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Cranbrook Herald Feb 26, 1925

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Array THF-3RAN
HERALD
VOLUME    27
CRANBROOK, B.C., THURS    Sz6i 'W AavnMU;iJ 'AVd
NUMBER    1
STAR
THEATRE
FRI. & SAT.,
MARCH 13 & 14
it
Birth
A
at ion
9 ' THE SUPREME
PICTURE OF ALL
TIME
May Establish
Library in City
Movement Now Under Way
To Supply Long Felt
Deficiency
OUT FOR MEMBERSHIPS
One often hoars it stated tliat people today have little deslro tor the
better   tilings;   that   life   means   bul
one continual round of pleasure and
amusement, the character of which
in some cases is extremely doubtful.
Heading, except, nf the newspaper
and some story magazines, has been
given little consideration. It waa of
interest therefore, to note that on
Monday evening last a meeting was
held in the Y.M.C.A. for thc purpose
of starting a library in Cranbrook,
when about a dozen citizens were
present. Pending another meeting,
called for Monday, March Oth, tentative officers were appointed as
follows:
President, G. J. Spreull; secretary, J. G. Cummings; book committee, H. L. Porter nnd the president
and secretary; House and Rules committee, J. M. Clark and Mr. Stewart
of the government office; Membership committee, Mrs. P. W. Willis,
convenor, Mesdames J. G. Cummings, T. R. Flett, A. A. MacKinnon, J. H. McQuaid, F. B. Miles, F.
G. Morris, Miss Flett, F. H. Pym,
and Messrs. F. H. Dezall, H. S. Haynes, Rev. F. V. Harrison, aud Rev.
W. T. Tapscott.
The membership committee will
make a canvass for members in the
immediate future, the yearly fee being placed at $2.00. It is anticipated that they will have no difficulty
in getting at least 120 members in
the next two weeks and that the
next meeting for the appointment
of regular officers will be well attended.
Alrendy offers have been received
from citizens, of books for the library, while the book committee are
also getting in touch with tho Dominion and Provincial commissions
nt Ottawa and Victoria. The Rockefeller and Carnegie library commissions will also he consulted.
The committee will be pleased to
hear from anyone having books they
feel that they can spore for the library.
GYROS COMPLETE
STATEMENT FROM
PIERROT CONCERT
METHODIST W.M.S.
CONCERT AND PROGRAM
AT "BIRTHDAY PARTY"
Monday  n
the  Methodi,
ghl tin- schoolroom of
i Church was the scene
of a birthday parly which was held
under  the  auspices  of  the   Women's
Missionary Society of the church.
The occasion made one feel in a very
touching manner advancing years, as
in order In gain admission to the hall
it was necessary to produce a penny
for each and every year that one
was old. The amount collected was
about $.10.00. (We will not state
just who were present).
The chair was taken hy Mrs. B. C.
Freeman, who announced the following program, which was enjoyed by
all present.
Piano Solo   Miss Sarvis
Vocal  Solo     Mr,  A.  Shankland
Male Quartette
Messrs.    Shankland,    Shepherd,
Lodge and Morton
Reading   Miss Myrtle Garden
Vocal Solo   Mis. McFadden
Violin Solo   Mr. W. Thompson
Solo and Quartette
Mrs.  Kinghorn,    Messrs  Lodge,
Morton  and  Shepherd
Reading    Mrs.  A.   W.  Hodgson
Vocal Solo   Mrs. J. S. Mcintosh
Piano Duet   Mrs. Ryckman and
Mrs. R. Potter
Vocal Solo   Mrs. Kinghorn
After the concert the ludies served refreshments which were much
enjoyed by all.
TALK ON TELEGRAPHY
AT WEEKLY GYRO
LUNCH ON TUESDAY
At the meeting of the Gyro Club
on Tuesday lust, the members  had
the pleasure of hearing a very interesting vocational talk on telegraphy
hy the local C.P.R. telegraph agent,
Gyro  >l.   II.   McLean.     The   speaker
showed tbat ihe method of sending i¥
messuges   by   other   means   than   by} 4*
written   or   spoken   word   had   beenj^
known and used for a long time be- ?
fore the electric  telegraph. Bon-1 *
fires, flag-waving, and similar methods were cited. About 1837 electric
telegraphs were developed as commercial speculations. The first ever
constructed were laid down by
Wheutstone and Cooke on the. London and Birmingham Railroad, but
were discarded as impracticable, In
1844 the Morse system came into
use, this code remaining in use today though many improvements have
been made in the instrument for
sending and receiving messuges.
Mr. George Wilson, of Lethbridge,
was a visitor at the luncheon.
Harbor Commissioner Visit! Here
R. E. Beuttie has been a visitor in
the city since Sunday, and expected
to remain foi- about ten days, looking
to the vnrious interests he still retains here. Many old-time friends
have been glad of tho opportunity to
meet him again, and to learn that even while moving in a considerably wider -sphere as harbor commissioner,
he still retains a warm spot in his
heart for Cranbrook.
Big Trout Win* Prize Rod
Below is published a statement
handed to the Herald hy the treasurer of the Gyro Club, giving the receipts ami disbursements of the Gyro
concert held recently for benevolent
purposes. From this statement It
will lie Beon that through the efforts
of tbis club $i:;s.SH was given to two
worthy causes. The Gyro Club appreciate tlu- support given them by
the merchants ut the city and the
patronage extended to their performances by the public generally.
RECEIPTS
Ticket Sales $401 50
Advertising - - net proceeds
from programs 47.00
DISBURSEMENTS
Rent   uf  Auditorium
Cosl of Production
Printing and Advertising
Donation to Salvation Army
Christmas cheer Fund
Donation to St. Eugene
Hospital
(448 50
$100.00
L80.06
09,76
.10.00
108.80
For catching ihe largest Kamloops
trout in local waters last summer on
tackle from the Delany & Sinclair
store, T. E. South captured the valuable prize rod. reel ami outfit, put
up by the firm of Needle and Fishing Tackle Co.. through Delany &
Sinclair, their agents. The prize was
presented to the fortunate winner
by II. .1. Collier at the Rod and Gun
club meeting on Wednesday of last
week. A similar prize wns won last
season by Alex Hurry, his rod being one by Messrs, Alcock, Laight &
Wostwood. through the Cranbrook
Drug & Book Co.. the venue being restricted to Moyie Lake.      These two
concerns and their local representatives were given a very hearty ack-
Nowledgent for the interest taken in
the position of ihe angler.
\'. ~r   -.".:. . .!\    X
9448.00
Certified corrocti Al. Knight, Pres,
P. W. Burgess, Troaaui r
Liquor C*»ci Como Up
A number of liquor eases have
boon disposed of this week in lhe
police court, among them some of the
Kiml erley cases arising last week as
a result of the raids there. In some
instances the customary $!U>0 fine
was levied and paid, others again being unable to pay, and therfore forced to the equivalent of a jail sentence, lu one instance a man who
was charged over a year ago with
an infraction of the law, but who has
since been in the Uniter States, ro-
eiveil sentence of a fine, for the old
offence, which was paid. In the two
cases of selling feer to non-members
against the G.W.V.A., ont- case was
withdrawn and in the other case a
fine of $1100 was otnposcd.
Coming Events
Tuesday,  Feb. 84:  Meeting of Rod
and Gun Club, City Hall, to discuss
game regulations.
Friday, Peb. -'!: Wrestling at Kimberley, Nick Boslnil vs. Aaron Davis, at Blgatlini's Hall.
lunday, Mar. 1: Public Mooting at
the Auditorium, addressed by Mrs.
Rose Henderson.
Thursday, March 5: Dance hy the
Ha 11IV orchestra, in Auditorium,
Cranbrook,
Friduy, Mar. (J: Women's Institute
Hard Times Dance nnd Whist
Drive, K.P. Hall. Cards 8 to 10;
Dancing 10 to 2.
Snt., March 7th: "Tht Dumbells"
in "Ace High" nnd "Oh, Yes!" at
the Auditorium.
Fri. & Sat., Mnrch 18 & 14: Super-
Special production, "Birth of a Nation," at the Stnr.
Tuesday, Mar. iT: G.W.V.A. Masquerade Ball at Auditorium.
■ •:• •:• * * * ** * * * **************
Cabinet Miniser %
In Alberta Says        *
Election Imminent *
t
That a federal election is in ,
sight is the general impression 4*
all over the country it being
generally felt that the announcement will be made possibly
at the close of the session which
it i,- -aiil, is likely to be shorter
on this account.
No less a person  than  Hon.
* Chas. Stewart, minister of the
* interior, in the course of a ^
^  visit to Alberta, where it is de- 7
* sired he shall regain a seat, if *
* possible,   has  said   thpt   there I
* would be un election    in    the f
* near future, and    his    mission  f
* west was to prepare the way %
% for a Liberal success if possible %
t  in Alberta,    and    to    assist in j*
* placing candidates in the field.    .;.
* *
**************************
leu
DONATIONS TO PIANO
FUND BEING RAISED
FOR S. W. SCHOOL
The teachers of the South Ward
School wish   to    acknowledge with
thanks   the following donations   lo
their pinno fund:
Per Central School from
Home Cooking Sale '. $10.001
Balance P.T. Association        1.50 Isur
Mrs Eley        1.00
Mrs. Berkin        1.00
Mrs. Geo. Shaw        1.00
Mrs. Magro        1.00
Mrs. Sullivan  25
Mrs. Walsh        1.00
Mrs. J. Cameron  f>0
Mrs. Cassels        1.00
Mrs. Reynolds        1.00
Mrs. Mohs        1.00
Mrs. Russell        1.00
Mrs. Coleman        1.00
Mrs. Bond          .2T>
Mrs. Cox        1.00
Mrs. ff. E. Ryckman     ' I.on
Miss Curley        1.00
Miss Rice   1.00
iVffff,Vff.Vfffffffff*V,
M
I        OBITUARY
1
Total
Challenges   Jack   Milo
Nelson Moi, of Yorkton, who was
referred to in a recent issue, is going to he in Cranbrook on Wednesday
next for a wrestling bout with .lack
Milo. Moe is the man who claims
that Milo has no right to claim the
championship title of the light-hen-
weights, and therefore sent him
challenge to meet him here or elsewhere. Accordingly, George Anton
busy and arranged a match be-
1 /AVWMVAVAWWWrf
THOMAS BATES
After a residence of ubout twen
\- years in the Fast Kootenay, death
n Monday morning, at about
"> a.m., to Mr. Thomas Bates, of
Kingsgate. He was brought to the
hospital here from Kingsgate the
middle of last week, but did not long
He lapsed into unconsciousness ou Saturday, from which he
never recovered. Death was due to
long continued and acute rheumatism, developing into other ailments,
kidney disease being the specific
cause of death.
For many months past the late Mr.
Bates had been iu anything but good
health, and had gone to various places in the States for treatment, but
getting little permanent relief. He
had not been uble to work since last
summer, and seems to have gradually lost ground since that time.
He waii in his fifty-third year, and
first came to this country in 1005.
He was at Moyie for some years,
working iu the St. Kugene mine,
$26,60 [where it is presumed he contracted
his rheumatism. Luter he was appointed a fire wnrden for the district, aud from that post was transferred to the station of the immigration department at Kingsgate. In
1923 he was appointed inspector in
charge of the station there.
The late Mr. Bates was born near
Burnley, Lancashire, Kngland, One
son still resides in the Old Country,
and he is also survived by a daughter, Mrs. K. P. Johnson, of Kings-
gate, aud formerly of this city. Mr.
and  .Mrs.  Johnson  accompanied   Mr
LOCAL SECRETARY
OF Y.M.C.A. ATTENDS
CALGARY CONFERENCE
the
Clai
M.
he
Accompanied liy Mrs. Clark, Mr.
J. M, (lark left on Thursday evening
last for Calgary, where on Friday
and Saturday, a conference of sec-
retorles uf the Alberta division of
took place. Mr.
ied on Sunday, sta-
I a profitable and
pleasanl time. Prominent speakers
were present to address the secretaries, these being Harry Ballantyne,
national general secretary; Stanley
Brent, national secretary for Western Canada and Lou Buckley, nasociliary.
fttyno spoke on the prole in the constitution and
f information on the fin-
other conditions of the
From a membership of
100 after the war, there
ver one million. He re-
i large (dace that the Y.
in the boys' life. They
pioneers   in   the
tin
tionol b
Mr. 1
posed cl
gave a l
ancial c
Assoclal
forrod t
M.C.A.
ha
boys' work,
Mr. Bucli
ley spoke about the big
conference that Is to take place in
June, in Denver, Colorado, where over 000 delegates are to he present.
On Friday, the secretaries attending the conference were guests at
a Board of Trade luncheon, where
they had an opportunity of hearing
Mr. A. M. Belding of the Telegraph-
Journal and the Times-Star, of St.
John, X.H., who i.s visiting cities in
the central and western provinces,
to present arguments in favor of
carrying out in full the policy of
conducting Canadian trade through
Canadian channels, Jn asking the
support of the Board of Trade he
presented many arguments in favor
of his claims. The Mnritimes had a
rightful claim as the winter ports of
Canada, and the trade through them
.should be built up, thereby fulfilling
pledges given them ever since confederation.
The speaker asserted the right of
all ports to l>e protected and was of,
the opthroa thut' tne whole country
would reap a benefit when they are
made prosperous from an ever-growing commerce. .More people will be
profitably employed at the ports;
more men engaged in railway transportation and there will be more
consumers of what the rest of the
country produces.
OFFICERS ELECTED
AT ROD AND GUN
CLUB MEETING
The annuul meeting of the Cranbrook and District Rod and Gun Club
was held on Wednesday evening of
last week, when the main business
put through was the election of of-
ficers. Owing to a desire to get us
large a representation as possible tu
discuss other matters, it was decided
to adjourn till Tuesday so as to get
if possible representatives from other
clubs, and other parts of the district.
in order to get as wide u discussion
on a number of mutters, such as fish
and game regulations, etc.
The officers elected for the
year were as follows:
Hun. President   Hon.
Hon.   Vice-Pres. .... N.  A
coming
J. IL King
Wallinger,
M. 1'.  P.
T.  Cooper
MacKinnon
F. Gulmont
President   K
Vice-Pres. ... Dr. C. K. L.
Secretary      J.
Kxecutive  ... Wm. Whiting, L. Clapp,
H. J. Collier,      Alex.  Hurry,
F. 11. Dezall, T. E. South, D.
Halcrow.
A  number of other matter.-  were
up foi" discussion, and were laid over.
These included a notification    from
Grant For
Govt. Phones
Dr. King Advises Board of
Trade Provision is Made
To Better Line West
NEW METALLIC CIRCUIT
In response to a request for its
consideration made by the Board of
Trade last fall, W. H. Wilson, president, is now in receipt of word from
Dr. King to the effect that provision
is being made by the government in
its estimates for the installation of a
new metallic circuit on the link in
the government telephone lines between Yahk and Creston. Dr. King's
letter reads as follows:
Office of the Minister of Public
Works
Ottawa.
February
Dear Sir:—
It may be of Interest to
know  that we are carrying
in our Telephone Estimates for this
yenr for the Yahk-Creston telephone
it. mii
item
the department as to the opening of (line  —  installation  of  metallic  cir
cuit — $8,000.00. ^^^^^^^
Yours very truly,
J. H. ICING.
The communication was read with
gratification  at an executive session
some lakes in the district for Kamloops trout, somewhat earlier than
usual, and complaints from Yahk
that deer had been killed in that vicinity in deep snow. The usual re-l
Commendations are being sought of the Board belli on Tuesday eve-
from the club on closed stains, bag' ning, as it is a much desired improve-
limits, etc. •''' ,are to be consider- morn in telephone comunication bc-
ed later.
tion of the hatchery ae
son, the same committee
In regurd to the opera-! tween East and West Kootenay
uiu this sea-|
tween them. Both Milo nnd Moe Blltfts t(> tWfl city Iust week antl were
Claim the light-heavyweight champ- with him when thc end cume.
ionship of Canada. Moe is an old In former years Mr. Bates was a
master at the game of wrestling, and | well known figure in politieal cir-
is well known. He has beaten some cles, being something of a public
of the best men in the country. He (speaker, He was a staunch Conser-
clnims to hold the light-heavyweight vative, and was active and loyal in
championship of Canada as well as the dnys when he was able to get
a similar championship    of    Norway
and Sweden. The match will he held
under Police Gazette Rules, two out
of three falls to count. The bout is
being put on by George Anton, who
deserves much credit for his efforts
to provide good clean sport.
Fifteenth Wedding  Anniversary
On Tuesday evening of this week
a pleasant event was participated in
by nineteen or twenty friends and
neighbors of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Henderson, when a surprise visit was
paid to Iheir home to mark the occasion of the fifteenth wedding anniversary of the wedding of Mr, and Mrs.
Henderson. During the evening
the visitors made a presentation to
their surprised hosts in the form of
a beautiful silver casserole, the gift
being handed over to the surprised
recipients by Mr. Jnck McDonald on
behalf of those present. Dancing,
cards, songs, and a general pleasant
social time spoil the time nlong, and
made a most enjoyable evening,
Those attending were Mr. and Mrs.
J. F. Lunn, Mr. and Mrs. Jas. McDonald, Mr. and Mrs. Jack McDonnld,
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Martin, Mr. and
Mrs, J. R. McKay, Mr. and Mrs. M.
McCrindle, Mr. and Mrs. W. Harvey,
(Mrs. J. H. Spence, Mrs. A. Swan,
Mrs. H. G. Flewelling, Mrs. H. Holdener, Mrs. H. Huggins, The fact of
the lights going out did not interfere with the program arranged, the
pnrty carrying their own lights when
they made their friendly invasion.
around the district, and still a fairly
frequent visitor to this city in his
official position,
The funeral was held on Wednesday morning, services being conducted by Rev. F. V. Harrison at the
Anglican church and at the cemetery.
The only fraternal organization in
which the late Mr. Bates had membership .was the Loyal Order of
Moose, Fernie Lodge.
MRS. MARGARET JOHNSTON
The death took place at the St. Eu
gene Hospital, at 3.15 a.m., of Mrs
M, Johnson, of Alberta, Deceased
had been a patient at the hospital for
about two weeks. She had been staying previous to thut at the home of
her daughter. Mrs. J. H. Corbett, at
Lumberton, Since early December. Her home was at Rimbey, Al-
Calgary on Tuesday for interment
Calgary on Tuesday for int erment
there.
Local Angler Wins Croft Rod
During the annual meeting of the
Rod und Gun Club last Wednesday,
the presentation was made of the usual Croft prize rod, which has been
made for several years past through
their local agents, Motfatt'sVariety
Store.
Mr. Wi
throat
n office last
year he asked to carry on the work,
and a proposal to re-engage .1. H.
Ryder, who last year did such good
work as overseer of the local hatchery, was held over for a week.
A proposal to join in a movement
from the Boundary district in the
formation of a central association to
work in the interests of the interior
rod and gun clubs was not considered very favorably, the idea being expressed that it would be preferable
to unite the East Kootenay Associations for the most effective work.
During the evening pre=entations
were made as mentioned elsewhere,
of prize rods and outfits won by local fishermen in connection with the
competitions put on by the local stores.
Star Car Distributor Her*
winner this year was!
ith, whose prize cut- j
§ Weighed fl lbs. 1 oz., j
and was i au lit in .Mineral Lake, near!
Moyie. Tne Croft prize is a partic-
ularly valuable one, consisting of a J
$.52 Champion Split Bamboo Fly Rod,
with agate guide and tip, a $12 Rain-|
bow Vacuum Enamelled Silk Tapered
line, of 300 feet, and a SO single action reel. This prize has been up
for a number of years past, and always elicit.- considerable interest among local anglers. At the Rod and'
Gun meeting R. P. Moffatt han-1
ded tbe outfit tn the winner, nnd a
vote of thanks was tendered him and
the firm he represents.
Mr. Godkin, of Calgary, representing the district di.-iributurs in that
city for Star cars, was in the eity for
a day or two this week, and also made
a trip to Kimberb-y. Co-incident
with his visit here with the local agents, Messrs. Ratcliffe & Stewart,
was the arrival also of a carload of
1925 Star sport models, which this
firm took delivery of. This i.s the
ear hailed as the "car for the millions," with a "million dollar motor,"'
and thc smart looking cars attracted much attention as they stood outside the garage.
The Board is also considering its
advertising program for the year,
and is already in receipt of considerable material from the department
.f the interior, and the parks commit-
sioner's office that will be available
for distribution. A quantity of maps
will also be procured from Calgary
showing the location of the trail from
Alberta points, through Cranbrook
and on south by various routes.
Spend Week-End in Fernie
M:» A. K\ Ltitch a id -v^ug'iu-r*
Asenath were week-end visitors in
Fernie. leaving on Friday and returning on Sunday. Miss Miller of
Jaffray accompanied them.
Wrestling at Kimberley
Arranging  for  "The  Dumbell."
K.   P.   Anniversary   Dance
-. Kirk, of Kingsgate,
to attend the funeral
rhomas Bates, also of
Mr. and .Mi
ure in the eit]
of the    late
Kingsgate.
It is stated that the wholesale fruit
and produce firm of Plunkett & Savage have been considering locnting
a warehouse here, but reports that
that had secured space in the basement of the Hanson block for the
purpose were not confirmed by the
lessee of the property at the middle
of tin* week.
The members of the local Order
of the Knights of Pythias and their
friends enjoyed a very pleasant evening in the hall of the Knights on
Friday last, when they gathered to
celebrate the Gist anniversary of the
founding of this flourishing fraternal and benevolent organization. Social affalif hold under the auspices
of the Knights of Pythias have become noted for being thoroughly enjoyable ami this orcasion proved no
exception. The first part of the evening was spent with cards. Many
tables were in play whist being the
order. Following the whist, dancing
took place, being kept up till the wee
small hours, everybody enjoying a
very pleasant dance to the music of
the Robinson orchestra, who despite
the fact thai it was their third successive evening engagement were
right up tn the scratch with their
time and snappy music. The refreshments which were provided by
the ladies of the Knights, were served about 12.80 and were the subject of much favorable comment, being enjoyed to the full by nil.
G. G. Garrette, business manager
of the Dumbells, was a visitor in the [
city last week-end, arranging the de-'
tails in connection with the appearance of his company here on the
evening of March 7th. Mr. Gar-,
rette has been with the Dumbells in
the same capacity since their incep-1
tion, and reports his company has
bod a wonderful reception in the big I
cities where he has stopped. Tht-
program here is to consist of the1
best of their two revues, "Ace High" '
and "Oh, Yes!'' the two being boded down to a long single program.
They take around with them two cars
of effects, etc., and the rompanv con- n
BUtS of over thirty people.
The wrestling fans of Cranbrook
and Kimberley will be pleased to
learn that on Friday evening of this
week, at Bigattini's Hall. Kimberley,
there will be a wrestling contest that
will be well worth witnessing. The
principals in the main bout are Aaron
Davis, of Kansas City, who holds the
middle-weight championship of Kansas state, and who wrestled with "Cyclone Thompson last week in Lethbridge to a draw. Davis ranges between 165 and 168. Jt is considered
by those who know the two men that
they are nearly an even match. His
holding Thompson to a draw shows
that he is a man of much ability. Davis is here on a tour, in an endeavor
to clean up on the Canadian wrestlers. He is on his way to Spokane
but stopped over especially to meet
Bozinfs, "The Greek Flash." Bnzinis
is in good form and will arrive here
from Spokane on Friday, after having wrestled there Thursday night.
Those who saw Bozinis wrestle with
Sampson and know the wonderful
ability of the Greek wrestler are all
going to Kirr.berley to see the go.
Activity at Kitchener
Mishaps on Kimberley Road
The mill of the Continental Lumber Company at Kitchener, commenced sawing on Tuesday of last week,
and has already booked orders that
will keep it busy for many weeks.
The firm has taken out a big cut of
logs, and is putting in a dam up tho
river, near the Leadville claims
to give it a surplus of water to bring
the logs down when the stream in
low.    The cut of logs for the Crnn-
  ; brook Sash & Door Co., Is very large
A double mishap was reported on; and the report is that sawing will
Thursday from the Wycliffe road, commence at that plant in April.
The delivery truck of the Kootenay j Sleighing is still good at Kitchener
Trading Co. was burned on the road I and the log and pole haul will prob-
near Wycliffe, being a total loss.|ahly finish this week. The depart -
The same day two cars were in col-.ment of public works has given as-
lision ut Marysville, a stage car dri-|surance that the new road between
ven by Hedley McLeod meeting thc > the river and Kitchener, which was
McClure dairy truck nt u turn in the built two years ago at a cost of about
road. Owing to the ruts it is under- $22,000, will be surfaced this spring
stood that neither car could turn out [and put in fine shape, ami it is ex-
to let the other pass. A passenger j pected the cut-off at Arrow Creek
in the milk wagon had some ribs bro-1 will also be built before mid-sum-
ken, and while the stage cur was : mcr. Up to the present Kitchener
able to proceed on in spite of dam-1 is the only point nt the east end of
age it had received, the other car the Creston riding to file an appli-
was damaged more severely. cation for a heer license.
G.W.V.A. Masquerade Ball,  March 17th
IH the auditorium: ...ii_k*-^*_„," 3
«
ively The Last Chance
One of the most successful contests ever conducted in Western Canada closes in a few hours. 100 Prizes costing $5,000 are
waiting owners. Make us send you one. YOU STILL HAVE TIME. But Don't, delay. Start now. It only takes an hour
or two to solve this puzzle and send it in to us. You still have plenty of time, only hurry and start on it. Bear in mind
that the contest closes February 28th, at Midnight; but anything received Monday, March 2nd, will be accepted.
FIRST   PRIZE
SECOND   PRIZE
(l^-7':'(
$350.00 Radio
plua 10 time, the
to $30.00.
Super-Heterodyno
.mount  sent  in  up
THIRD   PRIZE
$5. ...00 Westlnshou.e -
Super Eight, plus 20 tines the
amount of money Bent ir. up to
$30.00.
START COUNTING NOW
Take a pencil and put down the
numbers as you stroke them out,
then add them  up. We would
suggest that you cut the chart
into dozens of pieces then check
them 1'roui all sides.
SAVE THIS PAGE
It may mean $1270.00 to you.
One Hundred Free Prizes. This is
not a trick puzzlo but merely a test
of patience and skill. Surely your
chance for winning is as good as
anyone else's.
$5,000 in Prizes     .
FIRST PRIZE Has a Value Up to $1,270.00   Choice of—
$070.00 Ford Touring Car, plus 21) tints amount sent in up to $30
$575.00 Rndiulu Super 8, plus 20 limes amount sent in up to $30
$450.00 Cash. plus 20 times amount sent in up to $30
SECOND PRIZE Mas a Value Up to $650.00-
$U50.00 Radio Super-Heterodyne, plus 10 times thc amount sent
in up to $30.00
THIRD PRIZE Has a Value Up to $475.00—
$325.00 Radiola No. 10, plus 5 times amount sent in up to $30
FOURTH PRIZE Has a Value Up to $325.00—
$265.00 Radiola Regenoflex, plus 2 times amount sent in up to $30
FIFTH PRIZE Has a Value Up ^o $110.00—
$80.00 Radiola 3-A, plus the amount sent in up to $30
SIXTH TO FORTY—
$45.00 (each) Radiola 3. or $45 (each) Bicycle.
FORTY-ONE TO FORTY-FIVE Choice of—
$35.00 (each) Radiola Loud Speaker or $25.00 (each) Cash.
FORTY.SIX TO SEVENTY-FIVE—
$14.00 (each) Brandos Table Talker or $10.00 (each) Cash.
SEVENTY-SIX TO ONE HUNDRED—
$7.00 (each) Headset or $5.00 (each) Cash.
CLOSING DATE IS FEBRUARY 28th - STILL TIME YETI
Much interest hns heen taken in iods have expired, there is still an
this competition,   and   solutions opportunity ..till ..the end of the
have come in from many of the month to get solutions in which
outside points tin thc district, as will rank for the principal prizes,
well as from the city. .. From as Extra copies of the puzzle may be
far away ns Lethbridge even, re- had free of charge, or copies of
plies and solutions have been re. the puzzle containing exceptional-
celved. ly Plain figures may bc referred
$325.00 Radiola No. 10, plus 5 timet
the amount .cut in ap to $30.00.
35 BICYCLES GIVEN
Contestants standing from  Sixth  to
Fortieth will be given thc choice of
$-15.00   Bicycle    (Men,    Women,
Boys or Girls), or a $46.00 Radiola
Three.
Although lhc special prize per-    to.
FOURTH   PRIZE
$265.00  Radiol*   Rcge-
noflex,   plui  twice   the
•mount   sent   in.
FIFTH PRIZE
$80.00   Radiola   Three
A,   plus   tho amount
■ent in.
*&
THIRTY-FIVE
THE  PROBLEM
The problem il to find the sum total of thc figures in the two circles, which, when
added together, represent the total number of miles that Canada's most powerful*
broadcasting station can be heard. Every figure is complete and the drawing is entirely free from tricks and illusions, but like a lot of other things, it is not as easy as
it 'oolts. Figures range from two to nine, each standing alone thus, two, three, four
five, six, seven, eight, and nine. Thee arc no ones or cyphers in the chart. The
tops of the sixes are curved, while thc bottoms of the nines arc straight. By looking
at any figure carefully you can easily tell what it is. However, to pick out all the
figures and add them together correctly is a task that requires both patience and
skill. This is one of the most attractive figure puzzles that has ever been produced,
and it would be worth while to solve, even though no prizes ware offered. In the
event.that no one obtains the exact answer, the prizes will be awarded for the nearest
correct solution. Accuracy and patience are thc main factors for arriving at the correct or nearest count. Those who display these qualifications to the best advantage
will solve the puzzle best.
$5,000 in Prizes FREE
No One Knows Correct Answer
To make sure that no one know'the exact or correct answer to thc problem, or
how mnny miles CFCN can be heard, Mr. H. W. Wood, president of the United Farmers' Association of Alberta, Mr. W. M. Davidson, member of the legislative assembly, also editor ond publisher of the Calgary Daily Alhertan, anil Mr, J. I. McFarland,
president and managing director of the Alberta Pacific Grain Company, Limited,
kindly consented to erase one or more figures from the puzzle chart. This was done
at different times, consequently no one knows just what numbers were taken out.
Notes of these figures were mado by Mr, Davidson, Mr. McFarland and Mr. Wood,
sealed and placed in a safety deposit box, where they will remain until after the close
of the contest.
• Bear in mind that the correct answer was known before the judges erased some
of thc figures. After the contest is over, the judges will inform the Contest Department just what numbers they erased. These numbers will be subtracted from the
origin"! correct answer, thus giving the present correct answer.
SOLUTION AND REMITTANCE BLANK FOR CONTESTANTS
This contest is being run in conjunction with CFCN Radio Broadcasting Station,
All Contestants must use this blank when sending in solutions. Calgary.
My answer to the problem is 	
I desire to enter your Figure Puzzle Contest, and herewith remit, in accordance
$2,190.00 IN CASH
with conditions of same, the sum of $ .
Subscriptions collected from the following:
Name  Address 	
Name  Address	
Name Address	
Name  Address	
Name  Address	
Is this your first remittance on this puzzle?
Total amount of money sent to date $	
If this a winning solution, send prize to ....
which please place to my vredit.
New
Renewal
 I-
Amount
-I ?	
-I *	
-I *	
-I»	
-I *	
General Rules
1. This contest is open to everyone except employees of The Cranbrook Herald.
2. Additional puzzle charts on a good grade of paper may be obtained by writing to this office. They will be mailed to you free
of charge.
3. Competitors must fill out the entry blank and enclose a subscription of not less than $2,00, which will be credited to their
accounts, both as entrance fee to the contest and as u prepaid subscription to the Cranbrook Herald, which will then be sent at the
regular rate until the subscription expires.
4. The full amount of your subscription must be sent direct to
Contest department of the Cranbrotk Herald.
5. You have the same chance of winning a prize by paying a $2,00
subscription ns you would have by paying a larger amount, but the
amount of the first five prizes depends greatly upon tbe amount of
subscription money you send in to the Contest Department.
6. The contest is open to both old and new subscribers alike, anyone may help you in collecting subscriptions or solving the puzzle.
7. Subscriptions for $2.00 and over are transferable, a subscription makes a very acceptable birthday or other present, The
Cranbrook Herald will bc sent to any address specified by the contestant.
8. In case of a tie for any prize a second puzzle will bo presented,
which will be os practicable and as solvable as the first. Only those
tied will be permitted to solve Puzzle No. 2, Should two or more
persons be tied for any prize, that prize und as many other prizes following as there are persons tied, will be reserved for them, before
any prizes will be awarded for less correct solutions,
9. One person cannot win more than one Regular prize.
10. The Contest Department will bo more than pleased to answer
all questions regarding doubtful figures in thc puzzle.
11. No entries unaccompanied by a cash subscription will bc accepted.   No solution can be changed after it is once registered.
12. If a subscriber, who has given his subscription to some other
contestant to send in, desires later to send in a solution to thc puzzle,
he can do so. He does not require to send any further payment on
subscription unless he wants to.
13. All cheques, Postal notes, bank, postal, or express money orders, etc., should be made payable to The Cranbrook Herald.
14. Only those tied will be permitted to solve Puzzle No. 2. There
will bc no Third Puzzle, and no remittances will be accepted on Puzzle No. 2.
15. The Contest will close In February, 1025, but send in your solution us soon as possible as there arc some special prizes for early
solution senders.
l(i. Tho Contest Department nf Tho Cranbrook llernld reserves
the right to alter the rules and regulations. ^\lso to refund subscriptions and disqualify any competitors whom they consider ineligible.
Also to finally decide all questions which may arise. Competitors
must abide by their decisions.
FIRST   PRIZE
RADIOLA THREE, valued «t $45.00
cash,   will   nl.o   !>c  given.
Thc ca.ii prize, to bo given away
in the contest have a va'ue up to
$2,100.00.
(Please print Name and address and city plainly)
IMPORTANT:—BE SURE AND ANSWER ALL QUESTIONS, AND
ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO
The Contest Dept., THE HERALD,
Cranbrook, B.C.
$670.00 FORD TOURINO CAR plus 20 times the amount of
money sent In, up to $30.00. Thursday, February 26th, 1925
nn ruAxnitooi hibalb
PAGE     THREE
f***********************
I    LUMBERTON
I CHIPS
Mr. C. H. Werden, president of
the B. C. Spruce Mills, Ltd., arrived
in Lumberton on Monday of last
week, from his home in Ashland,
Wisconsin. Mr. Werden will spend
some time in Lumberton in the interests of the Spruce Mills.
Mr. Thomas Melville, who is employed in the capacity of watchman,
had the misfortune to injure his left
leg while performing his duty in
connection with his nightly inspection of the sprinkler system. Mr.
Melville is confined to the St. Eugene Hospital fur the present, und it
is hoped that he will noon be able
lo resume his duties.
Tho regular social meeting of the
Lumberton Club was held last Wednesday evening in the club rooms. A
largo number of members wero in
attendance at this gathering, eleven
tables uf empire whist being in play
during the early part of the evening.
A lunch was served by the committee in charge of arrangements, this
being followed by dancing till midnight. The committee has decided to
hold a raffle, the funds from which
Canadian Cafe
and Rooms
YAHK, B.C.
Opposite Garage, Near Bridge
Comfortable  Rooms with
Cafe ln Connection
We Solicit Tour Patronage j
A. Hjort - Prop.
**************************
PAUL  NORDGREN
When Yon
CALL AT YAHK
Do lot forget to Tlalt the
i i Paul Nordgren Store!:
On Main Road, near bride*
' \   New   Shipments   of  Seasonable   \
Goods Always Arriving.
**************************
7^**Mgtmmmm**^Z.
WMSBSMM
The old reliable remedy for rheumatism, neuralgia, sore throat and
spiains.
Best Liniment Made
Mk.-VK. 1.a«"*"kv,Edmonton.wttte*:—
"Hell froill« ImiMiiiKiiiKlmrivwiwlint
tlipitivlorcnllcil a. W»
bad sjuainit) ntikle. nml
' ildmelmuati
on il fl
Ihr
weeks
ot MiNAKD'S 1.1 Nl-
StllNT audio six &ya I
(nil out to work ag&ln,
* think it tlie best Liui-
intnt made,"
Mlnm-il'.* I iniivr itt
nt»ti>-j given ne s"
fiulion. For nny
■the or pn in. It
dives inntunt relief.
Minard's Liniment
Co., Limited
Yarmouth,    -   -    N.S.
arc to be devoted to a special purpose in connection with the club activities. Mr. J. Bartle, secretary of
tho club, has kindly donated a band-
painted pillow cover, the work being
done by himself. This cover is to be
raffled on next Wednesday evening.
tickets selling at 25c each. The committee is meeting with marked success in the selling of the numbers
and there will undoubtedly be a tidy
sum realized from this means of
raising revenue. The membership
of the club is steadily growing und
the interest among the present membership seems to be taking on new
life. The attendance this month
has exceeded that of any previous
month since the organization of the
club.
Messrs. I. Poole, secretary of the
Mountain Lumber Manufacturers'
Association, of Nelson, and A. Martin, of Vancouver, spent Tuesday of
this week in Lumberton, on business
in connection with the re-assessment
which was levied by the government
some time ago.
Miss Swanson is Spending several
days at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
K. Lunn.
Pat Downey has been stricken
with the gas fever, and has made
the purchase of a Ford.
Vancouver.— The industrial committee of the» Vancouver Board of
Trade is in consultation with representatives of interests that propose
to erect a plant for the handling of
copra, soya beans and peanuts. Production will be oils and stock feed.
This will be the first plant of the
kind on the Canadian Pacific Coast.
Raw materials will bc obtained from
the Orient.
GOV'T MAKES BIG IM-
PROVEMENT ON RED
TRAIL; RELIEF WORK
(From the Fernie Free Press)
The relief work provided by the
provincial government in the Fernie
district is in a fair way to being completed this month.
The work at Crow's Xest, of widening the hill road around the south
end of the lake will he finished on
the 26th. Notwithstanding the disagreeable weather some valuable
work has been done. The entire
road hns been widened so tbat two
cars can pass at any point. The cost
of the work at Crow's Nest will be
10.000.
Good work has also been accomplished al the hairpin turn. The
smaller turn on the far side has been
completely filled in and the foundation for the trestle across the big
cut is in place and the bridge will
be rushed to completion before the
snow goes. Just about $9,000 has
been spent on this work, the trestle
will cost $3,500 und another $1,500
will complete the job. The original
appropriation for relief work was
$15,000, but the total amount spent
will be in the neighborhood of $25,-
000.
The total amount of money spent
in the district in 1924 was $85,000;
$40,000 on bridges and $45,000 on
roads, and it is sincerely hoped that
we will be able to receive at least
this amount for 1925. Fernie bus 420
miles of roads, 125 gravel and 301
dirt, and it takes a lot of money for
upkeep. In Superintendent Uayne,
the district haB a man who is a hustler and if given half a chance would
make our roads a credit to the province.
NOTICE
OF
Dissolution of Partnership
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN -
that the partnership heretofore ex-
isting between the undersigned, Second- Hand Dealers, Cranbrook ond
Kimberley, has this day been dissolved by mutual consent. AH debts
owing to the partnership on account
of Cranbrook business are to be
paid to William Thompson, and all
claims against the said partnership
are to be presented to the said William Thompson, when the same will
be settled.
Dated at Cranbrook, this Oth day
of February/1926.
WILLIAM THOMPSON
HERBERT HARROP
MARCH ROD & GUN
INTERESTING TO
ALL SPORTSMEN
BEN ALLEN, of "The Dumbells"
In "OH, YES!" which comes to
(he Auditorium on Saturday
night, March 7th.
"THE DUMBELLS" COMING TO AUDITORIUM
SATURDAY, MARCH 7
The world famous "Dumbells
Company," under the personal di-
rection of (apt. Mert. Plunkett, will
offer their latest and most succe.^K-
ful revue, "Oh. Yes!" ut the Auditorium Theatre for an engagement
of one night only. Saturday. March
7th.
Among the outstanding features
of this new revue are Al. Plunkett's
songs. "Do Shrimps Make Good Mothers?" "Cross-Words," and a new
"fly" song. Knss Hamilton sings,
"The Kis> That I Got in the Moonlight," and "My Dream Boy." "Red"
Newman has two great songs, "Let's
Keep the Money in the Country" and
"How Does the Milk Get Into Co-
counutsV" Another great comedy
song is Pal Rafforty's "Lips That
Touch Kippers Shall Never Touch
Mine." Stan. Bennett has a couple
of delightful songs, one of them being "Colonel Lipstick of the Cold-,
cream Guards." "Jock" Holland
leads the beauty chorus in "Where
Are Tho Girls uf the Old Brigade?"
There are two great comedy sketches, one called "Red Justice" and
the other "Some Billet." In these
humorous travesties "Red" Newman,
Pat Rafferiy, Morley Plunkett, Stan
Bennett, and '.lock Holland, are afforded ample scope for their individual characterizations, which are
so well known and liked by the
"Dumbells" patrons.
Captain Plunkett and his "Dumbells Orchestra" provide a half hour
of harmony and syncopation,  inclu-
A Sweet Brenth\
at all times I
^"Oi'iMM-j,'
Gtoin Young, Dry Klan leader
of Herrin, III., who was shot down
In the latest riot at tliat place. He
leaves a blind widow, who lost her
right in rioting last year. The
town is again under martial law
ding in their repertoire a bit of
everything from y,i/.?. X" classical selections.
"Oh. Yes!" is a splendid successor
to " Ace High." which broke all Canadian records in its twenty-six
weeks on the rond. The company remains exactly the same, but the revue is entirely new from start to finish, not a line, sontr or netting of
"Ohj Yes!" ever having been used
here before. In fact, thi.- is the first
appearance of this company in Cranbrook since 1920.
After catinfi ot sraokinft
Yvrigley's freshens thc mouth
and sweeten* thc breath.
Nerves arc soothed, thruat h
refmlied and difit-stion aided
So easy to oury Utc little pjciwt!
\^ after etfery meal/n^
Golden.- -After   -ICI
urlng the Unl
ted States for the rig
it ki
id of land
for  fur  farming.   11.
S.   Sutherland,
«.f  Portland, On o n
rei
ently con-
eluded the purchase <
t a
argc tract
of land in the heart t
f th
• beautiful
Columbia River Vallc
y. 4
S miles to
the   SOUth   of   here   :i
d n
ar  to the
town of SptUamache
n.
There arc
ir.uskrat  houses  on   J
r. S
itherland'i
property from which
it i
s stated, a
revenue of $2,400 n
is   8
cured  Inst
season.    Cattle and
shoo
i  ranching
.■a a large scale will
also
be under-
taki ■  bj Mi   Sutherli
nd.
♦♦♦*•>***♦*+**♦♦**♦♦♦♦♦♦+**
FOR GOOD MEALS   J
and Comfortable Rooms |
GO TO— |
The New Cafe 1
Mount Baker
Hotel
30 Newly Furnished Rooms,
All with running water (Hot
and Cold) some with private
baths,   some   witli   shower
haths
BAKER ST., CRANBROOK
Only absolutely first-class fireproof Hotel in the city.
The stories in the March issue of
Rod and Gun in Canada are sure to
excite the Intcrect of every cportn
man. Staking All on Horse Sense,
by E. Dnltoh Tipping; Western Experiences, hy Donald Graham; Thc
Tenderfoot, by Roderick O'Neill, ure
a few of the interesting stories contained in this number. Canada's
Wild Buffalo, By Maxwell Graham,
is an article brimful of interesting
and valuable information on this
subject. In addition there aro the
regular stories—Thut Tent and Thirty-Five Below, hy P. V. Williams;
Slightly Mistaken, by Martin Hunter; Some Adventures With the
Greut Horned Owl, by Bonnycustle
Dale, and Emperor Geese & Queenly Swans, by J. W. Winson, which
cover a variety of subjects, and the
departmental editors, W. C. Motley.
R. . Lincoln, C. S. I.andis and M. U,
Bates have brought their departments vj. to their usual high standard, helping to make the March
number one of the best yet.
Published monthly hy W. J. Tuylor.  Ltd..  Woodstock,  Ontario.
Success at 40
THE
NEW HOTEL
Yahk, B.C.
J. MARKLUND, Proprietor
 1 I  t   ft,    .:L* .'
When lo Yahk make your home at
THE NEW HOTEL.
Thii Hotel is new (rom bottom to top.    Twenty-five nicely furnished rooms. All are clean
and comfortable.
RESTAURANT IN CONNECTION.
CRANBROOK CARTAGE & TRANSFER CO.
TOWRISS * ROBERTS
Agents for Hard and Soft Coal.    Distribution Cars a
Specialty,   ■xcallcot Warehousing
SAND and GRAVEL
OPPOSITE C.P.R. DEPOT
Telephoae 63       .1.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
P .0. Boa ;
Twenty yean ago Walter S. Gif-
lori of Salem, Mass., went lo work
at pay-roll clerk for the Western
Electric at Chicago. Last week lie
was elected president of the American Telephone and Telegraph Co.,
the biggest public service corporation in the U. 3. He It 40 yeara
<iM.
THERE'S  JOY
in dining at a Restaurant where
things are kept immaculate, the
service prompt and the food exceptionally tasty nnd whole-
some. Thnt's why you'll enjoy
dining here- Our daily menu
always Includes mnny delightful dishes.
VICTORIA CAFE
Fortieth Anniversary of Canada's First Trans-Continental
System Marks Centenary of Locomotive.
- ,.-.-gi -■-
xts- /-.-.    ^cw;'
Above U mi unknown ariUt'n conception of n tent of *peed en the
linltlmwre timl Ohio II-hIMtuj*- In IR30, beftvern ■ horot-.Irnnii rur nnd Telrr
Cooper'* diminutive locomotive "Tow Thowb". On th* lefl 1* **t-n the
flro; passenger llally ln,m the Kiat at the ('uniiiHtin I'nclfle Depot, IVrnie,
II.C. HlKhl, » iloii Me-ended wood-ho rains locomotive Imported to .Interim
In IM'-'. und u»ed on tbe Toronto MpUalnc Hiillivtiy—ilelrm. the —J300",
repri-ot-nllm; thr wmc ot locomotive efficiency, a* now operated br the
i nnndlnn Piielfle.
TWO events make 3925 notable In the annals of rail transportation. It
maiks the centenary of the locomotive engine and the fortieth anniversary of the completion of Canada's first transcontinental, the Canadian
Pacific Ron way's main line from Montreal to Vancouver. The first opened
a new chapter ln thc history of the world; the second a new chapter in the
history of Canada.
Looking h;ick over the events of tho intervening century It will roadfly
he agreed that tlie introduction of thc locomotive waa one of tbe most
important events In modem history. It has enriched the lf.re of the Old
World by delivering to it at low cost the product'- of thc ends of the earth;
while it has brought within the reach of tbe pioneer on the frontiers of
civilization highly tinished products which can be developed only where a
numerous population makes possible a minute diviaion of labor. It haa
given the settler in Northern Alberta, over 5.000 miles distant from London,
a market in that great metropolis just as certain as that enjoyed by tho
English farmer. It has also made the same settler as much a customer of
London as are tbe people of near-by countries.
The lncomotive engine made Ita first appearance in Canada In 1837 on
the Champlain and St. Lawrence Railroad. Tbis road was only 16 miles
Icmp. and ran between the town of La Prairie on the St. Lawrence River
and St. John s on the Rfc'ielieu. This railway was opened in 1836. being
opciated by horses during the first year.
However, it was not until with the Incorporation of the Grand Trunk
Railway in 1SJ2 that the railway era in Cannda really began. While a
btE-'iunlng had been made in 1837. still during the next fifteen years only
50 miles of line were added. The Grand Trunk linked up Ontario ami
Qurl.ec, and gave boil: provinces direct connection with the Atlantic coast
thriugh Portland, lt also laid the foundations for direct connection between
thnt port and Chicago. Much railway building followed In Ontario. The
nexl project of Importance was the building of the Intercolonial, which was
begun In lfctili, and completed in 1876. This gave Ontario and Quebec direct
connection through Canadian territory with a Canadian port on the Atlantic
open all the year round. In tbe meantime an agitation for tiie building of
a railway to connect Ontario and Quebec with tbe Pacific Coast culminated
in the incorporation of the Canadian Pncific Railway.
On November 7th. ISSli at Cragellachlu ln Kagle Pass, a gorge in the
Gobi Range, British Columbia. Sir Donald A. Smith, afterwards Lord Strath-
con.i and Mount Itoyal. drove tbe last spike In tbe main llu of the Canadian
Pacific Railway, thus connecting Montreal with Vancouver. Tills was a
notable event, not only in the history of Canada, but of the British Empire.
Ily the connecting uf the Pacific Coast with Montreal Canada secured its
first trnnsconilurntal railway. Indeed, It was the first real transcontinental
uu tblE contlurnt. foi while in 1869 the east coast of tbe United States was
conuec'.cd v.lth San l'rancli=co by rail, and several other such connections
have been added, slill even now no single railway in the United States
extendi from Coast lo Coast as does the Canadian Pacific in Canada.
Novombor 7ib was also a notable day for thc British Kmpirc in that thc
Canadian Pacific provided a short cut from Britain to the Orient. As Sir
Charles Tupper In his Itc-minlaccnces has pointed out, lt brought Yokohama
three week* nearer to London than it was by thc Suez Canal.
The history of tbe Canadian Pacific Railway Is the history of Greater
Canada. When it was first .proposed there were only tour provinces In
Confederation, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Between
1S70 and 1873 Prince Kdward Inland, Manitoba, and British Columbia
entered, the last mentioned on the express condition that It would be con-
necind with Eastern Canada by a line of railway. At tbat time Manitoba
was a mere postage stamp in dimensions, and thc regions between it and
the itockies were unorganized territory.
The promise of the Canadian Pacific not only brought British Columbia
Into Confedl ration, and cave Canada a window on the Pacific; but the bulld-
n^ of It, by establishing direct and quick communication between the oast
.im! the w st fixed the destiny of tho vast regions WOlt of the Great Lakes
:nd north of the i!ii]i parallel, The ties of sentiment were UlUl stiengibeneil
ny Hie economic link of steel. Fifty years ago it was by no 016*01 certain
llial the territories between Lake Superior and the Hockics would not pass
into the hands of the United States. Thc shortest route from BMtftrn
Canada to Port Garry, now Winnipeg, was via Chicago and Ht. Paul Trade
moved north and ROUth rather than cast and WWt, so that political ubsorp-
'lon uccmed likely to follow American economic penetratfaa.
It is with the development of Western Canada that the fortunes of thc
Canadian Pacific have been indlssolubly linked.   A* it has expanded the
West has grown.   In 18S5 there were hardly mor<- than 180.1  people in
the whole country west of the Great Lakes. As a result of tht Iti- i Ilr-b-lllon
the country was also in a state of utter confusion Still the year 1886 marks
the real beginning of the period of western development Ts- country
continued its policy of aggressive construction by adding feeders 'o its
main line. This encouraged settlement, for settlers [ell C: :.. :,'. secure
as long as they were not too far from the railway. Note how th' pOpuli 'Ion
on the plains began to Increase. In 18S5. when there wera ttot more than
1,000 miles of railway there were only 130.'•"(, people i:i ■,:,.1i vast territory
between Winnipeg and Calgary and Edmonton, one-half of whom were
located fn Manitoba. Within tho next 20 years, tbe prairie provln'-os. with
about 4.500 miles of railway, had a population of 800,000, Ly 1983 these
provinces had 20.000 miles of line, of which 8,500 belonged to tbe Canadian
Pacific, and their population was 2.000/-00.
Tho driving of the !a>>t spike at Craigellacbie also marked the opening,
by the company of the most aggressive and sustained Immigration and j
colonization campaign that Canada has witnessed.   From that time to the*
present the company h:n sp'-nt nearly $70,000,000 on its Immigration and
colonization activities.   And It got the immigrants too.   Luring the years,
preceding the incorporating of the compnny Immigrants were coming lo ■
Canada at thc rate of only 36.000 a year.   Tills was a wry light inflow, for
away back in 1832 as many si 52,000 were received; but during the period
1881-91 Immigration was very nearly trebled: that ls H came at th" rate of
92.000 a year.   Indeed, during lbr last two decades of the list century the
Government seems to have left Immigration pretty much to tbe company,
for durint thfl tS82-!!»n2 period, the total expenditure nn Immigration was
only $5,475,000. as compared with an appropriation of 18,4004)00 this year.
Through the company's agencies have come the greater proportion of the
over G.000.000 Immigrants received during the last 10 years.
Coincident with the driving of tbe la.st spike at Cralgellnchie the
company launched out as a promoter of foreign trade and transoceanic
trrfvel. In this department not only has It been by far the most Important
factor in Canada, but one of the most Important within thfl British Empire,
which is saying a great deal, when it is recalled that thfl lattSl is tbo
greatest commercial unit that the world has ever s-cn. Within leas than
nlno months after this .-pike had been driven there arrived at Port Moody,
the then terminus of the Pacific, ;t brig with the first cargo from lapan for
the railway That little brig the "W. B. Flint" of 800 tons, haa croivn Into
a great fleet of over 400,000 tons, sailing on two oceans, and linking Europe,
America, Asia, and Oceania, In 1887 a regular transpacific service was
established, and In 1008 a similar service was launched on the Atlantic.
Begun originally as a feeder to the freight department of the railway, the
passenger feature ol ibese steamship services has now become of chief
Importance. As an evidence or how the trans-Pacific trade boa grown it
may be snld that In INK-f, Cunada sold to China only 16,978 worth nf products
and to Japan only 121,780 worth, whereon during the 12 montbft ending
1924, bor sales to Chliu were 114.612,4811 and to Japan 92u.87o.03i PACIE FOUR
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
Thursday, February 26th, 1925
jfYouBRetK
SE
DON'T WORRY!
Pick Up The Pieces. We can match them j
| —and possibly improve on them.     Our |
experience with thousands of eyes has 3
made us experts in that condition of •:
yours.   Come in today and let us have a |
confidential chat about vour eyes. 3
4
REMEMBER — THIS WEEK IS t
"FATHER AND SON WEEK" i
ros: I
NEXT DOOR TO THE POST OFFICE |
IU Cranbrook herald
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
r A. WILLIAMS - - U* i'OTTER, B. 8c.
SuliwrliptliMi l'rico $8.00 l'er Year
Te Uultod Suites  $2.50 l'er Vear
AdvertiBinB Ratog on Application, Cbangea of Copy
tor Advertising should l»u banded In not Inter than Wed-
oeeOey noon to .* *.*i-rj attention.
MARCH
1925 i
■l*J*   HON   TUI   VCD   TMU
rrti  sat j
12 3 4 5
6 7
8 9 10 11 \Z
;: ;:4
15161718 29 2021
22 25 24 25 Z6
27 28
29303!
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26. 1925
ANOTHER MILESTONE
IF thc Herald may be permitted to point it out,
without having first referred it to tlie ^reat self-
constituted I AM of East Kootenay journalism,
ihis issue of the paper marks an entry int«> the
twenty-seventh year of history. This period bridges a long span. It barks back to tbe time when
('ranbrook was an uncertain point in a sparsely settled district that the pioneers were hopeful of, but
cot sure about. They took the chance, and those
that have stayed with Cranbrook all through these
years have had the satisfaction of seeing steady
development without anj boom madness. Steady
industrial influences have grown in the city and district and carried tbe place along as they have prospered, till now Cranbrook's strong position is due
to the fact that it leans not upon one of nature's
resources, or any single industrial activity, but has
a variety of interests contributing to its business
pulse.
As might be expected in steering a course
of such length in a growing western town, the paper has had shoals aud narrows to navigate, and
the pilots have changed more than once. Through
thick and thin, however, in times when the horn of
plenty seemed close at hand, or when the editors
found it necessary lo tighten their belt in lieu of a
meal) and whatever tbe personal opinion on national and other issues of its editors may have been—
through it all the paper seems to have stuck pretty close to its purpose of being a mouthpiece to echo
thc story of the development and opportunities of
the place, and to champion whatever might seem to
he the various steps through wliich the ends striven for were to be attained by the community.
Sins of omission and commission by former
regimes are hard to live down. No atonement
can in some case suffice for them. Nevertheless
it must be recorded at this time, at the turn of another page in the volume of thc years, that an adherence to principles is worth while. A refusal
to compromise on a number of questions lias cost
money in the form of business which might have
been had. has cost support which may still be had
as a sort of reward to recede from positions taken up—hut the allurements have been passed up.
Hard work is tbe outcome of such policies, but at
least there is satisfaction in tbe maintenance of an
uncompromising front.
The outstanding event in the year just closed from the point of view of Herald annals is the
launching of a newspaper enterprise in the town of
Kimberley by the proprietors of this paper. Contrary to the studied reports being circulated, this
second paper is not being issued as a localized edition of another paper, or vice versa, but for reasons of economy which must be obvious it is found
expedient to print tbe two papers in the same establishment. This in no way prevents them being separate identities as newspapers,
With the continued goodwill of it- widening
circle of friends, and those whose sense of fairness
cannot bc warped by every wanton influence
brought into play, the Herald faces another year
determined to merit to the utmost the friendships
it has had evidence of.
*****
SHOULD WATCH BOTH ENDS
in prosecuting the ease. The premises in question
are duly licensed to sell beer, but restrictions are
laid down as to whom it shall sell to. The general
opinion is that the place was bcing conducted along
generally similar lines to other clubs at various
points. The law provides that the beer shall bc
purchased through government stores in the regular
way by individual members, and lockers provided for
keeping thc beer, members being allowed the privilege of going there to drink, aud taking a friend.
But the point arises if the government had
knowledge, as it must have had, that tlie beer on
these premises was uot being consumed regularly
why steps were not taken to put thc purchase on the
footing called for by the strict letter of the law.
In other words, if the government allowed irregu
larities in the purchase of the beer, is it not a natural conclusion that there will also be some laxity in
the enforcement of thc regulations surrounding its
consumption?
By thc simple expedient of tightening up its
liquor store sales, thc government could largely
eliminate thc necessity for .such distasteful episodes
as invariably occur when information is procured in
this way by informers. The police have a good idea
of lhe ultimate disposal of a good deal of liquor
purchased in a perfectly legal way, and they
should be given free access to the records of the
stores where the liquor is procured. The government would bc better employed iu watching its
sales than iu checking up the resulting cases of
over-consumption. It's just like stopping to bind up
some small scratches when there is au artery bleeding,
The government's policy of making the sale of
beer freer and less restrictive has not secured the
desired results in stopping illicit or irregular sale,
and now it is proposed to open the regulations wider
when there will be a new crop of law infractions to
contend with.
PEACE TIME HEROES
THE diphtheria or "black death" epidemic recently at Nome, Alaska, provided an epic of heroism
that was compressed down in thc daily newspapers
to far less space than it deserved by the volume of
other news more spectacular perhaps, and so more
appealing to the public. While columns were being
devoted to the efforts being made to reach a man
imprisoned in a Kentucky cave, a very few inches
sufficed to tell thc story of the self-sacrificing labors of a doctor aud a nurse in combating an epidemic which might have taken toll of hundreds of
lives had it not been checked. Prompt remedial mca-
ures with such supplies as were at hand and the
tringent enforcement of what restraints and restrictions were known to bc in thc public interests
to prevent the undue spreading of the disease, together with constant and unremitting toil till such
time as additional supplies could be brought in from
the outside world by means of dog teams—these
were incidents in the story of how these two people
battled to stave off the inroads of the grim reaper
into their outpost community. It is a story which
could be paralleled in many unrecorded cases, and
underlying them all i.s thc same self-sacrificing spirit and devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming
liscouragements and handicaps.
1 LB>
wmi«
Magic
BAKING
POWDER
**************************
I TWENTY |
I     YEARS   AGO     j
*!* Extract! from the Issue of *
* The Cranbrook Herald of this *
I        Date Twenty Years Ago. ,-.,
**************************
The road appropriation for the district is announced as $12,010; $788
being spent in the town of Cranbrook.
Several carloads of piling, all over
a hundred feet in length were this
week shipped from Kimberley to
Montreal. It was considered a remarkable shipment, the piling being
the longest ever sent out of this
country.
Present indications point to much
activity in the Columbia Valley this
summer. The survey of the K.C.R.
from near Jaffray 180 miles north to
Golden is completed, and construction is expected to commence very
shortly.
The St. Eugene concentrator broke
all records one day last week, when
in a twelve hour shift over 196 carloads of ore went through, making
132 tons of concentrates.
A fire at the entrance of the St.
Eugene mine endangered tho lives of
fifty men or so working in the tunnel, when the timbers caught fire,
and the smoke and fumes were blown
in through the tunnel by the strong
draft. Fortunately the men at work
were able to make thoir escape.
The dispute between the B.C. Telephone Co. and the light and power
company, over thc telephone situation at Fernie, has ended by the former selling out to the latter at a
handsome figure. So Fernie's telephone war comes to an end.
Friday,  February 27
A   MAN   THAT   HATH FRIENDS
must   shew   himself   friendly,   and
there is a friend that sticketh closer
than a brother, — Proverbs 18:24
+   +   +
Saturday,  February  28
THE LOUD is the portion of mine
inheritance nnd of my cup; thou
maintainest my lot. The lines nre
fallen unto me in pleasant places:
yea, I have a goodly heritage.—■
10: 5,0.
+    +    +
Sunday, March  1
OF A TRUTH I perceive that God
is no respecter of persons: but in
every mition he that feareth him,
and worketh righteousness, is accepted with him.—Acts 10: 84,85,
+    +    +
Monday,  March 2
BE SURE YOUR SIN WILL FIND
YOU OUT.—Numbers 32:2U.
+   +   +
Tuesday, March 3
COMMIT THY WAY unto the Lord;
trust also in him, and he shall bring
it to pass.—Psalm 117: 3,5.
+ + +
Wednesday, March 4
BLESS THE LORD, 0 my soul, nnd
forget not all his benefits; who for-
giveth all thine iniquities, who heal-
eth all thy diseases, who redeemeth
thy life from destruction. — Psalm
103:2,4.
a a a a
Thursday, March 5
WHEN THOU PASSEST through
the waters, I will be with thee, and
through the rivers, they shall not
overflow thee; when thou walkest
through thc fire thou shalt not be
burned, neither shall the flame kin-
die upon thee.—Isaiah 43:2.
Vancouver.—One hundred British
farm families will reaeh the province
early next spring. These are the
forerunners of 3,000 families that
are to come out and go on the land
in Canada. Provincial and British
government assistance is being given
them to get started.
EASTERN interests are said to be urging thc
government at Ottawa to grant a subsidy to
allow of thc establishment of a coke industry there.
This is a market hitherto supplied almost entirely
from United States points. The government would
bc acting on a sounder principle, however, if they
devoted their energy and the people's money to
building up the existing coke industries in this country, and helping to widen the market for these so
that they could compete with the imported product.
There are coke plants in the Crow's Nest district
that could supply a far wider demand than at present exists, and if thc government were to assist by
way of rebated freight rates on thc long hauls to thc
east, work would be provided for many more men in
the district, and a general condition of prosperity
could be built up on a more satisfactory basis than
by means of a new subsidized industry.
from Our Exchanges
USING its customary procedure, the government
gathered information against a  club  in  the
city for selling beer illegally, and has been engaged
THE PRIME MINISTER HEARS FROM QUEBEC
Evidence that the Dominion government will not go
very far with its proposed curbing of the Senate is accumulating.
The Prime Minister is already henring from Quebec. The temper of Quebec is plainly against any tampering with the British North America Act. Quebec's
religious liberties and civil and legislative rights are
defined and guaranteed by that Act.
Quebec will reason that if the British North America Act can be altered to allow one government to restrict the powers of the Senate, it may some other time
be changed to let some other government lessen Quebec's representation in the Dominion House, or abolish
the use of the French language 18 an official language
in Canada, or do some other thing injurious to the citizens of French Canada. Thc alarm has already been
sounded in Quebec.
If the members of parliament from that province
resist the move to amend the B.N.A. Act, in what position will such action leave the King government? The
Western Progressives who arc demanding the head of the
Senate, are the balance of power in the House of Commons, hut so far as Premier King is concerned, the Quebec members nre the power itself. It is by their per-
miFsion that the King government exists. The Prime
Minister can not do anything that they oppose. They
may allow him to amend the British North America Act,
but if they do it will be a sure proof that an astonishing
change has come over French Canada in respect to protection of the rights there enjoyed as a Frcnch-spcn-
king minority. — Calgary Herald.
Summer town, P.K.I. —Fox ranching continued to prosper in Prince
Edward Island during the past year,
some $3,000,000 being realized from
thc sale of live foxes and pelts. The
desirability of the island's foxes for
foundation stock hns brought about
a heavy demand on the provincial
stock and during 1024 shipments
have been made to Upper Canada,
Manitobu, Alberta, British Columbia,
Oregon, Washington, France and
England.
LAND REGISTRY ACT
(Section 160)
IN THE MATTER or Lota 16
and 17 in Block 2 of Lot 4683
Plan 1293
Proof having been filed in my office of the loss of Certificates of
Title Nos. 5952-1 and C254-1 to the
above mentioned lands in the names
of Charles Oscar Nelson and John
Sanderson, and dated the 20th of
August, 1919 and the 30th of September, 1919, respectively:
I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE of my
intention at the expiration of one
calendar month from the first pub
lication hereof to issue to the said
Charles Oscar Nelson and John San
derson provisional Certificates of
Title in lieu of such lost Certificates.
Any person having nny information
with reference to such lost Certificates of Title is requested to com*
municnte with the undersigned.
DATED at the Land Registry Office, Nolson, B.C., this 10th day of
February, 1925.
A. W. IDIENS,
Registrar
Date of first publication, Feb. 19th
1925 52-4
*****************************************************
| Just Arrived!
*   BHBi:.*! I       ■   nm  ID ■--——f"—
A CAR LOAD OF
DODGE
1925
MODELS
It will be worth your while to drop in
and inspect the Models in the
present shipment, consisting of
SECIALS - STANDARDS
and SEDANS
AUDITORIUM ™
"The
Dumbells"
InCAPT.PLUNKETT'S
"Oh Yes!"
AND IT'S "ACE HKiH"
COMPANY OF 30 INCLUDING
ROSS HAMILTON, AL. PLUNKETT,
"RED"  NEWMAN,   STAN. BENNETT,
PAT RAFFERTY,   "JOCK" HOLLAND
AND 10 PIECE "DUMBELL ORCHESTRA"
Prices: S1.50 & $2.00 ™
SEATS NOW, At Benttie-Noblc's
Look At These Prices
Compare the Quality
Choice Pork Legs,
Choice Pork Loins
Choice Pork Shoulders
Choice Side Pork
22c lb.
25c lb.
18c Ib.
17c lb.
12'/*clb.
8c & 10c lb.
Choice Beef Pot Roasts
Choice Boiling Beef
CHOICE VEAL, SPRING LAMB and MUTTON
STRICTLY FRESH EGGS     ■      ■      50c Dozen
SEE OUR WINDOW DISPLAY FRIDAY EVENING
P. BURNS & Co Ltd.
Phone 10        ...        . Cranbrook, B.C.
ffff.vfff.vff
Co-Operative \
Phone 104 Phone 104  *\
OTSTER SHELL \
We are expecting a shipment from Baltimore, Md., tlmt
we will sell for:—
100 lb Sack,   %2M
per ton -$45.00
ORDER EARLY
SALLY ANN 2 tins for 25c
SNAP, per tin   25c
CANNED PEAS, per tin 20c
CANNED CORN, per tin   20c
ROYAL NAVY TOBACCO. 1-2's   70c
ONTARIO CHEESE, per lb  30c
CLARK'S TOMATO CATSUP 30c
NAVEL ORANGES, 3 dozen $1.00
FLORIDA GRAPE FRUIT, large size, 2 for 25c
LETHBRIDGE BREAD
McLAREN'S IMPERIAL CHEESE, per pot  45c
NOTICE
The regular monthly meeting of the Co-Operative
Ladies' Guild will he licit! at the home of Mrs. T,
S. Gill, at 8 p.m., Wednesday, March 4th.
Cranbrook Dist. Co-Op. Soc. ji
Vffffffffffffff.Vfffffffffffffffffffffffffff.Vfff.V
«-lAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA-^^^--^WAAAA-V-AAAAAAAA-W-<
PHONE 82
PHONE 82 \
DEZALL'S GARAGE   ji™««2
♦+♦♦*+*♦+*+++♦♦♦♦■♦*♦++♦♦+
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
We Have Now Opened
At the Former Building of the
DOMINION MEAT MARKET
With a First Class Stock of
FRESH MEATS,  SMOKED MEATS,
POULTRY, BUTTER, EGGS, ETC.
Big Butte Dairy Fresh Milk and Cream
H. D. KEMP
PHONE 82
ARMSTRONG   AVENUE Thursday, February 26th, 1925
1'HK   ClUNBROOH   HKRAl.t
PA HE FIVB
tVfffffff.V*Vffffffffff.Vfff.V.Vfffffff.Vffffffffffff
KIMBERLEY
AND WYCLIFFE NEWS
ffffffffffffffffffff.vffffffffffffffffffff
Yihea l'ou Think cl Insurance
— Call Up —
BEALE & ELWELL
Cranbrook & Kimberley
Solo Agent* (or Kimberley Townsite.
DAN'S TAXI
Cranbrook - Phone  534
— Trips Anywhere —
— Prices Reasonable —
Special Trips Arranged
Cars for Hire with or Without
Driver
At the time of writing, curling and
hockey are at a standstill owing to
the mild spell.
NISBET & GRAHAM
Barristers, Solicitors, &c.
Offices: Imperial Bank Bldg.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
OFFICES at KIMBERLEY
IN K. of P. HALL
Open Every Wednesday from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
*****************
t|   KIMBERLEY   !
If NEWS NOTES £
:**************************
j    School   inspector  V.   '/..   Manning
i was in town in his official capacity on
Wednesday ami Thursday.
Mr. \V. M. Archibald spent several
days in Kimberley this week.
Mr. Bowman, of the Kootenay Music House Nelson, was a business visitor the end of the week.
Mr. Blngay, of Trail, was a town
visitor the end of last week.
Mrs. (nr.) Hanlngton returned
homo on Wednesday last, having
spent several weeks at Victoria and
Vancouver.
Mr. J. J. Warren of the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co., puid a
visit to Kimberley on Saturday last.
Mr. Brown returned to Kimberley
on Monday, having spent several
days nt Creston.
Mrs. C. A. Foote entertained a
number of curlers on Friday evening
in honor of the winners of the
"Montgomery Cup" and their friends.
Covers were hud for fifteen at the
banquet table, and a very enjoyable
evening was spent.
Mickey Edmunds left on Sunday
for Kaslo, where lie has been trans
ferred to the branch of the Bank of
Montreal at that point.
Alex. Fergus left on Monday for
Hamilton, Ontario. He expects to be
away for several months.
The ladies of the Catholic Church
are still hard at work preparing for
their big affair on the 17th of March.
Another program is in preparation
for presentation at the Orpheum in
aid of the Union Church, more detailed particulars of which will be
published shortly. This will be of a
strictly amateur nature, and patrons
may look forward to a real treat.
The Native Sons of Canada are
EAST OR WEST-
HOME IS BEST
holding forth on Wednesday night in
the Oddfellows' Hall, and a big time
is anticipated. Member;- from outside points will be here in full force.
Miss Kulo of the Sullivan mine,
■■■-. ho h as recently operated on for
appendicitis at the St. Eugene hospital, Cranbrook, returned home on
Sunday.
WYCLIFFE NOTcs
OkO^'
A few drops of Shiioh brings quick
relief to throat irritation, hoarseness and coughing. Shiioh is economical—a favorite remedy for
over fifty years. At all druggists,
30c, 60c and $1.20.
SHILOH&ni
Use Celery King
a gentle laxative "Tea"
that purifies the blood
At yoar druggist 30c and 60c.
THE yearning to possess a home is an instinct.
*    It is not peculiar to men.   Birds and beasts
have it. )       ;   -3MHI
Till- HOMEBUILDER AND HOMEOWNER
IS \ SOURCE OF PROSPERITY, ONE
HOMEBUILDER IS WORTH MORE TO
ins COMMUNITY THAN TWO RENTERS
Decide TO-DAY to get more enjoyment
out of life, nnd to he worth more to your
community — yourself.
The OTIS STAPLES LUMBER COMPANY will help
■iiiii wiih your plans in n way tlml will make homchuiljinic
n pleasant experience,     CALL TO-DAY,
THE OTIS STAPLES LUMBER
COMPANY,   LIMITED j
Kimberley   and   Wycliffe   f
1
♦+++4,t4.4.+++*++-4.<.++t+++<.*4..f.!.++++++.|,<.<.<,+<.+.;..-*.<.<.<,++t+4,t+4,
l***************************************************^
DR. C. W. HUFFMAN,  Chiropractor
C  U  N A R  D
ANCHOR
ANCHOR DONALDSON
CANADIAN SERVICE
FROM HALIFAX
To Plymouth, Cherbourg, London
Ausonla Mar. ',»; Antonia Mnr. 30
Andanla   (omits London)   Apr. 20
To Queenttown and Liverpool
(monia Mnr. 16; April 13
To Glasgow—
Saturnia Mar. 30
FROM NEW YORK
To Quccnatown and Liverpool—
Auranin Alar. 7; Cnronia Mar. 14.
Lancastrla Alar. 21 Carmania Mnr 28
To Cherbourg and  Southampton—
Aqultanla, Mar. 14: Apr. 8; Apr. 20
Berengaria Mar 25; Apr, 15; May fl
To Londonderry and Glasgow—
Athenia  Mnr.  7;  Columbia  Mnr  21.
Cameronla Mar. 28; Tuscania Apr. -1
To Plymouth, Cherbourg, London—
Ausonla, Mnr. 7; Apr. 11
Anlonin Mar. 28; Albnnia June 13
To Plymouth, Cherbourg, Hamburg
Andanla, Mnr.  14; Apr. 18, May 23.
Money orders nnd drafts at lowest
rates.    Full  information  from  Agents, or Company's Offices, 622 Hastings St. \\\, Vancouver, B.C.
KIMBERLEY
(Over Kimberley Hardware)
A\omlnys( Wednesdays &
Fridays
10 to 6
And by Appointment
CRANBROOK
(HnnHon Block)
Tuesdays, Thursdays &
Saturdays
11 - 12 and 2 - 5
Alio by Appointment
* ** ********** * * *** * * ** ** * ** ************ ** * ** **it*******
{Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
of Canada, Limited.
OFFICES, SMELTING AND REFINING DEPARTMENT
TRAIL,   BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS AND REFINERS
Purchasers ol Oold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Ores
Producers ol Gold, Silver, Copper, Pig Lead and Zinc
"TADANAC"BRAND
■MMBBRMMB
HURRY'S WHITE LUNCH::
IS THE PLACE TO EAT.
While Help Onlj Is Employed. '• !
Yon will IM this Cate a Homer
I'liire ta Knjoj V'oor Meals
ALEX. HURRY   •   Prop.
*************************f
KSiiii..:.:;;:,:!:
;.::, ...i
IF
YOU
APPRECIATE
Good   Food—WeM   Cooked—in
one  of the most unitary
kitchen, in the Weit
Try the
WESTERN CAFE
Van Horne Street
Opp. S. end of C.P.R. Depot
AND—
Price* Are Reasonable
MAKE the WESTERN
YOUR HOME
Mr. and Mrs. O. Bourgeois, for
nieily residents of Crescent Valley
have taken up residence in Wycliffe
Mr. Bourgeois having entered thi
employ of tho company as stockman.
Messrs. Bert Sang and Alex Der
by, <>f Cranbrook, were in Wycllff*
on business on Tuesday last. Thes*
gentlemen arrived in state, and 'ti;
said that during a business tuik Bert
so far forgot himself ns Lo quot
''custom built cigars with automatic
windshield wipers." We fear the
genial salesman had lost his grip on
things and mixed the genus automl-
bilis with the fragrant weed.
Mr. Roy Barrows, who has been
receiving treatment for n badly injured foot, in the St. Eugene Hospital, returned on Wednesday last.
He will have to depend on crutches
for locomotive power for some weeks
to come, however.
Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Adlard were
Tuesday evening visitors at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Fulton.
Thursday evening's hockey game
on Cranbrook ice, between the All
Stars and the Kimherley team, a return game for the close and hard-
fought battle enacted at tlie mining
town the preceding Sundny, was a
severe wallop to the A.S., und wus
not such a good brand of hockey as
was the first game. Play was very
much one-sided in the first and third
periods, with Kimherley generally
leaning on the All Star nets. The
second canto was thc best of the
game from the spectators' viewpoint
and produced plenty of action. The
final score was 11 to 5 in Kimberley's favor.
Bert Allen of Calgary, took the
ico with the locals in Thursday
night's game, and gave a good ac-
unt of himself, proving to be a
hard and willing worker who shakes
a fast pair of blades.
Fire destroyed the goods van of
F. Haddad of Cranbrook, about two
miles from Wycliffe on Thursday last
presumably starting from defective
wiring- The enr, with thc exception of the actual chassis, was completely destroyed.
The condition of Mrs. J, Peder-
■on, who is critically ill with pneu-
nonia, remains unchanged at the
time of writing. It is sincerely hoped
by everyone in Wycliffe that with
the expert medical attention she is
leiving her dangerous illness will
yield aud give place to returning
health and strength.
At the home of his parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Thos. Ireland, Master Har-
Ireland was host to several of
hts boy friends on Friday night. An
njoyable evening was spent playing
games and contests. The young
guests were Tom Clark, Alec Yager,
Harold Johnson, Bobby Leggett, Geo.
Quick, Jim Tanner, George Tanner,
e Taylor and Hannes Poho.
Mrs. A. Staples entertained at an
enjoyable bridge, at her home, on
Friday evening last. First prize was
won by Mrs Yager and .Mrs. H. Houle
received the consolation. The following ladies were the guests of the
evening: Mesdames Frederickson,
Yager, Clark, Houle, \V. Johnson,
Caldwell, J. S. Staples, Crowe, Miss
M. Baxter and Miss M. Harrop.
Mr. Wnlker, representative of the
Xelson Daily News, was in Wycliffo
on Monday of this week, on business
in connection with that popular publication.
The heavy thaw of the past two or
three days has created much satisfaction, mixed with dismay. Hockey
hns gone by the board, but Messrs,
Crowe and Clark were seen in deepest conference the other day, and we
are of the opinion that the baseball
hug is rousing from its winter's
sleep. A good part of the town is
under water, hollows that are generally mud hides have become miniature lakes, rouds are under a foot
or so of mud and water and some of
tlie local car ownrs have had to anchor their garages to prevent them
from taking a voyage. There's a notion though that spring is here and
nobody kicks.
Messrs R. Allen nnd E. Mapson,
of Calgary, who have been engaged
in audit work here for the past week,
Ift on Saturday for Waldo.
MW*t- ... •'
Championship
Wrestling Match
AARON DAVIS
:msas City, Middle-weight Champion of K»
VKRSL'S
NICK B0ZINIS
AARON    DAVIS
Middle-weight   Champion
nf   Kama*
Of Boston, Former Middle-weight Champion of Canada
FRIDAY  February 27th
BIGATTINPS HALL
Some Good Preliminaries
COMMENCING at 8.30 p.m. Sharp
MAIN BOUT at 9.30 p.m.
Catch As Catch   Can — No Time Limit
— Police Gazette Rules ,yei\
Best Two Out of Three Falls
Geo. SUTHERLAND, Referee
Geo. ANTON, Promoter
ADMISSION: $1.00, Pus War Tax 10c
LADIES CORDIALLY INVITED
NICK
Former    Middle
of
BOZIN
.w.l,hl
Canada
S
CKnmpioo
period February 7 to 1-1 Inclusive
Name of Mine- nnd Locality      Tons
LEAD
Bell, Boavordoll, B.C.,   -14
Creacont, Groenwoodi B.C, 2
Emerald, Xalnio, B.C.,   44
Golden  EaglO,  Nelson, B.C.,   3
Paradise, Lake  Windermere  40
Providence, Greenwood, B.C  27
Roseberry Surprise, New
Denver, B.C.,   20
United, Ainsworth,  B.C.,    20
Knobhlll, Republic, Wn.,  (dry)   105
ZINC
Rosebery Surprise, New
Denver, B.C.,   20
Standard,  Silverton, B.C.,     154
Silversmith, Silverton, B.C.,   80
United, Ainsworth, B.C.,   4
Van Roi, Silverton, B.C.,   57
Company Mines   11597
Total     12289
Uniforms   for   Provincial   Police
The provincial police will appear
in new distinctive uniforms at the
Bpring assizes, it is announced from
Victoria, the order applying to all
parts of the province. The material has arrived at police headquarters, and arrangements are now under    way    to    have    the    material
i d 0 up. Uniforming
the members of the force has been
one of the ambitions of Attorney-
General .Manson ond Col. Mc-Malien,
superintendent of the force, since
the reorganization of the force a
little while back. The new uniforms
will be of khaki color with green
epaulettes, cord riding breeches and
leather leggings. Sain Browne belts
with gun hoi. ters will be worn. Tho
hats will l)t- similar to the style now
worn by tin- mounted police.
THE SALVATION ARMY
HANSON AVENUE
Have you attended the Win-One
Campaign nicctin^s yet?
If not, he sure and come on Sunduy afternoon at 3 p.m., when a very
pecial meeting of great interest will
take place.
Monday night will be a time of
prent excitement for both young and
old. Special service of reading and
song, entitled, "Christie's Old Organ." After the program the children will receive their prizes for last
year's attendance at Sunday School.
Other meetings, Tuesday, Thursday and Priday at 8 p.m.
Swimming   Pool   For  Fernie
SHIPMENTS OF ORE
RECEIVED AT THE
TRAIL SMELTER
Following: iti  u statement of ore
received at thc Trail Smelter for thc
Alfred Cummtngi and Geo. Quail
were appointed a committee from
the Rotary Cluh to get busy on the
swimming pool proposition and stir
up the general committee who are
supposed to have the matter in hand.
At n public meeting held last summer a committee was appointed to
choose a site and get the work going,
but owing to the unsatisfactory condition of the labor situation it was
not thought advisable to proceed
with the work. However, the site
was selected, and as the industrial
situation lias cleared there is no reason in the world why a start should
not be made just ns soon as the frost
is out of the ground. The public are
behind this worthy and badly needed community proposition ond hope
that then- will be no further delay
in the matter. An expert in Calgary
is preparing plans and specifications
in connection with the proposed
pool. The present idea is for a pool
105 feet long and 85 feet wide, the
top of the concrete structure to be would be commenced as soon as the
about two feet above the ground, frost was out of the ground.—Ker-
Mr, Cummings stated that the work niv Free  Pres.*.
Proved safe Dy millions and prescribed by physicians for
Colds
Pain
Headache
Neuralgia
Toothache    Lumbago
Neuritis        Rheumatism
•/O v^*' A:cept   on-1-v   "Hayer"
%^r which contains proven J
Atpirfa i* ths m
•Accept only --Bayer" package
vhi:h contain; proven directions.
Bandy '•Bayer" lm*n of 12 tablets.
Also bottles oi 2) an'l 100—Druggists.
]*• mark   -frest-fte-fed  !r,  Csr.t'!»t  '.f Bsjtt   "..■■■. !   -.   ■■•   UsotmtttUa'
line •!  <.*<•■;•■  -■-.. a    !.    A   -   *■ "j     v.- *.*      *   . -,
Di    r  ...   ..'.T-turt*. to ftuUi ti,.  •..■;- -.„. -j-ji.],,*
■ l'i  I.- itamptd  wlUi tielr jtwrit tnda mark, ib* "Bayer Cwts"
I—c -. ft  AJ£u~.L2J\
4*
There is no uncertainty about
Radian <Bi§T
WHISKY
The age is guaranteed by the Dominion
Government.
Observe its Stamp over the capsule
We guarantee that these whiskies have
been   matured in  oak casks  in  Rack
Warehouses for the period indicated by
that Stamp.
Read the label on the bottle
Your purchase is made from the Government Store, which is a guarantee
that you get what you demand.
DISTILLED AND BOTTLED BY
Hiram Walker & Sons. Limited
WALKERVILLE   -   ONTARIO
Distillers of Fine
Whiskies since ISS8
Montreal, Om. London, Eng. New York, U.S.A.
This advertisement is not published or diMiI.iyc! by the I.irjuor
Control Board or by thu Government ol Uriiish Columbia,   wg
3333L • a a b six
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
Thursday, February 26th, 1925
k
SUNDAY, MARCH 1
FREEMAN,
Pastor
11 a.m. Reception and Sacramental Service
JUNIOR CHOIR
12.15 Sunday School and Reorganized Adult Bible Cl.
7.30 p.m. Evening Service—Senior Choir
YOU WILL RnCLIVH A    CORDIAL WELCOME
«e
East Kootenay Looks Bright
A MINING RESUME, BY J. F. HUCHCROFT,
IN SPOKANE MINING TRUTH
raorEssiosAL CARDS
f
nit.W   A.»XB61B
dbvtist
CMatbdMBanalBg Bin«k
FboBe W.     OMfe Hilar* •
5 to U, 1 to I p-.ii.  Hat". •» to 1.
Dra. Union £  Maelilnnnn
Physician" anil Surgeons
Oflle-a at  r-wldenr-a,   Armstrong
Avenue
OTTICB  HOURS
Afternooni    2.00 to 4.00
■realm   7.30 to 8.30
Him-toyi   J-00 to -t.00
CRANBROOK, B.C.
OR. F. B. MILES
DENTIST
OFFICE HOURS
• 10 II a.m.      1 to ) p.m.
Blk., CRANBROOK. BC.
t. M. MACPHERSON
Undertaker
Phena CM
Sartor? ins ant to Cltj HaU
i 	
JOHN CARD
('A1NTER&
PAPHRHANGER
i-aU Lin.   Of Wall  l'»por
IB Stock.
fcio-e. Haueon Avenue
nma« 44* »i nil aoen
CRunnoox   .   .   .  m.
U.iptist Church
Rev. W. T. TAPSCOTT
213 Norbury Ave. ■ Plione 202
SUNDAY, MARCH 1
1 a.m. "Our Equipment for
Service."
noon, Sunday School and
Bible Classes
7..J0 p.m. "Joseph in Prison;
'    Does Virtue Pay?"
rou
AKi;   COItDIALLT
INVITED.
C.?AKBRDOK.OlJEftN0ffi
ABD DYEB8
t>.ery Garment M..1 to es to ut
Cleaned or Vjetl l« !<'•"
Oar utmost Car-.
Onr biow! "t»« o( tha kuslneee
li yoar aa.'ir v* ot aatlBfaction
kora.   P>ioat, M.4 te -rill etll,
01 krttit «a f»sr vnk.
Wa OXttM aad Ora RrarytlilBf.
eyttVf*v*vff*v*v*vffffffff*\
i ^ave Money \
\ FRESH MILK 10c Quart
■J   CALL —
I   GODDERIS'   DAIRY
j Rural Telephone
MOaHMpMIMWIOilli!lllltnCinii.ii!'*.:]<iiniiiiiiiUlini|i!N
C. JOE BROS. J
LADIES' and GEM'S'     I
TAILORS
- S1HT8 MADE TO ORDEB - |
CLEANING ft PRESSING       |
Cranbnuik 8t, t)|ip. Ok. ol Coat, I
Montana Restaurant
M-*l' at AB Horn
•JV-an,  -Jlfartttaa  U4  Caailte
'-<■»».
M. notaa su
Iwtf al Conuaaraa
L. D. Cafe
(UttJe Diraaitit)
HVp rom wtoh aaBathlaf «oo*
-to   «i ao to tha "L.D."
NELSON BUSINESS
COLLEGE
— LRARN TO EARN —
Shorthand, 1 pewriting, Book-
l.eepinp, I nniannhip, Spelling,
Rapid Calculation, Commercial
Enplinfi, Ctunmer^ial Law, Filing, General  Office   Procedure.
Individual Tuition
Commence Any Time
?*■ * Tarm Now Commencing
P.? Box 14 - Phone 603
IODGES ANB SOCIETIES
WOMBN'8
President:      Mrs.
8M,.Treaii™ri
INSTITUTE
Meeta  la  tba
K.  of  P.  HaB
aftarnoon ol tba
Drat Tuaadaj at
I p.m.
AU ladlw ara
eordlallr in-rlted
GEORGE SMITH
Mrs.    Flolarton
1. O. O. F.
KEY CITV LODGE No. 42
mfikkmm^ .        MfPts every
£/*>
KJEf^ Monday night at
fa%JSj**w The Auditorium
Sojourning Oddfellows are cor-
dially invited
N. G
-     A. E. LEIGH
Rec
See. E. G. Dingley, P.G.
ANNOUNCEMENT
THE
Alberta Rooms
Van Horne St., Opp Fgt. Sheds
ARE NOW OPEN.
If ynu want a home lhat ia comfortable  and clean,  call at  the
ALBERTA
Hot & Cold Water on all Floors
SANDY   ORENUIK, Prop.
At a recent meeting of the
B. C. products bureau of the
Vancouver Board of Trade,
surprising figures showing the
loss of this province through
the purchasing of imported
products were given hy Mr. W.
I.. Macken of Chilliwack, past
president of the Associated
Boards of Trade of B.C.
The $7,000,000 sent out of
British Columbia last yenr
would have kept several hundred people here working.
That's important.
Pacific Milk Co., Ltd.
Head Office, Vancouver, B.C.
Factorie* at Abbotaford and Ladner
Cranbrook, B.C.—As the tonnage
production of British Columbia advances in a general way, so does the
East Kootenay in regard to silver-
lead-zinc, and this might be said to
be due almost entirely to the great
Sullivan mine, located at Kimberley,
which has sprung from n mere mining camp, a few years ago, to a leading place in East Kooteiiay's business life.
With a modern milling plant installed at an approximate cost of
fl,500,000, and an annual payroll of
approximately $2,000,000, the Sullivan is producing at an accelerating
rate, as may be seen from the following figures supplied by the Cranbrook Board of Trade in tlieir annuel report:
Sullivan ore shipments for the last
L2 months were: Zinc, 56,467 tons;
zinc concentrates 66,684 tons; lend
concentrates 124,780 tons; iron
1,948 tons.
North Star and Stemwinder
Tlie North Star and Stemwinder
groups at Klmberloy are also being
thoroughly developed under new
management supported by Eastern
Canadian capital. Considerable diamond drilling is being done on the
former, while on the latter, shaft
sinking is now under way and drifting from the lower level that will be
obtained is in contemplation. The
work now is in ore nud is expected to
be so throughout. Those in a posl
tion to form an opinion in regard to
the future of these two properties
are most optimistic and anticipating
another heavy producer for that
camp.
The Globe Mining Co., operating
on Copper Creek, nre steadily devel
oping their property by way of in
cline, with a view to blocking out a
considerable portion of the ore ir
sight, and commencement of ship'
merits within the next few months,
Their ore is carrying excellent values
in antimony, silver and copper, and
once shipments commence they may
be expected to continue regularly.
The property now under control
of W. S. Santo of Cranbrook, and located on Bull river, near the falls, is
being developed steadily and two
shipments have already been mad'
The first being only a trial lot, has
proven so satisfactory that a second
is now in transit. While no definite
statements are being published by
the owner, still, it is assumable that
shipments would not be continued
or other development continued unless the results were proving satisfactory.
Lead-Gold on Perry Creek
Messrs. Powell and Bird are developing a lead-gold property on
Perry Creek from which high grade
ore is being obtained at lowest available depth by tunnel and drift. If
present indications continue for another short distance, in all probability
i they will be able to commence ship-
' ments or install machinery and carry
on more extensive development.
Much local interest is being manifested in this undertaking.
j Hell Roaring Creek properties are
I being given considerably attention
l this season. Messrs. N. A. Wallinger, M.Ii.A., and associates are continuing drifting on their lead pro-
! perty there. Upon returning from
a recent trip into the property Mr.
Wallinger reported most satisfactory
results and the ore body showing
added strength, in both size and values.
It is reported that considerable
work will likely be done on the Angus group in the same valley this
season.
Interested parties are now in
Cranbrook, awaiting the opening up
of the season when thorough testing
of the Dominion group, located some
four miles above St. Mary's Lake,
will commence. This property has
been lying idle some time and will
benefit largely as a result of thc
present market prices for both lead
and copper which make it possible to
handle its known ore body to advantage.
Aurora and Society Girl
In the Moyie region considerable
preparatory work was done last year
by the Armstrong syndicate, of Spokane, upon Aurora and Society Girl,
but the work has been closed down
for the winter and pending completion of plans for the coming season.
In the former a considerable tonnage of lead-zinc ore is nvnilnble for was
mining as soon as re-timbering and and
tfWWWAA
LAKE
| WINDERMERE!
NOTES
other necessary preparations may be
completed. Machinery will have to
be installed to work to advantage,
asportation facilities aro needed
but are obtainable at no great expense. If the present indications are
supported by further work in the
ore bodies in all probability this property will soon become a shipper,
in the latter named property some
considerable more work must be
done before it would be wise to de-
i(ie upon the future operations.
Both have been on thu shipping list
in the past and have been developed
to considerable depth.',, lt is most
oncouraglng to  see  these  propoftloi
ng tested out by responsible man
agement wlio will avoid the cosily errors of the past in their history,
Their proximity to the old St. Eugene, which was a heavy producer
at one time and carries the same vein
system, is BUfllcloilt alone to warrant
their thorough testing.
Windermere Diatrict
In the Windermere district a considerable force of men is being employed by Mr. I'urlain, of Vancouver, in preparing a lead property on
Horse Thief Creek for shipping.
While not much publicity has been
given this venture, it is worth while
watching the results ns the best of
engineering advice and management
is behind the undertaking and the
mineral possibilities are known to be
of the best.
The Paradise continues to make
regular shipments, having 246 tons
in January of this year, and 1,1187
tons during 1A24 of lead ore to its
credit. Further north the Monarch
is now reported to be under a new
control and continuing operations. It
shipped 101 tons during 1924.
Thc Wild Cat, near lnvermere,
shipped 118 tons last year and is expected to continue this season.
Tlie St. Kugene dumps were fairly
well tested out last season and 51
tons of lead and 15 tons of zinc tailings shipped to Trail smelter for
trial purposes. Much local interest
is being manifesto 1 in these tests,
but as nothing of an infoimative nature is being made public the results
nre yet to be demonstrated.
Gypsum Land For Caah
Recently a sale of six claims of
gypsum-bearing lands near Wardner, B.C.. was put through on a cash
basis by local residents disposing of
their recent locations to the Manitoba Gypsum people. Whether or not
this will lead to development operations is yet to be seen. As the known
quality and quantity of gypsum
available is highly satisfactory, in all
probability in the course of time important operations mny be expected.
In a general way much optimism
is being displayed by mining property owners. Many examinations are
pending.    1926 looks bright to all.
(Special to the Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., Feb. 21.— A delightful evening wus spent on St.
Valentine's eve, by tlie superintendent, teachers and friends of Christ
Chureh Sunday School, Lake
W I n d e r m ere. This
took the form of a fancy dress dance
coupled with games, as held in McKay's Hall, Athalmer, on that occasion. Fully seventy children appeared dressed in costume. From
near eight o'clock till ten was given
over to tlieir exclusive amusement—
the children hud the floor, might
truly be said. Prizes were offered
tn the six children Who by ballot the
"grown ups" should decide were
most attractively dressed. It was
hnrtl to make Litis choice amongst
such a varied and wonderful collection but finally the scrutineers declared lhat tlie prises had fallen respectively to baby Skivington as Cloo-
tru; and Jackie Lord as a Leghorn
l
Rooster, in the under six year old
class; and to Barbara Scott, as a
Cross-word Puzzle, and Bryan (i
as the celebrated eat Pollx iu un
II years of age; and to father
Pye as Night and to Master Joseph
Peters as "Yes! We Have No Bananas". *
Rev. Dr. Ferguson, of Calgary,
Superintendent of Presbyterian Missions, was in here this week.
Mrs.   John   R.
Mr. H. H. Peters.
Davey   is   visiting
Mrs. E.. G. Erickson is
visit to Creston.
BABY'S jg%
OWN     *-^J
SOAP
■{••t'**********-*****-*****-****
*   For Good Value in *
GOOD   EATS    |
Go to Tho 1
ZENITH   CAFE      |
?  Cor. BAKER & VAN HORNE  |
♦♦♦"♦♦♦tli *** ** ************.;..;.
wwwwwvwwwwvw
FOR ALL YOUR
REQUIREMENTS
—IN—
TRUNKS      .      VALISES
HANOItAUS
Or anything in Leather     jj
Also for
Shoe.,   Rubber.,   Sock..   Over-
• lll, Clove., Etc.,
It will pay you to visit our store
THE
Cranbrook Saddlery Co.
Van Horne St.   Cranbrooit B.C.
FERNIE IS MULCTED
$2800 FOR TWO LIQUOR
CONVICTIONS IN CITY
A reply to the letter sent by tli
council to the attorney-general's dc
partment, asking for information a
to how the deduction of $2800 froi
the city's portion of the liquor pre
fits was arrived nt, was receive
from tbe Liquor Control Board ami
read nt their meeting last week.
They stated that all accounts had
been verified by the Comptroller-
General's department and that it was
not the policy of the board to make
public tho activities of secret service
agents. It stated that board oflicers
had been in the city during the fiscal year from October 1, 1U2.'J, to
September 30, 192-1, at various times
and had secured substantial convictions for breaches of the Act. It
nlso stated that it was the policy of
the board that when they believed
the Act was not being satisfactorily
enforced in n municipality, board officers were sent to do tbe work.
Before placing the letter before
the council, Mayor Irvine had requested Chief Anderson to go carefully over the records and make a
report. The Chief's report showed
that during the time stated Liquor
Control Board officers had only secured two convictions in the city of
Fernio, while during the same period
the city* force had conducted raids
and had secured 07 convictions under the Liquor Act. The city clerk
instructed to write the board
o notify them.
GIRLS! A GLEAMY MASS
OF BEAUTIFUL HAIR
35c
"Danderine"   So   Improves
IJfclcss, Neglected Hair
An     abundance
of luxuriant hair,
full   of   gloss X^
fleams    and    life 7-*
shortly  follows  a/
genuine toning up*£
of   neg 1 e c t c d
scalps with depen- ,'—
dable       "Danderine."
Falling hair, itching scalp and the
dandruff is corrected immediately.
Thin, dry, wispy or fading hair is
quickly invigorated, taking on new
strength, color and youthful beauty.
"Danderine i.s delightful on the hair,
a refreshing, stimulating tonic— not
sticky or greasy! Any drugstore.
Watch Child's Bowels
"California  Fig Syrup" is
.   Children's Harmless
Laxative
Children love the pleasant taste of
"California Fig Syrup" and gladly
take it even when bilious, feverish,
sick, or constipated. No other laxative regulates the tender little bowels so nicely. It sweetens the stomach ami starts the liver and bowels
without cramping or overacting. Contains no narcotics or soothing drugs.
Tell your druggist you want only
the genuine "California" Fig Syrup"
which has directions for babies and
children of all ages printed on bot-
tic Mother! You must say "California" or you may get an imitation tig
syrup.
Canadian
Cafe & Rooms
STRICTLY  CLEAN.
SANITARY COOKING
IS OUR MOTTO
Comfortable Rooms
First Class Cafe Service
f  PHONE 98   <
ji       CRANBROOK - B.C.      \\
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
THE ROYAL
Cafe
Bowness Building
BAKER STREET
Opposite Parks & Co.
IS
NOW   OPEN
TRY   THE   ROYAL   FOR
::       GOOD MEALS       ::
Mrs.  M.  R0WE
Proprietrei.
General Change
in
Train Service
Effective Sunday, January  11, 1925
Times for Trains at Cranbrook will
bc:
We.tboundi No. 67.
....Arrives 12.05 p.m. daily;  Leaves
12.15 p.m. daily.
Eaitbound; No. 68
Arrives 4.10 p.m. daily;    Leaves
4.20 p.m. daily.
CRANBROOK ■ KIMBERLEY
No. 823 Leaves 7.05 a.m. Daily ex-
Sunday, No. 824 Arrives 1.10 p.m.
CRANBROOK . Lit. WINDERMERE
No. 822 Arrives 3.30 p.m. Wednesday A Saturday. No. 821 Leaves 9.00
a.m. Monday and Thursday.
(Pacific Standard Time)
For further particulars apply to any
ticket agent.
J. E. PROCTOR,
District Passenger Agent
47-50 Calgary
I   TASTY FOODS
| Carefully selected — prepnr-
* ed by Cooks who know how
* — and served to you in an
| appetizing ant| appealing
J way — is what you tret when
you dinc-witli us.     Prompt
and courtous servce,
CLUB CAFE
Phone 155
*********************+m
<mwumimamiuimi:Miuiti,mm,w.:'mm
Sainsbury & Ryan
BUILDERS AM)
OOM'lUUTOItM
Bttltnatw fill uu and Work
GuarantMd
ItUpkoiM 181 ant gag
CRANBROOK      .      B.C.
For Fint Clau
LAUNDRY WORK
Call: QUONQ   CHONO
-.    Opposite W. I). Hill's Store
5   II     ARMSTRONG    AVENUE
f*V*Vfffffffffffffffff,
Bitabllabod 1891
Pkoot 114
Geo. R. Leask
riOM!E« nriLDKR
AJiP COXTKACTUR
Cablaet Wnrk.   Picture Framing
Estimates flvea  oa
ail clAsp-eg of vork
OtSeet Corner Vorbnry Areata
aad Kdwardi Street
CLEANING
- PRESSINO
REPAIRING —
Ynu Will Jink.. No Mistake
Id (Inlcriug tbat
NEW 8FRINU SUIT
OU OVERCOA1
— Mom —
H. C. LONG,
The Tailor
Tan Horne Street
Opposite C. P. R. Depot
Phone 416     it     Phone 4II
Milk and Cream
DIRECT FROM
Big Butte Dairy Farm
FH0tre ie
WHY OPERATE?
fnr Appendicitis, Gallstones,
Stomach and Liver Troubles.
when HEPATOLA does the
work without pnin ;uid nu
risk of your life nor loss of
time.
Cnnlainnnnpni-ion.   Not sold bydniuWi.
Mrs. Geo. $. Almas
SOLI UANlTACTt'RKH
230 fturth Avp. S. Phonr 4S0S
SASKATOON
Price 5.1 60-Pwwl i*«t 2.1ce*lra
70*2
Bruce Robinson
Phone 295        Teacher of Mule P.O. llox   '
STUDIO - ARMSTRONG AVBNUB
Third Hounc from PreabytorMUi Chureh
flOBIHSOH'S ORCHESTRA-DANCES ARRANGED FOR
FOLKS
IN OUR
TOWN
No
Wonder
By
Edward
McCullough
AVrbCAflBR
Mi Thursday, February 26tfi, 1925
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
PXQB SfiVEN
^VNA/
OLDSMOBILE
SIX
is beiier'Value"
OVER forty thousand owners have proven Oldsmobile
to be the outstanding value in the light-six field.
The Refined Oldsmobile embodies all the tried and
proven features that have won Oldsmobile popularity.
In addition, it has many new refinements and improvements—the revolutionary DUCO satin finish—strikingly
distinctive radiator design—cowl lamps and other recent
developments in automobile construction.
No other car can offer such value in a six-cylinder car
at anywhere near Oldsmobile price. See the Refined
Oldsmobile and judge for yourself.
0-J25
Hanson Garage
I Cranbrook, B.C.
OLDSMOBILE
UPSET STOMACH,
GAS, INDIGESTION,
TAKE "DIAPEPSIN"
The moment you ear n tablet of
"Tape's Diapepsin" your indigestion
is pone. No more distress from a
sour, acid, upset stomach. No flatulence, heartburn, palpitation or misery making pises. Correct your digestion for a few cents. Each package guaranteed by druggist to overcome stomach trouble.
Victoria. — British Columbia In
ItCM shipped 410,000,000 feet of
lumbar to foreign markets. For the
entire year moro than 800)000,000
feet have been taken by China and
Japan. American markets consumed
100,000,000  feet, most of wliich  is
Koine to the Atlantic seaboard via
the Inter-coastal route and the Panama Canal. The t'nited Kingdom
took approximately 31,000,000 feet:
New Zealand antl Australia 27,000,-
1000 feet, and India aud Egypt 3,000,-
000 feet each.
THE WEATHER BULLETIN
Montreal. — The volume of new
[construction work initiated in Cannula during1 1924 was below the 1923
j figures, but a noticeable quickening
took plnce during the closing months.
Tha total value of construction undertaken last year was $276,261,100,
as compared with $314,254,000. in
! the yenr previous.
Official    Thermometer    Readings
Cranbrook
Max.
I February 18
i February 10
February 20
February -1
Fbniary 22
February 2:\
13
41
11
41
47
47
February 24       47
Montreal.—Pulp and paper manufactured in Canada during the eleven months ending November 30,
1024. totalled in value $120,124,165,
as compared with $126,464,550 in
the corresponding period a year ago,
according to a statement issued by
the Canadian Pulp nnd Paper Association. Pulp products accounted for
$43,157,380 of the total value, while
paper manufactured had a value of
$85,066,786.
T
H
£
C
A
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0
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T
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£
M
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S
RATCLIFFE & STEWART GARAGE
THE QUALITY LEADER
In The
LOW PRICED FIELD
Low Cost Transportation
STAR*CARS
The Car For The Millions
with
The Million Dollar Motor
STAR CAR PRICES—F.O.B. CRANBROOK
Standard Touring j, $975.00
Special Touring $1175.00
Regular Sedan  $14-40.00
Ri'Kiiliir Coupe  $1255.00
Special Coupe $1380.00
Special Sedan $1590.00
RATCLIFFE & STEWART GARAGE
T
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£
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0
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0
R
MOTHERS LIKE TO TREAT
COLDS WITH VAPORS
Direct Treatment  with Vaporising
Salve Immediately Reaches
Inflamed Air Passages.
Itis no longer necessary constantly to
dose uie children in
treating croup, bronchitis, sore throat,
or deep chest colds.
Many Canadian
mothers nowuse the
"outside" remedy,
Vicks VapoRub, for
the cold troublesof all the family, because
it is just rubbed over throat and chest—
there is nothing to take. When bo applied
Vicks gives oil medicated vapors whicli
are inhaled directly inio the inflamed air
passages, loosening the phlegm and making the breathing easier.
At the same timeVlcks is absorbed and
stimulates thc skin like a liniment or
plaster and thus aids the vapors inhaled
to break up thc congestion.
At all drug stores 50c a jar. For free
test size package, write Vick Chemical
Co.,344St Paul St., W.,Montreal, P.Q.
Moet Ing  of  Baptlll   Brotherhood      (objects     of     \\w   ft'
The Baptist Brotherhood met on
Tuesday evening in the basement of
the church, in a special gathering,
when about twenty-five or thirty men
of the congregation were present.
Notwithstanding tliat the lights were
out for the evening, the men managed
to account for a very hearty supper,
which had kindly been provided by
the ladies, but which was served entirely by Brotherhood members. At
the conclusion of the supper, A. D,
Bridges, president of the Brotherhood Bible Class, took charge of the
program, and outlined the aims and
FERNIE GIRLS TAKE
LONG END OF SCORE
WITH CRANBROOK
Friday last, the Cranbrook girls'
team, the Canucks, with the addition
of two or three players from the
Bluebirds, journeyed to Fernie to
play a return match with the famous
Swastikas, who the previous Saturday night had defeated the Canucks'
team by a score of 8-0. The Cranbrook girls hoped to give a better account of themselves, having additional players from thc Bluebirds team
for their forward line, and in this
they might have been successful but
for one thing—excuse us we should
say one lady— who had not played
with the Swat-Stickers in their game
here. This was Mrs. Kirkpatriek,
who was a regular wizard, quick aH
a trap, had a shot like a rifle, and
manipulated the puck as easily ns
most girls could a powder puff. The
Cranbrook girls hold no grudge
against this player, but if they meet
again they would rather she stay at
home.
The Fernie team proved themselves a high class organization as a
hockey team. They beat the local
girls by eight to nothing in a fast
game, adverse ice conditions hampering both teams. Mrs. Kirkpatriek was responsible for the major
part of the score, as she scored six
goals, and figured in the other two.
The Swastikas as a team, possess
everything that is required in the
make-up of a good club. They play
their positions, back check, and their
combination is exceptionally good.
As for the Cranbrook team, considering thnt some of the players
hardly knew one end of the stick
from the other at the beginning of
the season, they have nothing to be
ashamed of. To play well, hockey
has to be practiced for a long while.
The Cranbrook forwards tried their
hest to penetrate the Fernie defence
but were unable, Marjorie Burton
being tho only one at all successful.
Frances Drummond, despite the
large score against her, was credited
with some good saves.
While eight-nothing might correctly tell the story of the game,
"ate nothing" does not apply to the
rest of the time the team spent in
Fernie, as the Swastikas saw to it
that they were feted and dined in
right royal style. Dances, teas and
house parties were given in their
honor. Both thc team and the fans
from Cranbrook are loud in their
praise of the pleasant manner in
which they were entertained.
Fernie scored four goals in each
of the first two periods, a portion of
the last period Mrs. E. Kirkpatriek
was subbed, this possibly accounting
for the fact that no goals were scored.
The teams lined up as follows:
F. Drummond .. goal .. N. Commons
S. McCallum .... def.   B. Graves
A. Wright   J. Richardson
D. Greaves   for'ds ..'.. F. Hamel
A. Moir   M. Steeves
M. Burton   A. Costa
A. Wallinger     E. Kirkpatriek
E. Patterson   A. Schagel
Mrs. Donald
The Cranbrook girls take consolation in the fact that so far as their
own scoring was concerned, they did
no worse away from home than they
did at home.
With a score of eight to nothing
against them, it was absolutely impossible for the team to return without an alibi, consequently when they
arrived several of the players had
their heads bandaged or were patched up with plaster. Some of the
spectators on the platform were
about to call for the ambulance when
the farce was detected.
The Cranbrook players and fans
enjoyed the games at the rink on
Saturday night between Fernie and
Some of the Cranbrookites at the
game were Mrs. A. K. Leiteh, Miss
Miller, of Jaffray, Verne Woodmnn,
Dr. Huffman, Charlie Clapp, Will
Leigh, Jimmy Logan and ???
was
i-rgai
the
fail,
M.
othe
with the Sunda]
roy gave a pointed ■■ 11
showing how i';; \ il . .
set way:-, and pointin
more essential [| <.-, -. *
be exemplary. .!
greeting from a J>
ter church, and Rev. '
gave an inspiring talk
Task." Under th- lea
11. I.. Porter, who leat
Sunday mornings in c
the Sunday School, a
table discussion took
objectives     of     the   n
D
■ ■:.    T
G
to h<
hel|
place,
I the
clearly.    In about six
meeting of the same
aid, when the men will
adies of tho church and
I,   and    following this
■ ; itht r gathering to
the] hood  whidi  meets
il Church will be in-
iptist Brotherhood will
*r consideration a pro-
summer camp In con-
ic church at some place
suited to the purpose.
ale Quartette also ren-
the eve-
during
Ottawa.—Thc total value of the
principal field crops of 1924, as now
estimated for thc whole of Canada,
amounts to $948,063,400, an increase
of $49,497,200, as compared with
1923. The totals for 1924 are composed of the following items: Wheat
f325.332.000; oats, $208,752,000;
barley, $59,837,000; rye, $14,120,-
700; other grains, $51,240,700; potatoes, $49,102,000; hay, clover and alfalfa, $174,298,000; root and fodder
crope, etc., $47,091,000.
mm
*ift '    " ■'
New Radiator
Large Honeycomb Radiator with highly-polished
nickel finish shcll.adding
greatly to the appearance
of thc car.
New Clutch
Single plate dry due type
—easier, smoother, more
positive, requires no lubri-
cation. Clutch and fly*
wheel fully enclosed.
New Axles
Hear axle re-designed,
strengthened and en-
larged; gear contact great*
ly increased; one-piece
banjo type housing. Front
axle strengthened.
New Springs
Semi-elliptic chrome van*
adium steel springs—rear
springs underslung—Ale-
mite lubrication.
New Frame
Longer and stronger. Five
sturdy cross members.
Deep channel steel con*
struction.
New Bodies
Open bodies longer and
roomier; modern full
stream tines; beautiful,
durable upholstery on
deep cushion springs.
Closed models have new
and more beautiful bodies
bv Fjiher.
New Finish
Lustrous, durable Duco*
Open model* and Coach
in rich dark blue. Sedan.
aquamarine blue and
black. Coupe Ontario
grey and blue.
New Motor
Refinements
Improved construction
for carburetor and manifold. Extra wide crank*
shaft bearings. Rocker
arms and .valves enclosed
for better lubrication and
protection from dust
and dirt.
New Windshields
Closed models have new
type W one-piece windshield with automatic
windshield wiper. Open
models with new pattern
very low bottom wind*
shield, rubber weather
stripped.
The Roadster
L,      *735
at Factory, Taxes Extra.
The Touring
1735
at Factory, Taxes Extra.
The Coupe
S995    n
•t t-actory, Taxes Extra
Thc Sedan
$1165
at Factory, raxes I.xtra.
T/u- Coach
$1015
at Factor}, Taxes Extra.
Kootenay Garage - Cranbrook
Brown & Sutherland - Kimberley
C-262S PAOE   EIGHT
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
**************'•:■■. ************************************
I OUR REP4:RING DEPARTMENT f
t Is Fully Equipped to handle all kinds of j
*      Watch, Clock, Instrument & Jewelry Repairing      I
< We Also Repair PHONOGRAPHS *
nd carry a large stuck of phonograph springs, parts, etc.,       *
iur any standard make f
— —— *
*
*
t
— THE GIFT SHOP —
A.EARLELEIGH    -    -    -    ■    JEWELLER
NOKBURY AVENUE CRANBROOK   Z
********************************************
Thursday, February 26th, 1925
Miss Alice Comfort of Creston
was operated on for appendicitis at
the hospital hore on Thursday last,
from which she is now convalescing
nicely.
Boys' Shoes, goodyear wait, solid
leather insoles.      Hale price, sizes 8
to lOVi, $4.25; li to 2, $5.00. at
A. STRANGE, Armstrong Ave.
A. Rogers, at one time druggist
in the Beattle-Noble drug store, was
a visitor in tho city thi.s week on
business. lie is now a travelling
representative of n pathological institution in California, and this city
is part of his territory.
Mr. Frank Harrison, of Fernie,
was operated on at the St. Eugene
hospital on Sunday last by Dr. Kil-
man, of Fernie, and his condition is
reported as being very satisfactory.
For prompt repairs and satisfaction go to Ratcliffe & Stewart's garage. 20tf
Tho C.G.l.T Girls of Knox Church
in a recent Saturday afternoon sale
and tea, held in the schoolroom,
cleared about $35. The affair was
most successful and was held on tho
afternoon of St. Valentine's Day,
llio girls being under the leadership of Mrs. Dow.
HERE AGAIN!
Dance
At The Auditorium
THURSDAY, MARCH 5th
Music by the Well Known
Banff Dance Orchestra
ADMISSION
Gentlemen $1.00
Ladies 50c
if
CHAMPIONSHIP
WRESTLING MATCH
JACK MILO
Claimant Light Heavy-..
weight  Championship  of
Canada
NELS MOE
Yorkton, Sask., Light
Heavy-weight Champion
of Norway and Sweden
Catch  A.  Catch  Can—B«.t
Two Out of Three Fall.
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 4th
Audiorium, Cranbrook
Several   Snappy   Preliminaries
Boxing, Wrestling
This will be the show of the
Season.   Tlie two fastest men
- of their  weight in  Canada in
thc Main Bout
Hrinf,' your Wife, your Son and
■your Daughter. Promoter Geo.
Anton Guarantees Clean Sport
Secure Your Scat. Early. Ticket, on Sale at Victoria Cafe
Ringside Seats $1.50 — General Admission $1.00
(PLUS WAR TAX)
CEO. ANTON, Promoter. Geo. SUTHERLAND, Referee
oniiiimiiiu iiiiioniiiiiiiiiumwituiuiMiiiHiguiiiai'iiii'iic
House Cleaning Season
Is now at hand, and we are fully prepared to fill your
wants.   See our window display of —
Soaps, Soap Powders and Brooms
We have an Extra Special line of Brooms ranging in price
IROM 60c to $1.00
For your week-end wants in
Fresh Vegetables and Fruit
We Have Them—
Oranges, Lemons, Bananas, Celery, Head and Leaf
Lettuce, Tomatoes, Carrots, Parsnips, Turnips
See Our ORANGE SPECIAL, 3 dozen for    -    $1.00
John Manning
PHONE 173
OFFICE 93
Insure with Beale & Elwell.
J. D. Kennedy is u patient ut the
hospital at present.
— I **
Special prices on new Bateries at JI
Service Garage.   Phone 34
ltf
BORN—To Mr. and Mrs. Leonard
Burton, on Friday, February 20th,
at the St. Eugene Hospital, a daughter.
Dr. Wilson Herald, ear, nose and
throat specialist, will arrive in Cranbrook February 26th, remaining until March 5th, and can be consulted
at the hospital. 52-1
After it sojourn of two months in
California, most of which time was
spent in Oakland, Mr. Frank liutley
returned to the city last week.
For Bales nnd service Nush und Star
cars.   See Ratcliffe & Stewart.   U3tf
The drawing for articles of Mrs.
C. II. Knpcke came off on Thursday,
February l'Jth, the winning number
being 24, held by Mr. W. S. Santo.
Lady Belle Oxfords, black and
brown, sule price $5,00 per pair, ull
sizes, at
A. STRANGE, Armstrong Ave.
Mrs. Wm. Taynton, of lnvermere,
is a patient at the hospital at present
recovering from the shock of a serious operation which she has undergone.      t
We carry a rull line of Men's Women's and Children's Rubbers.
W. F. DORAN.
Our low prices win every Urns.
J. J. Wnrren, president of the Con
solidated Mining & Smelting Co.
pussed through the city on Friday
last on his way to Kimberley und
Trull on u trip of inspection.
For first class automobile repairs
and winter storage, see Ratcliffe &
Stewart 33tf
Mr. Bert Grady, who is now stationed at Elko with the East Kootenay Power Co., wob in the city on
Friday last, returning to the falls
city on Saturday.
The Guardian Brogue Oxford,
brown, all sizes. Sale price $6.00
per pair, all sizes, at
A. STRANGE, Armstrong Ave.
Messrs. Evans and Hill of the -staff
of the Bank of Commerce, were Fernie visitors over the week-end, cal-
Uing on the staff of the Commerce
branch in the coal city.
SPECIAL: — Tungsten lamps, 10,
25, 40, 50 and 60 watts; 25 c each,
at — W. F. DORAN'S.
Our Low Prices win every time
Messrs. Sainsbury & Ryan have
been carrying out further improvements on the upper floor of the Herald building, the intention being to
rehabilitate the remaining rooms,
when they will become attractive
quarters for roomers or light housekeeping.
Mr. Phil Gougeon returned from
the Coast at the beginning of the
week after a stay there of two or
three months, necessitated by the
need for medical treatment. Mr.
and Mrs. Gougeon returned on Tuesday to Kimberley, where Mr Gougeon is resuming his position as vendor at the Kimberley government
store.
e*m
Word has just been received by
the Fernie District Hod. und Gun
Club from the Department of Fisheries, of the allotment of 300,000
Eastern Brook Trout eyed eggs for
the stocking of Btrenms' in the Fernie district this spring. This is pnrt
of an extensive program of re-stocking the streams tributary to the Elk
River, undertaken by the club in cooperation with the government. —
Fernie Free Press.
Whist Drive and Hard Times
Dance will be held in the K. of P.
Hall on Friday, March Gth, by the
Women's Institute. Whist nt 8 p.m.
Bhurp till 10. Duncing 10 to 2.
Robinson's orchestra. Lady 50c
Gentlemen 75c. Everybody welcome.
Good Eats. Ladies' and Gent.'s prize
for best Hard Times Costume. Come
and have a good time. 51
POOR   EYESIGHT
will make Children back
*f ward in School.      It af-
** fects   their   work,   their
** health ami their  success.
** Do not allow your child
%% to suffer through neglec-
II ted eyesight.       At .the
** slightest      indication    of
** trouble  let  us  make  the
** examination that will tell.
**
** 	
if W.H.Wilson
**
ll
Optometrist
CRANBROOK    ■
+*4"t"M"M"t+*+* *+++*+++* ****
MARTIN BROS. PAY FOR ASH-
ES. 52tf
Tho private car of C. A. Cottorell,
assistant general superintendent for
B.C., C.P.R., was in a mishap on Monday morning when the Kettle Valley
train to which it was attached hit a
boulder on the track. The engine
wns derailed, nnd Mr. OottereU's car
was overturned. The official was nol
aboard, however, but it wns occupied
by the secretary, who escaped unhurt.
We repair Hor Water Bottles,
Rubber Footwear, or anything made
of rubber,
WILSON'S VULCANIZING WKS.
42tf Cranbrook
On Thursday night of last week
the Home Workers of the Anglican
Church entertained at a card party
in tho Parish Hall, when an enjoyable whist drive was held. The high
prizes were won bv Mrs. F. G. Morris and Mr. J. G. Cummings. Refreshments were enjoyed at thc conclusion of the cards and an enjoyable social period was had before the
gathering broke up.
We cart 7 a full line of Men's Women's and Misses' Shoes.
W. F. DORAN.
Our low prices win every time.
Road Supt. Hayne will commence
the work of building a new road into
McBain's Lake as soon as spring
opens. The new road will strike the
southern end of the lake nnd a
branch will run along the shore on
ench side. It is expected that the
work will cost about $2,500. Quite
a number of Fernie people have acquired property along the lake front
and the new road will be a godsend
as the one big drawback to McBain's
us a summer resort has been the poor
road into it. — Fernie Free Press.
Ignorance of the law did not save
Robert Saunders, late of Alberta,
now of Wilmer, from a $50 fine for
trapping without a permit, when he
came up before Magistrate E. M.
Sandilands, of Wilmer. He paid the
fine in preference to going to jail.
Saunders was arrested at Fiilnnds
by members of the provincial police,
according to information received ut
headquarters here, nnd it was found
he had fourteen traps out. These
were confiscated and he wns brought
up before Magistrate Sandilands on
Friday, and pleaded guilty, ami also
ignornnce of the trnpping regulations.
It costs you nothing to try. When
ordering your bread to-morrow, just
ask for one loaf of City Bakery
Bread. 3Gtf
The annual dance of the Tennis
Club was held last Wednesday evening ut the Pnrish Hall, when a very
enjoyable time was spent, which hus
become a fixed idea nnd a customnry
expectation in regard to this function. Requests are being voiced that
the dance be repeated again after
Lent. The prizes won in the competitions are usunlly distributed at
this dance, but owing to some of the
men's events not having been concluded, this could not be done at this
time. Tho hall was suitably decorated for tho dance, and the usual
dainty refreshments were in evidence. Robinson's orchestra provided the music.
1
MEN'S   SUITS
Made from our own Materials by
^orotjj Irani* ©Intfos
FOR YOUNG MEN AND
MEN WHO STAY YOUNG
Recognized to be the finest Clothing Makers in the United
States and Canada. There were over 50 Suits in this
shipment, no two alike, so there are plenty to choose from,
and the prices will be most pleasing to you and your
purse.
1
<
1
iniiiiigiiimmiiiiiiiiDiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiminiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiDiiiiiiiiiiniiiniKini
PUBLIC MEETING
Auditorium - Sunday March!
at 2.30 p.m.,
TO BE ADDRESSED RY
Mrs. ROSE HENDERSON
CELEBRATED WELFARE WORKER
Delegate to Hague Conference, 19^3 — Has Also
Toured Russia
Subjects:
WOMAN — THE KEYSTONE OF CIVILIZATION.
WOMAN'S POWER FOR WAR AND PEACE.
EVE, THE RISEN.
CANADA, A NATION OF A COLONY.
— Collection will be taken to defray expenses —
BORN. — At the Cranbrook Cottage Hospital, on Wednesday, February 26th, to Mr. and Mrs. F. A.
Williams, a son.
Mr. F. G. Perry of Fernie, is in the
city for a few days. Fred hus just
returned from Ottawa and other Eastern points where he has been in attendance on the meetings of the
federal fruit commission, whose report was recently tabled In the house.
It is announced thnt Dr. Large,
who is commencing dental practice
here, is now receiving patients at
his office above the C. P. R. Telegraphs building, near the Imperial
Bank, between the customary houra.
An effort is being made in the
city to establish a branch of the Pythian Sisters, which is understood is
meeting with success. Anyone wishing to become members of this order
should get in touch with Mrs. Patton, the convenor of the membership
committee.
A. E. Jones is making considerable
improvements to the home of Len
Richardson, on Cranbrook Street.
The house has been raised on to
substantial foundation and re-floored
und a porch built alongside the kitchen. Thi.s with other interior work
will improve the place to some considerable extent.
The most serious interruption for
some time in the light *and power
service to the city took place on
Tuesday evening, when shortly nfter
five o'clock the current went off suddenly and remained off till about
two o'clock the following morning.
The Kimberley line was not affected, it is stnted, and the cause of the
interruption wns said to be a tree
which fell across the line near Camp
Eight, Bull River.
Girls' Patent ""Leather Slippers,
Goodyear welt, sale prices, 8 to 10%
S.'l.OP; 11 to 2 $3.50, at
A. STRANGE, Armstrong Ave.
Many who heard the Rhondda
Welsh Mule Choir when last here
will regret to learn of the death of
the secretary of that organization,
Mr. Trevor Evans, which occurred
ut Sun Diego, California, on February Oth. Mr. Evuns will be remembered by all who heard him here as
having a wonderfully sweet and sympathetic tenor voice.
Ernest Wood, for many years local manager for the Cnnudinn Bunk
of Commerce, has received word that
he has been uppointed assistant inspector for the bank in the province
of British Columbia. The promotion
will necessitate the removal of tha
family to Vancouver. During their
stay in Fernie, Mr. Wood and hla
amiable wife huve always taken a
prominent and active part in every
move for the good nnd welfare of
the city and tlieir departure will be
keenly regretted. They expect to
leave in about two weeks' time. C.
G. Bennett, of Creslon, has been appointed to Mr. Wood's position with
thi- bank in Fernie. — Fernie Free
Press.
Mr. nnd Mrs. Geo. Appleyard, who
returned last Friday from a trip to
the Eastern States, are selling their
household effects and will shortly
leave for New York, where Mr.
Appleyard has purchased a seat on
the New York stock exchange. It
is said the price paid wns something
like $100,000. We understnnd Mr.
Appleynrd will represent large interests in Minneapolis and St. Paul.
During their residence here Mr. and
Mrs. Appleyard have mude n host of
friends who sincerely regret their
depnrture. — Fernie Free Press.
Owing to unexpected delays, it
was not found possible to commence
the henring of the nppeals against
the claims made at the instance of
the provincial government against
some lumber nnd other concerns of
the district, for nllegod arrears arising from under-nssessment in past
years. Judge Brown of Grnnd Forks
who will hear the enses, could not
reach the city in time for the hearings on Tuesduy. nnd the enses will
therefore be held over for a day or
two pending his arrival. Legal representatives will appear for both
sides it is understood.
Sherwood Herchmer left on Wednesday morning for Vancouver,
wliere he will act for the Canadian
National Railways in a suit brought
against them by Loch, the B.C. government spotter, who became notorious us a witness in several liquor
coscr in Fernie a yenr or so ago.
Loeb is chnrging the Canadian National with false arrest. — Fernie
Free Press.
NEW
Shoe Repair
SHOP
Now Open On
ARMSTRONG AVENUE
Next to W. D. Hill's
—Give Us a Trial—
YUEN KEE       ■       Prop.
WANT ADS.
SELLING CHEAP — Billy goat and
three bred nannies.    W. G. Bnte-
man, Moyie, B.C. 1-3
ANNOUNCEMENT
Dr. LARGE
DENTIST
Begs to announce the
opening of his office in
The
C. P. R. TELEGRAPH
BUILDING
Hours 9 to 12 and 1 to 5
TELEPHONE 204
STRIP TICKETS
With and Without Coupons
For General
Admission Purposes
For Sale at
THE
CRANBROOK HERALD
OFFICE
WANTED — Position required ns
house help or children's nurse.
Apply Williams, cjo Mrs. Galbraith, Fort Steele. 1
LOST — Lady's white gold wrist
watch, between Y.M.C.A. and Arena Rink. Finder please apply to
Box 288.    Reward given. ltf
WILL THE PERSON who took black
mnckinnw coat from Curling Rink
on Friday last, February 18th,
kindly return same to this office
and get their own, u black coat
with red corded seams. 52-1
WANTED—Men's nnd Ladies' Stockings to mend and darn. Mrs. Kan
dull, Slaterville. 52-1
FOR SALE—In hill residential section of Cranbrook, on two corner
lots with good garden. Four or live
bedrooms, large dining and silting
rooms, bathroom, etc., cement
bnscment, hot water heating system, largo kitchen. Price, $4,000
Could not be duplicated for double, P.O. Box 745, Cranbrook,
B.C. tf
Developing
puv
Printing
24 Hour
Service
.1. F. SCOTT
Crnnbrook Drue & Hook Co.
i'!      ;"   ■;*"•::*■:• ;-■'! r :■■■:,;•■! r, • •
fffffffffffffffff.Vfffffff
COTTAGE HOSPITAL    %
Maternity   e\   General   Niirltttg   ""
Terms Moderate f
Mrs. A.    CRAWI <>RI>      >
Matron \
Garden Ave. Crauhrook ll.C. f
fffffffffffffffffffffffff
FOR SALE—One steel bottom, top,
and front Queen Heater, with
hearth and guard rails. Apply to
Box 458, or Mrs. A. H. Blumenauer. 3-ltf
For lhe past year the Canadian
Pacific Railway and the Great Northern Railway have been negotiating
with a view to using one line of
track from Klko to Natal. This would
bo a saving of half the upkeep on a
line over 50 miles long. Recently
engineers for both lines hnvo been
making a complete survey of tbe situation and it is quite possible that an
early announcement will be made.
Que line could easily handle all tbe
business on this stretch of road with-
| out working any particular hardship
upon the settlers in the valley. As
tho Great Northern has a much better grade than the C. P. R., the chances seem to favor it as tho permanent line. If the idea is carried into
effect, the abandoned right of way
would make a wonderful trunk road WILLIAM THOMPSON
for autos through the valley.       It I Phone 76      •      -      P. O. Boa 238
|  would bo a real speedway for fifty Secoad Hud Daalart
~ miles, — FcmieFree Preia.
Million Oak Dining Room Suite
Upholitered Wicker Suite
Wicker Rocking Chain
Dreneri, Bed., Tablet, Chain,
Incubator., Harnett, Stovet, Heatert,
Etc. Etc.
TREES
Shrubs, Vines
Perennial
Flowers
NO TIME TO LOSE NOW
IN ORDERING.
I will try to call ever} where.
Should you not see me drop
me a card and I will call.
S JOHNSON
Box 626, Cranbrook
52-2

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