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Cranbrook Herald Aug 26, 1926

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Array THE CB4NBR00K HERALD
VOLUME  28
CRANBROOK,  B.C.,  THURSDAY,   AUHUST  26th.   1926
N UMBER    27
LIBERAL PREDICTIONS NOTHING BUT
PROPAGANDA - A SYMPTOM OF DESPAIR
It is always a symptom of despair when party managers
begin broadcasting extravagant claims about their election
prospects, and Liberal head(|unrters nre providing abundant
evidence of their state of mind. Day after day its propagandists arc publishing statements to thc effect lhat the Liberal
party is certain of at least 130 scats and the only question at
issue is Ihe size of its majority. Thc best antidote for this
sort of twaddle i.s the recollection of the fact that just prior
to lhe election of 1925 Liberal organs were blithely claiming
140 scats as assured certainties, and the actual outcome only
gave Ihem 101. The truth is that Ihi' liberals have as much
chance of gaining 230 seats as (hey have of securing 130, and
the proof is to bc found in their anxiety to enlist all sorts of
allies *>■! their side.
Under the leadership nf Air. Mackenzie King the Liberal
party has been reduced to Ihe level of a motley faction whose
lodestar is the possession of oflice and its perquisites, and
which cares little for political principles or decent administration. Its famous platform of 1919 has long since been banished into Ihe limbo of forgotten things.
There is only one means of escaping this demoralizing
calamity and that is by conferring upon the Conservative party,
which stands firmly upon a body of definite principles and offers a prospect of sane, honest and efficient administration, the
mandate nf a clear majority. Any other result of the election
simply means a repetition of the shameless misgovernment and
unsavory episodes whose prevalence since 1921 has reduced all
intelligent and public spirited citizens to despair.
Winners at
W. I. Fair!
DEATH CLAIMS MRS.
L. VEEBERG ON FRIDAY
NIGHT LAST WEEK
Saturday morning last the citizens
of Cranbrook were shocked to hear
of the death, the night previous, of
Mrs. L. Veeberg, Although it was
known to a few that following a recent operation at thc hospital, Mrs,
Veeberg's condition was extremely
serious, yet the news of htr passing
was none the less of a surprise. Although comparatively a stranger to
Cranbrouk, Mrs. Veeberg was well
nml favorably known to a large circle of friends; to whom her loss will
be keenly felt. Besides her husband,
who is very well known here, she
leaves two little daughters, and the
fact that to Mr. ami Mrs. Veeberg
n baby girt hail been born but six
days previously made the circumstances of her passing all the more
tragic.
On Monday at 3 p.m. the funeral
service was held at the Presbyterian
church, Hev. M. S. Blackburn oflieiut-
(ng, As an evidence of the esteem
in which tbe deceased lady was held,
The church was filled with thoso who
attended to pay her their last respects.
To tlie large congregation of
friends present Rev. M. S. Blackburn
read the IH.Ii Psalm, and basing his
remarks thereon, lhe speaker .said
thai they were gathered again together on another occasion when the
valley of the shadow of death had
bpened its portals and had taken in
one who was near and dear to many
in the community. They were there
to pay their respects to the memory
of one that, many loved, and to sympathize and comfort, if possible, those
of their number upon whom the hand
oi' death bad fallen so heavily.  Spcak-
ing of death, he described it as thai
which look place when vital functions cease to exist.   From birth to
whatever ae.e  we  live,  be   it  twenty.
thirty or m venfy years, death wns nt
nil times operative, To some it ap-
poured like a full stop, but under
l lie Christ ia ii teaching there W8S
something beyond, The speaker traced the various mythical*beliefs with
regard to death, bow tbe Creek*, considered it could lie held captive and
tbe Italian! that it could be banished
to the bills. There was nothing definite until Jesus eiime and triumph'
id over death, conquering it for us
all.
Referring to the departed sister,
tin- speaker claimed be had the pleasure of knowing her quite well. Her'*
had been a lifo not lived in vain, for
while she lived a quiet, modest and
retiring life, she had done the task
that bad fallen to her lot well, Hor
duty to her family and home were
never neglected. She was possessed
of Chris) tan courage and had a clear
conception of tbo Christian fuith, and
before entering into the larger and
fuller lite  »as not   unmindful of the
children that were left, an Intercea
sion for ihem heing ln-r last thought.
Tin- speokei aid .die would be sadly
inlsseu in lur home, and anionic her
immediate friends ti vacancy had
bun madi that would be hard to fill.
Following the address the entire
congregation, led by ihe Pythian Sis
ters. of which order the late Mrs.
Vceberg was a valued member, filed
past tbe open casket, each talcing a
farewell view of their departed sister
and friend
I'ttln.m   Service   at  Gravf
Tbe   funeral  COftOgC   to  the  grave
was   one   of   the   longest   seen   in
Cranbrook   for  some   time,  upproxi
mately fifty ears being required to
take the mourners to the graveside
whero the service of tlie Presbyterian
Church was concluded by the pastor,
followed by the impressive ceremony
of the Pythian Sislers. Those taking
part therein were as follows: Mrs. .1.
McNeil, Mrs. Mueller, Mrs. McDonald, Mrs. Holdener, Mrs. .1. Taylor
and   Mts.   Brumby.
The beauty of this ceremony did
not fail to impress all present, many
being the remarks that were heard
with respect thereto, concluding as
it did with the beautiful ode as follows:
Sweetly  sleep,   Oh  sister dear,
Kver to our hearts so near;
Angels   wafl   thee   gently   o'er
To  lhat bright eternal shpre.
Pilgrims to a better land,
When we in yon temple stand,
Kvll  ne'er Hindi us molest,
Safely   harbored  and   at  rest.
Besides   the   sorrowing   husband,
there are left, to mourn her loss two
baby girls, her father and mother,
Ur.   and   Mrs.   Jamas   Mitchell,   of
Flower Show Last Week Is
Successful and Well
Attended
A TEMPTING DISPLAY
Pincher Creek, and brothers Charlie
and Olif Mitchell, of Pincher Creek.
The pall hearers were as follows:
C, Eckstromi H. Collier, J. Taylor,
A. C, Bowness, C. Johnson, B. Mat-
son, A. Bullock and Sam Anderson.
Many  Floral Offering!
There wus a profusion of floral
offerings in evidence from friends,
these   coming  from  the   following:
Family, pillow; Mr, and Mrs. J. P.
Scott, spray; Pythian Sisters, Cranbrook, triangle; Mr. and Mrs. A. Hur-t
ry, spray; Scandinavian Brotherhood,]
wreath! Mr. B. Matson, star; Mr.
Carl Branch, spray; Mr. Sam Anderson and Miss Martha Olson, heart;
Mr. and Mrs. Paulson and M. Matson,
wreath; Mr. and Mrs. X. Holdner,
spray; Mr. and Mrs. A. Mueller and
family, gates ajar; Mr. and Mrs. \Y.
.f. Wilson, spray; Mr. and Mr**- H-
Caldwell and family, spray; Mr. and
Mrs. Brault, spray; K. of P. No. 33,
triangle; Mrs. Kummer, spray; Mr.
and Mrs, John Taylor, spray; Mr. M,
Kelly and Jim Diamond, wreath; Provenzano Bros., wreath; Dr. and Mrs.
Miles, spray; Pythian Sisters No. 27,
Kimherley, wreath; Mr. and Mrs.
Carlson, wreath; Mr. and Mrs. C.
Quick, Wycliffe, spray; Mr. and Mrs.
(ius Quick, Wycliffe, spray; Mr. and
Mrs. Wasson, spray; Mr. and Mrs.
A. Knrle Leigh, spray; Mr. and Mrs.
A. Larson, Wycliffe, spray; Mr. Ole
Klandered, spray; Mr. and Mrs. Boris
Michailoff, Moyie, star; Mr. and Mrs.
R, A. McBurney, spray; Mr. A. C.
Bowness, wreath; Cranbrook Brewing
Co., wreath; North Star Lodge, No.
Mi, wreath; Mr. and Mrs. Benspn,
wreath; Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Tater,
spray; Mr. Gus Johnson, Mr. Hens
Olsen and Mr. Nel Strom, wreath;
Mr. W. H. Morris, spray; Hon. Dr.
and Mrs. King, spray; Mr. and Mrs.
A. C. Blaine, spray; Mr. and Mrs.
Walkley, spray; Mr. mid Mrs. J. E.
Kennedy, spray; Dr. and Mrs. Rut-
ledge, spray; Mr. F. Parks, wreath;
Ratcliffe * Stewart, wreath; Mr. W.
F. Doran, spray: Mr. and Mrs, F.
Pasmore, spray; Mr. and Mrs. Jacob-
son, -pray; Mary Fen ton and Hoy,
>pray: Mr. and Sirs. S, Hill, spray;
Mr. and Mrs. Gillespie, spray; Kink
Mercantile Co.. spray; Mr. nnd Mrs.
A. K. Jones, spray; Mr. and Mrs. It.
Frame, spray; Mr. K. Kemp, spray;
Mr. and Mrs. Marsh, spray; Sir. and
Mrs. Halcrow, spray; Mr. nnd Mrs.:
Santo, spray; Mr. and Mrs, C. \elson,!
Hull Uiver, spray; Mr. and Mrs. T. M,
Roberts, spray: Mr. and Mrs. C. Berg- i
Strom, spray; Mr. and Mrs. Sjolund,
Bpray; Mr. and Mrs. Bill Johns, spray;.
Riley & Larson, spray; Miss Macleod,!
spray; Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Playle,
spray; Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sandberg,
Bpray; Mr. and Mrs. A. D, James,
Calgary, spray; Mr. A. C, Falconer,
Spray; Mr, and Mrs, Geo. F. Lunn,
spray; Mr. nnd Mrs. C. .1. Little,
spray; Mr. and Mrs. Lindburg, spray;
Mr. and Mrs. John Leask, spray; Mr,
Ole Ornls, spray; Mr. and Mrs. Wel-
lander and Annie, spray; Mr, and
Mr.-. A. Rosen, spray; Mr. and Mrs.
Geo. Smith, cross; Miss Olive Nor-
grove, spray; Mr. and Mrs. Lundeen
und family; Mr. and Mw. Geo.
Smith, cross; Mr. and Mrs. H. Anderson, cross;   Mr.  aud  Mrs.  R,  Park,
Leave it to the Women's Institute
nnd it will bc done well. The above
has become an accepted truism SO
far as the Cranbrook Women's Institute is concerned, and the annual
flower show held last week was
no exception. Thursday afternoon
,last the K.P. Hall was the scene of
'one of the most successful shows that
the institute has put on, being a revelation to many attending as to the
possibility of the Cranbrook district
to produce flowers and garden vegetables of the finest kind, and also the
ability of the members of the Women's Institute in the matter of fancy
work of all descriptions and the
cooking arts. Officers and members
of the Institute have every reason to
feel justly proud of their efforts, and
many complimentary opinions that
were current with regard to the show
were well deserved,
At 3 o'clock His Worship, Mayor
Roberts, opened the show with a few
appropriate remarks. He pointed out
the advantage of such a function as
the Institute conducted each year,
enumerating the good that was derived therefrom. Following the opening, a short musical program was
given. Mrs. F. M. MacPherson delighted all with her solo, and responded with an equally pleasing encore.
A violin solo by Theodore Padberg
was the next number. It was well
received, and in response to an urgent encore he again favored with another selection.
The president, Mrs. J. Norgrove,
on behalf of the Institute thanked
his worship Mayor Roberts for his
kindness in presiding at the opening
function, and also expressed the grot-
titude of the society for his donation
of a silver vase for the highest aggregate in the show. She invited H"
present to stay and have afternoon
tea and view the exhibits, which comprised fapcy work, cookery, flpwers
and  vegetables.
With regard to the different classes
of exhibits, it should be said that
the fancy work was well up to its
standard, several new names appealing on the entry list. The cookery
section was much larger than 'ast
year und competition in this class was
keener. The floral section, considering the fact that the season has
been a dry one, exceeded the expectations of everyone. The potted plants
made a splendid showing, and while
the competition in the prizes for vegetables was less than in former years,
the cut flowers more than made up
for this. Mrs, Gould and Mrs. Fen-
ton were in charge of the table where
cut flowers were sold for the benefit
of the Crippled Children's Fund. The
judging, which was hy no means on
easy task, was performed by the foi
lowing: Fancy Work, Mrs, J. \\r. Rui-
ftdge and Mrs. M. Mcl.pod; Flpwers
ind Plants, Mr. W. S. Santo; Culinary. Mesdames fl. D. Carlyle, J. T.
Sarvis and L. Clapp, and Mr- A. B.
Smith. The judge of the floral section, Mr. Santo, gave much credit to
that section, saying it is a splendid
advertisement for the Cranbrook district.
A   feature  whicli  was apprecintod
by many with respect to the show was
(.Continued an p«fe Six)
MANY CARS TRAVEL
FROM CRANBROOK TO
FERNIE FOR BIG MEETING
************************** I VANCOUVER BUSINESS
* Meighen's Address f      MEN  ON  TOUR  TO
LABOR CANDIDATE
NOW CAMPAIGNING IN
NORTH END OF RIDING
LIBERAL LADIES
ACCORD RECEPTION
TO MRS. J. H. KING
James Sims, Labor candidate in the
federal election, is busy this .week
in the Columbia riding, holding meeting almost every night, starting at
Athalmer on Monday, and visiting
Wilmer, Briscoe, Spdilmachene, Mc
Murdo, Field and Golden, as well as
the little points in between, for meetings and personal canvassing. On
Friday of next week, September 3rd,
he will be going to Kimberley, where
he has announced a meeting, at which
he may he assisted by Fred White, of
Calgary. Ou Friday afternoon last,
Mr. Sims addressed an audience of
ladies ut the Maple Hall, when a
pleasant social time was also enjoy
ed anil refreshments were served.
Mr. Frank Bond, of this city, has
been named to act as Mr. Sim's election agent in this campaign.
Meighen Meeting Last Sat.
One of Most Outstanding
Ever Seen in E. Kootenay
About a dozen cars or more from
Cranbrook went to Fernie on Saturday last, with people eager to hear
the Premier enunciate his policy.
Though it was un afternoon meeting,
called at probably the most inconvenient time of the week, there was
an audience of aboul twelve hundred
at the rink, at wliich almost every
purt of the big riding was represent-
d. Several cars from Kimberley
were also noted among those who
made the trip.
The general opinion heard afterwards was that the Premier had created a splendid impression with hi;
straightforward address and clear
cut pronouncements, particularly his
references to a proposed policy for
extending the area of consumption
in this country for Fernie coal, one
means suggested for bringing this
about being tu subsidize the transportation.
Tribute  to   Dr.   Rutledge
From thc promises of support made
voluntarily since the meeting to Dr.
Rutledge, Conservative candidate, it i.s
a foregone conclusion thnt Dr. King's
big majority in Fernie last year is
going to be cut down by a big margin. Dr. Rutledge was on the platform with Mr. Meighen, and one of
the pleasing references in the Premier's speech was the endorsement
of Dr. Rutledge he was able to give,
from knowing his home folks back iu
Portage Lu Prairie, his own riding.
It pleased his supporters, to say the
least, to have such commendation of
Dr. Rutledge come from the Premier.
Sherwood Herchmer, who acted us
chairman for the biK meeting, entertained the Premier dining his short
stay in Fernie. Premier Meighen was
accompanied by his daughter and ' -o
sons, one of whom, Theodore Meighen, was taken for a trip into the
mines at Michel, where tlie Premier
also addressed a meeting for forty
minutes. The boy missed the special
train that was taking his futher on
to Lethbridge, and had to follow Inter
in the day by the regular trail?.
Was Statesmanlike,
Says Independent
The Vancouver Star, an independent journal, with Liberal-leanings, has the following
to say editorially of Premier
Meighen's address there recent-
ly:
"Vancouver bad the satisfaction of hearing an address devoted to the real issues and to
the real issues alone, un address which contained much
that his opponents will doubtless answer, but which was not
marred by a single personality
T   of an  objectionable  kind."
**************************:
REACH CITY MONDAY
Will Be Entertained At Banquet and Taken to Kimberley Next Day
'First Meeting
Well Attended
INTERESTING SAMPLES
OF EARLY STAGES OF
SALMON DEVELOPMENT
Best Fall
Fair So Far
This Is What  Is Promised
For Cranbrook on
Sept. 16, 17, 18
MANY ATTRACTIONS
Klk.,
Mr. und Mrs. J, F. Smith have received from Mr. Arthur Bailey, a
brother of Mrs. Smith, some interesting specimens of fish life, showing
the development of the salmon of the
'Pacific from the egg stage, till the ■,,   .,..,        .,   , „.  ; ,.„',,-,.*   ,
time they  reach  about  four  iiiches| "■ Wilson; R«'d Bird C..C.M. bicycle,
in length.    Mr. Bailey is connected j ^ue 160.00, donated  Uy   Patmore
The Gyro Club now has arrange
ments well under way in connection
with the fall fair, which takes place
in Cranbrook on Thursday, Friday
and Saturday, September 10th, 17th
ami IHth, A drive for the sule of
admission tickets Is to commence
right uway, these tickets being offered for $1.00 for adults and 50c for
children. This includes membership
in the Agricultural Association, and
also carries with it admittance to the
fair for the three days and the privileges of the grounds. These tickets
will also carry with them a numbered
stub, and on each of the three evenings, drawings will take place for the
handsome prizes which are being given in connection with the junior and
adult tickets. Drawings for the junior tickets will take place each evening at 8.30, and for the adults at
11 o'clock. Six handsome prizes have
been  provided as follows:
Senior Prizes- McClary li hole
range, value $75.00, donated by F.
Parka & Co.; camping outfit, value
$1)0.00, donated by Fink Mercantile
Co,; Brunswick Upright Phonograph,
value $115,00, donated by Cranbrooit
Drug k   Hook  Co.
Junior Prizes—Autographic Spec-
al Kodak camera, value $02,00, donated by Beattie-Noble, Ltd.; Wrist
watch, value $40.00, donated by W
with the fisheries service in the
northern waters. He has sent six
glass phials of specimens, the first
showing the egg as deposited by the
female. The -Sgcotid stage -hows the
eyed egg stage, a short time afterwards. In the third the little fish
are shown to have assumed their
bape. followed by more development
itill in the fourth stage. By the fifth
stage the little fish have changed
their color, and are a little over an
inch long, fully formed. The sixth
stage shows the salmon about four
inches long, ready for its journey into
unknown and distant waters, from
whence it returns four years later, a
full grown salmon, to Its original
waters.
This porlgrinutlon by the salmon
is something of a mystery to the observers of fish life, but it has been
proven beyond question that the
salmon Invariably returns to its native wators for spawning, and in ihe
meantime reaches points hundreds
and even thousands of miles dfstnnt.
These interesting specimens will
be placed by Mr. Smith at the disposal of the Rod und Gun ('tub if
they desire them, and they may be
placed on exhibition at the fall fair
here. They were taken from tho
Bahine hatchery, north of Haaleton,
B.C.
A reception was held on Saturday,
afternoon Uist in the K.P. Hall, Kimherley iu honor of Mrs. (Dr.) J. II.
King, by the Liberal ladies of Kimberley.
During the afternoon a short program was rendered. Mrs, F. B.
Miles, of Cranbrook, gave a very interesting address on the '-sues in the
coming election campaign, stressing
the satisfactory connection between
promise and performance ou the part
of the Liberal party and giving a
good deal of credit to the representative for this riding, Hon. Dr. King.
A delightful solo was rendered next
by Mrs. F. M. MacPherson, of this
city.
Mrs. A. A. MacKinnon then addressed the meeting and was well received. This was followed by a aplp
by Mrs. M. Forrest in a very pleasing
man ner.
Mrs. Little ended the program with
a few remarks of encouragement to
the campaign committee. Mrs. II.
Morrison presided,
While refreshments were being
served Mrs. MacPherson, Mm. J. 11.
King nml Mrs, 11. Forrest aaoff.
**************************
BIRTHS
**************************
BORN' — On Wednesday, August
18th, at the St. Kugene Hospital, to
Mr. and Mrs. IL Huggins, a daughter.
ter. _
BORN—At the St. F.ugene Hospl*
tai, on Thursday, August 10th. to
Mr. and Mrs. K. Cumberland, of
Moyie, a daughter.
BORN—On Thursday, August 10,
at the St. Kugene Hospital, to Mr.
land Mrs. C. McFarlane, of Vahk, n
'son.
  BORN—To Mr. and Mrs. X. Mc-
_, ,       , ...     „ Kenzie, of Kimberley, at the St. Ku-
The remains of Miss Eunice Mc-|gene Hospital, nn Thursday. August
FUNERAL OF KIMBER
LEY LADY HELD HERE
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON
I
Lend, of Kimherley, who died in the
hospital there on Monday of this
week, were brought to this city for
interment, and on Wednesday afternoon were laid to rest in the cemetery
here, where her mother was buried
about a year ngo. The late Miss McLeod was only about nineteen years
of age, and had been failing in health
since the death of her mother, suffering severe attacks of the heart,
along with other complications, which
eventually proved too much for her
constitution.
She is survived in Kimberley by
one brother, Mr. Glen McLeod, and
four sisters nt Kimberley as well ns
another sister in Nelson.
Rev. M. S, Blackburn conducted
the service in the Presby terian,
Church, and this was attended liy
members of the Rebekah lodges of
Kimberley and Cranbrook. Odd Fellows from the Kimberley lodge acted
as pallbearers, and at thc graveside
the Rebekah service was read, and
the brothers and sisters of the order
dropped on to the casket their sprigs
of evergreen. Many beautiful floral
offerings were in evidence at the
funeral.
20th, a son.
BORN—On Saturday, August 21,
at the St. Kugene Hospital, to Mr.
and Mrs. Lowell Murdock, of Bull
River, a son.
Bros,
These valuable awards will no
doubt be the means of attracting
large numbers to tho fair during the
three days.
Exhibits   In  Arena   Rink
The exhibits will be arranged iu
the Arena Rink, the fair exhibits
proper being arranged along the two
sides, while the middle of the rink
will be occupied by various industrial
exhibits which have been arranged
for, all the available space being taken. Various local concerns have undertaken the staging of these exhibits, and in addition there will he exhibits of minerals, wild game and
other natural resources of the district, and the Rod and Gun Club are
arranging for an exhibit in an aquarium of ten specimens of fish found
in local waters. Exhibits will also
be put on by the Forestry Department and the Dominion Experimental
Farm at lnvermere.
The Conklin-Garrett Entertainment
Company will stage the midway, and
promise attractions of all kinds, including ferris-wheel, chair-o'-plane,
Missouri mule and all the usual carnival booths and attractions. In addition arrangements arc heing made
for the appearance of an aeroplane
ut the fair, the contract for which
may he closed at the end of this
week. A parachute jumper may also
be arranged for to arrive with the
aeroplane.
Each evening there will be sports
attractions at the grounds, Thursday
at ft p.m., the baseball game being
scheduled between Kimberley aud
Fernie; Friday, a lacrosse game between the old timers and the juniors.
and Saturday a football game, probably between Kimberley and the
Concentrator. Two big dances will
also be held on Thursday and Friday
evenings.
The Gyro Club are sparing no efforts to make the Fall Fair in Cranbrook go over well, and deserve the
upport of everyone in the district
o the extent of at least one membership un<] admittance ticket, foi
which $1.00 is a very reasonable
price, especially when coupled to it
are .-ix chances to win the valuable
prizes  totalling nearly  Solid.tin.
In Vancouver Hospital
Mrs. 0, T. Moir, who recently left
for Nelson to recuperate after her
iUnes1* this summer, was compelled
to g(, on to the coast to lees relief
in a lower altitude. She has had to
enter a hospital there, where she i.s
still confined. Mr. Moir la remaining with her at the coast for the present.
Will Add Another Polling Booth
Owing to the increases on the vo-
ters' list in Crnnbrook, it has been
decided to add another polling booth
to the city polls, making seven booth:
into which the city poll will be divided an election day, with an additional one for the advance poll.
At Kimberley there will also In- an
nther poll added, muking four in th*
town there, with one at the Concen
trator and two at Sullivan Mine. Thi
week, on Tuesday* the court of revision sessions opened, wilh Judge
Thompson, chief revising officer sit-
 A.  Lilly
Back From Long Hike
Tho party of Scouts who set out
last week to make the hike over the
St. Mary's summit to Kootenay Lake,
returned to the city on Tuesday, but
were unable to carry out their objective. In spite of the rainy weather of last week-end, they stayed
with thejr hike, but thcrp was confusion in regard to the trails, and
they followed one for a day that
brought them back to the paint they
had started put from that morning.
Taking another one they got within
a short distance of the summit, and
were then unable to determine the
right trail. One of the noteworthy
incidents of the trip was the discovery many miles from civilization of.
a copy of the front page of an issue   ting In Cranbrook, and A
of the Herald, a find which would' revising ofllcer, sitting at Kimberley   v
naturally b© hailed by Murray Mac- Cranbrook is the only point in the j, JM undentbod that Mr. Motherwell
Farlane, who was one of the party, riding at which thert will be su ad- wi,| „1mi „ddn«H a meeting at Fernie,
aa A message from home. vanred poll WM.
On Monday next. August -'loth, a
party of Vancouver Board of Trade
members, now in the course of a tour
of the southern district of British
Columbia, will arrive in Cranbrook
by their two special cars, coming In
from the West, their previous stop
bi big at  Nelson.
On Monday evening there will be
an informal banquet tendered to the
visitors by the Crunbrook Board of
Trade at 7 p.m. The following morn-
i ii tr the visitors will be taken to Kimherley, and they will he met at the
Concentrator by members of the Kimherley Board of Trade. After an inspection of the Concentrator, they
will proceed on io Kimherley. where
a luncheon will be tendered them by
the   Kimberley   Hoard   of  Trade.
In the afternoon a visit will he
made to the Tunnel and upper workings of the Sullivan mine, returning
to Cranbrook in time to take the evening train on to Fernie. Front Fernie, after spending two or three days
here, Including an inspection of the
—'-"■j, a visit t,, the power plant at
and other points, they will pro-
reed to the  Windermere, where they j
will make their headquarters at In-1
veiniere,   but   will   visit   Sinclair   Hot
Springs and other points in the district before proceeding on to Golden
on their way back to  Vancouver.
Well   Known   Men   in   the   Party
' Mr. Allan Graham is in charge of
the committee of the local Board of
Trade, having in hand the arrange-
ments for the visitors during their
stay here. The party numbers in all
about thirty-five or forty members,
among the more well known members
making the trip being the following:
Mayor I. D. Taylor, IL S. Leckb of
\V. It. Leckie k Co., Ltd.. F. J. Bunt.
managing director. Vancouver Dally
Province; J. J. Banfield, of Banfield'.
Black   k   Banfield;    W.    H.    Malkin;
Hugh Dalton, secretary Canadian
Manufacturers' Association; W. R.
Mclntoshj of the Kelly-Douglas Co.;
.Alderman F. S. Woodside, president
B.C. Chamber of Mines; G. Baird.
supervisor of B.C. branches, Rovai
Bank of Canada; W. .1. Blake Wilson,
of l'. Burns .K fo.: C. Sutherland.
Vancouver Province; II. T. Mitchell,,
Vancouver Sun; .1. K. Norcross, Van-!
COUVer Star; W.  E, Payne, secretary
Vancouver   Board  of Trade:  G.
Bonnaillie,  Bank of Commerce; N
hoi Thompson, of Caramel)
Dr. Rutledge and W. J. Bowser Speak at Conservative
Meeting Friday Last
MAKE TELLING POINTS
LEGION BRANCH
APPOINTS MANAGER
AND   3ST. STEWARD
At an executive meeting of the
local branch vi the Canadian Legion
hebl early this week, W. 3. Johnston
was appointed secretary manager for
the newly organized branch and assisting him will be A. Kemball, who
has taken the position of Assistant
Steward. Mr. Johnston has been acting a.- secretary for the former G. W.
V. A. and is continuing his active
connection with the new body, while
Mr. Kemball, who was vice-president
of the (I. W. V. A. will now devote
his full time to the I-egion, severing
his connection with the Cranbrook
Cartage and Transfer ("ompany.
I. A. Young, president of the Legion here, was in Fernie last Sunday with several otht-r Legion member.- and attended a conference of re*
presentatives of legion branches in
Kast Kootenay which w-as held thert;.
Other points represented at this
ting were Fernie, Corbin. Michc-I,
Creston and Kimberley. Among the
matters considered was the question
f taking up with the government the
matter of having the clubs granted
the privilege of selling draft beer tht
same as beer parlors Instead of confining them to bottled beer as- is now
the practice. A decision was reached not to make any request for the
opening of iheir clubs on Sunday for
the purpose of selling beer.
A New Building
Friday of this week, members
Displaying much of his old-time
vim, and showing as always an amazing Insight into public affairs, which
he is able to present with a force
and lucidity that cannot fail to he
grasped, W. .1. Bowser, veteran Conservative appeared on the platform
in this city on Friday last, in support
of the candidature of Dr. J. W. Rut-
ledge, Conservative candidate,   Both
fpcakeis got a very good hearing, and
the Auditorium was very well fillet!
for the gathering, which was the first
public meeting held by the party in
the city.
Local  Pretident  it Chairman
The  chair was taken  hy   Mr. Jac';
Young,   the   president   of   the   Crunbrook city association, and with him
n the platform was A. A. Robertson,
resident of the federal association,
ml ('apt. Bell, president of the Kim
berley Conservative Association.
The proceedings were opened with
the singing of O Canada, after which
the chairman introduced Mr. Bowser,
the first speaker, as one well able to
present the issues of the dav to the
electors.
Mr. Bowser, who was received with
applause, expressed pleasure at once
again being in ''ranbrook. ami to
renew the many acquaintances he had
here.
Plunging right into his subject, and
touching on the unsettled political
conditions,   be    asked.     "What     has
brought about the present conditions,
and what has forced another election
on Canada?"    As an answer to this
he  reviewed  the happenings  in  the
federal political arena since the time
of Premier Borden.    In    thc    1021
election the  Liberals went in as the
strongest  group with   1111 member.*,
followed by th,- Progressives with 6S,
and the Conservatives, last, with 51.
But   in   1926,   with   all  the  election
machinery in their control, and with
the possibility of such  manipulation
being used as is now coming to light
m  Athabasca and   Peace   River, they
were  badly defeated.    Their follow-
liminished liy sixteen, the third
A. j party   was  reduced  to   twenty-eight,
ic. | and   the   Conservatives   gained   the
Laird &'lnrge-t following, electing 116 mem-
! bers.    Mackenzie King Hnd eight of
his ministers were defeated and lost
alfu in seven of the nine provinces.
This. Mr. Bowser said, told Mr. King
:hat   the   people   of   Canada   were
through with him as prime minister.
Still CUnfi le Ottca
N'ohviihsianding this setback, And
being in  a minority with his party
following in the house, and lacking
200,000  of  the popular vote as received   by   the    Conservatives,    Mr.
Kintr decided  to cling to offiie, and
made preparations to barter with the
remnant of the Progressive party.
Referring to the fact that Mr.
Meighen had won in seven of the
nine provinces, Mr. Bowser said that
in Quebec, the remaining Liberal province, they were- able to make a break
of only four seats, against the vilification of Mr. Meighen which was ao
persistently carried on there, and the
ther province going against him was
;a>katchewan. This was populated
largely hy American farmers, who
had become naturalized, but whose
> ambition, Mr. Bowser said, was
ell their wheat in the highest market and buy their implements in the
lowest market. What did they care>
Mr. Bowser asked, for Canadian factories? This province had elected
every member either a Liberal or a
Progressive.
Triei   to Carry On
Mackenzie King at once started
u, barter with the Progresses for
their support, and in regard to carrying on advised the governor-general
it would be wise to wait tht opening
of parliament and see if he could
command a majority in the house.
In their first division the government
was upheld by a majority of three,
and after that the session had drat-
he  local   legion  will   meet  when | ged  along,   nothing  being  done   but
tonden will be discussed for the crec-1 debate,   and   nothing  was  done  to
tion of the new legion headquarters, I wardi implementing the Liberal pro-
Whlch will be constructed on BMtrlfnrai the former premier had given
Street at the corner of Fenwick Ave., out in 1025, the points in which were
opposite the Mount Baker Hotel, rhetai follows:
Legion has taken an option on fouri (|j Transportation—Not a single
lots   from   the  city at   this  site  and I hill was introdua-d to keep his word
it   i«  n*tneu*ke*A   u-ill   tn.*n,l   „..„„*   tin    I,.   .*.. 1        .
s expected will spend about SlO.-
000.00 in erection of its new building, and the purchase of ihe lot-.
lie plans for this building were recently prepared by Messrs i. <.. M..r-
ti and II. C. Kinghorn. al.o.g with
detailed specifications, and local contractor.- have submitted l»id>. for the
buildii g. It calls for a itucc - - r
brick veneer building with a front*
age "f about thirty feet and a <b*pth
over all of about seventy f.t-t. A
front elevation shows (ftlte a hand-
- in- looking building which will unci, ubtedly be a big addition to that
part of Baker Street. If the tenders
are considered satisfactory, it is altogether likely that construction of
the building' will commence immediately.
Liberal Meetin-ft Saturday
Saturday next is a heavy date with
the Liberal campaign committee in
this section. On that evening meetings are being hebl in both Cranbrook and Kimberley, Hon. W. R.
Motherwell, former minister of agriculture in the Liberal government,
wiil be a Speaker at tht- Auditorium,
along with J. W. delt. Karri-, former
attorney general for B.C., ami llr.
King, Liberal candidate. In Kimberley. the speakers are Hon. Wm. Sloan,
minister of mines at Victoria, along
with Mr. Karris and I"" King. Mr.
Farris, after being the first speaker
in Kiniberley, will be brought to
Cranbrook in time to appear as a
speaker here, and Dr, King, after
making his address here will he taken
Kimberley fur the meeting there.
to the people—he wai too busy bargaining with th" Progressives.
(2) Immigration—There is not
an immigration policy in this country.
Population of the proper kind is needed and Mackentle King knew he was
striking a kcy-not»- with the people
when he pronii-ed an immigration
policy.
(;i) Senate reforni-~The only
thing done was to put one of tho
RIOSt notorious scoundrels, Hon. Jacques Bureau, into the senate. As Mr.
Meighen properly put it at a meeting
at the coast, Mr. King had sentenced
Mr. Bureau for life on a salary of
14000.00 a year.
(I) Kis< al Policy—In tin's they
had done something. They had
brought down the postage by reducing
the letter postage from three cents
to two cents. This was very good, but
it took them a long time in the way of
reducing taxation. It is now nine
years since the war is over. Kngland
ami United Stales had made wonderful reductions in taxation, and it took
nine years for Canada to mako a reduction in postage. How many people
in thi- audience found anything of a
valuable nature to them in reduction
of Lhe income tax? It was good in
his opinion for the millionaires, but
when it comes to the man who walks
the streets, it .amounted to nothing
a all.
Rite o' the Cvitomi Prob*
In the meantime, various rumors
of a great scandal in connection with
smuggling had become rampant.
There were u number of men who had
large investments in Canuda, who
were forced to form themselves Into
a Merchants' Protective Association.
(C««tiaa«4 a* l»mt P«|«) PAOB   TWO
THE  CRANBROOK   HERALD
Thursday, August 26th, 1926
Province  of  British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MININC ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate one-half mils east of
the Fording River, on the north-west
side of Grace Creek, and about one
and one-half miles south of the big
bend of the Fording River.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C, McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing  at  a stake  or  post
placed at its N.E. corner, situate 300
feet south from where the Fording
River turns to  flow north-westerly,
situate  north   1000  feet,  west  two
miles from  the N.W. corner  of  L
6755; thence south so chains; thence
west   80   chains;   thence   north   HO
chains; thence eust HO  chuins; and
containing 0-10  acres,  more  or less.
Dated the 31st day uf May,  1920,
I). C, McKECHNIE,
Signature of applicant or agent.
201    28-27
Commencing nt a stake or post
placed at its N.E. corner, situate
north 1000 feet, west 1700 feet from
the N.E. corner of L 0758; thonco
south SO chains; thence west KO
chains; thence north SO chains;
thence east so chains; and containing
040 hitch, more or less.
Duted the   1st day of .lune,  1020,
D.   C.   McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
205    23-27
Province   of   British   Columbia
Province of  Britiih  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5   (3).)
Notice  Of   Intention   To   Apply   Foi
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Divi
sion, and situate on the Bouth-cust
aide of the Fording River between
Grace Creek and the southerly point
of the bend of thc Fording River, and
about three miles below the mouth of
Ewin Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consol
dated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its N.W. corner, situate '.100
feet south from where the Fording
River turns to flow north-westerly,
and situate north 1000 feet, west two
miles from the N.W. corner of L
6765; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; and
containing 040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 31st day of May, 1020.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or ugent.
202   23-27
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply    For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division and situate on the east side of
the north or main branch of Line
Creek, one mile above the mouth of
Tornado Creek and south of the divide between Line Creek and Ewin
Creek.
TAKE NOTICK lhat the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co, of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation ; mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C, McKechnle, of Kimberley,  B.C.,  by  occupation a   mining
nglneer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its N.W. corner, siluale
north 1900 feet, west 1700 feet from
lbe N.E. corner of L 0768; thenco
utfi 80 chains; thence east St)
chains; thence north SO chains;
thence west 80 chains; and containing
(M0 acres, more or less.
Dated the 1st day of June,  1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
200    23-27
Province of Britiih Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6  (3).)
Notice  Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate intersected by the
Fording River, below tbe southerly
point of tbe bend where the river
flows in a north-westerly direction,
and about three miles .below tht
mouth of Ewin Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consoli.
dated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing al a stake or post
placed at its .S.E. corner, situate 300
feet Bouth from where the Fording
River turns to flow north-westerly,
and situate north 100(1 feet, west two
miles from the N.W. corner of L
6755; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chnins; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 ehains; and
containing 040 ucres, more or less.
Dated the 31st day of May, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of upplicunt or agent.
208   23-27
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Nolict Of  Intention  To Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate intersected by thc
Fording River above thc southerly
point of the bend, where thc river
flows in a south-westerly direction
and about two miles below the mouth
of Ewin Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation u mining and smelting
company, by their duly uuthorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
nlacad at its S.W. corner, situate 300
feet south from where the Fording
Kiver turns to flow north-westerly,
and situate north 1000 feet, west two
miles from the N.W. corner of L
6766; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; and
containing G40 acres, more or less.
Dated the 31st day of May, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
204    28-27
Province of  British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  6   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply    For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division and situate on the. west side of
Ewin Creek immediately north of the
divide between Ewin Creek and Line
Creek.
LAKE NOTICE that the Consoli
dated Mining & Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimherley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following de-
ribed lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its S.E. comer, situate
north 1900 feet, west 1700 feet from
the N.E. corner of L 0758; thence
north 80 chains; thence west SO
hains; thence south 80 chains;
thence easl 80 chains; and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the  1st day of June,   1020.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
207    23-27
Commencing at a stake or post
laced at its N.W. corner, situate
orth 1900 feet, east 1200 feet from
he N.E. corner of L 0751; thence
outh SO chains; thence east 80
hains; thence north 80 chains;
hence west SO chains; ami contain-
ig 040 acres, more or less.
Daled the  1st day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
Ill    23-27
Province of  British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section   6   (»).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate intersected by Ewin
Creek ubout two miles ubove its
mouth and two miles north of the
divide between Line Creek and Ewin
Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consoli.
tinted Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining antl smelting
company, by their duly authorized
ugent. D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Acl." over the following described lands:—
Commencing ut a stuke or post
placed ut its S.E. corner, situate
north 1000 feet, east 1200 feet from
the N.E. corner of L 0751; thence
north so chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 8.0 chains; and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the  1st day of July, 1920.
I). C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
211    23-27
north 1900 feet, west 900 feet from
tho S.E. corner of L 0743; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 30 chains;
thence east 80 chains; and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 1st day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
215    23-27
chains;    thence    south    80   chains;
thence west SO chains; and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 1st day of June, 1928.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
220   23-27
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6  (3).)
Notice  Of   Intention   To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
t In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate between Ewin and
Todhunter Creeks, about one half
mile south-eust of Todhunter Creek,
two and one-half miles above the
mouth of Ewin Creek, where it joins
the Fording River.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, hy their duly authorized
agent, IX C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, Intend to upply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its S.W. corner, situate
north 1900 feet, west 900 feet from
the S.E. corner of L 0743; thence
north 80 chains; thence cast 80
chnins; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 1st day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
210    23-27
Notice  Of   Intention   To  Apply   Fnr
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate ou the south-east
side of Chauncey ('reek, about one
and one-half miles ubove its mouth,
where it joins the Fording River.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co, of
Canada, Limited, of Kimherley, B.C,
by occupution a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to upply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its N.E. corner, situate
north 1400 feet from the N.E. corner
of L 0735; thence south 80 chains.
thence west 80 ehains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; and
containing  010  acres,   more or less,
Dated the 2nd dav of June, 1920.
1). C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
21    23-27
Province  of  British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section   5   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, ami situate on the east side of
Ewin Creek about two miles above
its mouth and two miles north of the
divide between Line Creek and Ewin
Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and pmelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act." over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its S.W. corner, situate
north 1000 feet, east 1200 feet from
the N.E, corner of L 0751; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west So chains; and containing 040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 1st day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or ngent.
212    23-27
Province  of   British   Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention    to   Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division and situate ou the east side of
Ewin Creek, immediately north of the
divide between Ewin Creek and Lint-
Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C ,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, Intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following tie-
scribed lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its S.W. corner, situate
north 1900 feet, west 1700 feet from
the N.K. corner of L 0758; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; and containing  040   acres,   more  or  less.
Dated the 1st dav of June,  1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
08    23-27
Province of British Columbia
Province of BritUh Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6 (3).)
Nolle*  Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Diviaion and situate on the west side of
the north or main branch of Line
Creek, one mile above the mouth of
Tornado Creek, and south of the di-
vide between Line Creek and Ewin
Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following de-
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section fi  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting   Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division and situate on the wes! side of
Ewin Creek, about three miles above
its mouth, and one mile north of the
divide between Line Creek and Ewin
Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kiniberley, B.C.,
by occupution u mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:-—
Commencing at- n stake or post
placed at its N.E. corner, situate
north !900 feel, east 1200 feet from
the N.E. corner of L 0751; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north SO chuins;
thence east. 80 chains; and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 1st day of June, 1020.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
209    23-27
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  fi   (3).)
Notice Of   Intention   To  Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence,
mining ,
ocribedl
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division and situate on the east side of
Ewin Creek, about three miles above
its mouth and one mile north of the
divide between Line Creek and Kwin
Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly uuthorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupntion a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under tlie "Phosphate-
mining Act" over tlie following described landa:—
Province of  British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fori Steele, B.C., Mining Division, ami situate intersected by Ewin
Creek ubout one mile above its
mouth where it joins the Fording
Kiver.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consoli-
tlatetl Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D, C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phospnate-
niining Act" over the following de-
cribed lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed ai its N.E. corner, situate
north 1900 feet, west 900 feet from
lhe S.E. corner of L 0743; thence
nth SO ehains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east. 80 chains; and containing
Till) acres, more or less.
Dated thc 1st day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
213    23-27
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  fi   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence,
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate on the east side of
Ewin Creek, about two miles above
its mouth, where it joins the Fording
River.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelling Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupution a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
plaeetl at its N.W. corner, situate
north 1000 feet, west 900 feet from
tbe S.E. corner of L 0743; thence
south SO chuins; thence east 80
chains] thence north 80 chnins;
ihence west 80 chains; and containing (Mu acres, more or less.
Datetl the 1st day of June, 192G.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
214    23-27
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINJNG ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice Of Intention  To Apply  Fpr
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate between Ewin and
Todhunter Creeks, on the east ride
of Todhunter Creek ubout two miles
above the mouth of Ewin ('reek
where it joins the Fording River.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kiniberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. 0. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phoephate-
mining Acl" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed  at  Ita   S.K.   comer,  altwU
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section fi  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate intersected by Todhunter Creek about one and one-half
miles   above   where   it   joins   Ewin
TAKE NOTICE that die Consoli-
dated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.
by occupation a mining and smelting
compnny, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupution a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed nt its N.E. corner, situate
north 1900 feet, west 1000 feet from
the N.E. corner of L 0742; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 ehains; and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 1st day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of npplicant or agent.
217    23-27
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section ii   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
.In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, ami situate on the south-east
side of Todhunter Creek, about three
miles above where it joins Ewin
Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consol
dated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kiniberley, B.C,
hy occupation u mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, p.C, by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphute
miniiitr Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its N.W. corner, situate
north 1900 feet, west 1000 feet from
the N.E. corner of L 0742; thence
south SO chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
ihence west 80 chains; and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 1st day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
218    23-27
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  To Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate on the north-west
side of Todhunter Creek, about three
miles above where it joins Ewin
Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intena to bpnly for a prospecting licence under the "Phospbatp-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its S.E. corner, situate
north 1900 feet, west 1000 feet from
the N.E. corner of L 0742; thence
sout h 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; nnd containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 1st day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
219    23-27
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Seet/on 6  (3).)
Notice Of  Intentiop  To  Appl/   Foi
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Divi
sion, and situate intersected by Tod
hupter Cree)i abput phe mile from its
head and three miles above where it
joins Rwin Crept.
TAKE NOTICJ2 that the Cc-nsoli
dated Mining ft Smelting Cp. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its S.W. corner, situate
north 1900 feet, west 1600 ftat from
the N.E. corner of L 6742; thence
north  80  chelae;  Umm|   tin If
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  {li).)
Province of BritUh Columbin
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5 (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  To Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate intersected by
Chauncey Creek, about three miles
above its mouth, where it joins the
Fording River.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phospnate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its N.W. corner, situate
north 1600 feet, west 1000 feet from
the N.E. corner of L 6729; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chuins; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 2nd day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
220    23-27
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MININC ACT
(Section  5   (II).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   App'"   for
Prospecting Licence.
Province of British Columbia
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate on the west side of
Brown Creek, and the north side
of Kilmarnoch Creek ubout two miles
from its mouth where it joins the
Fording River.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining &. Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupution u mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a miring
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphute-
inining Acl" over Ihe following described lands:—
Commencing ut a stake or post
placed at its S.E. corner, situate
north 1500 feet, west 1000 feet from
the N.E. corner of L 0090; thence
north 80 chains; thence west K0
hains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east HI) chains; anil containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the Brd dav of June. L920.
I), c. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
281    23-27
PHOSPHATE-MININC ACT
(Section &  (3).)
Province of  British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MININC ACT
(Section 5  (II).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate one mile south-east
of Chauncey Creek, and two and one-
half miles above its mouth, where it
joins the Fording Kiver,
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of
Cunada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agvnt, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its N.W. corner, situate
north 1100 feet from the N.E. corner
of I. 0786; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chuins; thoncc west 80 chains; and
containing  040  acres,  more or less,
Dnted the 2nd day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant oi agent.
222    23-27
Province of  British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5   (8J.)
Notice  Of   Intention   To Apply   For
Prospecting Licence,
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, und situute intersected by
Chauncey Creek about two miles
above its mouth, where it joins the
Fording River.
TAKE NOTICE thnt the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimherley, B.C.
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
ugent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over thc following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its S.E. corner, situate
north 1400 feet, from the N.E. corner
of L 0735; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; and
containing 040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 2nd day of June, 1920
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent,
223    23-27
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  6   (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  To Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate on the south-eaat
side of Chauncey Creek about two
and one-half miles above its mouth
where it joins the Fording river.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing nt a stake or post
placed at its S.W. corner, situate
north 1400 feet from the N.E. corner
of L 0736; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; and
containing 040 acres, more or less.
Dated lhc 2nd .lay of June, 1020.
P. C.  McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
224    23-27
Province of  British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (8).)
Notice Of  Intention  To Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, und situate on the west side of
the first north branch of Chauncey
Creek, N.W. of Chauncey Creek,
about three miles above, its mouth
where it joins the Fording River.
TAKE 'NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberle/, B.C.,
by occupution a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or PR8t
placed at its N.E. corner, situate
north 1500 feet, west 1000 feet from
thc N.E. corner of L 0729; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence cast 80 chains; and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 2nd day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent
226   23 27
Notico Of  Intention  To Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate on the west side
of the first north branch of Chauncey
Creek one-half mile north-west of the
Chauncey Creek, about three and
one-half miles above its mouth where
it joins the Fording River.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.'\,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
.placed at its S.E. corner, xitutitt*
north 1600 feet, west 1600 feet from
the N.E. corner of L 6729; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 2nd day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
227    23-27
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6  (3).)
Notice Of  Intention  To Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate on the east side of
the first north branch of Chauncey
Creek, and on the North-west side of
Chauncey Creek about four and one-
half miles above its mouth where it
joins the Fording River.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its S.W. corner, situate
north 1600 feet, west 1600 feet from
the N.E. corner of L 6729; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 2nd day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
228    23-27
Province ef BritUh Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6 (3).)
Notice Of Intention To Apply  For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate on the south aide of
Kilmarnoch Creek, about two miles
above its mouth, where it joins the
Fording River.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining t Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its N.E. corner, situate
north 1600 feet, west 1600 feet from
the N.E. corner of L 6690; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 3rd day of June. 1926.
P. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
229   28-8? VV
Province of BritUh Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6 (8).)
Notice Or  Intention  To Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate on the couth side
of Kilmarnoch Creek, about three
miles above its mouth where it joins
the Fording River.
TAKK NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKechnle, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at 1" N*W- copier, sityifte
north 1600 feet, west 1600 feet frpm
the N.E. corner of L 0690; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; and containing
640 acres, more or Uh.
Dated the 3rd day of Juno, 1926,
D. C. MeKECHNIE.
Signature of oppliean t or agtst
23*   ll-fl
Province of  British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MININC ACT
(Section  6  (8).)
Notice  Of   Intention   To   App'y   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mininpr Division, and situate on the east side of
Brown Creek, and the north side of
Kilmarnoch Creek about three miles
above its mouth where it joins the
Fording River.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its S.W. corner, situate
north 1600 feet, west 1000 feet from
ihe N.E. corner of L 6090; thence
north SO chains; thence eust 80
chains; thence south K0 chains;
tht me wesl SO chains; ami containing
040 acres, more  or less.
Dated the 3rd dav of .lune, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
2.12    23-27
Province of  British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MININC. ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice  Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
t In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate on tlie west side of
Brown Creek, one mile north of Kilmarnoch Creek, ubout two miles
above its mouth, where it joins the
Fording River.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimherley, B.C..
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing nt a stake or post
placed at its S.E. corner, situate
north 1500 feet, wesl 1100 feet from
the N.E. corner of I. 0095; thence
north 80 chnins; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains;
thence east K0 chuins; anil containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dnted the 3rd day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
233    23-27
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MININC ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice Of   Intention   To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate intersected by
Brown Creek, one mile north of Kilmarnoch Creek, ubout three miles
above its mouth, where it joins the
Fording River.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kiniberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining ami smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, I). C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a slake or post
placed at its S.W. corner, situate
north 1600 fleet, west 1100 feet from
the N.E. corner oT L 0095; thence
north   80   chnins;   them ast   80
chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains; and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 3rd dav of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of upplicnut or agent.
234    23-27
Province of  British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MININC ACT
(Section  6   (3).)
Notice  Of   Intention   To   Apply   F. r
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situute on the south-west
aide of Moore ('reek, one mile south
of Henrietta ('reek, ahout one mile
above its month where it joins the
Fording River. •
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting t'o. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining und smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at ita N.E. corner, situate
north 1500 feet, west 1300 feet from
the S.E- corner of L 0045; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains: and containing
640 acres, more or Icsh.
Dated the 4th day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or i
tai hit Thursday, August 26th, 1926
FIRST MEETING
WELL ATTENDED
THE  CRANBROOK   HERALD
(Continued from Page One)
Mr. Sparks, of Ottawa, and president
this association, was a personal
friend of Mackenzie King, und a
strong Liberal, He knew that smuggling had Iieen rampant not only in
the port of Montreal but also along
the American boundary. They tried
for eighteen months or two yeurs lo
rectify this, though it wus not tho
duty «'f tho merchants to do this. He
had brought to the attention of the
government the mnny scandals which
o going on iii the customs depart-
it, nml so they formed themsolves
■ the Protective Association. They
it $20,000.00 of their own money
ng to force lhe government to do
till
ill-
llll
llr duty
I    Iirl',
<l mndo
.    Tho
iro Mi
ii stnli
y pliu-i-il tholr ovl-
icki'ii/.ii' lvi11tr. who
-mi-Mi thul ho knew
till
I'll
Wil
Mi
I.i
lllllv   Mi
  Imv
1,1,1*117.11-
|H   (IO|)l
-. Spin
.' In IP
llu*   1
Kinr:
whicb
irtmonl wiis roltiin,
1. ilcchleil thut ho
. in iln- opposition,
'iiiisi-iviiiivi's. Nuw
stall's Hint Ihis iu-
i   Stevens   racolvod
Llll
J    null,**
-I   Impi
1    Stlll't*
■npi-lly just lit'fnt-e
i'il  in  Ottawa  when
llu
•V    Illl-Ml
nolvoa
wen' bofflnnlng to
wi
tw
/cutlgnlo
.Vi   thla
I-C8   ttllic
ooii Mr.
' point
li Im.l
Steve
Mr, Hnwser rend
Iieen OXChungOd hells ami  Mr.  Sparks,
n which il was clearly shown that lhe
information in the Duncan report
md been pnssed on to Mr. Stevens
inly when it had heen found Impossible in get the Liberal government
o do anything, nud that the government hm! been in full possession of
this information before It was handed
it. Mr, Stevens. This effectively refuted the statement made by Mackenzie Kinu- thai Mr. Stevens had
wrongfully obtained ihis information,
Whnt the Committee Found
Mr. Bowser went into the composition and work of the committee
probing the customs department, and
told of the conditions which the inquiry brought to light. He gave
many instances of bogus clearances
of vessels from maritime ports, ostensibly to distant points, but in
reality to have their contraband cargo
transferred at sea to other smaller
vessels ami landed illicitly in other
places, and so escaping the duty.
Ships would clear for South America
or the West Indies, and return in two
<>r three days' time for other cargoes.
Many cases of this wore given, lt
was shown that the infamous business was carried on with the utmost
flagrnney, and undoubtedly with the
connivance of officials high up in the
customs service, and cases were given
where Liberal members of parliament,
and even ministers, had intervened
when the law sought to take its
course in some of these episodes.
References were also made to the
notorious Bisalllon and his activities
iu all kinds of illicit business, while
holding the position of chief inspector
at the port of Montreal, and it was
shown how the business had also extended to other lines, such as silks
and drugs, and that high Liberal officials were interested in the protection of the culprits. All this was
amply proved by extracts from the
evidence at the enquiry, from which
Mr. Bowser quoted.
This scandal had ultimately become so bad, everybody in Nova
' Scotia knew about it. A body
of ministers was formed to go into
this matter composed of the heads of
the various churches, and thoy wrote
a letter to .Mackenzie King informing
him of this wholesale smuggling of
liquor, which was not paying duty Into lhc treasury. Mr. King paid no
attention to this information.
When the committee brought in Its
report, it unanimously condemned
.1 nci |Ues tt u t cau, former min [ster
tht n translated to the senate. Tht
Conservatives hat! sought to anient
it by adding censure of the then min
Ister of customs and the government
itself, but the committee would not
agree to this, and so this was moved
in the ibmse as the now famous
St.-veil-, amendment. Of thc movements made to try and slave off the
Thc pl'OVin
nt. of tht
me of thi
consulted «
bee,   he   sn
es were to pay fifty per
cost of the pensions, but
provinces had ever been
ii the question, and Que-
d,   would   never   support
team to the Coast, the successful operation of the gymnasium and the
success attending July 1st, which,
said the speaker, waa largely due to
vol
i lh
is amendment, Mr, Bowser
I'll'
,'   i
i  f
nil  iii-i-iiiiiit,  including  nil
Iln
tin
pel
1
nil
|.i*i*
al suhtorfugos adopted lor
nl  government  t" irei- by.
l<ii
mils
ii
line iln- time when it wns
seen thai the amendment would
and the government resigned.
Challenge! Dr. Kmr
Referring lo the Buppressc
di to i- m the Duncnn report
committee, Mi Bowser threw out a
direct t Imllenge to Dr. King. -Miss
Mt I bail,  the  Ind)   member  of  the
I    . wns on her wny In Rnglnnd on
a Imlidnj when lhc critical time
it rose, "und," anl Mr. Bowser, "some-
.on was senl to gel el off the boat
an.I bring her back to save the gov-
tin
uch a measure. It was never intended thai it ahould become law, but
was simply a subterfuge. The Cou-
rvatlves had not opposed it, but
believed that proper provincial support should have been obtained for
the measure. As an instance of the
Liberal feeling on the measure, it
was shown that many Liberal senators had absented themselves rather
than hnve to record their vote for
the abortive measure.
Mr. Meighen had promised when
lectotl to introduce on old age pen-
ions measure with thu full consent
f the provinces.
Chances   Favor   Conservatives
"What are the chances of the Con-
ervalivcs," Mr, Bowser asked, and
ii answer said there was one certainty, ami that was tliat Mackenzie Kiiiiv
not likely to win back his lost
itigo after tho doings of the past
c Tho Conservatives had lo win
seats more, and hold what they
had. They were likely to Improve
Iheir position in B.C., antl if he Knew
villi nn' of the situation,  Dr.  King
d the flghl of his life on his hands
KnsL Kootonay, In conjecturing
whal Quebec was likely to du this
he draw attention to (he fact
thai in 1925 the Liberal vote in that
province had,slumped from 1921 by
1*12,000 and the big majorities in
some of llu- ridings hml been reduced.
After referring to the part Hon.
II. IL Stevens had played in bringing
to' light the conditions in the customs
lepnrlmt'iil, Mr. Bowser concluded
his address with an optimistic ,*re
diction that Quebec was going to
rise ngainst the flooding of the east
with muggled goods, prison-made
pestilential goods and other things
that were interfering seriously with
the output of the Canadian factories,
and that the people of Canada were
going to rise in their might nnd give
Mr, Mackenzie King their answer in
no uncertain voice.
Mr, Bowser concluded his address
amid much applause.
Candidate   Speaks
Dr, Rutledge, the Conservative
candidate, was also accorded a very
cordial reception. He said at the
outset that while the constitutional
issue had been described at fh'st as
the great issue, some Liberals were
now applying the soft pedal to this
talk. A retiring premier usually
glossed over any difficulties he mny
have had with the governor-general,
but did Mackenzie King have the pubic interests at heart in following the
.•ourse he hail? Possibly it might bc
said that it made little difference to
the man in the street who was elected, but he felt the people were interested in securing responsible government.
Nothing To  It?
Dr. King would soon he saying
that there was nothing to the customs scandal, but Dr. Rutledge said
there was evidently enough in it lo
defeat the former government. He
quoted additional cases to show how
widespread the frauds in the customs
department were, and instanced one
case where 10,000 gallons of denatured alcohol had boen disposed of
perly for 35c per gallon, when
til.i have fetched $14,110 a gallon.
The policy of the Conservatives
adhered closely to the platform as
laid down in l!)2n. There would be
no tariff changes till a commission
had been named to no into the question, representative of all classes and
interests. They would also ascertain
any cases where advantage was being ftaken of the tai iff. Canada
needed a constant tariff, acting even-
lj on all classes, he stated.
Hi feiring to the emigration from
Canada which had taken place to the
United States, Dr. Rutledge asked the
reason. It was Canada's luck of payrolls—which constituted the best emigration agents any country could
have. It was worth noting that
there were no American emigration
agents in Canada—there was no need
for '.hem.
Passing on to a review of the Canadian natural resources, Dr. Rutledge
Instnnced nickel, asbestos and pulpwood ns resources which were heing
shipped in the raw state to the United States, to be manufactured Into
proiluels of immensely greater value.
In regard to the need for a pro-
p -r tariff wall against United Stales
good, Dr. Rutledge instanced many
c.ases where the American duty is
far higher than the duty of American
goods coming Into Canada. Agti-
CUlttiral products were being dealt
with unfairly, he claimed, quoting
jimny products that were allowed entry Into Canada with a nominal duly
to lhe detriment of the Canadian producers,   for   the   nominal   benefit   of
ji few Canadian exported manufactur
Australian
the co-operation of the business men
of the town. The present gathering
was to do honor tu all who had aided
in nny way, and to them Mr. Lilly
tendered thc thanks of the K.A.A.A.
Mr. Fred Willis thanked the Service flubs and citizens for assistance,
referred to the gratifying result of I
collections from the mining companies' employees and presented his report.
Receipts
Subscription list among mining Companies'  employees   817.50
Subscription   list   Kiniberley,
TECHNICAL MINING
MEN AND ENGINEERS
TO VISIT CRANBROOK
including amounts
271.45
inipro
108B.!i!i
July   1st—
tiate at grounds 	
...   '.nti.no
iti I're.hnif nl  stanil nn
grounds 	
„   1117.75
Ilinisie stand  	
ill. 10
Blanket stund 	
200.60
...    40.20
Groceries stand 	
a:i.5o
Doll stand 	
...     78.30
...     71.80
...     71.40
...     99.70
...     86.05
Refreshment stand 	
...     50.95
Fancy stand 	
...     85.85
Carnival tickets, gates .
...   412.85
Sold on ground 	
...     31.45
...   322.20
2292.25
I.css change 	
324.50
19C7.75
Tnlal Receipts 	
3056.70
Expenditure.
General Expenses 	
.. 1802.64
Kiddies Day Prizes 	
34.00
Total  .'	
... 1836.64
POPULAR MARYSVILLE
GIRL GIVEN SHOWER
BEFORE GOING EAST
The joint meeting of the Canadian
Institute of Mining and .Metallurgy
and the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers will
take place in Spokane and Cranbrook,
October 13 to 15, writes H. Mortimer
Lamb, divisional secretary of the former, lt is the first meeting of the
kind that has been held in the west,
although, in the past, the Iwo institutes have on frequent occasions
held meetings in common in the east.
The opportunity was afforded by thc
decision to hold the annual western
meeting of the Canadian institute Ibis
year in British Columbia, while the
regional meeting of the northwest
sections of the American institute hud
been planned to take place about the
same date. In the circumstances, the
proposal to meet in common was a
natural outcome of the friendly relationships  existing  between the two
societies.
The   Program
The first two days of the meeting,
Wednesday and Thursday. October 1.1
and 14, will he held in Spokane. On
the morning of the 15, the members
of both societies will proceed to Cranbrook, and on the following day will
visit the  Sullivan mine and mill.
An excellent program of papers
has been arranged, which will include: "The Examining Kngineer and
Mining Industry," by .1. O. Galloway;
"Electrical Prospecting at the Bri-
tannia Mine," by James 1. Moore und
F. Ebbutt; "Mining in Warfare," by
Angus W. Davis; "The Geology and
Ore Deposits of the Slocan," by Dr.
C. E. Cairns; "Mining Methods of
the Sullivan Mine," hy members of
the staff of the Consolidated Mining
& Smelting Company at Kimberley.
Mount   Logan Lecture
The last mentioned paper will be
presented during the evening sess-on
at Cranbrook.
In addition, Col. W. W. Foster has
undertaken to deliver in Spokane his
interesting lecture on "The Expedition to Mount Logan."   ,
A general invitation to mining me l
throughout thc province, whether
they are members of the institute or
not, to attend the meeting has been
extended.
A. G. Langley, resident engine r,
Revelstoke, is chairman of the committee in charge of the Kootenay arrangements.
KIMBERLEY FIRST
AID TEAM WINS IN
DISTRICT CONTEST
'.'.".','''"'   .IH led lines, under the recent
'.She cnme back, ns ihey thought, treaty
wive the Muckcnsle King govern-      .„ 'i„,i.„   i,*„   .„i,i,...„„   n.   r,,i
.,...      1 ... , I       *   . ■       I 111     Closing      HIS     llUlirCSS      IT.      1*111-
,*    ',      ,, r!     , ",     ,' ,1 T, \l I      1     i ledlte   gave   emphatic    denial   llini'.l
,..'„.,  und    I,..,.,,    ,i ,,.,*„„„.„,    ers   lhal   he   was   seeking   tn   disen
In     "" otMy%ffpSS£ /'""ohlse   many   -foreigners  entitle,!
i , i  -«    , iiim.   Unvote.   There waa no dscrlminatlon
,"■',     ThJSe™papS?!b«»r,lha!1.tJr f"'T""',"Vm
■   ■   '        not   naturalized   in   ( anada   should
 ."»!' *<*»*<■   '".*"<* «»«v,,|^7^Xm;oy&raP»ria%.n:
I Ins   would   upply   to   ull,   whatever
party they adhered lo.
»  .,  ,      ii l ii      i..,.     .- .i t     It   the   Conservative    partv    was
he -buy ol the women|c:ected( ,„, MillvtM, thm> >,„„,;, comfl
M, I'l.'.il
I io the	
know, bot  the)   are *„ vile ih< .
uhli-h ihem. Dr. King knows, j
hnd access io these reports.
Dr. King hool.I give an account of
Ihi        ihe electors of ihe East Koo-1
ot' tl in i.no \, ,n ii I particular! j IV '.V'
1.1' ih.  I Iberal committee, lo ask him  ,",„
kindl)  --.ie what i- in the reports j
(From Our Marysville Correspondent)
A delightful linen shower and
dance was held in Hodgson's Hall on
Thursday, the 10th inst., in honor ot
Miss V. Crane, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Crane, of Garden Avenue.
Miss Crane is one of our most
popular young ladies, whose nuptials
will shortly take place in the Eaut.
Afterwards she, with the groom, will
leave by steamer for England.
We are always sorry to have these
pretty and bright, cheery dispositions
leave from among us, but our loss is
someone else's gain.
There was a fine linen shower, and
Mrs. John Horman, lief ore calling
the young lady up to receive her presents, spoke a few well-chosen words,
not only for herself, but for those
present also, wishing Miss Crane all
happiness in the future upon which
she is so soon to enter.
Miss V. Crane, who was gowned in
black embroidered silk Mechlin lace,
lornt d with virgin blue ribbon,
made a very pretty picture as she
thanked everyone in her bright,
cheery  way.
The "two man band," Messrs. Ben
Tran ami Bergen Johnson, suppbed
the music. Mrs. John Horman made
a charming "mistress of ceremonies,"
and the dancers surely did "whoop it
up" in fine style. In the interval
Mrs. Ixacc, of McDougall Height;.,
sang "1 Cantia Leave the OUI Folk.-
Now," "Ye'tl Better Bide A Wee" nnd
"Marguerite;" both BOpg being sung
in fine voice. Mr. Crane, father of
Miss Cram1, sang "I'd Never Been
There Bt fore." and he also gave an
imitation of "The Lancashire Lad,"
ami being from Lancashire he naturally rendered it in fine style, Mr.
John Horman danced a splendid .iiu-
Mrs, Bell, an aunt, of McDougall
Heights, sang "The Toreador." This
song, for fun, is a classic. She also
Ming in full voice "Laughter." Mr.
11. Roberta sang "Obi MacDonald's
Farm," which was well received. Mr.
George Twiner danced the "Schoolboy Dance." antl a very difficult one
it is, tot), the legs and body being out
nf gear while the shuttle steps are
danced.
A collection was taken from the
men to pay ixpeiises.
Special thanks are due to Mesdames Herchmer and Leiiimon, who
so kindly made preparations for the
event ami attended, with the other
ladlee, tti the refreshments, etc.—it
entails lots of work.
All went home in the "wee sum'
hours" and declared that they had
spent the best time ever.
Those present were Mr. and Mrs.
Crane, and Mr. Crane, jnr., father,
mother ami brother of Miss Crane;
Mr. and Mrs, Stuurt, aunt, and Elsie;
Mr. and Mrs. Bell, aunt, of McDou
th(
Kimberley's representatives i
first-aid  competition   at   Fern
cently    gave    a    good    account    of
themselves, securing second prize
the first year class.
The teum consisted of Walter
Glanville, Murk Beduz, Leslie Mawson, Leonard Mawson, patient; E.
Taylor, captain.
Mr. Harry Parsons, instructor,
went with the team, who were driven
to Fernie by Mr. E. G. Montgomery,
who has taken a practical interest in
the work during last winter and up
to tlate, antl who entertained the team
at supper after the competition.
The prize won in Fernie was an
Auto-Strop safety razor outfit, in
case, for each man.
On Wednesday nf last week Mr.
Parsons was presented by the members of the team with a set of ivory
handled carvers in token of their appreciation of his efficient ami untiring
work as instructor.
H
ere an
dTh
ere
i  conditions, and more )'
nl'
w ith   .lipophilic.    It
Ih nothing to be ashamed of,
[jfttise   l^r.   King   will   tell   lhe
laities   there   is   nothing  to   it,   ami
vdl prove it."
Canning on to the abrupt end of
the session, Mr. Bowser defended the
course of Baron Byng iu not granting a dissolution to Mackenzie King.
I rew attention to lhe attempt of
Meighen to make a statement in
house, lo suggest a conference to
assent to the legislation pending.
he  former  premier had  acted
mil ;
The
dvanccment,
•ting closed with lhi
ef the national anthem.
Hi-
Mr
thr
gel
Bu
tike a
said.
,\
Which
lowed
ved schoolboy,   Mr. Bowser
to precedents for the course
Mr. Meighen subsequently fol-
Mr, Bowser quoted many precedents in parallel cases, and claimed
thai the entire constitutional Issue
wan nothing but a smoke screen to
gel away fioni lhe customs probe.
Bui lhe electors were, afler all, the
final court <>*' appeal, and it would
be settled emphatically on the Mih
of September,
Dr.  Kiiiff nnd  lhc Old  Agr  Pension*
Mr. Bowser chnrged that the old
age pensions measure lhat had been
Introduced by Dr. King himself in
the house was part of the program
of bargaining wilh !>•*  Progressive*.
JULY FIRST CELEBRATION AT KIMBERLEY
SHOWS GOOD MARGIN
lu connection with Kimberley's
Dominion Day celebration, an informal bantpiel lo all who assisted, took
plaee there Wednesduy evening
of last week, and about fifty of
(hose who hud helped to achieve the
satisfactory results which the secretary was able to announce, uceepted
the invitation of the Amateur Athletic
Association by whom the atl'air wan
given, aud all thoroughly enjoyed
the evening's entertainment.
Mr. A. 11. Lilly, president of Kimherley Amateur Athletic Association,
occupied the chair.
Slum* of th« A.A.A.
The chairman next, gave a brief
outline of the activities of the K.A.A.
A., referring to the trip of the hockey
Following a recent tour of western Canada, W. L. Smith, former
editor of the "Farmer's Sun", writes
that he will be surprised if the
segregate wheat crop of the Prairie
Province! falls below 400,000,000
bushels. "It will not be surprising
if the 600,000.000 mark is nearly
reached," states Mr. Smith.
Eleven hundred farms will bt
needed next year to accommodate
the British settlers who will be
brought to western Canada, according to Major E. J. Ashton,
commissioner of the Soldiers' Settlers Board. So far this year 1,430
families were placed on farms ia
the prairie provinces by this organization.
LAKE
WINDERMERE
NOTES
(Special to The Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., August 2a.—
Messrs, Harrison and Kirksee, of the
touring section of "The Automobile
Club of Southern California." arrived last Friday from lhe South. Thi?
club is the largest in the world, employing over nine hundred clerks.
Their policy is always to find out
about roads and trails by personal
inspection, antl fur this reason they
sent up Messrs. Harrison and Kirksee
to go over the Banff-Winder mere motor road and its tributaries, in order
to have first hand Information. These
gentlemen have also gone to the
"Lake of the Hanging Glaciers." under the supervision of Waller Nixon,
the celebrated guide of lnvermere.
This trip may be mode partly by auto
anil the rest of the distance is covered
by pack train, taking three days for
the actual trip, hut if time is not limited,   a    week   may    be   put    ill    Very
pleasantly.
The G.W.V.A. gave a very enjoyable dunce in ihe David Thompson
Memorial Fort on Friday evening
last, the proceeds going to augment
their working funds. The floor was
in excellent shape, anil the music of
Diehl's orchestra made everyone want
lo dance. Quite a number td' visitors
were noticed, who said lhat "The
Fort" was au ideal place for a dance.
Dr. Mury E. Crawford, chief medical inspector of schools, of Winnipeg,
who has been spending the past
month with her sister, Mrs, B, G.
Hamilton, of Kootenai Lodge, lnvermere, returned to Winnipeg last Friday, taking with her Mrs. Hamilton's
nephew, Master Arthur D. Davidson,
of Calgary, who has also been visiting
at  Kootenai  Lodge.
Mrs. C, E. Bennett, of Fernie, with
her Iwo children, Eric antl Mary, are
the guests of Mrs. Bennett's mother,
Mis. G, Erickson, of lnvermere, for
lhe balance of the summer holidays.
Mrs. Owen Meredith Jones, of Victoria antl Lillnet, B.C., is at present
a guest at Fairmont Hot Springs.
Miss Huth Armstrong is giving a
fancy-dress dance on Friday (he 'J7th,
at "The Fort," us a farewell lo her
helpers at lhe C.P.R. bungalow camp,
the season drawing to its close in a
few days.
About thirty members of the Vnncouver Board of Trade are expected
to reach lnvermere the beginning of
next month, and a tentative program
is heing prepared for their entertainment.
The annual Fall Fair «.f the Windermere Agricultural Association will
be held (his year on the Urd and 1th
of St pt ember. A large number of
generous prizes are being offered this
year, and a very great increase in
the number of entries is expected.
The general prospects for higher
education for the Windermere tlistrict are brightening, and the tar
seeing pluns of the educationalists
continue to mature. It has now heen
decided, ami, in fact, has become necessary, to expand the higli school
work wh'ich, under Principal McGar-
ry, was so -auspiciously commenced
last year. Mr. McGarry will again
he iu charge, a third teacher will be
added to the stall' antl a branch dealing with the higher grades of the
consolidated school and the junior
high school work will be opened in
the building owned by the board in
Athulmer, where most of the schooling for the district was carried on in
the early lid's. Dr. Coy, the secretary of the school board, says that
his board have practically made arrangements so lhat boarding accommodation may he had for any outside
pupils desirous of attending the
school.
hospital   Sunday   morning.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cnrlnon were
among those from town who attended the funeral of the late Mrs. L.
Veeberg. of Crnnbrook, on Monday.
Miss Lillian Matson, of Spokane,
i-; the guest of Miss Iris Carlson this
Mr. C. A. Foote and son. Chris,
left on Wednesday for Moyie, where
they will be the guests of Mr. and
Mrs.  R, A. Smith for a few days.
Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd and son returned home on Thursday, having spent
a very pleasant holiday at Kelowna,
\ an co uvet* and other Coast points.
.Mr. a ml Mis. Frank Fortier re-
turned home on Thursday by motor,
after a holiday Irip to Alaska, which
ihey enjoyed immensely, and a stop
i.vei    in   Seattle,   Spokane   antl   other
points of interest.
Dr. ami Mrs.  Dn\
are home  froii
The afternoon was thoroughly enjoyed.
Mi. and Mrs. Jas, O'Brien, of the
Sullivan Hill, wen- visitors to Crunbrook   on   Sunday.
Mr. A.l.dph. of Bain's Lake, is in
town   again   for  a  few  days.
PYTHIANS HOLD
MEMORIAL DAY
SERVICES ON SUNDAY
Sunday afternoon the members of
Crescent Lodge, No. 33, together wilh
members of Pythian Sister Lodge,
assembled at the K. P. Hall, where
what is considered one of the most
important ceremonies of the Pythian
order, the "Memorial Service," was
commenced. Following a short service at the hall, flie members, each
with numerous bouquets of flowers,
took cars that were in waiting ami
?ded to the cemetery, where the
■heir holiday spent at different points,Iproceeded to the cemeter
including Calgary, Cardson and the «ffi« was continued, the members
Waterton Lakes, motoring through ta^ln«r "P thei' Places around the
the Windermere country, enjoying a I triangular curbing marking out the
most  delightful trip. ' iplotoi the Kn.ght t.i Pythias.
— j     \\ uh   bared   heads   the   members
Mr.  and   Mrs.   Phil  Johnson  andjst I, while Past Chancellor HHI and
pariy spent  Sunday at Radium.        Chaplain Harrison read the impressive
— I ritual,   reminding   those   present   of
A   large   number   of   citizens,   in-'their duties to those of their brothers
eluding many ladies, motored to Cran- who have departed. Occasion.- of
brook Wednesday to attend the fun-, tin.- kind served to keep them ever
eral of Miss Eunice McLeod, who green in their memories, and showed
died at the Kiniberley hospital Mon- to others that the order was for someday morning. Deceased had been thing besides the deriving of social
iiiing for some time, but  her death ' pleasures  and   material  benefits.
apid mi-'gall Heights; Mr. and Mrs. lzalt and
'Johnny, and Mrs. Taylor, of McDougall Heights; Mr. and Mrs. John Horman, Mr. und Mrs. Harvey, Mesdames
Herchmer and Ltmmon, Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Stirtin, Mr. and Mrs. Bartholomew, Mr. and Mm. George EUL
und Edith, Mrs. Steve Waite and Millie, Mr. and Mrs. George Freake, Mr.
and Mrs. E. Roberts and children,
Mr. and Mrs. E. Dickenson, of McDougall Heights; the Misses Hazel
Herchmer, Bertha Roberts, Moe Doran, Blaney, Edna Barclay, Evelyn
Roberts, Eva Tihbetts, Muriel Herchmer nnd Midgie Roberts; Messrs,
Wm. Bidder, Alfred Bidder, Jimmy
Miller, H, Roberts, stir., Ed. Freake,
Frank Cox, Hagen, Jim Lemmob,
Don Lemnion, Hit) (Concentrator),
Allan Keer, George Tunier, Saunder-
son, Len Glanville, Warren Keer, Don
Tihbetts, Ben Tran, Bergen Johnson,
Max Bidder, II. Roberta, S. Roberts,
und thc three carpenters building the
Crane and Stuart houses.
The writer wishes Miss Crane a
very hnppv and prntmerpus voyage
through life.
o
Modttl  Achievement
When, with due deliberation, the
mason manages to lay another brick,
it is decently modest of him sot to
/acklt.
Hogs to the value of $400,000 were
ihipped from the Prince Albert dia- I
trict in 1D25.   Thia sum was far in i
tdvance of that received the previ>
ius year and the increase was due
to ■ considerable extent to the activi- '
ties of the agricultural society hoost- j
ing hog production.   Thin year tht
hog raisers' slogan  ts one million )
dollars worth   of   hogs,   and   from j
present indications this mark is more ;
;han likely to be attained.
Arrangements for the export of
large quantities of British Columbia !
seed potatoes to California are be-1
ing made by a potato grower of that ■
itate, The British Columbia potatoes are desired In California for
seed purposes because they introduce new strength into the south*
im strain. Experiments were
made with Canadian grown seed
last year in California and growers
were well satisfied with the results.
A flock of 46 sheep, comprising
35 ewes and 11 rams, has been purchased by an official of the Dominion Government under instruction
{rom the Soviet Government for dispatch to Vladivostok, as soon ai
arrangements can be made for their
shipment. Last year quits a number of priu*wlnnlng cattle were
•hipped from British Columbia to
Russia and thla new order indicates
tbat praviuiu ahipsesnu have baa*
**************************
I KIMBERLEY f
I NEWS NOTES f
**************************
Mrs. Hedley McLeod entertained
a number of friends at a very pleasant afternoon on Wednesday last.
Mrs. Neil McKinnon and daughter,
accompanied by Mrs. Bell, left on
Saturday for Manville, Altu. Mr, McKinnon journeyed with them us fm
as Pincher Creek, returning to town
on Tuesday.
" Mrs. N. W. Burdett and son, Norman, returned home on Sunday after
a pleasant week's holiday spent at
Spokane.
Mr. ami Mrs. Wm. Lindsay and
family spent Sunday at  Green  Bay.
Donald McKeehnie is spending a
few days in the Windermere district
in the interests of the C. M. k S, Co.
Mr. and Mrs. Bob Crerar returned
home on Saturduy after several week'
spent in Spokane antl other points.
(ieorge Wilson, son of Mr. T. Wilson, left On Monday for his home in
Manville, Alta., after spending a very
pleasant week with his father.
Miss Jessie McKenzie and Mi-s
Connie Hillyer returned home last
week after spending a pleasant holiday ut Moyie, at the home of Mr. and
Mrs.  R. A. Smith.
A son was horn to Mr. and .-Ii*.
Nick McKenzie at the St. Eugene
Hospital,   Crnnbrook,  last   Thursday.
Mrs. Fouracre has had her sister
for her guest during the past week,
and who left on her return to Winnipeg on  Monthly.
1 Mr. nnd Mrs. Robert Woody, of the
Sullivan Hill, left on Sunday for a
holiday   trip   iu   California.
it shock to the family
and her many friends. She leaves
in town to mourn her loss several sisters and one brother, her mother being buried in the Cranbrook cemetery
about a year ago. The family have
the sympathy of the entire community.
Mrs.   Bell,   accompanied   by   her
daughter, Mrs. Knickerbocker, left
for her home iu Calgary Monday,
after visiting her daughter here,
Mrs. Kvans, sister of Mrs. John
Morrison, who has been her guest
for some time past, left on Sunday
for her home iu Calgary, accompanied
by Mr, Dan Morrison.
Mr. and Mrs. K. Small, of Cranbrook, were visitors in town on Tuesday.
Mr. Bruce Ritchie and Mr. Forrest, of Trail, were among those who
attended the banquet at the Canadian
Hotel last Wednesday evening, given
by  lhe Athletic Association.
Mr. Jack Taylor, government road
foreman,   was   in   town   on   Monday.
Those who attended the picnic held
at Peckham's Lake "ii Sunday had
a most enjoyable 'lay. the weather
was ideal and everything in the way
of eats was to be had. A big crowd
motored out to the favorite picnic
grounds. _
.Mr. Rahal left on Friday for Mo-
yle, where he has started up in busi-
Mrs. K. G. Montgomery entertained a number of friends "at tea fast
Friday  afternoon.
Messrs. Barton and Sutherland
spent Sunday at St. Marys, and reported very gootl luck fishing.
A. Bernard ami party, consisting
uf Mr. ami Mrs. Billy Barr and family,   spent   Sunday   at   Fairmont.
The dance Monday night, given
by the Catholic Ladies, was a big
success, a gootl crowd turning out at
the Odd Fellows' Hull. The McKay
orchestra was in attendance.
A number of Cranbrook ladies attended a meeting of the Liberal ladies at the "At Home" given for
Mrs.   (Dr.)   King  on   Saturday  last.'
Following the lead of Brother Hill,
who placed a wreath on the grave of
iheir late esteemed Bro., F. Kummer,
the members distributed the many
bouquets which they had brought on
ihe grave- of the several Pythian
Brothers and Sisters whose remains
lie buried in various parts of the
cemetery.
Besides the ('ranbrook Brothers
there were present also from the
Kimberley lodge Chancellor M. Beduz and  A. Watkins, ef North Star,
♦♦♦♦♦+♦+++++
TWENTY
YEARS   AGO
Extract!   from   the   Uiur  of
The Cranbrook Herald of thii      *
Date  T>/rnty   Vein  Ago. X
**************************
Employees of the St. Kugene mine
at Moyie hav,. commenced an agitation tor an eight hour day.
The Cranbrook Trading Company
s he newest addition to the business
drcles of Cranhronk, and in a few
lays will be opening their store in
the building next to Dezall's blacksmith  sh"p.
The Fernie branch of the Home
Bank ha- opened there this week.
S. Tayb-r. ef the Standard Lumber
Company, ha- been -.n a visit to Montana to purcha-e horses for the lofv
glng operations of his company.
TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS AGO
Work i- to commence right away
on th- California group of mining
claim- a mile from Moyie Lake. A
thirty-foot shaft ha= been sunk to
uncover a big vein of copp-er and
gold ort-. _
Very r'cn samples have been
brought in this week by a party who
have been prospecting on the Hell
Roaring Cre»k. Samples are now ou
exhibition in thi-- city.
Biting
Now that the mosquito is to be
filmed, it may interest Famous Players or -omebody else to know that
we'd =ell the right- to a few moths
for their board and lodging.
Mr. and Mrs. Bill McDonald wen-
visitors to Cranbrook on Friday la-i.
Mr. ami Mrs, Neilson ami two
daughters, who were visiting Mrs.
McKinnon of the Canadian Cafe, left
for their home in Coleman by motor
on Thursduv. Mrs. McKinnon »<'-
companied them II fnr as Cranbrook.
A daughter was bom tn Mr. and
Mrs. R E. Jarksun at th« Kimherley
$5000.00 IN CASH
FOR   READERS  OF
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
—   and   —
The Family Herald and Weekly Star
of Montreal
Arrangements have been completed whereby the Cranbrook
Herald and the Family Herald and Weekly Star will conduct an interesting contest in which ninety-nine ca.-h priz*^ amounting to Five
Thousand Dollars In all will be awartled.
The contest is simple and there are no strings on the prizes.
Every   reader   has   an   equal   chance.     A   general    federal   election
will be held soon.    At thc last general election on Ortober 2'.*. 1026,
a total of 8,108,412 VOtei were polled. How many vote- will b**
polled in the forthcoming election? Whoever estimates th** correct
or nearest to correct number wins the first prize of (2,500.00 according to the special otTer made below.
Prize List — A Total of Five Thousand hollars
To the lubacrlber who sends the correct or nearest to ror-
rect estimate—the sum of Two Thousand Five Hundred
Dollars $2,500.00
To the subscriber who semis the second nearest lo correct
estimate—the sum of One Thousand Dollar- 1,000.00
To the subscriber who sends  the  third  nearest to correct
estimate—the sun. of Five Hundred Dollars     .   . SOO.OO
To the subscriber who sends the fourth nearest to correct
estimate—the sum of Two Hundred  Dollars  200.00
To the subscribers who send the next ten nearest correct
e-timates—Twenty-five Dollatl each  250.00
To the subscribes who semi the next twenty-five  nearest
correct estimates—Ten Dollars each .     250.00
To the subscrihers who send the next sixty nearest correct
estimates—Five Dollar- each         300.00
99 PRIZES IN ALL—A TOTAL OF  $5,000.00
HOW  TO  ENTER  THIS  (ikCAT  CONTEST:
The subscription price of Canada':- greatest national weekly, the
Family Herald and Weekly S*ar, is One Dollar a year. The subscription price of The Cranbrook Herald i< Two Doll an a year. We
now offer a full year's subscription to
BOTH   PAPERS   IOR   $2.50
and each subscriber will be entitled to make TWO KSTIMATKS in
the   Federal   Election   Contest.    All   subscription   arrears   due   The
( ranbrook Herald must he paid up.
TJai contest is not a time-waster or a dollar-catcher. You get
ful! value for your lUbicription ami an opportunity to win a small
fortune. The winner of the first prise in the lust Election Content
wai .Mr. A. Williamson, of Prince Alitor!, Sask., who received
$2,MM.00. Remember, there can be no juggling of figures, as the
correct returns will be furnished by fiovennnent officials afler the
rontent has closed, and will be public property.
The eontesl will close before election day.
All orders an.| estimate- for the above combination to be sent to
THE  CRANBROOK  HERALD
P. O. BOX 21.7 CRANBROOK, B.C. THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
Thursdny. Angus! 26lli, 1926
Treasure Island is Mecca for Children
1. Completo and oinct in ovary dotal! Is tlih smull engine, representtna
ilieliiriti-Hi tyin: nl t'imiiif used In ihe Rockies In Canada. Thl»Nmall enjlne
pulls Mi people around lho "Inland" at one irip. 2. A composite picture o(
n "Treasure [hIiiiuI" bci'IH-showing n party of younft ftlrls leaving Quebec on
iiu- Canadian I'm-ilk- Train and passing iltnunih tlio Conmtuilnt tunnel
op of i HU Is a miniature of oho ol Canada's finest hotels, i lu- Chateau Frontenac,
Treasure Island, the outstanding amusement feature or
the Hritish Empire Exhibition at Wembley — with ita
bold but nice pirates, Long John Silver antl Captain Hook,
anil Its many other famous characters from storyland,
Peter Pan. Wendy, Alice, the Duchess, the Mad Hatter,
Cinderella, Mother (loose and Kolnnson Crusoe, has
proved to be the greatest entertainment attraction at the
Sesqui-Centennial International Exposition at Philadelphia. *
It is a much bigger and moro wonderful "Treasure
laluud" than the one wttich delighted thousands at
Wembley last year, lt has six acres of land, surrounded
by a natural lagoon. The entire lay-out of tho Island in
Philadelphia was designed and built by Maxwell Ayrton.
architect of the Wembley exhibition overseas. Drake's
ship the "Golden Hind", Noah's Ark und iis animals,
two by two, and pirate and smugglers' caves will be a few
of the features seen.
but quite the most fascinating experience of the
visitor to Treasure Island is the trip aen.su Canada on
the  mlnluture  Canadian   Pacific   Railway's  "Imperial
Limited" train which is pulled through a replica of the
Canadian Pacific Rockies by a small puffing engine only
four feet long, but strong enough to pull .10 people. The
engine driver is J. Terrenee Holder, the twenty-one year-
old son of one of England's wealthiest families who prefers
this job to an Oxford career.
One gets on the train at the Palais Station, Quebec,
just below the magnificent Chateau Frontenac, and
passes through Quebec antl Ontario provinces and enters
the prairies in less than no time. When Banff is reached
the train stops to allow passengers to see the Banff
Springs Hotel and tlie beautiful Bow Valley. Westward
It Speeds through the Canadian Pacific Rockies, some 600
feet long, the tallest towering 74 feet high and built of
sheet iron and plaster, and dashes into Connaught
tunnel; thence on to the Coast, where one sees Vancouver
Harbour, the Straits of Georgia and picturesque Victoria.
More than half a million people rode on the little
Canadian Pacific Railway at Wembley last year, and
among its distinguished passengers were the King and
i Queen and the Duke antl Duchess of York.
H.
ere an
dTh
ere
Famous Park Where Indians Once Gathered
"There is no chance of aiioiner
general strike in Great Britain for
a generation und perhaps lunger,"
is the view of Victor Suhr, news
editor of the Kvening News, London, who spent a short vacation in
Canada recently. He thought thc
miners' strike In Great Britain
would not be settled before the fall
and perhaps not until the winter.
~  •
The fishing season open* iimin
August 15 on Lesser Slave Lake and
Luke La Bicha fn Alberta. There
■r« approximately 100,000 pounds
of white fish to be shipped during
the season from Lake La Biche and
over half a million pounds from
Leaser Slave Lake as well as a
considerable quantity of jackflah
and   pickerel   from   hnth.
Canada's estimated wheat yield aa
Indicated by crop conditions on June
30 is 348,026,000 bushels. Tlu'
yield estimated for the Prairie Provinces according to the Bureau of
Statistics    report    is    827,226,000
bushels and for the rest of the Dominion 2l.400,0(K) bushels. Total estimated yield fur oat.< is 468,840,000
bushels and fur hurley, Hill.fl2t.nnn
bushels. For rye the total estimated
yield is 11,702,000 bushels and for
flaxseed   8,4IU,0U0   bushels.
The Manitoba Government lun
commenced an agricultural survey
of unoccupied lands in the province
which when completed will provide
the incoming settler with all available information on such lands. A
total of 2,474 homesteads have heen
taken up in Western Canada this
year. All post-war Immigration
records were broken recently when
1,681 Immigrants passed through
Winnipeg recently in 48 hours.
The Ear! ot Clarendon. British
Under-Secretary for Dominion affairs, and T. Macnaughton, chairman of the overseas committee, aro
making a tour of Canada to investigate condition" undei wliich thc
8,000-family scheme is lieing handled
in this country. They are issuing
glowing reports of what they have
seen. The full three thousand families will have been brought over
here by the end of next year.
Vancouver, B.C.—Harvesting of
oats and barley is well advanced and
an average yield of grain is expected,
according to reports received by the
Provincial Department of Agriculture. Apricots, peaches, plums and
prunes are somewhat below average.
Apples should be above average. Hops
ure doint>- well and a good yield is
expected.
Night after night on the shores of
Thunder Bay, long ago, wero
heard weird chanting laments of Indian braves. Hundreds of members
of various tribes then mado this inlet in Northern Ontario ring with
their shouts and songs, and the rumbling sound of wooden sticks thudding with monotonous regularity" on
buckskin tom-toms. There the Indians went to hunt and that was the
site of many a tribal rendezvous.
For three miles the water front
looks out over the spreading waves
of the Bay at thc Sleeping Giant.
The Welcome Islands lie in that entrance while beautiful, picturesque
Pie Island ls on the southern side.
In place of the laboriously hand-
mads,    Intricately - decorated    war
Upper—The Pavilion. Left—A Birch-bark Wigwam, Centre—
"Tame Teddy" taking hia daily dip. Right—S.S. Aasiniboia, one of
the magnificent Canadian Pacific passenger steamer* plying the (irsat
Lakes from Port MoNicoll to Fort William and Chippewa Park,
canoes of Indian days may now be
seen processions of great Canadian
Pacific passenger and freight vessels, and the fleet of smaller craft
plying in and out of Fort William
and Port Arthur. Where enchanting Indian laments rose high and
clear in the humid air may now be
heard the voices of happy English-
speaking throngs of tourists.
On the sand^ beaches of Thunder
Bay has magically arisen a park
called Chippewa. Camping grounds,
attractive lodges, long, shady lanes
overshadowed by towering giants of
the forest, and a real, honest-to-
goodness, live-animal zoo are among
the features which have contributed
to the popularity of Chippewa Park.
The three hundred acres of forest
lying undsr ths shadow ol Mount
McKay were originally part of an
ancient National Reserve and rarely
ancient Chippewa Nation Reserve
and rarely saw the foot of a white
man. Now, on the main line of the!
Canadian Pacific Railway. advanta-j
gcously situated close to Fort William, the park is visited by large
numbers of men, women and children throughout the year.       i
Canadians are beginning to find
that in addition to numerous natural
resources Canada possesses unrivalled sites for summer playgrounds,
parks and other resorts.. Instead of
going to other countries Canadians
are learning to appreciate Canada
first. The changed condition is due
largely to improved travelling conveniences by steam, rail and automobile. '
Lethbridge,   Alberta.—Crop  colldl-1     Banff, Alberta.—Great iiUei Cat was       Victoria,  B.C.—Whab-rs who have
tions in the irrigation  districts sur- shown in the third annual pow-wow  been much alai med of late years over
rounding  Lethbridge  tbis   year   arc ! of the Trail  Riders of Canada held
considered to be exceptionally good,   here   recently.    Members   froi:   all
On the Lethbridge Northern ii is expected that the total wheat threshed
will be nearly double last year's figures, while the Coaldale crop will
be aboul   as good.
as well as the United
few from Europe at-
the small size of their catches off
Vancouver Island, art- reassured liy
the large increase in whales this season.   So far this year vessels of the
over < annd
Stales, and
tended the trail ride, which was con-  Consolidated    Whaling    Corporation
sidered  one of the  most succejsful  have caught IS2 whale, according t >
ever held by this organization.        I reports received hero. Thursday, August 26th, 1926
THE  CRANBROOK   HERAiW)
PAflE   THREE
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
Tn Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate at the head of Moore
Creek, one mile south of Henrietta
Creek about two miles above its
mouth where it enters the Fording
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and -smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D, C McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., hy occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under tbe "Phosphnto-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at n stake or post
placed »t. its N.W. corner, situate
north 1600 feet, west 1800 feet from
tbe S.K. corner of L 0046; thence
south HO chains; thence emit 80
chains; Ihence north 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; antl contnining
040  acres,  more or less.
Dated  Hit- 4th day of June, 11)20.
I). 0. MeKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant ov agent.
2:i«    88-27
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (8).)
Notice  Of   Intention  To Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate on the south side of
Henrietta Creek about one mile above
its mouth, whore it joins the Fording
Kiver.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C ,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at n stake or post
placed at its N.E. corner, situate
north 1600 feet, west 2300 feet from
Ihe S.E. corner of L (1044; thence
south 80'chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
Ihence east 80 chains; nnd containing
ti-ll) acres, more or less.
Doted the 4th day of June, 102(1.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
237   .23-27
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fori Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate on the south side of
Henrietta Creek about two miles
above its mouth where it joins the
Fording Uiver.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Miidug & Smelting Co. of
Canada. Limited, of Kiniberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation n mining
engineer, intent! to apply for n prospecting licence under the "Phospnatc-
inining Act" over the following described lands
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fori Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate on the west side of
the Fording River, about one und one-
half miles above Henrietta Creek, and
about four miles south of the head of
the Fording River.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kiniberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining anil smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, 1). C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupution a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following tie-
scribed lands:—
Commencing at a stake oi post
placed at its N.E. corner, situate
nurlh 1500 feel, east 2000 feet from
the S.E. corner of L 0810; thence
south 80 ehains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east so ehains; and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the Bth day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
241    23-27
Province of  British Columbii
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5   (8).)
Notice   Of   Intention    Ta  Apply   Fn"
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate on the east side of
thc Fording river, about one and one-
half miles above the mouth of the
Henrietta Creek and about four miles
south of the head of the Fording
River.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at its N.W. corner, situate
north 1500 feet, east 2000 fee*, from
the S.E. corner of L 0810; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the Bth day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
242    23-27
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To  Apply   Ior
Prospecting Licence.
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 5th day of Juno, 102G.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
245    23-27
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  6   (31.)
Of   Intention   To   Appl/
Prospecting   Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C.. Mining Division, and situate on the east side of
the Fording River, about three and
one-half miles above the mouth of
Henrietta Creek and two miles south
of the head of the Fording River.
TAKE NOTICK that the Consoli-
datetl Mining & Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kiniberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. c. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
ngineer. Intend to upply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
minlng Act" over tha following tie-
scribed lands:—
Con mencing at a stake or post
placed at its N.W. corner, situate
north 1500 feet, east 3000 feet from
the  S.E.  corner of  L  0821;   thence
uth SO chuins; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chuins;
thence west 80 chains; antl containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 5th duy of lune,  1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
240    23-27
Commencing al a Btake or pust
placed at H» N.W. corner, situate
north 1500 feet, east 8800 feet from
the N.E. corner of L 0822; thonco
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; tlunce north so chains;
thence west 80 chains; and containing
040  acres, more or less.
Dated the 5th duy of  lune, 1020,
D.  C.  McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
250    23-27
Province   of   British   Columbia
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice   O'   Intention   To   Api»'v   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate on thc west side of
the Fording River, about four aud
one-half miles above the mouth of
the Henrietta Creek, and one mile
south  of   the  head   of   the  Fording
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada. Limited, of Kimberley, B.C ,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their du)y authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to npply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing ut a stake or post
placed at its S.E. corner, situate
north 1500 feet, east 3000 feet from
the S.E. corner of L 0821; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the fith day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
247    23-27
Province of British Columbia
senium i-unutii—
Commencing at n stake or post pecting licence under the "I
placed ut its N.W. corner, situate; mining Act" over the foil
north 1500 feet, west 2300 feet from I scribed lands:—
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate on the west side of
the Fording River, about two and one
half miles above the mouth of Hen
rietta Creek and three miles south
of the head of the Fording River,
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a pros-
' * "Phosphate-
'owing de-
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section   5   (3).)
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section   5   (3).)
Ice   Of   Intention   To   Anply    F
Prospecting   Licence.
! WYCLIFFE NOTES '
:•***♦**■;•***•:
In Fort Steele, B.C.. M
sion. and situate one-half
of Aldridge Creek and Int.
the first south fork «.r the
immediately to the north-v
pass on tbe divide betwei
Creek and the Fording Rl
TAKK NOTICE thai tli
dated Mining k Smellin
Canada, Limited, of Klmbi
by occupation » mining nn
company, by their duly
agent, lm C. McKechnle, a
ley, B.C., by occupation a
engineer, intend to apply to
pecting licence under the "PI
mining Act" over the folio
scribed lands:—
Commencing  at  a stake
placed   at   ils   S.K.   corner,
ning Divi-
mile Bouth
rsected by
reek, ami
est of the
i Aldridge
ier,
c Consoli-
i:    CO.    Of
rley, B.C.,
1 smelting
authorised
f Kimber-
a  mining
phnte-
ig do-
post
ituate
northlSOO feet, east 3300 feet from
the N.E. corner of L 0822; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence smith 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; ami containing
010   acres,  more  or  less.
Dated the 5th day of .lone, 11*2(1.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
251    23-27
/ince  of   British   Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section   5   (3).)
No*!ce   Of   Intention   To   App'v   Ft
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C.
ion, and situate
Mil
outh of
NMice   Of   Intention   To   App')    Fo
Prospecting Licence,
Aldridge ('reek and intersected by
the second south fork of the Creek,
antl immediately to lhe norlh-cast nf
the pass ou the divide between Aldridge Creek and the Fording Kiver.
TAKE NOTICE thai the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a mining ami smelting
company, by their dulv authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, nf Kimberley, B.C., by occupation n mining
engineer, intend to apply Cor a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate-
mining Act" over lhe following described lands:—
Commencing at u slake or post
placed at its S.W. corner, situate
north 1500 feet, mst 3000 feel from
the N.K. coiner of L 0822; Ihence
north 80 chains; theme east 80
chains; Ihence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; and containing
040  acres, more or less.
Dated the 5th dav of June, 1020.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
1252    23-27
•I-vvvvvvv
One of Wycllffe's popular old-
timers was calling on his old friends
-.'ii Sunday in the person of Harry
McCoubrey, now superintendent at
Yuhk. He was accompanied by Mr.
Don Hollinger, wbo is also on employees at Yahk. Harry is always
sure of a warm welcome when he
makes his occasional visits.
Mr.   and   Mrs.   S.   O.   Clark   and
family    motored    to    Radium    Hot
Springs on Sunday, taking thoir elder
son, Thomas, to spend a short vacation there.
Mr. C. 0, staples and family returned from Kaslo on Saturday after
spending the summer vacation there.
.Mrs. W, B. .MacFarlane. of Cranbrook, is visiting in Wycliffe, and is
the guest of Mrs. C. Johnson.
Mr. and Mrs, A. Frederickson and
family returned last week afler
spending a very enjoyable holiday at
Bet I Ingham,    Spokane,    and    other
A quiet wedding was solemnized
at Vancouver between Mr. .1. Jones
and Miss A. Reekie, on Monday, August Kith, Mr. Jones was recently appointed superintendent  for the Otis
Staples Lumber Co., am) Miss Reekie
has filled the position of teacher in
the junior department of the Wycliffe Public Schools for several
yeurs. Mr. antl Mrs. Jones returned
from the coast on Wednesday to
Crauhrook ami left by automobile for
Banff, where they spent a short holiday, returning to their home in Wycliffe on Saturday evening. Their
many friends unite in wishing the
young cotijile b.ng life, happiness and
prosperity. ,
Several Wycliffe parties visited
Wasa Lake on Sunday afternoon,
among them being Mr. and Mrs. Val
Anderson and family, Mr. ami Mrs.
L. Piper and party and Messrs. Art
Duff and Vic Swanson.
Mr. and Mi's. A. Frederick-m and
Airs. A. Yager were Cranbrook visitors on  Saturday evening.
The two eldest daughters of Mr.
and Airs. Clark left on Monday's
train to spend a week visiting at lhe
home of Airs. F. Dcnuison, at Fernio.
Mr. S. Clark \yn8 " Kiniberley call-
el* on Friday. ,
visiting with her sister it
also bringing .Mrs. Lewis'si
ter. Gloria, had; with her.
Spokoi
Mr. ;
in Crai
Everett Staple
n Saturday.
Mr.  and
ranbrook :
Mrs.    P.
hoppers
Fraii/.en   were
ui Saturday,
Commencing  at  a stake  or  post
north , 	
the S.K. corner of L 0044; thence <^^^^___
soulh SO chains; Ounce east 80 J placed nt its S.E. corner, situate
ehains; thence north 80 chnins; north 1500 feet, east 2000 feet from
tbtuce west 80 chains; and containing .the S.E. corner of L 0819; thence
040  acres, more or less. • -.-~n-   •»*   .u„:_-.   «.«..„   ,....„*   Cn
Province of  British Coluivbii
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5   (•'>)■)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   Fo
Prospecting  Lice-nctt.
In Fort Steele. B.C., Mining Divi-
ipn, and situate on thc east side of
the Fording Kiver, about four and
one-half miles above the mouth of
Henrietta Creek, and one mile south
of the head of the Fording River.
TAKK NOTICE that the Consolidated Alining k Smelting Co. of.
Canada. Limited, of Kimberley, B.C., In Fori Steele, B.C., Mining Divi
by occupation a mining and smelting!sion. and situnte two miles west of
company, by their duly authorized the Klk River, one-half mile north
agent, D. C. McKechnle, of Kimber-1 of the mouth of Hartley Creek and
ley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphute-
W. J. Cox spent Friday taking in
the Bights of Kimberley.
Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Staples were
visitors to Crunbrook on Wednesday.
Air. and Airs. C. Johnson were
■.lining tlie Wycliffe autoisls iu 'ran-
b mdi nn Saturday,
.Mr. Pagan, who has been Bubstltut-
ne for Air. Frederickson while on
bis holidays, returned tu Vnncouvei
dm Ing the week.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Foster were ('ran
brook callers on Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Bampfiehl motored
i town on Saturday night.
Airs. C, Johnson entertained a few
friends in on Monday afternoon in
honor of her house guest, Mrs. W. B.
MacFarlane.
Mr. Ireland returned lu resume hb-
duties last week, after seeing his
family settled in their new home at
Creston,
Monday evening was the scene of
great excitement in Wycliffe when
the boys gave Mr. and Airs. Jones a
grand and glorious charlvarie. At
the conclusion of the malodorous program of the many and varied instruments the boys presented the happy
cou|de with a handsome case of silver. The presentation was made by
.Mr. L. Piper, who carried out his
duty in a very efficient manner, at
the same time wishing .Mr. and Airs.
Jones every happiness in their new
life, in the name of the Otis Staples
employees. Air. ami Mrs. Jones re-
sponded suitably.
Al
returned
where  th
week's    vacal
journey as fi
by automobil
1 Mrs. L. Fisher
from   Nelson   t
been
fhe;
have
and fa mi I
n  Monday
{pending
made    tlu-
After Every Meal
It doesn't take much
to keep you in trim.
Nature only ask* a
little help.
Wrigley's, after every
meal, benefits teeth,
breath, appetite and
digestion.
A Flavor for Every Taste
us Creston an.) back
ENTOMOLOGIST URGES
CONSTANT VIGILANCE    $
IN WAR ON POTATO BUG i=
I 'fffff.ff.ffffffffffffff.ff
JALBERTAJ
ROOMS   I
Dated the lib day "of June, 1026.
D. C.'McKKCHNIK.
Signal ure of applicant ut agent.
288   2:i-27
Prnvinr-f  of   Britiih  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section B  (8).)
Nnlirr   Of   Intention   To   Ap,>!y    For
l'i itap-fi ling   I.ier ner.
In Fori Steele. R.C., Mining Division, and sltuato on the north Ride of
Henrietta Creole, aboul one mile above
Its mouth, where It Joins the Fording Kiver.
TAKK MOTIOK thnt the rnnso.I
dated   Mining   k   Smelting   Co.   of
Canada, Limited, of Kimbarley, B.<
by Occupation n mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorised
agenti D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, H.t'., by occupation a mining
engineer. Intend to apply for a prosper! ing licence under the 'Thospnnte-
mbiing Act" over the following de-
hcribetl lands:—
Comment'ing at a stake or posl
placed al its S.K. corner, situate
north 1500 feet, west 8800 feet from
the S.K. corner of 1, 0044; thence
north SO chains; thence west RO
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east HO chains; and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated lbe 4th dav nf June, 1080.
D. 0, MeKKCIlNIR.
Signature of applicant or agent.
880   *J:t 27
north 80 chains; thence west 80
-bains; thence south 80 chnins;
hence east 80 chains; and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated the oth day of June, 1026.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or ngent.
848   211-27
Province of  British Columbin
Province of  BritUh Columbia
PHOSPHATF-MINING ACT
(Section 0 ('d)-l
PHOSPHATE-MININ$ ACT
(Section  5   (11).)
Ntilce   Of   Intention   To   AppW   For
Protpectln-g Licence.
Iii Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Divi-
>ion, and situate on tho east side of
lho Fording Kiver, about twn and one
half miles above the mouth of Henrietta Creek, and three miles south
of the head of the Fording River.
TAKK NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley. B.C.,
by occupation n mining nnd smelling
company, by their duly authorized
agent, li. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation n mining
ngineer. intend to npply for a prospecting licence under the "I'hospnute-
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at n stnkc or post
placet) at its S.W. corner, situate
north 1600 feet, east. 200n feet from
tbe S.K. corner of I, 0819; thptteg
north 80 chnins; thence cast 80
chains; thence smith 80 chains;
tlu nee west 80 chains; nnd containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 5th day of June. 1026
D. C McKECHNIE.
Signal ure of applicant or agent.
24-I    23-27
mining  Act" over the  following de
scribed lands:—
Commencing at n stake or post
placed at its S.W. corner, situate
north 1600 feet, east 8600 feet from
the S.E. corner of L 6821; thence
north SO chains; thence cast 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thtnee west SO chains; and containing
840 acres, more or less!
Dated the ftth day of Juue,  IU26,
0, C, McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
248    28-27
Province of Britiih Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Province of Britiih Columbia
Notb
Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
ProipeclinR Licence.
In Fori Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate <n thc north side
of Henrietta Creek, about two miles
ubove ils mouth where It joins the
Fording Hiver.
TAKE NOTICE that thc Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C
by occupution n mining and sim-!l:ng
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation n mining
engineer, intend tn apply for n prospecting licence under tne "Phospnule-
mining Act" over thc following described lunds:— I
Commencing nt  n  stake  or   post
placed  nt   its  S.W.  corner,  situate1
nprtb 1500 feet, West 8800 feet from
the S.E. corner nf I. 6644; thenco
north   80   chains;   thonco  enst   80
chains;    Ihence   mmth    HO    chains;
thence west 80 chains; and contnining
040 acres, more ur leas.
Dated tbe 4th day of June, 1026.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent
240   28 27
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6  (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  To Apply   For
Proipecting Licence.
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Ap-i'y   For
Proipecting Licence,
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Divi-
ion, anil situute on the west side of
the Fording River, nt its head, immediately to the south-west of the
divide between the Fording River
and Aldridge Creek, which enters
the  Elk Kiver from the east.
TAKE NOTICE that the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation n mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C. McKeehnie. o,f Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the ''Phosphate-
mining Act" over the following described lands;—
Commencing* at a stake or post
placed at its N.E, corner, situnte
north 1500 feet, east 8300 feet from
the N.E. corner of I. 0822; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; and containing
040 ucres, more or less.
Dated the 6th day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
240    23-27
B.C.
TAKK NOTICK that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada. Limited, of Kimberley, B.C..
by occupation a mining antl smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D. C McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., l»y occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for 11 pros
pecting licence under thi' "1'hosphate-
miniug Act" over the fo'lowing de
scribed lands:—
Commencing ut a stuke or post
placed nt its N.E, corner, situate
north one mile from the N.W. corner
of L 0304; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
ami containing 640 acres, more or
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature uf applicant or ngent.
256    23-27
A. A. Denys, assistant entomologist, who has been stationed in this
tlistrict this summer ami has been directing the work being carried mi for
the control of the potato beetle
in this district, has been urging continual watchfulness antl prompt measures in dealing with this pest. In a
recent letter t(, the growers of the
Creston tlistrict. through the Creaton
Review,  Mr.   Dennys  says:
Sir,—Some people have hud the
idea tbat potato beetle work in this
district has been discontinued. The
public is assured that this is certainly
not the case, antl that every effort 1-
being made toward keeping thr-  pest
in check.
It is true that, owing to the unsettled state of Ottawa political affairs,
funds have been temporarily shi>rl.
However, this has not been allowed to
interfere wiih the work in connection
with the potato beetles.
The war against thi" pest has progressed continuously throughout the
summer, The provincial department
11 f agriculture has been supplying
I nisoii and loaning dusters to anyont
finding potato beetles, and ihe writer
has spared  no effort to make si.rc
tbat the poison got to tlu- b.-t-tbs;i
wherever they showed up. There 1J
have been a great many small out-ji
breaks, but these have been fought I1
strenuously.
A very active campaign for next \
I season is being worked out by the (
Dominion and Provincial departments \
antl it is confidently expected that
this season's data and results will, 1
with lhe hearty co-operation of all |
growers, lead tu the eradication or. at;
any rate, the prevention of the spread |
f this beale.   Parliaments may com.
n   Home  St..  Crnnbrook        5j
UNDER  NEW J
MANAGEMENT i
Clean  and  Comfortable >
Rooms at moderate
prices.
When i
Alh.-r
Iranbr.
1 Roomi
mako
r lii>in
Cafe in Connection
i   P, O. Box 431   ■   Phone 534 5
:: \
'fffffff'f.f.ffff.ffffffffff
fffff.ffffffffffffffffffff
St. Joseph's
Academy
- NELSON  -  B.C. -
BOARDING SCHOOL
FOR OIRLS
Alius Phyllis Staples returned home
by auto with Mr. and Mrs. Freder-    , Mwl „,,.„	
Ickson after ipendlng several week.   .„„■ parliaments may go,"butUie po-1
 ;—7"*:    :       \      tato   beetle   work  goes  on   forever.!
mining Act" over the following de-   Anv g-rowers havinf; trouble with in-1
seribed lunds:— 'sect pests please write A. A. Dennvs'
Commencing nt  a stake or  post  (jox jq  Cranbrook,
placed  ut   its   N.K.   corner,  situate.	
north   three  miles   from   the   N.W. ~
chains; thence west SO chuins; thence j
north   80   chains;   thence   east   80
chuins;   and   containing   040   acres,
more or less.
Dated the 12th dny nf June, 1926.
p. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature af npplicaiu or agent.
258    2:1-21
Complete Primary. Elementary
and High School; also Commercial antl Music.
For particulars apply
Sister Superior.
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
Province of BritUh Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5 (.1).)
Province of  Britiih Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  .i  (:)).)
MINARD'S LINIMENT
King of Pain
Tee etJ "!<-:'■'* Mrii/jf RidWw etU WeeaTetfr, ■$*« T-fPit. .r.ftint. Stri.i. _
RELIEVED THE FAIN f-l*
|.i*,i,|.i«***.ihU.-f     I   .ii •/» *.n : i| w. SB4.-* I U'«: -.u' >; r   ■ /   1     , I   ■ /
'*t %.   \        I
Notice  Of   Intention   To  Apply   For
Proipecting Licence.
Minard's  Liniment Company
Limit*
YARMOUTH NOVA SCOU\
Notice   Of   Intention   To   App v   For
Proipecting Licence.
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Divi.
Mon, and situnte on the went side of
the Fording River nbout three and
one-hnlf miles above thc mouth of
Henrietta Creek, and two miles
smith of tlio head of tho Fording
Kiver.
TAKK NOTICK that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canadft, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by dccupnlion n mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
ngent, 1). C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for a nros-
pecting licence under the "I'hosplmte-
mining Act" ovor the following described lands;—
Commencing at a stuke or post
placed ut its N.K. corner, situate
north I MM) feet, east .'1000 feet from
the S.K. corner of L 0821; thence
south   80  chains; A   **
chains;   thence
thence eaat
Province of Britiih Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, nnd situate north one and one-
half miles, west two miles from the
mouth of Hartley Creek, and about
four miles north of Fertile, H.C.
TAKK NOTICK that the Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kiniberley, H.C.
by ocL'upation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent, D, C. Mt-Kcchnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer, intend to apply for u prospecting licence under thi- "Phosphate
mining Act" over thfl following described Innds:—
Commencing at n stake or post
pluced at its S.E. corner, situate
north one mile from the N.\V. corner
of L 6894) thence north SO chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chnins; thence east 80 chains;
and containing 040 acres, more or
less.
Dated thc oth duy of June, 1020.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of npplicant or rgent.
257    23-27
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situate intersected by Hartley Creek, near its heud, and about
four miles ubout its mouth and nbout
six miles north of Fernie, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that the ( onsoli-
duU'd Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kiniberley, B.C ,
by occupation a mining and smelting
company, by their duly authorized
agent D. C. McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a mining
engineer* iutend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "phospnate-
mIning Act" over the following described lands;—
Commencing at a stoke or post
placed ut its S,K. corner, situate
north three miles from the N.W.
corner of L 8894; thence north 80
chuins; thencv west 8it chains; thence
south 80 ehains; thence eust 80
chains; and contnining 010 ncres,
more or less.
Dated the 12th day of .lune. 1020.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of npplicant or agent
BSD    23-27
I
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
ol Canada, Limited.
OFFICES, SMELTING AND REFINING DEPARTMENT
TRAIL,   BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS AND  REFINERS
Purchasers tf Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Ores
Producers ol Oold, Silver, Copper, Pig Lead and Zinc
"TADANAC BRAND
Province of  British Columbia
Notxc  Of  Intention   To Apply   For
Proipecting Licence
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Diviiion, and situate on the enst side of
the Fording River, at its bend, Im-
nicdiittely to the south-east of the pass
on the divide between the Fording
River and Aldridge Creek, which en-
tern the Klk Biver from tho east,
TAKK NOTICK that thu Consolidated Mining k Smelting Co. of
Cunada, Limited, of Kimb.-rley, B.C.,
by occupntion n mining and smelting
company,   by their duly  authorised
province of Britiih Columbia ,
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  6   CD.)
Notice   Of   Intention   To  Apply   Fori
Proipecting  Licence.
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (Ii).)
Ni'iu-r  Of   Intention   To  Apply   F r
Protpectlnt Licence,
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Division, and situnte ou the south-west
side of Hartley Creek, about four
miles above its mouth, and ubout five
miles north of Fernie, B.C.
TAKK NOTICE that the Consoli-
dated Mining & Smelting Co. of
Canada, I.imiled, nf Kimberley, B.C.
agent, I). C. McKeehnie, of Kimber-    MnmlH'''     ""'"i\,h"   '   .maltinir
JR  B.C    by  occupation  a  mining      ^    nt   .' V    ^ Si    nuthoJiieS
ihains;  thence   west   80^^ A,      t"*^*.1^
80 chains; |nd - eaUinlng|Bcrlbtd Un^^- ••£'     &££ m.a.r lb. "PhanE
ing
proa
In Fort Steele, B.C., Mining Div
sion, and situate on the north-eaat
side of Hartley Creek, about four
miles ubove its mouth and nbout six
miles north of Fernie, B.C.
TAKK NOTICK thut thc Consol
duted Mining k Smelting Co. of
Canada, Limited, of Kimberley, B.C.,
hy occupation a mining und smelting
company, hy their duly authorized
agent, D. C, McKeehnie, of Kimberley, B.C., by occupation u mining
engineer, intend to apply for a prospecting licence under the "Phosphate*
mining Act" over the following described lands:—
Commencing at n stnkc or post
placed at iU S.W. comer, situate
north three miles from the N.W.
corner of L 0804] thence north HO
chains; thence enst Ho chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence vest HO
ehains; nnd containing 040 ucres,
more or less.
Dnted the 12th day of .lune. 11*20.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent
200    23 27
THE
NEW HOTEL
Yahk, B.C.
J. MARKLUND, Proprietor
tft   When ln Yahk make your home it
V THE HEW HOTEL.
Thla Hotel li naw from bottom to top.   Twenty-flfa nlca-
ly fumlihed roomi. All are clean
aa< comfortable.
V
BE8TACBANT IH CONNECTION. a. A 0 E  FOUR
THE  CRANBROOK   HERALD
Thursday, August 26th, 1926
the Cranbrook fierald
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
MEMBER B.C. AND YUKON PRESS ASSOCIATION
t. A..WILLIAMS R. POTTER, B. Sc.
Sabscrfptlsa Price  »t«0 Per Tear
Co VsSfi Statss HM Pa* Imi
AdTvUilai Rate* on Application, Changea ot Cop;
•or AdTertlalm -should be banded ln not later tban Wed-
■aiday noon to Near* attention.
THURSDAY. AUGUST 26th, 1926
WELCOME VISITORS
CRANBROOK will welcome the opportunil} to
show the visitors from tlie coast who arrive
the beginning of next week what the Kast Kootenay
in general, and Cranbrook in particular, has
as an excuse for its existence. The object of tin-
visit of the Vancouver business men to the district,
presumably, is to leam more of the resources behind
each district, aud to open the way for a better understanding of things, so that closer business relations between the different portions of lhe province
can be engendered. Vancouver ought to be tlu-
business centre for this province, but Alberta, the
prairies and even the cast get a good deal of business that should as a mutter of fact go to the coast,
but does not through lack, very often, of a knowledge of the competitive conditions from the other
direction.
With the co-operation of the Kimberley board
of trade, the visitors will sec tlmt the Cranbrook
district has a very solid foundation, and that its
varied activities keep things moving along wilb a
pretty even keel, compared to some districts where
the bottom drops out of everything when things do
not go just right with their basic industry.
The Cranbrook Board of Trade can be relied upon to give thc visitors the best entertainment that
their brief visit to the district affords, and the hope
is extended that lhe visit of lhe Vancouver party
will bc profitable as well as pleasant.
r tb*
customs scam
Liberal Man.
repeated assertions ni
speakers lhat  I Inn. 11.
ask lu
Tin*
im the
ntidencc of thc electors.
scandal should also be elucidated
point.    Notwithstanding the
tlu  late premier and other
11. Stevens obtained the information "ii which iln- customs investigation was
finally based by underhand methods, lhe electors
have heard sufficient lo convince them that the Merchants' Protective Association placed thai information in lbe bands oi tlie opposition openly, and only
when they realized thai there was no hope of the
Liberal government being induced tn take action.
Indeed, how could they be expected to do so, when an
impartial report ahead) made charged one of its
ministers directly with being derelict in his duty
ter of the crown?
a mint.
There is no
is an issue
the fact that the customs
campaign, the unanimous
report ol the pai
to make it sn, ;
savory slate of
nauseating fact
there has been -
has il, but is thi
■ liti-.ni-. which «
such rottei
I by lh
ping
i the
iantcntary committee being enough
id  while  delving into such au llll-
allai
il   I
to h
ippc
dices
Lib
id-slii
delving
likely  tu uncover  some
tn   he  done.    Xo  doubt
as the vernacular
;it, when the con-
k-pai'liiH-iil round wilb
wi-iV not only condoned but
■ral ministers?
f room in this campaign for
IIICICTCC:
the
THE LIBERAL DEFENCE
THIS week-end the electors of the district will
have thc opportunity of examining at first hand
the position of the Liberal part in the presenl election. The speakers announcer are of a standing that
should be able to give the electors the information
they are looking for wilhoul any unnecessary persiflage, and without any personal criticism of Premier Meighen, tbe lieutenant-governor, Dr. Rutledge, Mr. Bowser, or anyone else. Dr. King and
those supporting him should remember that it is
not the Conservative government, but the Liberal
administration, which is now on trial, ll is the
abrupt resignation of Mr. King that has to lie explained—without any attempt to make provision for
the essentia! services of the country, and spinning
the opportunity of conference when it was extended
to him, for the purpose of giving effect lu the essential supply vote, and
ready to pass on to the statute hook. There is no
apology due from Mr. Meighen for taking up the
reins of office after the Liberals had admitted they
were unable to carry on—it is the Liberal leader's
petulance and contempt iu tossing aside the responsibilities of thc premiership so lightly lhat need to
bc explained and apologized for.
The speakers might also tell just what the "intrigue" consisted of, that the former premier complains was responsible for loosening the ties which
had bound thc Progressive remnant lo ins government. In the mind of tbe average elector there are
two factors thai could have contributed to ibis con.
dition—either il was fell that the Liberal government had not lived up to its bargain for support from
the Progressives, or it might have been a knowledge
of thc degree of culpability thai attached lo tbe late
government as to lhe conditions iu the customs department, leading up to the investigation. There
was no variation on the part of the Conservative
policy that caused thc wavering of the Progressives.
What was the "intrigue," or is lhat term used by
McKenzie King to cover up his lack of generalship
that led him finally into a eul de sac?
Presumably little will be heard of the celebrated
constitutional issue, whicli was at first raised, for
apparently Dr. King himself was one of the first
to realize lhat tbis cry would nol be a popular one
in this part of the country. On his way west from
Ottawa, in Winnipeg, be gave out a statement that
he had no quarrel with the governor-general, so thai
should dispose of this question, aud the subsequent
happenings that placed Mr. Meighen iu the premiership, and leave the way clear for au explanation of
policy, and a frank Btatement as to why the Liberals
can still have reason to feel that they have a right
encour
There i-- plenty
constructive policy, and Dr. King and his supporting
peakci's will du well lu confine themselves more to
an account of Ibeir stewardship in the past four or
five years, and an elucidation uf iheir policies for
lhe future, rather than tu rail against the circum
stances that took them from the saddle of power.
.   *    .   *   *
CANADA NEEDS MEIGHEN
Good Work
At Convention
DR.
RUTLEDGE IS
RECEIVED WELL
AT GOLDEN MEETING
Cranbrook District Is Well
Represented at Recent
Nelson Gathering
SAMPLES DISPLAYED
A GOOD many Cr.it
lnsl Saturday <■
personal contact will
Meighen, who has
brook people took advantage
the opportunity to get ;i
the   I
'remicr, Hon. Arthur
t heen able to come to
Cranbrook, hut did last week enter the Kast Kootenay riding, for two meetings. In the big audience
of between twelve and fifteen hundred people who
faced the premier at Pernie, were people of all shades of politieal opinion. Yet it is certain that with
the exception of those wlm were not open to conviction from om- cause or another, there were very
few who did not consider his address was a solid
contribution to his elucidation of policy as it ha:
been given all over the country.
ll was inevitable that there should be some references to the criticisms being levelled at him for
taking office. Bul his remarks on this subject were
an able defence of his course, and not a helittlemeul
of his opponents. His references to the custom
scandal were made for the purpose of elucidating
il to his hearers, rather than digging inlo the depth
for tlie unsavory revelations which are to be found
there.
The balance of liis address was of a distinctly
constructive nature, showing the advantages which
he considers would accrue tu the country from thc
adoption of a stable fiscal policy, and thc establish-
tlier legislation wliich was ment of the principle of a protective tariff that really
protects, bar from proving himself the apostle of
gloom, as Liberal critics have Iieen wont to label
him, it is evident that a large section of the public
is turning lo him as the man best able to get the
country out of the unsettled atmosphere that appears to have enveloped it iu almost every direction,
and by a frank and avowed plainly-put policy, not
subject to the modification of any other political element, strengthen the position of the nation in the
empire aud world, and make it an attractive
place for its sons, native and adopted, to live more
in harmony by reconciling iu a more statesmanlike
way the varied interests oi this vast country.
"Canada needs Meighen."—this is the slogan
lhal lhe Conservatives should reiterate throughout
lhe land, and those who have had the privilege of
personal contact with him are more satisfied than
ever that with the implication it carries of endorsement of the four-s(juare Conservative policy, it epitomizes the firm belief of the supporters of the
present government,
W
'OK!) given out from Ottawa a few days ago
indicated thai the election officials were endeavoring to see what could be done to prevent any
advantage being taken of the difference in times between the easl aud the west on election day. This
will mean that the Conservatives may be without
the encouragement that early returns gave them
last year, and that tlie Liberals will be kept in suspense lhat much longer as to the extent of their
defeat. While it is questionable if there is any opportunity "f making use of tins information in view
of the time at wliich it is received here, there is,
perhaps, something lo be said lor the procedure it ii
proposed to take.
t    FORT STEELE     |
I NOTES J
**************************
A surprise party was held at the
house of Mrs. E. C. Cretney on the
llth inst., in honor of Mrs. H. Mather. Court whist was indulged in
during the evening. Mr. R. Blumenauer carried off gents, first prize
and Mrs. R. Blumenauer ladies' first,
Mrs. Jas. Crowe and Mr. Moore winning consolation. Many old friends
greeted Mrs. Mather, including Mr.
and Mrs. Joe Carlin, Mr. Drayton,
Mr. and Mrs. E. Howard, Mr. and
Mn. E. C. Cretney, Mrs. C. Levett,
Mrs. P. W. Cooper, Mrs. Cameron,
Mrs. Crowe, Mrs. Kershaw, Mrs.
Brander, Mrs. G. Barr, Mrs. B. Werden, Mrs. T. Fulton, Mrs. MacDonald,
Mrs. B. Reid, Messrs. J. White, A.
Moore, sr.
Mr. Gordon Jewell had the mis*
fortune to lose his planer and quite
la lot of planed lumber by fire on
Thursday, How it started is quite
a mystery. No insurance was carried.
Church service at the Presbyterian
nt. 7.HO p.m.    Rev. M.
will be tlie preacher.
Sam Brander
week.
S. Blackburn,   Monday nn a berry-picking picnic.
Mrs, Mather left on the Kootenay
returned home lasl   Central to spend a few days in the
Windermere country.
On Saturday the young peoplo of
Fort Steele gathered at the home of
Mr. J. White for a surprise party on
Miss 0. Reid. Among those present
were Misses Ethel and Elsie Kershaw.
B. MacDonald, H. Cretney, P. Jeffrey, E. Crookes, II. Fulton, M. Cooper und Messrs. H. Chamings, .1.
Crookes, S. Brander, J. Raslaw and
R. Johnson. Quite a jolly evening
was spent.
Mrs. E, Howard was a business
viitor in Cranbrook on Friday.
Mrs. Ei C. Cretney and Mrs. Reid
motored to Fernie last week.
Crow's Nest Pass Lumber Co. are
moving their camp No. 8 to Wasa.
Mrs. Burton and Mrs. Macmastei'
were Cranbrook visitors Thursday.
F. W. Cooper and H. Chamings
spent Sunday at the ranch.
Miss  N.  Brander aad  Mrs.  Sam
Church on Tuesday next, August 81, Brander left  for the mountains on
71. Chamings and Angus Gillis left
on Monday for the Carruthers mill,
near Wycliffe, the new location io?
the Jewell Lumber Co.
(Report of proceedings, .submitted by
W.   S.   Santo,   (.'ranbrook   Board   of
Trade delegate.)
That East Kootenay was given due
representation at the Mining Convention, held in the city of Nelson last
month, is evidenced by the following
report of lhe proceedings, submitted
by W. S. Santo, Crauhrook Board of
Trade delegate. The ore samples
collected by Mr. Santo as representative of the locul business body aroused keen interest in mineral potentialities of the district, and the manner
in whicb they were packed and displayed was an eye-opener to veteran
mining men of tha northwest. Eust
Kootenay scored distinctly with its
varied and rich exhibit of tlistrict
ores.
Here is what Mr. Santo has to say
of the convention and the reception
accorded him:
"On my arrival in Nelson 1 was
met hy Mr. .). W. Mulholland, secretary of Nelson Chamber of Mines.
Mr. Mulholland's welcome set me al
ease at once. It was obvious, how.
ever, thut he was anxious as to whether it would be possible to arrange the
Crunbrook exhibits in time for the
opening of the convention. Mr. Mul-
hollud did not then know thut, thanks
to the Crunbrook board having taken
the precaution of providing me with
a portable ore specimen case, five
minutes was ample time in which to
arrange the Kast Kootenay display.
Many Copy Unique Idea
Mr. Mulholland was not alone in
expressing pleasure that Cranbrook
had solved the problem of transport
ing mineral specimens for exhibition.
The unique idea of a specimen cabinet, that has but to be unlocked to
reveal its contents, was copied by
mining men from every part of the
U.S. and western Canada. They appeared to divide their admiration between the variety and extent of our
display and the cabinet in which it
wus packed.
"The convention was opened at
10 a.m., July Bth, b- His Worship
Mayor J. A. MacDonald, who was
most happy in his opening remarks,
his address of welcome to visiting
delegates being the feature of the
morning session. In reply, many
prominent mining men of the northwest, including delegates from the
U.S., left no room to doubt the international character of the three-day
meeting. One and all expressed the
conviction that Kootenay East and
West, is a great mining country, with
a wonderful future before it.
"The speakers, the Hon. William
Sloan, Minister of .Mines in B.C.,
Arthur Hooper, Esq., president Northwest Mining Association; John F.
Davis, Esq., president Spokane Chamber of Commerce; Hon. George Turner, Spokane; Conner Mallott, Esq.,
vice-president Spokane and Eastern
Trust Company; Charles Fleming,
Esq., .Mayor of Spokane, all spoke
enthusiastically of the prospects in
store for mining thioughout the
northwest and offered many valuable
suggestion for the betterment of international mining trade.
Parade and Sports in Afternoon
"I have this to say for Nelson
Delegates and visitors to the conven
tion did not lack entertainment. The
afternoon and evening wus given
over exclusively to a monster street
parade, staged under the auspices of
the B. P. O. Elks; firemen's sports
were in charge of Fire-Chief Mai-
oney; baseball and boxing in charge
of R. E. Kirkby; smoking concert under the auspices of Nelson Gyro Club;
dancing and carnival under the auspices of Nelson branch A. C. T.:
launch races under the auspices of
Kootenay Launch Club; banquet
charge of Nelson Rotary Club.
I have never met more generous
und thoughful hosts than Nelson'
reception committee, named as follows: Mayor J. A. MacDonald, F. A.
Starkey, J. S. Carter, Roy Hunter,
Chief of Police Long, Alderman J.
T. Berrington, R. D. Barnes, R. E.
Kirby, Fire-Chief Maloney, Alderman
J. McKenzie, J. A. Irving, W. T.
Brodie, \V. R. Dunwoody, Alderman
J, P. Morgan, Alderman A. S. Hors-
will, C. D. Blackwood, G. MacPherson, W. 0. Miller, Alderman S. Barton, Alderman R. A. Peebles.
"The above-noted gentlemen threw
themselves into the sports of the afternoon with all the abandon of the
prospectors of the .olden time, as indeed many of them are. They extended to their guests that old time
hospitality, long proverbial among
men of the northwest. Throughout
the day and evening three brass
bands supplied music to the regalement of the multitude of visitors.
Prospectors' Day
July fith was Prospectors' Day.
Sourdoughs were given the keys of
the city. Roy Hunter, president of
the Prospectors' Asociation, took the
floor in the fair building at 10 a.m.
Mr. Hunter's speech left no room to
doubt his faith in the future of mining in the Kootenay?.    TTi
Issues of Campaign Discussed
Also By W. J. Bowser at
Big Gathering
A large and most attentive audience assembled ut Golden on Wednesday evening of last week to hear
the opening addresses of the Conservative campaign. James Henderson,
sr., occupied the chair,
Mr. Bowser gave a resume of the
King administration since coming into otlice in 11121. In connection with
the Robb budget, the speaker said
that there had been a reduction in
taxation, which did not assist thc
average working man hut benefitted
the middle and wealthy class.
Liberal  Platform Disregarded
In connection with the policy of
the King government, Mr, Bowser
criticized their immigration and transportation policies, which, lie slated,
had not been mentioned during the
lust session.     Taking up the question
of the reformation of the Senate, tin
speaker stated that the way the Liberal government had reformed this
body was to appoint tho lion Jacques
Bureau, who had been nvoven a discredited minister of the crown, to fill
the vacancy therein.
investigation of tlie customs department, according to Liberal propaganda, hud been started by the Liberals, but Mr, Bowser stated that the
Merchants' Protective Association
were the oria-inators of the :-""sti-
gation when this should havo been
taken un by the government, As a
result of the manner In which this
department wus conducted, tlie people
of Canada were losers to the extent
of over fifty-two million dollars
through the liquor traffic alone. The
speaker challenged Hon. Dr, King
io explain to the electors of this constituency the suppressed evidence in
the customs enquiry as conducted by
the parliamentary committee,
Upholds   Baron   Byng
Referring to the constitutional
question, Mr. Bowser slated that ht
had been associated with politics long
enough to know the points in connection with that matter. During Ms
21 years as a member of the provincial parliament he had seen the constitutional question from all angles
and he stated that the manner ir.
which Governor-General Byng had
dissolved parliament was absolutely
in order.
Referring to tbe Old Age Pension
Bill, the speaker stated that every
Conservative member from British
Columbia supported the bill, but "it
was never the intention of the government to enforce this bill,"
Concluding his remarks, Mr. Bowser eulogized the Conservative candidate in this riding nnd stated that in
order lo do away with the corruption
practiced by the King government
the electors would do well to support
Dr. Rutledge.
Candidate  Speaks
Dr. Rutledge opened his remarks
by referring to the constitutional
question and lhe manner in which
Premier King handed in his resigna
tion as prime minister of the Dominion. He gave great credit to the
Hon. IL H. Stevens for the work he
had done in connection with the customs enquiry. Referring to the policy of the Conservative party the speaker gave a brief outline of the effect
of the tariff on the working class and
also referred to the Australian treaty
and its effect on the farmer. In conclusion he stated that if the electors
wished to have a continuance of the
past maladministration they should
support the Liberal candidate, but if
a clean stable p-overnment was desired
they should support the Conservative
candidate.
Following tho meeting, Dr. Rutledge, in an interview, stated that
the present building is use at Golden
as a post office was a disgrace to any
town and that he was strongly in
support of the erection of a Dominion buildlm* '■o house the post office,
customs department, telpniinnn office
and land office. Referring to the
telephone lines, he also advocated the
establishment of a twenty-four hour
-service »* *'** Golden end, to conform
with that being established at the>
central exchange at lnvermere, pledging himself '« strongly support any
movement in lhat direction.
j Recollections of Octogenarian jj
Reminiscences of John Fl ngal Smith, of this city, as
Recorded by Himself.
the subject of favorable markets. He
enlarged on the necessity of mining
men bringing to the notice of the out
side world the vast store of mineral
wealth existing in the northwest. He
outlined the policy of fair play to
outside investors as endorsed by the
better type of prospector and small
mine   owner.    Particularly,   he
at the unveiling of a monument to
the late Mr. John Houston, first
mayor of Xelson. It pleased me further to note Nelson's choice of the
Honorable William Sloan to draw-
aside the draplngs that hid the sculptured features of an honored and
famous pioneer of the Kootenays
from public view. Mr. Sloan's speech
was most impressive; no one could
doubt the earnestness of the minister
of mines as he drew a word picture
of early struggles, of pioneer days
when railroads were few, of couruge
and faith in the destiny of the mining
fields in the interior of British Columbia.
Visit to Bluebell Mine
"In the afternoon of the second
day we were invited to board the
lake steamer Kuskanook, chartered
to convey delegates to the Blubell
mine at Riondel. That this trip was
pleasurable and interesting goes without saying. The Bluebell is most
intimately connected with the early
history of mining within the province and was worked, in fact, by
the Hudson's Bay Company, one hundred and one years ago. It is, in
my opinion, an outstanding proof of
the permanency of mining in the Kootenays. I confess to a sense of
privilege in heing given the opportunity of exploring the workings and
reduction plant of the Bluebell. The
splendid specimen of ore I cut from
the face of one of its drifts is a distinct and valuable addition to thc
collection of district ores assembled
by the Cranbrook Board of Trade.
"It is but meet and fitting thut I
dwell a little on the part the ladies
of Nelson and Spokuno played in
making the boat journey to the Bluebell enjoyable to the many old timers
crowding the decks of the Kuskanook.
The ladies were the life of the party.
They fairly compelled their guests
to lhe taking of refreshments. They
dragged the older men to their feet,
insisting that they make speeches.
They sang the old time songs of four
decades ago. For the time bcing
they converted the deck of lhe Kuskanook into a ball room, one quadrille
they insisted upon lasting a full half
hour.    And again, during the course
immi_ of the dance nnd carnival, held  ...
wjth the fair building in the evening, the
******************
(Continued)
The Abyssinian Expedition
A sort of barbaric civilization existed in Abyssinia from time immemorial. The "Queen of the South"
is an obscure reference. The Queen
of Sheba's visit to Solomon is recorded in the scriptures. Her son,
Mameluk, wus the first king.   Chris
*************** ** **** -.«
three months, was not received, and
a Mr. Had was senl, who was received by the King aud was made to join
his family in prison.
A Preposterous   Proposal
The foregoing brief historic review
was necessary for whal is to follow.
There is one interesting item that has
been given in Blackwood's magazine,
tianity   was  introduced   in   tho  4th which one will not find in the aver-
contury by Frumentius. Ia(re history, and one wonders, until
From the commencement the this faH |8 known, why so enlighten-
church of Abyssinia adhered to the ed a Hl,ion of Kinir Solomon should
mother-church of hgypt, and with exhibit, so much bad temper and roller adopted the Monophysite doc- Kentnicnt. This was a blind-the box
trine, and tne metropolitan bishop, or of cam|y 0f the modern lover. The
Abuna, continues to be nominated by lover's epistle that was sent and re-
the Coptic putrmrchs. turned, save the mark, a proposal of
The modern history of Abyssinia mmTiage to Queen Victoria. Hence
has been mainly struggles between u\\ this turmoil.
lhe princes of various districts for su- nou" for the practical side of what
preme power. About 1850 an Am- follows. Preparation was now made
haric adventurer obtained dominion fol. W1U.( for only that would bring
over successive provinces, and in the recalcitrant Theodore t„ his seu-
1855 had himself crowned under the ,#&, gjr Robert Napier was appoint-
name of Theodore as "Negu*s, king C(j commander of the expedition. Thc
of kings of Ahyssinia.    " , pioneer force sailed from Bombay on
Ute Hiitory • September Uth, 1807.    The advance
From visits of James Bruce in brigade of 8500 men sailed from
17(}8 and other travellers, much in- Bombay on the 7th and 8th of Oeto-
formation respecting Abyssinia has ber, and landed. The captives in
been gained. Several expeditions into Magdala  reported   well.
Abyssinia have been organized by
tbe French government. In 1841 a
treaty of commerce with the king of
Sboa, one of the divisions, was made
by Captain Harris. Mr. Plowden,
who was made British consul at Massowah in 1848, concluded a treaty
with Ras Aii, ruler of Amhara, in
1840. Ras Aii was deposed by his
son-in-law. Theodore, who was crowned "negus" in 1855.
Protestant missionaries were received, replacing Roman Catholics.
Mr. Tlowden, who had joined the party of Theodore, was killed by the
rebels. His friend, Bell, was killed
soon after when avenging him. Theodore overcame the rebels and massacred ahout 150 prisoners as a sacrifice to their manes.
Captain Cameron was appointed to
succeed consul Plowden. He arrived
at Mnssowah February, 1861, and
went to Abyssinia in May. He was
received by Theodore in October, and
The British parliament met, and
the Queen's speech announced the
war. Sir Robert Napier arrived at
Amusley Bay January -1th, 1868, uud
reached Magdala in April. Theodore's   troops   were   routed.
A third ultimatum seia hy Sir
Robert Napier was intercepted by a
rebel chief, was given Rassam and
suppressed as likely to endanger the
lives of the captives,
Sir Robert arrived below Magdala.
Theodore's troops attacked the firsl
British brigade and were repulsed
with great slaughter. Lieut. Prideaux
was sent with a letter to Sir Robert
Napier, which wus returned. Theodore received it indignantly and sent
an insulting reply. Magdala was bombarded and stormed. Theodore killed
himself and Magdala was burned to
the ground.
The Outcome Of   lt
This expedition was the most remarkable on record.   The troops and
lent   away   with   a   letter  for all the animals travelled ovei- three
Queen    Victoria, _ desiring   alliance hundred miles of a scorching desert,
against the Turks, which arrived
February, 1863. It was decided that
this letter was not to be answered,
and Cameron was ordered to remain
ut Massowuh and return to Abyssinia.
Kev. II. Stern, missionary, was beaten and imprisoned for alleged intrusion upon Theodore. Captain Cameron and all British subjects and missionaries were imprisoned for pretended insults, 3rd of January.
Report   of   imprisonment  reached
London May 7th, 1863.   The prison-
were sent to Magdala and chained
and for the first time artesian wells
were used. Only twenty were wounded and three killed of the Indian
troops, who had not yet been supplied with the Enfield breach loader.
Cattle said to lie employed on this
expedition numbered 45 elephants,
7417 camels, 12,920 mules and ponies, 7033 bullocks and 827 donkeys.
Nearly ten millions sterling were
voted by parliament, and it is said
the expedition cost more thnn this.
A pension of three hundred nnd fifty
pounds was given to Colonel Came"
like criminals. Hormusd Rassam, on—he died in 1870—two thousand
Chaldee Christian, first assistant Bri- to Rassam, two thousand to Dr.
tish political resident at Aden, was'Blanc and two thousand to Lien Print on a mission to Abyssinia.    He deaux.
arrived at Massowah July 24.   Lieut,
Prideaux and Dr. Blanc had been appointed to accompany him.
Rassam having negotiated without
Theodore's son, Ahimayou, aged 7,
arrived nt Plymouth and was presented to Queen Victoria.
Sir  Robert Napier  was  raised  tp
effect for a year, GhTord Palgrave the peerage as Lonl Magdala. He
was appointed by Earl Russell to go [is one of six famous Napier generals
to Ahyssinia in July, but was stopped and admirals—all the way from Na-
on the intelligence that Theodore pier of the logarithms,
had invited Rassam to come to Now the inference. Great Britain
him on August 12th, 1865. Rassam]did all this to save one man. Austria,
Lieut. Prideaux and Dr. Blanc arrived who had one representative as count Matemma from Massowah on Nov.[sul, never contributed a franc. Can
21st,  1865, and were well received any other act shed  brighter lustre
by Theodore, 28th January, 1866,
Prisoners were released on March
12th, then all were seized and imprisoned about April 13th. Lord
Stanley's ultimatum to Theodore, demanding release of the captives in
on the greatness and might of Britain? And this is only one example
of Britain protecting' her subjects,
"A British subject I was born, und
a British subject I will die." So say
all loyalists.
Ruby Howard Is spending her holi- l«««l'on the desirability of boards
days at lnvermere with Mrs. Art Ho-  ?J *i"» «ndkmdred business bodies
ward.
Frank Moore returned ttotn the
hospital lust week quite recovered
from the effects of his operation.
Mr, W. A. Drayton has been spending a few days at his Windermere
mine. He wus accompanied by Mr.
J. White.
Mrs. Jas. Crooks left on Monday
for a trip to the coast.
Mrs. Jas. Crowe and Mr. and Mrs.
Taylor were visiting at the Cooper
ranch on Tuesday.
Miss Grace Brander left on Monday for Cranbrook,
Service was held In the Catholic
Church on Sunday.
identifying themselves with the movement toward development of mineral
holdings, urging them tp co-operate
with chambers of mines and prospectors' associations to the widening
of markets und establishment *■* '■t">
mining industry on a sure and sound
footing,
"Mr. Hunter was followed by Mr,
Nichol Thompson, Vancouver Chamber of Mines, and J. O. Hass, M.E.,
two gentlement thoroughly convers-
ant with mining and which arguments
were full of meat.    All hearing the
above-named   speakers  were  visibly
impressed, voicing their appreciation
of  thc   completeness  characterizing
the covering of the ground of the
various subjects introduced.
Monument Unveiled
"Speaking for myself and others,
11 esteemed most highly being present
ladies injected vim and interest into
the proceedings,
Citi-xem' Day
"Thc morning of July 7th was set
aside exclusively for transaction of
business. Having the honor of being called upon to speak on behalf
of East Kootenay as representative
of the Cranbrook Board of Trade, I
expressed the view that it is essentially the duty of all organized business
bodies to inform themselves on the
mineral potentialities of their respective districts, to disseminate reliable
and accurate information on mines
and mining among prospective investors, and to interest themselves in
the passing of legislation beneficial
to the mining industry. Presenting
the resolutions of the Cranbrook
Board of Trade that the next mining
convention to be held in Crnnbrook
and that an effort bc made towards
securing free transportation of delegates and ore exhibits to conventions
of the future, I was flattered lo note
thnt both resolutions were passed unanimously,
"The Honorable William Sloan
then took the floor to cover the
ground of mining within the province
most thoroughly, to be followed by
the chairman of the day, S. S. Fowl
er, who dealt entertainingly with the
history of mining, interlarding his
discourse with stories of adventure
in the lives of the forty-niners of
California, of Caribou, Alder Gukh,
Wild Horse and the Yukon. The afternoon was given over to sports and
in the evening I was invited to present myself at a meeting of mining
men in the Hume Hotel. I expect
results from that meeting. The mining men present were deeply interested in East Kootenay, constantly plying me with questions relative to what
this district has to offer to the
investor. It is unnecessary to add
that I embraced the opportunity to
put Cranbrook on the map. if, in
deed, the splendid mineral display of
which I was in charge had not already
accomplished that object.
"As mure than one delegate intimated, if East Kootenay mines are to
be judged by the ore specimens exhibited by the Cranbrook Board of
Trade the future of the field is assured. Cranbrook's ore exhibit was
by no means the least among the
many splendid displays finding place
nt Nelson's mining convention of
July 5th, llth, 7th, inst.
Milk and Cream
DIRECT FROM
Big Butte Dairy Farm
P10H1  It
'—NOW   OPEN-::
Thorough instruction in all
Dullness college subjects.
Rates that save you money. '.
SPOKANE SCHOOL OF
BUSINESS
S 110 Howard Street
Spokane
J. I. Klnman: Pre,, and M,r.
Pincher Creek Convent
PINCHER CREEK - ALBERTA
Primary courses to the 8th Qrnde Inclusive. High Scliool
course, Normal Entrance, Matriculation, Agriculture, fllh tu 12th
Grnde Inclusive,
—    Unusual Advantages In    —
MUSIC, ART, DOMESTIC SCIENCE, FRENCH, GERMAN
Catholic Boarding School for Boyi, age 6 to 12
and for Young Girls of any age.
WRITE   FOR   CATALOGUE
27-30: 32-95. Thursduy, August 26th, 1926
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
paiiPi©
The speaker ut the United Church
lust Sunday morning was Rev. Everett S. Fleming, B.A., B.U., who has
jusl arrived to take charge of the
work of (he United Church nt Yahk,
Lumberton nnd Moyle. Mr. Fleming
is not a stranger to the district, as
lie taught school at Wycliffe nboul
len yenrs ago. Since then he hus
been attending University and Theological College, graduating from the
University of British Columbia, and
Knox-Victoria Collego, Toronto, lie
hns also spenl some time travelling
in Europe, visiting must of tbe important capitals, lie was ordained to
the ministry on Sundny, August 15th,
by tho Presbytery ol Westminstc
lh- comes well equipped tn his task,
and we look for nuicii blessing ij|
i-was given ns $4.1,226,221.
hi
ervii
n tht
+   +
es'   Aid
lisl rid.
lie Ladies' Aid of the Unit.
itIi will resume Iheir meetings
r the summer vacation, on Thurs-
Seplemher 2nd, nL ."( o'clock iu
parsonage.   Arrangements   will
daj
the
In- made for the reception nnd indue
tion service of Hev. nnd Mrs. Bryce
Wallace, wliich it is hoped will tuke
place ou September 8th.
-r + f
In connection with the interest
aroused over tlie matter of the local
beer situation and plebiscite, the following fuels muy he of concern to
those who are vitally concerned for
the increasing prosperity und happiness of our district. The figures are
supplied from Rev. W. VV. Peck, Dominion Secretary for the Prohibition
Federation.
+    f    T
"To appreciate the serious financiul
drain of the liquor business on British Columbia, one must remember
that the total population is considerably less than that on Montreal. Also
that per capita, the provincial debt
is much larger thnn in any other province in Canuda.    On November 1st,
1021
18. From June 15th, 1921 till Sep
tember 80th, L926, B.C.'s total liquor
bill wns $4(1,006,065.78. If we could
hnve applied th*' money spent in liquor tot these four years to our
provincial debt, it would hnve been
wiped out, niid left n surplus of over
three million dollars. <
"Regarding the sale of beer. In
June 1024, the "moderation" party
urged the sale of heer by the glass
us a temperance monsure. It wns designed firsl nnd foremost to reduce
the sale of distilled spirits, they declared, .ot in six months, from
April 1st to September 80th, 1025,
over one million dollars were spent in
beer, while the sule of "hard" liquor
Increased ulso. Thut. i.;, from the
Government stores only; when we add
thi' sums spent on "bootleg" in addition, we see how far from accurate
the prophesy of the "moderation"
party' really was. When such discredited prophets try to toll us thut
more beer Will bring more prosperity
to our city wo might well hesitate Jn
believing   them.
We do not try to minimize the
great difficulty which thc liquor question presents. We do not put all
the blame on the police nud the uu*
thorfties. It is always easy to bin ine
"the other fellow," but the experience
of the Canadian provinces, trying
government sale nnd beer parlors is
ery fnr from being satisfactory,
economically, socially or morally.
There is something "rotten in the
stale of Denmark," us far as our own
province is concerned, when we spend
$11,000,000 on liquor annually, and
can  onlv afford  $8,000,000  on edu
PAQE    FIVE
in  town Wednesday  in  the  Liberal
interests.
Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Williams, on
Wednesday the 18th, a daughter.
Mr. Edmonds hus installed •' lunch
counter in  his  bakery shop.
Master Roy Langlands has returned to his home in Trail, nfter spending several weeks' vacation here.
Miss Mamie Farreli is home from
her motor trip through the slates of
Washington and Idaho.
Mr. Joi
operated
nicely.
Braiden. who wus recently
u for appendicitis, is doing
of perpetuating British
and the British connectio
his   forefathers   had   done
which  others have  fought  and died.
have been lost in the larger port nf
Montreal and other Canadian points
of entry? He drew attention to the
attitude  of   McKenzie  Kii
nstitutions I wanted to endorse the actions of such
..  events'people  who hnd  failed  in   their duty
 Ilut stopping such practices when
The late Premier had declared in, iwT' Kl!« JST.&S£i T
other words that ho had no use for didatea.     Ik- loft them t..  i ,.!„.'-/   .
Bjmg, hut the Doctor pointed out in themselves as to whom tbll ShoJld
this connection that the Germans had support, hut pointed outthat when I him
no use fo,- Byng either. such Progressives as Lucas "f Cam       Wil
Sljahtin, th. Di.irict [rose, refused to support the Liberals, sions, he supported th*
In opening his remarks, he thanked |-knowing as he ditl the evidence tint  titudc   -of   the
existed against  th
limit iiuii*
llciliB hill
self
the V
letui
lid
lot    I'll
r in run-
censure.
inn, such
well with
Meeting At
Fort Steele
Dr. Rutledge and Col. Clayton
Get Good Reception on
Monday Night
FOR STABLE GOVERNM'T.
electors,
were essential on the i
cation, the latter total including the
cost for schools and universities.
"A nation which prefers fathers' beer
to the children's education is a nation which may have had a past, but
which can hardly expect to have a
future," (Art'ifex, in the Manchester
Guardian). ,
**************************J
{  MOYIE NOTES |
•;• * * ***** * ** ***** *** ****** *
B.C., is
Gordon
Miss Annie Monroe, Trail,
the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
Monkhouse.
Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Ed, Cumberland, ut the St. Eugene Hospital,
Cranbrook, Thursduy the 10th, a
daughter.
Mr.  and  Mrs.   Clifford  Oughtred
were motorists down from Kimherley
during last week.
One of the biggest events yet held
in  Pator's Hall  was the dance last
week-end. Cars were even in all the
way from Creston. Kiniberley and
Crnnbrook were there in goodly numbers to help swell the crowd.
A now furnace has been installed
hi the schoolhouse. ,
Cordon Armstrong, Kimherley, is
again at work in the Consolidated
office here ut the mill.
Mr. Rahul, n Kimberley merchant,
has opened a dry goods store in town.
Mr. and Mrs. Whitehead took in
the movies at Cranbrook on Thursday
evening.
Hon, Dr. King and Messrs. Joe
Jackson and Major McDougall were
Judging from the number of people
at the Conservative meeting at Fort
Steele on Monday evening last, the
residents of that town and district are
anxious to hear the questions of the
day discussed from the public platform. It was only natural that the
speakers were agreeably surprised at
the lurge turn-out.
The chair was tuken by Mr. Arthur
Fenwick, who expressed his pleasure
in having the two speakers, Messrs.
Col. W. G. Clayton of Point Grey,
and Dr. Rutledge, visit Fort Steele
to give them first hand information
on  the political situation.
Candidate in Good Form
Dr. Rutledge was the first speaker,
and it should be stated here that if:
in other races he was possibly en-1
titled to a little handicap, when measured from the speuking standpoint,
it looks as if he wilt have to start
from scratch, so greatly has he improved in platform oratory. Dr. Rutledge, in an illuminating speech,
showed he had a thorough grasp of
all angles of the complex political
situation, und dealt with them in a
sane, businesslike manner. He showed that he was not afraid to race,
using the "constitutional" hurness
which Dr. King's leader and namesake had at first prescribed, ably
showing that Baron Byng's course
was the only logical one. Thus equipped, it was but natural thut he should
draw attention to the customs scandal with its "little bits of fluff," at
which his opponent's steed was wont
to shy, but which to him were quite
visible through thc constitutional
blinders he had heen asked to wear,
in the hope that his, us well as the
eyes of all the people of Canada,
would bc focussed on the one object,
river bank near "ffriculturist would ensue. and
hort Steele, while millions were be- noW the present tariff was operatine
ing spent on u large bridge in the "Winst the farmers of this district
east, which people did not want. j "<• pointed out the fallacy of bringing
With regard to the closing uf the1"1 ""migrants at great expense only
last session, he pointed out thai even 5? 8M Ca"adlan Boys leave for the
if King were in lhe right it would be United Stl>tefl following Canada's raw
more becoming of a British gentle- products to their place ,,f monufac-
man to gloss over any difference that rure '» tnt' U.S.
he might have with one who, on ac-L ''"lltl applause was accorded Dr
ount of his position, had no conte "u*ledge when he took his seal
hack.   ►Referring to Premier King's Col. Clayton Sneak.
Richmond   Hill  speech,   he  drew  ut-      The next speaker was Col   W   v
tentlon to the promises made therein.!Clayton, of Vancouver, president nf
and  the  unpredecented  disregard  of the Point Grey Bourd   hf Tr I     «
them when he found that the result was cordially received as he   os..
of   the   People'a   choice   had   been speak.   He regretted the unfortunate
against him. He then did not spun, the, circumstances that compelled   hem to
crutch   winch   had   kept  him  on   Ins'come again to the people in a,'
feet lor the previous years, but which tion, but hoped—and was sure—thai
he had ungratefully cast aside think- this time i, would be settle    for
[ng that he would never need it again    ime.    He claimed that the rcspons
He pointed out how the Progressives bility rested with  the late premZ
were willing to "pocket the insult "for the  fact that  for six oipmv n
an operation which they were sub-!months the government had been phi-
nutting to again in the present elec- rled on at an expense of SS!) 000 nw
tion. The Progressive and Labor mill- day. only to result in a mass of ubor
stones which had been sinking them tive legislation.    He traced the his
were now cast aside and Liberal prin-: lory of group government in i'lin-ld-i
ciples      were       being       frantically showing that after a trial of It tho
grasped as life savers.    He pointed People virtually voted it out  in     «.
out   when  the self-decency   of   the oleetion of 1025. bul tint McKonVin
Progressives   forbade   them   lending  King, rather than lose office  was wil
their support  longer to  King,  that ling  to   sacrifice   Liberal   nriucinl m
great political acrobat had  tried to I" hold office bv the purchase of Pro
sidestep the issue by going to Byng ffresslve support. He showed that the
for dissolution.   But this was refused, Conservatives, as led by Mchrhcn had
and Mr. Meighen, after being tailed consistently stuck to their tariff iirln
upon to form a government, was ablelnples as enunciated   in    1021     ™
to carry on till defeated through the bodying with it the tariff commission
alleged error of one of the Progres- which he had endorsed    The sneaker
sives In voting when he was morally j claimed  that  both  in  t|„. cast 'and
debarred.    Ostensibly  surprised   at west the Liberals were somewhat dis
the granting of dissolution to Meigh- comforted at the outlook   what with
en, and chargined ut the position tn the stench of the customs scandals
which he found himself, he at once j in  the east  and  the  vile
tried to throw up a mountain out of taking plaie in Athabasca
River.
the Old Age pen-
nsistent nt-
Conservative   party,
Mni , ,        Pa"y. surely it   pointing out the fallacy of the charge
nol too much to expect that the  made  by  the  Liberal!   that  the  bill
who were m reality sitting was  killed  by a  Tory senate      lh
in judgement on the actions of the claimed th<   " '■
past,   would   by  their  ballots   show us   thev   li
what they thought of such govern- bringdown
ment debauchery. land  more
In conclusion   he  dealt  with  the wl
'H'estion of the tariff, showing that!     With r
under the conditions that his leader|?d out that the Uonser
insistent in th-
the people of Fort Steele for the support that they had given him ut the
time of the last election, and trusted
that same would be repeated on September Uth next. While claiming
Dr. King as a personal friend, he said
lie felt free to criticize him in a politieal way, pointing out where us
their representative he had been negligent in his duty in not having au- .   	
thorized   the   improvements   which,' Pr"P0S,ei' ? better condition for the I bad 1
i onservatives would
;d   previously   intimated.
ii bill which was workable
1   in  the  interests  of those
was   intended   to    benefit
egard to the tariff, he point-
■ party
f
best
the withdrawal of the luxury tax on
all Canadian made cars, a preference
of ins was given the Canadian manufacturers, which counterbalanced reductions previously made. The majority of the people were immune
from the income tax, hul all hail to
pay their share of the sales lax. The
tux on the great mass of people had
never been  lifted.
In conclusion he referred to the
four-square policy of the Conservative party. To his mind, there was
ii" difficulty as to which party should
he charged with the clearing up of
the mess whjch the Liberals had
made. Never before in the history
nf Canada have the first ministers
af the land been guilty of abetting
the crimes that the  Liberal leaders
The meeting
a of the Natfoi
losed with  the sing-
Mi Anthem,
ogres-
that
the "sand" which Lord Byng was not
afraid to show, in the hope of escaping from the flood of condemnation which he had called down upon
himself. As he aptly put it, the constitutional question was only a smoke
screen.
An Attempt to Stop Scandal
With respect to the customs scan-;
did, he showed the connection thut
existed between the members of the
government and the principals responsible for the sud state of affairs,
He pointed to the great loss of rove-
expos i
and Pi
Lack of  Liberal   Policy I showing  wh,
< alone  Clayton stated that he had worth of raw goods wer
™«jn ly hsened to McKenzie King, there   and   fabricated
Who had tailed in any way to nd cote million dollars' worth
wha  policy ander ay the Liberal plat- forty huge  factories
term.    He  felt    hat  it  was  but  a to  put]
wing plunk by which they hoped to nickel '
S,     m';»  tThc   ProF«*'ves  bad     In a clear and coincise manner he
again sold their wares In the highest; pointed out  the fallacy with regard
With regard to the ......   I^the.. Ro.b!i   bu.d«et: Rowing that
tariff which would he iu tht
interests of Canada, a tarlfl
which would result in a renewing of
industrial activities, providing opportunities for hia boys as well as those
of other electors to obtain work in
Canada.
With regard to the Australian treaty, the speaker in an interesting manner traced the history of this now
famous document, showing that
the first treaty drawn up by the Liberals and whicli was favorable to Australia, and also in Canada's interests,
wus strangled in infancy by the Liberal government when they in turn
found themselves with the P
sive axe over their head, und
by them to so change the trea
its value was entirely lost. A. .. • >-
suit, ships are bringing back Australian goods free of duty, in direct
competition with our Canadian farm
products. He   showed   where   the
change of front by the entire Liberal
party with respect to the treaty was
done practically at the dictates of
twenty-four   Progressives.
Tariff  Question   lhe   lustue
lie  claimed  the   Meighen  issue  in
this  campaign  was  the
tl'. sin.wing where th
tivo party hud been consistent with
regard to same. With regard to the
Working of a tariff as supported bv
the Liberals, he showed where in the
construction »f the Wetland Canal
that when the American contractors
wire forced to supply B.C. fir in
place of American timber, they
simply boomed the timber across
I'uget Sound, manufactured them
into timbers and transported them
over American railways direct to the
Well and.    lb' questioned who could,    ,, ,,.,,•,,-. j
prosper  under such conditions.    He   , Voters of CwdPorM^wood
pointed out the falacy of exporting decided in a plebiscite held[ on Satur-
w material to the United States • day in favor of the establishment   .
PROVINCIAL GOVT. TO
INVESTIGATE LUMBER
BUSINESS AND FIRES
Hon. T. D. Pattulo, minister of
lands, has notified the Associated
Boards of Trade for Eastern British
Columbia, through the commissioner, V. A. Starkey, of Nelson, that it
is intended to hold sittings of enquiry throughout the southern interior as to the fire situation, and the
best means to be employed in combatting the fire menace in the season.
At the same time advantage will he
taken to look into the conditions surrounding the lumber business, which
at their convention this year.
The  letter, which is dated at  Victoria. August 10. reads:
I  wish  to advia
he
mum
dii  of
scrva-
the fire sltuatl
that   it   is
it hold  an  investiga-
and other poits, into
n in the southern bias the  fire season  is
over.
"A:
this i
niuirv
undii
ttion it is proposed
'nerally into con-
s   the   timber   in-
i   in   the   southern   interior.
am   nol   yet    able   to   set    the
date- on which the ir.vestiga-
t Kelson and other points into
time anyone Interested will have the
opportunity to compile sticn data us
he may see fit."
Be
For   Grand    Forki    Riding
uls.
lillion dollars'
ken over
into seventy
t products iii
What applied
to   asbestos.
nue thut resulted from the:
lations,  and  indicated  thn
appll
pper.
ill     In a clear and coi
I   noiule
to   the   Robb _    .      ^^^^^
. a ocan- while the Liberals might point to it
dul, ull he wished to point out was with pride, the reduction was not in
the Interests <»f Canada as they would
  minor ports   have   the   people   believe.     With   the
they Jul St. John una Halifax.   What must imposition   of   the   <ales   tax   and
customs
fifty-two   million   do
nanlpu- had been lost in the two
thai constituency in southern British
Columbia, of licenced establishments
for dispensing beer hy the glass.
This definitely assures lhe establishment <>f beer parlors In the boundary
riding. An nrder-in-rouncil proclaiming the district officially "wet" will be
passed by the government very shortly. Under this order the liquor board
will be able to proceed with the issuance of beer parlor permits. This
is the procedure that beer advocates
in this city are hoping will be followed in the vote that may soon be taken
in thU city.
PUBLIC MEETING
WILL BE HELD IN THE
AUDITORIUM, Cranbrook
ON
Saturday, August 28th
1926 • at 8 p.m.
TO BE ADDRESSED BY
Dr. J. H. King,
Hon.   Wm.   MothcrWCll,    Former Minister of Agriculture
J.   W.   DeB.   FarriS,    of Vancouver
A CORDIAL INVITATION IS EXTENDED TO ALL ELECTORS TO BE PRESENT
LADIES SPECIALLY INVITED
-   GOD SAVE THE KING   - PAGE   SIX
THE  CRANBROOK  HERALD
Thursdny, August 26th, 192-8
THE UNITED CHURCH
REV. BRYCE WALLACE,  B.A., B.D., Minister
SUNDAY, AUGUST 29th
11 a.m. — Subject: "Kadesh Barnea." 	
12.15 — Sunday School and Bible Cluss.
7.30 p.m. - Subject: "Abiding Things." Senior Choir
"THE CHURCH OF A CHEERFUL RELIGION"
Junior Choir
DR.  W.  A.   FERQIE
, DENTIST
i    Campbell-Manning  Block
Phone 97 OBc. Hour.
• to 12| 1 to 5 p.m. S.t. » to
3
Dn.  Green   &   MacKinnon
Phj.leUn.   ft   Surfeon.
Office «t BwWence, Armrtrong
Avenue
OFFICE     HOURS
•MtarnooM  2 "> *
Crenlngs   "0 to 8.30
Sunday. 2.«° t0 400
CRANBROOK,   B.C.
DR.   F.   B.   MILES
DENTIST
OFFICE HOURS
9 to lt a.m.      1 to 6 p.m.
Hums Blk.,  Cr.nhrook,  B.C.
F. M. MacPHERSON
Undertaker
Phoo. 380
N.r-k.ry An., Nut City H.1I
H. W. Herchmer
BARRISTER
hnd
SOLICITOR
CRANBROOK   -   B.C.
— PHONE 61 —
NISBET & GRAHAM
Barristers, Solicitors, &c.
Offices: Imperial Bank Bldg.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
OFFICES at KIMBERLEY
IN K. of P. HALL
Open Every Thursday from
10 «.m. to 6 p.m.
SUNDAY, AUG. 29
WAYMAN K. ROBERTS
— of Kimberley —
Will Preach Next Sunday
morning   in   the   Baptist
Church.
12 noon—Sunday School.
United Services in the Bap.
list Church in the evening, conducted by Rev. M. S.
Blackburn.
tOU   ABB   COKMAU.Y
IHTOED.
GEORGE   J. SPREULL
BARRISTER    i    SOLICITOR
NOTARY
CRANBROOK - B.C.
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
FOR  SERVICE,   QUALITY
AND   CLEANLINESS   THE
L. D. Cafe
CANNOT   BE   EXCELLED
Sanitary Electric Refrigeration
UJD8I8 AND 8001ET1US-
TTOHKN'B
INSTITUTE
Ifttta  ln   th.
K.   of  P.   HaU
afternoon of th.
(rtt TuMday at
I p.m.
AU ladlu ar.
cordially Inylted
Mr.. NORGROVE
Mr.. J. COUTTS.
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
I YAHK I
[\ NOTES |
f.f.f.f.fffffff.fffoffffff
.Mr. John Mottson had the misfoi-
tune to get his knee badly bruised
while working in the mill and is now
lonfined i" iii? home.
llr. E. Home nnd little son, Edgar,
were m town for a few days.
Edith I-'uulkoner, from Cranbrook,
is Bpeuditig a few duys in town with
friends.
Mr, Hill Baum, nlanor foreman for
llu* ('. P. li., is now luid up with the
mumps. Mumps are supposed to be
a kid's disease, but they are manly
onough when men take them also.
S. Stool hnd tin- misfortune of hav-
Ing his arm mangled between the pul-
ly mul bolt, und is now laid up.
Bridge foreman .Ferguson and crew
are now repairing the new bridge as
it is beginning to he pretty shaky
when the big C.P.R. truck goes over
il with logs. _
Mrs. Moore und little son motored
from Brldesvllle, H.t:., and spent a
short time with Mrs. Don Puttinal, of
yahk. __
On Thursday last, a number of
C.G.l.T. girls and leader Mrs. Royal
met the train, tho occasion being to
see one of their girl members from
Cranbrook, Miss Gertrude Patmore.
Miss Patmore was presented with a
pretty bc-juquot of sweet-peas and
ferns' liy :l Yahk member, Helen Mclnnis.
Victor Jacobson, who hus been
visiting Mr. nnd Mrs. Baum for the
past month, left to join his mother
in Spokane on Thursday.
Miss Nora Home returned to Yahk
after spending the week-end at their
uiinmer home ut Doswell with her
parents.
Mr. Gerald Craigie, from Creston,
motored in to town on Priday, selling
plums at a price one could not refuse
buying them.      	
Mrs. Bill Smith who has been
.pending the winter in the Kast with
relutives, returned home on Thursday.
Mr. M. A. Anderson, of Wardner,
who hus been assisting freight agent,
returned to Wnrdner on Saturday
when Mr. Woodhouse took over his
ild position after a two weeks' holi-
lay ut  the coast.
The new chureh is now well under
way. I.. Williams and Geo. Warren
are busy kalsomining and painting.
Tlie new boll is now here and the organ is coining from Vancouver. Soon
we wil] lie able to say there is a
church in Ynhk. __
lt is understood that Miss Nettie
Hrowney bus tuken over the work of
janitor for the schools.
Edith Faulkner, who hns been visit*
ing wbh friends in Ynhk, returned to
her home on Sunduy.
Constable Davidson was a business
visitor to Creston on Tuesduy.
Mr. anil Mrs. James Foster and
daughters were the visitors of Mr
and Mrs. Hugh Mclnnis, motoring
through from St. Mary's Prairie on
Sunday and to their disappointment
found them out of town.
Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Williams nnd
son, and Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Mclnnis
were the visitors of Mr. ond Mrs.
John Tipper, of Glenlilly on Sunday
afternoon.
Miss   Ethel   Brownrigg,   who   hns
i. o. o. r.
KEY CITY LODOE No. 42
■   i- t,         Heeta every
ds'BEJr4<kMotidav night at
WfSw Thc Auditorium
Sojourning Oddfellows are cor
dially invited
JJ  0  F. RUSSELL
Rec. Sec. E. G. Dingley, P.G.
FOR RELIABLE
Shoe  Rep airing
Take your that, to tho
-0. K. SHOE SHOP-
Norbury Ave. — Cranbrook
For Quality and value In
Men'a Dreis and Work Shoei
SEE US — W. NICHOL Prop.
For Good Value to
GOOD   EATS
Go to The
ZENITH   CAFE
Cor. BAKER St VAN HORNE
Sainsbury & Ryan
BOTLDBBS AND
0OHTBAOT0B8
CaUlfBBOOI
aim smS Wart
B.C.
J. F. SCOTT
1 Cranbrook Drug ft Book Co.
SEE US FOR—
YOUR NEXT SUIT
Lot.it >ty'«. & fabric. $40-$60
H. C. LONO, Van Horne St.
When f oa Think .1 Imuran*.
— Call Dp -
BEALE & ELWELL
Cranbrook & Kimberley
Sale Af.ati for Kuaherlej Tonnslte.
"Swat the fly
with
GILLETT'S
LYE
A teaspoonful of
Gillett's Lye sprinkled
in the Garbage Can
prevents flies breeding
Use Cillett's Ly for all
Cleaning and Diiin-fecting
Coitt little
but alway.
effective
Tuesday for the same.
A Labor meeting wus held in the
Yahk Hotel on Saturday. James
Sims was speaker nnd Walter Alien
chairman.
Miss Hayward and friend, Miss
Ogilvie, from Great Fulls, Montnna,
are visiting with Mrs. Alex Rattray
and is a guest ut the Yuhk Hotel for
a few days. Miss Olga Nelson, of
Kitchener, is also visiting with Mrs.
Rattray.
been spending the past few weeks at
Creston with Mr. and Mrs. Martin,
brought Miss Ruby Martin back with
Iier on Sunday.
Mr. John Holmgren made a trip to
Jaffray on Saturday and returned on
Sunday evening by nutn with Gust
Johnson and Ed. Muttson, who spent
a day or so in town.
Mrs, Harder, who has been cooking
for Gust ldcrstrom, left on Mondny
to join her husband in Spokane. A
Chinese cook is now filling the position. _
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Heric and family spent Sunday at Creston with Mr.
Heric's parents.
The boiler inspector for the engines
was in town this week inspecting tlie
boilers.
Mr. and Mrs. Dan Hamilton and
daughters returned home on Sunday
from their trip to the States. They
spent six days in Garibaldi, Oregon,
with Mrs. Hamilton's mother, rindiing
her very much improved in health.
Thev report having a splendid time
on their trip. Thoy left asai.i on
Monday afternoon by train tor
Maple Creek, Sask.. to join the rest
of their family, these being Dannie,
Bobbie and Tommy, who have been
spending their holidays witli Mr.
Hamilton's parents. They expect to
return home In time for the opening
of the school.
Preparation has been made to build
the house of John Wardrope on the
main side of the town in Yahk.
A Chinaman, while employed in
C. P. R. lumber mill, Yahk, cleaning
up under the nigger, the nigger broke
and a piece fell on the Chinaman's
head, leaving him in need of medical
attention. _
Miss Kathleen Gillis was thc visitor
of Miss G. Bakee on Mondny as she
was coining from Spokane to her
home in Kaslo,
Mr. John Harrison, of Vancouver,
is visiting with his relatives in town
for a few days.
Mrs. A. Henry, of Yahk, was
rushed to the hospital in Mr. Jack
Hamilton's cur, accompanied by D.
Hamilton and Dr. Thompson, but hod
to roturn to her home without undergoing the  operation.    She returned
STRIP TICKETS
With and Without Coupons
For (iencral
Admission Purposes
For Salo at
THE
CRANBROOK HERALD
OFFICE
PACIFIC IN
TOMATO
SOUP
Some time ago Mrs. May
Andrews of Vancouver asked how to get results with
Pacific Milk in tomato
soup. An excellent way Is
to dilute one tall tin with
water enough to make a
(|uarl. Yesterday we received n reply iu which Mrs.
Andrews says til's proportion makes a most palatable
and creamy soup.
PACIFIC  MILK
Haa4    Offic«t    Vaac«av«r
FmImIm *t U4mt ft AkWotiford
H. Tnt tovr Cofco -1
In nn endeavor to divert public
Attention from tlie malodorous CUB*
tmus scandal, his personal breach
of fuith with the Governor-General
in repudiating the entire purport of
tlie plea upon which he last year
secured a dissolution and in (after
his deft-nl) persisting in holding to
office by dickering with and making
un warrant able concessions to the
Progressive minority group, ex-
premier King has been devoting
much of his energy of late to hanging a smoke screen visible as the
"constitutional issue"—tbe right of
His Majesty's representative in Canada to dissolve parliament on Mr.
Melglton's advice.
Mr. King's late associates in of-
fiee sensibly refuse to follow his
lend. Hon. J. II. King, at Winnipeg-
took especial cara to disassociate himself from such tactics. "We have
no criticism to make of the Governor-
GoneraVa action," he said in effect.
"I told onr orgnnizers to proclaim
everywhere the fact that the Liberal
party has no intention of attacking
tin- King or his representatives in
I'minda, and never bud," asserts Hon.
Mr. Cardin.
And vet Mr. King storms on and
bis new'tabloid organ, the "Montreal
World," moans that "if freedom-lov-
in* Canada does not destroy B.-ng-
ism. then Byngism will destroy freedom-loving Canada."
A campaign against British connection is a dangerous game to play
among French Canadians, whose
many special rights have been rigidly safe-guarded since the time of the
conquest, and who are wise enough
to recognize that severance of the
British tie could have but one ending—absorption by the United States
antl the loss of their civil and religiom
privileges.
The fact is that the King tirada
against the niennf*- In which dissolution was brought about and tho solution of national problems placed, lu
the hands of the Canadian nennle. Is
nothing but a smoke screen to conceal the charlgin of the ex-premier
(subject to Progressive consent) over
the loss of the control of the election
machinery by the breaking of the
Progressive cord under too greut
strain—the cord that, tied *n the
string of Liberal members, enabled
hint to bold the balloon of power.
aa*
**************************
WARDNER NOTES    I
**************************
The engine on tbe Company pile-
driver is being overhauled this week,
preparatory to repairing the sections
around the mill pond which were
••.■ashed out or otherwise injbred by
the higher waters during the summer.
Mr. Geo. Sinclair is in charge of the
irk on the pile-driver,
A political meeting of the Conservative party is planned to be held
in the Club Hall on Wednesday evening of this week, when L>r. Uutledge,
of Cranbrook, Col. W, B. Clayton,
of Vancouver, will address the meeting during the evening.
Messrs. Emil Shelborn and John
Anderson returned to Wurdner on
Tuesday last, from tbe prairies,
where they journeyed last week to
work at thc harvest. However, they
report that the rains were so heavy
as to indefinitely postpone the threshing.
Dun Luce has purchased a new
Chevrolet sedan, from the Kootenay
Garage, Cranbrook, trading in his
old Chevrolet on the deal, lust week.
Mrs. Verio Moore and son Terry,
of Midway, spent several days of last
week visiting friends in Wardner, heing a house guest of Mr. and Mrs.
John Lawson, of tho Wnrdner Hotel.
Mrs. Moore is a former resident of
Wardner, ond her many friends were
pleased to welcome her again.
Mrs. J. E. Scanland bus been on
the sick list during the past two
weeks, suffering a severe attack of
pleurisy. Her many friends nre
pleased to learn that she has recovered somewhat and bus been allowed to
return home this week from the St.
Eugene Hospital, Cranbrook.
Mr. nnd Mrs. Win. Holton motored
to Cranbrook on Wednesday evening,
on business.
Mrs. Bert Donahue motored to McBain's Lake on Wednesday to spend
the day visiting Mrs. Ed. Peppier.
Harold Anderson spent purt of the
week at his home here, suffering a
light uttaek of sickness, which necessitated his laying off work for
several days. Harold wus able to return to bis work in Waldo on Thurs.
day of this week.
Hurry and Sam Thompson motored
to Waldo on Friday evening to attend
the dunce there that evening.
Mrs. Al. Kievill returned to Wardner on Friday, after spending the
past week in Fernie, visiting nt tbe
borne of her cousin, Mrs, John Gibson, and other friends.
Mrs. Howard Haney, of Bull River,
has been spending the past week in
Wurdner, visiting ut the home of Mr.
and Mrs. L. II. Haney.
Mrs. Sears, of Swe-elgrass, Montana, arrived in town last week, to
spend a few weeks holiday here, visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. L. IL
Haney.
Sam Brander, of Fort Steele, spent
Sunday afternoon visiting friends in
Wardner.
Miss Dagne Nordmark has completed her engagement at the cook-house
and left for her home in Jaffray on
Saturday for a few days' holiday, before leaving for Waldo, where she
has secured work in the camp cookhouse. _^
After a six weeks' holiday the
ladies' basketball club again met for
practice on Thursday evening. Although the full number of members
were not present a large number turned out for practice, white several new
members joined the club. During
the evening the local ladies were
pleased to welcome several members
of the Bull River ladies basketball
team, who motored down for a practice game. Both teams were in good
form, and some sharp plays were observed. The weekly practices will
take plaee on Thursday evenings at
7 p.m. as usual from now on. Incidentally the Bull River ladies have
extended an invitation to the Wardner club to motor to Bull River for
a practice game to take place at the
convenience of the locul ladies.
Mr. Stewurt, official grader of the
Western White Pine Association,
spent Thursday nnd Friday iu Ward.
ner, looking over the grudes in the
Compuny yard.
Several afternoon tens have been
held this week in honor of Miss Winnifred Macintosh, who bus been
spending tbe summer here with her
sister, Mrs. August Duye. Among
the hostesses enlertnining for Miss
Macintosh were Mesdames Frank
Miles, Tcmy Thompson and Ben Daye.
Miss Macintosh plans on leaving for
her home in Kelowna about Septem
her first
Mr. Olaf Wold left this week for
Barons, Alberta, where he will join
Mrs. Wold nnd daughters, who have
been spending the past few weeks
visiting friends on the prairie.
Mrs. Sears, of Sweetgrass, Mont,.
who is visiting iu Wurdner with her
parents, Mr. nnd Mrs. L. H. Honey,
left on Tuesday for Bull River, where
sho spent a few doys visiting at the
home of her brother, Howard Haney.
returning to Wurdner on Thursduy.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Harris, Mr. nnd
Mrs. Fred Hurris motored -to Mud
Lake on Sundny ufternoon.
Morris Anderson, C. p. R, operator
at Kimherley, spent tho week-em!
here with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Prosser motored
to Wardner on Monday, looking for
a place of resilience in town, planning
on moving in as soon as a house can
be secured.
The schoolhouse is being repaired
and given a coat of paint In preparation for the commencing of the school
term   in   Seplemher.    Mlstt   Laurlne
WINNERS AT WOMEN'S INSTITUTE FAIR
(Continued from Pago One)
the fact that the hour of closing: was
changed to 9 o'clock, thereby enabling a greater number of people to
see the- show.
Of interest to many was the bouquet of wild flowers collected by Miss
Olive Norgrove, It being an eye-
opener to many, few believing that
such a collection of beautiful wild
flowers could be obtained in the district.
The display of pies, cake and bread
was a very tempting one.
Mrs. George Smith merited well
the silver vase donated by his worship the mayor for the highest aggregate. When it comes to the production of sweet peas and other
flowers, Mrs. Smith is pretty nearly
in the Burbank class.
The prize list is given bedow.
Cl... 1
Names first and'second respectively unless othorwlse stated.
Kmbroidcry on white linen, solid—
Mrs. Coutts, Mrs. Brault.
Buffet set—Mrs. It. II. Moore, Mrs,
Geo, Smith.
Tail- embroidered towels — Mrs.
Healey, no 2nd.
Embroidered afternoon tea cloth—
Miss J. Baynes, Mrs. Norgrove.
Cut l.occ Work—Mrs, T. Cooper,
Mrs. Healey.
Bedspread—Mrs. J. H. McClure,
Mrs. Brault.
Best cotton crochet—Miss Mott,
Mrs. Baynes.
Fancy Bag—Miss Mott, Mrs. Healey.
Tatting—Mrs. Brault, Mrs. Gould.
Home-made bag—Mrs. W. Brown,
Mrs. H. Brown.
Article in X stitch—Mrs. Cooper,
Mrs, Healey.
Crochet article in wool—Miss Emslie, no 2nd.
Hand knitted article—Mrs. Baynes,
Miss Mott.
Hand knitted sweater—Miss J.
Baynes, Mrs. Norgrove.
House dress—Mrs. Cooper, Miss
Mott.
Silk embroidery—Mrs. Brault, Miss
Mott.
Paper flowers—Mrs. J. H- Mc
('lure,  1st and 2nd.
Best collection of fancy work—1st,
Mrs. Coutts; 2nd, Miss Baynes; 3rd,
Miss Mott.
Special prize of leather underarm
hag donated by Miss Mcl/epd for a
bedspread—Mrs. S. S. Simpson.
Cl... 2—Flower, and Plant,
Sweet peas, 6 spikes, 6 colors—
Mrs. Geo. Smith, Mra. \\. H. Browii.
Pansies—Mrs, Campbell, >|r». lawson.
Cut flowers, 6 varieties—Mrs. Gep.
Smith, Mrs. Nprgrpve.
Hoses—Mrs. Geo. Pmith, no 2nd,
Asters, 3 colors—Mrs. McCltjre,
Mrs. Norgrove.
House Plants—Mrs. Brault, Mrs-
| Chester.
I Best Geraniums—Miss Mott, no
2nd.
1 Slocks, 3 colors—Miss Mott, Mrs.
I Norgrove.
| Best Begonia—Mrs, Campbell, Mrs,
Chester.
Best foliage plant—Mrs. Geo.
Smith, Mrs. Campbell.
Best Fern—Mrs. Norgrove, Mrs.
Campbell.
Best plant A.O.V.—Mrs. Campbell,
Mrs. Brault.
Six carrots—Mrs. Cooper, Mrs.
Ellen Smith.
Six potatoes—Mrs. Geo. Smith,
no 2nd.
Plate peas—Mrs. Geo. Smith, 1st
When using
WILSON'S
FLY PADS
■tt;
ID   DIRECTIONS
CAREFUtlY   AN
FOUOW 7HEI-"
s-v     EXACTLY/
Best of all Fly Killers—10c and
25c per packet at nil IM'tu^isls,
Grocers and (ienera! Stores.
Corbett and Mr. Iverson, will both
return to teachc school in Wardner
again this year.
Miss Mabel Embree returned on
Saturday from McBain's Lake, where
she spent the past week visiting Mrs.
Md. Peppier, at the Peppier cottage.
Miss Grace Taylor and Dan Luce
motored to Waldo and Mud Lake on
Sunduy afternoon.
und 2nd.
B««t cabbage—no 1 st, Mrs. Geo,
Smith.
Six parsnips—Mrs. Rllon Smith,
Mrs. Geo. Smith.
Be&ts, round, ll—Mrs. (Jen. Smith,
Mrs. Norgrove.
Cauliflower--no 1st. Mrs. Elloii
Smith.
Six slocks rhubarb Mrs. Ceo,
Smith,  Mrs.  Henley.
Pumpkin—no lsl, Mis. II. Hrown.
Piute black currnnts—Mrs. Healey,
no 2nd.
Piatt* stniwlu rrloa — Mra. II.
Brown, Mrs. P. W.  Willis.
Best collection vegetables—Mrs.
Geo. Smith, no 2nd.
Best plate Broad Beans—Mrs. Geo.
Smith, no 2nd.
Best plnte Wax Beans—Mrs. Geo.
Smith, Mrs. Norgrove,
Plate onions—Mrs. Finlayson, Mrs.
Ellen Smith.
Clatt 3—Culinary
White broad—Mrs. Manners, Mrs.
Gould.
Whole wheat bread—Mrs. O'Hearn,
Mrs. W. H. Brown.
Fancy bread, two varieties—Miss
Baynes, Mrs. O'Hearn.
Doughnuts—Mrs. O'Hearn, Miss ,1.
Baynes.
Buns, six plain—Mrs. Manners,
Mrs. Gould.
Iced layer enke—Miss Baynes, Mrs.
J.  H. McClure.
Jelly Roll—no 1st, Mrs. J. II. McClure.
Fruit  coke—no   1st,   Mrs.  Noble.
Shortbrend—Mrs. ,1. H. McClure,
Miss ,1. Buynes,
Jam tarts, ll—Mrs. Norgrove, Mrs.
J. JI. McClure.
Apple Pie—Mis. Norgrove, Mrs.
S. S. gimpson,    '
Pineapple Pie—Mrs. 0'IUarn, Mrs.
Kllen Smith.
Lemon Pie—Mrs. Ellen Smith, Mrs.
Gpuld.
Collodion of preserved fruits in
syrup—Mrs. Copper, Mrs. Geo, Smith.
Collection jams and marmalades—
Mrs. Geo. Smith, Mrs. Norgrove.
Collection pickles—Mrs. Healey,
no 2nd.
Meat, canned—Mrs. Geo. Smith,
np 2nd.
Chicken, canned—Mrs. Geo. Smith,
no 2nd.
Best collection canned vegetables—
Mrs. Geo. Smith. Mrs. Cooper,
Special Prize*
Burpees Social for best collection
of Burpee flowers—Mrs. Geo. Smith.
Burpeo Special for best basket of
Burpee's sweet peas—Mrs. Geo
Smith. .'
Best bouquet of flowers, lien/
Special—Mrs. Geo. Smith, Mrs. W. ..
Brown.
Most entrits in Culinary section—
Mrs. Norgrove.
Best loaf of bread from Kohin
Hood Flour—Mrs. O'Hearn.
Mayor Roberts' silver vase for
highest aggreKute in show—Mrs. Geo.
Smith.
Best bouquet from children's gardens—Miss Olive Norgrove.
Best bouquet wild flowers—Miss
Olive Norgrove.
Special prize for most prizes in
section 3—Mrs. O'Hearn and Mrs.
Geo. Smith, equal.
A word of credit must be given to
Mrs. H. Brown und her helpers, who
nerved "refreshments during the afternoon, many enjoying u social time
over a dainty cup of tea.
MI WBT 17* AVE.JHAU-OHNBSY HHOHTS. VANCOUVER. B.C.
Jn Jlfifhtm. 'Rmstnlkl mi <Dey School for Ql,l,
Provide, a ihereu^i
Fira trade to jtmor Hid
wiih indoor
English ind
tat
mth cartful fflortl tnd physical intuuetion.
Melrtr-nlMirn Art, Music, Physical Eduction
AH lh* Mi-arMstl Md degrees (rom the best
I. ,'
aeely t* Tht Mother Superior.'
ALL Studebakers are built
for real aolid comfort. If it's a
five-passenger—that means
five grown-ups, with ample
leg room—seat room—elbow room. Roominess!
.Your comfort depends on it
—so Studebakers have it—
abundantly! Just try sitting in
g Studebaker-front or rear.
DEZALL'S GARAGE
CRANBROOK - B.C.
STUDEBAKER Thursday, August 26th, 1926
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
PAGE SEVBN
•>^.:..!.*.l.*********<,***********++************'!''!''!'**'!'*!'***t
NELSON BUSINESS
COLLEGE
THE BEST EQUIPPED BUSINESS COLLEGE IN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Shorthand, Typewriting, Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Spelling,
Commercial linglish, Commercial Law, Commercial
Arithmetic, riling «"il Oeneral Office
Procedure,
INDIVIDUAL TUITION.    FEES: $17.50 A MONTH
Nelson Husiness College Students secured 14th, 16th, 17th and
18th positions In the Canadian Typewriting Championship, 1926
|   Two  -Hold  and   several   Silver  and   Hronze   Medalists  for
j last term,
| The College in which Students either Work or Leave.
I — NEW TERM COMMENCES  —
*
I Wednesday, September 1st
I 1926
*
*   Room for a limited numher of students only.   Apply at once.   +
I Phone 603      ■      -      P. O.Box 14, Nel«on,B.C. |
3. *
X *
%****************************************************
GOLDEN COCOC I
BRITISH AUTHOR
I     MAKES PACK TRAIN
TRIP OVER NEW ROAD
SYNOPSIS
Molly Shannon, university student,
hus recovered at the home of the
Cochrans, where Gregory Cochran,
bachelor lawyer, had taken her after
rescuing her from the river. Molly
had been driven desperate by the
treachery of Stephen Renfro, efficiency expert, wbo deserted her and married the wealthy Miss Dilworth.
Cochran ha* introduced Molly to his
mother, who is proud and aristocratic,
uml not to,, woll pleased to have the
girl in her bouse.
*****************************************************
1     -    SATURDAY   SPECIAL   -      f
I Neapolitan Ice Cream Bricks I
At All Leading Confectioners
CRYSTAL DAIRY LTD.
PHONE 88       : : : :        CRANBROOK. B.C.
*****************************************************
$2500.00 Club
For Particulars Apply to
B.C. Mutual Benefit Assoc.
0. W. SPEIRS, BOX 240, FERNIE, B.C.
Why Home-brewed
Beer Can Be Bad
For Your Health
BREWING beer at home, a habit that has
become widespread in the United
States since prohibition deprived the people
of the right to purchase pure and healthful
beer legally and openly, presents difficulties and dangers of which those who
enffftgo in il nre rarely aware.
HOME-BREWED bear van bo actually danter-
ous to (hose who drink it, for thc home
brewer works by rule of thumb, perforce, and
usually has no acquaintance with or control ovor
the complex physical and chemical reactions that
take place in the brewing of beer. Pure beer can
only be made in a modern brewery hy scientifically trained brewinnaters who have at their disposal the most modern equipment and who are
hound by the most exacting standards,
THK mimi* materials which, hi h modern brewery, are
imule iutu pure, lienllVul In it, can become, in the
hands »f n home brewer, a raw, Incomplete I) fermented. Indigestible and harmful mixture unfit for consumption, hm where un established brewery uses only
the hlghesl jtru'Ie of material—malt and hops—tea ted i«r
pm it v, the himir bjrcwpr is forced to purchase in stores
Imported syrup concoctions of Inferior moll and low-grade
hup .extracts frequent lj blended with synthetic esnences,
1'iie product nt such mixtures is always harmful to (he
stomach nml digestive system and dangerous to drink for
nny length nl' time,
THK home brewer is hampered tint only hy lark of
knowledge of tho science of  brewing,  but   home
equipment does nol Ittcludo the elaborate pi mt ne*
cesser? for -prolonged sterilisation and filtering io assure
a pure, healthful beer free from bacterial Infection.   In
heer that is the pindiirt of a perfectly equipped hrewery
hJI fermentation Is complete| in hnnie-lirewed beer fer-
mentation continues, unit continues after It I* consumed.
It Is really an explosive mixture, whether in your Rtomach
or in Ihe hot lie, hs shown >>> the way in which bottles
explode and tops are blown oil'.
I IOMB-SSEWED lieais *ra usually higher ln alo-hoilc oon-
1 ■ t'int than they Nhuuld he. In the been supplied i,y the
iitnalffeinnted Brewurlee to tho peupla of British Columbia
thrcuRlt licensed jj-roml.os or thr<ua:li Ooverninetit st-.i-ss the
cTcohollo strength in rnly 41., per cent., the moet .., /-u-shle
t ti'tfittfth for the stimulation of the stmnaoh towant aiding
ingestion. Hi'm?-hi''-wa:t beers also n»u;,lly contain giuator or
1j..» perceiitr.ffeu of iten.lly fund oil, from which iiropsrly
brewed, itoied and aged been are lree.
I HT phyilclcn can tell of the dnngsri of home-brewed beer,
" trom whioh, happily, the people of Brli.-sh Columbia nre
fin-, fur they have the p:lvtlrt;e uf obtaining- pure, r.n,d bsvr
tiitide by the Auul^miit>:d Brow-artsy of British Columbia la
plant* thnt aro oqul|tped with every facility tor th* brstvii-nf
of pure bill1, perfectly flavored, well m-atimd and healtlimi.
Visitors are cordially welcomed ut the plants
of the members of, the Amalgamated Brew-
tries of Hritish Columbia: Vancouver Brew*
trie*,. Limit ed; Rainier Brewing Co, of
Canada. Limited; Westminster Hrewery.'
Limited; Silver Spring Brewery, Limited; and
the yiftoriu Platen.,- Brewing Co. Limited,
Tliiti advertisement In not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control Board or by tho Government of British Columbia.
He
trice.
and
'You
n ore
wus
CHAPTER XVIII—Continued
Mrs. Parker wns like n gnmo little rat, hopelessly cornered, hut with
lots of fight left in her. "Well, you
know, Stephen Renfro he was alwuys
nt me—wnntin' to lend me money for
you, . . . He knew how hnd vou
needed  it   ..."
"Oh . . .1" Molly turned with
a violent movement and walked over
to the door which opened on tin* hack
yard. After a considerable silence
she said, "It was he, then, who gave
me the money for these . . . ?" .She
indicated without looking at them the
,suit, shoes und hut she wns wearing,
They were the only respectable onet
fhe hud.
"Woll," the distraught fairy godmother admitted unwillingly, "it be
gun  the  time your father died,
didn't have u red cent, und you hud
to go, ..."
"Thut too ...!"
Presently Molly faced round and
cume toward the cook table, "Don't
think I blame you," she said quietly,
"I know you only did whnt you
thought wus best for me, But—I've
got to plan some way to return that
money.   I'll be going now . . ."
In her room nt the dormitory she
■tore the clothes off and flung them
intolerantly from her. They were no
longer new.
Seventy-five dollars, . . . For ull
her resources to pay, the sum might
us well have been that many thousands, The fifteen .dollars she hnd
offered Mrs. Purker meant going
without u badly needed ruineoat und
the sacrifice of some of hor most
precious books. There was not another hook that could be sold, not a
cent to be squeezed from anywhere.
Her scholarship covered merely the
necessities; the little that she' was
able to pick up from couching went
to her mother. She hud never owned
piece of jewelry in her lift*. Vet
somehow Stephen Renfro must be
paid. . , ,
Sitting in hor underthings on the
edge of the bed, she looked up and
caught her reflection in the mirror
opposite. Was there anything of her
very own that she might sell'.' She
leaned closer t(> the mirror and scrutinized herself attentively. Her teeth
were sound, white—flawless as Stephen had often said. Fan tine in Les
Miserables had sold hers, hut thnt wus
t long time ugo. They couldn't have
had false ones then. . . The obvious
asset, of course, was her hnir. She
took out the pins und let it slip, a
shining, blue-black veil for below her
waist. It was very thick and slightly
curly at thi lips. Perhaps thev would
buy that  ...
She twisted it up again hurriedly,
brought from the closet a frock long!
-since relegated to second best, pinned
in a sailor, ulmost as old ns her own
career at thc university, und went!
out
There were less than half a dozen I
liniidressing establishments in the
town, and at every plnce it was thel
same story—repeated with either j
a condescending or a. pitying smile i
for her increuible ignorance. Hair
whs not lieing worn. It had gone out
of style—this with ft supercilious
glance which intimated how hopelessly out of the mode Molly herself was.
What little hair was used, peasants
in Kurope furnished Rt a few rents
a pound.
But—surely they w,,uld give lu-i
something for it, she insisted despairingly at the bi.it plflCQ. The proprietor shook his head, the while he eyed
her curiously up and down. Xo, it
wouldn't pay them to bother with a
single switch, not even if she guve
it to them. Her hair was quite worthless to everybody except—possibly
herself! But as she was going away,
absolutely crushed, nn elaborately
COlffed blond head was thrust out of
B cubbyhole. Its owner looked once
at Molly, twice at her hair, and beckoned to the man. It seemed there
was hy the merest coincidence a customer who wanted thnt color—Molly's heart leaped. How much would
they give her for it, she asked eagerly.
Oh, by stretching a point, maybe
as much as ten dollars. The man
made an impressive gesture,
"Ten dollars . . . !" she echoed
in   a  small,  stunned  voice.
He shrugged. She could take it
or leave it. They were only anxious
to accommodate her.
Twenty minutes later she came out
of the shop, feeling light and queer
nud intensely conspicuous, ffer pocket wns heavier by only nine dollars.
They charged a dollar—this ahe-
learned after trje deed was done—for
cutting it ,itf. Of the avarice and
cruelty of the shopkeeping cluss to
those who are in distress she knew
a little already, She was to know
more. . , ,
She wos not thinking of that now.
She sat down on a bench in the Capitol grounds, took out her small store,
and counted it. Fifty-one dollar* was
lacking still. She put the money back
in her bag and sat gazing despondently at the ground. She had nothing
else to sell—yet the seventy-five dollars must go to Stephen before she
slept.  . . .
After a time, a newspaper, sprawling where some former occupant of
thc bench had left it, claimed her
dispirited attention. She picked it
up, glanced indifferently nt the front
page, then turned slowly toward the
want columns.  .
A half hour later, sho presented
herself at the larger of the cityrs
two hospituis. To %' girl at the
desk she indicated one of the advertisements ip tht* paper, "This nays
that one of your patients needs some
blood from a young, healthy person,
and Is willing to pay for it. Do you
think he would pay as much os fifty-
ono dollars?"
The girl stared even moro curiously than the proprietors nf thc hair-
dressing places had done. Her stare
took in the shabby dress, the clipped
hair, the ancient sailor.     "I don't
MBB9S
know," she said, moving away rather
doubtfully. "1*11 ask Ur. Rodney . ,"
Directly, a young and pli asa-Ht*
faced doctor appeared. He gave
.Molly a brisk, businesslike once-over,
which registered also the short hair,
the old dress and sudor—und something besides. "Come in hen.'
opened the door into un inner
He motioned ber to a thai
sat down opposite—at his desk,
don't look   as   if   you   hud   any
blood than you need yourself,]
his blunt   comment,  alter a second
and keener inspection.
"I need the money worse," she -aid
simply. "Do you think they will pay
as much ns fifty-one dollars?"
"Will, one cun hardly put a price
on that sort of thing . . ." He shifted n little at the desk to get a beu
ter angle, "in fuct, It's not usual
to pay for such services ol nil, but—
this patient happens to be a man (,f
means, He wished to offer some compensation, 1 can't say precisely how
much . . . ."
"Anything less than fifty-one dollars won't do mo nnj good."
spoke  not loss  bluntly  than
done u moment earlier.
"Fifty-one dollars. JI ui
that's quite u lot, you kno\
guve her another intent glanc
a minute—I'll see. . . ."
Before Molly slept that night a
money order, with the briefest of
tints in Mis. Parker's handwriting
was dispatched to one Mr, Stephen
Renfro at an nddress in New Vork
City.
uf last Week
go over th
or   highwa;
I     On .Monday afteruo
the  first pack truin
Golden-Yoho   Park   t
; from Lake Louise to (i
Golden  in charge of Walter Nixon
■well known guide of lnvermere.    It
juil. fourteen bourses  were   in   th
;truin.
The trip wus mnde in tlte interest
of Morley Robert, noted Knglish au
I thor, who is gaining data for a book
entitled "Forty Years After." M
Roberts, in 1884, was employed ;
the construction of the Mud Tunnel
near I'alliser. Prior to placing a con-
Crete lining in this tunnel a few years
i after Its construction, it caved in and
i Mr. Roberts was the lust man through
before the cave-in occurred.
Meeting Walter Nixon at the Trail
Kiders' Pow Wow in the Ptarmigan}!
(valley,   Mr.   Roberts   engaged   him   t
Ottawa, Ontario. The output of
Coal from Canadian mines during the
month of May was IT per cent, more
than the production of the precedina
month and 30 per cent, greater than
the average for May in thu post five
year.-. Tbe figures were 1,140,031
tons in May as against i'Tii.liii', ton.-
in April und an average of 877,308
tons for the month during the fivi
preceding years. Nova Scotia, Al
berta and British Columbia, were the
only coal producing provinces to show
an output in Muy larger than the
five year average.
Timmins, Ontario.— Hollinger Consolidated continues to put great energy into the task of preparing the
mine for its final big increase in the
production of gold. Hoisting machines and general operations are now
consuming   hydro-electric   power  at
the rate of about 22,MOO horse power.
(This power consumption will be fur-
her Increased at such time as the ad-
al milling equipment cun be
'broughl in to operation, Three shafts
make the 'rip through" the" Kicking I," a dePth "f ''!•",l" tail e«h will
Norse and Voho Vnlloys, a collide of ff« ?cceM l" tht* ore deP°sits °ccur-
days being spent in fishing up the ring b*twe?n "»rf«e and that horl-
Ic, Hiver. j zon.    Nearly a   score   of   additional
shaft- will be used In various ways
 -o  jfn entering shallowei sections of the
mine.
Molly
ie had
'.   He
•Must
Ottawa, Ontario.- Tbe quantity of
■iitnery  butter made  in Cunada in
25 was 170,882,003 pounds, valued
Ial $00,038,460, according to a report
I issued  by the d< partitiont of Trade
j und   Commerce.    The   quantity   ex-
exceeds that of the preceding year
| by over one million pounds, and the
value  by   over   six   million   dollars.
The production of 1026, as regards
both quantity and value, is the largest in the history of the industry. All
the provinces, excepting Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia, show Increases in quantity of product.
WW^AWAVWrtWWWrfWW
Victoria Cafe
Whether you want a light
lunch or a satisfying meal
you will find our food tasty
and delicious.
After the Dance and Show
visit   the   VICTORIA.
Cranbrook's Popular Cafe
CHAPTER XIX
Molly's graduation in June cume
olf in a small blaze of glory. Then
were, among other things, offers of
two Eustern fellowships, but these
she did not allow herself the luxury
even of considering. Some months
earlier she hud applied for the principalship of the two-teacher Laws'
Chapel school. The sulary was less
than she might huve had elsewhere,
but she could make it count for more
at home and—her mother needed her.
Aunt Lena wrote that she had not
been so well of late.
Toward the end of Commencement
week Cochran brought an invitation
to tea. Mollv mistrusted that it had
been won by u species of coercion,
but she did not wish to rebuff his
kindness. She presented herself ut
the appointed hour, and was received
in state by the mistress of the place!
—not more condescendingly, perhaps,
than the difference in ages warranted,
(To   be   continued)
'AVivr.v
VVWwwWWWW
B. C.
ROOMS
Clean   and  Comfortable Roomi
Hot nml Cold Water
50c per Night
Durick Ave., opp C.p.R. depot
Next  F.  II.  Dezall (iara&e
Cranbrook, H. C. — Box 68
Quebec, Quebec—A IreatJ
pilgrims  hnve   visited   the
Ste.   Anno  de   Beuupre  this
compared with 145.000 in t
of the year 1026, according
figures given out by the Ki
ist Fathers.    The season pt
be one of the greatest  In
number of visitors  at   tli
shrine.
official
mptor-
PAUL
NORDGREN !
YAHK, B.C.
For  that  new
STRAW HAT, SUMMER
SHOES - AND
|   WEARING APPAREL
see our stock
— Best Quality —
MEN'S WORKING
CLOTHES
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PREVENT
FOREST
FIRES
YOU CAN
HELP
I     B. C. FOREST SERVICE
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Vresentm
TkJke
highest Quality and^Value^
Sensational Chrysler Performance^
^uilt as only Chrysler Builds..
ej*fm
j. o. h. Wituliur m.l-M.liMf lui «nj rqwiptnr.il
*V>
FOR the first time all the fine car
qualities that purchasers of low-
priced cars have had to do without are
how offered at amazing low prices in
the new Chrysler "SO".
For the first time—and now only because of the enormous advantages of
Chrysler's gigantic Quality Standardization plan of building four quality
cars to supply the four greatest motor
markets—you get these outstanding
superiorities:
50 milei and more per hour; 5 to 25
miles in 8 seconds; big car comfort and
roominess; Chrysler beauty and style
—all these higher-priced-car attributes
developed and perfected and built as
only Chrysler builds—and, given, not
at the price of wasteful operation, but
with the amazing economy of 30 miles
to the gallon of gasoline.
Chrysler "50" not only looks better—
it is better and performs better—and
stands up better.
Come in for a ride. Once you do that
you will never again want to consider
any other car near this price—because
no other gives you such value as the
new Chrysler "50".
Quality Standardization
Built m only Chrytler build,—under th.
great Chryiler pIan of Quality Standardization—group manufacture in Chrv*-
ler'a vast planta by one manufacturing
organization where all the gigantic Chryiler t'acilitiel and resource! are utilized.
Value
Never before, at thla price, have you been
able to get ao many features, such great
operating economy, such astonishing
value.
5 to 25 Miles in Eight Seconds
\lirv.ler "SO" give, you brilliant, flashing Chrysler pick-up—far finer than any
car of equal price.
CHUYSLER
Now ready /or your inspection and giving swefc a
demonstration t>/ Speed,
Pou'i-r, Comfort, Beauty und
Economy as was nner shotui
before in any car near
this price.
50 Miles per Hour
Speed with comfort. No rattle or shake
or shimmy. 50 miles per hour— and the
easiest, smoothest miles you ever had in
a four.
Economy
30 miles to the gallon—thanks to engine
improvements and scientifically accurate
gas distribution.
FullSized All-Steel Bodies
' Chrviler "50" ji m full-iUcd car. Notb-
ing cramped or skimped in its strong all-
steel bodies. Seats wide and easy. Every
detail planned to tfive finest riding and
greatest comfort.
Beauty
Each Chrysler "50" is a beaury. Each
extra generous in quality details, in fineness of finish and fitments. Striking In
color and line. Each is a Chrysler—and
that means the finest, the most alluring
style.
5C
F (). B. Wftwta
%Ases,h*tmpeti front uw-l
-Coupe, $1055—Coach, $1092.50—Sedan, $1160
Onl. I height onl> ><> hr added.)     Abo*-e bt-irrl intitule all
tt ii". lire ,.i*rt. „nd tainh full of (ui.iitn*.
Wilson's Service Garage      -   Agents   -   Cranbrook
Jas. Mitchell - Dealer - Kimberley
t/a
*v? paqe Eiam
THE  CRANBROOK  HERALD
DAY, AUOUST 26th, 1926
A favorite choice
for worth while
TRIUMPH
atuwpatttmia
Wn-Kpgers&Son
Silvetplate
COMPLETE
SERVICE
Every piece to match
"Open Stock" pattern,
of beautiful designs
— Moderate Prices —
Tea Spoons $1.75
Butter Knife
Sugar Spoon
Cold Meat Fork
. doz.
85c
. 75c
$1.50
THE GIFT SHOP- J
— A. EARLE LEIGH J
* Jeweler   -   -    Norbury Ave.    *
*************************
visit-
ErneBt Worden is a Spokane
or this week.
Mra. Reid, of Crow's Nest, was in
the city for a visit on Thursday last.
'   Miss Annie Harbinson left on Sunday for a vacation at the Coast.
Mrs. J. M, Robertson left on Monday for a two weeks' visit to Grand
Forks.
Mrs, Emberson Walker, of Fernie,
was a visitor in Cranbrook on Friday
last. __
Mr. Edward Lindsay, of Montreal,
brother of Mr. Cam Lindsay, of this
city, is a visitor in the city.
Mrs. J. McDonald and son, Billy,
left on Sunday to enjoy a two weeks'
holiday at the ('oast cities.
Mr. R. Woody, of Oakland, Calif.,
is a visitor at the home of his brother-in-law, Mr. Darcy.
Mr. G. J. Spreull left on Saturday
for Kaslo to enjoy a few days' holiday.
Mr. Austin McDonald, of the Beattie-Noble Drug Co., is enjoying a
holiday at the Coast metropolis.
Anything you want welded, take it
to the Service Garage. Work guaranteed. 22tf.
Miss Thelma Pelkey returned on
Monday after a pleasant week spent
visiting frien'ds in Lethbridge.
Sam Shaw returned home from the
hospital after undergoing an operation for appemli',;,:■■
Miss Mary Venus, of Creston, who
has been visiting at the home of Mrs.
A. Cox, returned to her home on Sunday last.
Mrs. J. McCall, of Vancouver, aunt
of Mrs. F. M. MacPherson, is visiting
in the city on her return from a trip
to Winnipeg.
Miss Ida Johnson, of Edmonton,
Alta., and formerly of Cranbrook, has
been spending a few days in the city,
the guest of Miss Annie McBurney.
After a visit of a week at the home
of Mrs. Kenneth Green, of this eity,
Mrs. C. Pwigg returned on Saturday
to her home in Creston. !
Misses Marie ami Evelyn Vaness
are visitors at Cranbr< ' '*•'•■ week,
Whero they are guests of Mrs. M.
Cox.—Creston Review.
Mrs. L. Lundy returned to Lethbridge on Friday afternoon lnst, having enjoyed a pleasant three weeks'
visit at the home of Mrs. Brown,
The Ladies' Aid of the United
Church will hold their monthly meeting at the Parsonage, Thursday, September 2nd, at :i .30 o'clock.
For first class automobile repairs
sea Ratcliffe A. Stawart. 83tf
Mrs. A. H. Johnson and daughter,
Margaret, left on Wednesday for
Vancouver, where in future they will
reside.
Mrs. A. J. Roach, sister of Mrs.
A. C.  Blaine, returned  to  Medicine
Hat on Saturday last, after a pleasant
visit  in  Cranbrook.
The Baptist Women's Mission circle
will hold a picnic meeting at Mrs.
Mennie's ranch on Wednesday, September 1 st. Cars will leave the
church at 2.45 p.m.
Travellers to and from Spokane
will be pleased to know that the
bridge across the Pend d'Orielle is
again open for traffic. The bridge
was recently destroyed  by fire.
Mr. W. H. Demiers, of the Big
Butte Dairy, left last week for Alex,
Alta. It is expected that Mr. Demiers will be returning later in the
Fall and will not be unaccompanied.
The Co-Operative Women's Guild
will hold its next meeting at the home
of Mrs. Chas. T. Spence, Martin Ave,
at 8 o'clock Wednesday evening.
September 1st.
Mr, and
stoke, were
Mr, Little
here as one of the local despatch
to  take  the   place   of   Mr.    Harvey
Brown.
Mr. A. A. Reeves, of Lacombe,
Alta., is visiting at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. W. E. Worden. Mr. Reeves
is on his way east lo resume his studies at Varsity,
Mr. and Mrs. George Anton left on
Monday for a two weeks' visit to
Banff and Lake Louise. Mr. T. Dan
os, formerly of the Patricia, is ii
charge during his absence.
Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Collins and
family arrived on Friday last from
North Bend and have taken up their
residence in the Mahaffey home on
Lumsden Avenue, formerly occupied
by Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Burpee.
LOCAL
>PEMZVG$
Insure with Beale & Elwell.       *
Mr. and Mrs. Alphen, of Hillcrest,
were week-end visitors at the home
of Mr, and Mrs. Dan Campbell.
Mr. nnd Mrs. A. Cummings and
family, of Fernie, were visitors on
Sunday last at the home of Mr, Cummings' brother, Mr. G. J. Cummings,
of this city.
F. Green arrived home
last from Mirror Lake,
has   been   spending   the
— A     Water at Kootenay Lam
Mrs. T. E. Little, of ReveliJ ported the lowest in twi
I in the city on Wednesday.! years, the barges have been
is contemplating a transfer^*vx\ nf that point.—Cresto
COMMERCIAL
CLASSES
—      Re-open at      —
ST. JOSEPHS' BOARDING
AND DAY SCHOOL
Parents wishing to place their
daughters und^r the care of the
Sisters of St. Joseph
—    NELSON     —
will find rates moderate.
Classes in Primary, Elementary
and High School; also Music
and Commercial.
For particulars apply
Sister Superior.
Ask for Big Butte Dairy Ice
Cream — Cranbrook's velvet ice
cream. lOtf.
F. G. Morris left on Tuesday morn-
iii(r by car for Sceptre, Sask., where
Mrs. Morris and family have heen
spending the summer. It is expected
they will all return by car shortly before the opening of the school term.
Miss Helen Bridges, a sister of Mr.
A. D. Bridges, left on Saturday for
Brandon, where she in attending college. Miss Bridges was on her return
from a trip to Prince Rupert and
other coast cities.
After a busy six weeks spent in
New York in attendance nt the summer session of Columbia University
Mr. V. Z. Manning, school inspector
for the East Kootenay district, returned to the city on Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. James Donahue, of
Regina, are visiting at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. C. Lindsay, Mr. Donahue heing a brother of Mrs. Lindsay.
They expect to return to the prairie
city on Sunday.
Mrs. W. Hay, of LaChute, Que.
is visiting here with her son, Mr. An
gus Hay, district agriculturist. Mrs.
Hay is on a tour of the West, visiting
her sons at Lethbridge, Cranbrook
itiid  Kamloops,
Mrs. W. M. Patton is expected to
return to the city on Monday, after
having spent a two weeks' vacation
holidaying in the district. Mrs. Fred
Ryckman has been filling her position at the doctors' office in her absence.
Miss Rosalind Davis, who for the
past month has been visiting at tlie
home of Mr. and Mrs. G. D. Carlyle,
left on Wednesday for her home in
New Westminster. Miss Davis is fl
daughter of Mr. E. R, Davis, druggist, of the Coast city.
Word has just come to hand of
the death of Commandant Bryanton,
She will be known by quite a few
Cranbrook people, she has put many
years of real hard work in the Salvation Army, and will he missed
greatly.
C. W. Allan, manager of the Im
perial Bank, left on Wednesday for
his usual two weeks' vacation, which
he is spending at coast points. In
his absence Mr. Godfrey of thc Cranbrook branch is in charge here.
—CreBton Review.
A. E. Jones has been busy this week
with the construction of a two-storey
addition at the rear of the Wont-
Worth Hotel, which has been added to
the building in place of the lean-to
additions, which have been torn down
by the new owner of the place, E.
Biggatinni.
Mr. C. Stephenson, of Fernie, who
has charge of the tourist camp at
Fernie, was in the city on Wednes.
day, the purpose of his visit being to
make an inspection of the Cranbrook
tourist camp grounds, as the Fernie
camp hus under consideration the in
stallation of shower baths there,
Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Whiteside left
nt the end of the week for Cran
brook, and w\\l visit at prairie points
before returning. They will be away
a couple of weeks, ana In the former's absence) Bert Hill, of Cranbrook,
is handling the yard engine.—Creston
Review.
Ask for Biff Butte Dairy Ice
Cream — Cranbrook's velvet ice
cream. lfltf.
Mrs. W.
on Tuesday
where she
summer,
Water at Kootenay Landing is re-
twenty-seven
operating
reston Review,
An alarm of fire on Monday about
midday look the fire department on
a run to the residence of S. Saunders
on Vun Horne Street, near the old
power station. The fire had originated in the front part of the house behind a wall, possibly due to defective
wiring. The fire was extinguished
by the aid of a small hose and the
damage resulting was not large.
Wednesday evening of last week
the Masonic Hull was the scene of a
very pleasant function, when Miss
Helen Worden was at home to a num
ber of her friends. The occasion also
afforded a number of Cranbrook people an opportunity of meeting Miss
Butler, of Calgary, and Miss McKeehnie, of Vancouver, who were guests
last week at  the Worden home,
Mr. Ireland, of Wycliffe, who last
week moved into the former Lidgate
residence, just north of town, has
purchased the property from J. W.
Dow, and intends making considerable improvements to house and
grounds. Mr. Ireland has for years
been master mechanic at the Otis
Staples sawmill plant in that town.
—Preston Review.
Mr. Harold V. Anderson, of McGill University, Montreal, who has
been spending the summer with Mr.
and Mrs. E. Staples, as a guest at
their Premier Lake summer home,
was in the city this week, and is making preliminary arrangements for a
piano recital which will be given in
this city next month. Further announcement of this event will be
watched for with interest.
Hon. Dr. J. IL King, ex-minister
of public works, met Rt. Hon. Arthur
Meighen on his arrival in Fernie lust Saturduy, and welcomed him
to the district of East Kootenay. Dr,
King had just returned to the city
from a tour of eastern points in the
constituency, including visits to
('row's Nest, Corbin, Michel and Natal, and happened to be at Fernie
on the morning of the prime minister's arrival.
Word was received in the city on
Monday last that the Advance OU
Company of Calgary have struck into
some very good ground, and it was
expected thut on Saturday of this
week that gas would he struck. The
Herald has been given a tip to buy, so
has pleasure in passing it on. Many
Cranbrook people are interested in
Advance, and it is the Herald's wish
that their highest hojies are realized.
Combining pleasure with business,
Mr. B. Weston is at present enjoying
life in the East, having left last week
for the business centres on a purchasing trip. Besides visiting in Toronto,
Montreal and other eastern points,
Mr. Weston will include New York,
where he will spend a few days visiting relatives. He expects to
i < turn in time to cast his vote
Cranbrook at the big election.
PHONE 93
PHONE 173
..MINING'S    LIMITED
"* THE HOUSE OF QUALITY
Specials for Friday and Saturday
MILK
Carnation Brand
Tall tin, each .. 15c
SOAP FLAKES
Ivory for Purity
3 pkts,   25c
JAM, 1926 Pack
Maik.  Best., Strawberry, 4 lb till . 75c
FRY'S COCOA
i lb tin  25c
ASPARAGUS, California State Brand,
2 tins fot   45c
CORN FLAKES
Quaker Brand
per pkt  10c
Malt Vinejar, in bulk, gill. $1.10
Whit. Vine.ar, ill bulk, Kill. 1.10
Cider  Vine-jar,  ill  bottles,  Hl'inv.
pint size 30c
Sp.i.tti in Tomato Sauce, Heinz.
medium size   l»c
Heinz large size   *Sc
Ontario Honey, Bee-Kist Brand
5 Ib pnil   *115
Banana Special
l:resh Fruits nnd Vegetables
This it the week for preserving.
Peaches, F.lberta, free stone
per case   $1.60
Pears, Bartlett var., case 2.60
Prunes, Italian var., case .. 1.20
Plums, Greengages, Lombards,
and Bradshaw, per case    l.SO
Concord Grapes, 5 tb  lisltt. 90c
This Week-end
PER  POUND
10c
Itev. E. S. Fleming, graduate in
Arts of U.B.C., and of Knox College,
Toronto Divinity, occupied the pulpit
in the United Church on Sunday
morning last. The Rev, Mr. Fleming
has come to take charge of the work
of the United Church in Lumberton,
Yahk and Moyie, where he will proceed with his work at once.
Blank Counter Check Books at the
Herald  Offlce. tf
Accompanied by Mr, and Mrs. J.
P. Fink and family, Miss Wanda Fink
left on Wednesday of this week for
Vancouver where in future she will
reside. In selecting Vancouver, Miss
Fink has chosen a field which affords
a greater scope for the musical ability and the teaching knowledge which she possesses, affording
her a greater opportunity for progress along the professional teaching
vocation which she has decided upon.
The best wishes of a large number
of Cranbrook citizens go with Miss
Fink. She is entering into association with Miss Isobel Campbell, L.T.
CM., who has a .studio at Fairview.
Mrs. Vernon Carlyle accompanied
them to the coast. The party will
return on Lahor Hay.
B, ti. Hamilton, returning officer,
returned to the city this week, after
a tour uf the Columbia riding, making the final arrangements for the
appointment of deputy returning officers in that district, and aU these
officials, covering the entire seventy
or so polls, all through the riding,
are now named, it is understood.
After spending the summer at
their camp on the banks of the St.
Mary's River, near the McPhee
bridge, Mrs. E. II. McPhee and family returned to the city on Wednesday
Dance in Auditorium, Election
night, September Uth.—Bluebird
Orchostrn. 27
Thc Cranbrook Drug & Book Co.
had on display a large salmon caught
recently at Smith Lake by Roy Issler.
Thc catch gives Mr. Issler the record
for the summer, the fish being in the
neighborhood of three feet in length
ami weighing seventeen pounds. A
fight like Mr. Issler and Mr. G. E.
McDonald, who assisted him in getting the large fish from the water,
is what makes fishing in this district
worth while.
A big Liberal meeting will be held
in Fernie next Friday, August 27th,
at which Hon. J. H. King, ex-minister
of public works; Hon. Wm. Sloan.
minister of mines, and Hon. J. W.
ilcH. Farris, ex attorney-general, will
address the electors. On Saturday
the same spoakers will be at Kimberley. Hon. J. H. King and A. I. Fish
er, K.C, are also addressing a series
of meetings this week in the Golden
district.
THEODORE    PADBERG,    piano
tuner;  player  expert.    Phone 602,
•Ltf.
Following the prayer meeting at
the Baptist Church on Thursday
evening last, a pleasant surprise
party was held in honor of Miss
Mabel Stender, who left on Friday
lnst with her mother for Victoria,
where she is to attend Normal School.
On behalf of her friends and In ap
precintion of her service* in the
Church, Sunday School and C. G, I,
T., Miss Stender was presented with
a cluh bag us a small token of up-
pronation from her many friends.
Mr. Fred Sterling, nf Vancouver,
was u visitor in town one day last
weok; he has been calling on friends
in Cranbrook and Kimberley and has
left for Trail tn see Mr. Harry Gale.
Mr. Sterling, who was Liberal campaign manager at the last provincial
election, and also manager for Mr.
McGeer in the last federal campaign,
is en route to Vancouver from a trip
to Winnipeg.
N0 trace has yet been found of the
missing elephants which are still at
large In the district, in spite of the
diligent efforts of the circus crew
here to trace down the numerous rumors which have been brought to
them us to the whereabouts of the
runaways. It was stated aarly this
week that it was intended to ship
away the animal that was recovered
week ago last Sunday, and that
other men from the circus were being sent here in an endeavor to fin-
ally   locate   the   other  two.
The Canadian Legion hns put in
to the provincial government a request that in the appointment of a
successor tn .1. E. Kennedy as superintendent of the labor bureau in
this city, the claims of a returned
man to the position be given due
consideration,
Martin Broi. Pay for Ashes.      tf.
The Cranbrook Cartage and Transfer Co. have received from the Imperial Oil Co., Calgary, a carload of
a new fuel wliich they nre now manufacturing, in thc form of petroleum
coke. It consists of the residue of
the heavy crude oils when the highly
volatile contents have been extruded
for refining purposes. This residue
is then treated again, uud the result
is a fuel that is said to possess very
high heating und lusting qualities.
Some reasons why tlie government
hns held up the projected issue of
historic postage stamps were officially
indicated from Ottawa lust week.
There have been a number of complaints. One is that Sir Wilfrid
Laurier is linked with Sir John A
MacDonald ou imi.' of tlie stumps, lt
is argued that Sir John's confederate was not Laurier, but Sir George
Etienne Curlier. Some objection hag
also been made uguiusl tlie lulo IV- !
Arey McGee being on a stump. The
whole project has been suspended for
further consideration, but assurance
has been given that if the issue is
ever proceeded with Cartier wiil lie
included.
W. E. Worden completed the end
of last week the removal of the monument to the deceased soldiers' of this
district which now stands in quite a
commanding position at the east end
of Baker Street. Its appearance has
been further improved by the cement
posts which the city council hns
had put up but it is felt that the ap-,
pearSnce if the monument would be      Mrs.  Water Edwards   and   sons,
still further enhanced by planting Bilhc and {'ck, were visitors ut the
around the monument a small patchi home of Mrs. Dan Campbell tha
of grass which could be fenced in week, leaving on Wednesday for their
and kept continually green. A little home In Edmonton, Mrs Edwards
und |-taking of thi.s kind would great-1 was an old resident In Cranbrook, and
ly improve the appearance of thati"0'01'
end of Baker Street.
Wednesday evening a number of
local radio fans had the pleasure of
listening in on Regina, Sask., where
Premier Arthur Meighen was addressing the electorate of that city. Judging from the applause with which the
address was punctuated from time to
time the Premier's reception was u
very rousing one, the Premier having
to wait repeatedly for the applause
to subside before he could continue.
He appealed tellingly to Liberals and
Progressives, asking them to judge
for themselves as to the sincerity of
Mackenzie King's statements with regard to the dissolution, the vote of
censure, and his alleged usurping of
offlce,
Blank   Counter   Check   Bo
stock at the Herald Office.
•ks
tf
Tuesday afternoon members of the
school trustees visited the public
school where a preliminary test was
placed <>n the heating system which
has been recently altered according
to plans of Mr. Labeau. The work
which has been done has made it
possible to operate one large boiler
to heat the entire school, while at the
same time by turning on one valve,
two other boilers can be cut in. When
the test was made there was but one
boiler under fire and with no pressure on the system, the radiators were
so hot that it was Impossible to hold
one's hand upon them. It is estimated that the work will be compleed at
a cost under $1300.00, whereas the
estimate of the Calgary experts was
$1725.00
For prompt repairs and satisfaction ro to Ratcliffe * Stewart's carafe. 20tf
A. L. Hay, district agriculturist,
returned to the city the end of last
week from the Coast, where he had
been attending fairs and assisting in
some of the judging. He was naturally much gratified at the success the
judging teams of this district had
made, and while he had been quite
confident that the team from Cranbrook was practically unbeatable, it
had seemed almost too much to hope
that the other teams from Jatfray,
Michel and Golden would also get in
the high awards, as he had been able
t
her marriage wns Miss Ethel
Peverellu.
H
ere an
dTh
ere
The total coal production of Alberta mines during 1925 amounted
to f>,88.',,394 tons, an increase of
679,681 tons over the preceding
year. The figures were as follows:
Domestic coal, 3,150,35'.) tons; sub-
bituminous, 581,835; bituminous, 2,-
145,200,
A corps of young guides who will
show visiting skiers the best locations, hills and runs for the sport
was formed at Mont Holland, Que.,
(n the Laurentian Mountains recently. About twenty young fellows
were enrolled. For the summer a
corps ef guides will probably be
formed to show visitors the best
fishing, bathing and boating locations.
Twenty-three seconds was clipped
off the Canadian record for women's indoor 220 yards swim at the
Crystal Gardens, Victoria, B.C.,
when Marie-Chen Wenslaus, famous Hawaiian mermaid, Olympic
champion and holder of 100 yard
and 100 meter world records, met
Audrey Griffin, well known Canadian girl swimmer of Vancouver,
The time was 2.62 5-6.
The Chateau Frontenac at Que
bee will have been reconstructed and
the entire building of 190 rooms will
have been rendered fire-proof by
June 1st, according to information
from head offices of the Canadian
Pacific Railway in Montreal The
burnt part of the Cliateuu has been
rebuilt up to the fourth floor whil«
the steel for the roof ii in process
ef erection.
School Days
— will soon be here again
and the boys and girls will
require heavier clothing to
protect them from cooler
weather. This store is well
prepared to care for every
want whether it be SHOES,
HOSIERY, UNDERWEAR,
SWEATERS, COATS,
SUITS, DRESSES, or the many other items loo numerous to mention. This store's policy will be whal it
has always been — QUALITY lirst and price as low
as dependable goods can possibly be sold for. We
believe a good article is the cheapest in the long run,
that is why the goods that we sell are worthy of OUR
GUARANTEE as well as that of the makers.
New goods are arriving almost every day, among
the early ones are LADIES' COATS, LINGERIE, HOSIERY, FELT HATS and SHOES.
We will soon receive the most beautiful lot of
women's silk dresses that we have bought, wonderful
quality of material, lovely styles and shades—and the
prices, you will just have to see them to appreciate
lhe wonderful values.
Mr. and Mrs, L. A. Thornton and
daughters, Katherine and Marian, are
visitors at the home of Mr, and Mrs.
R. Potter. Mr. Thornton, who is city commisioner of Regina, is on his
return trip from a motor trip to
Banff.
Conservative Speakers Coning
Another public meeting in Cranlironk in the interests of the Conservative party is announced to take
place at the Auditorium on the evening of Labor Day, September Oth.
Supporting Dr. Rutledge at this meeting will be R. L. Maitland, Vancouver lawyer, and president of the B.C.
Conservative Association, along with
Col. W. B. Clayton, of Point Grey,
who is now in the district. The same
speakers will also address a public
meeting in Kimberley on Saturday
evening, September 4th.
Successful Meeting
A meeting held ut Athalmer on
Thursday evening of last week in the
interests of Dr, J. W. Rutledge was
very successful and quite well attended, as were all the meetings which
Dr. Rutledge held in the Columbia riding last week. The speakers at the
Athalmer meeting were Mr. W. J.
Bowser, who spoke in Cranbrook on
the following evening, aud Mr. A. M,
Chisholm, of Windermere, us well as
Dr. Rutledge himself.
WANT ADS.
WILL THK PERSON who took a
lady's coat from Green Bay bathing house by mistake, on July 11,
please return same to Mrs. N.
Neilson, Sullivan Hill, Kimberley.
27*
I LOST. — -Glasses and case.        Finder please leave at Herald Office.
27tf
Major F. J. Ney, executive secre-
,     . ,      , tary   of  the   Canudian   Council   of
In spend only about a couple-of days   K(Juc,lioI1   niurmi ,„ Cu.iudu  on
in these places coaching.    Their sue- tu.lt,      n       n   iti    u
cess was therefore all the more groli- ward th. Canadian Pacific liner
fying. These three teams were ulso Montcalm after a tour of Poles-
expecting to take part in the events tine, Cyprus and Egypt where he
at the New Westminster fair shortly. la|d foundutlona for the organise-
* tion  of  the   Mediterranean   brunch
of the Overseas Education League.
Lord Lloyd, High Commissioner for
Egypt and Field Murshull I.nid
Plunter, Commissioner in Palestine,
have both consented to become honorary vice-presidents of the League.
WANTED — Raspberry, loganberry,
black   and   red   currant   bushes.
Phone .182 or write P. O. Box 287.
26tf
FOR SALE—Gendron baby carriage,
full size, in good condition. $30.
Phone 382. 27tf
FOR SALE—Registered Holitein
bull calf, 2 month old, price $36.00.
Registered imported bull, 7 years,
(gentle) ready October, $100.00.
All particulars from M. Cathcart
Seott, Newgate, B.C. 25-27
NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS TO
LET—Also garage. Apply 240
Hunson Avenue, in the Caven
place. 27-28
ROOMS TO
Office.
RENT—Apply
Herald
27
CARD OF THANKS
Mr. Lawrence Veoberg wishes to
tender his sincere thanks to the many
frlends, particularly the Pythian Sis-
ters, who in his sad hour of bereov-
ment, by their words of sympathy and
many acts of kindness, endeavored
to lighten the burden which wus his.
—'■—i—tt —- '
What may he looked upon os the
advance guard uf several Old Country miners who are coming tp Can-
da to seek work In the Crow's Nest
Pass mines, and who will take up
farms at Camp Lister, if part-time
employment can be secured, arrived
at Creston on Saturday in the persons
of George Crooks, William Orme and
James Mordecai, who were going out
to look the farms over, and will then
go on to Kimberley and Fernie in
quest of work. If their reports on
the Lister farms are favorable, they
state that several other miners will
follow their example. The three newcomers are from Derbyshire.
When Lord and Ludy Allenby
Were in Vancouver recently, a group
of women whose husbands and
sweethearts had been cared for by
Lady Allenby during the war duy-!
ln Cairo, thanked the "Lady of
Mercy" for her care and attention.
These husbands und sweetheurts aro
now happily settled In the sunny
Okanagan Valley of Hritish Columbia and have bunded in u unique organisation known as the Jaffa Gate,
every member having passed
through the Jaffa Gate into Jeru-
CLEAN ROOMS TO RENT—by day
or month. Apply Mn. C, Howard,
Herald Building. 18tf.
CANADIAN LEGION
B. E. S. L.
The Regular Monthly
GENERAL
Meeting
of the Legion will be held
in the
Club Rooms
—   on   —
Fri., Aug. 27,
AI 8.00 p.m.
A   lull   attendance   of
members is requested lo
discuss  lhe  advisability
of building
FOR SALE—Piano, aa good aa new.
Mason and Riach. 1360 cash. Enquire Box L, Cranbrook Herald
offlce. 21tf
—   SEAL BUS   —
COOK  STOVES,   HEATERS
DINING ROOM SUITES
DRESSERS, BUfFETS,
TABLES, CHAIRS, ROCKERS,
BEDS AND BEDDINO.
TOOLS — ol every deecrlptlon.
WILLIAM THOMPSON
Pho.a 78       .      .      P.O. Baa IU
Sesea-a Hand Dealer
We Bay. Seel md F.stmwf
*************************
Cranbrook  Board of
School Truitees
I NOTICE
All pupils Intending to attend Third and Fourth Year
(lasses in the High School $
will pleaae hand In their
names at the Secretary's of- J
(Ice immediately an that
| the Board will have an opportunity ol arranging (or J
the necessary accommoda
tlon.
F. W.
BURGESS,
Secretary. *,

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