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Cranbrook Herald Dec 23, 1926

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Array THE CRANBROOK HERALD
VOLUME  28
CRANBROOK. B.C., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23rd, 1926
N IJ M li E R    4 4
UTHE LAST FRONTIER"
FRIDAY   AND
CHRISTMAS   DAY
WORLD'S GREATEST WESTERN PHOTOPLAY — Famed in Canada at Buffalo Park, Wainwright, Alta.
STAR
THEATRE
CHRISTMAS DAY MATINEE AT 2.30;    NIGHT SHOWS AT 7.30 and 9.30
GREETINGS FROM MAYOR ROBERTS TO THE
RATEPAYERS OF CRANBROOK
Permit mc to avail myself of this opportunity oi wishing the Citizens of Cranbrooit and thc surrounding district
tlte compliments of thc season to express the hope that the
New Year will bring us all much prosperity, happiness and,
above all, health.
While the passing vear has not been productive of any
marked signs of prosperity, conditions generally have been
I believe, satisfactory on the whole.
This year marks tbe twenty-first anniversary of the
incorporation of our eity and its growth throughout that
period has been one of continued success—and that this growth
is built upon a sure foundation is now a well-accepted fact.
Thc financial condition of our municipal government continues
healthy; our Sinking Fund, as in the past, has been adequately
maintained and compares favorably with any municipality in
thc province. During tbe year three of our early debentures
have been retired, namely the Municipal Hall Debentures
of $7,500, Fire Mall Debentures of $4,000, and the Streets and
Sidewalks Debentures of $10,000.
One is apt to look back to the early days of incorporation
and compare, perhaps unfavorably, the tax rates of those days
with our present rate of taxation, yet upon closer examination
tlie then rate of approximately 18 to 20 mills does not compare
so unfavorably with our present rate of 40 to 42 mills as the
mere figures would indicate. In those days our school rate
was only five mills and today our school requirements necessitate a levy of twenty-six mills, so that the amount levied
for the City's general purposes are much the same as formerly,
notwithstanding thc fact that labor costs almost 100% more.
In referring to the school rate it must not be inferred that I
am criticising our school board. Very few, if any, object to
paying tbe necessary taxes for school purposes and I am sure
that the school trustees, who are all ratepayers themselves,
exercise the strictest economy in all school expenditures, and
it is of vital importance that our schools be maintained up to
the present day requirements and it is to the credit of the
trustees that our educational facilities are well up to
the average of other cities of this size in the province. It will
also be admitted that our educational facilities arc of much
commercial benefit to the city at large.
The board of works undertook- quite a heavy program
during the year, but owing to certain unforeseen and unavoidable circumstances not as much was accomplished as might
have been desired. Criticism has been made in this respect,
some of which was not quite justifiable, yet I am free to confess that I am not myself satisfied that the work was carried
out with that despatch and thoroughness I would have liked.
The full benefit of this year's work, however, will not be appreciated until next year. Much excellent work was done
during tbe late fall.
The health of the city has been well maintained, and I
feel that some credit for this happy condition is due to testing
of the cattle for tuberculosis and the inspection of the milk
and dairies. Death has taken its inevitable toll, and to those
who have been bereaved 1 respectfully tender my deepest
sympathy.
T. M. ROBERTS, Mayor.
Cranbrook, B.C..
December 23rd, 1926.
"WHITE GIFT" SERVICE
AT KNOX CHURCH
XMAS ENTERTAINMENT
The annual Christmas Tree and
entertainment of Knox Sundny scliool
was held lnst Monday night Thore
was a large crowd out to hear thfl
children recite and sing. A gratifying phase of the entertainment was
thfl presence of so many adults', who
appeared to enjoy the evening. Thfl
"White Uift" service proved a splendid success, Rifts of food, clothing and
toys having heen distributed among
needy families in thi1 district. A
conservative estimate of the value of
the Rifts has been placed at eighty
dollars, and those in charge of ar*
rangements wish to thank all those
who brought in donations, and especially those men who so kindly sent
turkeys and geese, which are much
appreciated at thia time of the year.
May   Return  to  Erickaan
The school trustees are in communication with Miss M. Jerome, at
Kimbii-ley, with a view to securing
her to replace Miss Vickers as vice-
principal of Creston school. Miss
Jerome had charge of that room from
September to January laat year, and
gavo fine satisfaction.—Creston Ke-
ffi!r;ili;i!!:L'!.WH;iii.:'"!i'   ' 'i!i;;."*:i''1':II
ICENRTAL SCHOOL
REPORTS FOR MONTH
OF DECEMBER
DIVISION I
Number enrolled,   35;  percentage
1 of attendance, 08.0.
Olive Norgrove, On Young, Grace
I Pritchard, Lucielle Rosling, May
Strachan, Jessie  South, Willie Cox,
i Rosaline Weston, Helen Wade, Mary
Richmond, Kathleen Edmondson,
Douglas Patton, Eileen Grey, Mary
D'Hondt, Betty Lunn, Chrissie Charboneau, Garnet Blaine, Robert Muirhead, Marshall Russell, Edwin Haley,
I Jean Macdonald, Vera Sadler, Lillian
I Webster, Dorothy Flett, Gordon Dezall, Fresa Luca, James Brookes, Peggy   Johnston,   Rusk   Randall,   Alex
JLaidlaw, May Russell, Malcolm McPhee, Lloyd Burgess, Vincent Ljung-
jquist, Lillian Dale.
A. WOODLAND.
DIVISION II
Number enrolled,  42;  percentage
| of attendance, 98.9.
Eddie   Gartside,   Walter   Barrett,
I Bernice McDonald, Beverley Collier,
Paulir1 Bowness,  Margaret  Farreli,
Ruth McKowan, June Collins, Mary
Fyfe,  Robena   Miller,  Evelyn   Eley,
[Helmer Erickson, Berta Junes, Alfred
I Calhoun, Marie Collins, Helen Gilroy,
| Joe Genest, Edna Taylor, Allan Mc-
[||Currach,  Mike  Frost,  Bertram   McLean, Angus Rector, Eddie Leonard,
Elva Turner,  Ellsworth Ryan, Ruth
Fanning, Alex Williams, James Dixon,  Winnifred   Pelkey,  Donald   Mclnnis,  Pat "Harrison, Jean   Niblock,
Florence  Johnston,   John   Chisholm,
Vvonne    Williams,   Cyril   Harrison,
| Willie Stevely, Wright Spears.. Nor-
t man Galbraith, Joe Walkley, t'vonne
j Stenberg, Eugene Kennedy.
M.  G. JOHNSTON.
* *  •
DIVISION  III
Number enrolled, 87; percentage
of  attendance,  to'd.19.
Bert Pelton, Stanley Porter, Mary
Lamont, Derrell Varner, Gladys Burton, Dorothy Worthington, Nancy
McCrindle, Edna Collier, Jack Parker, Yuel Guthrie, Jean Rutledge, Vivian Kemp, John Belanger, Edna Baxter, James Stone, James Atchison,
Lillian Russell, Mae Neily, Elizabeth
Godderis, Hazel Clapp and Winnie
Steward and Robert Stevely (equal),
Reginald Shaw, Harry Walkley,
Frank McClure, Alice Marsh, Betty
Genest, Edith Walker, Hilda Robinson, Edna Shaw, Leona Small, Gene
Ingham, George Haddad, Florence
Steward. Absent— Marjorle Wade,
Florence Ford.
M. L. BAXTER.
• • •
DIVISION IV
Number enrolled, 41; percentage
of attendance, 04.74
May the ship o( Golden Opportunities
and Success dock at your port and may
we be listed among your friends who
wish you a MERRY XMAS - whether
it does or not ?
RATCLIFFE & STEWART
Meets Death at
Mine Saturday
W. A. Chisholm, Well Known
Here, Killed at Kimberley
By Ore Train
VERDICT 1s~ACCIDENT
Early on Saturday morning last,
William Alexander Chisholm, employed as an outside worker at the
tunnel of the Sullivan Mine, was instantly killed when he was knocked
down by nn electric ore train coming
out of thc mouth of the tunnel. His
work was in connection with the
track, and it is surmised he did not
hear the train approaching when he
was struck.
Verdict  at  Inquest
An inquest was opened on Saturday morning by M. J. Halpin, coroner, with Ross Rutherford, as the foreman, and after hearing the evidence,
adjournment was made till Monduy
so thut a mine safety inspector could
attend. The verdict returned then
was that deceased came to his death
accidentally, and everyone was exonerated from blame in conjunction
with the tragedy.
Deceased was ^cIobq tu seventy
years of age, and WW very much respected by all who knew him. He
was a pioneer resident of the district,
und is survived by a widow and two
sons, grown up, both of whom are
at Kimberley in the employ of thc
company.
Well  Known  Here
Word came t<i this city of the ac-
cident through notification being
sent to the ("ranbrook .Masonic Lodge,
uf whicli deceased was a member.
The older residents in particular regretted to learn of his passing, being very well acquainted with him.
Twenty-seven years ago he made his
headquarters in this place, and among
other things worke flat hauling lum*
ber to Kimberlcv for the construction
of the North Star Hotel, which was
then being built. He was also at
Fort Steele following mining in the
early days. At one time he conducted a meat market here for Pete
Woods, where the present Dominion
Meat Market la, and in his employ in
those days was J. R. Walklev, now of
the Cranbrook Meat Market,
Mayor Roberts
to Run Again
Makes Announcement of Intention to Stand for Second Term
MAY BE OTHERS OUT
Mentioned in the Herald some time
ago as a possibility, Mayor Roberts
this week makes the definite announcement that he will again be a
candidate for the mayoralty at the
civic elections next month. This is
the first definite pronouncement
which is made in connection with the
civic elections, outside of the announcement that W. F. Attridge will
again allow his name to go up us a
police commissioner. Whether Mayor
Roberts will be opposed is not at all
certain, though there is continued
consideration of the nume of W. F.
Cameron, und it is most likely thnt
he will be contesting the mayoralty.
He has already hud both considerable
mayoralty and aldermanic experience.
Another nnme has been mentioned
of late, though it is understood he
has not as yet consented to allow his
name to be considered in connection
with the mayoralty, this being F. II.
Dezall, at present chairman of the
school hoard. He hns been approached to this end, and while it is understood he is willing to run again us
a member of the school board, he has
not made any decision as to the other
office.
It is likely that next week will
bring definite decisions on the part
of a number who are being spoken
of in connection with the vacancies
on the various public bodies. Alderman Fink hns decided not to run
again next year, but it is probnble
that Alderman MacPherson will again
be in the running.
CONDUCTOR DIES IN
CALGARY; WELL KNOWN
IN CRANBROOK
Much regret was expressed in railroad circles on Saturday morning
when it became known that word
had been received that Robert H.
Moseley, C.P.R. conductor, was in
hospital at Culgary, and that his condition was serious, following an operation for appendicitis. Later word
came that he was not expected to
live, and Sunday a telegram came
that he had passed away that afternoon. J. 0. Ingham, representative
of the Order of Railroad
Conductors, left on Saturday afternoon for Culgury, und reached there
some time before Mr. Moseley passed away. Details of his illness have
not been received, but it is presumed that his condition must have been
precarious when he wus taken to the
hospital, and that the operation was
a last resort.
Thc late Mr. Moseley lived here
for a number of years, and was well
though of among the railroad men,
and those with whom he came in contact. He was of a quiet and retiring nature, unassuming, and of a
pleasant disposition when his natural
In addition
employed by the company at his pres
ent work. He was steady and reliable, and earned the respect of all
with whom he came in contact.
The funeral took pluce at Kimberley on  Monday afternoon,  and the
Owen Haley, Bunye Futa, Norah un>l«d f1hureh,.there belnE deemed
Simpson, James Halcrow, Adelia Chis- too small for the occasion the fun-
holm and Jane Nisbet (equal), Ira Sl^S&^lBW^.2flS,
McNaughton, Herbert Potter, Marion Hal', which waj filled to capacity,
Richmond, Hilda Gillis. Rose Magro, »«•£»•«••f^JE^J?]*1*
Jack  Pattinson, John Magro,   Mike
r
ACCEPT OUR SEASON'S GREETING
IN THE GOOD OLD FASHIONED WAY.
WE WISH YOU JOY AND HAPPINESS
ON THE MERRY CHRISTMAS DAY.
j. r. Mcdonald
Kollantk. Kathleen Nell£ Gordon' gvuM, United C hurch pastor of Kim-
Calhoun, Evo Kilby, Jame. Lunn and,S"1^ conAuc.te-? if\e seivicM* J,n,d
Billy Whiting (equal), Margaret Rut-ife wa. aMiated by Rev Bryce Wal-
ledge, Marshall MacPherson, Murray \]"°."' ""». cffi T(^ "jSffiJfc
Rombough, Eliaabeth Stewart, Chria- Kimberley Lodge, acting for their
tine William., Evelyn H-ildener,! bre l"*n '» Cranbrook, also took part
Clara Gordon, Eunice Moore, Nor-l"1 the service, there being - -■-
man Blaine, Mary Small, Theo Law*
rie, Harvey Blrce, Elliott Harris, Gordon Speers, Edgar Offin, Mary Pritchard, Clarence Johnson, Allan Patmore. Absent—Huel Bowley, Harry Christian, Frnncis Curie, Harold
Howe.
S.  D. WHITE.
...
DIVISION V—Gr.d. 8
Percentage of attendance, 1)9.55.
Edith Faulkner 05.0, Eileen Moore
94.4, Billy Saunders 03.4, Edwin
Bakken 92.6, Kenneth Haynes 02.0,
John CaUirelia 02.4,-Joe Birkin 02.0,
Carl Brennan 80.4, Norman Hall
80.2, Rudie Kotak 88.8, Percy North
88.6, Doris Haley 88.2, Donalda Walker 88.2, Roberta Collins 88.0, Mimi
Blefare 87.4, Angelo Provenzano
87.2, Edythe Wells 87.0, Klchi Maigawa 88.8, Georgina Haddad 83.6,
Grant McGregor 83.2, Edith Sullivan
82,6, Muriel Worthington 81.4, Dolly
Johns 81.2, Ada Gammon 79.6, Joe
Ward 79.2, Clarence Barrett 79.0,
Robert Gagnebin 77.8, Tom Miller
77.6, Billy Burton 77.2, Jack Parkin
76.8, Stanley Heise 75.4, Mildred
Watkins 73.4, Margaret Walkley
72.8, Robert McGregor 71.0, Kathleen Haynes 70.2, Barbara Worthington 67.0, Harold George 65.0, Miriam
Price 62.6, Esther Leonard 61.6, Harvey Moir 59.8, Edward Romanik 58.4,
, M. McCASLIN.
(Continued on Page Eight)
l reserve was penetrated,
<"- ' - »- "»' '"• "»" -"  Ir ^■WF'SjStetSS
the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, he was also on the roll
of Key City Lodge, I. O. O. F.,
and also belonged to the Encampment
branch of that order. Ho was also
a member of the Rebekah Lodge
at Kimberley. It is expected
that these orders will be represented
at the funeral, which takes place in
Calgary on Wednesday, by W. Wolfer.
formerly of this city. R. T. Tiffin,
a conductor formerly of this city,
and now of Calgary, is also there
to assist in the arrangements.
The late Mr. Moseley left Cranbrook about two years ago, and was
running out of Shaunavon, Sask., up
till quite recently, and later out of
Calgary. He is survived by
by a widow and young family.
deceased was held there.   Rev. James
number of members from Cranbrook
Lodge present. Interment took place
in the Klmberlev cemetery, and there
were a large number of floral tributes in evidence.
The mishap created u very painful
impression in Kimberley over the
week-end, nnd much sympathy Is ex*
tended to thc members of the bereaved family.
♦♦++♦++♦♦♦+♦♦♦♦♦+♦♦♦♦♦♦+♦♦
LAKE
iWINDERMERE:
NOTES
**************************
(Speciul to The Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., Dec. 17th.—The
annual concert and  dance   of   the "A Dark Secret" "by Division I.    At
Preparing for tha Bi, Dance
Next week will sec one of the big
social events of the year take place,
the annual dance given by tho B. of
R.T., and the Ladies' Auxiliary of
tbe Trainmen. The committees are
hard at work getting the arrangements into final form, and it is promised that thc 1926 event is likely to
be the best yet. As formerly, the
supper alone will be well worth it,
to say nothing of the long dance program, into which some novel effects
will be introduced. The Bonners
Ferry Orchestra will provide the
music.
ping," was illustrated by Gladys Larmour, a pupil in Division I. The
drill was given by Division II; and
GREETINGS   FROM   THE   CHAIRMAN   OF   THE
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
In extending to iln* pupils of thc Cranbrook Schools,
the teachers and tin parents appropriate greetings at this
season (rom the School Board, it will nut be amiss to mention
that due to the co-operation of all concerned, prospects seem
bright for one of the most successful years the schools have
vet experienced. Consequent upon rapid expansion there have
been difficulties to meet in sonic directions, but with ;m admirable spirit apparent in all directions, it seems these problems have been disposed of with thc promise of the best measure of success.
It lias been the aim of thc School Hoard to make tin*
Cranbrook schools ui such a standard .1- thev now enjov.
Other places now [joint to this cit\ as u-orthv'of emulation,
anil in extending Christmas Greetings at this time, coupled'
with them i*, the hope that the coming vear ma\ bring this
goal appreciably  nearer,
Hi \KHROOK SCHOOL BOARD,
l-\ II. Detail, Chairman,
I A RACE FOR AN INLAND EMPIRE
$ BEING  AN   INCIDENT   IN  THE  LIFE  OF  DAVID  THOMPSON,
* THE GREAT EXPLORER AND ASTRONOMER
* OF   WESTERN   CANADA
+
+ By B. G. HAMILTON, IKVERJIEHE, B.C,
************************************************+***$
The   echoes   which   had    pas« d
around the world on the return of
tho ships of Captain Cook from his
Ill-fated voyage of discovery along
the western const of North America,
telling of the wonderful richness of
the furs, chiefly sea-otter, which
might be had un the Pacific shores,
and how they might be traded in
the Orient for the rich treasures of
Cathay, had barely reached the Atlantic coast of America before the
great fur traders of that part were
astir formulating ideas and perfecting schemes whereby they could pet
out west to establish a monopoly
there which would make them rich
"beyond the dreams of avarice."
Between the English Hudson's Bay
Company and the North West Com-
pany of Canada there had for long
been a bitter feud in murders and
in crimes, disastrous to the carrying
on of trade with uncivilised tribes of
Indians. The fur traders of the United States were rivals of both companies, but more particularly of the
latter, whose territory lay contiguous to the then undefined" boundary
between British possessions and the
lands to the south of them. These
last two competitors used the Mackinaw as a centre, an important en-
try port to the unknown, and from
there in fierce competition carried
on operations to the west and south.
Chief amongst United States fur
traders of the period was John Jacob
Astor, who later combined his interests with those of others and formed
the American Fur Company.
West and still further west these
traders pushed their frontiers, the
competition becoming keen as each
season went by, and as a natural con-
sequence profits from furs were ever
falling. Particularly did this apply
to the middle interior of the British
possessions, where all three met on
open ground, and where the fiercest
of the Indian tribes moved in nomadic independence.
Closely following the explorations
of the late Capt. Cook, of the British
navy, had followed Independent expeditions, sent around the Horn by
partners, merchants of Boston, Mas-
sachuHsets. At this period the mercantile marine of the United States
was the best in the world. At p*-acc
with everyone, her ships
Sailed the  Seven  Seas
and tha vessels from the port
of Boston were amongst the best,
Kach ship's captain was. when afloat.
independent of everybody. It was
his business by hook or by crook, by
fair means if possible, but by some,
means which would not be too closely
questioned, get thc most valuable
cargo possible, preferably from abor-
iginies, and either to bring it home
or trade it in the rich markets of the
Orient for a still more valuable cargo*   While Britain was busy fighting
every other important nation on the
th'   ships of the  t'nited States
 tl   -wept  undisturbed around
he world.    Here, then, on the Pacific
st, was an easy mark for them.
In addition to being busy with war.
shij - flying the British flag could
carry goods to China for trade, as
that market was. by special arrangement, controlled by the monopoly of
the great .East India Company. Xo
British flag dared enter a port of
that country without special permis-
W.
d of the
Athalmer - lnvermere Consolidated
school, directed by the teachers, was
given at the Athalmer Hall on Wednesday, December the 15th. The hall
was decorated with houghs of fir
trees, whiiu festoons of colored paper
were hung about, looking very beau-	
tifut. Over 150 attended. Division I Galena Parntsky, $.1.00, and Edith
of the school sang the Christmas car-1 McLean, $4.50. After the concert
ol of "Holy Night;" then Division III a dance was given. Great credit is
gave the singing games of the Grand due to Miss Brookes, Miss Graham
Old Duke of York and The Chinese;and Mr. McGary for the work '
Fan.    The  poem  "Christmas Shop-1 training the children. ,
the end of the concert, the whole
school sang the Christmas carol,
"Noel, Noel." The prizes for the essay
on "The Resources of the Columbia Valley," were won hy Charles
Crook, 1st prize in high school, and
the sum of $10.00; Roy Uke, $7.50
Irregular Methods  of  Trade
■■■■■- : the astonishingly rich cargoes
of furs which were picked up on the
Pacific coast continued to penetrate
easl These reports resulted in
stronger efforts to bring schemes to
fruition, to turn the trade overland,
=o as to reach London, one of the
great centres for fur markets of the
day. The concrete idea was to complete a line of posts, "houses" or
forts, just whichever you may wish
to cail them, from the present western frontiers across the mountains
ti tbe sea. John Jacob Astor's companies and the North West Company
of Canada began to make arrangement? to work this out in conjunction.
At that time <"anada did not have
'■'■•" f;' ■'•- communication with the
mother country; still. Great Britain
held all the strings of colonial policy.
For this reason, in part, operations,
extensions of trade, of discovery, of
territorial aggrandizement were slow.
On the other hand the new Republic
of the United States was home-centered in its activities. Settlers, as
well as fur traders, were commencing
to i ish beyond the Alleghanies and
Into the valley of the Missouri, and
asked for fresh worlds to conquer.
In this they had a ready ear in the
chief executive of the nation, President Jefferson. He, brave flian, had
visions of a far-reaching empire, far
beyond hi- country's then known
boundaries. John Jacob Astor found
in him a ready listener, combined
with a powerful helper, in his desire
f'r discovery and extension. True,
both were working to one end. though
for cross purposes, What did it matter for the moment? Thc country
was   large.
Jeffenon Wai m Man of Power
and Influence, filled with ambitious
dreams above his brethren of the pos-
nihilities of extending in every way
possible, particularly into the western terra Incognito, where scattered
pioneers had gone before.
Captain Gray, <>f the good ship
Columbia Kediviva, had discovered
the mouth of the "River of the
We-t." which so many had passed by,
and had named the river in honor
(Continued on Page 5)
■■nawKMHOMBaMnBai
A Sincere Appreciation 01 Your Patronage,
Past, Present and Future—
So a Hearty Good Wish —
::    MERRY   CHRISTMAS    ::
NELSON STUDIO
Annual NEW YEARS BALL
GIVEN BY B. OF R. T. AND L. A. TO B. OF R. T.
AUDITORIUM, CRANBROOK, FRIDAY, DEC. 3ht THE   CRANUKOOK   HERALD
Thursday,   December  23rd,  1926
CHRISTMAS GREETINGS FOR HERALD READERS
FROM HON. J. H. KING, OTTAWA
I HEARTILY join with the citizens of Hast Kootenay In
offering up thanks for all the bounties that we have en-
joyed during the year, and In doing so we can enter all
the more joyously into the festive spirit of the season. The
district of East Kootenay is coming rapidly into her own
heritage whicli has been so richly endowed by Providence, and
with the development of her fabulous mineral and other natural
resources, I om confident that the future of the district will
witness a prosperity and wealth unprecedented in any other
section of this great Canada of ours. May Divine Providence
continue to prosper and guide the destinies of our country and
its people. "Peace on earth, good-will toward men." It is
with sentiments of the deepest sincerity and pleasure thnt I
extend to thc people of British Columbia my best wishes for
a very merry Christmas and all happiness aud prosperity for
the year 1927.
J. II. KINO.
GIRL GUIDES MAKE
PRESENTATION TO THEIR
LEADER LAST WEEK
On Thursday evening last, thc
home of Mrs. W. B. MacFarlane was
the scene of an interesting Bocinl
function when the Cranbrook Girl
Guides met to bid farewell to their
osteomod leader, Miss M. McCaslin.
Besides the patrol, which was out
in full force, the members of the
Girl Guides' executives were nlso
present. The evening for all was a
most enjoyable one, the first part
of which was spent in the playing
of various interesting games and the
enjoyment of n sing song. About
10 o'clock the principal event of the
evening took place, when Miss Mary
Genest, on behalf of the Guides, presented their lender with an address,
in which they conveyed to her their
sincere feelings of regret at her departure from them, and as a small
token of this esteem and as n remembrance of them, she asked her to accept a beautiful silver flower baskt t.
This was accompanied by the usual
cheers of Rood-fellowship, to which
Miss McCaslin appropriately responded.
On Friday many of the guides and
friends of Miss McCaslin were at the
dopot to bid her farewell before she
look her departure for Spokane, ond
ns the train pulled out the girls gave
their departing leader three rousing
cheers.
**************************
! KIMBERLEY j
I NEWS NOTES §
**************************
Mr. Worden, of Cranbrook, was a
visitor to town on Saturday.
After an absence of several months
from town Marry Purcell arrived in
Kimberley on Friday from the
prairies, renewing old acquaintances
Mr. Bowness and Jack Martin were
in town on Friday last.
Mr, and Mrs. T. Alexander left
ou Thursday for Nelson, where they
will be the guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Fletcher.
Mr Dean, of Moyie, paymaBtor for
the C. M. &. S. Co., was a visitor
tt) town last wiek.
Mr. Morsh, principal of the public school, is spending the Xmas holidays ut his home in Peachland.
Mrs.   Hanington, Sr.,   arrived   in
'lis an old friend thnt greets you here, and hopes
that your Christmas will be running over
with Hapiness nnd (iood Cheer.
ALEX. HURRY AND STAFF OF
THE WHITE LUNCH
■I1-. ■!.*lil.,l*i!IM'l*»JHI
m\
H
Miiimp
;  <  r 'l <       i '
: ot  tlie part .
four tritnoship
■■^nii  patronaoi!
I,ha.vi  playe*** ";JL__    ,
Iiri our-j progress "" i
-eiti Ixiin-J +o you )
}      &r\d- our •   i^-y
Since tc • [Good-Wishes'
pwu&uii^^
THE OTIS STAPLES
LUMBER COMPANY, Limited.
WYCLIFFE and KlMBBRLBY
town on Tuesduy evening from th.
const and will spend the winter here
with her  son,  Dr. Hanington.
We arc pleased to learn that Mrs.
(Dr.) Davis is progressing favorably,
after a recent operation at the Kimberley Hospital. _
G. B. Willis, of the greenhouse,
Crunbrook, was in town on Thursday
last.
Mr, Bert Jure is spending the Xmas
week with hla wife at Rossland, ihe
guest of Mra. Peters.
I Mr. Blaylock, of Trail, spent a few
days iu   town  last week .
Mr. and Mrs. E G. Montgomery
* entertained at a dinner party last
| Thursday evening, covers being laid
I for ten. The party adjourned to tho
curling; rink after dinner, where a
I match between the Mine and the Concentrator was played.
Most of the teachers of the public school left town for their Xmas
holidays.
Misses Winnie and Mildred Burdett returned to town Wednesday
iVentng from the coast, where they
havo been attending the B.C. University, nnd will spend the holiday
with their parents.
Mrs. and Miss MacKinnon, of
Cranbrook, were Kimberley visitor on
Monday.
It was with deep regret that tin-
people of Kimberley received the
news of the sudden death of Mr. Alex
Chisholm Saturday morning, who wns
killed at the workings of the Tunnel
Mine. Deceased was a great favorite with all who knew him, having
lived in and around Kimberley for
a number of years. Tlie funeral took
place under Masonic auspices from
the Odd Fellows' Hall. The sorrowing wife and two sons who are left
to mourn his loss have the deepest
sympathy of the entire community,
especially at this season of the year,
which makes it seem more snd.
Mr. Curl White, of tho office stall'
of the C. M & S. Co., Is spending
the Xmas holidays at the coast.
Dr. Smyth, of Kelson, was the
guest of his daughter and son-in-law.
Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Thompson, of
McDougall Heights, this week and
attended the bonspiei on Saturday.
Mr. Ned Hanley, of Nelson, was a
visitor to town the end of last week.
Mrs Deschamps, of Spokane, and
three daughters and son arrived in
town on Wednesday and nre guests of
Mr. and Mrs. K. G. Montgomery.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Lindsay were
Cranbrook visitors on Tuesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Pete Woods were in
town on Monday, attending the funer-1
nl of Mr. A. Chisholm.
Mr.   and   Mrs.   Ben   Keer,   of   St.!
Mary's road,  were town visitors on
Monday
A large gathering from Cranbrook
and Fort Steele attended the funeral
of Mr. Chisholm.
Wednesday of this week was payday—n little earlier than usual—giving the shoppers a little more turn
before Xmas.
Kiniberley is experiencing some
mild weather and considerable snow,
which was much appreciated.
Those attending the bonspiei Saturday night at the curling rink had
"some  time," and the  banquet  pre-'
pared by Chas. Cook was thoroughly
enjoyed,
Mr. Doug. Campbell is spending
the Xmns holidays at Rossland. I
Mr. Attridge, of Cranbrook, was
a visitor to town on Monday. '
MARYSVILLE NOTES
VV.'.AV:.V.V.VAWMWftV
Greal sympathy is felt for Mrs.
Alex Chisholm and family In the
loss of a dear husband and father,
who was accldently killed. Mr. Chis-
hu'in was a much respected old-timer
in the country, and had lots of
friends. 	
' T/ho children's Christmas Tree and
concert, to which friends nnd parents gave very liberally, was held in
the schoolhouse on the night of the
IGth. Tho teacher, Miss Monteith,
gave great skill nnd patience in the
training of the boys and girls In
thoir dialogues, songs, etc. Of course,
the children did their best, nnd they
are very fond of their teacher.
Allan Keer was down for supplies
from his trapping lines above St.
Mary's Lake.
Mr, and Mrs. Bob Murray and Mrs.
Jack Attridge ami family were down
from Kimberley visiting their mother,
Mrs. Robichaud.
Mrs.  H. Stuart visited  Mrs. Bartholomew on  Friday evening.
Miss Monteith left  for her home
nt  Salmon  Arm  on  Friday.
Mr. E. Lundin has recovered nicely
from  his recent sickness.
Warren   Keer   is    up
Mary's Lake hunting.
above   St.
Miss Dot Keer. is. home at the.
ranch. We have missed, your bright
face from among us very much, DotI
Miss Keer has been engaged as a.
stenographer in Cnlgary.
Mr. J. Irwin is out ef the St. Eugene Hospital, Cranbrook, and he
speaks highly of the doctors' and nurses' kindness.
Mrs. Robichaud was a guest of
Mrs. Bartholomew un Sunday.
Mr. Irwin visited at Mr. Bartholomew's on Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. R. Stirtin and Mr.
and Mrs. Crane were the guests of
the Bartholomews' on Sunday.
BRIDGE
A new series of lessons bf
"Wynne Ferguson
Author of •PRACTICAL AUCTION  BRIDGE*
Coi^yiigbt 1926, by Hoyle, Jr.
A i,c
ARTICLE No. 8
W/WMVW^VyWLWV.VAVAttViV.WAV.ViWAVAV.",
C of readers of these articles,
.ing the various pi oblems that
an given, want to know if they should
itry to remember the hands given. Of
course not. Trie hard is of no value
v iiatevcr, but iha principle involved is
uioz'; important. You often h?ar players say, after playing a land badly:
.'Tne- next tinw I get that hand, I will
kitowbofr, to play ft," but they aie only
focliun themselves. The powible num-
fbci of hands that can bcbeldataucticn
■:-z ..*. tremendous tin', .no player can
-svci nope to hold the same hand twtee.
i or r\.v .-eason, don't try to remember
1.1 j .ne band. What you tl.oold dc is
jto t > to rcmembir the principle In-
v^vrfi, for the same priiii itile can be
ii-jd in numberlfies Siands. The on!-'
v.- il \M.po~v' of example liacida u t*c
i;;'.nii:'i'e,i of a principle, J.«l un'*0*"-
!>kU i ridsrst&vid the oriacipta iitvoV-K;
!ii*.:j. its proper application to other
ttai/ds cfwwrollarchaiacler j-du haven't
Waiiicd -.'e.*2 lessor. ft«m ths example
' baulk that they were :n'en;l*J to convey, Jn ttfe bands giver, is Icat veek's
;<r.'it:, t!;e jprtaciplc tfetlved is the
[(ji«8ticnof a trump le...!. VIcu bhouSo
■a tiui'.ji be led? Study itKce hands
!< awfully and tr^ to ma3tti*tbe \mnti.pi#
M-to\i/za which is dl important.
A&uwm so Pfc&ttetn Fto. 7
Sc-Mbs — A, 9,7,3 :     Y      :
r'rfpwcda —Q, 8,-1,2       :A       B :
-K, 7,5,4 :     Z      :
Iv*7 score, first, game. Z dt>d«, W oom*
H^irt and «tt passed. What thoHri A
|lezd? Thi* h» not the typt ol to *& jtat
j>**=ttt*}e i hutnp lead. TTe fceri ctf nx
■ lea.*! dcesat t-w-fw-yily in&xte great
'InKfifh&fcngtii oy tbat A'apeffiMe assy
■very p.-eli "bave or.? or irxe hancrti in
:ha- s-iil. for that nxrvm a lead ot A'n
icfasjfetoa fciuscp might "iti!" an haoor
;ir>;s part -Vr. Gtaod, A saouM oot fcad
amy f-om !ils Sour spades to tbe fckrj,
■fou* by fo dfiisg he rany lea he chance
to r»ike he king. The only two ks*d$
ilfifi are abd frcin four cm!« tw ihe
'a~a or fr.:r dhnrjnda tf* tfce quoui. Of
lie-? fcwa teafcajSw t^ttzr ii the b*b3r.
'If A h&&) Z\n d*cmj*ji sait, he s^ald
lyelthedcute. lilmiK^btl-echrbadt,
he chould Acad 'he tee. Dro'tlaad away
mow et^xrhen a eiv* « tr t\u, S you
fcrid four cr map?. IC \\u. riaj vm*n aa
very apt to have ttc cce lna.puv en
the Becond V^d. Tt Is aiso better iiwe*
tice *o avoid kading a suit bontaJ**«g
an ice if there is as good or a better 't*ad
inAaotl^r suit. The lead of anacegi'v^)
'fp coatiol of ini suii er-1 loses t'i-S
r'*a«ice of usii ^itto"!'.!!!" L V"'- tet**x
in *n cppo»rt"t's hand.
Jif-*eV*7*n tr Pr^jleru No. S
rIeaT»*s — 6  —
CHw — K, 7,6,2 Y
D**Mdda — K, 8, -I, 3      : A
j'Spacics— K, 10, 7,4 7.
1 No score, rubber game. Z decdt, WdiSwr;
I**fts and all pMfeed, What s^o^d A
! Ib-4? In this hacd, the lead of the «foA-
(tin trump is ook', tory. Tbe o'-vi*.
ithjt^ suits all contain a king ind .*«*
[of *.m cctijest ways to loso a Ichc la ?o
i >&d away from it. If you should decWa
td kxA one of li.e ti.   c sui-*o, w't'-ii'
o^e should youictd? Never g'*ew if
y^i ran avoid doing po and vou c**..
avoid it in thk hand by leading rJ«
cl'if^'rA) heart. The original wid oi f'>«r
bewts sbruid -ihow a bet up h.*^rt -»-ic
bo tbat a trump lead should not ukiff*
iu honor in B's band, as was ll.e e>..'
in hand No. 1, In case A fets tlie livd
CaSer and is (■: ced to choose btitweav
ths remaining suits, 1"j ohculd i}ivi*>r
ths o*>ade hind to anj oiher. t>l p.*-*
e.rvf tiva bkl o.f rom hearts sVniU iiJ>'
cz-.t weakness in spadts.
Kcrea.e tve lnt"JWtk»g haiids, botb1
cf iTuklifillustrAtelmpoftuit ij;t»tKji*<
of bkldh.s. Tii'.i'c tbtm ovei i*«l i-**
cot-pare re-id's rith th? analysis tlfcA
wilt C* g^Tn in tho next article.
?ro«*-ari No. 9
:     Y     :
:A       3:
:     X     i
Hsartn —A, Q 8,4„3
Clvfaa—A, K.3,2
Dtwfio.Tds — A
Spades — A, 10^2
5paaes — /», in\ i
■ VSe* occfE, rubber gmv. Wh it "feoiW Z
■ as dealer bid?
Prnbio<n Ho. JO
ftearts — A, K, Q, 3 —
Qub3 — 8
Dkmonds—A,IC,Q,J,8,3  :.
Spades— 9, 6 :
tie rcore, rubber ^mv.. if 7, d-ait t_d
bid 'Jimt-^iM-s, wnat cirjuid A Uii
Golfing Around the World
1. Member** of thc Round-Thu-World Golf Club aboard (ho Emprcu of Scotland oa
IW fUobe-codrcllna cruUc. 2. A doll couric In India. i\. Commander Jock UtM
ol the EmprcM of Scotland, an onthualaatlc member of tho Round-the-World Club.
Some people are unable to understand the fascination
of that Royal and Ancient that they refer to as
"chasing a little ball round and round a field"; but it
must be admitted that there must be a good den! to
it when players actually start chasing tho little ball all
around tne world.
And that ia what twenty members of the Canadian
Pacific Round-the-World Cruise aro going to do this
winter. Of course they don't say that the only reason
why they are going around the world Is in order that they
may play on 26 different golf courses in as many world
pOT; but tf tb* truth were known tbe Sphinx and the
Taj Mahal hold not the lure for them that do the gdtt
courses of China and India and Egypt.
Commander Jock Latta of the Canadian Pacific Cruise
ship Empress of Scotland, now on her way round the
world, is one of the most enthusiastic of the Round-the-
World Golf Cluh, nnd it is he who tees off from the deck
of his ship and splits the fairway far into thc ocean with
tho first ball of the tournament.
The above picture ahows a few of the members of tht
club taken on board, and a few golf clubs that won't bt
allowed to grow rusty with disuse this winter.
ilimii niniiiiiiiiiaiii iKtmniiiUiiiuiiiiiiiniioiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiE idiiiiiiniiiiciiiiu iitu iiiiEiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiuiiim
a
With keen--appreciation of the pleasant business
relationship you have permitted us lo enjoy in
the past we take this means of wishing you all
THE COMPLIMENTS OF THE SEASON.
I City Transfer & Warehouse
J Company
I W. E. WORDEN        -        -        CRANBROOK
°illllilllliuiililillliiiuiiiiiiiiiiii[]iiiiiiiimi[iimiiiiiiil[!iiiiiiiiiiiit!liiiiiiiiiii[iiiiiiiiiiiii!]iiiiii nillllllllllin mu llllltliiiilllilliit
J^WWtflVW'-.^WVVVVWWWWVWVWWWWJVtfVVAV^AWtfWVWW
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MAY CHRISTMAS BRING JOYS
THAT WILL LAST UNTIL WE
HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO
RENEW  OUR  WISH  TO  YOU
IN 1927.
DEZALL'S GARAGE
CRANBROOK - B.C.
ffffffffffffff*:
MM
You have heard it before,
The greeting we send,
But somewhere each time
The words seem to lend
A charm that is bright
A hope ever new—
So it's just Merry Christmas
We're sending you.
Miss M. McLeod
CRANBROOK - B.C.
♦•♦♦4«M*»«*« „*,,***********************
CHRISTMAS    1926
iiwftwt:
Among the other greetings
These few words small appear,
But just enough to hold a wish
For old-time Christmas chci r.
PATRICIA
Cranbrook, B.C.
%++***************** ,******************************** Thursday,  December 23rd,  1926
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
PAQE  FIVE
THE UNITED CHURCH
REV. BRYCE WALLACE, B.A.. B.D., Minister
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26th
-   CHRISTMAS   SERVICES    —
11 a.m.—Morning Service.   Subject: '.'The Child Leader."
12.15 a.m.—Sunday School and Bible Class
7.30 p.m.—Evening Service.   Subject: "The Other Wise Man."
Special Christmas Music will be rendered
at these Services.
THE CHURCH OF A CHEERFUL RELIGION"
-Baptist C&uwb
REV. V. H. MacNEILL
SUNDAY, DEC. 26th
11 a.m.: Christmas Message.
"Ik'tfiniiliiK at Bethlehem."
12 a.m.-Sunday School and
Brotherhood.
7.30 p.m.; Christmas Cantata,
The Choir.
You cannot afford to miss
the special Christmas music on Sunday evening.
COME-BRING YOUR
FRIENDS.
I0U   ABE   fOBDULLT
INTITBD.
A Race For An Inland
Empire
(Continued from Page Three)
of his vessel; but, beyond rowing up
it a few miles, no attempt hud been
put forward to determine thu wealth
and the possibilities of the country
which lay beyond the river's valley
or tributary to this waterway. Acting on the urgings of John Jacob
Astor, Jefferson in 1804 dispatched
overland a small semi-military expedition comprising twenty-nine persons, under the command of Captain
Meriwether Lewis, with William
Clark as hia lieutenant. They were
to travel up the Missouri river, proceed overland to. the Columbia,
thence downwards to the Pacific
ocean. On their return eust they
were to make the fullest possible report both in regard lu the country
at the mouth of the Columbia river
and that over which they had passed
both going and coming. The journey
was one fraught with much danger,
as well as much import. It wus successfully accomplished. A start was
made from .St. Louis in IK04. Reaching river they called the Snake, i
tributary of the Columbia, they foi
lowed down the latter to its mouth,
where the'* spent the winter of 1806*
1800.
It was on und after this date that
thc North West Company of Canada
pushed their operations west of the
Rocky Mountains, establishing posts
at Fort McLeod and Fort St. James, ... 	
in the middle north of what is now [Lake   Pend  d'Oreille
thc
0. K. SHOE REPAIRS
VAN HORNE STREET
— Nur Baker St. —
First Class SHOE REPAIRS
at LOWEST PRICES.
Shoes   Shined
Drs.   Green   ft   MacKinnon
Physicians ft Surgeons
Offlce st Residence, Armstrong
Annas
OFFICE     HOURS
Afternoons _ * to «
Evenings    7.80 to 8.30
Sundays - 2.00 to 4.00
CRANBROOK,   B.C.
LOD««i AMI 80CIMMI
ITOWS'g INSTITUTI
Hen. la tk*
K. tl F. Id
aflaram etlke
Sn* Tie***? a*
8 MS.
DR.   F.   B.   MILES
DENTIST
OFFICE HOURS
9 to 18 s.m.      1 to 5 p.m.
Hums Blk, Craaknok, B.C
GEORGE   J. SPREULL
BARRISTER    ■    SOLICITOR
NOTARY
CRANBROOK - B.C.
fffffffffffffffffffffffff*
Whea Vim Tklss et lnsinnw
— CW1 Dp —
BEALE & ELWELL
Cranbrook & Kimberley
Role Agents Ier Klmkerlt; TewasHa.
•ordlellr tavHad
Pre.id.si   Mn. NORCROVE
Secretary  Mn. J. COUTTS.
**************************
FOR SALE
FINE  FULLY MODERN
RESIDENCE
with three bedrooms.   Owners leaving town.   Price low
and terms attractive.
— Apply to —
BEALE & ELWELL
to pain their ends by devious ways in
carrying on their struggle with the
Hudson's Bay Company. Word came
to them at Beaver Hall, in Montreal,
that the Pacific Fur Company, under Astor's direction, was starting expeditions by sea and by land, bound
for the destined goal of the mouth of
the Columbia. In secret conclave
within the walls of Beaver Hall, plans
counteract these evil influences
on the trade were first broached and
then brought into being.
Time was not to be lost   The race
for
A New Fur Empire
rivalling in extent many existing empires combined in one. It brooked
no delay. In struct ions were sent
west to the wintering partners gathering for the summer meeting at the
chief depot of the middle west, at
Fort William, and from them sent
further west in short wave lengths.
Of these wintering partners who
received the news was David Thompson. That intrepid little Welsh-
Knglish-Canadian surveyor, explorer
and astronomer, had risen in the company to be one of themselves. He
was, in fact, the one, the only one,
of their principal officers who at that
date had been west of the mountains,
near to the region of the Columbia
river. Early in May ho, wilh his
winter's catch of furs, had started
from a post down south of the forty-
ninth parallel of north latitude, far
south of his favorite Kootenai House
to the east. On June Tth, 1H10, he
reached Kootenai House, on Nelson's
Rivulet, from Kullvspell House, on
and hurriedly
travelling on, passed over the Rocky
Province of British Columbia, {Mountains; then travelling express
then a wild uninhabited wilderness | by canoe, reached Rainy Lake House,
except for scattered nomadic Indians j now Fort Frances, on the Lake of the
and wild animals. In 1807 this com-; Woods, on the 22nd of July, 1810.
pany further established themselves j While outfitting there for his rounder David Thompson by building i turn journey, word reached him of
Kootenai House, on a small stream; the Astor expeditions. This in forma-
which he named Nelson's Rivulet, not i tion was accompanied by orders to
far from the present townsite of In-; anticipate their arrival and get there
vermcre, British Columbia. With i before the ship Tonquin, hearing the
these outposts established, nnd fur-,sea expedition, which had sailed from
ther rumors duly confirmed reach- j New York. By the merest coinci-
ing the heads, in Montreal, of won- denco this ship sailed from the port
derful riches awaiting the monopolist'possibly only a few days before Dav-
In the lands tributary to thc Colum- id Thompson turned his face went-
bia river, what more likely than that; ward from Rainy Lake House, bound
they should extend their operations • in his frail canoe to beat her to her
first to the south and thence to the destination.
west? I    The greatest of secrecy,  coupled
John  Jacob   Astor,   with   all   the j with expedition, had to be
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Over and over again you've heard
The wish that is written here,
But each repetition adds wealth lo the words,
"Merry Christmas and Happy New Year."
F. PARKS & CO.
CRANBROOK   -   BRITISH COLUMBIA
latest secret information at his com- in this race. Thompson wus equal to
mand also bent his energies more to-! both, but sometimes great possihjli-
wards the west; but knowing of work i ties are upset by small happenings,
done by his rivals, and of their inti-'Here is what happened:
mate knowledge of how the western] Heretofore the Piegan tribe of In-
fur trade should be carried on, he dians, with the assistance of other
again determined to try and win ' members of the Blackfeet Confedera-
over the Nor Westers, and with J tion, had in many ways tried to ob-
them and thc American Fur Com-,struct the passage of articles of trade
pany, enter into some amicable ar- from the prairie posts to their heredl-
rangement whereby they would cut j tary enemies, the Kootenais, especial-
out the disastrous rivalry which had Iy through their own territory, which
characterised the trading within Brit- commanded'the easy passes through
ish territory. j the mountains.
To his credit the records show that | Being a friend of the Piegans,
John Jacob Astor, with this end hi] Thompson had with great caution
view, revealed most of his plans to J been able to make this trip on several
the partners of the North West Com- j occasions since his first essay In
pany. Tsese canny Scots, the Frobi-!.lune, 1807; but now that firearms
shers, the McGillivrays and others, had been introduced amongst the
who formed the directing heads of Kootenais, through his energy, the
the directing heads of the concern,! Piegans   had   firmly  determined   mi
tempt such an undertaking was hazardous at any time of the year, but
now, with late fall setting in, it was
a work of danger in the extreme.
The
Way Wat Practically  Unknown,
to his already long journey, It took
much more than that, however, to
daunt a man like Thompson, or make
him turn from tho accomplishment
of his mission of trust. Such preparations as were required being completed, he started the expedition from
Rocky Mountain House with twenty-
four horses and the same number of
men. Bach horse was loaded according to the animal's strength with
goods from the weight of 180 to 240
xerclsed I pounds.    On the 2!»th of November,
j*^^wmw^w«vwav-waw.v/.s\s%%^%ssw.ssvasv
We hnve a few modera residence!  TO  LET.
*   Safety Deposit Vault and B»*«»
$3.00 per annum.
trusting in the lapse of time to outstrip Astor, and thus enable them to
establish a chain of posts which
would terminate at the mouth of
the Columbia River, declined the suggested tentative partnership, and
throwing down the gauntlet, entered
with vigor into a race to open a vantage post at the mouth of the great
river of the west.
The  Race Wai  Now On.
The date was the 23rd of June
1810. Again it might prove that
"the race is not to the swift," but
of that anon.
While not successful as a whole
in his negotiations, Astor had been
successful in approaching those who
had at times been in the service of
the rival company, and who knew the
territory in part, and with them, was
able to enter into an agreement embracing some of them, for thc carrying out of his plan?, which resulted
in the forming of a trading body
known as the Pacific Fur Company.
This company had as its primary
object the capture of the fur trade
on the Pacific slope, especially the
coast, nil of that, rather, which lay
to thc south of the operations being
carried on under the direction of
F. M. MacPHERSON
Undertaker
Pfcoee SM.
Norfc.ry Ave, N«t Cily H.I!
♦+♦♦♦+♦+♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
H. W. Herchmer
BARRISTER
Mid
soucrroR
CRANBROOK   •   B.
— PHONE 61 —
NISBET & GRAHAM
Barrittcrt, Solicitors, &c.
Offices: Imperial Bank BMg.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
OFFICES at KIMBERLEY
IN K. of P. HALL
Open Every Thursday from
10 s.m. to S p.m.
— For —
OYSTERS  SERVED
',   in any style you wish Iry ike j
ii VICTORIA CAFE!!
topping him on returning across the
mountains. They felt the strength
of the tide of battle increas ng
against them since guns, in trade,
had crossed the mountains. They had
good reason for either stopping the
visits or else levying a heavy tribute
for that privilege. For ths purpose,
as related, they were gathered. When
therefore Thompson arrived, in all
his haste, at Rocky Mountain House,
he found a motley throng waiting
for him, ostensibly for trade, but
fixed ami determined to expressly
head him off. In this they were for
ome lime successful, lt was weeks
before he could get his supplies ad-
anted. Well on in the fall, on the
18th day of October, 1810, he did
(jet his voyageurs started. They proceeded up thc Saskatchewan in canoes. But, alas! It was only a start.
When they were within twenty miles
of the "gap" they were headed off
by Big Bear, a chief of the Piegans,
and ordered back to Rocky Mountain
House. It was then a case of fight
or obey. Not being fighting men,
they wisely  chose the  latter.
This effectually Btopped, for the
j moment, all further progress towards
Kootenai  House by the old passes'
company from Russia.   The idea was f so, as Thompson says in his narrative
to establish a "factory" at thc mouth      "Here,   after   much   consultation,
of the Columbia river and from it to
pass back cast the rich furs which it
was hoped to obtain, these going
through a chain of forts or posts to
the seat of power in the United
States.
At that period in thc nation's life
there were not any telephones, nor
yet telegraphic service, nor railways,
nor radios; it was simply the most
primitive form of conveyance by
which news was conveyed from one
place to another. Each large company did thc best it could with espionage and swift "express" to keep
in touch with thc doings of its neighbors and rivals in the trade. Thus,
in time, one got to know of the doings of the other.
The partners of the North West
we fully perceived we had no further
hopes of passing in safety by the defiles of the Saskatchewan river, and
that we must change our route to
the defiles of the Athabasca river,
which would place us in safety but
would be accompanied by great inconvenience, fatigue, suffering and
privation; but there was no alternative."
Where Thompson now determined
to make for was some hundreds of
miles north of where he had been accustomed to cross the mountains, off
to the Athabasca Pass. A part then
of which practically nothing .was
known, it only having once been
crossed by half-breeds, and at intervals by Indians. Happily, it is now
better known  as the route of the
i Company had long been accustomed Canadian National Railway.    To at-
*-9%9 &!fc^
I. O. O. P.
KEY CITY LODOE No. 42
liypf Meets every
^jaL^jl Monday night ■'
t§B?53*£' The Auditorium
Sojourning Oddfellows sre cor-
dislly Invited
N. O F. RUSSHIA
Bee. See. E. O. Dingley, P.O.
A MERRY CHRISTMAS,
THE MERRIEST OF
ALL THE PAST, IS
THE WISH OF
PACIFIC MILK TO ALL.
******************************************
For Coed Valie la
GOOD   EATS
Oo ta Tb*
ZENITH   CAFE
I Cm. BAKU * VAN HOWE J *» •& & *£» «» & "»
PACIFIC   MILK
Head OBc.   -   Vaaeaaver
Factories at Udaer * AkWUfeed
Wreaths are shown in every
window, candles twinkle in the
night. May your home be
wreathed in laughter and your
Yuletide days be bright.
TATER'S POOL
HALL
>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦•>♦
1810, after nn extremely hard journey, the party reached the hanks of ,
the Athabasca river at 68 degrees,
38 minutes N., where the guide told
Thompson that from there on it l
would be impossible to proceed with |
horses. Part of the number were
accordingly sent hack to Rocky
Mountain House. Over three weeks
were spent on the banks of the Upper
Athabasca making snow shoes and
sleds. Temporary lop; huts were
built, and In this camp the party
spent their Christmas.
To David Thompson, then in his
forty-first year, that particular day
did tint pre.-ent many attractions.
In fact, it was rather cold and cheerless for him. At seven in the niorn-
llg the thermometer registered thirty
degrees below zero. By nine at night
it had not risen much, registering
■>i degrees below. He had left his
'iii year-old wife, to whom he had
been married eleven happy years, at
Fort Augustus—now Edmonton—
with their fnmily of four young children. Possibly the parting had not
been without forebodings, for it is
recorded that Joshua Thompson wos
born  ut  Fort  Augustus  in  March,
1811. Thompson could not have been
in a very happy frame of mind as on
that Christmas dny he pursued his
round of duties. But at the proper
hour, with due ceremony, he sat down
to grace thc Christmas dinner with
his companions, of whom there were
IVF.au, f'ote, Luscier, L'Arnoureux,
Vallade, Battoche, Pareil, Du Nord
and Baptiste, all French-Canadian
voyageurs ,and Thomas, his Iroquois
Indian guide. The bi'l of fare possibly consisted of soup made from
pemican, pemican dressed with
grease and, thc piece de resistance,
ragout. Finally there was a pudding made from flour, which would
be further strengthened with bear
paw, beaver tail and such other woodland delicacies as good Baptiste the
hunter hod been able to bring in.
Hardy strong men were Thompson
and his companions. Each of the
French-Canadians had "an appetite
of a wolf." It required eight pounds
of meat per man per day to feed
them.
Christmas Day soon sped, and
darkness settled down. Twilight in
the mountains is shorter than on the
plains.
A Camp Fire Was Buill
high; the night was cold, very cold,
skv  clear.    From  the   blase   there
rose    myriads,    yea    millions,    of
small sparks. Up, up they went, until
cooled by thc surrounding air, the
ash fell back to the blase.    As the
men lay on their beds of boughs underneath the shelter, covered by the
furs and robes of buffalo, each had
his thoughts, possibly not very entertaining except to himself, for the
voyagcur, in his youth, lived largely
in the moment,  on the anticipated
joys   of   a   convivial   gathering   of
kindred spirits at some distant post.
All  his companions  soon were lost
in sleep.    Thompson, a man of untiring energy and devotion to duty,
started the serious part of his day s
work.   To him sleep was a means to
an end.   This night, the 2Bth of De-.
cember, anno domini  1810, was no
exception to him. He wrote his diary, |
read his thermometer, took observations,   made  plans  for  the days to
come;  then, all   finished, stretched
out and let his mind roam back to
some of the places he had been, to
some of thc ventures which he had
been through, to his wife, to his family at Fort Augustus.   Then, ere his
eyes  closed,  came  the  thought   of
what  would the  morrow, the next
week, the next dny, thc next month
bring.   Would   he  win   thc   race-
would he, should he get to the Co.
lumbia river's moutlt in safety, but
above all other things, would he get
there before the  employees  of the
rival companv had arrived and had
become established!   If he did what
would result.    If not—?    But that
could not bc.   Thompson up to that
moment did not know what it was to
fail,     lie was not going to let thc
thought cross his mind  ot such  u
time as a Christmas night.
Wc shall sec!    We shall ace!
(To he continued
(NOTE—This is thc third of a series of thirty articles which the Her.
aid has published on David Thompson within the territory of the Rocky
Mountains. It Is proposed to publish the fourth, being the continuation of this one. In aa l.<sue ef the
yiaper before loaf.)
To our faithful old friends, tc our
new appreciated friends and to those
whom we strive to know, we
most hearty Christmas Greetings,
ing off— Merry Xmas.
3$&&fts%%%T!
tender
Sign-
CAMERON & SANG
"ffffffffffffffffffffffoWfffff.f.f fff fffffoffffffffff
Thinking About
Christmas
We've been thinking of Christmas for some time
now, and are able to announce that we are ready to
supply all kinds of poultry for individuals or to firms
desirous of supplying their employees with a
Turkey, etc.
These birds, ranging from white meated
turkeys to delicious geese, are now being
milk fed and prepared to give you the very
best of  a  feast   this Christmas.
We speak of them this early in the year
so that you will realize lhat to pick the best
you should  Order Early.
HAMS FOR THE HAMPER
Perhaps you are packing a hamper of good things
for some distant friend. Why not include one of
our CHOICE SHAMROCK HAMS?
FOR THE
PUDDING
We know you are about to
make those puddings for
Christmas. We remind you
of our SHREDDED OR
KIDNEY SUin.
FOR TODAY
Strictly l:rcsh Eggs. Heinz
Hulk Pickles and new season
1)111 Pickles.
SHAMROCK SPECIALS
Shamrock liacon
Shamrock Peameal Bacon
Shamrock  Picnic  Hams
Mincemeat       2 Ihs. for 45c
P. Burns C& Co., Ltd. PAQE    SIX
THE   CRANBROUK   HERALD
Thursday,  December  23rd,  1926
K
™Tl
Thanking our Many Patrons for Past
Favors and wishing all a
Happy Christmas and a Prosperous
New Year.
RAWORTH BROS,
—   JEWELERS   —
tbe Cranbrook Herald
PUBLISHED EVBRY THURSDAY
MEMBER B.C. AND YUKON PRESS ASSOCIATION
f. A. WILLIAMS R. POTTER, B. Sc.
•obscrlptloD Price  98.00 Per Year
To United SUtei DUO Per Tear
AdYfti-ttfllfif? Ratei on Application, Change* of Copy
tor Adrertlalns thould be banded In not later than Wed-
Maria? noon to «wiirt Attention
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23rd, 1926
THE   SAME  TO   VOU   AND   MANY
OF  THEM
A RIGHT ROYAL CHRISTMAS
FOR the young and the not-so-young, happiness
ought to reign supreme at this season, Not
the selfish happiness, huilt ou self-centred whims
and gratifications, hut the happiness that wells up
and overflows, because it springs up from the heart.
the source uf all true emotions.
While it i.s right and proper that Christinas, being essentially a religious anniversary, should have
some stress given to what it celebrates, profane
usage through the years since Christmas was first
celebrated has given to the occasion the gift attribute, that makes it so looked forward to by the
youngsters, and only slightly less so by the grownups. Some cynics mock tlie Christmas giving, claiming it is only a habit that means nothing, and that a
lot of the giving is useless. This may or may not
be so, though surely tlie obviously joyful Christmas
spirit of many givers refutes this assertion, .while in
tbe few cases in which it may perhaps be true, it
surely docs the heart no harm to at least be brought
to a semblance id Christmas cheerfulness.
There is no time of the year when there is such
a spontaneous desire to give, not only little material gifts, but to pass on the spirit of cheerfulness.
This is evidenced in the "Merry Christmas" that
passes from mouth to mouth, aud iu the harmless
surruptitiousness that surrounds a good deal uf the
gift-giving.
The Christmas season, after all. is a feeling of
the heart. Money spread round lavishly cannot
purchase the true happiness of itself, though it can
be the means of doing tremendous good. It is the
thought fulness and the sacrifice of giving that pays
the giver a hundredfold in cheerfulness and satisfaction.
Christmas does not mean complete immersion iu
pleasures to tbe exclusion of all else. There are
people to whom this season will bring sadness, and
whose homes instead of seeing the twinkling candles of colored light, and pretty decoration, will have
in its place the pall of sorrow. What of these? In tbe
time of universal joy, do these have no consideration' There are few sorrows that cannot be appreciably lightened liy friendly sympathy aud
thoughtful consideration, and in seizing every worthy opportunity that presents itself to lighten the
load, or to spread happiness, the seeds of true Yule-
tide cheerfulness aud joy are spread.
*   *   *   *   *
THE LAST MINUTE SHOPPER
PROBAHLY tlie merchant feels that like the
poor, the last minute shoppers arc always with
him. Nevertheless, the merchants would iiot he
without them. It is better to be a last minute
shopper than not to be a shopper at all, at this time
of the year, at any rate. It is no idle slogan, tbe
"shop early while tbe selection is good," for tbat is
tbe obvious way to secure tbe utmost satisfaction
with the Christmas purchases. Hut while it is true
the selection may not be quite as good for the late
shopper, the Cranbrook merchants generally have
seen to it that there need be no excuse for going
away unsatisfied. Stocks are exceedingly varied,
the range offered is wide, and if the last-minute
shopper is amendable to suggestions to fill the
need, there will be no disappointments.
Not everybody who joins in tbe last minute
rush is to be charged with procrastination, by any
means. There are many who love the friendly jostling of Christmas Eve, and who would not miss
making tbe round of tbe stores then for all the
extra inducements that could be held out for early
shopping. Shop early, or shop late—but there are
now only two shopping days before Christinas, and
it has got tii be done soon.
f^^f^W^^fS^
It is not what you say but how you say it.
So we're putting all we feel into two words
MERRY   CHRISTMAS
BROWN'S BUS LINE
CRANBROOK       _       AND       —
KIMBERLEY
ZENITH
SPECIAL
XMAS    DINNER
From  11.30 a.m. to
9.30 p.m.
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ft    ^y^*^'**,,/,, irillTII       'ki
"  "' I
1
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Table d'Hote $1.00
per cover.
MENU -
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Crisp Celery
Cream uf Turkey
RELISHES
Ripe Olives
SOUP
Queen Olives
A Is Duchess
A la Newburg
FISH
Minced Cream Salmon
ENTREES
Oiblel Sauce
Candied Sweet Potatoes
Stewed Butter Peas
Banana  Fritters
SALADS
Thousand Island Dressing
*" DESSERT
Supreme Plum Pudding Wine Sauce
ENJOY YOUR XMAS DINNER AT THE ZENITH
Ample Accomodation For Dinner Parties — 11 Booths
Wishing Our Patrons and Friends
A MERRY XMAS AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Roast Stuffed Young Alberta Turkey
Cranberry Sauce
Creamed Carrots
Lettuce-Tomato
mt
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**************************
\    WARDNER NOTES    j
**************************
The Wardner pierrot troupe motored to Waldo on Saturday to stage
their pierrott show in the Waldo Hull,
and met with a very enthusiastic reception from the audience. The attendance was exceedingly large, the
hall being packed, in addition to the
Waldo local audience, people motoring in for the show from Baynes,
Elko, Flagstone, and other neighboring towns, helping to swell the audience. The program put on by the
troupe was practically the same as
that staged in the Wardner Hall last
week, and in addition, a bunch of
"hot stuff" on various Waldonians
was rhymed off and set to music by
the troupe, and which proved a riot
of laughs. So pleased were the audience in Waldo with the show, that
the local troupe was made to promise
that they would also stage their next
show in that town, as soon as the
new program is completed. Practice
on the new show is expected to start
immediately after New Year, and
will no doubt completely eclipse the
last one, good as it was, since the
troupe are so pleased with their success that no stone will be left unturned to make their shows a continued success. Mr. C. M. Pennock
will again direct and train the troupe.
Mrs. Jack Guest, who returned
home from the St. Eugene Hospital,
Cranbrook, two weeks previously, is
reported as having had a slight relapse during the past week, which necessitated her again being confined
to her bed. However, we are pleased
to hear that she is now again on the
road to recovery,
Mr. and Mrs. August Daye and
family left on Wednesday noon for
Vancouver, B.C., where ' they will
spend tho holidays voting Mrs.
Paye's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Macintosh. Mr. and Mrs. Daye t-xpect
to be absent about a month, returning to Wardner about the end of
January.
Morris Anderson left on Wednes
day noon's train for Creston, B.C.,
where he will remain during the next
three weeks, acting as relieving op
erator at the C.P.R. station there
following his absence in Creston, he^
fore returning to Wardner, Morris
will proceed to Kimberley, where he
will act also as relieving agent, expecting to stay there for probably
two or three months. Morris spent
several months in Kimberley ns operator this spring.
Mr. and Mrs. James Eastwood and
family have taken up their residence
in the R, Dormer house, where they
will remain fo* the winter, Mr. Eastwood having secured work at the
planer.
Miss Astrid Johnson left on Wednesday evening for her home in Nelson, after spending the past month
or so in Wardner as the guest of her
sister, Mrs. Jack Trainor.
The annual kiddies' Christmas tree
and school concert was held in the
Club Hall on Wednesdny evening last,
a large attendance being in evidence
on thiB occasion, also supplemented
by several visitors from Bull River,
who motored down to see the kiddies'
performance. The concert provi'd
very successful, for which the children  have been  practicing for the
past two months, under tin* direction
of thc teachers, Mi*. H. O. Iverson and
Mrs, Mader, who were greatly assisted by Mrs. Haul Storey, both in
tlit* musical end and also in actual
training, Mr. Rowland served
chairman, and the concert opened by
tho singing of "O Canada" by the
entire school. The stage curtains
were then drawn, revealing a nicely
decorated scheme in the usual Christmas colors. The second item on the
program was a sketch by four of the
pupils of the higher grade, entitled
"The Mad Tea Party." This was
taken from the well known story
"Alice in Wonderland," and
though so well known, still proved
to be capable of provoking a good
laugh from the audience. The characters were well given by Miss Louise
Lawson, as "Alice," George Thompson as tho "March Hare," Anton
Rosicky as the "Sleepy Dormouse
and Mervyn Heffer as the "Mad
Hatter." The headdresses of the
latter three were masterpieces, almost looking as though thev had
grown on, while it was noticed that
the "Mad Hatter" still needed an
empty chair to accomodate his huge
hat hox. The pnrts were very well
taken, the words heing clearly onun-
ciated, while their actions were all
that could be desired, especially when
the watch was "fixed" with 'butter
put in by a crumby bread-knife
Severul light numbers followed next,
including two carols, "Holy Night"
and "Oh, Come, All ye Faithful,"
by the pupils of the big school
recitation by Alvin Storey, dressed
in comical costume, nnd followed by
a holly wreath drill by ten of the
pupils, which was decidedly effec'
tive. The crowning item on the program was reserved until last, being
a musical operatln, entitled "The Old
Women Who Lived in a Shoe," which
carried a large cast. The stage fittings for the operattn was splendid
tho hunks for the kiddies sleeping
quarters being lined up against the
wall, tier upon tier. When one con
sidered all the children shown asleep
as tho curtain was drawn, one decided
it was no wonder the' "Old Woman"
didn't know what to do. However
Kathleen Guest, as "tioody Green,"
the original "Old Woman," soon
showed that she had a splendid system for .managing a large family,
commencing from calling the roll
until tuck*d into hud at night. The
cast was as follows; "Fairy Uodmoth-
er," Jennie Eastwood; "Goody
Green," Kathleen Sheppard; "Mother
Goose," Jennie Moberg; "Santa
Claus," Billy Sinclair; "Santa's Children," Freda Dayer and Andy Rosicky; "Sleep Fairies," Louise Lawson
and Gudrun Johnson; "Fairies," Lauretta Renick, Grace .MaeKenzie and
C'harline Hamrin; "Whistling Willie,"
Eric Rogers; "Ficanniny Pete," John
Scanland ^"Children," Roy and Keith
Thompson, Billy Daye', Ruth Hamrin,
Florence Thompson, Fee Helmer,
Einai* Johnson, Jack Trainor, Helene
Wold, Bert Mackenzie. Georgetta
Ronick, Kathryu Scanland, Louise
Moberg, Blanche Harrison, Katherine
Rosicky and Hjordis Johnson. Those
of the children giving solo pieces were
Keith Thompson, who sang a Christmas carol, John Scanland, who in
his character as "i'icaiminy Fete,"
gave a humorous ditty telling all
about the "animili s entering de ark,
and Katherine Scanland, who also
gave a song, received loud applause
from the audience. Followin~ the
close of the concert. Santa Claus entered amid joyous greetings from the
youngsters, and each child was given
a present from the gaily decorated
Christmas tree, accompanied Ity fruit,
candy and nuts.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. .Mader are busily fixing up the house recentlv vacated by Mr. and Mrs. Fred I/eard>
and t-xpect to take up residence there
within the next woek or so.
Work on the skating rink has been
proceeding rather more rapidly during Uie past weok. On Sunday last
the boys were busy filling in the
final ditch dug for tin- water line,
and upon its completion, tho rink can
be flooded.
Mrs. Harris' duties as post mistress
will shortly be over, Mrs. Harris
ing resieiied her position after a term
of about four and a half years. Sev
ral applications for the vacant oflici
were sent t.i headquarters from local
aspfrents, but on Monday it was
notineed that Mr. O. C' Holmes has
been selected, temporarily, as postmaster.
The vacancy on the local teaching
staff caused by tho resigning of Miss
L. Corbett. prior to her marriage last
week to Mr. Wm. Mader, has be
filled, it is reported this week, Miss
lennie Hopkins, of Wasa, being
awarded the position. Miss Hopkins
was formerly at Mayook, where she
has been teaching for the past two
years, and will take up her duties at
the local  school after New Years.
Messrs. Angus MacRae and B. O.
Iverson left on Monday evening for
Calgary, where they will spend the
holidays visiting with friends; return*
iiiir after New Years.
Andy Powell will leave on Thursday of this week for Vernon, where
he will spend the holiday weeks visiting al the home of bis parents, expecting to  return after New  Years.
Dyer Klderking made a car sale on
Monday of this week, selling his much
loved, although rather ancient, friend
Elizabeth tt. Mr. J. I. Wright, for
use as a work truck. We wouldn't
wonder if Dyer felt rather grevious
over parting with the Ford, since the
old boat has certainly taken him and
a number of local young fellows on
various trips all tho way from the
Lake to Calgary to see the big English  football team  in action.
Parents of the Sunday school children were invited to church on Sunday afternoon, for the children'*
Christmas song service. The turnout
of adults for the occasion in response
n the invitations, however, was do-
idedly poor, proving rather a disappointment to tho kiddies. Rev. Mr.
Rowland opened the service, nnd also
gave an address, taking the Christmas season and its origin as his text.
During his talk, Mr. Rowland spoke
of the smallness of the Sundny
school, "•*•' •-'■*- of tho kiddies' knowledge of Christ, mnking a comparison
between tbe local school and that of
one of our iieighhoring towns. Since*
it was his first visit to the Sundny
school, it is felt that had he
first     looked     at     thc     roll,     he
at
would probably have found the num-
no doubt possescs as much knowledge
of religion as those of other towns,
thanks *-• 'l*~ few adults in town wbo
have worked hard to let****, the Sunday-
school together, and without whose
support there would probably bo no
classes «t all.
Misses Grace and Ira Tnvlor and
Leslie Bachs motored to Waldo on
Saturday evening, to spend Sunday
visiting their parents, Mr. and Mrs.
John Taylor and Mr. and Mrs. Pete
Bachs, respectively.
Mr. and Mrs. Anderson antl family,
of Wycliffe, motored to Wardner on
Sunday to spend the dnv visitino- his
brother, John Anderson, antl family,
at their home hore.
Mr. H. W. Birch was able to commence work again on Monday, following his illness of about throe weeks,
suffering from a severe attack of tonsilitis. Mr. A. J. II. Donahoe, who
has als0 been on the sick list with the
same complaint, is also now able to
be out again.
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Coffee and family, of Yahk, arrived in town on Monday, and will spend the holiday here
visitinir at the homo of Mrs. Coffee's
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ole Renstrom.
Mr. Boh Harrison roturned to
Wardner on Wednesday of last week,
from Spokane, Wash., where he spent
several dttvs on a businens visit, also
spending a day or so at Boise, Idaho.
Frank and John Moore left on
Tuesday for Wasa, where they will
spend Christmas wilh friends. There
will be quite an exodus of thc young
follows this week, who plan on spending the holidays in other towns, including Messrs. Angus McRae and B.
O. Iverson, who will be in Calgary,
Andy Powell, who goes to Vernon,
the Anderson boys, Harold, Adolph
and Morris, wbo plan on spending the
holidays with their undo and family
in Fernie; Arthur Arnold will spend
Christmas with friends in Calgary,
and Misses Grace and Ira Taylor,
who will be at their homes .in Waldo
over Christmas. Mr. and Mrs. H.
Haney, of Yahk, are expected in town
this weok to spend the holidays with
their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Theo.
Thompson, and Mr. and Mrs. L. IL
Haney. They will be accompanied
to Wardner by Mrs. Haney's father,
Mr. Thompson, who has been spending the past month in Yahk at the
home of his daughter.
There seems to bo some misunderstanding among the townspeople regarding- tho balance of cash left over
from that collected for the annual
kiddies' Christmas Tree, and as to
the reason this balance was not used
for the kiddies. Regarding, this balance, the exact amount of which has
not yet been reported officially, bul
which is said to be in the neighborhood of twenty dollars, it musl be
stated that most of this money was
paid in just a day or two prior to the
holding of thc tree, also that fruit
was donated by local stores, instead
of being purchased as was expected,
and also that freight was paid on tho
shipment of toys by the firm
from whom they were ordered, for
the first time, all of which put money
back into the treasury at the last
moment. This surplus will be kept
towards next year's tree. A full report of collections, etc., will be published in next week's edition of the
Cranbrook Herald.
Among the Christmas shoppers
who motored to Cranbrook on Saturday evening were Mr. and Mrs. Geo.
Renich, Mr. and Mrs. James Eastwood and B. Hargreaves, John A.
Lawson, Mr. nnd Mrs. Alec Days,
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Holton, and Mr.
and Mrs. Tonv Thompson. The Cranbrook shops are especially tempting
this year, nnd local opinion has it
that they are offering the best values
of years, nt present. Consequently
the usual bundles of all sizes and
shapes peculiar to Christmas are burdening locnl shoppers on the wny
home.
Miss Irene Birch returned to Wardner on Saturday last, to spend the
holidays with her parents, Mr. nnd
Mrs. H. W. Birch. Miss Birch has
been attending school in Salmon Arm
during- tho past term.
Dan Luce left on Thursday last for
Cranbrook, where he will' spend n
few days with friends, proceeding
Inter to Spokane, thence to Vancouver and other Coast points, spending
the nt'xt couple of months on a vacation. Dan is filer at the local sawmill.
Mr. Elmer Thompson and sons,
Roy and Keith, were Cranbrook visitors between trains on Saturday, the
kiddies visiting the shops, while Elmer conducted his Christmas shopping.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Mader left on
Monday evening for Hosmer, where
thoy will spend the holiday, visiting
at the home of Mr. Mader's sister,
Mrs. B. Wifflin. __
Both locnl stores have their Christmas decorations out, giving them a
gay air, to say the least. The stock
is very well displayed, the Company
Store stock of china being rapidly
depleted. Mr. Martinos is Inking
orders among the townspeople for
fine turkeyB, and business is rushing
at both stores during this last week,
before  Christians.
Alec Daye has purchased a new
five-tube Westinghouse radio from
the local ngent, Paul Storey, the machine being installed on Wednesday
of hist woek.
School   Report,   Diviiion   I
Perfect attendance—Gudrun John-
ion, Louise Lawson, Walter MaeKenzie,  Edith  Moberg, Jennie   Moberg, II
Harold Rader, Marguerite Robinson, I
Anton   Rosicky,  Josephine   Rosicky, I
Knthleen Sheppard, William Sinclair, II
George Thompson, Jennie Eastwood. al
B. O. IVERSON.
Diviiion   II
Clnss Leaders—Grade II, Takahiro
Miyasaki; Grade 2, Grace MaeKenzie;
Grade la, Keith Thompson; Grade
lb, Aya Miyasaki.
Perfect attendance—Bessie Anderson, Ruth Hnmrin, Charline Hamrin,
Hjordis Johnson, Einar Johnson, Takahiro Miyasaki, Aya Miyasaki, Swea
Moberg, Louise Moberg, Robert MaeKenzie, Grace MaeKenzie, Irene Rader, Mary Rader Georgetta Renick,
Lauretta Renick, Katherine Rosicky,
Andrew Rosicky, Keith Thompson,
Roy Thompson, Florence Thompson.
A. L. MADER.
 o	
R    Thanking you one and all for your past patronage    M
—   and wishing you   —
THE SEASON'S BEST GREETINGS
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Cranbrook, B.C.
R. P. Moffatt
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GIFTS FOR THE TRAVELER
The ideal Christmat gift combine, beauty with practicality —what,
then, could be more acceptable than a gift of leather?    Such a gift
will  prove  uieful  for a  period of  many  yeara.
For something particularly useful we recommend our
Ensemble Set — consisting ol   HAT   BOX,   OVERNIGHT  CASE  or SUIT  CASE — in exclusive  and
distinctive designs.   These may be purchased singly or
in set.
— OTHER SUITABLE XMAS GIFTS ON SALE —
Warm Wool Socks — Underwear and Pants
—  Complete Outfitters to the Woodsman —
The Cranbrook Saddlery
|W^W***WfWWWWW*^WW*^WVWWM*^WBW?
1       VETERANS'       j
I KIDDIES' XMAS TREE I
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The Legion Xmas Tree for Veterans' Kiddies will
be held in the K. of P. HALL on
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| Wednesday, December 29. |
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—   at 3.30 p.m.   —
Don't forget the Date, Time and Place.   Santa
Claus will bc there all right, all right — but
don't keep him waiting!
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ANNOUNCEMENT
THE GOLDEN GATE CAFE AND ROOMS
(Formerly Century Cafe)
opened on Saturday last under the management oi
L. CHOW, formerly manager of the Western Cafe.
Western Cafe.
The premises have been THOROUGHLY RENOVATED and patrons are assured of CLEAN, COMFORTABLE ROOMS and FIRST CLASS MEALS.
Accounts incurred by the former management should
be presented to Dong Barney, by whom they will
be paid.
JMSHffllll^^  HUM:  i
Babies cry most when they realize
It tl:
". p 'idviiv   imi   iiui'iini    in    niknuvon,    .      .
Incidentally, tho average locnl kiddy *»««»•
ber of scholar, much larger, many thnt ,h     ,   k llkc ,omc o{ th(!,   te.
heir    >bBcnt on nccount of HickneaH. , ..        *
For Toys of all Kinds
and many suitable XMAS PRESENTS don't forget
Drake's Variety Store
Genuine Closing Out Sale—All Goods Must Be Sold Thursday,  December 23rd,  1926
THE CRANBROOK  HERALD
I' A (i I-:   SEVEN
j^^«^^ft^fcMMfc^MWfciW*JW«*J$
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The Financial Institutions
of Cranbrook and District
IN APPRECIATION OF THEIR BUSINESS
RELATIONS  WITH   PATRONS  DURINQ  THE
YEAR 1926, EXTEND—
<fff*ffffffffffffffffffffff
MOYIE   NOTES
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
I The Season's Compliments |
turn
*****************************************************
* r
I   Compliments of the Season  \
FROM
Moyie friends regret to hear Miss
Helen Bonner is a patient in the St.
Eugene   Hospital,   Cranbrook.
Frank Conrad was in Cranbrook
on Monday.
Gordon Armstrong hns again been
transferred to the Kimberlev office
staff.
Mrs, Jerioux, Kitchener, spent over
the week-end here with her daughter
and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. St.
Deni.
A word of thanks to all those who
donated towards the Xmas collection,
which amounted to over $120.00.
Mrs. Charlie Bryant is home from
Cranbrook hospital, we are glad to
Bay.
Skaters are enjoying the good
sport on  the bay east  of the town.
Mrs.
the St.
The Canadian
Bank of Commerce
CRANBROOK BRANCH
J. H. McQuaid	
Manager
7;77'!7iS7'-7'
*AAA**AAA*A*AAAJ i^LAAAA fcAJ a  a. a..a.
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■■ ■im«li:si.4:;ii:>;.i]
THE MANAGER AND STAFF OF
THE IMPERIAL BANK
OF CANADA
WISH YOU A HAPPY CHRISTMAS
and a
PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
E
m 	
ti*";!"!;,1!:."1,     >< | ' * "  '.., :   - .1
With grateful appreciation of the favors
received by us from you, and for that
priceless, though intangible asset—your
good-will, we shall seek to merit your
continued confidence and aim to serve
you faithfully in the future.
REAL ESTATE
INSURANCE   -
The Season's Greetings
to our many Customers
who have helped to make
1926
OUR   BEST   YEAR
MARTIN BROS.
Real Estate and Insurance
CRANBROOK      :      -      KIMBERLEY      i
I
V'.-::i::,Jrr;iTi:amu»!i:f;j}M:;r.r.:,'ji.^::sii^iijiF^..-.--.■iU.:i.     ,      ill ..   iwiiMitti-QPiEi.i,*'! ;>. ■:.:".;:::-''"'■'
Wallace   has  returned   from
Eugene Hospital, Cranbrook,
We have a laundry building going
up in town.
Mrs. Wise and daughter, Madeline,
motored to Fort Steele on Monday.
The school Xmas concert and tree
was the event of Saturday, the 18th,
in Moyie. After listening to a pleasing entertainment, Santa Claus happened ih with presents, bags of candy and nuts, in no small numbers.
Roy Burch was chairman of the proceedings. The various committees in
charge of the Xmas tree, etc., are
worthy of every praise, and through
the medium of this paper, we heartily
express many thanks on behalf of the
Moyie citizens.
During a few days slackness at the
mi I for lack of power, many of the
boys took a trip into Cranbrook.
Pay day was on the 21st, on account of Xmas being at hand.
Jim Jackson is suffering from a
sprained back, and is under the doctor's cure.
The Aurora mine is now operating
the newly installed compressor.
Jimmie Logan and Bert Sung were
in from Cranbrook on Saturday.
School closed on Friday, 17th, for
the Xmas holidays.
Miss Ruth Baillie is spending her
vacation at Trail, B.C.
We're sorry! Master Melville celebrated his 12th birthday and not his
9th, as we mentioned in lust week's
issue.
Mrs. Philip Conrad and baby were
able to return home on Thursday's
train after two weeks' confinement
in the St. Eugene Hospital, Cranbrook.
Miss Sadie Whitehead was the
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Taylor
in Cranbrook for severul days last
week.
YAHK NOTES
**************************
Mr. Alex Ratteray received a hurried call to Calgary to be at the bedside of his brother, who is critically
ill.    Mr. Ratteray left on Thursday.
On Thursday evening a concert was
staged at Yahk in the C.P.R. Hall,
when the teacher and pupils of Glenlilly came along in the evening. A
few of the Yahk folks took part in
the program. The first item on the j
program was a piano solo.    Mr. C.
At Christmas Time
Man Appreciates Most His
"Home-Sweet-Home"
Here are all the K00'l greetings of the
season to those men in Home Sweet Homes
of tlieir own, particularly thanking those who
have favored us with their patronage. Maybe
they have new plans for the coming year—
and if so wc take this opportunity of soliciting
their trade on the basis of firsl, quality—and
secondly, service.
That your enp of Christmas (.'heer maybe filled to overflowing and that the New Year
may bring to you Health and Prosperity, is
the sincere wish of
THE CRANBROOK SASH & DOOR CO.,
Limited.
W. Edwards' chorus by Glenlilly pupils, entitled "High and Low;" recitation by Robert Tipper, entitled
"Putting the World to Bed;" instrumental, Mr. Lashir and Mr. Barnhardt; dialogue, "Robin Hood and
Simon Lincoln," followed by "the
meeting of Robin Hood and Little
John;" song by Naida Barnhardt entitled "Angels Sweetly Singing,
citation by Gertrude Tipper, entitled
"The Ringing of the Curfew;" drill
of bells nnd ribbons by Glenlilly pupils; a darky song by Mr. Lasher;
solo by Miss Muriel Knott; whistling
solo by Miss Knott (later in the evening) ; piano solo, Thelma Peterson,
Yahk; solo, Miss Edwards; solo, Mrs.
Williams; recitation by Lillian Nor-
din; recitation by Helen Mclnnis, entitled "A Most Obliging Little Sister." From time to time radiograms
came from Santa Clans saying that
he would be a little late in arriving,
and to keep the ball rolling until he
got there to distribute the candies to
the kids who were good, and, of
course, all were on their best behaviour*. After Santa had returned
to the North Pole coffee and cake
were served, this being followed by
games until quite late. The evening
finally came to a close with a short
period of dancing.
Misses Kate and Grace Wardrope
left on Tuesday for a few days' shopping in Cranbrook.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Brownrigg left on
Tuesday to spend the rest of the winter at Red Deer, Alta. Miss Ethel
Brownrigg expects to spend the winter at Erickson with her relatives,
Mr. and Mrs.  Martin.
Miss Muriel Knott, of Canyon, is
visiting with hor sister, Mrs. Barnhardt,  of Glenlilly, for a few days.
Miss Orsil, former teacher at the
Glenlilly school, has resigned her position and left for her home on Friday. She will be succeeded by Miss
K.   Littlejohn,  of Erickson.
Mr. Wm. Crowe left on Wednesday
for a visit to his relatives in Armstrong, B.C., for a few weeks.
Mr. Arthur Lythgoe and Mr. H,
Frost left on Friday for Vancouver,
where Arthur Lythgoe will take a
course at an automobile school for
the winter, and Mr. Frost is to visit
his parents over the Christinas vacation.
Mr, Venables, teacher of Division
2, left on Friday for Fernie, where
he will spend his Christmas vacation.
Mrs. J. A. Hamilton and sons left
on Friday, the boys undergoing an
operation to have their tonsils removed. Mrs. Hamilton's boys were able
to   return   home  on   Sunday.
Miss Dorothy Murray, who left on
Friday to spend a few days with
friends in Cranbrook, returned homo
on Monday.
Jim McGinnis left on Thursday for
his home at Waldo, B.C., where he
expects to spend the winter with liis
parents.
Mr. Tom Dunseath left recently for
Wynndel, to spend the winter at his
home there while the ingine on which
he has been working is being repair
ed.
Miss G. Patmore passed through
town on Sunday for Cranbrook. Miss
Patmore is now attending normal.
Mr. and Mrs. T. Cogey and family
left on Saturday for Wardner, where
they are to spend Christmas with Mrs.
Coffey's mother. Mrs. Renstrom.
Victor Johnson and Matt Hagen
were business visitors in town on Saturduy from Wynndel.
.Mr. Norman Beech spent the weekend in town from the camps.
On Sunday Inst Mrs, Harrison had
a fishpond for ull the little children [     Grade 7—Jessie Clark, Ruth Clark
of school age, between ten and eleven   Mary Wardrope, Frank Allen.
Edwards,   Alb,
o'clock, when Santa
all who were ther
presents to j
Ha?
Grade  8—Agnus   Mdn
McCartney,  .Mabel  Anderson, James
Stewart,   Hope   Baker,   Vera   Setter,
Helen   Mclnnis.   Ethel   Hamilton.
G. II. FROST.
Attendance,  D2.21   '; .
Division   II
Grade J—Ian Rattray, Tom Hamilton,   Jack   Williams,   Bob   Murray.
| Kate Thompson, Signumd Anderson,
  ' Leona   Heric.   Arthur   Hjort,   Elaine
Mrs. C. V. Edwards and son, Jack, ^nm, Nancy Johnson, Thea Sand-
were week-end visitors in Cranbrook, j »«, Edward Allen, Kathleen Coffay.
Christmas shopping. L^n   2\tS°T    ^P' t, Bw °
— Clark.   Dan   McCartney,    Mark    Mc*
Mrs.   0.   Taplin   and   children,   of ] .Master, John  Edwards, Jack  Ander-
Camp, went into Cranbrook on Sat- son, Kathleen  Revans, Victor Lyth-
' goo.  Bob  Hamilton.
Mrs. Walter Allen and children left
on Sunday for Salmon Arm, B.C.,
where they are to spend the Christ-!
mas holidays with Mrs. AlUn's sister.
.Miss  Tillie   Hogluiul   and   Dagony |
Hjort left on Friday for Wardner.
?pend their Christmas vacation.
.1. VENABLES.
an  i-   tri.i  proud t*>  beg
it m steal lu* limits up a
willing (■> trust him.
urday, where Mrs. Taplin is to spend
the  winter with her  parents.
Mr. and Mrs. Hector Cowie and
family, who are leaving for the coast,
where Mrs. Cowie's parents are living.
Mr. Cowie recently resigned his position as camp accountant, and the
vacancy is now being filled by Norman Beech. Ray Beech is now filling
his brother's place as camp clerk at
Camp 10.
Mr. Howard Haney is now running
the C.P.R. speeder which operates between town and the camps, formerly
done by Ray Beech.
On Sunday Mr. Harry Sanson left
for his old home town in Fredericton,
Now Brunswick, to spend the winter
with his mother. Mr. Sanson says he
bus not beeH to his home town for
nearly twenty-five years.
On Sunday Rev. Mr. Fleming held
United Church service in the new
church. He was nlso to hold
church service in Lumberton, but unfortunately Mr. Fleming missed his
train.
Miss Helen McGrath and Joe Brogan spent the week-end with their
parents in town, returning on Sunday accompanied by Sylvia Baker,
who has been spending the past week
with her parents here.
Mr. John Holmgren is leaving for
Jaffray in the near future, where
he will make his future home, as he
has bought a farm out there.
Mrs. P. Herric passed through town
on Sunduy en route to Seattle, where
she is to spend the Chnstmns vacation. I
Rev. Father Cronin held Catholic
service at the home of Mrs. McCartney on Sunday.
Grade 2a—Esther Pearson, Vera
Malison, Peter Heric.
Grade 3b—Marie Thompson, Mary
Sandness, Lily Hjort, Lloyd Corry,
Earl Rotvold. Nelson Mclnnis, Bill
Hamilton, Ronald Davidson. Tom
Sandnes, Henry Rotvold.
Grade «u—Marion Heric. Ada Nordln, Ell Mattson, Dorothy Murray.
June   Crow,   Hope   Mclnnis.   Donald
NOTICE
Logging Contractors
run SALE
Sj-ood ieam
with harnei
inK   conditi
CHHAI'—One
hea\ y horses,
in fine work-
;   also   set   of
good bob-sleighs and complete sot of logging equipment. Contract of logging
can also he had i.s desired.
Inquire Cranbrook Herald,
or   LEE RADER,
Wardner, B.C.
■l-'i 1.
CHRISTMAS   -   1926
May Christmas leave at your address
Lots and lots of happiness,
Enough of health, enough of cheer
To last you through the whole
New Year.
Cranbrook Cartage
and Transfer Co*
C. A. TOWRISS
T. ROBERTS
Manfnrd Samuelson passed through' ^^ftift^fe^^^^ft^- &&&&&&&&«
wn on Monday enroute to Moyie,   gm,
town
from Canyon City, B.C.
Archio McLeod, of Creston, is
siHtndin-r his Christmas vacation with
his aunt,  Mrs.  Harrison.
The young people arc surely taking
id vantage of skating while the ice
< in good shape. It is occupied morn-
:ig, afternoon and  evening.
The news arrived in Yahk on Mon-
lay of the sad death of Mrs. John
9'Genski, sister of Mrs. A. W. Shel-
han, of Nelson, who formerly lived
n the town of Yahk.
Division   I,   School   Report
Attendance, 93.24 %.
Grade 4—Thelma Peterson, Ernest
Allen, George Thompson, Lillie Nor-
din, Joe Clark, Reynolds Burlingham,
Evelyn Revans, Nick Kiceluk, Henry
Anderson, Synove Sandness, Alice
Allen Roy Stapleton, Dannie Hamil-j
ton.
Grude 5—Margaret Mclnnis, Edith
Nordin, Dagny Hjort, Arthur Anderson.
Grade 6—Donald Pratt, June Hamilton, "Stanley Stewart, Leslie Lythgoe.
Xmas Ice Cream Specials
We have something new to offer you for this Xmas
Cottage Puddings
-   A \ I)
Nesselrode Puddings
Leave your order now as these are Specials, and not
carried in stock.    You are missing a real treat if
you don't have one for Xmas Dinner.
A Full Assortment of Pint Blocks at Usual Prices.
I THE CRYSTAL DAIRY
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IS f * ^ t $ ^& f $ f & fc* WG s? a y.
SELECT POULTRY
FOR A DELIGHTFUL
CHRISTMAS   DINNER
Mother will be delighted with the ease
and success she has in preparing our
select, fresh and tender Poultry.
And the children—watching her "baste
it" or getting a peek at it while it is in the
oven—will hardly be able to wait until
Dad says "Pass your plates!" Then—
Watch Everybody Eat! !
Better Order To-day! "
CRANBROOK
MEAT MARKET
PHONE 8    -    - -    -    PHONE 8
TURKEY
DUCKS
CHICKEN
GEESE
FOWL
OYSTERS
Olympia Style —
Cocktails
CRAB
SHRIMPS
ETC.
for
^^ r aoe Eiam
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
Thursday, December 23rd,  1926
For Sore Throat
Rub threat »ndch«rt
witli VlekBicover with
umimii flannel. Hi
double illioet action
(loholed »nd absorbed)
btlnija welcome reliet
^WyVeVWftASWJWAAWiM
WALTER H. FORD
A. Mui., L.C.M. . Gold Medal
Piano  Expert,
Tunings  and  Repairs
—   VOICE  —
Pianoforte    ■    Harmony
Counterpoint
—  VIOLIN  —
Organist   and   Choirmaster
Knox Church.
225 Burwell Av. ■ Cranbrook
fffffffffffffff*
Central School Report For
December
(Continued from Vage Three)
DIVISION   VI
Number enrolled, 40; percentage
of attendance, 06.44.
Olive .Sadler, Doris Eley, Hubert
Linnell, Fred Kolisnek, Cyril Robert-
son, Flunk Morro, Stanley Williams,
Georgina Cox nnd Mary Lee (equal),
Thelma Thomas and Stanley Weston
(equal), Elliott Dale und Dick Slye
(equal), Elliot Taylor, William White
and Leonard Porter (equal), Gladys
Sainsbury & Ryan
BUILDERS   AND I
CONTRACTORS ■
Estimates Given and Work I
Guaranteed.
Telephone. 233  and 293
CRANBROOK    -    •    B.C. 1
•LSEIHL': :::...:.'■■■  .. '   ■*.:■'.:	
FOR RELIABLE
Shoe  Repairing
Take  your ehoea  lo tha
-O.K. SHOE SHOP-
Norbury Ave. — Cranbrook
Por Quality and value In
Men's Dress and Work Shoei
SEE US — W. NICHOL Prop.
FOR   SERVlCfi,   QUALITY
AND   CLEANLINESS   THE
L. D. Cafe
CANNOT    BE    EXCELLED
Saoitary Electric RrfrigoratioB
STRIP TICKETS
With and Without Coupons
For General
Admission Purposes
For Solo at
THE
CRANBROOK HERALD
OFFICE
Milk and Cream
DIRECT FROM
Big Butte Dairy Farm
raoni it
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
B. C. ROOMS    \
Clean and Comfortable Rooms  .'
Hot and Cold Water "f
50c per Night jj
Durick Ave, opp C.P.R. depot  £
Next  F.  H.  Dezall Oarage J
£ Cranbrook, B. C. — Box 68 *.
affffffffJ^ffJL-.'.'.'.a.'.	
. mMMHHMBI
BOWL   1
— at the —
VENEZIA!
ALLEYS I
j.Ei!t:!LS!»!iiiiiiiiiii!:iiiniiiiiiiiiiiuiiii:illliUis:;:iiii.ii..iiLi.]i:i<i..:ii:i£!iii;.i:i:i^:~S
********************* * ►♦■».
PAUL
NORDGREN
YAHK, B.C.
A Full Line of
WINTER UNDERWEAR
SHOES - AND
WEARING APPAREL  I
see our stock
— Best Quality —
MEN'S WORKING
CLOTHES
Minard's is the enemy of
all rheumatic trouble*.
Rub it in thoroughly and
often.
It eases the pain, supples
the joints, puts new life
into the tissues.
Hub it in
Consolidated Nining & Smelting Co.
ol Canada, Limited.
OFFICES, SMELTING AND REFINING DEPARTMENT
TRAIL,   BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS AND  REFINERS
Purchasers ot Oold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Ores
Producer! ol Oold, Silver, Copper, Pig Lead and Zinc
"TADANAC" BRAND
$2500.00 Club
For Particulars Apply to
B.C. Mutual Benefit Assoc.
Q. W. SPEIRS, BOX 240, FERNIE, B.C.
You have heard it before,
The greeting we send,
But somewhere each time
The words seem to lend
A charm that is bright
A hope ever new—
So it's just Merry Christmas
We're sending you.
MWWtNMR
NEW HOTEL
YAHK - B.C.
Ratclilfc and Walter Smith (equal),
Sheila Hennessey, Albin Erickson,
Helen Haddad, Joe Bun Quan, Mabel
Atkinson, Barrle Hill, Carrie Spence,
hum Taylor, Nooch Niblock, Goorge
Carpenter, Stove Romanik, Cecil
Morrison, Barbara Patton, John Pascuzzo, Donald Gill, Uml Sullivan,
Faith Ryan, Allan MacPherson, Ethel
Lewis, Clyde Williams.
F. I. M. FLETT.
DIVISION    VII—Grade   5
Percentage  of  attendance,  S9.74.
Ralph Manning, Douglas Paterson
and Gertrude South (equal), Blossom
Bottrell, Barbara Muirhead, Dorothy
Coleman, Sherman Evans, Florence
Stender, Grace Christie and Sigfi-id
Bakkin and Muriel Little (equal),
Doris Russell, Agnes Gray and Phyllis Wallace (equal), Mary Cameron,
John Richmond, Queenie Chow, Clyde
Colledge, Yow* Young, Louise Bridges
and Edna Johns (equal), Sam McCreery, Jack Reynolds, Ruth Lundy,
Harold Curie, Mary Romanik, Bernard Pelkey, Jessie Magnet, Ina Colledge, Putricin Parker. Absent from
part or all of the examinations—
Annie Birken, Eleanor Green.
P. M. G. C. MacDONALD.
* * *
DIVISION  Vlll—Grade  S
Percentage  of  attendance, i)0.G2.
Albert Robberetchs, Sam Macdonald, Albert Russell, Jim Adams, Hugh
McCurrach, Muy Stone, Raymond
Burgess, Lelghton Warren, Sybil Norgrove, Ivor Barrett, Ronald Bottrell,
Henry McMurren, Tony Naso, Margaret Carpenter, Marguerite Morro,
Kathleen Brend, Franklin Wood, Bill
Calhoun, Edward Walsh, Cyril
Georgo, Rosie Blefare, Willie Ban
Quan, Graham Patton, Pearl Walk-
ley, Jolanda Nagro, Stanley Whit-
taker, Annie Frost, Harold Porter,
Ronnie Coleman, Byron Kemp. Absent from examinations — Helen
Spreull, Pearl Steward.
I. WARD.
, . *
DIVISION    IX—Grade   4a
Percontage  of  attendance,  9.1.33.
Sheila Stewart, George Wilson,
Harold Coutts, Gwen John, Catherine Rosling, Eddie Frost, Earl Whiting, Herbert Conroy, Vivian Thomas,
Enid Home, Myles Beale, Bcrtil Erickson, Teddy Smith, Doris Dingley,
Billy McNeil, Frances Slye, James
Haley, Nina Gordon, Edwin Berrington, Dermot Moore, Gladys DeWolfe,
Glen Bowness, Gladys Milne, Harry
Soleski, Walker Willis, Lee Gammon,
Margaret Cassels, Ruth Briggs, Phyllis Ward, Eileen Pantling.
Unranked—Evelyn Whitter, Sevil-
la Rosevear, Stewart Flett, Jack
Fernside.
G. KING.
* * *
DIVISION X—Grade 4b
Percentage of  attendance, 97.15.
Edna McPhee, Esther Weston,
Phyllis Wilson, Eugenie McGruder,
Jack DeWolfe, Douglas Johns, Frank
Harrison, Bob Pattinson, Amy Offin,
Laurence Gillis, Arthur Hinton, Ivy
Sissons, Agnes Moore and Bernice
Coleman (equal), Stephen Lafleur,
Walter Cox, Alice Mah, Beatrice Calhoun, Ella Bigattini, Phyllis Ryan,
Betty Russell, Irene Playle, Lillian
Sadler, Charles Wormington, Hedley
Baxter, Wilfred Griffin, Franklin
Eley, Ro-se Yadernuk, Freddie Shaw,
Winnifred White, George Faulkner
Harry Collier, Adolphus Burton,
Charles McQuaid, Fred Pattinson
David Miller, Vivian Marsh. Absent
from examinations—Gordon Russell
• ♦ *
DIVISION   XI
Percentage   of   attendance,   92.0.
Grade 4b—Norman Minifie, Earle
Park, Pauline James, Marguerite
Pelkey, Ellen Saunders, Stanle;
Saunders, Steve Yadernuk, Marie
Dyson, Paul Staples, Millicent Pelkey
Lloyd Colledge, Frank Blefare, Leslie Colledge, Connie Worthington.
Fred Harbinson, Phillip Rombough,
Bernard Niblock.
Grade 3a—Harry Wade, Frances
Parks, Edward Flower, Christine Paterson, Margaret McCrindle, Richard
Jarvis, Harold Milne, Selma Ljung'
quist, Barbara Rutledge, Margaret
Smith, Sandy Halcrow, Margaret
Leonard, Florence Strachan, Pauline
MacDonald, Grace McCreery, Henry
Lunn, Nellie Burton, Fred Lancaster,
Betty Birkin, Kathleen Harbinson.
F. L. McDIARMID.
e  *  *
DIVISION XII—Grade 3
Percentage  of attendance,  91.22.
Barbara Fink, Dorothy Barber, Annie Lee, Letha Shoecraft, Dora McNaughtan, Annie Romanik, Agnes
Stewart, Evelyn Shoecraft, Eileen
Thomas, Henry Mah, Murray Wheaton, Victor Haddad, Bobby Collins,
Hazel Sinclair, Phyllis Brend, George
Wallace, Billy Sissons, Dougald
Stevely, Verna Watkins, Norman
Playle, Jack Neily, Mabel Griffin,
Gilbert Parker, Rosie Nnso, Richard
Price.
• ♦ •
DIVISION XIII
Percentage  of attendance.  88.85.
Edgar Home, Bertha Ban Quan,
Esther Paulsen, Queenie Kemball,
Edwin Erickson, Frank Dow, Thelma
Roberts, Billy Tater, Billy McGruder,
Susan Gould, Margaret Spreull, Beth
Rutledge, Herbert Offin, Margaret
McLaren, Feme Simpson, Lillian
Niblock, Mary Branch, Nelson Barn
hardt, Walter Christie, Dick Wallace,
George Harrison, Alex Lamont, Elgin Hill, Eleanor Collins, Frank
Lensk, Wilfred Faulkner, George
McMurren, Wilson Lee, Billy Hill,
Margaret McCurrach, Dominic Naso,
Ernest Dyson, James Niblock, Patricia Rankins.
Unranked—Percy  Ryder.
B. ROBERTSON.
'  w   »   •
DIVISION XIV
Percentage   of   attendance.   89.3.
George Ward, Mae Voisey, Rosa
Stewart, Dorothy Gammon, Mazie
Stewart, Mildred Ingham, Bernard
Weston, Jack Park, Marion Hop*
kins, Betty McLeary, Patricia Mc
Donald, Bruce Paterson, Isabel Pattinson, Leona Richardson, Joyce
Borgstrom, Jack Kuhnert, Gladys
Haynes, Leonard Dingley, Frank
Futa, Billie Sutherland, Doreen Kuh
ncrt, Irene Collier, Harry Taylor,
Gordon Lancaster, Jim Soden, Dorothy Wallace, Mary Walkley, Violet
George, Franklin Sissons, Billy Steward, Jerry Collins, Hazel Steward.
M. J. RICE.
DIVISION XV
Number enrolled,  32; percentage
of attendance,  91.7,
Alice Romanik, Nancy Crowe,
Frank Hinton, Wright Macintosh,
Lillian Bartholomew, Harold Parkin,
Eileen Farreli, Sam Naso, Thelma
Dyson, Billy Fergie, Joan Flower,
Billy Moore, Nancy Haddad, David
Hnlcrow, Jerry Wallace, Billy Hcn-
„ dorson, Douglas Kerr, Mary Frost,
iSUslta    Bridges,    Joyce    Bronsdon,
Plunkett's Revue of 1920," take any
good and comprehensive dictionary.
Select from it all the adjectives wliich
known critics have used to describe
their enthusiasms over attractions of
the light and airy, swiftly-moving,
colorful and highly-amusing tpye.
Use any or all of them. You caii
do so with absolute safety.
Excluding the famous Dumbells'
Rovues, which are ip a class by themselves, there hus been no other offering of recent years which has.even
approached the instantaneous popularity of this, the latest of Capt.
Plunkett's* successes. Its engagement at the Cranbrook Auditorium
is for one night only, Wednesday
December 29th.
From the point of view of sheer
beauty, it is u thoroughly unusual offering. Stuging and costuming huve
been carried out on a lavish scale.
The Leonidoff ballet—a solo dance
organization in which every girl is
a specialist and every one a beauty—
scores a dozen times at each performance. One of- the biggest numbers
is a perfume ballet whicli also serves
to    introduce    the    two    Canadian
E- -■ ■ m 1 nl •ufmi.^-w.. , m. am:. Bl l beauties with international reputa-
l": "'. SBSSSSgSjliESSa '"""• •k'"" T"1"1'1' lAi,;" Toronto),
i   ■*;, : REr.';-f " '"'" **'' 'and Patricia O'Shon (Miss Winnipeg),
in it, also, tliat dazzling young dnnco
[star, Jeannette Gnrretio, makes her
' debut,
Violet Strachan, Florence Williams,! Music there is, in abundance and in
Douglas Leltch, Phyllis Griffin, Er-,great variety. Arlene Jackson has
nest Pattinson, Francis Branch, Peg- two real song hits, both of the musi-
  cal comedy type and both greatly increased in effectiveness because of
her  personality  and  her  ability  to
5TANDARD
OF QUALITY     MAMF
FOR OVER     L"Z,U««
50 YEARS   BETTER
HOME
MADE
BREAD
fffaff
—   WE STILL HAVE SOME   —
USED LUMBER
Also SHINGLES — If Requiring Any - SEE US
Oet Your Orders Now.
DORIS  CONSTRUCTION  CO.
PHONE 101 .        .       -        P.O BOX 708
'■ffffffffffff.f*fffffff*\IW**ffff^^
****************
*******
*
gy Moore, Frank Lamont, Roy Sissons, Dora Kolisnek, Sammy W
Ington, John Kolisnek.
E. B. PATERSON.
* * *
DIVISION XVI
Percentage of attendance, 81.7;
perfect attendance, 10.
Alfred Bakken, Jo.m Bowley, Jack
Birkin, Leslie Carson, Kenneth Carver, Margaret Doris, Jessie Gammon,
Johnny Georgo, Douglas Griffin, Willie Hayward, Leslie Johns, Asbournc
.McClure, Eric McPhee, Margaret
Morris, Frances Wheaton, Pete Hnns-
sen.
L.   C.   HENDERSON.
PLUNKETT'S 1926 REVUE PROGRAM ONE
OF UNUSUAL VARIETY
To get an aecuvuti; Idea of all the
various qualities which no to make
sing them with her own particular
verve and dash. Ranee Q Harrington's
numbers rang** from unadulterated
comedy to the classical Jean llaig,
with a voice of a strength and quality
jvhich is rarely heard except on the
concert stage, is responsible, in a
very considerable measure, for the
production's continuous success musically. JiJmmie Reid adds to the
talents of an excellent Scotch
comedian, remarkable vocal ability,
and the Johnston sisters specialize
in harmonies, arranged especially for
them—and impossible of imitation.
Seats are now selling at the Cran
brook Drug and Book Store and local
theatre-goers should order them as
soon as convnient.
Mail orders fro mout-of-town patrons are still being accepted. These
should be accompanied by a money'
order or cheque to cover tickets and
tax. and if a stamped, addresses en-
CHRISTMAS    1926
*%     Ewl
1. Afd**'*\
Among the other greetings
These few words small appear,
Hut just enough to hold a wish
I'or old-time Christmas cheer.
Is2$l
K^l
T. Futa
■^
Cranbrook, B.C.
**#**+********.
for the success of that unique new velope is enclosed, the tickets will be
music-und-danco   production,   "Capt. sont to you by return mail.
SMASHED 16 BOX OFFICE RECORDS IN 8 WEEKS
CRANBROOK ONE   NIGHT
Auditorium ■■ Wed., Dec. 29
If you want to make your Xmas gifts really unique,
send tickets for this revue.    They are on sale now.
-   ALL SEATS RESERVED   -
A Sl$TERT0THC*DUMBELLS\
Cm plunketts
With the Famous Ballet of Beauties.   An All-Star Musical
Comedy Cast — Including Miss Toronto and Miss Winnipeg.'
PRICES:—$1.50, $2.00 — Plu$ 10 Per Cent. Tax
Seats Now at CRANBROOK DRUG AND BOOK STORE.
Buy lickcts now.   Out-of-Town patrons may order by Mail.
It is our hope that we may continue
to serve you in the future—not, however, without thanking you for your past
favors, and pausing to wish you all a
very Merry Christmas,
HANSON GARAGE
F. M. MacPherson
C. W. Draper
Christmas time again is here,
Accept once more
Our wish sincere;
The old, old wish, but
Still expressing
Kindest thoughts and
Christmas Blessing.
Quong Chong - Mah Jim
CRANBROOK, B.C.
^^^^^^s&e.^
The March of
the Years
Tarings Christmas once
•■"* again and with it thb
oitoktunity of extending
tu you tub Season's Greetings
A Very Happy Xmas
and a
Bright and Prosperous
1927
***
P. BURNS & CO. LIMITED
ft  §
ft     '
I
9
'ki
s
1
3
i Everything for the Smoker |
ft w
ft it to |o at coit. Call and see tlieir selection of £f
| PIPES, CIGARETTE TUBES, SMOKING STANDS, |
| POUCHES, ASH TRAYS, HUMIDORS and other |
suitable gifts. W
|     DAN'S PLACE     f
% PHONE 54 jj| Thursday,   December  23rd,  IMS
THE  CRANBROOK   HERALD
See the 50 cent and $1.00 tables    For tint class automobile repairs
at Cranbrook Drug St Book Co.     43 ,ee Ratcliffe a\ Stewart. SStf
Mrs. H. G. Long left on Tuesday
ftr a visit to Spokane.
Mr. Archie Leiteh, of Calgary, was
a visitor in the city from Monday to
Wednesday of this_weok.
Every fancy string of beads in the
shop goes at 60 cents each. Vnlues
up to ?4.50. i3
Miss Jennie Hopkins, of Ta-Ta
Creek, who has been teaching at Mayook, has taken a position on thc
school stuff nt Wardner, commencing
in the new year.	
Ono only Dining Room Suite, solid
oak; regular $160.00, at Delany &
Sinclair, Ltd. Closing out sale price
$'.17.50. 4;!
Miss Dorothy McKowan returned
on Sunday from Victoria, where she
has boen nttondingjiormnl.
Thc oillcial opening of tho new Legion Club will not tuke place till after the first of thc near, posibly the
eighth or tenth. _
Curling Brooms, regular up to
$1.60. Closing out sule price, ilo
cents at Delany &_Sinclair, Ltd.    48
Among the many visitors to Cranbrook for the Christinas season is
Miss Jean Flett, who has been attending normal in Victoria.
Mr. and Mrs. Austin Cartwrlght, of
Erickson, are expected on Friday to
spend Christmas at the home of their
daughter, Mrs. JL_A. McKowan.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Staples, of Erickson, are expected on Friday to
Bpend the holiday season with Mr. and
Mrs. D. M. MacDonald.
See tbis special. Simmon' two-
inch continuous post bed, coil spring
and cotton mattress at $26.50. At
W. F. Doran's. Our low prices win
•very lime. ™
Mrs. F. Allott, of Calgary, was in
the city last Thursday inspecting Selkirk Division, No. 473, G.I.A. to the
B. of L.E. While in the city she was
the guest of Mrs. D. Campbell, Armstrong Ave., who served afternoon
tea to a full attendance of the Auxiliary. __
R. C. Carlyle, of Calgary, and C.
W. Craig, of Vancouver were in Fernie as witness in thc Lyle perjury
case which was occupying he attention of the court there this week,
On the trial being resumed after the
remand Lyle was acquitted of the
perjury charge.   	
Mr. Jas. Fowler, of Kitchener, who
has been a patient in the St. Eugene
Hospital the last three weeks, has
sufficiently recoverd to leave that institution the first of the week. Before leaving for his home in Kamloops to spend Christmas, he Bpent a
few days the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
J. T. Sarvis, Hanson Ave.
For Bargain in Hardware take advantage of Parks' 25% Reduction
Sale. «
Tbe Scott Fruit Co.. of Calgary,
have leased the Rizzuto Garage at
Fernie, and turned it into a warehouse, where they will conduct a
branch of their large western wholesale business. J. M. G. Hart, of Coleman, will have charge of the Fernie
branch. The new firm hnve already
received several cars of vegetables
and fruit for wholesale distribution
along the Crow. 	
More than $3,500,000 in profits
from mining and smelting nre to be
distributed within a few weeks by two
companies of thc west. They aro the
Consolidated Mining * Smelting
Company of Canada, which will disburse $8,168,826, and the Premier
Gold Mining Company, whicli will
disburse $400,000^
There arc lots of little novelties
at Cranbrook Drug Co. for Christmas. *i3
On Fridny night of lnst week Mr.
and Mrs. Thomas lensk celebrated
their 27th anniversary. A party of
over sixty-five guests gathered, and
n very interesting whist party tried
for the prizes. The following were
the prize winners: 1st prize, Indies',
Miss Hilda Stewart; 2nd prize, men's,
Mr. Milne; consolation prize, men's,
Mr. Miller; consolation prize, ladies',
Mrs. Hanks. Dancing followed the
whist drive, commencing nt 10 p.m.,
and lasting till thc small hours of the
morning. Dainty refreshments were
srrved at 12 p.m.
It may hnve been a coincidence, or
possibly nn endeavor on the part of
Cranbrook builders to vie with New
York City in building notoriety, thnt
on the same day last week that thc
daily papers carried the news of thc
plans in that city for a 110-storey
building, there was commenced and
completed in Crnnbrook thc mammoth news emporium to bc known in
future ns Mac's News Stand. While
differing much when compared to its
New York twin brother, the building
of ,1. R. McDonald, local newspaper
salesman, between the Patricia and
Mannings, on Baker Street, ia no less
Important nnd he Is bcing congratu-i
latcd on bis enterprlze in securing
this enviable location. I
No surer way of making money I
than by buying fur present ond fu-|
ture requirements at Parks' 25% Re- i
ductlon Sale. 42:
The Herald is informed by the
Government Agent, J. A. Kennedy,
that number plates for the 1927 li-l
censes are now available at hie office. According to thc new regulations of the motor vehicle act it is
specified that owners of nil motor
vehicles others thnn motor cycles
must make en application in tholr
own writing, same to be made out in
quadruplicate—white, yellow, blui
and pink slips being furnished there
fore. The name and address of the
applicant must be shown thereon and
must be printed in block letters. It
is requested that particular attention
be given to the making out of the ap-
Clications so that the correct Burner ef the engine and aerial lumber
ie ghren mi net Um number ef the
eaetlag m other
Mrs. J. Lancaster is a patient at
the hospital just now.
Toyland is a real toyland at Cranbrook Drug & Book Co. 43
Thc Legion expects to move into
their new quarters before the end of
the yoar.
Miss Helen Bonner, of Kimberley,
is among the out-of-town patients
at thc hospital just now.
Lots of Christmas Tree decorations
at Cranbrook Drug & Book Co.     43
THEODORE    PADBERG,    piano
tuner;  player expert.    Phone  602.
81-tf.
J. E. Johnson, of Yahk, was
brought to the hospital this week suffering from the efferts of u liudly
crushed band.
For -.-our Community Plate or Rogers 1847 Plateware, for Xmas presents, see Delany & Sinclair, Ltd.
Closing out sale prices. 43
Miss Trilby Rebel, of this city, and
recently teaching at the Big Sand
Creek School, will most likely be in
charge of the Mayook school for the
next term.
We are making a clean sweep of
our zylonite handled Dessert and
Dinner Knives at 25 per cent off.
Wilson the jeweler. 43
Gordon Russell, son of Mr. and
Mrs. George Russell, underwent an
operation for appendicitis at the hospital this week, and is now reported
as doing well.
Give her a box of Neilsons Chocolates, they are different. She wants
the best, order Neilsons at Cranbrook
Drug Co. 43
Call end see the new designs in
Sitnmonds' Beds. Mattresses end
Springs in the car load of same just
received at W. F. Doran's. Our low
prices win every time. W. F. Doren.
38tf.
Whatever other faults Erickson
school teachers may or may not have,
it is pleasing to note the matrimonial
successes of lady instructors. At'
midsummer, 1025, Miss Richter became the bride of Mr. Moll, of Kimberley. At the summer holiday this
year Miss Trembath was united in
marriage with Mr. Irving, of Detroit,
Mich., and now comes the announcement that Miss McCaslin, who taught
here two '-ears ago, and lately has
been at Cranbrook, is to be married
on Tuesday next at Spokane *n Mr.
Henderson Rae.—Creston Review.
W. F. Doran has just received a
car load of Simmond's Beds, Mattres*
ses and Springs.    Our low prices win
SITE BEING MADE
READY FOR SLEIGH RUN
AND SKI JUMPING
Thriv public-spirited t'itizens,
.Messrs. T. Bt Roberts, A. H. Du-
Wolfe and C. O. Staples have interested themselves in providing a jjood
site which can be used as a sleigh
run ond ski-ing Mil by the people
of Cranbrook. A citable site has
been found about two hundred
yards wesl of the hospital and it ia
estimated that it will take about
$100.00 to clear and prepare it. Con
gratuimion are due to these men for
taking hold of an undertaking for
the benefit of the eily in general and
needless to say, this is one which
young arid old will take every advantage of while the snow is on the
ground. If there are any who care to
assist in deferring the expense connected with this work, their assistance will be very gladly received.
RECITAL GIVEN BY
PUPILS OF MRS. D.
FINLAYSON ON TUESDAY
BANQUET AT OFFICIAL
OPENING OF NEW RINK
AT KIMB. TOWNSITE
A number of Cranbrook curlers
were at Kiniberley on Saturday evening last, attending the officinl opening of ihe new curling rink at the
Townsite. Rinks were in attendance
from Crnnbrook, Bull River, Rossland, Nelson nnd Chapman Camp, and
very interesting evening's play resulted. About 10.30 p.m. the company was headed in n grand mnrch to
the boftrding house, where they wore
served n bumptuous banquet, ^iven
by the Kimberley Curline Club lo nil
the   visitors.
The splendidly built rink, with its
five well-lighted sheets of ice, evoked
favornble comment from all the curlers and the ice was in fine condition.
The services of A. C. Bowness, whose
reputation as an ice-maker is known
all over the district, were secured the
previous dnv, and with his assistance
perfect curiing conditions prevailed.
In recognition of his interest hi the
new curling rink nnd his assistance
at nil times, Mr. Bowness was given,
on Snturday night, an honorary membership ticket in the Kiniberley Curling club.
Among others from Cranbrook
who were at Kimberley for this interesting event were: Dr. G. E. h.
"acKinnon, president of the Selkirk
Curling League, and W. F. Cameron,
representing the Crow's Nest Pass
Curling Association.
The Kimberley Curling Club now
has a membership of about one hundred nnd seventy-five, in nddition to
nnothcr seventy-five who belong to
the club nt Chapman Camp.
The recital given by the pupils of
Mrs. Dun. Finlayson, in the Presby-
teriun shcoolrooni on Tuesday afternoon last was thoroughly enjoyed by
all present, and as Kev. M. S. Blackburn, thc chairman for the occasion,
said, reflected hard work both on the
part of the teacher and the pupils.
Mrs. Finlayson was assisted by Roy
Linnell, who gave two very pleasing
numbers on the violin.
After the program Mr. Blackburn
presented thc diplomas from McGill
University to Kvelyn Gartside and
Sheila Hennessy. The following was
the program:
"A March of the Soldiers—Nancy
and Margaret McCrindle.    ,
Waltz—Edith Faulkner.
"The Snowman" — Gladys Ratcliffe.
"Wild Flowers" — Selmn Ljund-
quist.
"The First Rose" waltz—-George
Strood.
"Rondo"—Georgina  Hnddnd.
"Hungarian Dance"—Bertha Gartside.
"Adventure"—Agnes Grey.
"The Prisoner's Song," violin—G.
Hnddad.
"Rondo"—Margaret McCrindle.
"Fairies Everywhere" — Barbara
Muirhead.
"At Eventide"—Lily Haddad.
"A Scottish Melody"—Marg. Walk-
ley.
"Comin' Thru the Rye"—Esther
Leonard.
The Boys* Brigade"—Jnck Fern-
side.
"Intermezzo," violin—Roy Linnell,
and Hubert Linnell et piano.
"Bohemian Dnnce" and "Melody"
—Gladys Milne.
"The Doll's Dream"—Dollv Johns,
"A Twilight Idyll"—Sheiin Hennessey.
"Le Cnrilon"—Hubert Linnell.
"Barcarolle"—Evelyn   Gartside.
Presentation of certificates from
McGill University.
WAP.
LUMBERTON
CHIPS
Apple  Sauce
"What nre thim?" asked one Irish
man of another.
"Thim  is cranberries."
"Are they fit to ent?"
"Are they? Why, whin thim cranberries is stewed they mnke better
apple  sauce  than   prunes  does."
WANT ADS.
SITUATION WANTED—By willing
girl. Housework; accustomed to
children. Available after New
Year.    Phone 882. tf.
FOR SALE—Pinno, ns good as new.
Mason and Risch. $350 cash. En*
quire Box L. Cranbrook Herald
office. 2ltf
LOST—November 16th to 18th, one
big table-cloth; dropped or mixed
with other laundry. $2.00 reward
if returned ti* Kwong Chong laundry. 44 •
FOR   SALE—Quebec   Heater;   like
new.    Half price.    Phone 263.
43
GRAMAPHONES
HEATERS,    COOK STOVES
DINING ROOM SUITES
KITCHEN TABLES,  ROCKERS
SEWING MACHINES, DRESSERS
SLEIGHS and SULKYS
WILLIAM THOMPSON
76 P.O. Boi 138
Second Hand DtaUr
Craabrook
We Buy. Sell and Exchaof*
Pioneer Guide of the Rockies
Proof that the hunting grounds of the Canadian Rockies are among the
finest In the world wai supplied recently by Tom E. Wilson, famous
bluo    mountain guide of Banff, during his first visit to Montreal since 1903. Mr.
Wilson stated that hunting today ia better than it was 40 years ago.
Mr. Wilson enjoys the unique distinction of having a statue or plaque
erected to him during hli lifetime, in the place he discovered 44 years ago,
Yoho Valley. He was also the first white man tn discover Lake Louise, which
the Indiana called the Lake of the Little Fishes. He named it Emerald Lake,
the name being changed some time later and railed after Prim-ens Louise,
wife ol the Marquia oi Lome, governor-general at that time.
Tom Wilton hae earned the title "Tha Dean of the Guides of tbe Rocky
Mm&m " The akate ihewe Mr. WUoon and Mrs. Walcott, wife of the
rn***-mt *l the t^theeeeae lo-mtut.*  brmda tb* tutu*- «r»tWd by tht
■ elaewC
The regular meeting of the C.G.I.
T. was held on Monday evening, and
took the form of a very pleasant social evening. Miss Laing* was initiated into the group, and Mrs. Neuman,
assistnnt leader, was nlso welcomed.
Mrs. A. J. .Robertson, on behalf of
both groups, was presented with a
little remambrance by Miss Stevens,
Miss Laing was presented with a
gift on behalf of the C.G.l.T. by
Florence Parent, nnd Miss Dinsmore
also received a gift from the Golden
Keys, Elsa Stevens making the presentation. Gaines and music finished the pleasant evening.
Brown Katzenbach, auditor for the
B.C. Spruce Mills, left here on Wednesday, nfter spending a week in the
office.* lie intended going to Kimberley for a few days before returning
to his homo in Wausau. Wis., for
Christmas.
Fred Andrews, sawmill superintendent, left on Wednesday for his home
in California. He will bo away for
a couple of months.
The school trustees have engaged
George D. Cameron, of Fernie, to
fill Miss Laing's plnce ns teacher for
the months of January and February,
Mies Laing having been granted sick
leave.
C. H. Werden, president of the
B.C. Spruce Mills, left on Thursday
for his home in Ashland, Wis. He
will spend a short time nt the Minneapolis office on his way home.
Ole Oleson, local millwright, left
on his annunl vacation Thursdny. He
expected to spend n short time in
Seattle nnd Vnncouver before returning to his home in Idaho for the holidays.
Mian Laing and Miss Dinsmore, of
the school staff, left Lumberton on
Friday to Bpend the holiday nt their
homes in Vancouver.
The Scout troop held their regular weekly meeting on Friday evening, with a fine turn-out. The evening was spent on second-class work,
semophorc and compass, and patrol
und troop drill. Corporal Lome Robertson presented the scoutmaster with
a Christinas gift on behalf of the
troop, tftelay races and games concluded thc evening's fun.
Bill Griffiths suffered a painful accident in the planing mill a few days
ngo. When working around the
p'aner his mitt caught in one of the
belts aud threw his arm up against
a guard. The arm wus broken, and
first-aid quickly rendered before Bill
was taken in to the hosprt»|. The
break is now henling nicely.
Mrs. Hughes, who has iieen staying
at the home of her brother. Bill Andrews, left for Edmonton on Tuesday lnst.
Miss Myrtle Powell, of Cranbrook,
a niece of Norman Moore, spent la*-
week-end ns ;i guest of Mr. and Mrs.
Moore at Camp 1.
The Lumberton school held their
annual concert nnd Christmas tree
in the hall on Thursday. PrncticaK
y everyone in Lumberton was present to enjoy the excellent entertainment put on by the youngsters. The
progrnm wus long and varied, and
very well done. Among those deserving of special mention were the relations by Eisa Stevens nnd Glendon
Barter, which were very well received. The "Charleston," by Phyllis
Dwelley und Dennis Downey, mnde
a fine hit nnd wus enthusiastically
encored, as was nlso the "Fairies'
Revel," by four of the senior girls.
The shadow work by the senior noys
was very well done and raised more
laughs than any other part of tbe
program. After the concert, Santa
Claus arrived, and lost no time in
starting his work of distributing presents to the children. Every youngster in the hall received two gifts and
also a bag of candy and nuts. Santa
also remembered some of the older
kiddies in the audience with various
amusing and useful gifts. The one
received by the time-keeper was of
a particularly useful nature. The
concert progrnm for the evening was
an follows: Opening song, "O Canada;" recitation, "Christmas Quizz,"
Dennis Downey; recitation, "Shoe or
Stocking," Bob Cook; song, "Christmas Dolls," Grades 3 and 4; recitation, "All He Wants," Gilbert Parent; recitation, "A Good Boy," Gilbert Barter; song, "Kentucky Babe,"
senior classes; drill, "Christmas Acrostic," Grades 1 and 2; recitation,
**A Christmas Wish," Billy Trussler;
song, "When Santa Claus Comes,"
junior classes; dialogue, "Christmas
Dialogue," Marguerite Yeager and
Gladys Downey; recitation, "Turkey's
Lament," Myrtle Gourlie; recitation,
"Favorite Tree," Willie and Albert
Griffiths, nnd Edwnrd Kydd; recitation, "No Stockings to Wear," Gladys
Griffiths; song, "Tinker's Song," senior group; recitation, "Sold," Elsa
Stevens; dance, "Charleston," Phyllis Dwelley and Dennis Downey;
monologue, "Mnking Christmas Presents," Marguerite Hutchison; song,
'Choosing the Yule Tree," junior
lasses; monologue, "Miss Prim's
Christmas," Jonn Robertson; carol,
"The First Noel," school; sketch,
"Trouble in Santa Claus I .and," senior class; recitation, "Outside,"
Kathryn Jacobson; dance, "Fairies'
Revel," Margaret and Doris Hutchison, Gladys Parent and Gladys.
Downey; shadow work, Gordon Trus-1
Ier, Nell Campbell and Tom Hanson. >
Distribution of gifts and candies.
I SPECIAL CHRISTMAS SERVICES IN THE
I CRANBROOK CHURCHES, SUNDAY NEXT
********************************* ** * *......................j..,..
Knox   Presbyterian   Church
Christmas services will be held
both morning and evening in Knox
church, Sunday, Dec. 20th. The
choir uili render special music, the
anthems being: "Sing, O Sing, This
Blessed Morn," and "Thy Light is
Come," by Jnmouneau. On Sunday
evening, at 7.15 sharp, there will be
an organ recital preceeding the evening service.
Bapti.l   Church
At the morning service, Rev. v. a.
Mc.N'cil will give ii Christmas nddress,
liis subject being "Beginning :it Bethlehem." In the evening the choir
wiil give n Christmas cantata, "The
Prince uf Peace," which will take
the place of the  usual service.
Christ  Church   (Antlican)
The Christ Church Christmastide
services will be as follows:
Christmas Day—Holy Communion
nt 8 a.m.; Morning Prayer and Holy
Communion at 11 a.m.
Sundny—St. Stephen's Dny, Holv
Communion at 0 a.m.; Morning Prayer at 11 a.m.; Evensong and Carol
service at 7.30 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 26th—At St. John
the Divine, Fort Steele, Kvensong at:
3 p.m.
The junior Sunday school partv,
and Christmas tree on Wednesday,
December 29th, in the Parish llnll t
at 3 p.m.
The senior Sunday school turkev
banquet at 6.30 p.m. on Wednesday,
January 6th, in thc Parish Hall.
Here and TK
ere
CRANBROOK ROTARY
ENTERTAIN NEWCOMER
AT DINNER
On Tuesday last at the regular
meeting of the Cranbrook Rotary
Club, Mr. J. It. McDonald, who waa
the gueHt for thc day, was introduced
as Cranbrook's youngest merchant.
"Mac," as he is mora familiarly
known, was extended a cordial welcome by his fellow merchants, who
wished him every succesa in his new
venture. At this meeting of the Club,
Christinas dinner was served, and a
most enjoyable time had. A matter
of interest to the merchants particularly and to the public generally,
came up for discussion, but on account af lack of time, the Batter
traa set ever to ttm. ap Ier tfe-
cuaaloa at the nrit nseetiag.
More than 500,000 people will have
visited Ste. Anne de Beaupre this
year when the season ends, tt Is
already an increase over last year
when 30-1,322 persons visited thia
famous shrine. During the week
ending August 22nd, 48,900 pilgrims
visited Ste. Annes.
Halifax.—Considerable quantities
of swordfish are being shipped from
Nova Sto'da to the Boston market
at the present time. This commodity
has found a good market in Boston
and shipments to that city average
around ten to fifteen thousand !
pounds a day during the shipping !
season.
September is becoming a popular
month for marriages judging by the i
number of honeymoon couples leaving from Windsor Street Station,
Montreal, recently. On Labor Day
no less than 50 couples boarded the
Canadian Pacific trains at this depot. The record established for one
day, however, was some years ago
in June when 70 couples left Windsor Station one morning..
The new North Channel below
Quebec will be opened to navigation
on June 1 next and continue during
the high water season, according to
a recent announcement of the Marine Department. The new channel
extends in a straight line from St.
Jean, Isle of Orleans, to near the
north shore. The work has been
underway for the past ten years.
The minimum depth of water at
high tide will be 35 feet. When all
the work is done there will be the
same minimum at low tide.
"The Little Red Schoolhouse" will
be brought on rails to the children
living in the remote areas along the
Canadian Pacific in Northern Ontario between Sudbury and Chapleau.
Fully equipped with desks and teachers' accommodations the railway
cars will visit about six points a
month. There are about 400 pupils
In these areas of the North who suffer disadvantages from the lack of
■chool accommodation. It is expected that eventually the entire areas
will he. 'rved by travelling schools.
Immigration to Canada In the first
six months of 1926 amounted to 70,-
253, compared with 43,241 in the
same period a year ago, an increase
of 62 per cent., aocording to a statement issued by the Department of
Immigration and Colonization. In
the period under review British immigration increased from 20,452 to
27,849; immigration from the United
States increased from 8,036 to 10,037
and from other countries increased
from 14,753 to 32,367. Immigration
for the month of June amounted to
12,191, an increase of 50'; ovei
June a year ago.
Saint John. — Representatives of
Boards of Trade from all over the
Dominion will gather here about the
end of September or the middle of
October for the first annual meet-
Ing of the Canadian Board of Trade.
All three days are to be devoted to
committee work on the larger questions ef importance to the country
at this time, including cost of
government, immigration, taxation
problems, preservation of the identity of Canadian grain, industrial
research, trade and commerce, domestic and export, and particular
attention is to be given to some system of facilitating inter-provincial
trade.
Eight Pacific type locomotives,
known as the G-3-d class and similar
in general design to the well known
2300 series Pacific class locomotive
of the Canadian Pacific Railway,
have been delivered to the Company.
They are pan of an order of 24 of
these locomotive!. By a special
application ef superheaters, greater
power is developed. Delivery has
also been commenced on an order of
twenty Mikado type locomotives ot
the 5,300 type which have the same
improvements. Both class of engine
an part ef the general equipment
fer which a pmiaien af IM.IMJM*
waa Bade ia IW h
United   Church
Special music is featuring the
1 Christmas services at the United
Church ou Sunday next, the program
arranged being as follows:
Organ Prelude, "Adeste Fiilcles."
(Ira P.. Wilson); anthem bv choir.
"Let the Laurel Twine." (Broughton-
Edwards); violin solo. "Sym-
Fink. .Mr. Fink will also provide violin accompaniments for other music.
Recitation, "Tin. Star in the Fast,"
Miss Aubrey McKowan.
The subject of Mr. Wallaces address ai tin* morning service will be
"The   Child   Leader."
At the evening service the musical
program will in. 0B follows:
Organ Prelude, "Chrlsmas Fanh-
tsu." Carl E. Mueller; anthem by the
choir. "O, Holy Night;" sol,,, "It
Cume Upon ihe Mldnlghl Clear,"
(A. Sullivan I. by Mrs. N. R. Park:
autlum liy the choir, "liar*;. Whin
Moan These Holy Voices?" (W. II.
N'eidlinger).
At this service Mr. Wallace will
give Dr. Henry Van Dyke's "The
Story of the Oiher Wise Men." with
an organ interlude.
CANADIAN LEGION
D.    Le    5.    Lie
Cranbrook Branch
The Regular Monthly
GENERAL
Meeting
of the Legion will be held
the
looms
i in the
—    on    —
j Moil, Dec. 27
Salvation Army
The .Salvation Army will he holding
special Christinas services next Sunday, December 20th, in th.* Army
Hall on Hanson Ave. Adult service's
ill the morning at 1 I a.m., an,I in
the evening at 7.80 p.m. A must
cordial iiivit a., i, is ,*xi*.!i*.:,■■: to nil
A brave man never lifts up a :'
for the purpose of knocking h
again.
J al 7 p.m.
ffffffffffffff.'.ff.fff, f,f
Xmnt  .Sh.)},pinc
Lady "Hou much will 1 have to
pay for a pair of silk hose?"
Clerk-—"About   two  d dlara."
Lady—"They com< rather high,
don'l they!"
Clerk—"Yes, but roi bor, you're
B rather sho
■ ■:■■
Victoria Cafe
CRANBROOK • B.C.
SPECIAL CHRISTMAS DINNER  i
11 a m. to 9 p.m.      Table D'Hote Sl.OO
CHRISTMAS  DINNER
—  19 2 6—
SOUP
Cream   of  Tomato
RELISHES ,
Crisp Celery Stuffed  Olives'
ROAST
Stuffed   Alberta   Turkey
Cranberry  Sauce
DESSERT
finglish Plum Pudding.  Brandy Sauce
.Mince Pie
Tea      —      Coffee      —       Milk
:     : ::7
- :   *.';•.
. . •:-;'
■ 'A
■ :':■!
-r."'
: .-■
.
Scandinavian Brotherhood
— Will Hold Their —
THIRD ANNUAL BANQUET
- IN THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS' HALL -
Friday, December 31st
Banquet at 8 p.m. — followed by Dancing
and Entertainment.
nv-EK v n o i) v   w i: i. c o m i
ft. ' tw
isrs
We just want to wish you a good old Merry Christmas, and to extend a hearty wish that the
New Year will bring you all the
Prosperity and Happiness
that you can wish
for yourself.
9
1
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tf
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1
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tf
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I Wilson's Vulcanizing Wks. 1
w. j. Wilton,
Cranhnmk, It.C.
tf
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IWKIiKKKKKIiiKKISKKKVKKWt^ttl^ THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
Thursday,  December 23rd,  1926
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St M0T 'rom mcre custom'but "s one with >ou Pcrsoiu,ll-v' ft.
ft PI    encountering   pretty   much   the   same   difficulties   and ft
ft much the same pleasures, the Best Custom Tailors of fi.
ft Cranbrook wish you all a Very Alerry Christmas, and a New ft.
ft Year packed with Prosperity. ft.
l   l
1 Muirhead & Guthrie!
j| HANSON BLOCK ■ ■ ■        CRANBROOK, B.C. gjr
warn rasa ram rag K5KHP !!?»> K38> JKSI ggg *pB> W S-M fg| 23
♦♦♦♦♦f *♦♦♦♦*«■♦♦♦««'♦» >«« M
WYCLIFFE NOTES
**************************
School   Report,   Division   1
Grade 8 — Dorin Purker, Otis
Stnplos, Alfred Watson, Helen Marunchak und Vernon (Jeheke (equal),
Opal Quick, Joseph Taylor, Camilla
l'ederson, Alex Yager, Wallie Johnson,
Grade 7—Victor Marunchak, Er-
nost Foster, Stephen Hebert, Harry
Johnson, Frank Charters, Winnifred
Fisher, Olaf Pederson, Teresa Mar-
zocco. Not ranked—Qeorge Quick,
Edithn Clark.
Grade fi—Ruth Greene, Jean MacDonald, Adriun AlIeKretto, Margaret
Yager, Florence Johnson. Not ranked—Harold  McClure,  Gino  Gambin. I
Grade 5—Peggy Cox, Muric: Parker, Sarah Clark, Cora Stanley, Eva
Nordin, Margaret Cooper, Hazel Foster, Joseph Fabbro, Ivun Fisher, Os-
knr Asplund, Emile Godin.
ELLINOR H. CURLEY,
Diviaion II
Grade <1—May LfigRett, Annie
Marunchak, Clara Fabhro, Katharine
Staples, Donald McClure, Suzanne
Staples, Lila Parker, Edward Charters, Elmore Staples, Hector Godin,
Frank Stanley.
Grade lib—Ellen Asplund, Pauline
Cox, Bernice Quick, Peter Pederson,
Elsie Anderson, Walter Charters, Edna Johnson, Margaret Johnson,
Grade 2b—Arthur Harrison, Irma
Fabbro, William Pederson, John
Stanley, Johnny Marunchak, Ine*/.
Quick.
Grade la—Mary Foster, Hoy Anderson.
WINNIFRED LIITITT.
Mr. and Mrs. Boyd Caldwell, of
Kimberley, were Wycliffe callers on
Thursday.
A number of ladies interested in
the Sunday school met nt Mrs. C.
Johnson's on Friday evening to arrange about the refreshments to be
served at the annual prize distribution, which took place- in the Recreation Hall on Monday. Among those
present were Mrs. Ambrose Staples,
Mrs. J. Sterling Staples, Mr. Alex
Yager, Mrs. L. C. Piper, Mrs. S. G
Clark. Mrs. R II. Trew and Mrs. W.
J. Cox.
Mr. V. Z. Manning was a Wycliffe
visitor on Wednesday, when he paid
n visit to the local school.
Mr. C, 0. Staples returned from
his business trip to Calgary on ThuiS'
day.
Pauline Cox spent the week-end
visiting with Mr. H. Edwards in Cranbrook.
Harry Stevens, of St. Mary's
Prairie, left last week for his home
in Stoke-on-Trent, England, where he
will spend Christmas and the New
Year with his relatives. He intends
to pay quite a number of visits while
on his vacation, among them being to
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Smith, who were
Wyclfffe residents for quite a number of years, Mr. Smith being engineer on the company's logging
train. They now reside at Fecken-
ham, England.
Mr. Alex Yager and nephew, Alex,
were Cranbrook visitors on Saturday.
The skating rink is in pretty good
condition now, and quite a few en
thuainsta nre taking every opportuni
Nlltlll)IIIIIIIIIUIiN[itlllllt)l>lllllltlNC]lllllll!li;i[llllIlllllltl[]llllllll|Nir] JIIJNClllllllllNIOIIIIIillNltll JIIIIIUJIIIIIIIIIIIUL'J
We wish you   MERRY CHRISTMAS.
The Greeting ist uld, but still, we cannot find
a better one.    Nobody ever will.
William Pritchard
I    BLACKSMITH
HANSON   AVENUE
■UEJUhhUril IUC3 C3MLII IL C J * I ■ ITIN K11 £ ] 111L1111FILIC 3 .11C 3 * 111: C: ■ 111.1111111C1 1C 3 911 h 1111 h 111111L 111 ■ IC 31111M M M N C 3 IJ 1111
uwwww
ty to make good use of it.
On Thursday evening last one of
thfl most enjoyable entertainments
ever* given by the school children!
was held in the Recreation Hall, j
Very great credit is due Miss Curley j
and Miss Lippltt for the hard work
and time they must have given to enable thc children all to do their respective parts so remarkably well.
The boys' drill and the senior girls'
scarf dance called for special congratulations, both being beautifully
executed. Miss Lippitt officiated at
the pian0 for the entire program,
and Mrs. C. 0. Staples occupied the
chair. The following was the program for the evening: "0 Canada,"
all; enrol, "Hurk the Herald Angela
Sing;" recitation, *'A Christmas
Greeting," Mav Leggett; nursery
rhymes, (a) "Miss Muffett," (b)
/'Simple Simon," Mary Foster and
Roy Anderson; recitation, "A Christmas Dolly," Annie Marunchak; play,
"The Paper Angel," juniors; song, "0
Christmas Tree," school; recitation,
"No Stockings to Wear," Walter
Charters; song, (a) "Twinkle, Twinkle," (h) "Choo, Choo, Choo," juniors; song, "A Letter to Santa Claus,"
juniors; drill, "Marching Song,"
boys; song and dance, "Snowflakes,"
juniors; piano solo, "Flower Waltz.*'
Margaret Yager; recitation, "The
Lost Puppy," George Quick; song,
"Kind Old Winter," seniors; recitation, "Miss Fogurty's Cake," Ernest
Foster; dance, "Scarf Drill," senior
girls; recitation, "Old Christmas,"
Helen Marunchak; play, "Golden
Silence," senior girls; song, "Strawberry Fair," Sarah Clark and Otis
Staples; carol, "Good King Wenccs-
las," school; song, (a) "Cradle
Song," (b) "The Owl," seniors; "God
Save the King." Then followed thc
best part of the evening for the
youngsters, when good old Santa
Claus, who never seems to disappoint,
came bounding in and presented
every child in Wycliffe with a Christmas j>;ift( and he certainly seemed to
have excelled himself this year in
his choice of presents, as on all sides
one could hear "Oh, this is just what
I was wanting." So he also did his
part well. After Santa hud left to
be on his way again, refreshments
were served in the smaller club room,
and dancing was enjoyed by quit)
large number in the big hall. The
teachers wish to thank heartily all
those who contributed to the success
of Thursday evening's entertainment,
those who served the refreshments,
who helped with the dressing of the
childien and tree, the mothers who
worked so willingly, and, no less, thc
children, who responded so splendidly. Everywhere was the real community spirit manifested so that the
children might be served.
Wong Sang, the local market gardener had a narrow escape while returning home with his motor truck
last Thursday afternoon. Coming
down the hill by the church, the truck
left the road, and after proceeding
for some little distance with the two
left wheels in the ditch, it eventually
turned on its side on the hank. The
driver luckily escaped witli a few
scratches.
On Monday night the annual prize
distribution of the Sunduy school
took place in the Club Hull", Rev, F.
V. Hurrison occupying the chair. A
large number of purents and friend.-
turned out, and were well rewarded
with a very good evening's entertainment The following wus the
program: "While Shepherds Watched," school; recitation, "What t he
Stocking Said," Lila Parker; dialogue, "An Xmas Diuloguc," Ellen
Asplund and Elsie Anderson; piano
solo, Margaret Yager; recitation,
"Sing a Song of Xmas," Annie Marunchak; recitation, "The Merriest
Boy," Roy Anderson; song, "Kriss
Kringle," eight girls; recitation, "A
Christmas Song," Pauline Cox; recitation, "His Letter," Johnny Marunchak; recitation, "Glad I'm a Girl,"
Cora Stanley; song, Doris Marie and
Lila Parker; recitation, "Lazy Betty,"
May Leggett; recitation, "A Boy's
Trials," Ivan Fisher; dialogue,
"Choosing Xmus Presents," Edithn
and Sarah Clark and Jeun MacDonald; recitation, "If You Aro Good,"
Peggy Cox; recitation, "A Nice
Grandpa," Victor Marunchak; carol,
"It Cnme Upon the Midnight Clear,"
school; "God Save the King." Refreshments were then served and
games enjoyed by the children.
Praise is due to Mrs. Chns. Johnson
for her untiring devotion to the Sunday school work which she takes on
each successive year, and which is
much appreciated hy both parents
and children.
Mr. Harry Hughes, St. Mary's
Prairie, was in Crnnbrook on Snturday evening.
.& ^ $? ^ & & W
The loyal support and patronage of our old friends
has made ours a happy Christmas, and it is
our wish that they, too — every one — enjoy a
MERRY CHRISTMAS and a PROSPEROUS NEW VEAR
Doris Construction Co.
PHONE 101
CRANBROOK, ll.C.
BOX 7*3
In with our stock we always
count the greatest asset
the good-will of our
customer.     So at this time,
it is befittiiiK that we
extend to you, our friends,
THE   BEST   WISHES
OF
THE SEASON.
Kootenay
Trading Co.
NOTE:—I cl us suggest
lhat you drop in and
see our attractive line
of Evening Dresses
for the New Year's
Hall — latest designs.
MAYOOX  NOTES
levels of Mount Baker. However,
Bill made no attempt to harm the
feline, so each went his way unharmed.
Mr. Herb Austin returned from
Crunbrook after spending a fow daya
there.
Fred Brown, who sustained a fractured ankle some time ago at Windsor's logging camp, is recovering
from his injury, but Is still unable
to get around or give the Kalispell-
Hop, and is still under medical attention at Cranborok.
I     Carl Ingham, of Elko, who is in
I the service for Mr. Windsor as clerk,
made  a flying trip to  Wardner on
Wednesday of last week on business.
j |     Mr. W. Windsor, logging contrac-
} j tor, spent a fow duys in Elko and
j Fernie in connection with his interests here.
mm
ft
m.
A
ft
ft,
ft
ft
ft
I
ft
MERRY CHRISTMAS
To All
§
m
'a
'a
'ki
•»
■a
Good progress is lieing made with
the hauling of logs und piling at
Windsor's base of operations, at thi.s
time, although more snow is needed
to make thc hauling more profitable
by taking out larger loads.
A large cougar or mountain lion
was seen u few days ago hy Mr. Bill
Thompson  while  scaling  the  upper
1 Pre-Christmas Sale
B. WESTON'S STORE
*
STEMWINDER NOW
SHIPS AT RATE OF
1,000 TONS WEEK
Following is n statement of ore
received at the Trail Smelter for the
period December 1st to December
14th, inclusive:
COPPER
Allenby Copper Co., Allcnbv ...   1576
LEAD CONCENTRATES
Bluebell, Riondel,  B.C  07
LEAD ORE
Atlin, Atlin, B.C       OS
Bell, Beaverdell        47
Hot Punch, Lake Windermere       7
Sally, Beaverdell,  B.C      103
Molly Hughes, New Denver ....      U0
Spokane Trinket, Ainsworth .        32
MILLING ORE
Aurora, Moyie      125
Bluebell, Riondel, B.C     402
Bosun, New Denver          134
Duthie, Smithers, B.C       35
Imperial, Imperial        28
Galena Farm,  Silverton         40
Homestakc, Louis Creek        49
Lucky Jim, Zincton, B.C   1221
Molly Gibson, Kitto Landing ..      28
Rambler, Rambler        30
Stemwinder, Kimberley, B.C.     2080
Whitewater, Retallack, B.C    502
Wonderful, Sandon, B.C. 42
DRY ORE
Last Chance, Republic, Wn     873
Princess, Laurier, Wn       23
Quilp, Republic,  Wn     590
Surprise Lease, Republic, Wn.      58
Trevitt, Republic,  Wn  114
Yankee Girl, Ymir, B.C     843
Terminus, Stewart, B.C  2
ZINC CONCENTRATES
Metals Recovery, Retallack . K8
Bluebell,   Riondel,   B.C.         120
Company  Mines      14134
PROM ST. JOHN
To—
DEC. 81—MONTCLARE, LIVERPOOL
JAN.    7—METAGAMA, GLAS
GOW. LIVERPOOL
JAN. 14—MONTCALM, BEL
FAST, LIVERPOOL
JAN. 21—MARLOCH. GLAS
GOW, LIVERPOOL
Through Slecpin-j Car to Ship'. Side
MEDITERRANEAN   AND   WEST
INDIES CRUISES
ft
mk
' .1*7-.: ■■ i*-3 j rf^'^iSg is
iristmas
i Cakes, Etc.
ft
% Let Your Appetite
*"' Rejoice
mt
i
■a
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a
*
1
ft To make your Christ- SW
ft mas dinner the supreme 'ki
fl. delight you wish it to be, £$
ft you must be sure that -gj
gjp your Bakery doodles nre >*»
» of the best. Everyone S?
|g enjoys Rood pastry and jR
ft cakes, and we can guar- ew
ft antee that our's ARI
ft  OOOD.
WYCLIFFE HOCKEY
CLUB ORGANIZED
FOR BUSY SEASON
(Special to the Herald from the Wycliffe Correspondent)
The annual meeting of tho Wycliffe
Hockey Club was held last Wednesday, Dee. 15th, in the Cluh Hall, and
was presided over by Mr. J, E. Jones,
last year's manager. The minutes
were read by Secretary E, Johrens,
and approved. Bruno Bourgeois was
elected secretary-treasurer, and En-
vie Johrens appointed manager. A
hearty vote of thanks was extended
to Mr. Jones for services rendered
last season.
Three teams were picked to represent the local sawdust league as folio wb :
K.K.K.—J. E, Jones, Capt., M. Luther, Tough Staples, Johan Pederson,
Speed Clark, Grabber {Vie) Swanson,   Frank  Charters,   Post  Johnson.
Black Hawks— Bill DoFoe, Cant.,
Inge Johrens, Grass Bourgeois, Radio
(Pete) Franzen, Barney Johnson,
Cleaver Mawer, Adrian Allegretto,
Jack Tucker and Slick Johnson.
South Paws—Diilv South, Capt.,
Hal (Bob) Trew, Slicer Staples,
Smooth Quick, Flash Dillon. Slicker
Bourgeois, Tripper Walters, Slim
Xordquist.
Idle captain to act as referee. All
games will start at 7 p.m,
Unless ono team wins both sections
of the schedule, the winners of the
first and second section will play for
the best two out of three games for
the championship of the league, and
the silver mug.
NOTE—The silver mug was donated by Sir Hong Lee. It will be
moulded by Mechanic (Slim) Larson,
and presented bv Sir Arthur McDuff,
M.D.,  and  H.I.
Schedule of games as  follows:
First   Section
Dec. 17 ........ K.K.K. vs. Black Hawks
Dec. 20 South Paws vs. K.K.K.
Dec. 22  Black Hawks vs. South Paw.-
Dec. 28 K.K.K. vs. Black Hawks
Dee. :10    South Paws vs. K.K.K
Jan.   4   Black Hawks vs, South Paw.-
Second  Section
Jan.  li   South  Paws vs.  K.K.K
Jnn. 11  K.K.K. vs. Black Hawks
Jan. 13   Black Hawks vs, South Paws
Jan. IS South Paws vs. K.K.K
Jan. 20  K.K.K. vs. Black Hawks
Jan. 25   Black Hawks vs. South Paws
The first game resulted In a win
by the K.K.K. over the Black Hawks
by three goals to two. Tbis was a
very good game, fast from start to
finish, winning goal being scored by
Jones within two minutes of time.
Scorers for K.K.K., Junes 2 and
Tough Staples. Black Hawks' goals
were scored by Defoe and Jolinson.
The second game was a win for
the K.K.K. over the South Paws by
four goals to two. Another good
game, but much faster than the first
gume, and inclined to be on the rough
side. Jones scored in tlie last minute
of the first period, and Pederson further increased the lead by a good
goal in the second period, and Jones
scoring two more from assists by
Staples and Swanson. South then got
busy and evened up matters for the
South Paws by scoring two good
gotils from lone rushes in the last
period.
Wycliffe play Crnnbrook two
games this week, away on Wednesday
night, and at home on Sunday afternoon.
Wycliffe now has a fast, snappy
team, and would be pleased to hear
from any outside points, with n view
to arranging home and away games.
*W:
ft
ft
m
ft
DECEMBER 18th to DECEMBER 24th
ft
ft
ft
'»
■a
■a
'a
i
i
1
1
Cakes, joj
Plum Pudding, Etc.   *
Si
Order Your        jtf
CHRISTMAS CAKE W
Leave Your Order
Early  for—
Fresh Baked Pies,
j? Home-Made
ft Doughnut
H Home-Made
% Chocolate
Now.
Total Tons    23,080
 o	
Mnny a man's failure is due to the
fact that ho aimed ton high with n
short-ranrr gun.
m
1 New City i
ft w
|   Bakery   1
ft. 'ei
gf    FRED BELANGER, Prop.    S
K Manson   Avenue 9L
|g   (Nexl lo Kootenay G»»g«) Ml
%       - I'HONE 23 -      M
To the Buying Public:—
WE APPRECIATE VERY MUCH YOUR PATRONAGE FOR THE RECENT YEAR. AND FEEL THAT
A SALE AT THIS TIME OF THE YEAR IS A THING
WHICH YOU WILL APPRECIATE MUCH.
—   HERE ARE A FEW SPECIALS  —
MEN'S WEAR
MEN'S HATS AND CAPS FREE WITH ANY OVERCOAT OR
SUIT SOLD. NO STRINGS ATTACHED. ALL PRICES ARE
MARKED, AND A  HAT OR CAP FREE.
MEN'S OVERCOATS—A delayed shipment of Men's Overcoats
just arrived thir week.    Fancy check back materials, luil*"
leather lined.    Sale Price  $25 00
Your choice of any hat in the store, free with each cont.
MEN'S SUITS—150 Men's and Young Men's Suits, made In three
or two buttons.    Young Men's or standard styles, sizes 35 to
48- s«'° p»« $1500 lo $30 00
A hat free with each suit $20 aad over.    A cap free with each
suit under $20.
STORE OPEN EVENINGS
B. Weston's Store
ew
■£
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at
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Mr
— BAKER STREET —
— I 9 2 6 —
•• CHRISTMAS DINNER MENU -
Christmas Dinner
-MENU-
Stuffed Olives      -      •      Crisp Lettuce
• Soup -
Oyster
-Fish •
Lobster Cutlets    ■     ■     Parsley Sauce
• Entrees -
Boiled Mutton      •      •      Caper Sauce
•   Roast Prime Ribs of Beef
Roast Young Stuffed Turkey
(Cranberry Jelly)
Roast Young (loose    -     ■     Apple Jelly
Browned Sweet Potatoes
Mashed Potatoes
String Beans   ■   Cream Sauce
Chicken Salad
English Christmas Pudding • Hard Sauce
Mince Pie     •     Christmas Cake
A woman's idea of an ideal luiis-
band is one who takes housecleoning
philosophically.
** ■ .'■H*BBIilTl"B«n= il
IilMJiUH iii .i»r i
PATRICIA O'SHEA
"Miss   Winnipeg,"    appearing   in
Copt. Plunkett's Revne of 1020.
The sweetest pleasures Christmas sends
is the kind remembrance of your friends.
CLUB CAFE
H. VOISEY, Prop.
Triiiaiiiiwi1-'*   * ■ i, i. .fix, sa*. 'KEriT    .;..(.:-.»«■:■ .*   	
pftn
WE  HAD YOU  IN  MIND WHEN  SHOWN
THIS  SPACE - SO  HERE   ARE OUR
HEARTIEST GOOD WISHES AND
A MERRY CHRISTMAS
TO YOU.
P. W. WILLIS
- CRANBROOK DYERS AND CLEANERS -

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