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Cranbrook Herald Nov 25, 1920

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TIR NATIONAL ADTKBTISIB
KNOWS THE BEST MEDIUM—
HE PATRONIJ.ES THE HEBALD
TBS^RANBROOK HERALD
A IMI'KIt FOR TIIK IIOXE-
THK INTE1UST8 OF CKAN-
HltOOK    FOIIK.MOST    AI.WAIS
VOLUME      it
CBANBBOOK, B. C, THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 25, 1020
> D M BE R    4 0
-V
X,
HERE    IS   TIIK   SOLDIERS
PRESENTATION OF THE
ISSUES INVOLVED
ONLY ASK FOR FAIR
AND SQUARE  DEALING
History of Creston Area Seeing
to Show Amazing Lack of
Govt. Co-Operatlon
During the preBont electton campaign the Liberal Oovernment has
been attempting to make much poll-
cal capital out of their treatment of
the returned soldier, establishing him
on the land. If there were not facts
right at hand to prove it otherwise,
the story handed out by the government speakers might pass muster, but
one has only to mix among the soldier settlers at Camp Lister to And out
that what Premier Oliver has done for
the soldier settler does not amount
to much, and what has been done has
not been brought about ln a straightforward manner, but that the dealings
of the government with the soldier on
the land have been earmarked with
patronage, lack of foresight and businesslike procedure, and bound up
tight with red tape.
So much misinformation concerning
tbe state of affairs at the Camp Lister settlement began to get abroad, ap-
arently emanating from government
sources, that the men there felt that
in justice to themselves the truth
should be made known. Articles such
as the following, which was clipped
from the dally press is typical of what
the Camp Lister men complained of:
"A second soldier community settlement, at Creston," so reads the extract, " instituted by the provincial
government, has advanced to a stage
where eighty settlers are in % position to seed their land and become producers. Each of the eighty tracts
consists of twenty acres; five seres
are olcared, ploughed and fenced, another five acres are rough cleared,
while the remaining ten acres are uncleared. Comfortable houses are erected, and the cost to each purchaser
is less than |3,000. A supervisor ls
located in the settlement to assist and
encourage the settlers, giving them
advice on all matters in relation to
agriculture: The necessary stock,
implements and seed are provided
and charged to the account of the purchaser." ,
Note the definite -statements contained in such obviously inspired matter, and the impression left that everything is going on swimmingly.
What are the facts, however? Here
is the reply of tho settlers at Lister,
to the above, framed by a committee
formed among themselves:
"Articles have appeared continuously In prominent provincial papers, apparently inspired for the purpose of
substantiating'the Soldier Settlement
plank in the Oliver platform, Those
articles and Mon. John Oliver's statements nil set fortli in glowing terms
the government's claims of what they
have done for lho returned mon. Taking ono .publication wo have on our
desk, we road: 'Eighty soldier sottlera
(have been placed on tlieir holdings,
witli a comfortable house, nnd five acres fenced and plowed, ready for seeding, nt a cost of not over $3000. These
ready made farm's have been sold to
the soldier at tho actual cost to the
government plus cost If improvements.'
"A careful survey of the nren shows
that ihe following UM actually taken
place. Blighty allotments have heen
mado, hut a large perreiijage have
been rcllii.|.iMu>d through the unsnl-
Marlon conditions created by the dl-
later) and iinhnslnoHslIke policy pur-
aiird by the government. . Actual Inspection shows twenty-two men with
6 acres plowed and partially   fenced.
"Ourlng the wlntor of 1919-20, ten
houses were made tit for occupation.
No houses havo been completed since
then, though several havo beon framed which mny be ready for occupation In the spring, . On reading further we see that these ready made
farms with comfortable houses will
cost under $3,000. In no case has
any farm which may be considered
completed been offered for the sum
mentioned, but tn all cases are well
over that amount. These and other
statements are ro contrary to the
actual facts thnt the soldiers of this
area feel that they should not be per
mltted to fro unchallenged, and they
would welcome any Impartial invest!
gatlon, which they feel assured would
not be a recommendaton of the government's administatlve powers In
this all-Important question."
A brief recapitulation of what the
soldier settlers actually expected
when they went on to the land Is
worth considering. Here are the
salient point* of the agreement reached by the soldiers who proposed ttie
atihema to tha government, ui tha
Dr. King and
the 8 Hour Day
If Minister Favors the Principle, Why Did He Vote It
Down on March 851
Over his own signature Dr. King has
stated that "1 am lu favor of the eight
hour day and Justice to the workingmau." How does this statement line
up with his record ln the Ltgislaturo7
The B,C. Pederutlonlst, tre official organ of tho Labor Party ln this province, ln a recent lsuus status tlie case
clearly as follows:
"On March Mth the I'rovlnclal Legislature turned down the proposal to
establish an eight hour day In the
pulp, paper and lumber mills of the
province. . Attorney-Ueneral and Minister of Labor Farris opposed the measure because, he said, 'of tbe need for
tallest possible production of these
commodities, particularly at the present time.'
"He was supported In this action by
Messrs. Bell, Yorston, Nelson, Duncan, Jackson, Cowper, Sloan, Oliver,
.King, Macdonald, M.A.j Sutherland,
Hanson, Thompson, Anderson, Macdonald, K.O.f Weart, MacLean, Patullo, Hart, Barrow, Whiteside, Walters,
Pauline, Hall, Buckham and Fisher.
"Major Burde, who Introduced the
bill was supported by Messrs. Pooley,
Schofleld, Jones, McDonald, A.; Mac-
kenle, F.J.t Hanes, Glolmu, Rohk,
Bowser, Rose, Mackenzie, W.A.; Haw-
thornthwiate, WlUson, Mcintosh and
Stewart.
"The Minister of Health," goes on
the Federatlonist article, in a par-
graph a little lower down, " and the
combination Minister of Labor and Attorney-General, whose duty it Is to
enforce the laws and protect the interests of the wotkers not only failed
criminally in these respects, but led
the opposition to the enactment of the
8 hour day.
'Now a few months later there is a
wholesale shutting down ot camps
aud mills and other Industries, and
many thousands out of work, and the
certainty of bread lines being In existence everywhere throughout the
winter months.
"Where was the vision of the
'statesmen,'" the Federatioaist goes
on to ask, " who could not see a few
months ahead and take action to minimize the evil effects ot a long work
day and a system of working the employee to tre limit of his (physical endurance?
"The political incompetents are endeavoring to get back into offlce for
a new term before the winter sets in
with Its thousands of unemployed, for
they realize that It would be hopeless
for them to expect to be re-elected
once the workers fully realized the
position they were placed in and how
little would be done to assist them."
members of the government who considered the scheme:
The land would.be surveyed Into
lots of approximately twenty acres,
fenced, wall dug, house built and the
first five acres cleared nnd ready for
ultivatlng. The men were to work
learlng, fencing, plowing, building,
etc., accordingly as they wore most
fitted to work, receiving pay at tho
rate of $4.00 per day. The lots as
thoy became sufficiently advanced.
would be drawn for, for the purpose
of allotment, seniority being the qualification to participate in the drawing.
Tho price of tho farms when complct-
d would ho the cost of the land, plus
the cost of improvements, less a rebate of $500 to men resident in British Columbia prior to the date of enlistment. The men were further Informed tlrat this scheme was a part
of the provincial Rovcrnment's quota
towards soldiers' civil ro-csablish-
nunt; that under tho plan, when
plans were ready, men would he expected to qualify for nnd obtain Soldier Settlement I/inns from tho Dominion Government to purchase from
tho provincial govornme.it, hut that In
iho event of any man fnlling to qualify for and obtain such loan, then tho
provincial government would mako
provision for such men to purchase
direct from them under terms similarly favorable to that of the Dominion Soldier Settlement Board. All
men were told that a 10% payment
down would not be called for.
Other promises were made to the
men in regard to accommodation for
themselves and families while working, and also ln regard to a co-operative store for the purchase of supplies.
But chr.nges in the personnel of the
Land Settlement Board were made,
and when Colonel Fred Lister gave up
his official connection with the Lister
settlement, ,he was succeeded by Colonel Davis. At a meeting held at
Lister shortly after he took over the
work, Col. Davles, after announcing
changes In the administration, Informed the soldier settlers that the new
executive had decided that they could
not continue the work of development
under the plan it had commenced
that the work was being done under
the Land Development Act for the Government, and that tlie settlers were,
In fact, merely working for the government, and tiiat they could cootin-
CANTATA WILL BE
GIVEN AT METHODIST
CHURCH SUNDAY NEXT
The services In the Methodist
church on Sunday next will be conducted by the pastor, Rev. R. W, Lee.
.Morning subectj. Forgiving and
lot given," the soloist being Mr. E.
h'by. At the evening serrioe the
-choir will render the sacred cantata,
The Good Shepherd." by T. Mee Pat-
tlsou.
The following is the program:
Chorus—"I am the Good Shepherd"-—
Choir.
Chorus—"The Kin® of Love"—Choir.
Solo—"Ho Every One"—Mr. L. Richardson.
Solo—"O  Jesus   Ever  Present"—Mr.
W, Sheppard.
Chorus—"And They Brought   Young
Children"—Choir.
Chorus—"Hosanna"—Choir.
Solo—"O  Lord   Ouf  Governor"—Mr.
E. Eby.
Solo—"Come Ye>People*'—Miss Eunice
Parrett.
Quartette—"Love Divine"—Mr. T. C.
Phillips, Miss A. Sarvis,    Mr. W.
Shepherd and Mr, F. Lodge.
Male Quartette—"Come Unto Me" —
Duet—"As the Heart Pants"—Mr. W.
Shepherd  and  Mr,  L.  Richardson.
Chorus—"Why Art Thou Cast Down"
Choir.
Solo and Quartette—"^God So Loved
the  World*'—Mr.    U  Richardson,
Mrs. W. C. Adlard. Mrs. E. H. McPhee, Mr. W. Shepherd and Mr. F.
Lodge.
Chorale—"We Cannot TellM—Choir,
Bass Solo—"Surely He Hath Borne"—
Mr.  E.  Eby.
Quartette—'There ts a Green Hill"—
Mrs.  T.   C.   Phillips,  Mrs.   E.  H.
McPhee, Mr. L. Richardson, Mr. E.
Eby.
Chorus—-"Worthy    is The   Lamb"—
Choir.
Duet—"Our    Blessed    Redeemer" —
Mrs. W. O. Adlard and Miss Alma
Sarvls.
Chorale—"He Is Gone."—Choir.
Chorus—"Lfft up your Heads"—Choir.
Mrs. F. Topham, a former resident
here, nnd now of Sandpoint, was in
the city this week for a time renewing
friendships.
By-Elections
Watched Clojely
Prom; Capital
ue to work for them at $4.00 per day
so long ns there was work to be done
profitably; and as they had come up
thore lo take up land, they would be
given the first chance to buy at an appraised valuation, provided it could
be provod to the satisfaction of the
local representative that they were
suitable mon to take up land. Contracts were to be varied according to
the individual; a young man would
Ket a long term contract, the older
mun a shorter term contract, and In
case of mon over forty, the contract
would bo limited to ten years. Instead
of the original contract, calling for a
loan for 25 years at 57c. the contract
would vary ln limit and hear interest
at V'/c, and in all cases would call tor
a payment of 10% down.
The soldier settlers naturally took
exception to these changes, and when
Colonel Lister visited Victoria and
took the matter up with the government he received assurances that the
original promises made to the men
would be carried out.
In due time, last summer, the proposed agreement of sale ln reference
to their land was submitted to the
soldiers, and regarding this agreement Col. Davles wrote ou September
23:
"It may be aa well for it to be understood that this the form ot the agreement, will not be changed.
"It is regretted that , , * . the
Land Settlement Board Is compelled
to place a doflnlte figure on each lot,
without regard to the cost of the work
ln detail. It will be necessary for
each settler to decide whether he Is
willing to purchaae his Individual lot
(Continued on pass) all)
OPPOSITION WORKED ON A
CRY OF SUGAR FOR ALL
THEY WERE WORTH
ATTEMPT TO ANALYSE
AMERICAN ELECTIONS
What Is Going to Be Attitude
of the Rogers Following to
New Fusion Party?
OTTAWA.—Sugar, which sweetens most things, is not by any means
sweetening our politics. On the
contrary, it ls fermenting Influence
At least it is in East Elgin, where reports say, lt is the chief Issue. One
can well believe this, -tor everybody
uses lt. Consequently everybody understands the subject. Besides, as
the opposition Is making a strong bid
for the women's vote, It naturally
uses the sugar argument for all It ls
worth. Morevover, this subject will
suit a great many of the speakers; for
a person may be very Ignorant of political issues and still make a whirlwind speech on sugar. In the meantime the refiners seem to have got
over the scare that they were going
to be ruined; for some of them are
now cutting prices.
Judging from the reports of heckling at western meetings, lt looks
as though the next campaign would
be one of the liveliest the country
has had since possibly 1896. The
1911 campaign was Interesting and
exciting; but lt provoked but little
heckling. There was much argument but little heat. In 1896, Sir
Charles Tupper .especially when be
spoke In Toronto, was booed and
howled at unmercifully, so when one
reads of cabinet ministers being heckled today one may be sure that con-
lilerable heat 1b being generated ln
the body politic. So the effective
campaigner will have to have both
a quick wit and a ready tongue.
Some old-time Conservatives dislike the National Liberal and Conservative party and evidently Hon.
Robert Rogers has not become reconciled to It. In response to an enquiry as to whether he had got on
tbe band wngon, he told the Toronto
Globe that he bad little use for the
N. L. and ("s. He stands by the old
Liberal and Conservative party, the
party of Macdonald and Cartler, aa
he calls it. Having ln former days
fought Calder and Sifton to tbe death
and opposed very strongly some of
the government's friends in Manitoba
politics, lt is quite possible that he
does not feel like taking them to his
bosom. With him politics Is a fighting game thnt demands a strong
sense of loyalty. He likes a thoroughbred, as he calls them. There
is much speculation as to bow many
old Conservatives share his views.
Our own politicians are now drawing conclusions from the presidential
elections. Of course most of them
will draw those that best please
them, The wise, however, will learn
many things. In the first place It is
quite plain that tho women are taking politics quite seriously; that
they have a fairly good understanding of tbe Issues and that the majority of tbem are anything but faddists, Women like to be sure of
their footing, and lt is a mistake to
think that In politics they will run
after every new thing.
The second lesson Is that party
lines have heen badly smashed. This
Is more significant tn the United
States than tt would be ln Canada,
for In this country a determined effort has ben made by even some ot
the old-time politicians to smash
them. But on the other side of the
line both the Republicans and Democrats kopt tholr party organisations
Intact during the war.   Tba Kepub-
WEDNESDAY NEXT
WILL SEE ISSUES
DECIDED AT POLLS
Elections at best are uncertain
things to gamble on, but there is no
gainsaying the fact thnt prospects
look mighty good for the Conservative party In this riding at the polls
on Wednesday next. And Cranbrook
Is far from being the only place entertaining such bright prospects.
Mr. Caven, the Conservative candidate, and his workers have been engaged In energetic work this past
week In many parts of the held, and
almost invariably have encountered a
solid support from the electors wltb
whom they came ln contact. Especially Is thla true In the outlying sections. Nevertheless, there ls no display of over-confidence in the outcome,
but the good prospects for victory are
being backed up by hard work    ,
The ladles are making their contribution to the cause ln a very marked way. A most successful meeting under the auspices of the Women's Conservative Association was
held on Monday evening at the Edison Theatre, the Conservative headquarters. Tbe hall was full and addresses were given by Dr. Rutledge,
Capt. Bell, of Camp Lister, and Mr.
Caven. Mrs. Elmore Staples very ably
presided. While there is considerable activity also ln the Liberal camp,
their workers must assuredly encounter a yery different feeling among the
people than was met with fn 1916.
GETTING AFTER
INTOXICATED AUTO
DRIVERS IN CITY
Geo. Negard, of Bull River, was fined 125.00 and costs a few days ago
for being in a car while under the Influence of liquor,   '
Hans Anderson was also fined $300
for operating a car when under the
influence of liquor.
The olty police are going to put a
stop to drunken persons having anything to do with autos. It is not
their own lives that matter so much,
but the lives of those whom these
people endanger.
HIGH SCHOOL NOTES
The second meeting ot the H. S.
Literary Society took place on Friday, Nov. 19th, in tbe Assembly Hall
This interesting meeting took the
form of a debate, the subject of which
was "Resolved that Oriental Immigration should be prohibited from Canada.
Debaters chosen from the second
year were George Huntep and Jessie
Baynes. These students handled the
difficult negative sdie exreedngly
well. The winners, Evelyn Anderton
and J ames Logan, of flrBt year, handled the affirmative In an admirable
manner and showed hard work end
good training.
During the retirement of the
Judges, two piano solos were effectively rendered by Marion McKinnon
tively rendered by Marlon McKowan
and Eva Molr,.
The Literary Society is very grateful to Mrs. McKowan, Rev. Lee and
our principal for acting as judges.
The new society hopes to contribute much to the life of the school.
Athletically basket ball has taken
much attention and when the new
rink ls ready it ls hoped some Interesting games of hockey will be played.
The musical department will be
heard from later and the literary ability of the students will be evident ln
the High School paper
Noted Old-Timer
Passes Out
Newe of Death   of  "Old Man"
Simpson Readies Here
During the Week
A wealth of reminiscence was stirred up this week in tlie memories of
the real old-timers of the city, when
the news came through on Tuesday
morning of the death of F. E. Simpson, formerly of this city, but lately
of Kamloops. *The word came to Mr.
W. M. Harris from Mort. Billings, who
was associated with "Old Man" Simpson both here anil subsequently at
Kamloops, that he had died while under an operation for appendicitis.
The story of "Dad" Simpson's connection with Cranbrook and vicinity
harks back to the earliest days of the
place. He came  first  in  1897  to
Wardner, which was at that time actually being used by the C. P. R. as
Us divisional point. Col. Baker, however, was largely Instrumental in having the C. P. R. change Us decision,
and the divisional point wns finally
removed to Cranbrook. Mr. Simpson had In tho meantime commenced
the publication of tho "Wardner International" at that point, but came to
Cranbrook in tho spring of 1898 and
established the Cranbrook Herald, for
a time continuing tho publication of
both papers. For the next twelve or
thirteen years ho was intimately connected with the life and growth of the
city. Ho was a charter member of
tbe local Oddfellows Lodge, and with
Mr, J. P. Fink was one of the first delegates to go from tlie local lodge to
Orand Lodge Sessions at New Westminster. Mr. Simpson was also closely connected with the early activities
of the Cranbrook Board of Trade, and
other organizations. Shortly after
'his coming to this part he married
Miss Kate Phelps, who came from his
old home town of Souix City. Iowa.
They had no family of their own, but
in the largeness of their hearts they
took a boy for adaption as their own
son, g'ving him their own surname.
Ever Blnce, Donald Watson Simpson
has had a good home, and has been
treated as one of the family. He has
been at Kamloops with his foster pa-
Tents since they established themselves there, Mr. Simpson was always
keenly interested In politics, and a
Democrat in. his homeland to the
south, he espoused the Liberal
cause in provincial Issues here, to
which viewpoint he leaned quite
strongly till about 1910 or thereabouts
when he turned to the Conservative
fold. He was an unexcelled speak'r.
and after leaving here in 1911 or
thereabouts, having disposed of the
Herald, he took part In the election
campaign of 1912.
He dropped newspaper work for a
time after leaving this city, and took
up with a tobacco and cigar business
at Kamlcops. While there he also
took an interest in one of the subdivisions of that city, and going over to
the Old Country made a sale of the
property, a deal which is supposed
bo have netted him something upwards of $50,000. Returning from
England, he went to Victoria and engaged in a journalistic venture ln the
form of a weekly journal, which however was not a success. A little later he was back in the newspaper
game at Kamloops, being connected
with the Sentinel, which he pursued
until two years ago or so. when fail
ing eyesight compelled him to relin
quish it. When he was thus compel
led to lay aside his pen, one of the
outstanding figures in British Columbia Journalism war. removed. He
was also connected with the Lethbrldge Herald at the time of the beginnings of that now prosperous paper.
Now with the news of his death,
there are scores all through the Interior who mourn In his passing the
loss of a good friend and true, and
•who join In extending to Mrs. Simpson and aon their deep sympathy.
LOCAL PLAYERS TO
PRESENT COMEDY
NEXT MONTII
Beans made special efforts In this
direction, and In doing so wore assisted by an abundance of money.
Two years ago when tho war was at
(ts height President Wilson asked
for the return of Democrats In ad-
(Contiaasd oa !*•«• Dew)
A company of local anlateure havo
been rehearsing for about three weeks
on a farcical play in three acts, "The
New Boy," by Arthur Law. It is to
be presented in the Auditorium on
Friday, December 17th, and the pub
He are asked to keep this date open
for the attraction, which is understood
to be a real side-splitter. The caste
will be as follows:
Mrs. Rannick MiSB Woodland
Archibald Rannick
(her husband) .. Mr. L* D. Rengger
Dr. Candy
(school principal)..Mr. A. Raworth
Felix Roach   Mr, P. G. Morris
Nancy (his daughter)
Miss Muriel Walllnger
Mons. Theodore Brizac
(French master)   ....  Mr. Eckhr-t
Susan (the maid)    Miss Blrkolt
Bullock, maj.,
(senior pupil)      Jack Haslam
Messrs. II. A. McKowan and J. H
Spence were In from Kitchener taking
In tb« Bhrlnere doinga tbis week
WORK IS PUT INTO HANDS
OF AGENT OF OLIVER
GOVERNMENT
MAKES EASY MONEY
UNDER SYSTEM I'SED
Piece ot" Electioneering Road-
work Likely to Prove Costly
from Standpoint of People
W. K. Baling, Conservative candidate lu the Rossland riding, threw a
bouib in to the Liberal tamp on Wednesday night, when he proved at a
public meeting that au agent of the
Oliver government, Angus Davis, was
receiving a "rake-off1 of some thirty
thousand dollars ou the construction
of tho six aud three yuarur miles of
the traoaprovincial highway, construction of which was recently undertaken
near thero recently.
While it is ostensibly a contract, the
evidence presented by Mr. Baling was
proof positive that tho alleged contractor is tn reality merely an agent or
iiie Oliver government.
Under the direction of Dr. J. li.
King it was announced some time ago
that a contract had been let for tho
road, a connecting link iu the trans-
,-roviuciul highway. Tenders had
been called for, but apparently without success, and what is known as a
"force" contract was awarded \o Angus Davis, who also hijd a similar contract for nine miles of Osoyoos road.
Men out of employment have been accepting this work because no other
work was available, and at present
many idle men are seeking employment, going Into Rossland becacse of
:he report that work was being undertaken. The claim of the government for doing this work in order
to provide employment for labor cannot stand, when it is known for a fact
that Davis is but an agent of the government, and the government engineer in charge of the work allots the
contracts to groups of tbe men. advancing provisions also. Davis apparently is not known in the undertaking,
only having been there on one or two
.-ccaslons before the work was started. The government gives the "contractor" use of machinery employed
on the work at Osoyoos free of cost to
:.im, under a memorandum made September 25th at Victoria hy Dr. King's
ilepartment.
Government Engineer Cwyer's estimate for this work to Dr. King's department was J7&.095.50, but Davis
was placed in charge under the force
plan at an award of $77,434.50, or a
difference from the estimate of the en- .
t^ineer of $1,661.00.
The engineer advises theEe men.
*nd they art being paid this amount:
that for grubbing they are to receive
$100 an acre, while Davis, it was
shown, receives many times this amount; for earth work the men receive
40 cents per cubic yard, Davis receiving 75c, or a rake-off on the earth
work alone of $13,160 in his favor, and
in the earthwork the men are compelled to do the separate item of grubbing, which amounts to $2900—4 nico
grab—and the workmen ray at tlieir
best they can only earn $4.00 per day.
For the loose rock work he pays 70
ents and receives $1,80, and this It-
cm amounts to $18,655 in the total estimates. A similar rake-off applies
as to the solid rock work, and all
through the contract logs flattened being put in his allowance at the rate of
$70 per thousand.
The Liberals from their RosslaDd
committee rooms advised the workers
that Davis In only receiving a slight
Increase above the rato bolnjj jm.ld
the men, but the truth will not be
downed. Figures do not lie in this
Instance, and It only goes to show
to what extent the workers nre being filched by tbe Oliver government.
Is it any wonder that Public Works
Engineer Foreman has resigned? A
memo attached to the acceptance of
tlie -proposition of Mr. Davis says that
tho contract is awarded "in accordance with the general terms of the Osoyoos contract, except that you will
be expected to use the plant supplied
by the government On Osoyoos work,
and provide at your own expense any
more that may be required."
Does this look like economy in administration in the public works department? Who la paying for this
work?     The people!
Under the terms of the contract, Davis is but an agent, not a contractor
in thc true sense of the word. On the
OsoyoQB work the engineer In charge
was compelled to arrange with the
banks there for advances to care for
payrolls, one bank having advanced
ten thousand for these accounts. It
is known that the Osoyoos work cost
considerably more than tho estimate
of the government engineer, and that
departmental lnterferen.ee hns greatly handicapped the subordinates In
(GantiBMd on Page Six. ries    tne
THE      C R A H I! 1*. 0 0 K      HEBALD
Thursday, November 85, 1030
_■_■_•
GETTING    AT    THB    "HOY
PROBLEM"
\ Just Yon Hear ■'
\ei^ruTUWH^.\
"i Plays AU Records at aa
"■ Ihelr Best „■
Coacwte Dally
RAWORTH BROS.
JEWELLERS and
OPTICIANS
Offlc*.
mt*. RTtnln-n,
■a  Nut to th* Port
■"
a ■ ■ ■
Cbe Cranbrook herald
Publl.-i.d Bv.ry Tbundar by
WILL, A. ELLETSON Editor
r. A. WILLIAMS Assistant Mgr,
HnbwriptiM Vrloa, $*.(*) a loir
SabHiipUoi Fries, t'Jk, tiM t Year
"WIS*  •   HlMloa,   Wl.fe.at  ■   HbuI«
Prlatsa tr V.I.. Ses.ee
AdT-.rtl.iu8 Kat.i oa Application.
Cdmbiw tor Adv.rll.lnv MUaT be lo
Uu. tilllc* sVeOnesilny ssoots tbe currant
week tu lecure attention.
CRAJ4BUOOK, BRITISH COLUMBIA
THUHSDAY, NOVEMBER, 25, 1920
CRAM-HOOK A BACK
NUMBER
In spite of lhe uiuuy organizations already existing iu
Cranbrook, litis ciiy is iu the
rearguard aloug several lines
oi progress. Such smaller centres as Rossland aud Trail have
undertaken vigorous programs
' aloug educatioual Hues. Evening continuation classes and
general night school work are
being successfully carried ou in
these places aud in uiauy other
centres where the need is uot
as patent as it is in Cranbrook
The provincial aud federal
governments have made such
work possible lor any cont-
muuity with enterprise aud ambition. The expenditure is so
small Ihat it is scarcely a factor to be considered. Young
people leave the community
every fall for the coast to take
courses, especially in business,
which could easily be arranged
for here under the> auspices
of the local school board.
Classes in stenography and
typewriting, elementary sei
ence, and English classes for
new Canadians would make an
appeal to a large number. The
Department o f Education,
through Supt. Kyle, has urged
Cranbrook to undertake such
a program, but so far no response has resulted. The opportunity is still open. The beginning of the New Year would be
an opportune time to launch
forth.
The University of B. C.
through its Extension Department, endeavors to bring higher education to the doors of
every community In the province. An excellent list of subjects and lectures have beeu
prepared and towns and settlements may now reserve dates
and subjects. The only local
expense involved is connected
with the place of meeting. Any
organization or individual may
invite the various lecturers
but some assurance must be
given that the lecture will be
fairly well- attended. Practically a free Lyceum course Is
open to all progressive centres.
An Incorporated city of over
3000 population with no library
can scarcely bid for a place in
the sun. Such things were luxuries in the dim past but the
wide awake town finds them to
be a necessity now. The need is
mote presing in such a district
as ours than in the large city
of many advantages. Any one of
the too many organizations already existing might easily
save Itself from dying out by be-j
coining sponsor and guardian
of this institution which would
exert an influence for good Impossible to weigh.
This is the re-contructlon
period. Cranbrook must fall
into line and put itself into the
vanguard of progress If it
would maintain its prestige In
Southern B. C.
i ncre has been considerable
activity manifested during the
fiast few days in the organizing of winter pursuits especially in behalf "of the boys of
the city. "Uudei- the auspices
of the Y.M.C.A., the Navy League and the High School various programs have been mapped out to provide recreation
and amusement for the boys
during their spare hours. The
desire behind such movements
is to eliminate as far as possible the so-called boy problem.
It would be well to realize,
however, at the outset, that no
matter how sincere and energetic the leaders of those move
ments may show themselves to
be, they can only be successful
and realize the ideal aimed at
as there is vigorous support
on the part of the homes from
which the young hopefuls
come. As a matter of fact, it
is quite apparent that there
would not be the same need for
these movements if the homes
In question were really functioning as they ought. The
tendency on the part of many
parents is to shift their responsibility on to the shoulders
of others. Arranging and planning for the play hours of a
boy is just as important as making provision for his bread and
butter and housing. Educationalists and psychologists
maintain, and without question, that the boy who knows
how to spend and use his play
hours will prove to be no problem when he arrives at manhood.
The committees and officers
in charge of these organizations should have, therefore,
the hearty support of the community as a whole. Such work,
while a pleasure, is needlessly
soon made a burden by the indifference or destructive cynical criticism of a few individuals. In giving their time
and effort such leaders have
no desire to relieve parents
and guardians of their peculiar
responsibility, but rather to
supplement the work of the
home in the general interest
of the child. That community
in which homes, schools and
welfare organizations work
hand in hand for the good of
the youth of the land will be
a healthy and desirable place in
which to live.
EE3
li*
EAL BANKING SERVICE
All branches of tbis Bank are in a position to
give the most comprehensive Banking service.
Government and Municipal Securities are
dealt in. Foreign Exchange bought and sold.
Money Orders and Letters of Credit issued.
Collections made on all points in Canada or
overseas. in
IMPERIAL BANK
OF CANADA
Cranbrook Branch,       •       •       •       W. R. Grubbe, Manager.
Sub*A|en-y at Klmb.il.y.
COMPARATIVE TACTICS
"Bowser!     Bowser!
Bow-
The Liberal Govern-
ser!! ,^^^^_^^_^^^^_
ment, from Premier Oliver and
his chief henchmen down to the
rank aud file of their supporters are harping on this oue
theme till the chorus has become a regular din. If Mr. Bowser's critics would devote a little more attention to an intelligent defence of their own policies, and a little -less to the personality of the leader of the
opposition, there might be a
less massive weight of public
opinion against Oliver et al., to
day. Vancouver has been the
centre of Mr. Bowser's activit
ies for the past seventeen years
or more, in a political way, aud
that city has not yet seen lit to
designate him as a back number.
The campaign methods of the
two parties stand out iu sharp
contrast. Those who listened
to Mr. Bowser during his address here will recall the un-
mistakeable absence of personalities from his remarks. Nor
has he elsewhere during his
campaign indulged in person
alities. There's a reason. It
is just as he says — he doesn't
have to. A strong case is invariably weakened by a descent
to personalities, and' Oliver &
Co. Beem utterly unable to grasp
the fact that to a knock-kneed
cause such a course is nothing
short of paralyzing.
Mr. Bowser is not making
any eleventh-hour electioneering promises. He stands by
the principles he has consistently advocated for the past
four years. But consistency is
a virtue that the Liberals can
uot lay very strong claim to.
COM.ERI.INO   CANADA
THE ACADIANS
Tho ciu-ly history of Ciinaclu contains no more touching an eulsodo
than tho story ot tho Acadlans of
Nova Scotia, and their exile from .ho
meadows ot Orand Pro, That story
wus Immortalized t>y the great poet,
l-ougfollow, in- his poem "Evangeline," the beautiful lines of which aro
known to nearly every school boy and
school girl. The poem Inspired thc
li-rcnch Canadian sculptor, Phlllippe
Hehort, to design the model of Evangeline "pleurant le pays perdu" looking back with tears on the land she
must leave, and in due time the Canadian Paeiflo Railway and the Dominion Atlantic Railway co-operated in
erecting a full-sled bronze statue
which Henri Kebert completed from
his father's (Phlllippe) model. The
Heberts were particularly interested
in the story of Evangeline, and tlie
AcadlanB, for they were themselves
descendents of the Louis Hebert who
came with Samuel Champlaln to Canada 300 years ago, and Bear river,
Nova Scotia, is generally understood
to be- a corruption of "Hebert" river,
where the family first settled.
The Acadlans are now scattered
over the continent, but they have a
link in the Societe de L'Assumptlon
which has about 70,000 members all
of whom must be of Acadian descent
und t'atUolic religion. The society
has 10 local brandies in New Brunswick, 52 in Nova Scotia, 7 In Prince
Edward Island, 2 in Montreal, 1 In
Ottawa, 12 in Massachusetts,' 5 in
Maine, 1 in New Hampshire and 1 in
Connecticut. There are 200.000 Acadlans in the Maritime provinces,
and about 50,000 in the province of
Quebec and the New England slates.
The Acadlans of North America are
found In the counties- of Inverness,
Cape Breton, Richmond, Antlgonish,
Cuysboro, Yarmouth and Dlgby, in Nova Scotia, with a sprinkling in the
counties ot Halifax and Cumberland
of the same province. In New Bruns
wick they are to be found in West-
njforland Kent, 'Northumberland,
Uloucester, Restigouch, Madawaska,
and a few In Victoria. They are also
quite numerous in the three counties
of Prince Edward Island. As to the
United States, apart from the state
of Louisiana, where they are In
large numbers, they are chiefly found
In the states of Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont,
Connecticut. As to tlte province of
Quebec, the descendents of the Acad
tans are to be found all over the
province, but in some places whole
parishes are of Acadian descent.
The natron day of the society Is
August 15, known as the Feast of
the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin.
The Acadlans of this Societe de
^'Assumption were anxious to still
further perpetuate the memory of Uie
old Acadian day and have subscribed
considerable sum to establish a
park at Orand Pre, Including the historic well associated with the story
of Evangeline, and the statue now
erected. A beautiful memorial chapel
is to bo erected from designs by an
Acadian architect, Mr. R. A. Frechet,
of Moncton, N.B., and a rustic fence
with Norman gateway has been built
around the park site, which has been
designed and laid out by Mr. Percy
Nohhs, of Montreal. ,
FEEM STUOMGLV ON
MISDEEDS Ol' OLIVER
GOVERNMENT UEUIMU
Contributor Thinks Kecord Is
Far From Such ns Ought to
Commend It To Electors
THERE IS ONLY ONE
GENUINE ASPIRIN
Only Tablets with "Bayer Cross"
are Aspirin—No others I
If you don't see the "Bayer Croat"
on the tablets, refuse them—they are
nut Aspirin at all.
Insist on genuine "Bayer Tableta of
Aspirin" plainly stamped with the safety
"Bayer Cross'—Aspirin prescribed by
physicians for nineteen years and proved
safe by millions for Headache, Tooth*
ache, Earache, Rheumatism, Lumbago,
Colds,   Neuritis,   and   Pain  generally.
Handy tin bozea of 12 tablets—also
larger "Bayer" packages. Made in
Canada.
Aspirin is the trad* mirk (registered
In Canada), of Bayer Manufacture of
Monoacetlcacideater of Saltcylicacld.
While It is well known that Aspirin
means Bayer manufacture, to aaaiat the
public against imitations, the Tablets of
Bayer Company, Ltd., will to stamped
with  their «Mml  Ua* mart, tts
(Contributed)
To lack Interest iu the forthcoming
election Ib to lack patriotism.
To read "The brief record of the Oliver Government" one would infer that
a moro conspicuous tmccess of a Legislature was never heard of, yet a
"brief" examination of the party bungling, now appealing to a long suffering
people for a repetition of the confidence placed in them over four years
ugo, reveals the most conspicuous example of incompetency, duplicity and
broken promises. Not a promise
made when appealing to tho country
has been fulfilled. Tlieir whole attack centred on the misrepresentation
of the former government, its libellous document entitled "The Crisis,'
concocted by a spy of the McBride Government and fathered by ministers
of the Gospel in Vancouver, of whom
since then two at least have left thc
country — served the purpose, for a
contradiction seldom, if ever overtakes
a lie. Taxes were to be reduced, instead the burden ls well nigh becoming intolerable. This financier Hart
gets special credit for borrowing money at a lower rate of interest than
former governments, to prove the credit of the party led today by Hon. John
Oliver. The deception lies in the
fact that tlie rate of exchange ircvail-
ing almost doubles tlie rate of interest
to be paid. The civil service was made
tlie nursery for party heelers, tinktrs,
tailors uud pluggers. These were given responsible positions at high salaries for their supposed activity lu
the int- rests of the party. At an enormous expense, accountants were Im-
j.orted to convict the McBride government of all sorts of speculation. After weeks strenuous toil the sum of
25 cents' discrepancy was uncovered:
A discarded .politician from Alberta
who ran in the interests ot tlte ..V*
conscription movement, was d'ought
in to flit one of the most important
ollices In the gift of the government.
The finances of the province were never in such p. hopeless muddle. Hart
ttnd his deputies are certainly "mixers and muddlers" of figures. Their
utter incompetency is a matter of
painful reflection to all men and woman in the country. And the sooner this Incubus is removed the sooner the country will be restored to its
former prosperity, and srved from Immediate disaster and bankrupcy. In
the despair of the Oliver government
to increase their funds, they have had
recourse to a page from the history
of the Lenine and Trostky scheme, the
Infidel Jews who have poor, benighted
Russian In their grip. They have an
nihflated Christianity and all that It
represents, but Oliver placed his dynamite under the churches and by a
heavy tax hns'striven to uproot the
only representative of law and civilization Iu existence. The joy riders,
the road superintendents, have claimed a large percentage of our finances.
Such wholesale extravagance should
receive the most complete defeat at
the polls on election day. The unspeakable farce of tiie attempted enforcement of the .prohibition law has
brought the province Into contempt,
and haB become a by-word all over tho
Dominion.    This has been emphatlc-
TWIITY TIABf A«t
Extract* from tht Cranbrook
Herald of thii date, 1900
Tho Quadrille club held a most enjoyable session at thee home of Mr,
and Mrs. McEachren last Tuesday
evening.
Jake Pink and C. Dow left Tuesday
eveninng for the Sand creek district.
They took enough hunting paraphernalia alone to bring back a whole herd
of deer.
Paul Rooke has been getting up In
the world the past week. He has
been assisting in attaching the electric light wires on the high poles
throughout the city. ,
The weather in this portion of south
East Kootenay has been almost perfect for the past month. There has
been little snow and each day hns
been warm and comfortable. There
is no doubt but that Cranbrook has
the finest eltaate in British Columbia,
a fact that tha people here tally ap-
i \ • J
ally a disgrace to the Attorney-General's Department. Th un < ■■
not (intio forgotten lie plugging op
orations in Vancouver In the inijic-- b
of the self-styled party of purity, but
moro tiuthfuliy designated as the "organized hypoorisy." Lot every voter
both man and woman on December
lst give such an overwhelming majority to Mr. T. Caven and iho party led
by Mr. W, J- Bowfer, so that the conditions arising during tho last four
years may never again bo attempted.
-lines very ci-
ch
erty
FBOM THE  VJKIV-l'OlNT OK
OUK (ONTEMl'OiUIIlKS
Doing Awny Willi Buffets
Fromior Oliver has Intimated that
ho is iu favor of doing away with the
presont 2 per cent buffots when lho
Government Control Act is put ill
forco. Tliis, wo bellovoi would ao-
couiplisli tho purpose of Mr, (Hlvor
very nicoly. "Honest John" claims
to bo a prohibitionist and as Btich
would probably dollglit In coining
out later with that woll-known classic: "I told you so." It would, without question he a great injustice to
Iho men who came iuto the city from
tho lumber camps to bo deprived ol
tho only club thut Is open to them.
Where could these men g.tther together for light refreshments and
social Intercourse if these places
were removed? It would menu that
thoy would he forced to their bedrooms, where probably four or five
would gather together, and as each
one would likely he entitled to n bottle of hard liquor, from tlie government store, it would mean that moro
time would ho taken up in drinking
than In conversation. If these buffets are to bo closed, then lirst some
means must be found for tho talcing
rare of the man from the bush, the
mines and the hills wlio has come
to town to spend a few hours or a
few days discussing the world's problems. If It is desired to wreck the
Government Control Act, then (nice
these men to the hard stuff.—Kamloops Standard-Sentinel.
No Promises from Premier
A year ago Premier Oliver told a
c'elegation from the municipalities
who were urging upon the Provincial administration that some of the
source? of revenue controlled by the
Oovernment should bo open lo thc
municipal corporations to meet their
pressing needs, that "Municipalities
must stew In their own juice." On
November 15th, he told a like municipal delegation that he could give
no promise of fintfnclal assistance'
that would afford relief to lhe overburdened taxpayers ln municipalities. The ground on which he took
the stand was thut he could not commit himself until he lmd consulted
his colleagues.
He did not even give an inkling of
what his personal attitude in the
matter was. He was content to let
the municipal administrators go hack
with the empty assertion that his
was no "one mau government," and
Insinuated that the delegation wiping upon him at tlu time had merely political significance.
But if Hon. John 0?:'ver is not
making promises to municipalities,
his lieutenant, Hon. Mr. Farris is,
and candidates in support of his government are—very large promises,
as to what support tho municipalities
may expect if the Oliver Government
is returned to power. Are these one
man promises? Tho people are entitled to know this.
The municipal taxation pr./itcm is
mer, la ■lutimat tl »
nected with the provincial admin.:;
tration. The present government
has dallied with the subject, and
even now will not faoe tho issue as
a ministry. But individual promises
aro bolng made. It is a way to fool
tho electors Into voting for Oliver
candidates. The people will not be
fooled. They have from the Conservative Party a definite promise of relief from municipal tax burdens.—
New WostuiIuster British Columbian.
LIT K It A It Y   MOTE
"Ih.mifson (smut" — New Can-
atlin ii Movul of thu Wi'st
Canada hnn gono forward amazingly in thn matter of becoming Bolt-supporting in Canadian novelB — u very
Important devoiopmenl in iho national growth, What people read del. r-
lulnos very largely what thoy think,
and It was a Horiou.i alluation when
a large portion of tho peoplo worn
reading what after all was foreign literature, and so developing a foreign
rather than a Canadian Viewpoint.
Perhaps no one has done moro to
bring Canadian literature to Canada
Ihat has Robert J. C. Stead, whoso
novels, "Tho Homesteaders" and "The
Cow Puncher" havo charmed and delighted everyone who has read them.
These books were not only written In
Canada; they were printed, bound and
published lu Canada. They havo helped to mark a sort of Canadian Declaration of Literary Independence, because in the past our Canadian authors — or a number ot them at least-
have beon carrying most of their
books to publishers in the United States.
Mr. Stead's new novel, "Dennison
Grant," a copy of which Is to hand, is
produced In Canada, pulished by the
Musson Book Co., Toronto ($1.75). It
is an absorbing story of the Canadian
West of today, and will undoubtedly
contribute still further to the author's growing popularity. Mr. Stead
never fails to charm and entertain the
reader, but he writes for more serious purposes as well, and in "Dennison Grant" one of the great problems
lying at the root of the world unrest
extant today — the ownership of money — becomes a theme of Intense Interest as about it circjes the destiny
of tlie hero and his two heroines,
That is as far as the curtain ought
to be lifted In a newspaper review.
Read "Dennison Grant" yourself and
learn what happened to him — and
to them.
ROBERT J.  C. STEAD,
well known Western Canadian Author, whose newest book, "Dennison Grant," has just appeared.
Is is reviewed elsewhere
in this lsBle.
— yourheadfcelslike
" ■■ basket of broken
■pic
Stomach or bowel disorder poisons the blood
%^W   and tm,s irritatea t1"
^t£Z0S    rest of the body.
targe-it Sato rf Any Medicine In lha World.
S*I4 •Ttrfffkn In Cmi.1i. In Loin, 2Sc, Sit*
OLD FBENCH-CANADIAN
CHANSONS COLLECTED
Ouuiiil and Attractive Volume
Roviyoa Melodies of Old
Colonist Times
Kro'ii piciiiit'K.im. Chateau Fronton-
;c, Quebec, lias como a book witli the
title ''chutiBonB of Old French Canada," lo IntrlgUfl Hiose Who delight in
rc.-iuscltalions of music left forgolton
In lho byways of oilier centuries. It
is a ii.i.iini aud atlraclively printed
volume wiili paper covors. Thn tit lo
page ox plains that accompaniments
art", by Margarot Gascotgoe, script by
James Kennedy and Ibe illustrations,
In oraugo nnd black, by ICihol Suith.
There Is n preface In which rejoicing
Is expressed that "In the desert Of American uniformity, the indent rural
districts of Quebec form u Quaint on?-
is whoro industrialism and cupid'tf
havo not yet withered all local color,
individual Idas or charm. Leisure and
gaiety have not altogether vanished.
Singing and story-tolling lu tho old
stylo still are casually engaged in."
An introduction it is, which Increases tho Interest with which the reader
will turn to lhe songs of love, of story, of labor, and of course, the canoeing songs for which the early Trench
Canadians were so famous, which follow. Here aro the titles of the airs,
all harmonized with tho utmost simplicity: "En Roulant ma Boule," "A la
Claire Fontaine." "Sur le Pont Avignon," "Mariana' s'en va-t-au Moulin,"
'La Fill'du Roi d'Espagne," "Hler,
mr lo Pont de Avignon," "Sur le Pont
de Nantes," "D'ou Viens-tu Bergere,"
'Dans les Prisons de Nantes," "Isa-
beau s'y Promene," "Salute Marguerite."'
Tho copyright for the little book Is
in tho name of th© Canadian Pacific
Railway.
THE WEATHER
Officials thermometer readings at
Cranbrook.
Max. Hia
November   17       46 26
November 18        44 26
November 19        43 26
November 20       42 27
November 21      35 25
November 22      43 27
November 23      42 27
/In Ulcer Lost
me 6 Months Patj
"Four years back," writes Mr. R,
Howard, of Bracebridge,Ont.,"a'scratch
on my It*g turned to an awful ulcer. It
took six months treatment io cure me
and all the while I was laid up, never
earning a cent." *
"Recently, an injury started inflammation and ulceration nn my other le^.
Knowing alum
! /..im-H.ii., li
owe*.
•er, this
time I acted
very difleren
tlv.
1 used
Zam-Buk alor
e, and not o
DIV   «
van the
nlceripi-etilijM ■
ih n nflhly hral
: t.ti.ln't
loMaday'iw rt<
Gel thiiKra i
and Stores. 60a i
V/I...W Coy
All 1
., "I'Ol
St
The Herald, $2.00 a Year
Subscribe Now and Send it to Your Friends Thursday, November SS, 1820
THB  CBANBBOOK  HEBALD
PACE THBBB
By Their Works—
d
-L
The Oliver Government has not a strong record of actual accomplishment behind it with which to appeal to the electors of the province.    Their poor record is also bolstered up by taking credit that does not belong to them.
What Legislation of Benefit to the Returned Soldier
has the Oliver Government ACTUALLY ORIGINATED?
THE PROVINCIAL DEPARTMENT OF INDU8TBIES DID NOT ORIGINATE WITH THB OLIVER GOVERNMENT. ITS ESTAB
LISHMENT FOLLOWED A REQUEST FROM A GROUP OF RETURNED MEN FROM VANCOUVER, WHO ASKED THAT HELP BE EXTENDED TO THEM ALONG THIS LINE.
THE RETURNED SOLDIERS' AI» COMMISSION AND THE "ASIA" SETTLEMENT SCHEME AS TRIED OUT AT CRESTON AND'
ON VANCOUVER ISLAND, DID NOT ORIGINATE WITH THE OLIVER GOVERNMENT. THEY WERE RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE
REHABILITATION COMMITTEE OF THE LEGISLATURE, AND FROM THE RETURNED MEN THEMSELVES.
THE HOUSING SCHEME DID NOT ORIGINATE WITH THE OLIVER GOVERNMENT, BUT WITH THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT.
THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT WAS ASKED MERELY TO ADMINISTER IT.
THE LAND SETTLEMENT BOARD IS NOT A NEW SCHEME ORIGINATED BY THE OLIVER GOVERNMENT. IT IS MERELY
AN INEFFICIENT AND FARCICAL SUBSTITUTION FOR THE FORMER CONSERVATIVE GOVERNMENT'S FARM LOAN SCHEME.
The liberals Are Claiming Credit for Legislation They Were
Forced Into by Public Opinion.
THE SOLDIERS JUDGE WHAT OLIVER HAS DONE FOR THEM.
NOT A SINGLE SOLDIER SETTLER WHO HAS GONE ON TO THE LAND UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT KNOWS YET DEFINITELY WHAT HIS LAND WILL COST HIM. AND HOW ABOUT THE LAND SETTLEMENT FIASCOS AT
KELOWNA AND FERNIE?
" ies
DURING THE PAST FOUR YEARS THE OLIVER GOVERNMENT HAS REPEATEDLY REFUSED TO EXTEND ANY RELIEF FROM
THE BURDEN OF LOCAL TAXATION TO CITIES AND MUNICIPALITIES. ONLY LAST WEEK PREMIER OLIVER SAID TO A DELEGATION AT VICTORIA THAT HE HAD NO PRESENT POLICY ON THE MATTER. (ABOUT THE SAME TIME IT WAS GIVEN OUT
THAT THE CITY OF VANCOUVER WOULD RECEIVE A GRANT OF $250,000, CONTINGENT, OF COURSE, UPON THE RETURN OF THE
LIBERAL GOVERNMENT TO POWER, A PROMI8E GIVEN APPARENTLY AS AN ELECTION BAIT, AND WITHOUT THE .SANCTION
OF THE PREMIER.)
MB. BOWSER, ON THE OTHER HAND, HAS A DEFINITE POLICY OF A FEB CAPITA REFUND FROM THE CONSOLIDATES BEY-
ENUEFUND FROM TAXES OBIGINATINO IN THE CITIES AND MUNICIPALITIES.
FINANCES
ji
■
"THE FROVINCE'8 CREDIT IS RUINED!" SO SAID. OLIVER IN 1916. SINCE THEN THE LIBERAL GOVERNMENT HAS
BEEN ABLE TO BORROW OVER $27,000,000. IF THE CREDIT OF THE PROVINCE WAS RUINED THEN, WHAT IS IT NOW? THE
DEBT OF THE PROVINCE HAS BEEN INCREASED BY $15,000,000, AND THE PER CAPITA DEBT OF EVERY MAN, WOMAN AND CHILD
IN THIS PROVINCE HAS BEEN INCREASED ACCORDINGLY. ONTARIO, WITH A POPULATION OF 2,500,000, PAYS FOR CIVIL GOVERNMENT ONLY ABOUT $180,000 MORE THAN B. C, WITH A POPULATION OF ONLY 450,000. QUEBEC, WITH A POPULATION OF
2,260,000, ACTUALLY PAYS FOR PROVINCIAL ADMINISTRATION $260,000 LESS THAN B.C., WITH ONLY ONE-FIFTH OF THE POPULATION. 26% OF THE ENTIRE REVENUE OF THE PROVINCE FOR THE PRESENT YEAR MUST GO FOR ADMINISTRATIVE I PURPOSES. THE OLIVER GOVERNMENT HAS BEEN RAISING LOANS IN THE UNITED STATES, TO BE REPAID IN AMERICAN FUNDS,
WHICH MEANS PLUS THE PREMIUM ON AMERICAN MONEY. THESE LOANS ACTUALLY COST THE PROVINCE ABOUT 9%%.
DO THESE THINGS INDICATE SOUND FINANCE?
t's Suffrage
THE FORMER GOVERN-
THE OLIVER GOVERNMENT SAYS IT HAS GIVEN WOMEN THE VOTE.      THIS IS NOT THE CASE.
MENT DREW UP THE ACT AND PUT THE PLEBISCITE TO THE PEOPLE IN 1916.
Government Control of Liquor
PREMIER OLIVER SAYS HE HAS AS YET NO POLICY ON THIS QUESTION, BUT HE DOES NOT DENY MR. BOWSER'S STATEMENT THAT AN ACT HAS ALREADY BEEN' DRAWN UP AND NOW RESTS IN THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. WILL
THE LIBERAL GOVERNMENT BE ABLE TO ENFORCE A GOVERNMENT CONTROL MEASURE ANY BETTER THAN THEY DID THE
PROHIBITION ACT?        WHAT IS THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL'S RECORD IN THE MATTER OF LAW ENFORCEMENT?
MR. BOWSEH, ON THE OTHER HAND, HAS SAID THAT A CONSERVATIVE GOVERNMENT WILL BBING IN A SANE AND SAFE
MEASURE THAT WILL BE ENFOBCED.      WHOM WOULD YOU BATHER ENTRUST LIQUOR LAW ENFORCEMENT WITH!
THESE ARE REAL FACTS
A Vote for CAVEN Means a Vote for a Better
Business Administration PA8B rOVB
THE  CBANBBOOK  HEBALD
Thursday, November 35, 1930
.i!iii!i.i.;i...i;;:!..Lt.;.
MACDONALD'S
Cut Brier
More Tobacco for the Money
imiiiimiiiiiiimii
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
of Canada Limited
Offices, Smelting and Refining Department
TRAIL, BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS     AND     REFINERS
Purchasers of Gold, Silver, Copper and Lead Ores
Producers of Gold, Silver, Copper, Bluestone, Pig Lead and
lime "TADANAC Brand.
A Pleasant Drink
FERNIE BEER Is the best beverage made, for business
professional men, for weak persons, everybody,
everywhere, this beer Ib hale refreshment for wholesome thirst
THE ELITE IN BEER — 'NUFF SAID.
Fernie-Fort Steele Brewing   Co.
WALTER HARWOOD    -    Manager    -    FERNIE, B.C.
•/ttetijoDtgt CJmrcJ)
BY-ELECTION RESULT
ANXIOUSLY AWAITED
SUNDAY NEXT
11 a.m. — Divine Service.
12 noon. — School Session.
7.30 p.m. — Sacred Cantata, "The Good Shepherd."
— A hearty invitation to all —
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
|   DR.W.A.FEBGIE
I DENTIST
1 Campbell-]
a.
f
Offlce llonrs, i
LODGES AND SOCIETIES
Drs. Green & MacKinnon
PhjilckM and Surgeons
Offlce at residence. Armstrong
Avenue
OFFICE HOURS
Forenoons   S.00 to 10.00
Afternoons  1.00 to   4.00
Evenings  7.30 to   8.10
Sundays   2.30 to   4.30
CRANBROOK, B. C.
DR. F. B. MILES
DENTIST
Offlce tn Hanson Block
OFFICE HOURS
• to 11. a.m.
1 to   6 p.m.
ORANBROOK, B.C.
ROWLAND  KING
MINING! ENGINEER
Vice-President
The O. M. Fanett Oo., Inc.
Engineers, Metallurgist
Chemists, Asiayers
Laboratory Supplies
■07-MM11-11I Wall Street
SPOKANE, WASHINGTON
F. H. MACPHEBSON
Undertaker
Pkose IM
Wmttntj Ave, ml te Olty HaU
CRANBROOK
FARMERS' INSTITUTE
Regular Meeting
SECOND  SATURDAI of each
month nt t p.m. In the City Hall
WOMEN'S INSTITUTE
HIH MeetB  fn   tlie
Parish Hall
first Tuesday
afternoon of
every month
at 3 p.m.
Pres. Mrs. B.
H. Leaman
Secy, Mn. J. W. Burton, P. O. Boi 031
All ladles cordially Invited.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Cnuhreek, B, C.
Meet* every Tuesday at I p.m. In
the Fraternity Ball
O. O. Borf strom, c. C.
a B. Collins. K. R. A 8.
Visiting brethren cordially Invited ta attend.
I.O.O.F.
KEY CITY LODGE, No. 48
Meeta   every
Monday night
 at Fraternity
Hall.     Sojourning   Oddfellows
cordially Invited.
Noble Orand,        Bee. See.,
J. H. Cameron       W. M. Harris
„-jwllily
medldtac for all Vssaslt Complaint. *fi u uu*.
or three for (10, ni drug Btorei. MAllefl toony
adtlre.s <>n rcoelj.l of jirli-i- THO Rcnlii'i.i. ftmib
Co., St. CiillinrliicN. Onlnriii.
PH0SPH0N0L FOR MEN^'ni:^'
tor N*rve nnd Hrnln; .iinriiscH "nicy iimller ;
■ ToulC'- will build you lip. 18a ■ >«.<. M two for
ft ntdniK'-ttnei .11 l>y innlloii rm'l[it of iirkt.
TNM Boobet.i. DlUOCo.. Bt. Gittiuf lin■*. OnWlri
«k * Dmg O*
OPERATIONS
UNNECESSARY
HBPATOLA removei Gall Stonw
corrects Appendicitis In 24 hourg
without pain. Registered under
Pun Food And Drug Act $6.00
Bole Manufacturer
MRS.   GEO.   8.   ALMAS
Bex 1071 IM 4tk Are. B.
(Continued from Page One)
dition to thnt the huge patronngo in
tlie gift of the Washington government helped to keep the Democrat
organization together. But in spite
of all these influences, tho people
went their own way. Even tho solid
South is no more, In the old sense.
It was something more than a victory for the Republican party. Indeed, the Republicans, though overwhelmingly victorious, rather fear
the result, knowing how badly party
lines have been smashed.
The Democratic party having been
ho badly defeated, there Is a widespread impression that it will pretty
much disappear, in the sense that it
has been known. There is much to
be said for this view. Many of the
elements that formerly stood by this
party have now gone beyond it to
the extent that they now bitterly oppose it. These elements will not go
back to it but will undoubtedly endeavor to form a new alignment
composed of Farmers, Labor and
persons of advanced Ideas generally.
lt looks vety much ay though the
Republicans had won too sweeping
a victory for their own good. Having so completely wiped out the
Democrats they have now cleared tbe
way for more radical element-.*. As
the Republicans cannot hope to bold
all those who voted with them, there
will be quite a breaking away within the next four years and those who
wander off will join the opposition.
So it is a fairly safe prediction that
lin 1924 there will be a utand up
I fight between the reactionists-, and
the progressipes or radicals.
' gome profess to think tbat the
| protectionists, having triumphed ro
easily in the -J.iit.ed States, will
sweep things in this country at the
next general election. It is impossible, at this date, to say what may
happen, but the Farmers are a force
to bo reckoned with in thia country,
whereas in the presidential eltcijon
they were not a factor save in a few
states. Aa a matter of fact, if the
Farmers have done nothing else.they
liavo succeeded lu checklm? the demand for a higher tariff. Indeed,
thoso who strongly advocate protection are at pains to make it plain,
ihat they do not intend to increase
the tariff. In the United States the,
poople practically said "You may doj
what you like with the tariff," Not
ho lu this country. The tariff will
uot be raised, if for no other reason
than that both sides are bidding
strongly for western suport.
Another lesson to be learned rrom
iho presidential elections ls tbat the
electorate are not much concerned
over abstract questions. This explains why the League of Nations
failed to receive more support. It is
idlo to suy that, as regards this issue, the electors were Ill-informed
and misled. It will be readily admitted that there is no electorate In
the world more intelligent than that
of the United States, and lt Is doubtful whother there is any possessing
a more highly developed conception of what is right. Hut what was
done to the League of Nations -bbuo
It is sad to contemplate. It will not
dn to say that the Americans did uot
understand the Issue. They did. No
other people hns given anything like
tho amount of study to the subject
that they have, and the more they
thought on It the more were they
disinclined to go in on lt. Not tlmt
thoy are opposed to "a workable ir-
rangement for the preserving oi tho
peace of the world; but they have
no use for the League as set foith
in the treaty at Versailles.
In this country there is an Inclination quite generally to plume ourselves on the fact that the League of
ijNations was swallowed practically
without discussion. The debate ln
the Commons was a mere pretence.
Tho average member did not profess
to -understand the treaty. He was
Inlil that It was ail right; that everyone was getting ln on It; and that If
he did not want to be looked on as
;l KUsplclouB character, ho had better
do the sumo. This waB enough; Iti
could not be swallowed too quickly.
It la aometlmea aald that Uw Unit--1
ed States is like a child ln international politics. Truo, tho Republic;
bas had little experience in tbat
sphere, insofar as big events are concerned, but in stepping warily it is
exhibiting much wisdom. Its disinclination to rush hastily into this
uncertain field will save lt from
many snares, to say nothing of the
saving In treasure and lives. The
principle of following whither voices
which som-*1 call duty, fate or deB-
tiny, seem to.cull, is disastrous. The
idea of a greal republic accepting
tlie say-so of ono man, or of a small
group of men, for that matter, on
such un import ant matter, ls not
democratic.
This brings ono to tho conclusion
that if Canada is to safeguard her
Interests adequately sho muHt insist
on ull matters rotating to external
affairs bolus discussed nml dm.liled
on tbo Hour of Parliament. To nay
nothing of other matters, lt Is impossible to keep taxation within limits
If a few mon commit lho country to
expensive undertakings, And in
this connection it mny lie mild thai
lho idea 'of making parliament, a
mere ratifying body of what, an imperial council does lu equally undesirable.
Thoro is'some apprehension over
tlie possible action of the Harding
administration on tho tariff. If it
puts up the bars on wheat, cattlo
aud other farm products, lt will do
the Canadian farmer much damage.
Some dismiss this lightly with the
assurance that a ready market may
be secured lu the United Kingdom
and Europe generally for all our pro
ducts; but tbis ls a mistake. For
one is inclined to the view that Uncle
as lt is today, no other market is
nearly so profitable as tbat in the
United States, tbe premium on Am
ercian funds being ten per cent. Ou
the otlier hand, the currency of the
United Kingdom and of most other
European countries ls so depreciated
—for which reason the cost of every
thing they buy from us becomes so
high—that they cannot afford to
take anything more than they cannot absolutely do without. Where
would Canadian wheat be sold today if not in the United States'
But this seems to be borrowing
trouble. If the United States shuts
out Canadian products It will, soon
find that that policy works both
ways. The United States sells to
Canada over $900,000,000 worth of
commodities a year, while Canada
sells to the United States only a little
over $500,000,000 worth. So if a
tariff war starts the United States
in dollars and cents has a great deal
more to lose than has Canada. So
one is inclined to the view that Uncle
Sam, who knows full well the value
of a good customer, will think twice
before he offends Canada.
ICE FORMED ON LAKE
WINRERMERi; DURING
RECENT COLD SNAP
Picturesque   Sheet   of   Water
First Discovered Over One*
Hundred Yenrs Ago
SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL
COURSES OFFERED
VETERANS BY Y.M.C.A,
Facilities Offered by National
Council for Supplementing
Work Under Oovernment
Any veteran who wants a course of
instruction along some line which he
has not beun able to get through the
S. C. R., or who may wish to supplement the instruction he haa already
received by further study, may do so
through an arrangement with the National Council, Y.M.C.A., which bat
set aside a sum of money to provide
this opportunity for returned men. It
a returned man wishes to take any ot
the educational classes at any Y.M.
C.A., the National Council will pay all
his fees. All he is required to do la
to pay 26% of the fees when he enrolls as an evidence of good faith and
determination, which sum will be refunded to him when he completes 75%
of the course.
If he should want to take a course
not provided by a local Y.M.CA., or
if it Is not convenient for him to attend these classes, he can take a correspondence course with the United
V.M.C.A. schools on any subject he
may desire, and tlie National Council
Y.M.C.A. will pay 76% of his fees.
These courses are the equal of any,
and Inasmuch as they are not conducted for profit, are cheaper than
others. Thero are scores of courses offered, some of the chief departments being commerce, mathematics,
engineering, electricity, drawing, agriculture, und all general cultural
subjects.
Tlie fund available for this educational service to returned men Is comparatively small considering tbe number of men who might take the opportunely offered. It ls therefore Important that those who wish to take
it up should do so promptly.
Storm Sash
StormDoors
Order your Storm
Sash and Doors
NOW
CRANBROOK
SASH & DOOR CO.,
Telephone «5 Ltd.
Lunber * BiMliff Material
PRODUCTION OF GOLD
IN B. C. FOR PRESENT
YEAR SHOWS DECLINE
(Special to tlie Herald)
Invermere, B.C., Nov, 20.—Ice has
formed for, the first time this season
on Lake Windermere. As this lako
forms one of the main1 sources of the
Columbia River, being rigrl near to
the start of the great stream, tho conditions which govern this natural phe-
nonemon may make rather Interesting
reading. It is a body (if water approximately eight miles In length nnd of
a menu breadth of a llttlo over a mile
and ono half, lin broadest portion being possibly three miles Its elevation
is given as 2G.I0 feet, lis location Is
between the Roelty Mountain range
and that of tho i'nirell, morn com-
niniiiy known as a branch of tin Sel<
kirk mountains. It was first dlscov
ered nnd explored by David Thompson, tho astronomer anil explorer of
tho North West Trailing Company,
who readied it In July, 1807, after an
arduous passage from tho north up
the main river. It is of shallow
depth, but very beautiful in appearance. It is interesting to note by the]
diary of Thompson, ovor a hundred:
years old, that climatic conditions
then were not quite what they aro today, for he says:
"January 9th, 1808.—Took the small
wooden canoe today and paddled up to
the small lake to shoot ducks. These
lakes never freeze over."
The small lake to which lie makes
reference is a smaller body still than
Lake Windermere, and lies between it
and what is now Columbia Lake, the
three forming the original sources of
the river. The waters of Windermere
Lako are still very warm, as is evidenced by the fact that the river in its
course does not freeze over for many
miles after leaving the fountain head,
■irrespective of the fact that the temperature is sometimes lowered to 35
degrees below zero.
A broken record kept of when Lake
Windermere was first frozeo over during the period of 17 years shows the
following: In 1903 15th November:
1904 Sth December: 1907 26th November; 1908 16th November: 1912 25th
November; 1913 17th November; 1914
16th November; 1915 13th November;
1916 llth November; 1917 4th December. 1918 24th November; 1919 5th November; 1920 10th November.
During the winter period the ice
forms first as a glare sheet and continues so for about one month, when
it becomes covered with snow, and by
the close of winter has attained a
depth of nearly three feet. By early
(spring the snow has again gone leaving glare ice, which allows for two
periods of excellent skating or ice
boating.
Eastern Production, However-,
Seems to Show Correspond"
Ing Increase In Value
Vancouver. — A clean-up shipment
from tlie Dominion of Canada Assay
Ofllce here of fifty gold bars, valued
at over 1500,000 has been made to Ottawa this month.
The season of 1920 has been very
unsatisfactory in the gold mining industry In both British Columbia and
the Yukon. Tho shortage of water
Interfered seriously with dredging op-
efatlonS, and tbo high cost of onernt-
Jng has adversely affected all mining,
both lmlo and placer.
The shutting down of the Hedley
gold mines recently Is a serious plow
io tliu lodo gold mining.
Russian.! has resumed mining and
shipments from Trait are arriving In
Vancouvor again, but tho long shutdown »f tho province's premier gold
rani,], has had Its share In tho drop
of golil production. Tho new lode
mines, like tho Premer, which will
bo important producers ultlmutt ly,
liavo not mado any appreciable addition to the ounces of bullion obtained
this year.
The dwindling .gold production in
B.C. is in marked contrast to the heavy increase in eastern camps. Por
the past six months of this year the
gold production of Ontario was the
highest on record. The increase was
over 22 .per cent, over the best previous year. The efTect of this will
be to practically balance the falling
off in Canadian gold production Injhe
west.
As it is, Canada is doing much better than the United States. The
U.S. gold production has dropped by
50 per cent, in the past three years,
and fs now only $50,000,000 a year,
Canada's production should be close
to $20,000,000 tbis year. The great
bulk of this is from Ontario, and over {5.000,000 will be from the Holllnger Mine alone, at Tlmmins, Ontario.
K. C. LODGE ORGANIZED
AT FERNIE LAST WEEK
The institution of a Knights of Columbus Council in Fernie on Sunday,
November 13, drew a large and representative crowd of visitors to the
city, says the Fernie Free Press. In
all there were one hundred and fifty
men at the gathering, und there were
54 candidates initiated.
The team work was performed by
teams from Cranbrook, Nelson and
Victoria. Mass was celebrated at
8.30 in the morning, and Rev. Father
Carroll, of Qonzaga College] Spokane,
addressed tho attendants. Tho degree
work was startod at 10.30 In Victoria
Hall, and there being so many candidates to Initiate It took all tho tmo available for the purpose to enable the
workers to complete their task before
tlie Imnqmt, which was given in lhe
Cutholc li'lnb by the lml cul of the Catholic Club, and which was tho crowning effort of those ladles.
J. F. Gulmont, of Cranbrook, acted
as loastnuister, and R. J. Collins,
Grand Knight of Cranbrook, responded to the toast to "Tho Now Council."
Aiming others present from Cranbrook wae Uev. Father Murphy, and
Rov. Father DOB Marias, of St. Eugene
Mission.
REORGANIZE BRANCH
OF NAVY LEAGUE IN
WINDERMERE DISTRICT
(Special to the Herald)
Invermere, B.C., Nov. 20. — By the
medium of Lieut. H. F. Heimsing, R,
N.V.R.. of Victoria, Secretary-Treasurer of the Navy League of Canada
for the B?C. Division, the Lake Windermere branch was reorganized recently, with Lieut.-Commander J. C.
Powles as president; R. Randolph
Bruce, C.E., F.R.G.S., as Vice-President, and Flight Commander Arnold
H. Sandwell, R.N., as secretary-treasurer, backed by a strong executive
committee.
During his visit here Lieutenant H
F. Heimsing also visited the various
public schools of the district and or
ganized competitive examinations be-
CATTLE SHIPMENTS
FROM WINDERMERE
ARE COMMENCING
(Special to the Herald)
Invermere. B.C., Nov. 20. — Cattle
shipments for the season from this
district are commencing. Owing to
continued low quotations from the
Calgary warket, some of the more important shippers are combining with
others a little to the south to make a
trial shipment of prime steers from
the isnge to the market in Spokane,
where prices offering are more alluring, and where the payment will he
made in United States funds, which at
present quotations here brings a high
premium, and adds to the possible
returns from the sales.- The Spokane market can be reached from here
within say thirty hours from the time
of starting, going out by way of the
Lake Windermere branch of the C.P.
R., over the Crow's Nest Pass branch
through Cranbrook, and then on to
Spokane by the Soo-Spokane or the
International. The shipment being a
large one, every effort will be1 made to
run it through on record time, and
the results will be watched with Interest. Another shipment of what may
probably be not quite such prime beef
will ba made In a day or two to Calgary by way of the north and the
main line.
tween the scholars on the writing of
an essay in the child's own language,
Getting out the importune; of the navy and marine on tha seas. Three
prizes are to be nwarcit-u to scholars
winning tn each of 'the various
schools.
fe+lMMm+eMmtm***
When all is said
and done-
VIIEN THE LAST IMPASSIONED WORDS OF ORATORY FLUNG
FROM THE ROSTRUM HAVE CEASED TO ECHO FROM THE WALLS
OF MEETING-HOUSE AND HALL — WHEN ALL CRITICISM OF THE
PRESENT LIBERAL ADMINISTRATION HAS BEEN MADE — WHEN
ALL PROMISES OF THE OPPOSITION CANDIDATES HAVE BEEN
SOLEMNLY AVOWED —
You cannot overcome
{ nor deny the solid
fact that-
T1IE OUVI.Il GOVERNMENT HAS GIVEN BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOUR YEARS OF THE SAFEST, SANEST, MOST EFFICIENT BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION THE PROVINCE HAS EVER HAD.
It will be in your
best interests to vote
for all Liberal Candidates
on December ist.
1 Thursday, November 25, 1820
THB     CBANBBOOK     HBBAIiD
PAGE      PITS
!     >
'..*-
1'
h
They were worn by our soldiers "Overseas"—gave perfect satisfaction under
the hard test of military service—
long marches—all weathers—constant
service.
Wilt Outwear Won't "draw" the feet into rubber
ii Leather Sold lolte—enahle you to stand continuously
or walk constantly without getting tired—put spring tn
your Stop— glv« action te yeur movements—tuko all the
"Jar" out   of   walking.
Popular Wiih Ladiei— just tht thing for British Co-
Indispensable for Men   lumhia winter wpar—will keep
your fi>ot porfoolly dry—iave you a coiiBtmit bill for overall non.
On Stile at Leading Shoe and Repair Shops
Qui-.:'.**'  tttMWhXaslst  oa  having   th«m
Prices I Men's \lm\-r, li.asi Man'a l.lRht. si.go; i.iuiIgk'. ii.m,
bOo Extra  for  AUni-.i.-iB
0. W. OOrP * 00., flnla DlHtrlhulnri for It.  C. 123  Homer  St..
Vafteou ver.
If your dcalur can't supply you, Craw an outline nf  the aola and
lt.>rl   of   your  ahoa  on   papar and antirl It with order.
3BB
Quaker
Brand Jam
is Lovely
It has the flavor and richness of
berrieB fresh from the fields — the
same flavor that made grandmother's
Jam taste so good to youngsters.
We follow the same recipe she did,
even to cooking lt In small kettles.
YOUR GROCER HAS IT
Dominion C«»«ri B. ft, LU-,
H«< *>■<•■
Vmooitw, B. 0.
*>
When ln  Spokane Make
It the
Hotel
Coeur
d'Alene
The Hotel With • Perten-
•lit-/.
Convenient lo Bverj-thlnf
Verj Itolerate Batei
m
cbihbbooi ctmaa
■osniii
Trltttt lentaf ■•■•
Utnttt tr TrttmstM fttrrA,
■al.nltj Hi mtmuii tmrmmt
stu,,p .tt Rett CU*. sVtMtt
Rsfem-ws, ttmt mtAtmA
Apply Mn. A. Onwfcrt. msTstmm
pi;.. II. PO.-NB*
IMrw. Strtn A«e.
1UNEUAL ACT
(Form r.)
certificate of improvbmnts
NOTICE.
"Btttjr Fr.", "Seaton Fr.", "Bobut
c. Fr.", "L111I.", "Yprw", "Oram",
"Vlmy", "Hoots", "Loe™", "Msnln
Fr.", "Rouler. Fr.", "Amu I*.",
"W«tau Fr.", "Plummer Fr.", "Per-
siting Fr.", "Foch", "Halt", "Petal*",
"Bjrni", "J««i.» Fr." "Iran* Fr.",
"Eileen Fr.", "Red Devil", "Roaring
Bill", "Norman", "Douglat", "Mil-
dred", "Lake Fi", "Millar", "Rowland", "Summit", "Momnlto", "J.
T. A.", "Enoofh".
Mineral Claims situate tn the Fort
Steele Mining Division of Kootenay
Dletrict.
Where located:-—
On Sullivan Hill, at Klmberley, BO.
TAKE NOTICE tbat B. O. Montgomery, F.M.O. IMM-O, acting aa
Agent (or the Oonaolldated Mblng
and Smelting Company of Canada,
Limited, Free Miner's CertUlcate No.
17500-C, Intends eftzy days from tba
date hereof to apply to the Mining
Kecorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for thi purpose et obtaining
a Crown Grant of the above claim..
And farther take notice that action,
under eecllon 17, must be commenced
before th. Issuance ot such Certificate
of Improvement..
Dated thi. fourth day of October, A.
D., lite.
•-7-1N
Frame-i Bread It GOOD
Hii Flea, Cakes and Pastry are
made In a tasty manner which
Invito th. moat electing person to call again, at
THE HOKE BAKER!
Tbeee 87      .      Nerbary Ave.
MONUMENTS
Ieeteney Oreille A Mon-
BBMtel C«, I'M.
Oeaeral Men Contraeter. aad
MoaaiHoUl Worke
rwtrtmMtsttm  p.o.he>W
CHAS. S. PARKER
Forwarding and Distributing
Agent for
LetMrUgo ail ereeeUU Ceal
Imperial On Co.
Dttributlon  Oare  a  Bpeolelty.
Bra/lBf nni Trnniferrlnf
Blven Prompt Attention.
::   F-ooeM   ::
CANADIAN
Pacific
lltAMlllUOK TRAIN TIBKS
NO. 17 IIAII.T—To Neleon, Vinton*
ver, Spokane, etc.   Arrive II.M p.
in.; leave 12.20 p.m.
NO.   18   KAILY-To   !"ernlo,   Lett*
bridge, Medicine Hat, Calgary, ite.
Arrive 4.10 p.m.; leave 4.11 p.m.
Granbroek, Fernle, Lethbrldge, Card.
•Ion Service.
NO. M—Leave 6.46 e.m.; NO. IJ—
arrive 8.30 p.m. Connection el
Macjeod to and from Calgsry; connection at Lethbrldge to and from
Medicine Hat
Cranbrook, WveUtfe, Klmberley Ser-
vleet
NO. 888-Leave 7.05 a.m.; NO. Sft-
arrlve 1.10 p.m.
Cranbrook, Lake Windermere nl
Golden Serin*.
Monday and Thursday, eecb week
—NO. 811, leave I a.m     Wednesday
and   Saturday—NO. SN. arrive   1.31
».m.
For further parttoelan apply to
any ticket egent,
J. B. PROCTOR,
Dletrict Peeaenger Agent, "ilprT
NELSON BUSINESS COLLEGE
DAT AND NIGHT CUtSSW
A complete rearee In Shorthand,   Typewriting,   Bookkeeping •B(1 I >H till Willi p, ueder tho
talUon of a practical teat'hlag
aUtt.
For particulars, apply
C. W. TVLKR, Principal,
Box 14, Nolaon, B.C.
PARSONS'CHANCES
LOOK OOOD AT SOUTH
KM) COLUMBIA BIDING
(Special to the Herald)
Invermere. B.C., Nov. 20.— Great
latere*:, is teiti*: manifested through-
out mis part of the Columbia riding
over tho coming electlflh of a rel*e-
sontatlve from this part tn the provincial house. It is hard to forecast
how tho free and enlightened electorate may go, but judging by records
of past performances ln the house and
in tho field, the chances seem strony
for H. G. Parsons, tlie Conservative
candidate, winning out. He has a
record of two past sessions, and can
look back with great pride to the substantial roads especially, which were
hullt by the Dejwrtnient of public
works during his terms of office.
Invormora, B.C., Not. 18. — Con-
..(■rvutlvu delegates from Windermere,
Wilmer, Spilliniachene, Radium Hot
Springs r.nd Athalmer united with local representatives at a meeting today and formed a central association,
whero they were addressed by II. G.
Parsons, candidate for Columbia rld-
1ns,' In the Conservative interests, who
after explaining fully his platform,
was plodged unanimous support. His
candidature here la much stronger
and ho ls lookerd upon as a sure winner.
WHO'S WHO IN THE
ELECTION NEXT WEEKl
LIST OE CANDIDATES
Following is a revised list of candidates nominated throughout B.C. for
the election December lst:
Alborni—Liberal, H. Lungli. Independent, K. J. Burde, M.C. Sol.
uu.r-i'minor, Brig. lien. Muney.
Atlin—Liberal, Bert Kergln. Conservative, Capt. W. C. Ross, M.C. Independent, O. B. Bush. Labor, Patriot. Daly. Labor, T. Armour. Fed"
erated Labor, Geo. Casey.
Cariboo—Liberal, John M. Yorst-
Conservative, James A. Fraser.
Independent, J. P. McConnell.
Columbia—Liberal, J. A. Buckham. Conservative, H. O. Parson.
Farmer, F. L. Mitchell.
Cliilllwack— Liberal, Hon. E. D.
Barrow. Conservative, Col. A. L.
Coote.
C'oinox—Liberal, Hugh Stewart
Conservative, W. E. Anderson. Independents, W. W. B. Mclnnes, J. T.
Smith. Peoples, Rer. W. Mensies.
Cowlchan—Conservative, G. A.
Cheeke. Independent, Kenneth Duncan.
Cranbrook—Liberal, Hon. J. H
King. Conservative, Thomas D. Car-
en.
Delia—Liberal, Hon. John Oliver.
Conservative, F. J. A. Mackenzie
Farmer, R. A. Payno.
Dowdney—Liberal, Major D. B.
Martyn. Conservative, J. A. Cather-
wood. Federated Labor, Dr. W. J,
Currie.
fcNijuJmali—Liberal, H. G. Helgjos-
consorvative,    it.    H.    1'ooiey
independent, Capt. B. J. Uadsdon.
■Fernle—Liberal, Alex 1. Fisher.
Conservative, L. S. K. Herchmer.
.Labor, i nomas Uphill.
i on titurge—Liberal, H. G. Perry*
Conservative, S. Cocker. Federated
Labor, J. Mclnnes.
urand Forks—Liberal, E. C. Hon-
niger.    Conservative, John McKio.
orocnwootl—Liberal, Hon. J. D
MacLeau. Conservative, John It.
Jackson.    Farmer, Geo. H, Pitman.
The Islands—Liberal, M. B. Jack-
eon. Conservative, George Clark.
iuuepeudeni, Col. Lewis Carey.
Kamloops—Liberal, Fred W. Anderson,    conservative, S. C. Burton.
Kaslo—Liberal, Hon. John Keen.
Conservative, Colonel Fred Lister.
LlUoot—Liberal, J. B. Bryson.
Conservative, Arch. Macdonald.
Nanaimo—Liberal, Hon. Wm.
Sloan. Conservative, Capt. Gilchrist
Labor, T. D. Barnard.
Nelson—Liberal, James O Shea.
Conservative, Dr. W. (J. Rose.
Newcastle— Liberal-Conservative
\V. Fraser. Socialist, Sam Uutbrle.
Socialist, J. H. Haw thorn th wai te.
Soldier, John Dickie.
New Westminster—Liberal, David
\\ hiteside. Conservative, Aid. W
Gitiord.    1-idependeut, W. J. Sloac.
North Oiiiimigan Llbt-in. K. C.
Macdonala. Jarmer, W. F. Laid-
mail.
North Vancouver— Liberal, Ben
Chubb. Conservative, V. V. Vinson
independents, Geo. S. Hanes, James
Orchard.
Umiueca—Liberal, A. M. Manson.
Conservative, Capt. Geo. Murray
Independents, J. A. Prudhomme, J
S. Keely, T. McKay.
Prince Rupert—Liberal, Hon. T.
D. Pattullo. Conservative, Captain
George Formby. Independent, S. W.
Newton. Socialist, J. H. Burrough.
ltovelstoke— Liberal, Dr. W. H.
Sutherland, olected by acclamation.
Richmond— Liberal, H. P. Mc-
Cranoy. Conservative, Reeve T.
Pearson. Independents, R, C. Abbott, Robt. McBride. Federated Labor, C. S. Cassldy.
Hossland—Liberal, J. A. McLeod.
Conservative, William K. Esllug,
Farmer-Labor,  George Dingwall.
Naanlch—Liberal, F. A. Pauline.
Conservative, M. P. Gordon. Boi-
dier-Labor, Capt. M, A. Orford.
Nimilkameen — Liberal, B. J.
Chambers. Conservative, W. A.
MacKenzIe.
Slocan - Liberal, Charles F. Nelson. Conservative, William Hunter.
Mouth OkanaKan—Liberal, L. V.
Rogers. Conservative, J. W. Jones.
Mouth Vancouver—Liberal, Frank
Russell. Conservative, F. O. Hodgson. Independent, Col. J. W. Mc-
IntoBh.    Labor, R. H. Neelands.
Trail—Liberal, J. S. Headlamps.
Conservative, James II. Schofleld.
Vancouver—Liberals, Hon. J. W.
dell. Ferris, M. A. Macdonald. Mrs.
Ralph Smith. Capt. Ian Mackenste,
Aid. James Ramsay, James P. Dougherty.
Conservatives—W. J. Bowser, K.
0„ S. L. Howe, Miss E. L. Peterson,
Dr. J. W. Mahan, Capt. Geo. Black,
Lt.-Col. J. W. Warden.
Independents—Mrs. E. Crossfleld,
Joseph Martin, Major T. B. Thomas,
G. J. Ashworth, W, O. Black, MoseB
W. Cotsworth.
Socialists—J. Harrington, J. Smith,
C. Stephenson, 8. Earp, W. McQuold,
J. Dennis
United Veterans—Perclval North.
Federated Labor Party—Thomas
Richardson, J. S. Woodsworth, W. R.
Trotter.
Victoria—Liberal, Hon. John Oliver, Hon. John Hart, Henry C. Hall,
J. B. Clearlbue.
Con sorviitivo—Canon Hlnchcllffe,
R. Ross Sutherland, W. W. North-
cott, Alexander Stewart.
Independent—J. Heddon Gillespie,
Dr. Ernest Hall, Francis O. Gllmoa,
Herbert W. Davles, Georgo Bell.
Soldier-Labor—R. P. McLernan,
C. K. Christian, James Dakers, Thos.
Donley.
Federated Labor Party—John D,
Macdonld, W. E. Pierce.
Yale—Liberal, J. R. Cameron.
Conservative, J. McRae. Independent-Liberal, J. Walters.
CORRESPONDENCE
THE SEEING EYE
Principal Reynolds of the Ontario
Agricultural College thus delivers
himself in the Agricultural Gazette of
anada:
The teacher who hopes to take a
right place in the life of the country
school district must cultivate the seeing eyo and the understanding heart
for persons and things rural. The
usual pOipular molodrama, comic
supplement, moving picture conception of the farmer and of country people must be forgotten. It is essentially and perniciously false. The farmer
ls something of a humorist., and takes
delight in deceiving the simple-minded by a somewhat unfinished exterior. The city-bred person makes the
fatal mistake by judging by outside
appearances. To the city-trained eye
there are two classes of persons, one
wearing overalls and the other wearing white collars. The former class
work with their hands. The latter
class work with their brains. That Is
the superficial judgment, which Ignores tho fact that there Is a very
great deal of clear, hard thinking
done today by the men wearing overalls. At any rate, tho farmer belongs
to both classes. The more he understands of those discoveries, which lt
Is the business of the agricultural
college to make tho more he absorbs the teaching which it is the
business of the college to spread abroad, the better farmer will he be.
ARE YOU NERVOUS?
Do Th Jimp tl tke Uui Noise?
Take VITAL Tablets
One whose nerves are unstrung, be-
uomes Irritable and cross, end no one
can sympathise with you- Why don't
you try Vital Tablets, you will be surprised alt the results. They make the
nerves strong and healthy. Vou will
be a different person in a few weeks*
Vital Tableta are a wonderful tonic
They build up the entire system. Indigestion and all of its horrors will
eventually leave you if you persist using VKal Tablets. Go to your druggist and get a box today. Price 50c,
or « boxee for $2.50, or by mall. The
Seobell Drag Co., Montreal.
ORE SHIPMENTS TO
SMELTER AT TRAIL
Following ls a list of the ore received at the Trail Smelter, during the
week ending November 14th, 1920:
Mine and Location Gross tons
Bluebell, Riondel    208 C
Emerald, Salmo      81C
Josle, Rossland      220
Krao, Ainsworth     21
North Star, Klmberley    128
Paradise, Athalmer       41
United, Ainsworth      11
Company Mines   7627
Total
8187
DECEMBER NUMBER
OF "ROD AND GUN"
To the hunter or fisherman looking
for new places to hunt and fish, "Rod
and Gun in Canada," for December
will prove invaluable. In a splendid
Illustrated article, W. L. Edmonds,
the well known writer, graphically
pictures the wild life of the Dominion,
including the North West Territories,
Boanycastle Dale takes his readers
with him on a goose shooting trip after the big Canadas. In a reminiscent style Judge Fraleck describee the
good old days in an Interesting story
of the wayside Inn. The dog that ls
growing In favor every day ts the Airedale terrier, and in addition to the
splendid cover painting by P. V. Wll
Hams, he has a story entitled, "Pluck,'
that will appeal to everyone. The various departments, Guns and Ammunitions; Fishing; Conservation; Trap
Line and Kennel are up to their usual high standing. "Rod and Gun in
Canada" ia published monthly be W.
J. Taylor, Limited, Woodstock, Ont
Peps will live f&a tenet'
Simply dissolve a Peps tablet la
yenr mouth. Your breath carries
the medicinal Pine vapor, which
la released, to ell parte of tbe
throat* nasal and Air passages,
where a liquid medicine could net
possibly reach. This vapor de*
stroys all germs with which It
comes In contact, soothes and
heal.* the inflamed membranes and
fortifies you against coughs, colds,
sore throat, bronchitis and grippe.
Peps contain absolutely no harmful drags and are therefore the
safest remedy for children.
PR6E TRIAL Cut °ot ■*■•
Ufi& UsspB article, write
across It the name and date of this
paper, and mall lt (with lc. stamp
to pay return postage) to Pane
Co., Toronto. A free trial packet
will then be sent you. All drag*
gists and stores sell Peps, Mc. box.
A PLEA TO VETERANS
iloaa Street,
Victoria, B.C.,
November 15,1920.
To the Editor,
Cranbrook Herald, Cranbrook, B.C.
Dear Sir:
Will you be ao kind as to permit me
to liavs a small space in your paper,
as 1 am one of those benighted individuals who voted for Dr. King in
1916.
The Liberal party came into power
on the distinct pledge and understanding that they were to abolish party
patronage, ln fact, this was one of
ihelr chief .planks. Having been overseas until tlie spring of 1919, we veterans were not much ln touch with
what was going on In tho Homeland,
hut after our return, what have we
found! We have found that ln Its palmiest days the McBride-Bowser administration never compared for a moment with the present abnoxious and
most glaringly unjust orgy of the rankest and most barefaced system of
party patronage which any government tn Canada, either Dominion or
Provincial, haB ever been guilty of.
Oliver and his colleagues have the'
consummate gall to come out on the
public platform and brazenly claim
that some eighty ,per cent, of the government vacancies have boen granted to returned veterans.     This esti
mate, which Uio general public tins no
chance In tho world to check up, comprises every kind of employment, both
temporary and otherwise, and In every
case-, wllh rare exceptions, only very
subordinate positions have beeu banded out tu tbe veteran. Further,
these rare exceptions have gone to
veterans who before the war belonged to tbe ranks of tbo faithful
in tlie Liberal fold.
How Oliver and his cabinet minis
tera can claim to he the genuine and
trusty friends of tbe lighting men .passes my poor comprehension. Why?
Because when the war was at its
height, and the nations iu their mighty
death grapple with the foes of freedom and humanity, what was the attitude of Dr. King, Premier Oliver.
M. A. Macdonald, and our staunch Liberal champions In B.C.? We find
them, in spite of the frantic appeal of
Sir Arthur Currie for men and more
men, .putting party before their country's need, callously betraying their
follow citizens in the mud and mire
of tho trenches by, to their everlasting shame, opposing conscription.
Prior to this I always had a high regard for Ur. King, and never for a
moment suspecte-d tbat lm was small
enough and selfish enough to inglor-
iously place his party above all other
considerations—even the lives of the
men who supported him in 1916. Well,
thank God, In spite of his and a section of his .party's opposition, the
world knows Canada's answer to this
momentous question, and as a direct
result of this decision, many of us are
back again who otherwise wuuld have
been numbered amongst the silent and
heroic host lying beneath the popples
on Flanders' fields.
Whllo we wore upholding Canada's
honor among thc nations, what were
our Liberal friends doing safe at home
in B.C? Were they carrying on thei
progressive and safe government that
they gave their solemn pledge to enact; were thoy patriotically and con-
t-clenclously framing plans and enn.*-
tlng legislation in preparation for the;
satisfactory absorbing and re-estah
Bailment of tho returned citizen No.
a thousand times, no! Their land
settlement schemes and their industrial schemes prove this to the hilt
by the awful muddle we now find
ourselves in. Not one soldier on the
land (provincial) yet knows what his
land is going to cost him, yet we find
John Oliver and Dr. King at their
Creston meeting "grieving," yes. ac
tually grieving, that the boys there
| have seen ilt to run Colonel Lister as
a soldier Conservative member. M re
power to you, Fred( I hope you snow
them under on election day!
Veterans! We smashed the Boche
machine In France; now It is up to us
to mobilize again, and on election day
send Oliver and hit gang back to the
farm. They basely betrayed us while
we were fighting with our backs to
tlte wall; now lt ls our turn to stand
shoulder to shoulder and turn them
out of power.
Thanking you for your space, and
hoping I have not exceeded the apace
limit,
Yonrs very truly,
A. MACDONALD.
WHO GAVE WOMEN THE V0TET
Cranbrook, B.C.,
November 24,  1920.
Editor,  Herald.
There ls an attempt being made to
persuade our women that John Oliver gave the women tbe vote in this
province. The fact is that Mr. \V, J.
Bowser introduced and passed In tho
provincial house the two measures,
women's suffrage and prohibition, to
be submitted to the electorate at the
general election In 1916. Mr. Bowser's party was defeated, but tho women's suffrage and prohibition measures passed with large majorities.
John Oliver had nothing further to
do with ttie question then to embody
the decision of the electors In tbo
statutes. So, young women, vote for
Caven.
GRANNY.
Wednesday next is polling day.
Have you got tho Issues squarely in
your mind? Read the ad. on page
threo and get the facta presented there
an«j you must see the weakness or the
Liberal   government   record.
USE "DIAMOND DYES"
Dye right! Don't rUlc
your materUl Each package of "Diamond Dyes' contains dir-Ktioni so tuiipta
that any woman can
diamond-dye   a   new,   rich
color into old garments,
draperies, covering*, everything, whether wool, silk,
linen, cotton or mixed goods,
Buy "Diamond Dyes'—-no
otter bind—then perfect results are guaranteed even if
vou have never dyed before.
Pruggiit bas "Diamond Dyes
Color Card"—Ifl rich colors.
Let a Personal
Greeting Card
Carry Your Message
of Christmas Cheer
Christmas Cards cost so little
and mean so much that you
cannot afford to forget anyone.
Every friend  will  appreciate a kindly message - Fathers,
Mothers, the Folks Back Home, Your Neighbors, Relatives,
Friends and Business Acquaintances.
See the Suggestive Samples. Distinctive
and Exclusive,
— at the office of —
The Cranbrook Herald
Order Early for Nailing to Distant Points PAGE   SIX
THE      CBAHBBOOK      HEBALD
Rheumatism
Neuritis, Sciatica, Neuralgia.
Templeten's
Rheumatic
Capsules
Havo brought good
health to half-a-mUHoa
■offerers.
A healthful, money-savins remedy,
well known for fifteen years, prescribed by doctors, sold by druggists, $1.00 a box. Ask our agents
or write for a tre. trial package.
Templetons, 142 King w., Toronto
Loca' agent. Beattle-Noble.Ltd
News for Well Dressed Men
Buy Clothes That
Are Guaranteed
It costs no more to huy clothes that are GUARANTEED tihan
any other kind.
Tbe name DresSwell on the
Inside of our coats ia a DOUBLE Guarantee — they are guaranteed by tbe makers and guaranteed by me to be absolutely
right ln every parrticular, or we
wouldn't sell them.
P. W. Willis,
Ladles' and Gentlemen's
Tailor
New Store ■ Norbnry A?e.
Customers' Own Material Mad*
Up.
Clothes are Hand-Tailored
to Your Measure at
$30.oo to $85.oo
Suit or Overcoat
We Make and Trim Ladles'
Suits, any style, from
$35.00
Over tbe Cea £up$
Insure wltb Beale & Elweli.
+   +   +
A sale of fancy and useful ur
tides, cooerky, etc., will be held in
the  Knox  Chmch   school  room,  os
Thursday, December 2nd, at 3 o'clock
Afternoon tea will be served.
+   +   +
Straw $25.00 a ton,    prairie hay
' $39.00, alfalfa $42.00, timothy $4(1.00,
Cranbrook Trading Co.
+   +   f
Boys' and Men's Hockey Boots.
Cranbrook Exchange,
Our low prices win every time.
+   +   +
No. 1 foed oats $50.00 per ton at
MacDonrld's Grocery.
+   +   +
Marathon Oak Heaters
No. 17   $23.00
No. 16   $20.00
While they last, as we are clearing
out this stock.
Cranbrook Exchange
Our low prices win overy time.
+   +   +
Mason k Rlsch pianoforte ln splendid condition, for sale cheap.   Star
Second Hand Store.
+   +   +
Wheat $4.50 a hundred, corn $77.00
a ton  and $4.00 a hundred,  barley
chop $67.00 a ton, bran $51.00 a ton,
shorts $56.00 a ton.
Cranbrook Trndlny Co.
+ + +
lilm Hoy, Chinese, was brought up
by the city police recently on two
charges under the Prohibition Act,
one of selling, and ono for having
liquor In his restaurant at the old
Saratoga .premises. He was fined
$350.00.
+   +   +
E Grade Linoleum, $1.50 per square
yard.     Cranbrook Exchange.
Our low prices win every time.
+   +   +
+   +   +
Orangec— New    Navels    JuHt    In.
large size. 80c a dozen, nlso Chestnuts,   grapefruit,  cranberries,   pears,
etc.   Cranbrook Trading Co.
+   +   +
No.  1 feed oats $50.00  er ton ot
Mae Don aid's Grocery.
+   ■*   +
Personal Greeting Cards lor Christmas at the Herald Ofllce.     Artistic,
exclusive and Inexpensive.    See samples and order early,
+   +   +
Granulated sugar, 100 lbs., $17.00;
20 lbs., $3.60; 10 lbs., $1.85; 5 lbs.
95c at MacDonald's Grocery.
+ + +
See the Christmas Greeting Card
samples at the Herald Ofllce. Plain
and fancy styles, all at moderate prices.
+   +   +
Christmas  Greeting  Cards  at the
Herald.     Remember all your friends
with a Christmas message this year.
+   +    (
Drop  in  flour.    $7.00  a hundred,
$3.55  50  lbs.,  Five    Roses,    Rioyal
Household.   Quaker rolled oats, 8 Ib.
Hack fiBc.   Cranbrook Trading Co.
+   +   +
Granulated sugar, 100s, $17.00; 20
lbs. $3.60; 10 lbs. $1.85; 5 lbs. 05c at
MacDonald's Grocery.
Tho Yahk stabbing case came up
lately beforo Sttpemfctry Magistrate
Leask, mul the accused, Nick Cuch-
uriii was committed tor trial.
+   +   +
The fast growing domnnd for Tom-
pletou's Rheumatic Capsules aud RAZ-
MAH for Asthma, which the Beattie-
Noble Drug Store has experienced
since securing the local agency, proves the value of the medicines.
+   +   +
Book your steamship passage to the
old country through Beale & Elweli,
agents for all tho finest Atantic
steamers.
+   +   +
Three vagrants imd the usual number   of  drunks   appeared   before   the
police magistrate this week and contributed to the city treasury.
+   +    +
Tungsten Lamps, 40 w 45o
Tungsten lamps, 60w BOc
Oranbrook Exchange
Oar low prices win every time. -
+ + +
There Is no necessity to leave your
Victory Bonds and Title Deeds unprotected when $3.00 .per annum affords absolute protection In a Safety
Deposit Box ut Boale & Elwells'.
+ + +
Fred Guiccl, manager of the Italian
pool room on Van Home street, was
recently before Magistrate Leask on
two charges preferred by tbe city
l>olice, one for selling liquor nnd one
for selling beer without a city licence.
He was fined $300.00 on the first
change and the beer case was witn-
drawn.
BosKland Jtoudwork
(Continued from Page 1)
charge in carrying on the work there
as engineers are accustomed to doing.
A worker on the road at Rossland
has stated that "lt Is a disgrace tlmt
the men should have to work in mud
and slime at a starvation wage when
this man Davis, who has no responsl-
hlllty, and not a single dollar at stake
is taking such enormous rake-offs.'
He said the men on the work "are
wise to tbo plan of the government
to continue the work only until after
the election."
But at Rossland, since it ls now
known* how the men are being filched
by the government, are compelled to
walk three miles each morning to the
work, and that the government has
provided no shelter for them on the
ground, ls acting as one of the biggest boomerangs of any campaign undertakings ever staged by a political party.
On top of this Mr. Esling makes a
direct chaifte that the government
engineer, a Mr. Stephens, was super
vising the work, employing the men
and securing provisions for them at
stores, which was usually done by the
contractor, but which was being done
at tbe expense of the government for
this agent of the government, Davis.
To this, Mr. Esling defies contradiction.
Social-Personal
(Hlver Govt, and the Soldier
(Continued from front page)
at the price set.      .   .     .   When title Is   In order   the Board wilt, of
course, be compelled to proceed with
the completion of agreements."
Some of the clauses from the proposed agreement to which exception
is being taken are the following:
"All improvements placed upon the
said lands shall remain thereon end
shall not be removed or dest^yed until the final payment for the said land
has been made and in default of such
payment shall become the property of
the said board."
. . if at any time . . .
owing to physical disability, lack of
energy, or other cause, the said purchaser should become, in the opinion
of the board, unfit to 'develop such
lands . . . the said board may
jjenncel this agreement, and the purchaser will immediately vacate the said
lands on being requested by the said
Board to do 80, and all payments
made . . , shall become forfeited, and the said lands shall then become open for further allotment to
other applicants."
"If such default (In regard to defaulted payments) continues, then the
purchaser shall deliver up quiet and
peaceable possession of the said lands
and premises to the Board or its agents Immediately nt tho expiration of
tho said thirty days (time to elapse
from mulling of notice) and this agreement iiliall become null and void
and be at an end . . . and ih
lunda hereby agreed to be sold shall
revert to nnd ro-lnvest in tho board
without nny furthen declaration or
forfeiture . . . and without any
other act by tho board to be performed, and without any suit or legal proceedings to be taken, and without any
right on the part of the purchaser for
compensation for monies paid or Improvements made under this agreement."
When these clauses were brought
to tbe attention of the Premier by the
Lister Bettlers, he expressed amazement. "Such clauses should never
have been In any of the board's agreements," he said.. Later, he wired
from Victoria that "the objectionable
clauses of the proposed soldiers' settlement agreement are deleted by the
settlement board at my request," but
still leaves it In doubt as ta whether
all or some of the clauses referred to
are to be deleted — nnd there the matter stands. Tills is an example of
tho Premier's "business-like" government, nnd Illustrates well the Liberal propensity for making eleventh
hour promises thnt are vague enough
to mean a lot or nothing, whlchevr
way one looks at them.
Capt. Jos. Bell, of Camp Lister,
was a visitor iu Cranbrook over last
week-end.
The Sash and Door Company's mill
at Kitchener has been closed down
till the beginning of the year.
Mr. E. Officer, with the C. P. R. Pas-
sneger Department, Calgary, jvas s
visitor to the city towards tbe eud of
lust week.
The express wagon shed a wheel on
Baker Street on Monday mornuv, and
tho consequences of the mishap might
have been worse If the wagon had
carried much of a load at the time.
M. L. Carmichael, the Skookumchuck mining man, and ono of the
owners of the Federal group of claims,
was in tho city yesterday. .
BORN—On, Wlednosdfr-y, November
24th, at the Cranbrook Cottage hos
pitul, to Mr. and Mra. Jas. Taylor, 1
son.
The local I. O. O. F. and Rebekah
lodges are holding Jollifications this
evening, Trursday, in the Parish Hall,
in tho form of a whist drive and danco.
Rev. J. Phillips, B.D., of Baynes
Lake, will conduct service In Knox
Presbyterian Church on Sunday next,
November 28. and the following Sunday, December 5.
Yes, Jlggs will be able to go to see
Dlnty and tbe gang when Maggie gets
her Crystul Hledtrio Washer. She
will be iu goou humor all the time
See lt on display at Patmore Bros.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Nlghswander of
Toronto, were visitors with Mr. and
Mrs. J. Woodman over last Sunday.
They have been travelling extensively ull summer and came over from the
Okanagan district.
Although no formal announcement
has as yet caught our eye. lt la presumed tbat Wednesday next, December 1st, election day. will be a provincial holiday, the same as the day
of the plebiscite last month.
The Christ Church Guild held their
annual Bazaar and Sale of Work yesterday afternoon at the Parish Hall,
and aa well as proving successful socially, the financial returns were substantial, running above $700.
Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Asher and the
members of their family accompanying them here, have moved this week
Into tbe parsonage on Norbury Avenue. Two daughters and a son, who
make up the complete family circle,
are expected to arrive next week,
Jas, FInlay arrived from Shawnlgan
Lake, B. C, en Tuesday evenng's
train and expects to remain around
his old clamping grounds till the
smoke from the election has cleared
away. He came primarily in connection with the Shrlners' doing this
week.
Mrs, J. S. Taylor conducted service
last Sunday afternoon at Kootenay
Orchards Schoolhouse, when there was
a good attendance present. A male
quartette, consisting of Messrs. Hlnton, Williams, Smith and Palmer, also went out and rendered a couple of
selections during the service,
T. B. O'Connell, manager of the
Santo Domingo Branch of the Royal
Bank of Canada, who at one time
was stationed here, recently .paid a
hurried visit to the head offlce of the
Royal Bank. He was dividing the
time allowed htm for vacation between his homme and elsewhere,
Mrs. Louise MacKlnney, M. L, A.,
of Claresholm. Alta., was ln the city
over last Sunday, and conducted the
services at the Methodist Church. Her
evening addresB, on "The Mission of
tbo Church," was .pronounced a very
fine effort on tho part of the lady leg
lslator.
Mr. Watson Hall, local C. P. R. Superintendent, resumed his duties at
lhe station last week, after a long
poriod of enforced absence through
illness. Mr. Crump, trainmaster, of
Ki.volstoke, who was here relieving
for Mr. Hall, returned last week.
If Jlggs would equip 1.1s homo with
a Crystal Klectrk* Washer We wouldn't
liavo any more 1 rouble with Maggie. It
ims all tho lateRt Improvements.
See it at Patmore Bros, Its' a beauty.
In last week's Herald it was Inadvertently stated that the vice-president of the newly organized Women*s
Conservative Association was Mrs. J.
P. Kink. This should have read MrB,
■T. W. Spence, and for Its mastake
the Herald wishes to tender profuse
apologies.
Thursday, November 25, 1920
Rev. R, W. Lee suffered a badly
broken wrist on Friday night last,
when the engine of his car backfired
while Mr. Lee was chanklng It. The
injured member was set temporarily
tlmt night, and an X-Ray picture taken the following day revealing tbo exact nature of the Injury, the wrist
was set properly on Monday at the
hospital. It will be necessary for the
patient to wear some kind ot a apllnt
for Ave or ali
At last week's meeting of the local
Boys' Naval Brigade held on Thursday evening ut tho headquarters In
lho Parish Hall, a number of new recruits were added to the strength of
the brigade, the following boys being
thus enrolled: Arthur Gill, George
Hunter, Douglas Thompson, Willie
Macdonald, Ernest Laurie, Gordon
Shaw, Frank Hawkesworth, Henry
Godderls, Lee Davis, Malcolm Belanger, James Cassldy, Albert Johnson.
Winter sports now merely await the
advent of Jack Frost to get away to
a good start. The open air skating
rink is practically ready for flooding,
and the curling club membership committee have been on duty this woek
issuing receipts for ten dollars to tho
seventy odd members who have so far
put down their names on tbo club
roster. No dues, no games—that Is
understood to be the businesslike policy upon which tho curling club will
base Its treatment of would-bo member who does not "come through."
At a mooting of the Knox church
congregation held on Tuesday evon-
ini! of this wttlt, il was decided unanimously that Rev. A. Rannle of CV
gary bo asked to accept the pastorate
of tho church for a period of at least
j-ix months. II Is understood Mr
Rtinnle Is wl'Wng to accept tho offer,
antl may h: expected here wi' ui
three weeks or so to engage upon tne
work. Rev. M. C. Campbell, M.A..
ot Kaslo. j. i c sided at tho congrega
tional meeting as interim moderator.
He returned to Kaslo the following
day.
A. S. Goodeve, whose death was recorded this week at Toronto, was
known to a good number of the older residents of the city, as all through
|the Kootenays. He was mayor of
Rossland ahout twenty years ago, and*|
also a member of the provincial government shortly after that. He sat
In the- federal house for two terms before being appointed to the board of
railway commissioners. It is recalled that he laid the cornerstone of the
Cranbrook Masonic Temple at the
time of its erection, and he was far-
famed as a speaker.
An echo of the Lake Windermere
tragedy of last summer when Mrs. D.
C. Coleman lost her llfo, came to light
last week with tho announcement of
the death of Mr. Alex. Grant, father
ot Mrs. Coleman, and formerly well
known ln this city. Mr. Grant died
on Mondaf of last week. He Is
survived by his wife, Mrs. Grant, two
daughters, Miss Ella Grant and Mrs.
Murray, of Montreal, and one son, Roland Grant. His daughter's tragic
death back in the summer is known
to have weighed heavily on Mr. Grant,
and probably hastened his end.
Under the princtpalsblp and teaching of Mr. R. S. Shields, B.A., the
Cranbrook public school has again
carred off the Strathcona prize for
physical drill. Por four consecutive
years this school has obtained first
prize in drill work. The High school,
thus has the unique experience of
having four prize classes now in session. Tlie fact that 100 per cent, of
tbe pupils have passed each year and
that this prize has been awarded
here so often speaks well for the
school in Cranbrook under the prln*
cipalsbip of Mr. Shields.
Politics were on the tapis at a meeting of the local Veterans on Sunday
last. Dr. J. H. King was present to
state the case for the government,
and attempted a justification of Its policies, particularly as affecting the returned men. It is no secret that a
great many of the veterans were more
impressed with the arraignment ot
the government's policy by Capt. Jos.
Bell, president of the Lister O. W. V.
A., and an official of the provincial
veterans' organization, that with Dr.
King'B oulogium of it. Mr. T. D. C»>
ven had been Invited to speak also,
but being out of town, haB been expecting another occasion to address the
veterans from tbe Conservative viewpoint.     ,
The basketball teams of tho high
school and tho All-Stars met In a game
on Friday evening last at the high
school. Tho result was a somewhat
easy win for the high school Iwys by
a score of 34—14. Tho teams were:
SILVERWARE
Whether ln sterling
or plated silver wares,
we have practically
everything one could
wish for in these al-
wafs popular goods.
To view our display
ls to onjoy it — to buy
ls an added plcasuro
further enhanced by
very reasonable prices.
You cun make a selection now, pay a deposit and Imve the aril-
put away till Xmas.
tt. II.  VYILS0N,_
Jeweler
High School All Stars
Otto GUI ford.       M. Argue
Artrur GUI ford.       P. McNeill
W. Spenco con.    A. Roblchaud
Ii. Burton guard J. Stevens
V. Woodman guard F. Bridges
Tbe high school boys have been getting in some good practice on their
floor In tho assembly hall, and the All-
Stars, who have hitherto bfcen making use of the public school ground.*
for practice purposes up to now, have
asked for .permission to use the high
school floor for this purpose.
G. C. H. Coleman wob down from
Windermere last weok-ond.
Bowlers at Nelson, llovelstoke and
Cranbrook played a telegraphic game
last week, resulting lu a win for Nelson. The scores were Nelson 4S62,
Revelstoko 4745, Crauhrook 459S.
An open meeting of the Baptist Women's Mission Circle was held ln tbo
church on Wednesday afternoon, at
which Mrs. J. H. King aud Mrs. W. G
Asher were guests of honor, the latter being the wife of Mr. Asher, tbe
new pastor of the church. After tbe
opening exercises, participated iu by
Mrs. A. D. Bridges and Mrs. J. S.
Taylor, the president, Mrs. F. L, Constantino, addressed Mrs. King and
Mrs. Asher in a few words of "welcome.
A few program number.; were given
during the afternoon, consisting ot
a duet by Mrs. King and Mrs. E, Pat
erson,. recitations by Misses Alexan
der and Honeyman, a mixed quartette
with obligato. Mr. Asher also addressed a few remarks to the meeting in
a short and bright speech, and tlie
meeting was closed by Mrs. Shield:
A social hour was then spent over tlie
teacups, and tea tables resplendent
with chrysanthemum blooms and sml-
laz.
An epoch in local fraternal history
lias been marked this week in the dp-
ings of the Cranbrook Shrine Club.
They are about ninety strong in this
eity, and tlie Initiation of about twenty-eight new members was made tbe
occasion for a grand ceremonial and
attendant entertainment. Upwards
'of fifty visiting Shrlners came from
all directions, from the Coast, Spokane, Calgary and Lethbrldge, Including Potentate P. D. McLaren, of Al-
Hazar Temple, Calgury, ond Illustrious Potentate Christie, of Victoria.
Tlie picturesque costumes with the fez
hats put a dash of color iuto appearances on the city streets, much to the
Interest of everyone in general. Jas.
FInlay, president of the local Shrine
Club and W. Stephen Santo, secretary, and the members, who were act-
iug as hosts, left nothing undone '0
give tlieir visitors a royal time. A
grand ball wound up the proceedings
yesterday evening.
Men s Tailored
. . Suits . .
We tailor our Suits correctly ■■
not thrown together. We use the
best suitings, best linings, best hair
cloth, best thread and buttons procurable, and we guarantee satisfaction.   Our prices are
From $55.00 up.
Let us show you.
AGENTS FOR WILLIS PIANOS
0A00
SEE THE WILLIS PIANOS NOW HEBE
1
1
Mrs, Flnnis expected to leave today, Thursday, on a visit to the Coast.
J. L. Simmons of Winnipeg has been
in tbe city recently, visiting his brother, who is the general contractor
in charge of the building operations
at the C. P. R. Yards.
POUND NOTICE
ADDITION MADE TO
HEBALD   STAFF
A steadily increasing volume of business accorded the Herald during the
past few months has necessitated an
increase being made to the staff, and
on Tuesday evening Mr. J. S. Thorn-
ley arrived from Macleod, Alta., to
take a position here. Mr. Thorn ley is a
returned man with four years' service
overseas to his credit, and wounds received ln action necessitated his spending upwards of a year in hospital.
He ls now completing a course in Linotype work under the Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishment scheme, and will
assume the burden of the Linotype
work at this office. Mrs. Thornley and
young son wilt como on from Macleod
very shortly, it is anticipated.
308r8P3COUGHS
HUSBAND'S STORY WILL
AMAZE CRANBROOK
He says: "Adler-i-ka helped my
wife for gas on the stomach and sour
stomach In TWENTY MINUTES. II
works beyond greatest expectations."
Adler-i-ka works on BOTH upper and
lower bowel, removing foul matter
which poisoned stomach. Brings out
all gaases and sour, decaying food,
EXCELLENT for chronic constipation.
fiiinrds against appendicitis. Adlor-*
l-ka removes matter you never
thought was in your system and which
may have heen • poisoning you tor
months.     Beattle-Noble Drag Store.
$50.00 • HEW A KM - XI50.00
The above reward will he paid to
the person giving lu florin a tion that
will lead to the arrest of the person
or persons who stole the McLaughlin
Automobile, license No. 25714, the property of Mr. J. Brault,
P. ADAMS,
Chief of Police.
Cranbrook, B.C.,
November 23, 1020. It
One black and white yearling heifer
inpounded in City Pound on Tuesday,
November Oth. If not claimed within
eight days from date the animal will
be sold to defray expenses.
P. ADAMS,
Chief of Police
Cranbrook, B.C.,
November 17, 1920. ll-18-2t
WANT ADS.
STAR SECOND HANS 8T0BE
Fhrai t.
Wa par the bast prion going for ill
kinds ot furnltura. Wt bur any-
thing from a mouss trap to an automobile.
LIVE LADY OR GENTLEMAN AGENT
wanted ln Cranbrook district, for
Supreme Watkins Products. Watkins goods known everywhere. Write
today Dept. C.50, The J. B. Watkins Co,, Winnipeg. 25-11-U
WANTED. —- Small house or housekeeping rooms, furnished or unfurnished.    Box 15, Herald Offleo.    tt
HBINTZMANN PIANO for sale, In excellent condition. Reasonable
price and terms. Apply Mrs. Arnold Walllngor. 25-11 at
Drop'. Prices
Timothy and
Alfalfa Hay .. $26 down
Oats $25 down
•Wheat, 2 weeks. .$40 down
Flour $25 down
Only by Quantity Buying
and   Seasonable Requirements can Low Prices
be obtained.
JAMES KERRIGAN
DISTRIBUTOR
WANTED.   —   A compolont malil
Mrs. O, 11. Thompson. 11
BAPTIST CHURCH
W. G. ASHKB
Pastor
Morning Service at 11 a.m.
Subject "The Master Passion."
Sunday School at 12 noon.
Evening Service at 7.30, subject, "This Day—Salvntlon.
Young People's Meeting on
Tuesday Nights at 8 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Thursday at
8 o'clock.
FOB SALE.   —   Good piano.     $225
Apply Box 12, Horald Offleo.
25-ll-2t|
SMALL PIGS tor sale at tho Mission
Farm. lt
WANTED—Board and lodging by a
young man. Apply at tbe Horald
offlce. 11-18-31
TIMOTHY, ALFALFA, and MIXED
TIMOTHY and ALFALFA HAY, oar
lots, well cured, and tlrst elaas
quality. Apply Keith Bell Har ft
Grain Co., Klrkham Block, Lethbrldge. Reference, Union Bank,
tf
REGISTERED HOLSTKIN STOCK
FOB BALE.
Choice of cows, heifers and young
bulls. One a magnificent bull calf,
will make a show animal. Extended
pedigrees on application. AU from
splendid milking strain. Prices from
160.00 to $500.00. AIM waat frada
stock.
X. CJLTHCUV KOR,
tt-l-Tt Hewiala, B.C.
Demonstrator's
Report
One of our demonstrators working
at BanfT Rent ln this Item on her report:
"Ihis morning one woman told me
tbe following:
When tbo milkman came 11: in morning she tolil lilm hIio lunl found a
good milk, ami would not romitro him
nny mere,
"TIiIh will give you un IdOfl of llOW
Pacific Milk Ih taking. "
PACIFIC JHIKK CO*
Malted
Factorlei st
LAPNEIl and AHIIOmollll, B.C.
<'*rti'*nii!:iffiiimi mi li'i' i-.m iiftuiiiiirm^iiililuimtflMHlMH
Montana Hestaaranl
Heals at IU Bow*
Clears, Cigarettes ail ('aid;
CRANBROOK BTHEET.
»pposltt .bt Bank of Comment
FOR PAINTING
-INK-
PAPER HAN QIN0
lto.
Telephone
JOHN GARD
Phone No. 401
Cranbrook,   .    .    . B.C.

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