of
'Freezone" for a few cents, sufficient
to remove every bard corn, soft corn,
or corn between the toes, and the c*l-
| lasses, without Mfiossi or irritation.
ponding return made. Neglect to return the required elements to any soil
will lead to soil poverty. The crop-
yielding capacity of a soil may be
greatly reduced by poor plowing, poor
tillage, and neglect to practise the
best methods of soil management for
(ho district. Autumn plowing of lands
that wash badly during the winter
and early spring frequently causes
considerable soil, or soil fertility,
loss. Permitting a soil to become
matted with the living roots of undesirable plants, such as couch grass,
will make uny soil unproductive of
desirable crops. Neglect to provide
proper drainage to give relief from
surplus irrigation, seepage or flood
waters results in considerable decrease in the productive capacity of
soils. Tho permitting of live stock to
run over pastures and tillable fields
during the wet periods of the year,
when the soil is water soaked, is an
all-too-fr-Squent means of reducing
grazing and giving au undesirable
puddled condition to the soli. Return
phosphorus and potash iu quantity equal to that removed by tho crop. Practise the best cultural methods at the
proper time in order thut the productive capacity of your soil may not
be decreased.
T?look Youn
is a valuable asset
women in busini
social and private'.
Nothing helps so m
as. a good digest
Poor elimination cai
one to look sickly
faded.
BEECHAN
PILLS
sweeten the stom
stimulate the l.verv
mote elimination. *
helps purify the b'.i
improve the comp
ion.bringthcrosest
to the cheeks. To!
and feel young—Be
am's Pills
WillHeipYt
i
Sold Everywhere
in Canada.
In boxes, 25c, SOc
Lwgnt Sal* of any Medicine io the 1
DAWSON, Yukon Territory.— Gold
Commissioner G- P. McKenz'e has beon
appointed deputy land agent for tlie
Northwest Territories according to an
Ottawa' announcement, in order to
obviate the necessity of Yukoners
staking at Port Norman having to
travel all tho way to Edmonton to record  their claims.
Canada's dairy productioi
reached tho big total of $250,0'
With a rapidly growing live
population, chese and butter n
nro showing corresponding de
ment, until there are 3,300 dah
torles, producing $1.15,000.000
Ranks fourth In the world's p
tion of cheese. Annual exports
$36,000,000,  mostly  to Great  I
ASPIRIN
" Bayer" only is Gem
HALIFAX. M.S.- The United Fruit
Companies of Nova Scotia whieh controls forty per cent, of the apple shipping of the province, has just Issued
their ninth annual report which shows
tho turnover for the past year to have
been $3,29ftr>50, the la/gesl In tho history of the company* The average
prico per barrel packed Of all grades
was $3.85.
Warning! Take no chance
substitutes for genuine "Bayer T
of Aspirin." Unless you see tlu
"Bayer" on pneknge or on tabb
aro not getting Aspirin at all. Ii
Bayer package are direction
j Colds Headache, Neuralgia, Ul
tism, Earache, Toothache, Lti
and for Pain. Handy tin he
twelve tablets cost few conts.
gists also sell larger packagos.
In Canada. Aspirin Is the trndi
(registered In Cannda), of Buyo
ufacturo of Mononcetlc-acideal
BAllcytcacld.
■ fli-Tift ifitaf pru| BiJtaiffiWiiili.nifc'iiWP
•jWethoinfit Churrl)
SIMIW  MXI
Kor. It. IV. Loe will .'.iimIiiM ho Ih Burvlcos
MORNING SERVICE 11 A.M.
Sllbjeoti   "Vliilcln umi Vipers"
Siihlocti
EVENING SERVICE 7.30
-IMli'illoiiM Irom llu* 1.11k.'."
|
•— A hearty Invitation to all —
■;!..ia ■iijji :.MCDiai^ini'ifnBhi$ui^ Luiq gnu; ijjjg -.i.fflKaBjJ-i! P-&3 "3$ 689 Mt-*WK|£--*EaSS-fflgi&-i
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Ci
of Canada Limited
OFFICES, SMELTING AND BEFININQ DEPARTMENT
TBAIL,   BBITI8H   COLUMBIA
SMELTERS AND REFINERS
Purchasers ot Oold, Silver, Copper and lead Ores
Producers of Gold, Silver, Copper, Milestone, Fig Lead a
Zlne  "TADANAC  Brand Thursday, August lKlli, 1921
THE      CRANBHOOK      HERALB
PAGE    FIVE
^(Sef this
tidbit I
'^i'.A\JiV''tyt
Delicious candy coat-
ins over a delectable
morsel of peppermint
chewing gum.
It is a nippy, zippy peppermint that you will like.
loo.
Cood tor teeth, appetite,
digestion and throat.
A98
The Flavour Lasts
THE  WEATHER  BULLETIN
Official thermometer readings at
Crnnbrook.
Mln. Max.
Aug. 11   45   85
AUB- 12   41   87
Aug.  13     45   80
Aug. 14   52   74
Aug. 15   45   80
Aug. 10   68   78
Aug. 17  .'  61   74
OPERATIONS
UNNECESSARY
HEPATOLA removes Gall Btonee
corrects Appendicitis ln 24 hours
without psla. Registered under
Puro Food and Drug Act. $0.50
NOT SOLD BY DRUGGISTS
Sole Mnnufactarer
HKS. GEO. 8. ALMAS
Boi liiTIl 2M 4U An. S.
 Hank* loon, Sasfc.	
-TKAMIKOOK   CABTAGE
AM) TUANSFKU TO.
Forwarding and Distributing
Agents for
l.clli.iridire   mill   l-iri'iiliitl   Coal
Distribution Cars a specialty
Uni) lug   nud    IninslVrrlnu
Given   Pruinpl   Attention
TOWRISS & AIIAMS
Phono (t-t Proprietors
rKANNHlitlOk COTTAGE
HOSPITAL
Prhnle Nursing Home
l-lconsed by Provincial Govt.
Maternity and General Nursing
Mustiiigu ond Itust. Cure, Highest
References, ti mm moderate.
Applj Mrs. A. Crawford, Matron
Pliino 25!) P. O. Box 845
Addrosn, Garden Avo. Cranbrook
MONUMENTS
Kmitimay Granite A Hon*
umenUl Co., LU.
General Btons Contractors ul
Monumental Worto
I'roni li, Malm   P.O.tea Ml
TORONTO, Out.— Tlie National Slag
Products Company, capitalized at
$300,000. liave located here and will
take over the slag from tlie Steel Company of Canada, wrich has liltlierto
been wasted, manufacturing this material Into tiles and blocks for building
purposes through a pateut process
held by them. The process has been
thoroughly tested and found durable
and in all ways satisfactory.
T OT1RFS AJID SOCIETIES
CRANHROOK
FARMERS* INSTITUTE
Regular Meeting
SECOND   -SATURDAY  of each
month ih fl p.nu In the City Hall
MAY VEX'CREATE NEW
PORTFOLIO FOB -Hits.
SMITH AT VICTORIA
VICTORIA— Back from a trip
through Central British Columbia, following her campaigning during the Alberta elections, Hon. Mary Ellen
Smith, minister without portfolio lu
the Oliver government, took her seat
at the Executive Council tuble laBt
Wednesday. This is only the second
meeting which the Vancouver woman
member has attended in two months,
and ull sorts of stories have been cir-
CUlatlng to account for her non-attendance.
Upon the occasion of her last visit
here some weeks ago it was rumored
that some change was about to take
place and that she would Imj given u
portfolio. The prospect Of Mrs. Waller Parlby, of Laeombe, becoming
minister or education or health in tiie
[former government nr Alberta revived
interest in Hon. Mrs. Smith's standing.
Asked if (here was any change in
her status, Hon. Mrs. Smith said there
was not. but from her smile and
chance remarks It would appear there
is "something In the wind." It Is
well known that the government prides
itself upon the "social" legislation it
has. passed, and it is also known that
even greater changes are contemplated in tho laws affecting women nnd
children.
Divorce, the social evil, hours of
employment, and kindred topics are to
receive closer attention, and It has
been expected that sooner or later the
Premier would organize a portfolio
of "social service," . with Hon. Mrs.
Smith as the head of that office.
Asked recently if tliere was a change
contemplated with regard to Hon. Mrs.
Smith, Premier Oliver suid the situation bad not altered.
Speaking of her northern trip, Hon.
Mrs. Smith said she had been carried
away with the infinite possibilities of
Central Brtlsh Columbia. She had no
Idea, she said, that thero was such a
vast agricultural area in that district.
Settlers were going in in large numbers, und still there was room for tens
bf thousands more.
HOD AM) GUN
WOMEN'S INSTITUTE
Lovers of the out-of-doors will be
pleased to know that a specially interesting number of Rod and Gun in
Canada is just out. The August issue
contains a particularly appealing article entitled "Mlssissauga—Canada's
Best Canoe Trip," by Douglas Haitis,
This is a story that everyone will enjoy. The stories by P. V. Williams.
Bonnycastle Dale and Harry M. Moore,
well-known contributors, will bo received with undoubted favor. The
thrilling experiences outlined in the
several articles following will be of
great interest and value to thc amateur sportsman. The sportmen's departments, fishing, guns, conservation
and kennel contain many important
points that the typical sportsman will
appreciate. Rod and Gun in Canada
Is published monthly at Woodstock,
Ontario, by W. J. Taylor. Limited.
Meets in the
Parish Hall
afternoon of
first Tuesday
at 3 p.m.
Pres:   Mrs.
Constantino
Sec-treas: Mrs. G. Taylor, - - Boi 258
All itrttfB co-dlally Invited.
QUEBEC. Que.—Whilst Quebec may
not be receiving many of tho large
contribution of immigrants a program
which aims to develop the unsettled
and uncultivated sections of the pro-
ince. This is being achieved by attracting farmers' sons from the old
crowded farm districts to the newer
and undeveloped districts. Numerous
colonization roads are being built and
wonderful progress fs being made in
tho new sections.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Cmiknok, EC
MmU every Tueaday oi 8 p.m. lo
tho mtnralty Hall
A.   A.   Hill,   0,0.
H. ti. Harrison. K.R. & S.
F. Kummer, M.F.
Vliltlng broUron cordis. It tn
Tttod U attend.
VICTORIA.— The gold production
of British Columbia for the current
year will exceed that of 1920. The
Hossland mines, whicli yielded gold
to tho value of about ?600,000 last
year, will have an output this year ol
about $1,500,000. The largest producer will be the Surf Unlet Mine, on
Princess Royal Island, with a production of ahout  |1,000,000.
Montana Kootaurant
Cigars, Cigarettes and Candy
Meals at All Hoars
CRANBROOK STREET
Opposite the. Bank of Commerce
FOR PAINTING
-km-
PAPERHANQIN0
it*.
Telephone
JOHN CARD
Phone No. 409
Cranhrook-,   .    .    . B.C.
I. (I. (). F.
KKV CITY LODGE,No.ii
Moots every
^Monday nlKlit at
     Ola|)|i's Hall.
Rejourning OridfollowR cordially
Invited.
!•'. 11. Morrls.w. M. Harris, P.O.
Noble (Irnnd. Roe. See.
A CASK OF MILK
FREE
The person who sends in the
best short letter telling why Pacific Milk is better than any other kind—will receive In return
ono case of lurge slzo Pacific
Milk FREE.
\l\ letters   must
be addressed   to
£$-§■& I    B°x 882, Vancou-
UuM I   ver' B0,
PACIFIC MILK CO, LTD.
82H Drake Ht., Vancouver, B.C
UctoriesatAbboUford * Lo-iner
WIXNIPKO, Man— The civic housing commission has up to date this
year mado loans aggregating $650,000,
lt!0 hums having been granted since
January 1st. This Is $50,000 more
than was grunted in the whole of the
1920 building season. Tiie total number of building permits used in the
first half of the year was 1,328,* being
for a vuluo of $5,4.15,450.
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.— An unofficial estimate of tho city's population
places it at 7,000, and lt Is considered that this would bt somewhat greater wero there greater housing accommodation, the lack of which has prevented somo expansion.
VICTORIA, B.C.— Tho visit of Governor Davis of Idaho to the province
Is believed to indicate a joint undertaking to reclaim land on the Kootenay river. Tho flats are at the boundary and there are 25,000 acres on tbe
United States side and 30,000 on the
Canadian aide, which are at present
producing only bay and which it is
believed can be reclaimed at a cost
of about $25 per acre.
Canada's output of manufactured
products In 1919 totalled over three
billion' dollars, an increase of 200 per
cent, ln six years. The capital invested in 35,000 manufacturing establishments represents two billions, while
the 700,000 employees Indicate tlie
largo percentage of the population engaged In the Industry. 600 branch
United States Industries have been aet
eo Ib Canada.
TO HOLD FORESTRY
co\vi:mjo\ AT
VICTORIA THIS FAL1
Arrangements have been completed
for the holding of a Provincial Forestry Convention at Vancouver, Stptein-
ber ltHli und 20th and at Victoria on
September 21et under the auspices ot
the Canadian Forestry Association.
The British Columbia directors of the
Association are* Hon. Hewitt Bus tuck,
Hun- A. C. Plumerfelt, P. Z. Caverhill, Provincial Forester, Chas, D.
McNab, H. H. MacMillan and R. D.
Prettle. It is expected that a considerable delegation will be present from
Eastern Canada and from Alberta-
While the subjects for discussion
will accord the greatest prominence to
British Colhmbitt, then, aro a number
of liastern Questions having close application to this province, such us the
future oi the EaBtem timber supply,
and the progre - of applied forestry
amongst eastern pulp and paper oom-
anles. A distinguished group of
speakers, each an authority In his
special sphere, will lake part. Every
effort has been made to have the program thoroughly practical ami helpful aud tu make the topics and their
treatment of positive servlco to the
business interests of British Columbia, The Canadian Forestry Association is a national Institution, twenty-
one years old. wltll nu Identification
with any government or commercial
interest. The membership is composed chiefly of Canadian citizens having
t patriotic interest in forest conservation. Mr. C. E, E, Usslier of Montreal has beeu president slnco 1919
and will attend the British Columbia
convention.
The high cost or living is Increased
hy forest fires. Every citizen should
help to. keep down fires.
Hay - Fever
SUMMER COLDS, ASTHMA,
spoil many a holiday.
RAZ - MAH
Positively stops these troubles ■
Sneezing, weezing, coughing,
weeping eyes aren't necessary—
unless you like being that way.
81.00 at your druggist's, or write
Tctnplctons, Toronto, for a free trial*
Sold By
IJeattie-Noble, Ltd.
BAPTIST CHURCH
PASTOR W.  T.  TAPSCOTT
MORNING  SERVICE
AT 11 A.M.
Sunday School at 12 noon.
Prayer   Meeting   on   Tliurj-
day at 8 p-m.
EVENING SERVICE 7.30
VOU ARE WELCOME
ORE SHIPMENTS
RECEIVES AT
TRAIL SHELTER
The followhiK Is a list of the ore received al the Trail Smelter for   tbe
week unlink August 14:
Mine Location Tons
I. X. I-, llosland        1
Knob Hill, Republic  {2
North Star, Kimberley       43
Roseberry-Suriiri.se, Koseberry ..   146
Republic, Republic 	
Surprise. Republic 	
Company Mines 	
133
140
9399
Total
9944
MINERAL ACT
(Form F.)
CERTIFICATE OF IMFBOTEMENTS
NOTICE
Rex Kr.," "Creek,** Daughter," "Sol-
oman," "Tiior," "Hiram," "Major,*
Horeb," "Sojourner," "Joshua,"
"Hngla," "Snrnia," "Ruby Prnctlon,"
"Slrus," "Mount Morlah"
MINERAL CLAIMS
situate In lho Fort Steele Mining Division of Kootenay District.
Where located:—
on Sullivan HIH, at Klmberley, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that E. Q. Montgom
ery, F.M.C. 35091-C, acting as Agent
for the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, Free
Miner's Certificate No. 35083-C, Intends sixty days from the date hereof
to apply to the Mining Recorder for
Certificate of Improvements, for tho
purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
the above claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, must be commenced
-beforo tho issuance of such   Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 22nd day of June, 1921.
THE CONSOLIDATED MINING ft
SMELTING COMPANY OF
CANADA,  LIMITED
Per E. Q. MONTGOMERY,
n-M
TWO DELIGHTFUL RESORTS
IN   TIIK
Canadian Pacific Rockies
LAKE    WIMil.llMl.Iti:    (AMI*
X Bungalow ('iimp It nlll Among Hr [Trees on a
Terrace til tlie Edge of Luke Windermere, n
Lovely Warm Water hake Lying in tlie Beautiful t lolutnbla Valley.
A camp wliere yon can enjoy Mountain Scenery
with every form trf Outdoor inversion.
LAKE WAPTA CAMP
Beached from the Main Line of the (iiniidlan
l'dctflfl Railway ut Uector, Beautifully Situated
ami within Lusy Bench of folio Valley, Kicking Horse Canyon,Emerald Lake, Voho Kalis,
umi Lake O'Hara, Where some of the Must
Magnificent Scenery is to he seen.
Moderate Priced Bungalow Camps
Consisting of Central Community Hall for Dining and Social Recreation and a number
of Small Bungalow Type Buildings for Sleeping Quarters
A DELIGHTFUL Sl'OT FOK THE FAMILY
Special 11-linj Fares from Calgary, Edmonton, Medicine Hat, Lethbrldge and Macleod
SCJDIEIt    TOIIilST    F.HIES
To llu*  PACIFIC COAST Will Allow STOl-OYKII AT LAKE « ll'TA (AMI*. III! Kill, 111.
ONLY  A SHOUT SIIIK  THII'  PBOM  GOLDEN TO l.AKK HIMMll.MKHl;
Information umi Full Particulars will bo irluill- furnished on np|>llcaUon lo mi) Igtnl of Uie
CANADIAN   PACIFIC   RAILWAY
Pure-Bred Stock at Cloverdale, B.C.
TmmT|ipnnniTnnmi|iii|miiiH»iiiiniiiiiiinn
r'Miniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiumiiiiiiiiiiii
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIilllMIIII
The South side of the Fraser
River Valley la known as the best
dairy farming district in British
Columbia. Some of thia mo3t far-
tile land has heen farmed for thi'tv
and forty years and is paying it?
owners back with full Interest for
all their toil of clearing it. A I! the
biggest fanners nre going in hot
and atronp for purebred alook. chief
ly Holstetns, Jerseys and Ayrshire*
and nearly all of them have the latest type of cow-house and most up-
to-date appliances.
One of the largest and oldest
farms is thnt of Shannon Brothers
•who weTe born and bred in the
neighborhood and settled on their
present farm of  two hundred  and
thirty-five acres when it was forest
land thirty-five years ne-j. Thfi-
hard work has turned the stanjinz
bush into acres of verdant meadow
and and rich fields of irrain Dro-
da-ing 100 bushels of oats to the
acre.
The specialty is purebred Ayr-
shires.
They hav a herd of eighty-foot
head of cattle, counting balls ar.:!
calves, and so famous have they become for thi= hrn-f-d that their s*o:k
is continually being sh'nc-vl all o*rer
riritish Columbia, to the States and
even across the Pacific to Hong-
Kong.
One of their cows, "Grand-view
Rose." whose sire came straight
| from Scotland, is supposed to be the
best Ayrshire in tbe British Empifg
and has s wonderful record of 21,-UB
lbs. milk and 1.0S5 lbs. butter M|
in 364 days. The Shannons tfctnS
little of paying $1,000 for a bull^alfa
such is their great regard for peA*
gte* and breeding to type.
AU the milking is done by ul
electric machine and the cow-mom!
is modern in every detail even to tM
use of a litter-carrier. Ai In il
dairy farms in B. C. the cattle er4
silo-fed throughout the whiter, el
mixture here of oats and vetch.
The milk is all bottled rif*»t on
the farm, after going throigfc rf
scientific cooling proeeM, and ?•
fallens of It are shipped every
j morning, chiefly to VanectrfW. —*
Ih. O. W. ^
4T its new low price, the Studebaker
J\ SPECIAL-SlX Touring Car is the
greatest dollar-for-dollar value on
the market. It is the ideal five-passenger
automobile—light in weight, speedy and
powerful, economical in operation and
low in maintenance
'Buik'in~Canada"
District Agent - Cranbrook B.C.
F. He DEZALL
NEW PRICES OF STUDEBAKER AUTOMOBILES
f, o. D. Walkers ilie, Onl., .ffscliix Jane Ul, 1021
Tnuring Car. und RnuJtt.r.
UGHT-SIX J-PASS. ROADSTER 518=0
UGHT-SIX TOURING CAR     .„„_.  IStSI
SPECIAL-SIX 2-PASS. ROADSTER
SPECIAL-SIX TOURING CAR     S32S
SPECIAL-SIX 4-PASS. ROADSTER  2331
BIG-SIX TOURING CAR  278li ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
ALL   STUDHIIAKER    CARS    AKE    BQUIPPED    WITH    CORD    TIRES
' ...(> •# a >.l Snl.ml
IJQHTtSlX COUPE ROADSTER  12385
lir.HT-SIX B-j'ASS. SEDAN   2885
SPECIAL-SIX -1-l'A.SS. COUPE  3525
SI'LUALSIX fi-EASi. SEDAN    3625
uk;-:,ix 4-pass. coupe 3995
ric-six v-i'ass. sedan  4095
This   is
idebake r   Year PAGE    SIX
THK      CRANBROOK      HERALD
Thursday, August 18th, 1931
MacDonald's
Grocery
PRESERVING
FRUITS
CRESTON PEACHES
18.35
ITALIAN PRUNES
$1.85
FANCY ISARTI.KTT
PEARS
$4.00
WE WII.I/ MK tlLAll TO
LOOK AFTER VOIR RE-
OI'IUEMEVI'S   ALOM1
THESE LINKS.
HIV QUAKER BREAD
KOIt BOTH
QUALITY  Si  QUANTITY
I'HONE   70
UNCLE TOM'S CABIN GOOD
Tho Stetson Undo Tom's Cabin Co.
Btagod their play to a lilg house at tho
Auditorium on Monday evening. After
tlie street imratlc the band ol eleven
craclc musicians entertained n goodly
number of listeners In front of the big
theatre before the show commenced.
The play Itself was a good production
6f "Uncle Tom's Cabin," and throughout tlie whole performance excellent
music was rendered hy tlie company's
own orchestra.
1'1'liCIIASi:   AIDIT'lltHM
No doubt many will be surprised to
j learn that the local I. O. ll. P. No. 12
! has practically concluded an agreo-
I ment whereby they will purchase tlie
Auditorium.    News  of tliis  transaction   was   received   Just   us   we   were
going to press.
A   >K«   STOItK
Mr. J. P. Deacon launched out hi
the grocery business hist week lu the
big green building ou Cranbroolt Bt.
Mr. Deacon has commoncou*!n a small
way but states tu will increase his
siot-k immediately and soon expects lo
have a full line of general groceries.
CUT ULASS
FOR THE HOME
Nothing Is more pleus-
^ig in the home than to
have a nice showing of
Cut Class. No home ts
complete without it-
•Iu selecting your cut
glass you should buy
only tho best. We are
sure our beautiful display will mett with thc
favor of lilt most exacting buyer as our prices
are Ho reasonable.
W. H. WD..SON
Jeweler
) City Items of interest
Insure with Beale anu Elweli.
AN ASSET
The local G-W.V.A. ia having its
club building repainted; with the new
lawn and a nice fence their premises
are now assuming an aspect of real
beauty.
WILL BE GOOD EVENT
Nearly all details of the Flower
Show being put on by the Womens'
Institute on Thursday jiext, August
26th, have ben announced in previous
Issues of the Herald hut It may again
be mentioned tlmt. in the afternoon a
good musical program Is lo he put on
and plenty of refreshments will be on
band, a nominal fee of 15 cents for
adults and 10 cents for children will
ho charged. Tliere will be a big display of feminine handicraft so set
some show sure Shursrtuy.
SOME GAME
The Wycllffe baseball team, winners of tlie Kast Kuotenay Baseball
League, will lock horns with a Leth-
briilge team at that city today,■"Thursday.
ASK OPEN HEAVER SEASON
Residents of the Caribou country
are urccntly seeking an open season
Tor beaver, according to a letter re*
ceived by the Board of Trade from
M. T. C. Lee of Alexis Creek.
POPULAR COUPLE
ARE RECIPIENTS AT
SURPRISE PARTY
PRICE
REDUCTION
THIS WEEK
Currants In hulk, lb 23c
Sultanas, dark. Ib   3.">e
Dates In hulk, 2 Ills   11,'if
or 3 lbs  50c
WHEAT, ALBERTA CHOICE
PEED, *».(M) (*wfc
BARLEY CHOP, GROUND PINK
LIKE FLOUR, VERY FATTENING POR I'IGS, ETC.,
♦l'.'-'O Cwt., HI'lM Ton
A CAR OP NEW NO. 1. TIMOTHY  TO |ARRIVB  MONDAY.
UIW.tKI TON
TRANSPARENT APPLES tttXi
PER HOX, OR il LBS. FOR -J,'.!!
CRANBROOK
TRADING Co.
The Joy Club gave a surprise party In the Maple Hall last evening,
Wednesday, iu honor of Mr- and Mrs
Hoy Leask.    The couple were the rt-
ipienls of an electric toaster. Many
novel events were the order of the
evening   which   Included    a    confetti
.bower.
Social-Personal
Mrs. McBurney und family were
Creston visitors last week-end.
(Jot the newest news in the Cranbrook Herald, the newsiest newspaper,
Mr. E. Woods of Fernie was a business visitor here Tuesday.
Miss E. Lewis of Ferule spent the
week-end here at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Lewis.
Mr. E. .A Hill, family and party,
returned this week from their camping
trip at Kootenay Lake.
Mr. Jas. FInlay left for Crow's Nest.
on Tuesday ou a few daya business
trip.
MIsb E- A- Greenwood, of Rocky
View Ranch, was visiting friends in
the city last week-end.
JOHN   MANNINGS
Large shipment of preserving pears,
Elberta, Peaches and Prune Plums expected Wednesday, August 24th, So
leave your orders early. Ripe tomatoes tiiic per basket; plums C5c and
85c per basket; yellow transparent
apples $2.:.'5 per box, or 3 lbs- for 26c;
celery 150 per lb.; lemons 06o dozen;
cherries 85c basket.
Phones 98 and 178
DRUMHELLER, Alta.—The Gibson
Syndicate Coal Company is proceeding
with the development of nn extensive
coal property in tlie Drumheller field.
The hoisting shaft which has been
put, down has exposed the Newcastle
seam a1/, feet ln thickness. Machinery which is being installed will be
operated wholly by electricity. The
esuipmetit is planned to handle - an
output of 1,000 tons per 8-hour shift.
Sydney, N. S.-~ Work has commenced on a forty-thousand-ton rail order
for tho Dominion government at the
Dominion Irou and Steel Company's
works here. Tho mills will first roll
twenty thousand tons of eighty-five
pound rails, and by the time these are
finished, preparations will be completed for thu rolling of 20,000 tons of
hundred-pound rails.
Club Cafe Re-Opened
UNDER   NEW  MANAGEMENT
Largest and Best in the City
SUNDAY   SPECIAL
Farm House Chicken Dinner :      »  75c
3. Buchanan, Proprietor
II. Ilcrlij, Manager
Cranbrook Board
OF
School Trustees
THE FOLLOWING  ACCOMMODATION IS  REQUIRED
FOR THE MEMBERS OF THE    INCOMING    SCHOOL
STAFF :
ONE SMALL FURNISHED IIO USE.
ONE SMALL UNFURNISHED HOUSE.
BOARDING  ACCOMMODATION FOR THREE LADIES.
THE UNDERSIGNED WILL DE   PLEASED   TO
FURTHER INFORMATION
GIVE
Cranbrook, 11. C,
August Snd, 11121.
T. M. HOKE UTS,
Secretary.
Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Dingley and family returned Sunday last from their
two weeks' visit with relatives at
Moose Jaw, Sask.
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Clark and family left on Mbnday of this week ca a
two weeks' trip to points in Alberta
and Saskatchewan.
Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Beale and family
left no Monday for Premier Lake
whero they will spend a two weeks'
vacntlon. J [Jjjf
Master Cyrus Pow Is filling the va
cancy made nt the C.P.R. Telegraph
office by the absence of his brother
Francis who is out camping*.
Mrs. S. Creeman. of Mayook, was a
visitor at the home of Mrs- Jas. Crowe
tlie early part of this week, returning to Mayook Wednesday, yesterday
Mr. J. L. Johnson, general merchant
of Yahk, was a business visitor here
the beginning of this week, be states
business nt thut place In Tairly good.
Rev. Evan Baker, of Kimberley,
started on Monday for Kaslo and tlie
Nakuap Hot Springs where he will
enjoy a couple of weeks vacation.
Mrs. P. Hurlbert- of Moose Jaw.
Sask., Is visiting hero with friends for
n few days nfter which she will join
relatives at Kllchene.*.
Mrs. H. L. Harrison and son, who
have been visiting Mrs. G. H. Sadler
anil Mrs. P. I). Hunt, at Vancouver,
arrived back bome on 'fucsdn-y evening.
Mr. H. MacKenzie of Hossland was
lu Cranbrook Monday In connection
with tho Workman's Compensation
Board, he will go to Crow's Nest be
fore commencing the return journey.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Coleman, and Mr.
and Mrs. J. S. Thornley aud baby
spent a day last week-end motoring to
several of the beauty spots in tho
surrounding country.
Mrs. Chas. West of Wnsa is the
guest here of Mrs. Jus. Crowe for sev*
eral days, her son In ing an inmate of
the St. Eugene hospital owing to an
accident.
Mrs. McCarthy, of Erlckson, spent
sovcral days here last week visiting
her daughter, Nurse Connie McCarthy,
who recently underwent nr operation
at the St. Eugene hospital.
Mr. P. A. Williams, editor and malinger of this paper, accompanied hy his
wife, and son Stanley, len on Priday
evening last on a two weeks' trip to
Calgary, Banff, Vancouver and New
Westminster,
The regular Klmberley news budget will not appear for a couple of
weeks or so owing to the fact that onr
worthy correspondent Ih away on 1i!b
vacation, he will make up for lost
time upon his return.
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Wilson nnd
daughter Jenn, accompanied by Mr.
and Mrs. W. P. Attrldge, left on the
noon train yesterday, Wednesday, for
Pentlcton where they wltll ipend the
neat two wecka.
Mr. A. Howard of Kitchener wai a
visitor hire for a few days last wceit.
Mr. J. B. Wise or Fort Steelo spent
Wednesday In the city/ *
Mr. W. Waters was a visitor here
from Trail this week.
JUSS— It grows hair—guarantied.
Haslam's Drug Store.
Mr. W. D. Hill returned last week
from the Coast wliere lie spent a couple of weeks holiday-
Miss ituth Kllngonsmlth of Erlckson
was a visitor here last week at the
home of htr sister, Mis. M. McLeod.
Mr. and Mrs. S- C. Uobsou, of Lethbrldge, passed Airotl'gh Uie city tho
middle or Ihis week.
Mrs. 1). H. Penwlck, sister ot Mr.
N. A. W&lllnger, loft Sunday lasl tor
her home iu the Old Country.
Mr. nnd Mrs. J. J. Grady of Wyn
del wero .Cranbrok visitors Tuosdaj
of this week-
Mr. and Mrs. II. E- Jecks lefi by car
Wednesday of this week for Klngsgate
wliere they will visit friends for a
lime.
Mr. Geo. Mead, cashier at the Sirdar
branch of the Imperial Bank, Is spending his two weeks* vacation litre vis-
itliug friends.
Tho L. D. Cafe, which has been repainted and overhauled in general,
has been reopened and now assumes
a chic appearance.
Mrs. W. M. Patton and children returned last week-end from Trail
where tbey visited friends for some
time.
Mr. R. P. Moffatt, Stanley, Jack,
and Francis Pow. left'for St. Mary's
Lake Tuesday for a fortnights camping expedition.
There was a four-inch rain on Uie
prairies the other night, but It is explained that the drops were four inch
apart.
QUEBEC.— The Canadian Pacific
liner "Empress of Scotland," formerly !
the German "Kaiserin Augusta Victor-j
ia,'* has been officially assigned to
tho St. Lawrence route. This vessel,
which is of liii.OOO tonnage, will make
her first sailing In July.. With luxurious cabin equipment, built iu 11*05
especially for the"*-New York run, she
will bt operated as a three-class boat.
147,1)01) new arrivals entered Canada
in 1920 («tl,000 from Britain, 48,860
from U*S.) Three and a hair million
came to Canada rrom 1900 to 1920.
The American inflow shows a steady!
stream year by year. No less than
fifty-three nationalities aro Included
in Die Immigration tables of the past
few   years.
Canada has a government all' force,
with large training camp al (.imp
Borden. Ovor BO private aviation I
■iiiiipHiiies exist for commercial purposes. Ovor ,16,000 passengers wore
carried during 1920. A cross-Canada
lilght was made In October, Ui'lh, 3,-
■100 miles, from Halifax In Vancouver,
Iii actual flying tlmo of 46 hours and
20 minutes.
WANT AOS.
STAR  SECOND  HAM>  STORE
Phone 9.
We pay tbo beBt pricos going for all |
kinds of furniture- We buy anything from a mouse trau to an auto- j
mobile.
LOST— Ladies fancy comb sot with
Oreen Stones. Reward. Haslam's
Drug Store. 26
WANTED—Small furnished house or
rooms hy September lst, in vicinity
of Baptist Church. Leave word at
Herald Office. 24tf
Mr. H, R. Dove of the Imperial Bank
staff, left this week ou a fort nig lit'a
vacation to Fertile aud surrounding
district.
Mrs. H. E. Plastow and children
of St. Thomas, Out., who have been
visiting for tho last two months with
Mrs. Haslam, sister to Mrs. Plastow,
returned home on today's train.
Messrs. W. M. Harris and YV. D-
Gilroy compose a. delegation to represent the local I.O.O.F. nt the public meeting In tho City Hall on the
29th Inst.
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Wortman and
son arrived here today from Edmonton'by motor and will bo the guests
of Mr. and Mrs. M. Finniss for several days.
Rev. R. W. Lee, who is camping on
tlie shores of Kootenay lake, is expected In the city Friday, and will conduct
hte service sat the Metliodlst Church
next Sabbath.
Walters Walters, of the L. D. Cafe,
left Friday evening last for an indefinite tour of the Eastern provinces
and possibly some of the state of the
U.S.A.
Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Johnson, of
Klngsgate, were in the city over last
week-end. returning homo Monday
last accompanied by Master Edwin
Jecks who will visit with thorn for a
few days.
Mr. Chas. West, Jr., of Wasa. who
mot wltll an accident ln tho sawmill
at that place on Wednesday of last
week and who was brought litre to tho
St. Eugene hospital, is leported to he
improving favorably.
Tbo Degree Captain or Maple Leaf
Rebekah Lodge No. 19 would like the
degree team and other members interested to meet at the lodge room at
S o'clock on Tuesday evening. August
23rd, for rehearsals.
Tlto Flower Servlco conducted by
Rov. Evan Baker at Klmberley last
Sunday proved exceedingly successful.
The Sunday School students lent
their talent to tho choruses and were
ably assisted by Mrs. Ross, who rendered two appropriate solos in splendid form.
Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Pink and family
will leave Wednesday next on a visit
to N.r. Fink's brother at Muskoga, Oklahoma, after which they will proceed
to Toronto where Miss Wanda and Mr.
Vincent Fink will resume tbelr respective studies at the Toronto Conservatory of Music and Toronto University. Mr. Fink will return here about
the first of October but Mrs. Pink will
remain in Toronto for about Ibrce
months.
GRAND FORKS, B.C.—TIio fruit-
raising sections of this district are
receiving tho benefits of a considerable immigration this summer. During the past week, two carloads of
settlers' effects arrived from the Un-
ltod States, and substantial holdings
of fruit land were purchased by two
Englishmen -and an arrival from Mes-
FOR SALE OR RENT—15 acres good
garden land, irrigated by pump;.
Dwelling houses; 2 root cellars, and
outbuildings, newly fenced. Good
market for all kinds et vegetables
nnd small fruits. Apply to P. Backs,
Waldo. B.C. 24-31
I BY      BEALE  c- ELWELL.
I N S C It K   V 0 I  It   A I- T 0
AGAINST PIKE AM) THEFT
ANO OURS IS THE LOSS,
N O T   V O l'< It S
TRANSFER tho worry and lhe
loss lo our shoulders. Insure
your auto. Tliere are several
forms of desirable auto insurance, or one broad policy thai Is
a complete coverage for every
kind- of accident or probable
financial loss.
Do you keep your valuable papers at home when you cun 'get
one of our Safely Deposit Boxes
for $;!.00 a year and know that
they are absolutely secure against loss by fire or theft.
REAL ESTATE
INSURANCE   -
om
Crnnbrook,   B. C.
PHONE  20
LINOLEUM
TOOK A SLIDE
CANADIAN LINOLEUMS HAVE H10KN IMPROVED   SO
MUCH THAT TIIIOY NOW HANK IN QUALITY   WITH
Till': BEST, AND IN DESIONS (IAN NOT UK
KUItl'AHKI'.D
JUST COMPARE OUR  PRICES WITH THK CATALOI!
HOUSES AND SI3H HOW MICH    WB    BEAT    THEM,
THEN ONE CAN SEE JUST WHAT   THKy    AUK C1ET-
TINd IIKUK AND IT IS DELIVERED AT YOUR HOOK.
AND IT IS CUT TO EXACTLY PIT VOUR ROOMS,
12 FT. $5.50 PER LINEAL YARD
6 FT. $2.75 PER LINEAL YARD
SERVICE J8 WORTH A LOT, YET IT
COSTS YOU    NOTHING    WHEN    HE
HEM. OUR GOODS AS CHEAP AS THE
OTHER VEI.I.OW
THY   IS   ONCE   ANI»   SEE
I
aui;nts for wans pianos
SEE THK VYIIJJS PIANOS NOW HERE
Halifax. NiS.— A bumper apple
crop is exii-cted In the Annapolis,Valley this year and It is estimated that
over a million barrels will he available
for export, all of which will paws
through ihis port.
Edmonton, Alta—Carrying hanking
accommodation for the lirst time into
the  northern   oil   dislrict,   the  Union
Hank of Canada will open a branch
at Fori Smith, in latitude sixty degrees
north. It Is not to be expected that
the Fort Smith branch of the Union
Hank can become a profitable venture,
particularly in its initial stages, but
It Is characteristic of Canadian banking that the banker should accompany
the forerunner of civilization and de-
vtlopment iu any movement tending
towards national progress.
The Spell of Quebec's Roadside Oven
PRESERVING
. FRUITS
in our
ALUMINUM   KETTLES
ou a
Perfection
Oil Stoves
is a rare
PLEASURE
A Fen Oil Stoves left nl
Spuria! Prices
Home of good Plumbing
and Heating
See our "Caloric" Pipe-
less Furnace—Dafldy of
them'all.
PATMORE BROS.
SANITARY mid HEATING
ENGINEERS
SHEET METAL  WORK
liy courtesy of the C.P.R,
A Quebec Roadside Oven.
No housewife In* America la so
Independent of tho price of coal and
oil as the habitant woman of Quebec,
with an out-of-door brick oven at
her heck ami call.
These roadside-ovens, — and nobody knows exactly what whim or
fancy    possessed    tllfl    Quebec-minis
mind I'or carrying his liakini; apparatus so far from home, unless it was
fear of the roaring fire which must
be set up in order to bake the IflrjN
quantity of bread necessary to fill
lhe many mouths of the grande
famille,—ure not only landmarks iu
Quebec but indications of the habitant housewife's hospitality. They
seem to say to the passer-by, "Now
you know you are in Quebec, and
Quebec is the land of home-made
bread." Mais. oui. "EntrM vous.
For a mere soup Madame will cut
you some thick slices and bring out
a pitcher oT milk." Oui, the grand
oven is undoubtedly the symbol of
Quebec! There is a friendly look
about these old wayside ovens which
arises out of the fact thnt they are
made by hand nnd fit in perfectly
with the landscape ami the scheme
of life in general obtaining in this
province, so pre-eminently the Innd
of thc home-made.
In many months of tramping in
Quebec we have encountered scores
of these ovens. But because they
are home-made-, ench one Is different. Each architect builds to suit
his own fant*tv or else to come in to
the possibilities ns to shape and ?iz»
contained in the material at hand.
Leaks   art  overcome  with  smudges
Blaster and added coats of whit»
*   till tit* own oltan resemble*
—a frosted cake. Ur else an extra
roof is attempted with bits uf old
board, ami then the oven resembles
some gueer little maiaori  ...  a
doll'l bouse for the children to play
iu, or a large Kennel for le chien
that draws the litlle cart. Seolng
these ovens for the first time you
funrv yourself somewhere in tho
Old-World. Hut linn a similar fancy
seizes you about everything in Quebec, which iii atmosphere, is all foreign ntnl different. On all OCCBllonS-
even iu the mailer pf these OVflllS-
Quobee is just herself. It is a Quebec loaf baked here nml not thi
"little bread" of France, nor yet Its
"yardstick" just a four or fivo
pound loaf that will cul tho doner-
ous slice that the child at play, or
gnrcon helping with the hay, finds
satisfaction in.
These ovens aloiitf the Quebec
roadside stand for two important
factors in our national life. Th. v
stund for rural life, for farm liie
and the development of the country
parts. Ar.d tbey stand for family-
life without which attempts al rural
development have proved vain, 'ibe
women of Quebec are among the
most hnrd working women in Canada and among thc most contented,
(liven a little house with a curved
roof, a tiny balcony and an out-of-
door oven by the roadside, your habj-
tunt woman asks nothing more of
life except a host of children to eat
her bread. Every dny may he "baking day" for all she cares with grain
growing tn her own fields, for flour,
and an oven of character that can
always be atrttched to hoU another

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cranherald.1-0069689/manifest

Comment

Related Items