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Cranbrook Herald Jul 8, 1926

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 THE CRANBROOK HERALD
VOLUME  28
Board of Trade
Special Meeting
Delegates to Nelson Meeting
Report on Resolutions
Passed
TO OPEN TOURIST BUREAU
Priday ovoulng a special mooting
t.f ihr Cranbrook Board of Trade
wan hold in i Ih> city hull, win ii sev*
iiiii intiMi'is <if Importance wero dealt
with.
A lettor from Mr. AngtiH Uny Inviting n member nf the Hoard lo attend Un' annual picnic nl Invormeire
was read, and Mr. Hay wns thanked
for same. Mr. .1. (*. Lowlfl was it.sk-
ed to reproBenl the Boards
To  Open Touritt Bureau
Tho -socrotary was Instructed to
make, application to the council for
tlte payment of the salary of the
clerk of the tourist Information office, suggesting that same be made
from surplus of tho park fees. Applications were received from Mrs.
Margaret Johtufon and Miss Jean Wilson for the position, the uppointment
going to Miss Jean Wilson, the former clerk.
A letter from Mr. Brady re Fort
Steele road was received. In connection with this matter it was pointed out thai the matter is under consideration and important improvements planned as soon as money appropriations can be obtained for the
work. It was felt by the board that
Mr. Brady had made considerable improvements in tht1 condition of the
road since the matter was taken up
with him.
An estimate of the cost of reproducing in plates the map at present
in the tourist park, showing local attractions, was read and referred to
the committtee for further consideration.
Nelson Delegate! Report
A letter from K. A. Starkey stating that it was the intention to publish in phamphltt form the proceedings of the n-cent Board of Trade
convention at Xelson, and asking
Cranbrook to subscribe to n S 10.00
page ad, was read. This letter was
ordered filed. The report of the delegates to the recent Board of Trade
convention al Nelson was then given.
Mr. Grubbe, v.ho spoke briefly, compared the convention of this year at
Nelson to thai of the year before at
Cranbrook. While there were many
resolutions considered this year, the
Cranbrook meeting had mnny more
items brought up for consideration.
Mr. Grubbe spoke highly of the entertainment that they received.
The next speaker, Mr. Fink, nlso
one of the delegates, referred to the
fact that the resolutions were fewer possibly, indicating better financial conditions. He referred to the
conditions of the lumber business,
hail conditions of the lumber business.
the prices being low, and the cost of
production high. The interior mill
pay $116.00 per yenr for each li
cettsi while the Com! mills pay (186
yet the reel per acre is five to eight
times as great on the coast, a reduction in this license would assist the
interior mills to reduce their overhead, a resolution was passed ask
ing lhc government to nvestlgate and
if at all possible extend some relief
Some   Resolution!  Turned  Down
The question of I normal school
for Nelson came before the hoard,
but it WO* not favorably reported
upon, as was a'so the matter of the
technical school for the same city,
In connection with the matter, Mr.
Blaylock,  who  was present,  referred
t„ ihe facilities offered at Trail for
such a school, and said little advantage hml been tnken ot if. Those
boys who did go through with course
Were paid 60c per day more than regular   wages
A resolution asking for the con*
structlon of a trail up the Duucin
river, in thfl lardeau country, was
pftssed. A resolution from towns of
the Columbia rivit- north of Trail,
protesting against excessive charge!
for ferrying autos was turned down
as tin pit; tnl i barges were not g:\vn.
The matter of the experimental farm
near Creston was discussed and a
resolution passed asking for the «•
(•blIshlllg of nu experimental Htatiou
al Camp Lister. The mutter of the
proper presentation of resolutions
came up for consideration, it
being pointed out that all resolutions
should he received in proper time for
Submission to the various boards before the annua) meeting. Tho
moval of the personal property tax
ami the installation of the turn-over
DR. KING EXPECTED
TO REACH CRANBROOK
END OF NEXT WEEK
ODinV        ANBROOK,  B.C.,  THURSDAY, JULY 8th, 1926
=PR0BINC1AL  «"£%,	
NUMBER    20
Hon. J. H. King, former minister
of public works in the Liberal gov-
rnment ui Ottawa, has sent word on
that he will be leaving Ottawa the
nil of this week for this province.
He Is expected to spend some time
in his riding here before going on to
the  coast,   where   he   is expected to
ul liiu* the Liberal plan of campaign
n the forthcoming Dominion elections.
Tightening Up
Customs Service
Kain Fails To
Stop Festivity
Dominion Day Program Carried Out Almost in
Entirety
TRUSTEES EXPRESS
SATISFACTION WITH CEN-
TRAL SCHOOL RESULTS
KIMBERLEY'S BIG DAY
(Special Despatch to the Herald)
Ottawa, July nth—Instructions designed to galvanize the customs and
preventative services into greater activity throughout Canada, have been
sent out, said Hon. H. H, Stevens, acting minister of customs, today. This
order went out following the placing
of a large squad of Royal Canadian
Mounted Police along parts of the
Quebec border, so much in the limelight during the customs probe. The
first seizures were made of $15,000
worth of liquor at Truro, N.S., as it
was on its way to the United States
border points from Lunenburg, N.S.
HEAVY INCREASES
REGISTERED IN
METAL PRODUCTION
C. M. & S. Co. Output ior Six
Months Much Higher
Than in 1925
Production of the Consolidated
Mining & Smelting Company of Canada for the first six months of this
yenr have been ahead of the corresponding period of 1925, according to
the report just issued by the company
covering the first half of the year.
Increases were apparent in every product, being particularly, noticeable in
the precious metals. Gold production was more than trebled and silver
output was increased more than 100
per cent.; lead production increased
by about one-third; zinc nearly i
100 per cent., while copper was ini
tiated anil over 5000 tons produced
as compared with none last year.
The production of the Company
for the six months of 1926, was: Lead
61,266 tons; zinc, 29,848 tons; copper, 5401 tons; gold, 672fi ounces;
silver, .1,206.359 ounces.
The production for the first six
months of 1926 was: lead, 10,082
tons; zinc, 15,711 tons; no copper;
gold 8179 ounces, and silver, 1,595,-
'.tSo ounces.
of   making  the   line  metallic  from
Duck Creek to Nelson.
A resolution was passed asking
for the completion of Trans-Canada
or Ked Trail, paying particular attention to the immediate requirements at various points in Kast and
West Kootenay. Another resolution
was passed asking for the immediate
completion of the road between
Cranbrook and Kimberley, making it
a hard surfaced road that can be
used the year round.
Should Be Followed Up
It was tho opinion of Cranbrook's delegate that if the local
board retained their membership in
the Associated, some assurance would
have to be given that the matters
taken up ut their various annual
meetings ore actively pursued, it be
ing felt thut many of the questions
I.
While it would be far from the
truth to say that tbe weather mun
smiled on the Kimberley Dominion
Duy Celebration, we are forced to
Day Celebration, it was not a? bad
as it might huve been.
One can easily imagine the feelings of the hard-working committee
when in the early morning they were
awakened by the downpour of rain,
coming down in that persistent looking manner that looked like a steady
thing. Word was received from Yahk
when word was received from Yahk
that sunshine had arrived there and
was proceeding this way. Plans
were made to start and the supreme
optimism of the committee softened the heart of the weather man so
that he did stop the flood and kept
it 6ff the rest of the day.
Band Comet on Scene
At about noon the Kimberley Band
appeared and by 12.30 the parade
was under way.
Everyone was soon in holiday spirits, to say nothing of those in whom
(Continued on Page Five)
Boyi' Camp on Moyie Lake
Expressing themselves as being
well satisfied with conditions at the
Central School, and especially at the
proportion of passes in the various
classes, as mentioned in the Heruld
last week, the bourd of school trustees hus gone on record expressing
their appreciation of tbe work of
Miss Woodland, the principal, during
the past year. The following resolution was passed at the meeting of
the hoard last Friday, and forwarded
to Miss Woodland In the form of a
letter:
Miss  A.  Woodland,
Principal, Central School,
City.
Dear Madam:
The Board of School Trustees are
again very much pleased with the
results of the work of yourself and
the various teachers throughout the
school year just closing, and 1 have
been instructed by them to express to
you their appreciation of the untiring efforts and loyal co-operation
which has been tn evidence throughout the term.
Yours truly,
F. W. BUBGESS,
Secretary.
**************************
WEDDINGS
**************************
GIBBARD—FREEMAN
A  quiet  wedding of gome  special
interest  to  many  people  nf this  vicinity took place on Wednesday, June
86th,   at   the   Beaeonsfield   United
Church   parsonage,   291   Slocan  St.,
Reports to hand indicate that the Is- Vancouver, ths home of the bride's
camp of the Trail Rangers and Tuxis I'mrc'ntH'  «*■"   Miss  Kathleen  Free-
1 h | man,  recently  on  the public school
teaching staff of Kimberley. daughter
boys at Aldridge, under the direction
of Rev. M, S. Blackburn, is the most
successful ever held, and a thoroughly profitable as well as enjoyable
time is being had.
B.C. Official of C. P. R, Promoted
Mr. F. W. Peters, general superintendent of the British Columbia district relinquished the duties of that
office on July 1st, in accordance with
the company retirement plan. Effective July 1, C. A. (.'ottered is appointed general superintendent of the
British Columbia district with offices
at Vancouver. Both Mr. Peters and
Mr. Colterell as well known here,
paying the place frequent official
visits. Mr. Peters was the second
oldest servant of the company in this
province in point of service, and it is
understood will still be attached to
the president's office in an unofficial
capacity.
of Rev. R. 0. and Mrs. Freeman, late
of Cranbrook, was married to Mr.
John R. Gibbard, of the Point Grey
high school staff. The nuptials were
celebrated by Rev. W. P. Hunt, of
Mission City, former home of the
groom, assisted by the father of the
bride. Miss Doreen Freeman, sister
of the bride acted as bridesmaid,
and the brother of the groom, Mr.
Wilfred Gibbard, served as best man.
After the wedding breakfast the
bridal couple started on a tn
to Seattle and points fartht
■ tour
Kith.
CRANBROOK BOWLERS
HAVE GOOD GAME
WITH BULL RIVER
Wednesday evening the bowling
green of the G.W.V.A. Club grounds
was the scene of a very exciting contest between the representatives of
Cranbrook and Bull River wielders
of the biased ebonies. While the official score indicates that Cranbrook
won, the local boys are not doing
too much crowing, as, so far as superiority is concerned, it was a toss
up. Besides, the McGregorites had
the advantage of playing on their
own "ice."
After twenty-one ends of good
bowling it was found that both sides
had seventeen points, thus necessitating an extra end, which resulted
in Cranbrook securing a three point
lead.
While thc possession of the big
end of the score Is undoubtedly desirable, still the fun and good fellowship that is created by a game
such as that on Wednesday night was
something which was shared equally
by both loser and winner, and in itself makes the game worth while, irrespective of the result.
It Is expected that a return game
will be played at Bull River shortly,
Election Date
Not Yet Set
(Special Despatch to The Herald)
July 8th,—All forecasts agree that
the voting will he around the middle
of September whether it will be the
14th, lfith, or 10th is not settled. It
cannot be before thc llth of that
month because of tlte delays required by tbe elections act.
KOOTENAY ORCHARDS
SUNDAY SCHOOL PICNIC THIS WEEK
tight up on various occasions have
been allowed to lay dormant from
year to year.
Chairman W. H. Wilson, on behalf
of the board, thanked Messrs. Grubbe
and Fink for their interesting reports,
lie was alio tn sympathy with the
matter of greater activity with regard to the results after having been'and Mr. Murdoch, the skipper of the
passed by the associated board. I ffopd ship Bull River, feels that no
To Invite Minim Cenv.ntip^      | ***** *nds will be required to show
Mr. Santo reported that the min.. the Mac-Mil-Ant-Cpl combination how
oral case was complete, and fcjt that the «*m* shouId be P,uvcd- T*>e
same would make a creditable »how-' Crunbr°ok !*•?*» on the other hand
Ing for Cranbrook at the Nelson con- fetl *»* nt Bul1 River they will not
vention held this week, it, in his be hampered by any fine considera-
mind, being the best exhibition that tions for their WM**~ as they were
(ranbrook has yet had.   Mr. Santo nere«
also brought up the matter of ob- Following the game on Wednesday,
taining reduced rates or free trans- the play*" enjoyed the game all over
portation on sample cases. Mr. Santo «K*ta around the festive board at the
also asked the board for permission Victoria Cafe, where an impromptu
to invite tho mining convention to luncheon was served.
meet next yenr in Cranbrook. After' With regard to bowling, it is hoped
consideration, the board decided by that more players will turn out and
to send nn invitation to  ,ak« a" interest in the gome, so that
The Kootenay Orchards Sunday
school picnic was held on .Monday last
at a pretty spot close to McKenzie'-s
Pond. The sports were ably handled
by James Gartside and Harry Ogden,
while the refreshments were well
looked after hy Mrs. Daniels and Mrs,
H. Langin, The eats were first-class,
including lots of fruit and ice cream,
and it was voted one of the best picnics are held. The men, on leaving work, went straight to the
grounds and took supper, which w
well enjoyed in the open air.
The following program w-as gone
through:
Two legged race—1st, Kvelyn
Gartside and May Stone; 2nd, Jim
Stone and Frank Hern,
Young men's race—1st, Jnck Ogden; 2nd, Alfred Clarke; Brd, Dan
Daniels,
Women's race-—1st, Kvelyn Gartside; 2nd, Mrs. F. Thompson; 3rd,
Mrs. Wm. Atchison.
Boys' 12 and under—1st, Jim
Stone; 2nd. Eddie Gartside; 3rd,
Frank Hern.
Boys' 10 nnd under—1st, Arthur
Hern; 2nd, Jack Langin; 3rd, S. Ruault.
Girls' race, 10 and under—1st,
Kvelyn   Hem,   Bertha   Gartside.
Girls' 7 and under - -1 st, Marion
Thompson; 2nd, Penrl Noyce; 3rd,
Phyllis Berkingham.
Meeting of
School Board
JUNIOR LIVE STOCK
JUDGING CLASSES TO
OPEN NEXT WEEK1
Many Matter Dealt With By
Trustees In Session
Friday Last *
LET HEATING CONTRACT
    resolution  -
•tax in Ita Kit-ail. wu discussed, and |t tho convention through Mr. Santo, u club moy be formed ond additional
wos  pointed out  by   Mr.   Peterson, I nsking them to meet next year in grounds secured.
Die provincial tax expert, thut it wus' Cranbrook.                                        I The Bull River teum was os foi;
hoped    thai    through    the   change!    The matter of the flog at Mount low»: Messrs. Murdoch (skip), Gor-
a greater number of businesses would' Baker Tourist park came up for con- hutt, Russell and Trueman.
Rome lindor the scope of the art, and side-ration, and steps wlll be taken Cranbrook team: Messrs. McGreg-
In this wny nny possible deficit due to have one installed there. or, Milne, Anton and Collier.
to the decrease in (lie rate would be
mode up,
The matter of thc phone service
In Kast- Kootenay was i-onalder-
verumrnt was to complete the auk
The board also by resolution Instructed the secretary to write Mr.
C. A. Colterell a letter, expressing
tu Ua their conftatulatlaae on kis
appeiatamt ta Ik* piiltln ef ■*»-
eral superintendent, expressing therein their appreciation of the pleasant
relation lhat haa existed between the
Wired Briefs
(Special Despatch to The Herald)
Mexico   City,   July   7 th.—Rising
flood waters today threatened Mexi-  Book Co,
co City with complete isolation nnd   less white, 77c per gross
The regular meeting of the school
aril was held in the council chamber on Friday evening last, their being present Trnsteu F. H. -Dezall,
chairman; Trustees Mrs. Miles, Mrs.
Jackson, Henderson and Gllroy.
A letter from a coast Parent Teachers' Association regarding funds to
endow a chair of Home Economies
in the University of British Columbia,
was ordered filed.
A letter from Miss Florence Paul
asking for an increase of $50.00 per
annum salary was read and after due
considertion it was decided that it
would not he possible to grant the
request,
A letter from Mr. Archer asking
for a recommendation over the signature of the chairman of the board,
and a copy of the chairman's recommendation, were read and ordered
filed.
May Teach at South Ward
An application from Miss Nora
Brander, of Fort Steele, recently
teaching at Kwelme,1 Aiherta, applying for a position on the South Ward
school staff was read. It was moved
that Miss Brander bo offered the
junior room in the South Ward school
at $ 11 till per annum.
A list of the successful scholars
passing grades 8, 9 and 10, furnished
hy Miss Woodland and Mr. Archer,
was read and ordered  filed.
A copy of the letter to Miss Woodland expressing the pleasure of the
members of the hoard at the results
of the examinations throughout the
Central school, was read. The secretary was instructed to forward copies
of this letter to the local press for
publication.
A letter from J. A. Anderson, of
lhe Free Text Book Branch, stating
hat the board was not entitled to a
new flag for the South Ward school
until March 1027, was rwul and ordered filed.
A letter from Miss Rice accepting
the position on the Central school
staff wot* read and ordered filed.
Supplementary Exam*. Here
A letter from S. J. Willis, Superintendent of Education, stating that
Cranbrook would be made a centre
for tbe junior and senior matriculation supplementary examinations if
any candidates ore available for the
September examination, was read and
held over until information as to thc*
result of Grades 10 and 11 examinations arc available.
Requests from High, Central,
South Ward and Kootenay Orchards
schools for supplies for the fall term
were read, and the secretary advised
that he had called for tenders un
50 reams examination cap, 50 gross of
while chalk and 25 gross of colored
chalk. It was moved that the supplies
for -the various schools be ordered;
that the matter of tenders be left
with the secretary to place with the
lowest tenderers; that the secretary
write the Department of Education
re their standing a portion of the
cost of the Silent Readers.
Correspondence with Mr, F. W.
Buck, principal, and applications
from Jas. F. Hunt, W. H, Cllffe and
others, applying for the vacancy at
the high school, were read. Mr. Ruck
advised that Mr, Cllffe had accepted
a position on the Fernie high school
staff.
The secretary was instructed to
write Mr. Buck asking him to recommend a teacher for the high school
capable of teaching a portion of
Grade 12 subjects, salary not to exceed $l*uo.ou per annum.
Messrs. Scott and McDonald having brought iu their tenders during
the meeting, and R. P. Moffatt's tender having been received previously,
the hoard proceeded lo deal with the
matter.
Tender* for Supplies
Tenders for examination foolscap
were as follows: Beattle-Noble Ltd.,
$1.00 per ream; Cranbrook Drug Co.,
$1.02 per ream; R. P. Moffatt (Durham), Sl.Sii'i!, (Students) $1.99U,
(Scholastic) $2.25. It was moved by
Trustees Gilroy and Henderson that
orders for examination foolscap he
placed with R. P. Moffatt for Durham
quality paper at $1.80Vi,
Tenders  for chalk:  Beattie-Nohle
Md.—R0 gross DuntlwM White, 85c
per gross; 25 gross Dustless Colored,
$1.00 per gross.    Cranbrook Drug &
50 gross Dominion Dust-
60 gross
The first period of the junior live
Stock judging classes will be held on
Monday, July 12th, at 1 o'clock at
Mr, T. Cameron's place ot Baker.!
All boys and girls who wish to be in j
the junior live stock judging teams
this year, will kindly send in their'
names to the Agricultural Office at!
once so that it can be ascertained j
how muny will be iu the class audi
how many cars will be necessary to!
take the boys and girls to Mr. Cameron's on July 12th. The teams fori
the coast fairs will be chosen from
these classes so that everyone should |
be on hand on July 12th und every
period afterwards.
Hatchery Man
Complimennted
Mr. H.  Ryder Recipient of
Presentation From Rod
and Gun Club
Main Line Trains
Pass Through
(Special Despatch to The Herald)
Vancouver, July 8th,—A slide Iti
miles east of Revelstoke derailed a
C. I'. It. freight Wednesday and caused routing of all traffic via Columbia
Valley and K. V. K.
This  slide  was caused   by   heavy
rains, and owing to the derailing of
the freight,  it was decided to route
the mainline trains by the southerly
i.    Four   trains   bound   for   thc
t passed through Crauhrook early
Thursday morning, and  four  for
the east will pass through here later
the day,
Death  of   AfM-d  Athalmer   Resident
John   Pratt, NT years of aye.
resident of Athalmer,  passed
at the  Hospital here on Tues-
So  far as  in known  he  was
-•ithotit relative
here.
Attend Native Sons Meeting
Me
Fre
I Ryckman. Jas Martin,
U P. Sullivan and Stanley Moffatt
left the beginning of the week for
Vancouver to attend the provincial
convention of the Native Sons of j
Canada, being held there this week.
Dr. Rutledge was also expected to
attend, but was not able to get away.
Messrs. Ryckman, Sullivan and Moffatt are attending as the delegates
from the Cranbrook Assembly, while
Mr. Martin i.- attending as one oi the
grand lodge officers.
Skookumchuck Lady Diet
Mrs. II. Johnson, of Skookumchuck,
passed away at the St. Eugene Hospital on Tuesday. Mrs. John.*r>n,
wlm was in her 31st year, came to the
hospital Tuesday morning but failed
to survive an operation which it was
found necessary to perform. 1 he
funeral was held from the undertaking parlors on Wednesday afternoon.
The pal! bearers were Bob Crewe,
Dave Hopkins. Billy Whiting and
Harry Collier. Rev. W. T. Tapscott
officiated.
Awarded Also I-. T. C. M
Miss Helen Worden, A.T.CM. received official notice this week from
the Toronto Conservatory of Music
that she had passed with first class
honors, and had been awarded the
prized degree of L.T.C.M. This degree represents graduation from the
Conservatory, and with the exception
of the Bachelor of Music degree,
which is given for the completion of
the course in theory, is the highest
degree granted by the Conservatory.
The many friends of Miss Worden
will be pleased to hear of her very
creditable success,
finr is expressed here that the nation Jiygeia Dustless White, 7:ic per gross:
may face famine or a food shortage 25 gross Colored No. I, $2,12 per
unless large quantities of food are'gross; 25 gross Colored No. 2, $1.02
imported to replace tho crops destroy- per gross. R, P. Moffatt—50 gross
ed by the flood. All railway tracks j DuMltas White, 05,7c; 25 gross as-
wlthin fifteen or twenty kilometres sorted chalk, $1.17.
of the capital were covered with wa-J lt waa moved by Trustees Miles
Ur hurt night.
bo given to Mr. Moffatt.
Changes   to   Heating   Plant
Tenders covering the alteration to
the heating plant at the Centra!
school, based on Clark & Co.'s plans
amended in accordance with ideas of
tenderer were read as follows; Patmore Bros.i cutting out one boiler,
otherwise following Clark plans,
$1180, plans for replacing air vents
or radiators in old building, and cov-
bestos, $445, total $1575.00; A. Leering all mains and branches with as-
beau, $1220.41, less saving on pur
chases of piping ond valves from K,
K. Lumber Co., $240, total $986.41.
A  letter from the United  Slat
Fidelity & Guarantee Co.,  Ltd., regarding bond from Mr. Lebeau, was
read.
It was moved that Mr. Lebeau's
tender for alterations to thp heating
system of the Central school *be
eepted, and that proper specifications
he drawn Up and that the usunl conditions   he  arranged   for.
Trustee Henderson drew attention
to the sagging of the floor in the
hall near entrance to new addition
and the building committee wus authorized to get prices covering the
necessury repaira,
Accuunts amounting to $48&&8Q
I antl Jacluun Uwt thm order far chalk were passed fer payment
W. WHITING TO CARRY ON
Another of the many successful
accomplishments of the local Rod nml
Gun Club wus. the little function thnt
luck place In the K. p, n,..n 0„
Wednesday evening last, when the
members of the executive and other
friends of -Mr. Ryder met around the
festive hoard to enjoy nn hour or so
previous lo the departure of Mr. Ry.
der for the const and incidentally to
let Mr. Ity.h-r know in no uncertain
way Just what the boys thought of him
and his work. There were about fif.
teen present to partake of one of
the finest fish dinners that could be
imagined. In New York it would have
been a J7.00 touch, and for it*, preparation the boys thanked Mr. Geo.
Anton, who had them cooked just
right, while Billy Whiting was tin-
one who f,|, thai for the occasion
nothing but Ihe best was good enough and iccurcd a.- nice a selection
of rainbow cutthroat and Kamloops
as could be obtained in the district,
and they vere about the tastiest
things that ever came out of the water. What unh the delicious salad
and other tempting dishes, it is lit-
tic wonder that others besides the
Herald representative indulged ns
though they had not eaten for a
week and did not expect to for another. The chef and the fisherman
were thanked many times during the
evening,
Following the supper an informal
meeting of the executive took place,
when a few matters of importance
were discussed, the principal of
which, however, was the impending
departure of Mr. Harry Ryder, who
for the last three seasons has been
in charge of the operation of the
local  hatchery.
Unu.u.lly Succei.ful
To repeat all the nice things that
were said about Mr. Ryder and his
efficient managing would fill this
page, the concensus of opinion being
that the succoss that has attended
thc operation of the Cranbrook fish
hatch-ery has been in no small measure due to the untiring efforts of
Mr. Ryder. Through his work on the
hatchery has demonstrated beyond
dispute the wisdom of the local fishermen who thought that a hatchery'
was a feasable thing here. Realizing
that the proof of the pudding was in
the eating of it, the local angling
enthusiasts compare conditions now
with what they were, a few years
ago. Then they were lamenting the
fact that the fish, about like the
buffalo, were a thing of the past; this
lake and that lake used to bc- good,
but now, alas, they were empty. Today it Is claimed they can go out
to any creek or lake in the district
and be reasonably sure of a catch.
This, from an attraction standpoint,
is considered worth all the time and
money spent on the project, to say-
nothing of the pleasure derived by
local lovers of the fishing game.
Not Able to Return
Mr. Ryder, having completed his
work here for this season, is returning to tht coast to resume his work
at other stations thire. It is feared,
however, that it will not be possible
to have his services again next year,
this being a matter of regret lo the
local men. But the silver lining to
the cloud is thc fact thut Mr. Billy
Whiting, whose work as assistant to
Mr. Ryder was the matter of much
favorable comment at the dinner, will
be in a position to carry on. That
he is able to dn so may be judged
from the statement of Mr. Ryder,
who said during the evening "Billy
can do it now just as well as myself."
While Mr. Whiting would not admit this to be thc case, he did say
that in going around w.th Mr. Ryder
he had found that thyre was a whole
lot to learn, and that he had not
failed to keep his ey s and ears open,
and trusted .that if il would not be
possible to have Mr. Ryder back with
them again next year, and if the work
was intrusted to him, that he would
do his best to insure success.
Given Presentation
Mr. H. .1. Collier, president of the
Rod and Gun Club, was chairman uf
the evening, and in a few appropriate
words refeired to the efficient work
of Mr. Ryder, as well as to the esteem in which he waa held by the
members of the club. He attributed
to him a great ileal of the success of
the work that the club had undertaken. Ile stated tbat it gave him
much pleasure to ask Mr. Ryder to
accept from a few of his muny
friends in Crnnbrook n small token
of their esteem, intimating that Jie
felt he was voicing the opinion of ull
the members that their relations hud
been the most cordial and that it
waa with keen regret that they hod
cume to say farewell, especially aa
(C-Mtiaurr*! on Page o, PAQE   TWO
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
Thursday, July 8th, 1926
THE UNITED CHURCH
REV. BRYCE  WALLACE,  B.A.,  B.D.,  Minister
SUNDAY, JULY llth
11 a.m. — "The Secret ol Greatness,
Adult Bible Class
12:15 p.m.—SUNDAY SCHOOl	
7.30 p.m. — "The Appeal ol Roman Catholicism."
ORANC1EMEN SPECIALLY INVITED
—   "THE CHURCH OF A CHEERFUL RELIGION"
W.  A .  P E R <i 1 li
DENTIST
Campbell-Manning  Block
Phone 97 Office   Hour.
12; 1 to 5 p.m. Sal. 9 lo 1
]
Drs.   Ureen   &   MacKinnon
Phy.ici-.il.   A   Surgeon.
Office at Resilience, Arm?tron(t
Avenue
OFFICE
Afternoons 	
Evenings 	
Sundays
HOURS
  11 to -t
.  7.30 to 8.30
... 2.00 to 4.00
CRANBROOK,   B.C.
Baptist Cijurci)
Rev. W. T. TAPSCOTT
213 Norbury Ave. . Phone 202
DR.   F.   B.   MILES
DENTIST
OFFICE HOURS
9 to 12 a.m.       1 to fi p.m.
Hanion  Blk.,  Cranbrook,   B.C.
F. M. Mncl'HERSON
Undertaker
Phono 350
Norbury  Avo.,  Nest  Cily   Hall
ffffffffffffffffffffff
H. W. Herchmer j;
BARRISTER
and
SOLICITOR
CRANBROOK   -   B.C.
— PHONE 61 —
i 'ffffffffffffffffffffffff.-
I. O. O. I'.
KEY CITY LODGE Nn. 42
Meets every
Monday night ut
Tho Auditorium
Sojourning Oddfellows are cordially invited
N. G.     -   -     A. KEMBALL
Rec. Sec.  E. G. Dingley, P.G.
SUNDAY,
JULY  llth
It Mil
11.00 a.m.—"Our Cure
God's Comf oris,"
Sunday School   12 noon
7.30 p.nit—"The Sneer ol the
Pharnsee, the Joy ol the
Sinner."
Services     in     the     |.;iptist
Church iii lhe morning—and
in    Knox    Chunh    in    the
evening.
ABE   < (lit in AM. Y
LNV1TED.
I) GOLDEN CO£OC*N
&-<       ^ RUTH CROSS
*
Mr, Kreuzer was
, "he might at least
, ."    He had bt,en
A
SYNOPSIS |    "I   do   think,"
Molly  Shannon,   State  University saying agrievedly
student, has accepted the marriage have told us. .
proposal of Stephen Renfro, but at particularly fond of Renfro.
his direction the engagement is kept      "Oh,   1   dare  say   he  deemed  it
] secret.   Then comes a night when j BUfflcient  to  tell  Miss  Molly  here,
ic fails to keep an appointment with
her and she learns he haa left  for
New  York  without sending her any
message.    Molly is attending school
on  a  scholarship.     She   is  of  the
"shiftless   Shannons,"    of    northern
Texas, and this romance was the first
in her young life,
iWiWWiWiVNSVWWiWW
I GEORGE   J. SPREULL 3
f,   BARRISTER SOLICITOR j
'' NOTARY i
3 CRANBEOOK - B.t:. 5
fffffffffffffffffffffffff.'
FOR   SERVICE,   QUALITY
AND   CLEANLINESS   THE
L. i). Cake
CANNOT    BE    EXCELLED
Sanitary  Electric Refrigeration
I <>!>'< 1.S A Ml NOClt'JIKH
WOMKN'8
FOR RELIABLE
Shoe   Repairing
Take  your  shoes   to  the
—0. K. SHOE SHOP—
Norbory Ave. — Cranbrook
For Quality and value in
Men's Dress and Work Shoes
SEE US — W. NICHOL Prop.
************************^
For Good  Value  in
GOOD   EATS
Go to Thc
ZENITH   CAFE
Cor. BAKER 4 VAN  HORNE
************************<
.!>.» ■:'■■
I
Sainsbury & Ryan
BUILDERS AND '
COHTRACTORS
■MiautM 01t«b Mt  Work
etservttmtl
■elsphoan IM mt M
CRANBROOK      •      B.C.
j. f. scott ;
I Cranbrook Drug & Book Co.
■•iiinii!	
NISBET & GRAHAM
Barristers, Solicitors, &c.
Offices: Imperial Bunk III Jr.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
OFFICES at KIMBERLEY
IN K. of P. HAI.I.
Open Every Thursday from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
"W^*>
INSTITUTE
Uamt* Id th*
h. of P. Hah
afternoon of tht
flrtt Tuwday at
I p.m.
All ladiM ar*
ronlially IriTtted
Mn. NORGROVE
Mrs. J. COUTTS.
WHY OPERATE?
for Appendicitis, Gallstones,
Stomach and Liver Troubles,
wl.i'11 HEPATOLA does the
wnrli without pnin and no
risk of your life nur loss of
time.
•->.•■ :: ipoiMOtl.    Notloldb?llru|gtSt«.
Mrs. Geo. S. Almas
SDLK MANCPACTCRER
ISO Fourth Ave. S. Phona 4BII
SASKATOON
l*rirr tu ."'I -Pnrcel poit Mc «trm.
When Vou Think of lntnnuiee
— Call Dp —
BEALE &. ELWELL
Crnnbrook & Kimberley
Sole  \,t in- (or Kimlierley TowaiHe.
STRIP TICKETS
Willi nm! Wilhoul Coupons
For (ieneral
Admission Purposes
Tor Sale et
THE
CRANBROOK HERALD
OFFICE
FRUIT
AND
PACIFIC
There is :i merchnnt in Van
couver who has built a na
iimi.il reputation as an expert iu his work. Two
years ago ht- was seriously
ill. Since then he is very
careful of liis diet. His
noonday meal is fruit and
Pacific Milk, because he dis
covered (|iiile hy accident
thai Pacific Milk agrees
with him perfectly, while
fresh milk could not always
he relied upon.
PACIFIC  MILK
Head    Ofieai    Vtsiosm
FactorlM al La*»r ft AkbalsforJ
CHAPTER XI—Continued
"Molly . . • ■'" she called anxl-
usly before she reached the head
f the stairs. Then she popped Iter
end in ut tho door and breathed
udlblo relief at sight of the slim
nt line under the sheet. "Why,
ve must have missed you und Stoph-
n ut the bazaar!" she began, advancing a little further into the room.
'We didn't go to the bazaar."
Molly lay very still, staring at the
wjiII opposite. "It was so hot Stephen thought it would be nicer just to
take a walk." The lie was an instantaneous gesture of self-defence;
as reflex as throwing un one's arm
to ward olT a blow. She would gladly have sworn away the rest of her
life to preserve for herself these next
few hours.
But id dawn she rose und went
downstairs to Mrs. Parker's door.
"He must he in some dreadful trouble—to have like that—without a
word," she finished her confession
of as much of the truth as she knew.
It hnd been hard all along not telling
Mrs. Parker. But Stephen had been
so uuthoritative.
The little fairy godmother, parched on the edge of the bed in her
high-necked cotton nightdress, regarded her with seared, sleep-dazed
old eyes. "Sit down, child," she said
at first "Vou don't look as if you'd
slept a wink."
"No, 1 haven't slept," Molly admitted in the same tone that she
Would have said, "Yes, this is a hot
morning," or anything else unrelated. "Do you think," she went on,
"lie can have done something—wrong
or shamtful—that that was why he
had to leuvo?" Strange, how that
ideu kept cropping up, as If from
some deep, inward distrust. Again
the sensation of having really known
ull the time ....
All's. Parker was shuffling hurriedly into her shabby bedroom slippers,
"If he wus in trouble, h,t would have
turned to us. I'll just telephone over
to thut place where he rooms "
Molly put a restraining hand on
her arm. "No, I wouldn't; they
don't like being waked."
It's just some misunderstanding,
the other mumbled us she began intend to pull on her clothes. She
eemed to huve an idea thut that wus
i step toward doing something about
it—Ma- going to a fire or running
to the assistance of a victim in u
treet accident. "He's been culled
away on business and didn't have
time to telephone. Ten to one you'll
u wire this morning, or more'n
likely he'll be sticking his hea'd in ut
the dining-room door two hours from
now. . . ."
Gallant words, but they cnrried no
miction.
ROYAL
YEAST
CAKES
y^tiMwd
mmte
Jtlodc
fo/md
JE
woman stole a furtive, anxious glance
at her, made a wordless entreaty to
Let's talk »about it." But Molly
either Ignored or did not see. She
fairly bristled with "Posted, no trespassing" signs, behind which even the
little fairy godmother dared not venture. She sense-d vaguely new depths
und darknesses, inner shrine, and
moved fearfully away from them.
At noon Molly went in to dinner with the rest, and listened carefully to what was said. Renfro's
marriage was frankly the whole topic
of conversation. It was, in fact, the
lenaation of the town. Air. Dilworth
hud, it seemed, admitted the mur*
rlage, but refused to discuss the details—if, indeed, he know any.
Through  it  all,  Molly  knew they
■re dealing fur more gently with
Stephen thnn they  felt he deserved,
out of  respect to tha fact thut he
vas Btlll—presumably—her friend.
At dusk Molly came out on the
torch where Mrs. Purker sat, cooing oft after the flurry of getting
nnd serving supper. She wus dressttd
or the street, with her hut on. "I'm
[olng over to spend the night with
ome friends in town," she announced, her eyes on the cotton glove she
was fastening.
(To   be   continued)
BUILDERS OF NASH
BODIES DATE BACK
THREE GENERATIONS
A FINE WHISKY COCKTAIL |
CAN BE MADE ONLY WITH m
FINE WHISKY
THE BEST WHISKY COCKTAILS
ARE   MADE   WITH
Whisky
SEND FOR OUR COCKTAIL BOOKLET
HIRAM WALKER * SONS LIMITED, WAl.KERVILLE, ONTARIO
This advertisement is not inserted by the Government
cf the Province of British Columbia
ed body production und us Indicating
the growth of this organisation,
founded buck in the duys of the
prairie schooner antl the ox-cart, the
Seaman Body Corporation iu 1022
produced 9,120 enclosed bodies for
Nush Motors, in 1923 the production
was 19,388, in 1924 tho figure was
27,040 and in 1925 it was 78,500,
^ six months of 192(1,
71,000 Nash enclosed
while in the fit
Soamnn huilt
bodies.
Each process in the production of
Seaman bodies is tunned forward
with infinite care nnd scientific accuracy, for quality bus heen a basic
principle with Seaman since tie day
the company was founded in 1S48.
CHAPTER   XII
.Morning passed und afternoon,
three days and three corroding
nights, und still there was no word
from Stephen. Molly went nbout
her usuol daily routine, talked as
little as possible, pretended to eat
and to sleep. To the group at the
table who inquired about him she
explained merely that he had gone
away for a while. And she invested
a precious half dollar in u box of
rouge, ami learned for the first time
to laugh from the lips outwurd. She
dared not absent herself from the
tnble,   lest   xhe   create   suspicion.
When she came down to breakfast un the fourth morning her senses, over-acute through the long abstinence from sleep, caught at once
the guilty hush which fell on the
chattering group about tho table.
The pink little rector dropped the
morning paper with crackling haste,
like u thief taken with the goods,
as she pulled out her chair next to
his. There was u profound silence,
manifestly uncomfortable for everybody but Molly herself. Then Ur.
Earned, heud of the muthematics department, leaned forward from his
place ut the heud of the table and
observed casually, "Well, Miss Molly,
und what do you think of this trick
Renfro has  playud  us?"
Molly hnd unfolded her nupkiu.
She dared not commit herself by
question.
The little rector pushed the pap*
doubtfully toward her, one plump
forefinger on 0 heading under "Society Items."    She glanced the half
mnn over with cursory, businesslike Interest She did not see a single
word,    The page was a swimming,
without taking the rest of the world
into his confidence," Dr. Horned interposed with a cheerful significant
smite.
She looked up from the paper,
smiled  back  at  him   mechanically.
"Well, I guess he's feathered his
nest all right." Miss Burton's eri.tp
tone left smull room for guesswork
as to what she thought of tlte affair.
"That's whnt hq was after!"
Their voices came to Molly dulled
und deadened, as though she were
shut up iu q sound-proof chamber.
But ufter a time the veering, zigzagged lines began to straighten under her eyes, to tuke form and meaning:
A.t four o'clock yesterday afternoon, Miss SUsan Dilworth and Mr.
Stephen Renfro, both of this city,
were married iu Bur Harbor, Maine,
where the former, one of the cap!-
No automobile body manufacturer,
in America has a more inspiring history than the Seaman Body Corporation of Milwaukee, exclusive builders
of Nash enclosed bodies nnd owned
in half by the Nash Motors Company.
Back beyond the memory of the present generation—over seventy-five
years ago—the house of Seaman was
founded. A photograph of an ox-
drawn cart bearing the inscription,
A. D. Seaman & Co., taken in 1871
and recently unearthed by Mrs.
Christ Behrens, of Milwaukee, Is a
picturesque testimonial to the years
of service that have been experienced by the Seaman organization. Mrs.
Behrens, whose husband was the
driver of an ox-cart, explained that
during the year 1871 a severe epidemic of influenza among horses
made it necessary to replace those
animals by oxen which were still,
however, in fairly general use.
The photograph, taken on East
Wuter Street, Milwaukee, near the
eity hull, shows n background of
buildings long since replaced by modern Bky-serapers. But even at that
time the house of Seaman was twenty
three years old.
Back hi the days prior to the Civil
War, A. D. Seaman, grandfather of
the present heads of the business, engaged in the building of fine furniture. In luter yeurs us the automobile industry grew to major importance and the demand arose, for automobile bodies that Would worthily
represent the woodworking art, Seaman turned its specialized ability to
this field.
Today the immense Seaman shops
ure entirely utilized by Nash enclos-
94« WEST 27th AVE.. SHAUCHNESSY HEIGHTS. VANCOUVER. B.C.
Jin Jinglican, ^Residential and 'bay School for QtrU
Provides * thorough education with careful moral and physical instruction.
Fira grade to junior and senior Matriculaii^n. Art. Music, Physical Education
with indoor and outdoor sports. All the Mistresses hold degrees from the best
English and Canadian Universities. : *
For prospectus apply to The Mother Superior,
The little rector pushed the paper
doubtfully   toward  her.
taps lovllest nnd most sought ufter
debutantes, was summering with
friends. Mr. und Mrs. Renfro will
reside in New York City, where the
groom has recently accepted a splendid editorial position. Mr, Renfro's
connection with the university
here ....
Molly  skipped that.
The bride is the only daughter of
Mr. .lames M. Dilworth, one of our
wealthiest und mosl influential muti
- prominent for years in state politics. Although the announcement
comes as somewhat uf a surprise . . .
She folded the paper and bunded
it buck to the rector without comment, Then she poured some crenm
over her cereal and began to eat it.
Dr. 11 arued mude another of his
amusing remarks ubout something
totally irrelevant. Everybody laughed und there was a sudden relieved
buzz of small talk ns the group broke
up. They hud come otf rather more
easily thnn they hoped, Molly reflected sardonically. It must have
been on ordeal for them.
Molly, quitting the room, too,
presently, encountered Mrs, Parker,
who wus just coming iu with a plate
of hot cakes, "There's something in
the paper," she said, pointing to
where it still lay on tho table. She
went on up lo her own room and
locked  the door.
Apply Minard's every day and
rub it in well wiih the Anger
tips. It penetrates and heals.
Removes inflammation.
A remedy for every pain.
&VBI0Ms S(*yS-
- it certainly is Economical to
operate"
Although larger than other low-priced
cars, Chevrolet has a world-wide reputation for being more economical of
gasoline and oil. Modern design is the
reason—just as quality construction
and fine-car features assure the greater
•conomy of long life, slow depreciation, and
freedom from repair. The Improved Chevrolet, the latest and greatest Chevrolet, costs
little to buy and little to own. Over a million
owners will tell you, "It certainly is
economical to operate I"
KOOTENAY GARAGE
CRANBROOK - B.C.
Mill
NEW LOW PRICES
$2500.00 Club
For Particulars Apply to
B.C. Mutual Benefit Assoc.
W. SPEIRS, BOX 240, FERNIE, B.C.
heaving blur,    She knew only that
hIip must keep her eyef fixed very An   hour later  she  came  duwn.
steadily on it, else everything would From lime to time, as she and Mrs.
turn lo thnt heaving Mack choo  Purker worked side by side, the alder
NEW PRICES ON STAR CARS
—   Delivered at Cranbrook   —
Model 4s. Model 6s.
Standard Touring $ 915     - -       1260
Special Touring     985    - -       	
Coupe   1160    ■ ■       1350
Coacb       1175    - ■       1420
Sedan   1300    - ■       1600
Above Prices include Spare Tire, Tube
and Tire Cover.
RATCLIFFE & STEWART
CRANBROOK, B.C. PHONE 42
DEMONSTRATIONS AT      ANY TIME Thursday, July 8th, 1926
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
PAOE   THREE
706.7IS INCREASE IN
C. N. RAILWAYS NET
EARNINGS ONE MONTH
Earnings statement issued recently
by the- Canadian National Railways
shows un increase ol $8,820,.426.B0
or 700.71 per ct-nt, in neUearnings
for May as compared with tin- satnt
month of last .vent- and an increase
of $8,740,800.01 or 200.88 per cent,
for the five months period since the
first of Mu* year as compared with
tin- same period of   l02-r>.
Grosa earnings for tho month of
May. 19211, were $22,183,80J, ns
againsl si:<,•_• 16,788 for Mny 1026,
an increase o( 113,087,600, or a 1.r>s
per cent. Working oxpensos urn-
$18,050,038.07 In May 1020 againsl
$17,840,708.23 In .May 102-5, an in-
eronso of $1,111,140.44 or n.23 por
cent, Nol earnings I'm- lho month
wero $3,220,3Uf>,33 as ngnlnsl $800,
080,77 IW .May ,i!' lnsl year, an In
crease of $2,820,126.H0, oi 70(1 * I
per cent.   Tho  operating   ratio  fi
Carry it f^\
always -nff >)
with -  V:" ]-
you/:
ttWi
mm
WW
M    Keeps teeth ^j£
clean, breath sweet,^
appetite keen and
digestion i
May 1926 was 85.40 percent, us Compared with 97.81 per cent, in the
lame month of last year.
For tho five months period to the
end of May, 1920, gross earnings
reached a total of $98,685,100
against $87,.'130,081 for the same
five months in 1925, an increase of
511,340,028, or 12.99 per cent.
Working expenses for the five
months were $85,769,528.15 this year
against $88,164,856,06 in 1926, an
Increase of $2,005,167.09 or 3.13
per cent. N»*l earnings for the five
months were $12,915,582.86
against $4,174,721.96, an increase for
the period of $8,740,800.91 or 209.38
l>i-i cent.
BELIEF OF MINIMUM
WAGE BOARD IS THAT
WHITE LABOR WILL WIN
Expreii Hope That New Measure Will Tend Towards
Elimination of Orientals
\\ JfterEveryMeal
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
I
$
APPROPRIATE CLOSING
EXERCISES INVERMERE
ATHALMER SCHOOL
(Spocjul   tn   Tho    llcrillil)
Invcrmorst B.C., July H—Thfl pu-
pll mi Un' Consolidated Athalmer-
(nverinore school la-lil their cloning
iixiM-cl •• hero for tliw term on Frill, iv litKt. Tho honor rolls ainl prleea
Cor work norformed were awarded.
Thero wus a largo attendance of
parents lo see tlu* specimen work
which was exhibited,
Those attending tho coveted honor
rolls in Mr. Mcunry's rtfom were
John Pruct, for proficiency! Susan
Nixon, lur deportment; Georgie
Sim- nml Bin Ong, for regularity
nml punctuality, and Joan Peters,
for spelling.
In Mlsa E, M. Brookes' room the
winners were Ellen Lake, for uro-
ritiriu-y; Dorothy and Bud Mclvor,
for regularity ami punctuality, and
Elsie   Wainwright,   for   deportment.
In boys' handiwork, the prizes
ivere taken by Lan Choy and William
Eoyston.
Edith and .Mary MacLean won the
respective prizes for needlework.
After these important ceremonies
were concluded th*1 scholars sang in
rhorua "The Maple Leaf Forever."
Grades fl and 4 sang "A Hundred
Plperg An' A' 'o That"; Grades 5 to
B Bang "Finiculi, Finicula," "Alloui-
tes" and "The Men of Harlech."
Proceedings were closed by the singing of "God Save the King."
Milk and Cream
DIRECT FBOM
Big Butte Dairy Farm
FHORI It
-..*.,-■+.-, 4,++■!■++»«+■»
Victoria Cafe |
Whether you want n light
lunch or a satisfying meal
ynu will find our food tasty
and delicious.
Afler the  Dance and Show
visil   Hie   VICTORIA.
Cranbrook's Popular Cafe    i *
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff  *******
PAUL
NORDGREN
YAHK, B.C.
For that new
STRAW HAT, SUMMER
SHOES — AND
WEARING APPAREL
see our stock
— Best Quality —
MEN'S WORKING
CLOTHES
As first announced in the Herald
recentlyt forty cents an hour is to
be the legal minimum wage for
workers in the lumbering industry of
British Columbia after November 1
next. This Is the essence of un order just issued by the Board administering the Minimum Wage Act for
this Province.
Under the provisions of the decree
exemptions are permitted in llu- case
of the handicapped employee and apprentice; but these must not exceed
ten per cent, of the employees engaged by any firm. The order embraces all operations of logging,
shingle mills, saw mills, planing mills,
box factories, sash and door factories,
pulp and paper mills, veneer plants
and cooperages, in wliich there art-
approximately 40,000 persons employed in the province.
Inquiries made by the Board show
that, taking into consideration the
number of persons employed in these
operations who are ut present receiving less than the-proposed minimum
wage, the new order will directly
mean an increase of pay for ubout
8,850 workers. Many of the low-
paid ■workers in the industry, amounting to over one-fifth of the whole,
are Orientals, uud it is believed that
one effect of the order will be to
make the industry more attractive to
white workers, and' lead to their
gradual substitution for Asiatics.
The Board states that the 40c minimum will be given a trial ftir a reasonable period, but if experience
should show that the order should be
reviewed, it will be prepared to consider such change as the circumstances may warrant.
Fletcher's
; especially pre-
elieve Infants itf
arms and Children all ages of
C nstlpntion,  Flatulency, Wind
and   Diarrhea;   allaying
I i     ■ uri ing therefrom, nnd, by regulating (he Stomach
and Bowels, aids lhe assimilation of Foojl; giving natural sleep.
To rvi "I Imitations, always look tor the ilgnature of wi.j/V/T/oj^^ul*
Ko i 'p'-ji'--;    Physicians everywhere recommend it
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
of C.'iuml.i, Limited.
OFFICES, SMKI.T1NG ANU REFINING DEPARTMENT
TRAII,   RKIIISII COLUMBIA
SMELTERS  AND  REFINERS
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**************************
ROOSVILLE NOTES
****%**********************
Mr. Chas. McGuire and parly mo
tored to Kuerka on Wednesday.
Mr. B. Danfear, of Gateway, mo
tored to Fernie on Wednesday to
take in the sports.
Mr. G. Zonik was an Elko visitor
on Sunday.
Mr. R. Reed motord to Grasmere
on Sunday.
Mr. McParlon, of Waldo, was a
visitor at Grasmere on Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. H. MflGuire and
family motored to Eureka on Sunday evening to take in the show.
Mr. J. A. Sineliar motored to
Glen Lake on Friday,
Mr. Harry Tolten made a trip to
Grasmere on  Friday evening.
Mr, Jus. Sinclair is sporting u new
; Oldsmobile six sport model car.
Miss E. H. Sinclair, who hns spent
:the lust few weeks in Kimberley and
Cranbrook,   returned   home   for   n
short time.
|    Mr.    Colin   Sinclair   motored   to
Grasmere to spend a few days before
returning to Salmo.
Mr. antl Mrs. B. Hyde motored to
Eureka on  Friday.
Mr. Jas Sinclair and Robt. MeCabe,
an<l the Misses Bertha Swanson and
Mary   McDonald   motored   to   Grasmere from Spoknne, where they will
spend a few days.
Mr and   Mrs.  Harry  Sharpe   and
party of Waldo motored to Grasmere I
on Sunday.
Mr. R. Reed and H. Holton motored to Roosville on Sunday evening
to take in the show.
Messrs Colin and James Sinclair,
and the Misses E. H. Sinclair, B.
Swanson and Mary McDonald motored to Elko on Sunday evening.
Mr. Thos Uphill, of Fernie, spent
a few days   in Roosvllle.
A number of local people took advantage of the hot weather by taking u cool dip in Edwards Lake.
**************************
WARDNER    I
NOTES
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Headdon
spent Sunday visiting Mr. and Mrs.
Peppier at their cottage ut Mr Bain's
Lake. On their return to Wardner
Sunduy evening Mrs, Peppier accom-
puiiied the part, spending a couple of
days at her home here, and again
motoring out to the lake on Tuesduy,
hem* accompanied by Mrs. C. I.ovick.
Mrs. Geo, Killam, H. Rentrom
and Fred Babick spent Sunday last
visiting friends in Cranbrook,
Miss Sophie Mader, of Crnnbrook,
arrived in Wardner this week to
spend the summer vacation with her
sister, Mrs. Tony Rosicky, and has
taken a position as clerk in Martino's
store. Miss Mader is a student in
the second year high school of Cranbrook,
Geo. Renick and daughters,
Georgetta and Lauretta; Mr. and Mrs.
Fred Leard and family, Len Flesberg;
Messrs John and Frank Moore, Wesley Montgomery, Andy Powell and
Jimmy Gordon were among the Wardner folk who spent the week-end
camping at Mud Lake.
Mr. and Mrs, Fred Harris, Mr. and
Mrs. Wm. Harris and family, Mr. and
Mrs. Paul Storey and son Alvin
motored to Peckham's Lake for the
day on Sunday, The water is about
the most comfortable place to be in
nowadays in the opinion of most people.
Mr. John Lawson, of the Wardner
Hotel, and daughter Louise, return*
ed on Monday morning afler a
month's holiday with relatives in
Philadelphia, Kansas City and Spokane. On the return trip they were
accompanied by Mrs. Lawson's elder
daughter, Miss Elizabeth kawBon, who
has been attending school in Philadelphia, and Mr. Lawson's brother,
Mr. Lars Luwson, of Kansas City,
both uf whom will spend lhe summer
in Wardner, Miss Lawson returning
to school in October, and Mr. Lawson
leaving for his home in Kansas City
about September.
Miss Ethel Dow and Chas. Haines,
jr., motored to Kimberley on Sunday for a short visit with Miss Dow's
sister, Mrs, Frank Roycroft, ujso
visiting friends in Cranbrook on the
ieturn journey.
Miss MAbel Embree, of Creston,
with her sister, Mrs. Elmer Thomp-
who is spending the Bummer here
son, left on Tuesday for Bull Kiver,
where she will -spend a few duys
visiting at the home of Mrs. Howard.
Mrs. Carl I.ovick, another Wardner
visitor, from Libhy, Mont., who is
spending a holiday with her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Olsen, Ls also
Spending this week as the guest of
Mrs. Haney, in Ilull Kiver.
Another young newsagent hns been
busy this past week, in lhc person
ot "Hud" Rader, who is culling on
the townshtdies, soliciting orders for
various Indies' magazines.
Mr. Lee Ruder spent several days
in town this week at the St, Eugene
Hospital, Cranbrook, when; his daughter, Mrs. Vincent Hickoy (Helen Rader) underwent a critical operation
for appendicitis. Upon his return
home Thursday, Mr. Rader reported
his daughter to be well on the road
toward recovery.
The first open-air dance of the
season was held on Saturday evening
last, when such an affair was he'd at
the Wardner camping grounds, .by
the proprietor, Mr. Win. Rothwell,
in his newly constructed pavilion.
(Owing to lack of notice the dance
was not well attended, but a very
enjoyable time was spent by those
who motored out. The pavilion is
built up off the ground, at the waterside, and is very pleasant on a moonlit evening. 	
Mr. and Mrs. Vic Lundbum left on
Monday on a motoring trip to Spokune, where they will visit friends
for the next few days.
Mrs, Ed. Peppier left on Tuesday
for McBain's Lake, where she will
occupy her cottage for thc balance
of thc warm season, Mr. Peppier motoring down for week-ends, while
several friends will visit al the Peppier cottage during July and August.
Mrs. Ered Leard, Miss Margaret
Leard and her brothers, Ralph and
Forrest, returned to Wardner on Wednesday last, from New Westminster,
where Miss Leard and her brothers
have been attending school.
Mrs, Curl Lovic and children, Ear!
und Geneva, arrived in Wnrdner on
Wednesday nioiiring, and will spend
a couple of weeks here visiting her
grandparents, Mr, and Mrs. Olsen,
and her father, Mr. Hafstad. Mrs.
Lovick is to be the guest of several
affairs, to be given in her honor during her stay here. Having resided
here formerly, Mrs. I.ovick has a host
of friends in Wardner, ami expects
to have a very enjoyable visit among
them.
Mrs. Howard Haney returned to
Wardner on Wednesday, after spending the past two weeks visiting
friends in Spokane and Llbby, Mont.,
Mrs. Haney spent the balance of the
Week in Wardner visiting her parents.
before returning to her home in Bull
River.
Ole Helman journeyed to Cranbrook on Thursday last to have his
hand dressed by Drs. Green and MacKinnon. The hand was badly injured, to the extent of losing three fingers, while Ole was ul work at the
sawmill, two weeks earlier,
Mrs. Deakin, of Sydney, B.C.,
pent Wednesday evening in Wardner, soliciting sales umong the towns-
ladies of the toiletries put out by
the California Perfumes Company.
Mrs. August Daye entertained a
number of friends at tea on Tuesday
afternoon, in honor of her sister, Sirs,
Winnifred Macintosh, of Kelowna,
B.C.
Several Wardnerites motored to
Jaffray on Saturday evening to attend the dance given at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Gust. Johnson, among
them being Messrs. Gust. Carlson,
Chas, Barnes, jr., N. Moberg. Tom
Fit-zsimmons, B. Johnson and Geo.
Umrean.
Miss Astrid Johnson spent Saturduy visiting ut the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Johnson, of Jaffray.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Wynne will
leave on Thursduy of this week on a
two weeks holiduy visiting relatives
in Saskatoon and vicinity.
In spite of the pouring rain which
ushered in the morning of Dominion
Dny, Wardner proved to ho an empty
town practically, nearly everyone
taking a chance on either the Fernie
or Kimberley colehrnti.-ns, or going
out camping for the day. Miss
Dagne Nordmark and Eric Michelson journeyed to Kimberley for the
day, while Mr, and Mrs. Tony Thompson and Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Holton
left on Wednesday evening for Mud
Lake, where they camped over the
holiday. Although the rain poured
down during thc morning, the weather Cleared all over the district at
noon, allowing the day's celebrations
to go right on us usual.
Onco again the rumor of starting
work on the Wurdner Gypsum deposits is going the rounds of the town,
but this time it apparently has a
foundation. Messrs. W. Martin and
W, S. Armstrong, president and salesman respectively of the Manitoba
Gypsum Company, spent several days
in town last week, and while here
mude arrangements for the driving
of a tunnel to determine width and
uniformity of quality of deposit and
to cover assessment work. If results
are satisfactory a five tower aerial
tramway is to he built to convey the
gypsum over the Kootenay river, the
raw materiul to be -shipped to New
Westminster to supply the company's
new modern cement und planter plant. '
Mr. I.ne Ruder, the well known prospector and rancher of Wardner, fa ln
charge of the work. v It will Jbt rt-
membered that Mr. Rader was thc
original discoverer of the depo it, and
sold the properly to the pr- eu' own-
era lust year. In addition to thc
manufacturing of cement and the dlf.
makes wall-board, plaster of parts,
ferent plasters, tho company also
Alabustine, hollow blocks for fiu-
proof partitions, and laud fertilizer,
Mr. and Mrs, Paul Storey and son
Alvivn, Mr, and Mrs. F. Thompson,
Dan Luc-e, John A. Lawson. Eric
Eric Michelson, Harry, Sam and Rollie Thompson, Elmer Thompson, S.
W. Donahoe motored lo Cranbrook
on Wednesday evening to attend the
Kimberley vs. Bonner's Ferry bull j
gume, the latter team winning by a
score of l(t to ll. Bonner's Ferry
brought a good team along.
About thirty five people participated in a big picnic to Wasn Lake
on Sunday last, arranged in honor of
Mrs. Carl Lovick, of Llbby, Mont,
who is spending the next couple of
week visiting friends iu Wardner.
The purty left about nine-thirty, ami
spent the whole day at the lake,
which was crowded by people from
all over the district during the day.
Mrs, Geo, Renick and daughters,
Inez, May and Evelyn, left on Saturday for Vulcan, Alta, where they
will spend the next couple of weeks
visiting Mrs. Renick's mother. Mrs.
James Eust wood. On their return
they will he accompanied home by
another daughter, Marie, whu has
been visiting with her grandmother
for the pust three months, and .Miss
Jennie Eastwood, a sister of Mrs,
Renick.
Wardner   School   Report   for  June
Pased to Grade 5.—Josephine Rosicky, Anton Rosicky, Dorothy Scanland, Katherine Scanland, Harold
Rader,   Alvin  Storey.
Passed to Grade (i.—Walter MaeKenzie, Edith Moberg, Jennie Moberg, George Thompson,
Passed to Crude x.—Alida Holmes
(conditionally) Gudrun Johnson,
Louise Lawson, Kathleen Sheppard,
William Sinclair.
('lass leaders in June examinations
Grude 4.—Josephine Rosicky. (irade
5.—George Thompson, Grade 7.—
William Sinclair.
id Atha
iv, Julv
will be held on Thurs
h, at the school house
Dr. F. E. Coy la tlu
term expires this year
Okanapan     Lakr     Service  —  A ri-
uncement is made uf the opening
by the Canadian National Railways
of a steamship service between Kelowna and Penticton on the Okanagan
Fake. A new steamship, the "Pen-
townu," will make two trips each
way daily, except Sunday, starting
July 15th. This extends the passenger esrvice which was put into
operation with the completion some
months ago of the new Canadian National lino between Kamloops and
Kelowna and gives a complete service from Penticton connecting with
the Continental Limited east and west
n Kamloops.
year.   Production   by  j
1026 was as follows:
N. Seotia and Manitoba
Quebec .
Ontario
British Columbia Z
Yukon Territory 	
5 3R8
148,461
7,271,944
5,1125,403
024,904
Bigger Silver Output—Production
of silver In Canada during 1925j as
reported by the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, shows an output of 20,-
228,088 fine ounces, which, at the
average New York price for the year
of Oil,005 cents per fine ounce, was
valued at $18,071,160, an increase of
5 per cent, in quantity und six per
int.   in   vavhie   over   the   previous
Huibl.nv Activity — Building
through western Canada is particularly active this year. Permits issued this year iu Winnipeg up to the
end of June totalled approximately
eight million dollars, as compared
with $2,412,950 for the first six
months of last year.
A scientist has stated that man
runs faster than woman. But it's astonishing the number of men who
don't take advantage of this natural
gift.
^WiViV.v.-,vvAWrtwW
B. C. ROOMS    I
Clem  lad Comfortable Room,  «c
Hot and Cold Water 5
0c per Night
Durick  Ave., opp C.P.R. depot
Next   F.
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P. H. Dezall Oarage 5
ook, B. C. — Box 68 5
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LAKE
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I The Doris Construction Co. \
T. J. DORIS ■:
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35?
WINDERMERE
NOTES
(Special   to   The   Herald)
lnvermere,   B. ('.,   July   3.-  Thej
council of the Windermere  district
Board of Trade tendered a complimentary luncheon on Wednesday to
Colonel' J.  S.  Dennis,  of  Montreal,
Chief Commissioner of Immigration
and   Development  of   the  Canadian j
Pacific   Railway  Company.
Mr.  II. O'Connetl Moore, of Gold-
,n, provincial assessor, is In the district going over his  ground for the |
1027 assessment.
Miss Harrriet Sanborn, of Golden,
presided   ut   the   entrance   oxamina-
tions held in the district's consolidate |
ed school,
Mr. and Mrs. Vaughan Kimpton, I
of Keoma, ure in Windermere on ai
short visit, having motored in over
the Banff-Winder mere highway. Mr.
Ashton Powers, of Cranbrook, was
also a visitor for the day.
Mr. Charles Ellis, of Windermere, j
with   three of his  friends,  left on
Saturday by automobile for Spokane,
Mrs. J. L. McKay, or' Athalmer,
and her family have returned hero
for the summer.
The annual meeting of lhe Consolidated School  District of lnvermere
THE
NEW  HOTEL
Yahk, B.C.
J. MARKLUND, Proprietor
When In Yahk make four home tt
THE NEW HOTEL.
This Hotel li new from bottom to top.    Twenty-five nicely furnlihed room*. All ire clean
aad comfortable.
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the same skill ond precision of workmanship that have won such public acclaim
in the ChryslerM70M snd Imperial "80".
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ease and roadjhility—a score of fine car
features never before incorporated in any
cor nur the new li«hit*r Six Chrysler
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We are eager to number you with the
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Touring Car, *1535
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CHRYSLER 6a
Wilson's Service Garage
Jas. Mitchell
Dealer
Dealer
Cranbrook
Kimberley PAQE   FOUR
THB  CRANBROOK   HERALD
Thursday, July 8th, 1926
m Cranbrook Herald
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
MEMBER B.C.  AND  YUKON  PRESS  ASSOCIATION
r. A. WILLIAMS R. POTTER, B. Sc.
•obfcrlptKm Frito  SS.IK) Per tea'
Io United Slates  JS.50 Per Tear
Advertising Rates on Application. Changes ot Copy
tor Advertising ihoultl lie handed tn uot later than Wed-
Mtday noon to eecora attention.	
THURSDAY, JULY 8th,  1920
In
A PROUD RECORD
THE achievement of the Rod and Gun Club this
season in replenishing the waters of this dis-
omething that does the district
ahead with the blessing of of-
ndertaking, bul that does not go
v carrying out the work. The
istricl gave good support to tlie
tvever, and have seen it through,
of a tew who have given freely
of their time for tin* benefit of tlte district in general.
Much as the) have done, however, it is not so much
the actual achievement that matters, as the manifes-
tirit that lias made it possible. There
ess of the men in different sections of
work together for tin- common ob-
iio one's particular benefit, This, lo
is refreshing in this day of "everyone
ml indicates that humanity is not al-
*HE achieveme
, season in rep
trict with fish is
credit. They wen
ficialdom on their
verv far in actna
sportsmen "i the
undertaking,
thanks to tin
tatton "i tne
was a willing
the district t
jecl. and for
say the least,
for himself"
together |iasl
el.
IE   I Ml I'N
115  Bl
nli- Parlli
.AMI-  BELONG?
.rv   history   of   Canada
Will
"In the wl
there haa not heen a more anomalous nnd a mure ludicrous situation created thnn In the acceptance of government by the Right Hon. Arthur Meighen und the
formation of u "shadow" Cabinet by the appointment of
acting Ministers in order in curry on. With Inordinate
haste he chose to step In before thc corpse of the late
Government was cold, with a hasty and undignified rush
to obtain even temporary power. Happily the furce was
ended in the dissolution of Parliament."
Tl IIC above, taken from thc Lethbridge Herald,
seems to represent the Liberal view on tile recent developments at (Ittawa ,a
far the parti/an viewpoint can
of the facts of tlie case. The i
newspaper can seek lo mislead the people by adorn
iiiK the head of the leader of one parly with the hah
id indicates just how
dull an appreciation
ay is past when any
for doubt that it would have been granted. But it
needs little reflection to realize that to seek the intervention of the crown for political ends is decidedly uu-Hritish, which is, in effect, what the step of
the former premier amounted to.
It does not look as though Mr. Meighen was
greedy for power, or that he sought to step in
"before lhe corpse of the late government was cold,"
when liis first proposal after the former head of the
government had made his pronouncement in the
house, was for a proposal to confer with a view to
concluding the business of the session. That is not
thc attitude of a man craving to get into power at
any cost. Then it was that Mackenzie King showed
the smallness of his political stature by refusing any
such conference. "There is no prime minister," he
said. How then were tbe functions of government
to be can ied on? What provision did Mr. King
make lot* such a situation? Absolutely none. He
did not expect the governor-general to refuse his
request for dissolution, and in apparent pique threw
up tbe sponge, earing little or nothing, it seemed,
how the countrj  fared without a government.
This was tlie situation before Mr. Meighen
ever took office, Thc King government bad resigned because the governor-general refused to take
cognizance of a situation that the political prophets
foresaw was likely lo happen. When il was necessary to form another government, Mr. Meighen was
obviously tlie man to head it. and to attempt thc
formation of it. He could have rescinded from bis
firm attitude of no truck with the Progressives and
attempted lo barter his government along as the
previous administration had done, but did not follow
this course, and the majority of people looking calmly al tlie situation are inclined to admire his courage iu taking hold of a situation that seemed un-
lenable. Ilis government was beaten finally, not
on any matter of policy—a previous vote had rejected a vole of confidence on that score—hut on an
obscure point of constitutional procedure, the invoking of which only tended to deepen the confusion lhal existed.
Now it is up to lhc people to judge, and
since facts have an obstinate way of refusing to be
dislodged by barrages of talk, it remains to be seen
who will be adjudged the more desirable of the two
leaders lo Ining the country back to stable government once again.
*****
A  WISE  STEP
f \' making provision for some supervision of the
of divine right, and ascribe to%another all the evil
attributes of Iscariotism.   There is absolutely in, 1 community playground, the Rotary Club is carry-
getting awa>   (rom iln- facl   that iu thi*, particular   ing to a logical conclusion the effort made to provide
case, the person rcs| sible for plunging the country i such a  place.   The necessity  for  this supervision
into the maze of constitutional theory and practice,! was foreseen, and attention was drawn to the need
and tbe resulting contusion from the sudden end of for it in these columns when the playground was
the session of parliament thc man wdio precipitated ready lor use. Children's activities in play lime
.this unprecedented situation into Canadian politics is! need directing and guiding in right channels, just as
not Mr. Meighen, bul former Premier King. He iti they do in other directions, aud the institution of
was who when his government was facing a vote of supervised play will undoubtedly mean tliat all the
censure, ami when it was seen io be inevitable, I children get a great deal more benefit from the play-
sought the intervention of lhe governor-general toj ground than they otherwise would,
save his neck, and railed againsl the representative *****
of the Crown when dissolution was refused. Had "HUE two-cent postage has gone into effect, and
the former premier had tin- courage to face the issue I Crumbling George says that it lias one draw-
out, met hi, defeat in the house if it had to be, and hack—you cannot tell at the end of the mouth which
then appealed for dissolution, there is little room | are the letters aud which are the bills.
BONNERS FERRY
WIN FIRST GAME
WITH KIMBERLEY
Wednesday eveninE1 tho preliminary skirmish between the Bonners'
Perry baseball team and the K:mber-
ley nine took place at the Crnnbrook
A, A. A. grounds, when nn interest-
inn exhibition of hall was staged.
The Bonnets Ferry team had the
belter of the -encounter, and except
during tlie f i Tt li innings, were in the
lead   all   the   way. The   Bonner's
Ferry pitcher had the game well in
hand, except in the filth, when the
entire Kiiulierley team batted, and
five runs crossed tho plate.
Miline and Jacoby  opened   up  n
bombardment on Johcxm, both securing hits, and circling the basis, nnd
after Tlgglebeck had fouled out, und
Hydon struck out, Saunders and Collins not around the bases on hits and
errors, thus counting four runs.
Kimberley Settle Down
Kimberley started nwny with a
strike-out, n foul nnd nn out on n fly
bull. After the first Innings Johren
got his hook curve working right, and
the visitors could do little. Tingle*
beck, Collins and Chamberlain, however, found him for hits in the fifth,
the first two getting across, making
Bonners Ferry count six. In the
eighth, Espy, Miline and Jacoby scored,    lu this Innlngi Ttggloboch was
robbed of an apparent sure hit when
Mitchell, doing a hundred yards in
eight flat, not under the ball with
one hand, making a wonderful cntch,
Espy scoring after the bull was
caught.
Miline and Jacoby scored again,
Miline getting away on four called
balls, Jacoby making a hit. in the
ninth, Collins, after making a hit,
scored Bonners Ferry's tenth and
last run.
For Kimberley the fourth innings
was the bin innings, In this stanza
Mitchell, Crerar, Clnrk, Vaughan nnd
Thompson nil made the four bops.
No less than three were close decisions at the plate, Manager Sircim
protesting vigorously. It was claimed that one nt least was tagged on
the shoulders after men had touched
the plate. The 5th. Oth ami 7th were
scoreless. In the 8th Vaughan ran
for Johrens, who was hit by pitched
ball; Vouglinu scored on a hit hy
Rodgers. In the ninth there wus no
score, the final score being 10-0 for
Bonner's Ferry.
Not«   of   the  Gamo
In five times at bat Piper made
four hits, got to 2nd twice and third
once, but failed to score through
weak  batting after  him.
rennington hud an off duy with
the bat, fanning four times.
Mitchell n«»t a good haul when he
made the one-hand catch.
**************************
I   FORT STEELE
| NOTES |
**************************
Miss Nora Blander returned home
on Thursday for tiie holidays.
Mr. and Mrs. Nels Robertson are
occupying the Jenning's shuck.
Among those from Port Steele
visitinn Kimberley for Ihe 1st July
were Mr. and Mrs. Knight, Mrs.
Richardson. Messrs Cnrlin, Doyle, E.
Howard. A. Kershaw, E. Chamings,
Eugene   Brander.
Mr. and Mrs. White, Mr. and Mrs.
Cretney and family spent last week
at the Springs.
Mr. and Mrs. Burton and Mr. Mac-
Mustier were Cranbrnok visitors on
Saturday.
Miss Dorothy Hodgson left Crunbrook on the noon train on Thursday
for Seattle, where she is sending
her holidays,
Mrs. E. Howard and family spent
Sundny at Wasa Lake.
staying over Saturday night and returning on Sunday.
There will be addresses from various speakers in the evening and un
invitation has been sent to thc Minister of Agriculture or some repre
sentative of his department to be pre
sent and also representatives fi"un
the societies in this district.
BEER PETITION NOT
IN ORDER; BASED ON
OLD VOTERS' LIST
FARMERS' OUTING
TO INVERMERE TO BE
HELD ON JULY 3lit
It has been decided by the directors of the District Farmers' Institute of East Kootenay that a field
day will again be held at the Experiment! I Farm at lnvermere on Saturday, July 31st. Although this field
day is being promoted by agricultural
interests of the district, nt the same
time it is hoped thnt everyone will
take nn interest in this and if possible
turn out to help make the day a success.
According to the program as out-
lint d at present, everyone is expected to arrive at lnvermere ut about
12 o'clock. Saturday noon and the
remainder of tho day will be spent
on the Experimental Farm and the
district in general. Those who are
close enough to return the saint day
will in all probuhility do so but
those attending from the south, nnd
as fur north us Golden will likely be
According to an announcement
made at the CoaBt, the recent petition sent in from Cranbrouk asking
that the government grant a plebiscite fur the city on the question of
establishing licensed beer parlors in
Cranbrook, has been found to be out
of order. It is stated that the prin
cipal reason for its being put aside
is that in checking thc names, and
computing thc number necessary to
acquire the proper strength, the
1924 voters' list was used, instead of
the 11)25 list. It is understood that
well over the required forty per
cent, of the voters' names appear
ing on the li"1 were secured for the
petition. It is stated locally that
steps may soon he taken to get an
ether petition circulating correcting
the condition that rendered the former petition invalid.
Grand Forks is thc latest centre
where a beer plebiscite will be held,
the government having granted n
petition from thnt place to hold un
other vote on the question.
Take* Over Newspaper Routt
Mr. J. R. MacDonald, of Fernie,
who hns taken over Jack Cassidy's
newspaper route, wishes us to announce that he would be pleased if
anyone who has been in the habit of
receiving the following papers from
Jack would so inform him in casa
Ihey have been overlooked. The
names of some of these customers
he failed to get from Jack before he
left, so it would oblige him greatly
if those who have not been called
upon would let him know. The papers which he is now handling are
'The Saturday Evening Post," "Calgary Herald," "Lethbridge Herald,"
nnd the two local papers. Mr. MacDonald wishes us to express his appreciation for the patronage he has
already received from Jack's old
customers, and also thut uf many
new ones.
WINDERMERE VALLEY
PIONEER DIES AFTER
LONG PERIOD OF ILLNESS
Late C. C. McKay Had Colorful Career in Many Parts
of the Empire
(Special  to  The   Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., July 3—On the
afternoon of Thursday, the 24th ultimo, there passed from this world,
in which he had long Buffered) one
more of the old timers of the Wiudermere district, in the person of Colin
Campbell MacKay, grandson of the
late Lieutenant-Colonel Colin ('amp-
bell MacKay of the 71st Highlanders,
who was the then head of the Big-
house Mac Kays.
The latt Mr. MacKay wus born in
Sydney, New South Wales, on the
third day of April, 1850, After a
sound and ganerous education he
went to India, living I'or fifteen
years in Ceylon und Travencore,
where ho was connected with tea
und coffee plantations. Leaving that
purl, Mr. MacKay visited Burmah
and then home to Scotland. From
there, having iu ltt-Sfi heard of the
good things that were offering on the
prairies uf Canada, he took passage
and landed in the valley of the Qu'
Apple Kiver, wliere he engaged in
sheep raising, taking'prizes at different times at the fairs uf Indian Heud
and Grenfell.
In 1890 he first came into the
Windermere district, where he, nlong
with his cousin, James Grant Gordon, established himself nenr where is
now the estate of Firlnnds. That
!inme year, Mr. MacKay was married
in Knox Chureh, Calgary, to his fiancee, Rosina Mary Berry, who as
his widow still survives. In this pnrt
Mr. and Mrs. MacKay huve since resided. ,
In the long residence of over thirty-six yeurs, the late Mr. MacKay
has been the owner of many large
estates, included in the number being that which was known us the
Bighouse ranch. This, after many
visecitudes and changes in ownership, has finally become part of the
Dominion government Experimental
Station  to the east  of  Windermere,
In addition to his widow, the late
Mr. MacKay leaves two sons, James
Alexander, at present residing in the
state of Washington, and Colin
George, who is at home; also Mary
Iderway, the wife of Mr. James Butterfield, of Vancouver.
The funeral took place on the
morning of Saturday, the 2Gth of
June, from the Presbyterian church
in Wilmer to the cemetery nt Windermere.
stream and throw in a line and be
reasonably sure of a catch. For the
success thut has attended their efforts the Rod and Gun Club feel indebted to Mr. Ryder, the efficient
hatchery manager, who has worked
hard to put the local hatchery over
and who has succeeded in bringing
it to the high state of efficiency, demonstrating to many who did not
think that a local hatchery was
feasible that just as good results
could be obtained here as elsewhere.
Following is the distribution of
Cut-throat Trout fry from Cranbrook
hatchery:
Cranbrook District
Winderemere Rod & Gun .... 60,000
Fish Lake, Moyie   46,000
Moyie Luke  126,000
Cooper Lake,  Lumberton  .... 26,000
St. Mary's Lake  150,000
Munroe Lake, Moyie  125,000
Evans Lake, Marysville   10,000
Smith Lake, Cranbrook   15,000
Bartholomew Luke, KinibTy. 13,000
Garbett's Luke, Bull River.... 10,000
Lake  15, Wurdner   10,000
Mineral Luke, Moyie   20,000
Government, Vancouver  200,000
Fernie District
Four Mile Luke, Wasa  10,000
Smull Lake N.E. Premier ... 10,000
Following is the distribution of
Kamloops Trout from Cranbrook
hatchery:
Cranbrook District
Echo Lake, Skookumchuck....    5,000
Mineral Lake, Moyie, Moyie    12,000
Smith Luke, Cranbrook   10,000
Stevens Lake,  Wasa   10,000
Twin Lake, Cranbrook      5,000
Lund Lake, Wardner      5,000
Bartholomew Lake, Kimb'l'y.    2,000
Fernie District
Tie  Lake,  Jaffray    10,000
Horseshoe Lake, Bull River    10,000
Campbell,  Myers       5,000
Premier Lake  110,000
**************************
CRANBROOK BOWLERS
FAIL TO EQUAL KIMBERLEY PROWESS
A team of bowlers from Cranbrook met defeat at the bands of a
Kimberley team at the Bowling Alley on the night of July 1st, the
score being, Kimberley 2G73; Cranbrook 2431.
The teams were: .
Cranbrook—Total 2431
Towriss   112    157
Taylor   133    123
Morin     150    122
Tito   138
Dallas   115
Biggatinni   125
140
122
132
703 ' 7911 872
Kimberl.y—Total 2673
Griffith       93    174 149
Morella    159    174 178
Cheeco     185    208 162
DeTano   126    148 144
LaChapple   115    109 133
Pete      126    105 125
804    978
MILLION FISH FRY
DISTRIBUTED TO LAKES
IN EAST KOOTENAY
Below is published a statement of
the distribution of the fish hatched
at the local hatchery this year. To
have produced and distributed one
million fish means that the Isaac
Waltons of the next few yenrs will
huve just one million thrills more
they would otherwise not have hnd
but for the efTort of the Cranbrook
Rod and Gun Club. Figuring that
these fish are caught at and average
weight of one pound It would mean
that it had cost but one cent for
each ten fish. Members of the Rod
und (Jun Club, tourists nnd others
who enjoy u day's fishing, have every
reason to be grateful to the Rod and
(inn Cluh for their untiring work.
Today it is possible to go out and
Stop   ut   pretty nearly  any  lake  or
ROTARY CLUB ASSUMES
RESPONSIBILITY OF SUP-
ERVIZING PLAYGROUND
At last week's meeting of the Rotary Club it was decided to engage
in playground supervision for the
months of July nnd August. On
Saturday Miss Lois Lythrop, of Lethbridge, arrived and got busy at once
making arrangements for her work.
Basketball und volley ball courts are
being fixed up and the children's play
is being regulated, much to their delight. Under Miss Lythrop's care,
the children will have a great deal
more pleasure out of the playgrounds
and all their activities will be clean
and healthy. Before Miss Lythrop's
arrival it was noticed by many citizens that u rough element, not confined to the boys by any means, waa
rapidly dominating things at the
grounds, much to the discredit of
themselves and their parents who
were doubtless unaware of their actions. Miss Lythrop, whose home is in
Lethbridge, comes well recommended
in the work she is undertaking, at
present being a student in the Washington State University and Physical
Education. Parents can be assured
that their children will be under
proper supervision while at the playgrounds. Miss Lythrop's salary for
the two months is being assured by
the Rotary Club.
CAMP ON WARDNER
ROAD BEING EQUIPPED
VERY ATTRACTIVELY
Mr. and Mrs. William Rothwell,
who came to the district last year
from the vicinity of Malfort, Sask.,
have been fitting up the roadside refreshment place on the Wardner
road, eighteen miles from Cranbrook,
and this season have the place in
very attractive shape. They have
named the place the Black Cat Camp,
and situated as it is right on the
banks of the Kootenay River, It
makes a very attractive location for
a camping site. Their building haa
been finished in a truly ruitlc style,
with decorations and furnishings in
keeping with this scheme, and Just
outside is an open-air dancing pavilion which would be very alluring for
evening dances. Motorists will find
the place an exceedingly pleasant
place for a stop, and picnic parties
could go u long way to find a spot
more suited to spend a short outing.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Having secured the services of Mr. John
Sutherland, of Vancouver, expert designer and
cutter, we wish to announce that he will be in
future in charge of my Tailor Shop, on Norbury
Avenue. There we will be in a better position
to turn out tailoring in the latest cuts and styles,
and on the shortest possible notice.
Come in and  inspect our Summer Weight
Suitings and those famous Foxhound Tweeds.
Pontchartrain W. Willis
Norbury Avenue, next to the Star Theatre
Cleaning   ■  41 Cranbrook Street
TWENTY
YEARS  AGO
Extracts from the Isiue of      *>
Tha Cranbrook Herald of this     *
Data Twenty Years Ago.        *
The Cranbrook Electric Light and
Telephone Co. is planning a long distance extension to Fernie shortly.
Jas. Cronin, manager of the St.
Eugene Mine, stated this week there
was more ore in sight at the mine
now than there ever had been.
Plans for the new provincial government building, which may ulso be
used by the city, have arrived, und
work will be stnrbml on the building
as soon us possible.
The old steamer Echo haa been
raised from the waters at Moyie Lake,
and after being refitted will again
be put in service on the lake.
27   YEARS AGO
Last Sundny, ut 5,15 p.m., the firsl
train under tho new passenger service arrived from the east on litno.
Ten minutes ure allowed for changing engines before continuing tiie
run to the landing,
Rev. G. E. Smith, of Hamilton,
hns been assigned to Fort Steele and
Cranbrook by the Methodist Conference. The Presbyterian church will
be used for his services at present.
Trained Wild Animal Circus have
been schooled in courtesy to a point
where Toto, Mary and Prince, a trio
of elephants Prom the Heritage Brothel's' herd, give deep bows for the
thunderous applause thut greets the
finish of their act. Sir Tom, the
largest camel in the show world,
"humps" himself to please, and bo
goes this co-operation from the front
office to the back door, and in return
for this loyalty Heritage Brothers
transports this huge amusement enterprise on a special train of double
length steel railroad ears of Pullman
construction, a real palace on wheels
whare every convenience is supplied
for man  or beast.
Heritage Brothers' Big Three Ring
Trained Wild Animal Circus will give
a parade at noon with all the cages
open, and two performances are given daily, Dooi'B open at. one and
seven p.m. Performance ot two and
light p.m. Iteganllcss of the number
of shows thnt mny visit your city this
season, for ontortulninent value there
is none equal to Heritage Brothers'
Big Three Ring Trained Wild Animal Circus.
On Saturday, July 10th, nt the
Athletic Grounds.
HERITAGE BROS.
CIRCUS EMBODIES
BEST UNDER CANVAS
Heritage Brothers Big Three Ring
Trained Wild Animal Circus has an-,
noxed thc cream of the Wild West
Show folk, adding n band of Sioux ',
Indians, squaws and papooses, who '
furnish all the thrills of the far west,
as enacted by the famous characters
of the Days in 49—roping, bulldog-1
ging, cossack riding and the pictur-1
isque tribal'dances of the first Am-1
ericans. No feature of the circus,
world has been overlooked by Heritage Brothers to make this brand new
enterprise the outstanding tented
amusement organization of the world.
Heritage Brothers have no old cir-
cus title or name to sell you—-every-
thing is new, new name, new ideas, I
new fnces, new acts, nnd the policy |
"Our Customer Is Our Guest."
The ushers, ticket-sellers, sale agents
and in fact, the entire personntl of
Heritage  Brothers'  Big Three  King j
Just Arrived
Another large shipment
of Tires and Tubes from
our buying agency in
Winnipeg.
Tires 25$ off reg. prices
Tubes 30% off reg. prices
We Buy
We   Sell
We Trade
We Vulcanize
We   fluarantee  Satisfaction
Wilson's
Vulcanizing
Works
Cranbrook   and   Kimberley
ONLY   BIG   CIRCUS   THIS   SEASON
HERITAGE BROTHERS
R I C   ?   RINT
WILD ANIMAL CIRCUS
  CRANBROOK 	
P H » OS *N
3R//VOS
| huge sreei arena..
IAA TRAINED WILD
IUU ANIMAL ACT5
SOFUNNV CLOWNS
I BANDotSIOUXMl ANS
\BIO WILD UltfS T
IOOCIRCUS  ACTS
BTfi^ZOO
* OailtiStiect Hi.iidcdCHiKit
sXoisopnJatf-sim,z»it3
Sat., July 10
A Peerless Program of
Pre-Eminent Performers —
300 people, 200 finest horses,
Herd of Elephants, Drove of
Camels. A complete circus
program of Startling Circus
Sensations, offering scores
of lady and gentlemen riders,
acrobats, gymnasts and aeri
alists, together with the
largest collection of wild
beasts ever embraced in a
single exhibition.
— CIRCUS (1ROUNDS —
ATHLETIC FIELD
ffffffffffffi■ffffffffffffffff ffff .ffffffffffffffffff
PREVENT
FOREST
FIRES
YOU CAN
HELP
B. C. FOREST SERVICE Thursday, July 8th, 1926
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
PAQE   PI V E
A number of the Trail Ranger
groups, including boys from different
churches, have gone into camp at
Aldridge, with Rev. M. Blackburn in
charge.
-i    -I-   +
Thc first open air service planned
by the Ministerial Association will be
held next Sunday in the Community
Playground at H.3U p.m. An orchestra will help in the Binging of
several old familiar hymns. Mr.
Clnrk, of the "Y," 1ms arranged tin1
musical pari of the service, while
Capt. Stobbnrtj uf tho Salvation Army
will lead tho Blnglllg. The address
will bo riven by Kev. W T. Taps-
coll, tho subject being, "The Joy of
Finding tho Lo8t(" Kev. Bryce Wallace, u( the United Church will be iu
charge of tho Service. As this sort
of gathering is something of au experiment here, it is hoped that those
who believe in open-air preaching
will support it by their presence The
non-churchgoer will have an opportunity also of seeing and hearing the
present-day church nt work.
+     +     T
To lose the Sabbath would rob life
of thc influence of the most potent
and most wholesome purifying
agency known to the world. Yet
many are consciously, or, unconsciously, trying to prevent this influence being felt. This most important matter of Sunday observance
will be dealt with on July 22, by
Rev. W. A. Lewis, of Calgary, who
comes on that date under the auspices
of tho Lord's Day Alliance.
+■   +   +
Rev. W. T. Tapscott has been taking the combined services of the Baptist ami the Presbyterian congregations during Hev. Blackburn's vacation. Speaking last Sunday evening
on the "Annmoly of the Christian
Life," he said in part: "Ocean voyagers tell us that they hnvo seen mountains of ice floating south, though
the wind wns blowing steadily in the
opposite direction. This is of course
because that the greater part of the
iceberg is under water, and the berg
is caught by the undercurrent, and
not affected by thc wind. So, too,
seems the Christian life. It is u
paradox. This is what the Apostle
Paul meant when he said: "As deceivers, and yet true; as unknown,
and yet known; ns dying, and behold
we live; as sorrowful, yet always rejoicing; as poor, yet making mnny
rich; as having nothing, yet possess
ing all things." (2 Cor.:6-8). This
is the Christian experience. To the
non-Christian, the Christian is a
riddle, for he possesses a dynamic
which cannot be explained by ordin-
nry hypothesis. How is it that the
Christian man can keep his temper
under circumstances which would
drive some people into insanity?
How can they be cheerful and resigned under trials that would crush
ordinary mortals? This was the
quest ion of the prisoners in the jail
at I'billipi, when thoy beard Paul and
Silas singing, while their feet were
in the stocks and while their backs
were cut aud bleeding from the
scourging."
The preacher maintained that it
is every Christian's duly to hit happy.
This happiness comes from seeking
joy in the right direction. Life's
true wealth is not money. This has
witigs. Nor yet heulth, for thia is
an uncertain quantity. Not yet
friends, for they are sometimes
fickle; nor yet in sensual delights, for
as we grasp th4 flower the bloom is
fled. Permanent joy can only be
erected on a solid base. A living
and loving Saviour making His home
in our hearts, is thc only unfailing
source, lt is Christ in you, who is
the hope of glory.
+   +   +
The churches welcome the coming
of Miss Lathrop, who is taking charge
of the playground. Neither the
churches nor the schools, nor even
the home, determine the character of
the child as much as how its recreational life is spent. Good equipment
without direction upon its use, is like
putting good tools into the hands of
an untrained mechanic. The Rotarians are to be complimented upon
this additional act of service in securing Miss Lathrop as director of
the playground.
LAKE
WINDERMERE!
NOTES
(Special to The Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., July 7.—Mrs. F.
P. Armstrong, of Victoria, B.C., who
has been spending some weeks with
her daughters, Miss Armstrong and
Miss Ruth Armstrong, at the C.P.R.
bungalow camps, at Radium Hot
Springs and Lake Windermere, mo-
tort d over the Banff-Windermere
highway   this   week   and   returned
■ ■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■
lit*
i^m
J
/ /
©
V"»'""7
PANTS FOR NOTHING
PANTS FOR NOTHING
PANTS FOR NOTHING
Wc have been appointed sole representatives in
the Cranbrook District for the
J. I.. TAYLOR CLOTHING CO., of Montreal,
nnd in order lo advertise this High Grade Clothing
in ihis locality we have been authorized by them
lo give ABSOLUTELY FREE one pair of Pants
with each suit sold during the month of July.
To anyone who can prove that this is not a
genuine offer of PANTS FOR NOTHING, or
that our prices were marked specially for this
occasion, they can have the Suit and Pants
free of charge.
Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty
Bring Your Work To Practiced Tailors
MUIRHEAD & GUTHRIE
home by way of the main line.
Mr. W. H. Tompkins, of this
place, made a non-stop trip to Calgary by way of the Bantf-Winder-
mer<j motor highway and returned in
the same manner. His running time
each way for the 180 some odd miles
was approximately Seven hours.
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Diehl motored
to Crossfield, Alberta, last week over
the Banff-Windermere highway on a
visit to Mrs. Diehl's relatives.
Mr. Duncan Murray, of the Imperial Bank of Canada staff at
Trochu, Alberta, is spending his holidays here with his parents.
Mrs. Alfrod Mitchell, for many
years one of the best known of residents iu the vicinity of Brisco, but
lately u resident of California, is here
on u prolonged visit to her sister-in-
law, Mrs. Arthur Togurt, of Portroie
ranch.
PHONE 19
HANSON BLOCK
**************************
\ KIMBERLEY f
J NEWS NOTES f
— ■*-■*»■»■»■■»   a a   a   » 4AAaAAAAJ A AAA *%*%
TTrTTTffTW fTffTfTW ▼▼ ^T •ww
Mr. and Mrs. John Morrison and
family anil Chas. Morrison motored
to Calgary lust week to take in the
Stampede.
Mr. and Mrs. Bob Crerar and family motored to Yahk on Sunday to
take in the ball game between Kimberley and Yahk, in which the home
team were again victorious.
Mrs. Lloyd Crowe und children left
last Sunday for Grand Forks, B.C.,
where they are the guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Art Crowe.
Mrs. E. G. Montgomery entertained at a dinner party on Tuesday evening. ^
Mr. and Mrs. Art Lilly spent the
week-end at Premier Lake.
Miss Marguerite Caldwell, who has
been visiting in Spokane, for the past
six weeks, returned home Tuesday
evening.
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Warren are the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Geoff. Warren
this week, at McDougall Heights.
Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Fisher motored
to Fairmont Sunday, and spent tho
day at the Springs.
Mr. and Mrs. Boyd Caldwell and
Barbara Bpent .the week-end at Premier Lake.
Mrs. Evans, of Anyox, B.C., arrived in town on Tuesday evening,
and is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. F.
Fortier, of the Sullivan Hill.
Mr. and Mrs. Kilgour and son, of
Moyie, were visitors to town over the
1st. While here, Mrs. Kilgour wus
the guest of Mrs. E. E. Jackson.
After a pleasant holiday in Eastern
States, Billy Barr returned home this
week.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Green and family spent Sunday at Moyie.
Mrs. Doran and Archie, of Chapman Camp, are camping at Wasa
Lake. ^
The Holland boys spent Sundny at
St. Mary's Lake-
Leslie Hatpin, son of Mr. M. J.
Halpin, arrived in town this week to
spend the holidays with his father,
and while here ts employed at the
office of the C.M^A S. Co.
Mrs. Douglas Thompson is spending a few weeks holidaying with her
parents at Nelson.
Dr. L. Montgomery, of Montreal,
brother of E. G. Montgomery, was
a visitor to town this week, on his
return from the coast, where he was
in attendance at the medical convention at Vancouver.
Mr. and Mrs. Shannon und Mr.
Sanderson and party motored to the
Windermere country over tho weekend, spending some time fishing at
Vermillion River. They enjoyed a
most delightful trip.
Tom Wilson and Neil McKinnon
were in Moyie for a short time on
Sunday.
Mr. Watkins loft for Spokane on
Friday last, where he went to interview a specialist.
Mrs. E. G, Montgomery entertained at a delightful dinner party on
Friday of last week, in honor of Dr.
L. Montgomery, who was visiting for
a few days here,
Bruce Ritchie was in town over the
1st of July.
Mr. and Mrs. Lody and family motored to Fairmont Hot Springs on
Sunday.
Mrs. Frank Fortier entertained a
number of friends at tea on Wednesday afternoon, in honor of Mrs.
T. Evans, who is her guest for a
few days. A most pleasant afternoon
wus spent.
The Summers family motored to
Fairmont Tuesday, where they will
spend a week or so at the Springs.
Mrs. Lody and family leave this
Week for Kelowna, where, they will
enjoy the  holiday  season.
Jack Holland was a visitor to Cranbrook on Friday last.
Mr. and Mrs, Jack Holland, Mr.
and Mrs, Emmett Pierce and Miss
Helen, George and Pat Holland and
Miss Jennie Arbry spent a most enjoyable holiday at Fairmont over the
Ha of July.
Miss Johnson spent a few days at
Vernon last week.
Jack Heather and Bob Ridge re
turned home last week after a few
months spent in the Old Country,
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Carlson and
Iris were visitors to Cranbrook for
the day on Sunday.
Dr. and Mrs. David Hartin, formerly of Nelson but now of Spokane,
were visitors to town last week, and
while here were the guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Sam Alexander.
W. M. Archibald, of Trail, was In
town  for a day last week.
Mrs. Johnson, who was the guest
of hex daughter, Mn. C. Ghatson, last
week, Itft on Saturday for her bant
at Cottar*.
.Miss Corsan, of Fernie, is lhe guest
of Mrs. Atchison, McDougall Heights,
for a few days.
Dr. and Mrs. Davis and hoys spent
Sunday at Green Bay.
Mr. Slingsby, who has be.ji visiting
at his home near Nelson for some
time,  is back to  town  again.
There was a meeting of lhe Board
of Trade Monduy evening. The question of a playground for the children
was discussed, and a committee of
three appointed—Fred Willis, C. A.
Foote and Mr. Gough—to look over
a propostd site suitable for the purpose. Another meeting will he held
next  week.
A large number of citizens from
Moyie attended the celebration here
on the  1st.
Mr. Gough, of Reginn, who was the
lucky winner nf the car raffled by
the Gyros, returned this week tn tnko
possession of his new car.
Frank Carlson nnd Jim O'Brien
spent ii couple of dnys this week
fishinir at  Bull River.
Mr. and Mrs. Snyder, of Rosslund,
have moved to town and tire now
living on the Sullivan Hill.
Mrs. Tosh, of Rossland. was a visitor to town  this week, the guest of
a number of eld friends from Rossland.
Hatchery Man Complimented
(Continued from Page One)
there was the possibility that they
would not have the pleasure of the
services of Mr. Ryder for another
season. He then presented him a
very nice club, hag—initialed J, R.
in gold. Mr. Ryder, who was altogether taken by surprise, thanked
his friends for their kindness nnd
co-operation, ami he referred to the
ability of Mr. Whiting to carry on in
case he was unable to return,
Hai   Able  Assistant
Mr. Guimont, who was certainly to
be pitied tliat evening, he having forgotten about the dinner and filled up
on just a plain everyday meal at
homo, ulso added his tribute of praise
to the work of Mr. Ryder and the
association of the club with him. He
felt that much good hud been derived
by the club and the district through
his valuable services. He reviewed
the work which had been conducted
by the club during Mr. Ryder's slay
in the city. With reference to the
possibility of Mi-. Ryder not returning, he felt thut while he would certainly be missed, the club was fortunate in him having so tutored Billy
Whiting that he was now in a position to take his place.
Mr. Guimont brought up the mutter of the biologicul survt-j which is
being mude in this district, and felt
that when thc time came, the club
would not be lacking in furnishing
the necessary samples of the various
specimens of fish obtainable in the
district.
.Mr. J- P. Fink, nnoihw speaker,
also referred to the work that had
been accomplished, and paid tribute
to the peculiar ability of Mr. Ryder
for this work. Several matters were
brought up by secretary E. T. Cooper, which weie dealt with by the executive, the principal one of which
was the matter of thtj affiliation of
the Cranbrook club with that of the
associated clubs of the district. During the discussion, it was evident
that the work of the Cranbrook club
had been of such an outstunding nature, that the membqrs were anxious
that no step should be taken that
might deter future progress along
the lines already started. The matter
will he taken up at the general meeting to take place later.
Mr. Geo. Anton, one of the speakers, told a good story about how
Ryder und Whiting came'to get their
reputation for cooking fiab.
J. C. Lewis nnd R. Potter, representing the press, also spoke.
Elsewhere is published the result
of the season's work at the hatchery,
showing where the fish brought out
have been placed to replenish the
fishing in the various lakes of the
district.
TUNNEL WINS
FOOTBALL GAME FOR
KIMBERLEY CUP
Rain Fails to Stop Festivity
(Continued   from   Paffe   One)
holiday spirits were. The procession
finally reached Lindsay Park ami the
duy was away. It was not long before the great football game was on,
then the tug of war match, and this
followed by a  good   ball game.
With regard to the parade the
cars undoubtedly were not as presentable as they might have been on
account of having to stand out in
the rain during the night. This was
particularly true of the Gyro float,
which, on account of its high swings,
could not get in any garage in town,
An interesting feature of tho parade
was the presence of the daughter of
Indian Pete, who in a way was taking the place of her somewhat illustrious father.
Kimberley   Turns   Tables
After the exciting football game
between Tunnel nnd Upper Hill the
spectators settled down to sei the big
hall game, and were not disappointed in their expectations that a good
gume was in store.
Kimberley came off with the long
end of a 7 to fi score and led all thfl
way. In the first of thc Oth Bonner's Ferry gave them u little scare
when they got a hitting streak which
netted them four runs. Klmberloy
played a flawless game, while Bonner's Ferry seemed to be off in their
judgment of the ground balls, Jacoby getting several bn'd breaks which
had to go as errors. Bonner's Ferry
have no reason to be ashamed of their
defeat as it would take a good ball
team to heat Kimberley the way they
were playing. Fielding like Crerar
did in the 'Ith, or the hack catch by
'ennington in tbe 2nd, and his spear
in the fourth, or Peover's great catch
in the 8th followed by a fast and
perfect throw to 8rd resulting in
doubling up of Jacoby at 2nd on his
run back from .Ird, is something
bard to bout.
ln the ninth Pennington replaced
Mitchell, but not being warmed up,
Bonner's Ferry found him for several hits.
Though losing tho game Ileathe-
shaw was hit safely only three times,
first in the itnl by Musser and iu
the 5th by Rogers and Crerar, each
for three bases,
Espey, of Bonner's Ferry, carried
off the Babe Ruth honors with a nice
drive for four buses, scoring also
Sanders.
Crowe ployed errorless ball, scored
one run, was thrown out at first four
times. Bases were empty during
our out of five of his times at bat,
Crerar carried off butting honors,
making two singles nnd a triple in
four times up, driving in three runs
but was left on base three
times he hit, Penny, Peever and
Vaughan following him each time
having off doys  with  the  willow.
Mitchell played a star game, scoring twice himself
The sports which were scheduled
for the afternoon, both adults and
uniors, were called off for the day,
it being the intention of the committee to hold same on thc firs; opportune occasion.
Parade   Is   Held
In spite of the inclement weather,
the parade on Dominion Day was a
success, though undoubtedly smaller
than it would have been hud the day
been fine. Great credit is due to
those who were willing to go through
with their arrangements for helping
the parade, In spite of conditions that
made it difficult.
The order of the parade was us
follows:
Clowns;   Indian   Squaw,   (Indian
**********************************+***+^^^^^y.
G. W. V. A.   !
+
*
An extraordinary general meeting of the mem-      J
bers of the G. W. V. A. will be held in the      §
gymnasium of the f
RECREATION
CLUB   ON
Friday, July 16th, at 8 p.m.
sr the purpose of winding up the affairs of
the G. W. V. A.
! CANADIAN LEGION
I
£ A meeting of all ex-service men interested in
| forming a Post of the CANADIAN LEGION will
$ be held in the gymnasium of the
! RECREATION   CLUB   ON
| Friday, July 16th, at 8.30 p.m.   !
* Every Ex-Service Man in the district should make a *
I determined effort to attend this meeting. j
| The rijfht to criticize is by payng the membership fees ?
f and becoming a member.                                   £
| All Ex-Service Men will be heartily welcomed.      I
* I
Pete's  daughter);  Band;  Police,  VY.' teams were ns follows
Kilgour and W. Derbyshire; Sullivan
Hill    School     float;    kiddies'    float;
Woodlock, Rutherford & Co, float;
Kimberley .Meat Market float and delivery rig; K.A.A.A. Trophies' float;
Gyro Club float, Concentrator float;
Mechanical Dept float; Drilling.
Steel Carpenter float; Kimberley
Lumber Yard float; Staples Lumber
Co. float; Kimberley Transfer Co.,
ice float. Many decorated car?, Including: Mr. Hooper, Mr. 1'hil John-
Scandinavians — Oscar Stonberg,
anchor; Olaf Johnson, Ludwig Pnr-
Bon, A. Osland, A. Ltndmon, V. Asp-
hind. M. Parson, Charlie Quick,
captain.
Tnuuell — Y. Johnson, D. Silver,
Ben Tran, A. I.anse, Ole Olnes. Chris.
Hodgson, Lewis Almas. C. Cunningham captain.
At
Che
Evenin-j   Program
o'clock at night the hos
olet   Garage,   Kimberley,   race  was run.  which  proved
six cars; Sutherland Garage, Kimherley. five cars; Gyro car. pilot—Mrs.
Rutherford; Mr. Bill Green. Mr.
Lloyd Crowe, Mr. T, Summers.
an
reel
at
traction to many on the streets at
that lime. At night king carnival
held sway, and a right jolly time wns
had.
Prize Winners
The prizes for the best decorated
cars and floats were awarded a.- follows :
De
The cries of those trying to en-
veigle the lucre from the by-stai.ders
could have been heard in Cranbrook.
The committee in charge of the
stands npots a very successful even-
rated cars—1st, Phil Johnson, inK< whi!e a !arge nuniber patronized
Stur 1 sedan; 2nd, Harold Bernard. lhe dance which was he](] in the jQ
Star 0 coach. ' o.F.,   the   McKay   Orchestra   furn-
Decorated floats—1st, Gyro Club ishing   the   music,   which   kept  the
float; 2nd, Concentrator float. 'large   crowd   dancing   until, about
Best decorated bicycle—1st,  Billy   '.'. a.m.
Barker: 2nd, awarded to delivery rig      Al the dance the drawing for thu
of  Kimberley   Meat  Market. Star car which has just been within
Comic  vehicle—1st.  Tunnel; 2nd, reach   of   nearly   everyone   in   the
Mechanical  Department. .district for the last month, took plate.
Parade Judgee-Nichol  Thompson Mr- Niucho1 Th°mP*°n* from Vaneon-
and Bruce Ritchie. : ver, who was an interested guest at
the days proceedings, fcuperindended
Strong   Pulling   in   Tuf-of-W«r       the drawing,  teeing that everything
One of the most interesting tug-; was done in accordance with Hoyle.
of-war events seen in Kimberley for He called upon little Miss Crerar to
some time was the pull between the  puIJ out '-he lucky number, this prov-
Scandinavians     and     the     Tunnel,  ing to  be number  2259,  purchased
These teams, captained by Quick for by Mrs. S. G. Gough, of Lewon, Sask.
the   Scandinavians  and   Cunningham
for the Tunnel, threw into -he pull ***** to CI"r E*P*"««
every ounce of energy that they With regard to the success of the
ould summon up. For at least day financially, the committee are at
seven or eight minutes there was a [present unable to state just how they
dead pull and it looked for a while j fctar.d, It is hoped, ho waver, that
as though the rope would have to; they will come out with a balance
break before a decision could be ob-j°n the right side of the ledger.
talned. Finally the Scandinavians! Had the weather been more
wavered and the handkerchief gradu- favorable, undoubtedly the larg-
ally went in the direction of the Tun- **t crowd of visitors that have ever
nei line. Loud cheers greeted the been in Kimberley would have been
winners, several of whom were near- on hand t(J join in celebrating Cana-
Iv   overcome   by   the   strain.    The (da's national holiday.
One of the best football games
seen in Kimberley for a long time —
or in the district for that matter —>
was thnt played on Dominion Day,
for the cup put up, and for which the
Sullivan Hill and Tunnel teams were
the contenders. Both teams went Into
the game for all that was in them,
and football thnt was a real pleasure to watch was the result. The
Tunnel won 2 goals to 1.
During the first period the Tunnel
succeeded in notching two goals, the
firnt by Woods nnd the second by
Scott, off a robound from a Hill
kick. Just before half-time the
most spectacular play in the exciting game took place. The Hil! team
was making a drive on the Tunnel
goal, Muir, inside.right for the Hill,
kicked in front of goal nnd Martin,
jumping high, made a beautiful head
in, which thc goal keeper tried hard
to save, falling in some way to the
ground, where he lay prostrate.
Martin was also found to bc in the
same condition, it being some time
before both men were revived. The
second period was one grand attempt
by the Tunnel to score against an
impregnable defence by the Hill,
It is understood a large amount
of money was lost by Tunnel supporters in goal-lead bets.
There's Double Strength in
Dunlop Patented Tires
The high-grade service they render
is in keeping with the efficient attention of thc Official Dunlop Dealer.
DUNLOP
BALLO
TIRES
—0—
OP 4
C. A. BOTTRELL
AGENT  • CRANBROOK
Opposite Bank of Commerce P A 0 E   SIX
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
Thursday, July 8lh, 1926
MANY CRANBROOK
FOLKS HOLIDAYING
AT MIRROR LAKE
(From Kaslo Kootenian)
Mr. Lamont, accompanied by bis
two daughters, Miss Margaret and
Miss Rachel Lamont arrived Thursday from Cranbrook and will spend
the summer months here.
Miss June Nisbett arrived from
Cranbrook Thursdaj to join her parents, who are summering here.
Mrs. P. W, Green and daughter,
Iieanor, arrived here Thursday from
Cranbrook and will si^nt the summer
months at her beautiful summer
place.
Will Green, who has beon attending Brentwood College in Victoria,
arrived Wednesday night to join Na
parents who art Bpending the summer
here.
Creeks,   which   is   nbout   six   miles
south-east of Michel,  B.C.
TAKK NOTICK that The Consolidated   .Mining  &  Smelting  Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining nnd Smelting
Company  by   their  duly  authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley,   B.C.,   by   occupation   a
Mining  Engineer,  intends to  apply
for  a prospecting licence  under the
"Phosphate-Mining   Act"   over   the
.following described lands:—
I     Commencing at   a  stake  or  post
plaeed   at the  S.W.   corner  of  the
I claim  about   one  mile  south  of the
I S.W.   corner of  S.T.L.   613;  thence
'south   Si)   chains;    thence    west    80
ehains. thence north SO chains; thence
east  80  chains,  and  containing 040
acres, more or less.
Dated the ITth day of June, 1920,
D. C. McKECHNIE,
Signature of applicant or agent.
120    18-22
Province of  British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section .r>  CO.)
Notice   Ot   Intention   To   Apply   For
Pronpecting   Licence.
situ i'n rn Ibe "CbI side of Alexander
Cre 'i abou' • miles north of the
confluence .■ lexnnder nnd Michel
Cree! t,    ■ ■:    .i about   six   miles
sow-w;i-', ■ ..  A.,  ml,  H.C.
T.Mvl- ■■'DTK K .hat The Consolidated Mining tb Sm.Hiug Company
of Ctnudw, Ltd.. ot" Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupa'icn a fining J-nd Smelting
Compsny ov 'hiii fjlv . uthorized
agent Uir.tdd l\ wan H Ltchnie, of
Kimb '|Pj    ' *v    ''cupation   u
Mining -Hgxcc ..■'r.-.ds to apply
for a prospecting P-.nce under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over thc
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the N.E. corner of the
claim about three mile; north of tlie
S.W. corner of S.T.L.  018; thence
uth 80 chains; tlu nee west 80
chains; thence north si) chains;
thence east so chains, and containing
640 aires, more or less.
Dated the  ITth dav of .lime,  1926.
D. c. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
131     18-22.
Province  of  British  Columbia
PHOSPHATF.-M1N1NC ACT
(Section   5   (3)-)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply    Foi
Prospecting   Licence.
thence norLh 80 chains; thence east
SO chains, and containing 040 acres
more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
M0    18-22,
The fi>h an- .Mill biting well and
Mrs. Nisbett was successful in binding some very fine rainbow trout the
first time she wonl .mt fishing on the
lake.
Miss Betty Given, of Cranbrook,
who has Just completed her year at
McGill College, Montreal, and Blnce
then has been vivsiting at the coast,
is expected tn arrive this week, making the trip by auto from Vancouver
to Mirror Lake. She will be accompanied by her friend, Miss Crew-Gib-
son, who will spend the summer here
as house guest of Miss Green  who
is joining  here   parents here.
Province of British   Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section   5   (8).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting   Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the west side of Alexander
Creek about, two miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is six miles south-east
of Michel, B.C.
TAKK NOTICK that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company bv iheir duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKechnle, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phospnate-Minlng Act" over the
following described land-':- -
Commencing at  a stake or post
placed at lbe N.K. corner of tin- claim
one mile south of tbe S.E. corner of
S.T.L. Oil'.; theme south SO chains;
thence west. SO chains; thence north
80 chains; thence oast Hi) chains, and
containing 640 acres, .more or less.
Dated tin- 17th dav uf June, 1020
D. c. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
123    18-22.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the west side of Alexander
Creek about four miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
(looks which is nbout six miles
south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKK NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelling Company
or Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining aud Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKechnle, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation u
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed ni, the N.E. corner of the
claim about one mile north oT the
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 613; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north SO chains; thence
east so chains, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June,  192G
i). C. McKECHNIE.
Signal mv of applicant or agent.
127    18-22.
Province  of  British   Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (8).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply    For
Prospect ing   Licence.
In Fort Steele' Mining Division, nud
situate on the east side of Alexander
Creek about two miles north of tbe
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKK NOTK'K thai Tbe Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, Intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing  al   o   stake  or  post
placed   at   the   N.W.   corner   of   the
claim  one   mile south  of  the  S.E.
corner of S.T.L.   013;  thence south
80   chains;   theme   wesl   SO   chains;
thence north KO chains; thence east
80 chains, and containing tillt acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June, 1020
D.  C.  McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
124    18-22.
Province of  British   Columbia
PHOSPHATF-MINING ACT
(Section  ft  (Ii).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting   Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, nnd
situate on the west, side of Alexander
Creek ubout three miles north of tie
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which ll about six miles
south-east of Michel. B. C.
TAKK NOTICK that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence Under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lauds:—
Commencing at a stoke or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
claim about one mite south of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L 013; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 80
chains; thenco north 80 chains
thence east 80 chains, and contain
ing 640 acres,  moro or less.
Dated the 17lh dav of June, 1020
D. C. McKECHNIE,
Signature of applicant or agent.
126    18-22
Province of British  Columbia
Province  of  British   Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  ft   («).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting   Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the east side of Alexander
Creek about, four miles north of the
influence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
iouth-oast   of   Michel,   B.C.
TAKK NOTICK that The Consoli-
luted Mining & Smelting Company
.f Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized,
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation u
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described binds:—•
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the N.W. comer of tbe
claim about one mile north of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L, 013; thence
south SO chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north SO chains
thence east 80 chains, und contain
Ing 040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1026
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
128    18-22
Province  of   British   Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section   5   (It).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply    Foi
Projecting   Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the east side of Alexander
Creek ubout six miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is about, six miles
south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKK NOTICE that The Consoli
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a-prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a slake or post
placed at the N.W. corner of the
claim, about three miles north of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 618; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June, 1020.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
132    18-22.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the east side of Alexander
Creek near the confluence of Alexander and Michel Creeks, which is
about six miles south-east of Michel,
B.C.
TAKE NOTICK that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd.. of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their dulv authorized
agent. Donald Cowan McKechnle, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation u
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for ti prospecting licence under the
"Phosphnte-MInlng Act" over the
following described lands:   -
Commencing at 0 stake or post
placed al the N.W. corner of the
claim, about three miles south of the
S.W. cornor of S.T.L.  013; thence
south    80    chains;    thence    west    80
chnins;    thence    north    so    chniti:
Ihence east 80 chains, and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Duied the 17th dnv of June, 1020
D. c. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent
130     18-22.
Province of British Columbia
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  CD.)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting   Licence.
Province  of  British   Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the west side of Alexander
("reek about seven miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd,, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for tt prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stuke or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
claim about three miles north of the
S.W. Corner of S.T.L. 618; thence
south 80 chains; thench west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, and containing
010 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June,  1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
133    18-22.
Province  ol   British   Columbia
PHOSPHA IK-MINING ACT
(Sectlo.i :"   (8).)
Notice  Of   Intention  To   Apply   For
Prospecting   Licence.
In Fort Steele .Mining Division, and
situate on the west side of Alexander
Creek about one mile north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICK thnl The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their dulv authorized
oirent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation u
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate Mining Act" over tbe
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
claim, about three miles south of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 018; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; Ihence north SO chains
thence enst 80 chains, and containing
040 acres, more or less.
. Dated the 17th'dav of June, 1020.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
137   '18-22.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the west side of Alexander
Creek about five miles north of the
confluence of Alexander nud Michel
Creeks,   which   is   about   six   miles
ulh-eii.-t of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining At Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company bv their dulv authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phospnate-Minlng Act" uver the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
claim about one mile north of thc
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 6X8; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chnins; thence
cast 80 chnins, uud containing 040
acres* more or less.
Dated the 1 Tth dav of June,  1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
Province of  British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting   Licence.
Province  of British   Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5  (.'!).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Alining Division, nnd
situate on the east side of Alexander
Creek about one miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
I Creeks,   which   Is   about   six   milo
j south-east   of   Michel,   B.C.
!    TAKK NOTICE that The Consoli
; dated   Mining  &   Smelting  Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C
by occupation a .Mining and Smelting
I Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKechnle, of
: Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for u prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described  lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.W. corner of the
claim about three miles south of tbe
S.W. corner of tbe S.T.L 013; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chnins
thence east 80 chains, and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June, 192G.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
138     1S-22.
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting   Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, nnd
situate on the east side of Alexander
Creek about five miles north of the
('influence of Alexander aud Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
south-east   of  Michel,  B.C.
TAKK NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly nuthorizecF
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie. of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—■
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.W. corner about one
mile north of the S.W. corner of
S.T.L. 013; thence south 80 chains;
thenco west 80 chains; thence north
so chains; thence cast HO chains nnd
containing  040 acres,  more  or less.
Dated the 17th duy of June, 1026.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of npplicant ur agent.
180    18-22.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the east side of Alexander
Creek about seven miles ninth of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
south-east or Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their dulv authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
I'or a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a .stake or post
placed ut the S.W. corner of the
claim about three miles north of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L, 018; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence easl 80 chains, and containing
040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1920,
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
184    18-22
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5   IS).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting   Licence.
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section o   (3).)
Notre*   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting   Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the eust side of Alexunder
Creek ubout three miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Province of British   Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  ft   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Port Steele Mining Division, and
Province of British  Columbii
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section ft  (3).)
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate near the Forks of the Alexander Creek on the west side of the
main creel: about eight miles from
the confluence of Alexander and
.Michel Creeks, which is about six
miles south-east of Mtlchel, B.C.
| TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
lof Canada. Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
(by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie. of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation u
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—■
Commencing nt 0 stake or post
placed nt the N.E. corner of the
claim about one mile north of the
N.K. comer of L 8518; thence south
HO chains; thence west. SO chains
thence north 80 chnins; thence east
SO chains, and containing 010 net
more or less,
Dated the 17th dnv of June, 1020,
D, C. McKECHNIE,
Signature of applicant or agent
1311     18-22.
Notice  Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the west side of Alexander
Creek mar. the confluence of Alexander and Michel Creeks, which is
about six miles south-east of Michel,
B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
hy occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cov an McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phospnate-Minlng Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placet! at the N.E. corner of the
claim, about three miles south of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 013; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chnins;
thence east 80 chains, and containing
040 ncreM, more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1920.
J). C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
135    18-22.
Province of  British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
-itunte near the Forks of the Alexander Creek on the east side of the
main creek about eight miles north
of the confluence of Alexander und
Michel Creeks which is about six
miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining nnd Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
ugent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimherley, B.C., by occupation u
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for u prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:— |
Commencing at u stnke or post
placed nt the N.W. corner of the
claim about one milo north of tho
N.E. corner of L 8518; thence south
80 chain:.; thence west 80 chains;
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate one mile north of the Forks
of Alexander Creek on the west sida
of the main creek nbout nine miles
north of the confluence of Alexunder
and Michel Creeks which is about
six miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE thut The Consoli-
biled Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C
by occupation u Mining and Smelting
Company   by   their   duly  authorized
agent, Donuld Cowan McKeehnie,
Kimberley,   B.C.,   by   occupation
Mining   Engineer,   intends   to   apply
for a prospecting licence' under tin
"Phosphate-Mining   Act"   over   the
following described lands:—
Commencing at u stake or post
placed at the s.K. corner of the
claim about one mile north of the
N.E. corner of L 8518; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains
Ihence north SO chains; thence east
80 chains, uml containing 040 acres,
more or less,
Dated the 17th dnv of June, 1020.
I). C. McKECHNIE
Signature of applicant or agent.
Ml     18-22.
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a slake or post
placed ut lhe S.E. corner of lite
claim, about three miles north of the
N.E, corner of L 8518; thence south
60 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 60 chains; thence eust
80 chains, und containing 480 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June, 1920.1
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or ugent.
145    18-22.
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section   5   (3).)
Notice  Of   Intention  To  Apply   For
Prospecting   Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate one mile north of the Forks
of Alexander Creek on the east side
of the main creek nbout nine miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
and Michel ('reeks which is about
six  miles  south-east of Michel, BTC.
TAKK NOTICE that The Consoli.
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd.. of Kimberley, B.C.
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKechn'o. of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—■
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.W. corner of the
claim about one mile north of the
N.E. corner of L 8518; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains *
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, anil containing 040 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1020.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent,
142    18-22.
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section   5   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate two miles north of the Forks
of Alexander Creek on the east side
of the west branch about ten miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
and Michel Creeks which is about six
miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C,t
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized^
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the N.E. corner of the
claim about three miles north of the
N.E. corner of L 8518; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, and containing 040 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
143    18-22.
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Proipecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate two miles north nf the Forks
of Alexander Creek, and intersected
by the main creek about ten miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
and Michel Creeks which is about
six miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli-
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation u Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKechnle, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over thc
following described lands I—
Commencing at a slake or post
placed nt the N.W, corner of the
claim nbuut three miles north of
N.E. corner of L 8518; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, and containing 040 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of npplicant or agent,
144    18-22.
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence,
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate three miles north of the Forks
of Alexander creek on the east side
of the west branch ubout eleven miles
north of the confluence of Alexunder
and Michel Creeks which is about six
lies south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli-
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKechnle, of
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (;!).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply    Foi
Prospecting   Licence.
In Fort. Steole Mining Division, and
situate three miles north of lhe Forks
of Alexander Creek and itilersictcd
by tbe main creek, about eleven miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
mid Michel Crocks which '-' about six
miles Boutb-onsl of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICK lhal The Consoli
dated Mining tii Smelting Company
uf Canada, Ltd., of Kimherley, H.C,,
by occupation a Mining nnd Smelting
Company by their duly authorised
agent, Donald Cowan McKechnle, of
Kimherley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under lhe
"Phospnate-Minlng Act" over tho
following described lands:—
Commencing ,at a stake or post
placed nt the HAV. corner of the
claim, about three miles north of the
N.E. corner of L 8518; thence loiith
00 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 60 chains; thenco east
80 chains, and containing 480 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th dny of June, 1020.
D. c. McKECHNIE.
Signature uf applicant or agent.
140     18-22.
Province  of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5 (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply    For
Prospecting   Licence,
111 Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate four miles north of the Forks
of Alexander Creek one half mile
west of the main branch and about
twelve miles north of the confluence
of Alexander and Michel Creeks
which is about six miles south-east
of Michel. B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimherley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent. Donald Cowan MeKechni.\ of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for u prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
claim about three and three-quarter
miles north of the N.E. corner of
L   8518;    thence   south    80    chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, and
containing 040 acres,  more or less
Dated the 17th day ot June, 192Q
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent
147    18-22.
miles north of the ennflut l-'J0 of Alexander and Michel Crct H which is
aboul six miles south-cast of Michel,
B.C.
TAKK NOTICK thai The Consolidated Mining & Smelling Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company hy their duly authorized
agent, Donuld Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for n prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at I lie S.E. corner of the
claim about 101)0 feet west of the
N.E. comer of L 8521; Ihence south
80 chains; thoncc west 80 chains;
tlu nee north 80 chains; Ihence east
80 chains, and containing 040 acres,
more or less.
Dated Ihe 17th dav of Juno,  1020.
h. c. McKECHNIE,
Signature of uppllcanl or agent.
ir.o    18-22.
Province  of   Uritiidi   Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section r. (::>.)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   Fnr
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, uud
shuttle two miles north west of the
forks of Alexander Creek on lbe west
side of the west  branch  about  leu
miles north of (ho confluence of Alexander and Michel Cre&ks which is
about six miles south east of Michel,
B.C.
TAKK NOTICK lhal The Consolidated Mining &, Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimherley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at n stake or post
placed at tho N.E. corner of the
claim about 800 feel south of the
N.W. corner of I. 0443; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thenco east
SO chains, and containing 040 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of .June, 1020.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of npplicant or agent.
151     18-22.
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5   (8).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
-.-_       Prospecting   Licence,
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5   (;l).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting   Licence,
In Fnrt Steele Mining Division, and
situate four miles north of tht Forks
of Alexander Creek aud intersected
by the main creek, aboul twelve miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
and Michel Creeks, which is about
six miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli
dated Mining & Smelting—Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimherley, B.C., , by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described binds:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed nt the S.W, corner of the
claim, about three and three-quarter
miles north of the N.E. corner of
L 8518; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, and
containing  840  ncres more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June, 1920,
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
148    18-22.
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section fi (:!).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate neur the Forks of Alexander
Creek, one-half mile west of the west
brunch, about eight mites north of
the confluence of Alexander nnd
Michel Creeks, which is ubout six
miles south-easl of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE lhal The Consoli-
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining nud Smelting
Company by their duly authorhseu
ugent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation n
Mining Engineer, intends to upply
for u prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the N.E. corner nf the
claim ubout 1000 feet west of the
N.E. corner of L 8521; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chuins, and containing 040 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1020.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
149    18-22,
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6  (fl)-)
Notice  Of   Intention  To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, nnd
situate one mile north-west of the
forks of Alexander Creek on the west
Kimberley,   B.C.,   by   occupation a side of tbe west branch about nine
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate three miles north-west of the
forks of Alexander Creek on the west
side of the west branch about eleven
miles north of the confluence of
Alexander and Michel Creeks which
is about six miles south-east of
Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli-
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada. Ltd.. of Klmberlev, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimherley, B.C., by occupation n
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" uver the
following described lands:-—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
claim about 8Q0 feet south of the
N.W. corner „f L 0443; thence south
00 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north lilt chains; thence enst
SO chains, and containing ISO acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June, 1020.
D. C, McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
152    18-22.
Province  of  British   Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section ft  (;t).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply    For
Prospecting   Licence,
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate at the head of the first south
fork of Grave Creek and near the
heud of the west branch of Alexander Creek, about twelve miles north
of the confluence of Alexander and
Michel Creeks whicli is about six
miles south-east of Michel, H.C,
TAKE NOTICK that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada. Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
ugent, Donald Cowan .McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation it
Mining Engineer, intends to upply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over tlie
following described lunds:—
Commencing n1 n stake or post
placed ttt the N.E. comer of the
claim   about   2000   feet   S.E.   of  the
N.W. corner of 1. 0781; thence south
47 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 47 chains; thence east
80 chains, and containing 870 acres,
more or less,
Dated the  ITlh dav of .lime,   1020,
D. 0. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
158     18-22.
Province  nf   Brilitli   Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  ft   (8).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply    I'or
Prospect in R   Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate one-half milo south of Grave
Creek, and Intersected by tho first
south fork of the above creek, ami
about five miles east of Ihe confluence of Grove ('reek nnd the Elk
Uiver.
TAKE NOTICE thnl The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Cunada, Ltd.. of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized^
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation it
Mining Engineer, intends to upply
for u prospecting licence under tbe
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described hinds:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E, corner of the
claim about 2000 feet D.E. of the
N.W, corner of L 0781; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chuins;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, und containing 040 ncres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent
154    18-22. Thursday, July 8th, 1926
THE CRANBROOK  HERALD
PAQE  SEVEN
***************************************
a
Recollections of Octogenarian
Reminiscences of John Fingal Smith, of this city, as
Recorded by  Himself.
*********>****&**********^^
THE CIVIL WAR DAYS
(Continued)
The memory of tho American Civil
War to one of any mal ure age can
recall the names of men and battles
during the period from the outbreak
of the civil war, when John Urown
and his hand adzed the arsenal at
Harper's Kerry, stopped the railway
trains nud cut thu telegraph wires.
A conflict with the military ensued,
and Brmvn was captured, nnd with
his companions was executed,
The Preitdanti <>f Thoic Dny*
Buchanan was Lhe president uud
waa " democrat who inclined to the
Interests of the slave States. Thoro
Was ii grial mix-up In tho choice of
presidents. The republican national
convention selected Abraham Lincoln, the famous "rnll-spllttar." It
was during Buchanan's term the
first submarine cable wttg laid across
the Atlantic. The first message was
sent by Quten Victoria, conveying
congratulations to president Buchanan, the only message, when the
cable broke. The story of the cable
will take another installment.
President Davies was fleeted by
the secession Stales for six years.
President Lincoln staled that the
federal armies comprised 000,071
men. We were pompously told by
the press the debt would nol be n
"flea-bite" and thttt the rebellion
would he Burprossed iu three months.
Lonl Kitchener was more modest
when he said the lute war would last
at least three years, and it would
have but for the defection of Russia. Bul then he could nut "whip
creation."
~^     Ifc^QRATEDI
"    MILK
and 	
dood-alw-ays
fresh cows*
mii&t sealed
in can*
v^hferevei: the
recipeifQHis for milk
The first me0tins of Congress vot
ed Ihnnka lo Captain Wilkes for his
valorous act in taking the southern
cu mm Iss Ion ers, Mason and Slidel,
Irom the British puckot, Trent, ii
one of the West Indian islands. Th<
foreign envoys at Washington pro
tested against Ihis net. The federals
commenced to sink hulks filled with
stones tu block up Charleston harbor,
South Carolina causing much indignation in Great Britain, The daring
act of Wilkes was a dangerous attempt to trample on the Lion's tail.
Effect  on   Canada
Forthwith, twenty thousand troops
were-poured into Halifax. This insolence wns shown thnl a little more
than "whipping creation" was to insult the mistress of the seas.
1 .remember well reading in Frank
Leslie's weekly tin article written by
this braggart, whoso violation of the
British flag nearly resulted in a proclamation of war. But Lhe country
had providentially at its head a clear
thinking leader, one of the greatest
citizens the country has produced. A
monument to Abrahnm Lincoln is in
a prominent place in the city ef Edinburgh.
The titantlc struggle lasted for
nearly five years. Numerous deser
tions took plate, One of these was
a graduate of music from the Boston
Academy. I remember this well for
my knowledge of the gamut 1 owe
to George I. Moore, the Yankee. I
I have a tabic showing the nation-1
alilies of the foreigners who served ,
in the federal army. The Ilrish and
Germans were very conspicuous as
deserters, even after taking the $300
bounty. Even when Lincoln found it
nectssary to establish conscription,
the Irish in New York caused serious
riots.
On the other hand, the records
show that there were nearly fifty
thousand men from the British Isles,
and about the same number from
British America, Upper Canada, Nova Scotia,. New Brunswick and Prince
Edward Island, who were noted as
the biggest men in the army. This
is in mighty contrust to the spirit
shown by a certain class in the United .States when the inventor of the
Guttling RUn, who in a commercial
way was" engaged by the Dominion
government to show its action during the Riel rebellion. Me was so
abused nnd persecuted that he fled
from his native country, took refuge
where all refugees go, joined the
British Army and, luter, the poor fellow was killed in ibe Boer War.
A Cotton Blockade
The cotton spinners of Lancashire
were now deprived of getting.cotton
from the southern states. All the
ports were blockaded, and u strict
heck kept on contraband. This resulted in a famine among the cotton
spinners.
Thc British had a real grievance.
Louis Napoleon, Emperor of France,
a most unstable churacter, proposed
to Great Britain to recognize the
belligerent rights of the southern
states. Since the Crimean War Britain and France were in alliance. The
emperor requested that this be annulled, so that he could act freely.
But that wise woman on the British
throne, Victoria, of revered memory,
point blank refused. Yet no one in
history had iieen more viciously slandered than the British sovereign by
the American press. I have ii cutting
from the "Portland Oregonian" that
the United States inherited slavery
from Britain. The press of the United States is as licentious today as
it was in the days of Charles Dickens.
The blackguardly attack on the royal
family on the death of ono of the
noblest, kindest nnd best of women,
Queen Alexandria, is an instance.
Maximilian's Death
It was during the progress of the
war that another tragic event took'
place. It was at tbe instigation of!
our uncertain friend, tbe emperor of
France, that in 1864 French troops
■altered the capital of Mexico and
proclaimed an empire under the Archduke Maximilian of Austria. This
was u terrific violation of the Munroe
doctrine. The United States government ordered him to decamp. The
Mexicans were not satisfied with this,
but arrested the would-be emperor,
gave him the usual trial and sentenced him to be shot. He behaved
with great dignity, smoked his cigar
beside his coffin and grave, and refused to have his face covered. The
platoon fired and thus ended the tragic career of MuximMlian. His wife,
Empress Charlotte, became insane,
and lived for many yeurs never learning of the tragic end of her unfortunate husband. The fault of Louis
Napoleon was thut he deserted his
friend and left him to the tender
mercies of Americans und Mexicans.
LAKE WINDERMERE
NATIVE SONS STAGE
SUCCESSFUL DAY
Dominion   Day   is   Marked
Appropriately By Good
Program
(Special to The Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., July 3rd.—The
Lake Windermere encampment of the
Native Sons of Canada held their
first public celebration on Dominion
Duy on the grounds of the Agricultural Association and they certainly
did themselvus proud. The president's car, decorated from front to
Vear with Union Jacks and parti
colored patriotic bunting, was most
refreshing to behold, und did Mr.
Louis Hiehl honor.
The day opened with bright sunshine, but before high noon had come
around there wus a fine drizzle of
ruin which helped cool the air and
laid the dust, although rather bard
on the baseball team us it made the
grass diamond slippery. The sports
were varied, consisting of two innings of baseball between the hoys
of lnvermere and Athalmer, resulting in a score of six to ten iu favor
of the latter. Later in the afternoon
a friendly game was played between
a combination teum representing
Lake Windermere pitched against a
team of players from Spillimacheen,
strengthened by players from among
the local Indians. These rather
walked away from the home teum
with a score of 7 to 20. Dominic
acted as umpire. Whitehead, u pitcher on the side of the Indians, proved to be a winner. The local team
was shortened through want of practice and the unavoidable absence of
their regular pitcher. William McKay and W. C. Webster took a hand
at it, while Washburn and Reg. Bavin were catchers. Tom Alton, as
;>U plus X was a star player. Two
veteran old-timers amongst the spec-
tutors were placed hors de combat
hy heing hit by foul balls, but soon
recovered.
In the other part of the field there
was broncho busting, riding the bucking   s'teer   and   horse   racing.    The
vents   which   creuter   much   ainus^
lent and thrills were the pony races
r thc squaws.
The hospital  workers, under their
president, Miss  Kittle, were bus;,  tin
the grounds;  while some served tea.
others   dispensed   ice,   while   others
again   wens   tagging   for   the   g.
cause.    The gate receipts were very
encouaging.    Never  huve   so   man''
automobiles    been    parked    on    the
grounds as on tbat afternoon.
In the evening a piiy-as-you-enter
dance was given under the directln:i
of the Ladles' Association in aid ot
the Hospital, Brilliant lighting, cool
air, and bright costumes of the Indie.-
mude u most entrancing scene to
those who were in the bulconies.
( To be continued)
We notice thut the Aurora road is
11   under  way.     A  smull  crew is
already   employed   at   this  mine.
.Mrs.    Sam   Soutter   and   children
ere to Fernie over July 1st.
Mr,
party
Lloyd   Crowe   and   Kimberley
were Sunday visitors to town.
d Mrs. Kelly spent Sunday
Bay.
Mr.  ai
a Green
Miss Jessie Weir
Weir,  returned  fn
Saturday.
mil brother, B
n   Cranbrook
Mr.
Sat u r
Bo
Corn-
son.
George Smith
his  home  here.
Mrs.
July
Frank
Ird,   a
spent the holiday at
Mrs.
in   the
Frank
Cronbr
Guindon is
ink   hospital.
The dance Satur
ly well attended,
nishul   the   lunch,
given  by  Moyie u
ties.
lay night was fair-
Mr. Edmonds fur*
The   dance   was
id Cranbrook par-
Jim
Mullen
Farreli   has   returned
to remain at his* home
from
here.
WW
LUMBERTON
CHIPS
of ffff ffffffffffffffffffff.
TWO WEEKS' RECEIPTS
AT TRAIL SMELTER RE
FLECT MINES' ACTIVITY
1
2
both ends down*
ward In one quick move*
■want, breaking open  ear-
3
4
Hold both ondo of c.rton
togoth.r and ,h.k. out
numbor  of   pot.   r.quirad
Om. ter*eti  mt roplooo
In  rofrljorotofc
BURNS'
GLENDALE
CHOICEST^
PASTEURIZED
CREAMERY
BUTTER
O
A -   PAT
A    -   TIME
v
AS
NEro
TMKM
The Orange Lodge picnic could nol
he held on July 1st us planned, owing
to the weather, and wus postponed
until Sunday, July  10th.
Misses Florence and Gludys Downey returned home on Tuesday last
from New Westminster, where they
linve  been   attending school.
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Piper left for
the States on .Sunday. Mr. Piper held
the position of planer foiVman with
tlte B C Spruce Mills for several
years. Both he and Mrs. Piper were
Staunch members of the Luinbeiton
Club, and will be greatly missed by
tbe members. Harvey wus also an
enthusiastic baseball fan, and manager of the team. Their many friends
iu Luinbeiton wish them the best of
luck across the line. Harold Piper,
a nephew of Harvey's, is taking over
his  position us  planer foreman,
Mrs. IL P. Klinestivver spent several days in Spokane lasl week, returning on Monday.
Col. Leltch, inspector of explosives,
was a visitor here for u short time
on Friday afternoon, on his return
trip to  Vancouver.
B. Sternberg left on Saturday for
Culgary, to spend his vacation.
— ■■»
L. T. Dwelley returned Monday
mm ning ufter making a trip to Vancouver,
Lyle Klug, who was timekeeper nt
the mill for several yeurs, motored
up from Rose Lake, Idaho, on Saturduy, and spent the week-end in the
district.
Jack Khnens was a visitor here on
Monday. He was mill superintendent
for some time in Lumberton, several
yeurs ago, and is now locuted across
the line. He and Mrs. Ehrens were
on a motor trip, and dropped in at
Lumberton to see some of their old
friends.
Follow
ine is
a statements ore re-
i-eiv.-.l at the '
I'rail Smelter
for the
period ,1
une  1."
ith to June
:10th, in-
elusive:
C
OPPER
Allonby
Coppc
r  Co..
Allen!
iy,   B.I
. ir.su
MILLING ORK
Bluebell,
Rloni
lei,   B.C.,
. i .'.."..<
Itlnck Ci
ill. Sandon, B.C. ...
li
Colonial.
Kamli
m.  H.C. .
:17
foils IV.
ivlnce,
Zwicky, B.C
.  .   190
Bell, W.
I... Loi
lis Creek
t;.'i
.Monitor,
Throe
Forks ,.
23
Lucky J
iiu,   '/,:
itcton
.   1171
.Metals  1
tecovery, Retallack
120
Sovereign, Ala
mo  ...........
26
Wontlei f
ul,   Al*
iimo   	
       58
Stemwln
der, Ki
mberley
   12S2
Whltewn
ter, Re
tallock
491
Ilomesta
Duthie,
ke, l.oi
Smithe
65
rs 	
42
DRY
Boundary Merc
. A: Equip-
ment
Co., G:
reenwood ....
       14
Duthie,
Smithe
rs         	
       94
Gootleno
llL-h,   \
'mir  	
       53
McAlltab
er, Tin
ee Forks 	
     54ii
WILSON'S
FLY PADS
v WILL KIIL MOHt FLIES THAN
- $8°-°WORTH OF ANY
x STICKY FLY CATCHER     '
Clean to handle.   Sold by aU
Druggists, Grocers and
General Stores
Everything for the comfort and
recreation of members -seems to huve
been arranged, and there is no doubt
of the success of .the new undertaking-
After   The   Potato  Bug
Quilp, Republic     S36
Yankee Girl,
Mr. Donnys, of Salmon Ann, a
Dominion department of agriculture
entomologist, is spending aome days
in the Valley and with horticulturist
Twigg is making a fight ty end tbe
potato bug jn'st that has shown itself
at West Creston. Mr. Dennys bos
been in the Cranbrook district for
Beveral weeks and tin' potato bug ia
very much in evidence at several Bast
Kootenay points, Be la accompanied
hy Mrs. Dennys, whu Is a guest of
Miss Vickers.—Crepton Review.
CANADIAN IfACiriC
fSAILINGS
l;roni   MONTREAL-QUEBEC
To   Liverpool
July 10 Sept 10 *Montroyal
July 23 Aug, 20 Sept H     Montrose
Julv 30 Aug. 2": Sep. 24     Montcalm
Aug.   '"> Sept. 3 Oct.    i     Montclare
To   Belfait.   Glaigow
Julv 15 Aug. 1-  Sep:   9     Metagama
Julv £1' Aug. 26 Sep. 28 •Montnairn
To Cherbourg. Southampton, Antwerp
Julv 14 Aug  11  Sept. 8 .   ..  Melita
July 28 Aug. 25 Sep. 22    Minnedosa
To Cherbourg Southampton Hamburg
Julv 21, Aug. IS .      . * Empress of
Scotland
Aug. 4 Sept. 1   * Empress of
France
I MOYIE NOTES J
Mrs. Cameron spent over the weekend with Mrs. Taylor in Cranbrook.
Mrs. Shore is here from Saskatchewan visiting with her daughter,
Mrs. Annie Weir.
Miss Sadie Whitehead took Wednesday's train to Kimberley.
There are about eighty men employed here at the mill.
The Central dining room has again
changed hands.
Mr. and Mrs. Kilgour and family
are now occupying the Cameron cottage.
The finishing touches are heing
added to the electric wires about the
town.
About twenty or more Cranbrook
boys ure camping down at Aldridge
under the supervision of Rev. M. S.
Blackburn. The boys are right in
line with Moyie and are surely having
a wonderful time, what with swimming, fishing, boating and so forth.
Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell were motorists down froth Kimberley on Sunday. __
Mioses Violet and Florence Aglund
were in town on Sunday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. Young, tourists from
Manitoba, together with Mrs. Philip
Briggs, of Cranbrook, were in town
Monday enroute tn Bonner's  Ferrv.
Idaho.' _
Tom Horselin and party wore to
Wasa Lake on Sunday.
The Fator dance hall opens this
.Saturday night, the 10th. A Cranbrook orchestra will play. We are
ready to say that this hall is by far
the most inviting and largest hall
Moyie has ever provided. Mr. Fator
holds the best wishes of this community for every success in his new
enterprise.
Jimmy Campbell left last Tuesday
for Kimberley, where he holds a position as assayer for the Consolidated
company.
A shoe shop has been established
in Moyie. We wish all new business
concerns the best of good luck.
Dominion Day passed over very
quietly in our little town. Many
spent the day fishing, antl' again u
goodly numher enjoyed the day at
Kimberley.
Bailey Yuill is having his newly-
hought  property remodelled.
llr. and Mn. Jaases McCarthy kit
Ymir 	
LEAD
Penticton Mining Co.,
Penticton   	
Silversmith, Sandon  ...
Wellington, Beaverdell
Beaver,   Beaverdell  	
ZIN'C
Silversmith, Sandon 	
Company Mines	
121'
Total tons
..    172
18,811
28.1S4
KIMBERLEY ELKS
PLAN ON HAVING SO-
CIAL CLUB FOR LODGE
The premises in Kimberley recently vacated by J. Lombard! have been
leased by Kimberley Lodge, B.P.O.E.,
Xo. HO, and tastefully redecorated as
a clubroom for the exclusive use of
members.
The large room has been suitably
furnished with lounge chairs, card
tables and billiard tables, while in
addition a canteen has been provided, whore the members, it is expected, will be able to quench their
thirst with good British Columbia
beverages.
Mr. Roy Clemens is manager of
the new club, and thc house committee consists of Messrs. W. W, Parnell, E. Nesbitt nnd J. A. Booth.
SEE US FOR—
YOUR NEXT SUIT
Latest ity'ei 4 f»bri« $40-$60
H. C. LONG, Van Horne St.
REX CAFE
AND   ROOMS
—    CRANBROOK    —
OPPOSITE  DEPOT
L'nder  New  Management
CAFE-
Two   Doors  from   Baker   Street
(iood  Cooking - Prompt  Service
All White Help
ROOMS—
Twenty  Clean  and  Comfortable
Room-- — 50.  - 75c per Night
D.   E.   GUST IN
— Proprietor —
Dollars and Sense
Motor Car Chats
with Tom Greene
lc$cmc$c$c$emc$c$
A LOT of people
make the mis*
take of figuring motor car operation
costs by what they
pay for a car.
I'll show you that
it costs less to own
a Studebaker than a
lot of cars that sell
for less money. And
I have the proof.
DEZALL'S GARAGE
CRANBROOK - B.C.
STUDEBAK EJL PAOH EIQHT
THE  CRANBROOK  HERALD
Thursday, July 8th, 1926
■lllll'..; n .... '
I
•Specials
ENGLISH   AND
DRESDEN CHINA
Cups and Saucers
Cuke Plates,  Fruit Bowls
Marmalade Jars, Etc.
Insure with Beale & Elwell.
Mrs. Fred Scott is having the pleasure of a visit from her Bister, Miss
Pearl Sweeny, of Vancouver, who is
-pending her holiday here.
P, II. Worthington waa able to return home lost week from the hospital after undergoing an urgent operation for appendicitis.
Meet your friends at Smith bake
on Sunday next. Everybody will be
there. 20
Friends of Mr. L P. King, formerly of Lumberton, but now of Hose,
, Idaho, were pleased to welcome him
bach this week when he relurned to
i spend a   few days in the eity.
Martin Bros. Pay for Ashes,       tf.
From Victoria comes the word of
he appointment of Jos. W. Brault,
w practicing law at Kimberley, und
T. A. Martin, of Kimberley, us notaries public. The appointment of
John Lyle, of Kimberley, us a notary
hns ah:o been  gazetted.
George Huyzer returned this week
from Vancouver, and resumed his
former position with the Herald as
extra pressman. He commenced his
printing experience in Holland, but
has now been some time iu this country, and is glad to get back to bis old
tiade again in Cranbrook,
THEODORE    PADBERG,    piano
tuner,  player  expert.     Phone   502.
31-tf.
THE GIFT SHOP
A. EAELE LEIGH
I Mi
Tuesday on
In idgc, uliit
day visiting
decks, jr.
Mr
H. K.
a motor
Ihey wil
with  tin1
Jerks left Oil
trip to Uth-
: onjoy a holi-
r son,  II.  E.
K Watchninlur
Bi	
Jeweler
FAMOUS GUARDS BAND
TO APPEAR HERE ON
MONDAY, AUGUST  16
The band u
His  .11
ijesty's Cold-
Btro-nm Guards
Regimen
, fifty strong
will visit Crai
brook u
ider the uus-
pices of lhe K<
tary Clu
b, Gyro (.Tub,
the G.W.V.A.
md Elks
, on .Monday,
August   ISUi.
They   K
ill offer two
concerts, to bt
given i
i Anna Kink
ut'u-rnoon and
evening.
The Coldstn
mi Regiment ..f font
guards is tho
oldest  1
y continuous
existence in th
British
Army    It is
also the sole n
preacnti
iv,* by lineal
descent   ol   111
first
cfrular   army
v.'hich was ore:
,i.-..*.l by
Oliver Crcm-
wdl   under   lh
■  title
f llu-  "Now
Model."    A Cl
ilsl ream
band existed
Mr. Stephen Hcmbrey arrived on
Wednesday  from  England,  nfter  a
§ stay there of about two years.    He
Wl  is staying nt the home of his dough-
~   ter, Mrs. JI. 1.. Harrison.
BUI Robson, uf Cranbrook, is a
Fernie visitor. Bill snys he is doing
well in Cranbrook, the only thing he
refuses is wooden money.—Fernie
Free I'ress.
Look  for   Fink',   Ad.   Next   Week.
20
A C.P.R, telegraph gang has constructed a second wire from Kimberley to Calgary, which will much facilitate telegraphic business from that
point.
Miss Byrnoce B, St. Denis, who
has been in the employ of Dr. Rut
ledge, left on Friday by motor for
ihe prairie provinces) where she wiil
visit with her parents. She was accompanied as far as Elko hy Miss E.
Sinclair.
Wednesday evening Mrs. T, It.
Flett and family left for Medicine
Hat, where a lew days' holiday will
be spent. Misses Marion and Jean
are proceeding to Toronto, where the
balance of the holidays will be spent.
As soon as thc work on Baker
Street is completed, Norbury Avenue—among other streets—will certainly be eligible for similar treatment. Since the recent rains big
holes have appeared in the surface
of thc street, and driving on it haa
now ceased to be a pleasure.
Charged with theft and receiving
John Hugh McDonald was arrested
un Tuesday of last week and appeared before magistrate Leask when he
wus sent up for trial. On Monday
he came before Judge Thompson,
found guilty and sentenced on Tues.
day to iwo months in goul.
Look   for   Fink's  Ad.   Next   Week.
20
Mr. and Mrs. D. T. Diplock, of
Montreal, are spending a few dnys
wth Mr. and Mrs, R. Potter on then-
return from attendance at the annual
convention of the Sun Life Insurance Company agents, which this
year was held in Victoria. Mrs.
Diplock is a niece of Mr. Potter.
Mr. ond Mrs. Colin J. Campbell
left Kimberley last week-end by
auto for a holiday trip to New
Brunswick. Tbe outward journey
will be by way of the All-Canadian route, while the return will
be made through U.S. territory. The
tourists are trying out their new Star
car.
Wonl has been received in town
of the deuth of Beverley M. King, at
Moncton, N.B. Deceased was a well
known resident of Baynes Lake aud
Waldo, where he resided for 15 years,
and was owner of the Klk River
Ranch in the south country. Deceased, who was visiting in New
Brunswick, died on June ,'10. He is
survived by Mis. King.—Fernie Free
Press.
Ask
for
Big
Butte
Dairy
Ice
Cream
— (
rani
rook's
velvet
ice
cream.
16tf.
Ask for
Cream —
cream,
Big   Butte
'runbrook's
Dairy
velvet
Look  for  Fink's  Ad.
Nent   Week.
20
Look   for   Fink's   Ad.   Next   W«
in J742 hut military history does not
give us much information regarding
the organization until 1815, when
they had been augment) 1 hy tiie introduction of flutes, trombones and
key bugles. It then numbered twenty performers, With this composl-
tion, it was ordered to Paris during
the occupation  by tin   allies.
The present Director nf Mu.dc i>
Lieut. Robert ti. Kvans, who succeeded Col., Mackenzle-Rogan in 1920.
Mr.   Evans   served   with   the   Royal
Artillery   Band  at   Woolwich   as   a
violinist and comet player before he
was transferred to   the   Coldstream
Guards   Hnnd   as   a   musician,    lie
served fur a few year.-; with the Cold-
streamers before going to Kneller
Hall to qualify fur a band mastership.
After passing n very successful examination he wa< appointed bandmaster to the Highland Light Infar>| Mrs, Donenu, of Nelson, who is a
try nnd served with that Regiment daughter of Sheriff Doyle, and one
until he was specially selected toj time residents of tiie Kast Koutenny
form the Royal Garrison Artillery) section, has been in the city relicv-
Band nt Plymouth, a baud which was ing at the day commercial telegraph
well known to Canadians, and from office, while J. McLaine has been un
this hand he wns promoted to com-   holiday.
mission rnnk and transferred to the,     |t h m,(lil),y ~povlii(i that a dc_
Coldstream Guards. termined attempt was made to hold
The Coldstreamers are verv proud ■ UP tnc tWn Kimberley bank managers
of the fact that they were the favor- at Matthew Creek one day recent-
ite bond of the late King Edward VII '* The bandits* which werc two-
and also of Queen Alexandra, and the ! ™'and'bu^ ftXMS ft
Cranbrook Beach, Smith Lake, is
fast becoming the pupular summer
resort for Cranbrook and tho district.
More peuple each week ure taking
advantage of a short run and an enjoyable dip in the waters uf the lake.
Never before and  possibly never
again will yuu have an opportunity
!of   getting  such   bargains   as   Leigh
the jeweler is ull'ering for one week
I iu ch(naware.   Now is your time to
stuck up on the best. 20
For first class automobile repairs
see Ratcliffe & Stewart. ;i:itf
same may be said of King George V smaller one was new to the game
and Queen Mary.    Th'.z band  plays they might easily hnve achieved their
#«.. nii  ti,,. utm «..*«•- t„ „*.: u  iu«: purpose.     The   two   bank   magnates
for all the bg ncnti In which the *^Jwd  back  in town  considerably
royal family are concerned. t out of breath.    Those two robbers
Lieut. Evans find the members of  were certainly bears for money bags
the band, worthily maintain the proud   -^namon bears, in fact,
motto  of  th:  regiment,  "Nulli  Sc-      Special prices on new Batteries at
cundtiF." Service Garage.   Phone 34 lit
****************************************************
/ft
CANNING
SEASON
Among the visitors in Kimberley
for the big day were the following
officials of the C.M. & S. Co.: Mr. W.
M. Archibald, general superintendent,
Mr. Bruce Ritchie, assistant superintendent; Mr, Crowe, solicitor; Mr,
Hill Forrest, manager of farms; and
Mr. Nichol Thompson.
Kenneth Varnell, Herald pressman,
is spending this week at the Calgary
Stampede, leaving on Sunduy last by
cur. He was accompanied by his
mother, Mrs. Campbell-Smith, and
they travelled in lhe car of Mr. and
Mrs. Ira Smith, who recently arrived
from Detroit, Mr. Smith having come
ou u visit with his mother.
After three weeks on the Lethbridge end of the division, R, H. Dow
returned to Cranbrook on Tuesday
of this week. Mr. Dow says that the
prairie may be alright for gambling
in wheat growing, but for the life
worth while, give him Cranbrook.
Harold Haslam also returned at the
same   lime.
For prompt repairs and satisfaction go to Ratcliffe & Stewart'? gar
age. 20tf
Another change in the dairy business in the city has been effected, by
which the Standard Ranch, long in
Ihe milk business here, has rei in
qulshed the retail milk trade, and
disposed of their cows. Their customers are being taken over by the
Model Dairy nnd M. McCrindle, two
other dairies.
Administration of tho estate of the
late Mrs. Houlgrave, of Wilmer, has
been granted to her husband, Lieut.-
Comdr. G. Houlgrave, R.N.R., hy His
Honor Judge Thompson. The estate
is valued at $20,1182.48. H. G.
Loekwood mude the application a:
solicitor fur the administrator.—Gol
dan Star.
Another striking full-sheet poster
was this week issued from the Herald,
this being tbe announcement of the
Kiks' Kiddies Day Carnival, which is
lieing held on the last three days of
this month, Thursday, Friday and
Saturday, July 20, 30 and SI. This
is the third full-sheet poster in two
colors to be undertaken in the Herald
Ofllce within about a month.
Something unusual in the run of
ordinary printing was completed ut
the Herald ntTicc lust week-end consisting of a hundred sets of chureh offering envelopes, the sets of fifty-two
being for ench Sunday in the year.
Fifteen tons of steel work are to
be used in the work which Sainsbury
& Ryan now have under way at the
hospital, fur the installation of fire
escapes and steel balconies of the
latest type. They are to be uf ample
width to allow of patients being moved on cots in cases of emergency, and
can also be made use of at other
times. It is also stated that the hospital authorities are seriously considering the question of adding another
wing to the building, possibly next
year.
The Banff Springs hotel was opened last Thursday with 800 guests on
the first day, the largest opening day
in the history of this famous Rocky
Mountain resort. Thirty-two states,
It countries, and every province in
Canada, except Nova Scotia, were
represented in the guest list. The
opening of the hotisl constitutes a
remarkably speedy re-building operation following the disastrous fire
which took place there early this
year.
For the latest magazines and papers call at the Rex Cafe, near depot,
itf
The cup donated by Mr. Jack Sanderson, for competition among the
four Kimberley football teams, is now
on exhibition in Woodlock, Rutherford & Co's window there, Accompanying the trophy are individual
cups for the players of the winning
team. Mr. Sanderson is to be complimented on the spirit which prompted the gift, and Mr. D. A. Sutherland
will receive congratulations on the
design aud workmanship exemplified
in the cups.
The Baptist Sunday School picnic
lakes place on Wednesday afternoon
of next week, July 14th, to Green
Bay. Cars will leave the church at
1.30 ou that day to convey the pier-Jeers to their destination.
Miss Lorna Tite, who has been visiting with Miss Worden since their
return from Toronto Conservatory
of Music, is leaving on Friday for
her home in Prince Rupert.
E. ti. Dingley made a short trip to
Calgary the beginning of the week
and was in the Alberta metropolis in
time to see the big parade in connection with the Calgary Stampede,
which he says Is certainly a big turnout.
Mr, Malcolm Leiteh has moved the
office of the Fast Kootenay Lumber
Co., Ltd., from the Hanson Block
to the'former C, C, S. building on
Norbury Avenue. Space In the portion of the Hanson block which Mr.
Leiteh has just vacated has been taken
by W. S. Johnston for offlce purposes.
In the issue of lust week the name
lOtf, of Mrs. J, T. Sarvis should have been
given in pluce of Mrs. Marshall as a
representative from the Conservative
Women's Study Club to the recent
Conservative District Association annual   meeting.
Specials for Friday and Saturday
PHONES   93   &   173
BAKING POWDER
Blue  Ribbon Brand
12 oz. Tin  20c
PORK and BEANS
Llbby Camping Sze.
2 tins 25r
MARMALADE
Mn.  Haines'   Brand
4 tb , Orange .. 60c
CORN
Quaker   Brand
2 lb tin   15c
SALMON
Finest Sockeye Brd.
Large tin   40c
PLUMS
Green  or Blue
! lb tin: 2 for .. 35c
1000 Island Relish Spread
2 sizes     25c and 50c
Gold Medal Mayonnaise
2 sizes   25c and 45c
Walnut Quarters: Fresh In
Per lb   40c
Glendale Creamery Butler
in the new style package, four
quarters, each separately wrapped and enclosed in one carton;
the Ideal size for picnics: at the
same price, 2 lbs. for   85c
Man-Ring's   Orange   Pekoe   Ten
saves you 16c per Ib over the
advertised package nl
Per Ib 80c
WHAT ABOUT THE CIRCUS?
Fresh Roasted Peanuts;  tb   20c
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
Raspberries, per crate ... $3.60
Raspberries, per box   2 for 35c
Strawberries,   2   boxes      35c
Loganberries,  per ernle .. 3.60
Bing Cherries,  per eratc .. 3.60
Black Cherries, enite        .  3.60
Yellow   Trnnsparent   Apples
l'er lb .  ... .   ...  ISc
Hui-hiiune Tomatoesi   lb  .. 35c
Cucumbers, eiirh      ............. 25c
New   Pens,  2   lbs  for 25c
Carrot*,   Beatl  und  Turnips
il bunches 25c
Celery,  2   lbs  tor 25c
lee
MANNING'S LIMITED
Strainers
Kettles
Measures
Steamers
Fruit Racks
THREE REASONS WHY WE SHOULD CAN !
(1)    "To make ourselves healthier and better nourished;
12) "To provide a pleasing variety of succulent, tender
young fruits snd vegetables throughout the winter instead of
having then-, only during the few days ur weeks when they are
in full season;
(8)    "To save food which otherwise would go to waste."
otnpleti
line of nil canning supplies arc to
he found here.
DELANY & SINCLAIR
PHONG M P.O.BOX 499
***************************************************
.*. | This usually falls within the scope
JI of specialty printing,  but the time
*  wns not sufficient to allow of the work
being sent  away,  and  hence  it all
'had to be completed in the office here.
There will be u joint installation
uf tbe officers of Sullivan Lodge I.
O.O.F. and Kimberley Rebekah
Lodge, along with the officers of Key
City Lodge, I.O.O.F., nnd Maple Leaf
Rebekah Lodge, Crauhrook, in the
A uditoriuin, Crnnbrook, on Monday
evening, July 12th. All Oddfellows
and Rebekahs are invited to attend.
Tbe business session will be followed
by a social and dance.
The announcement made in this
issue of the meeting of ex-service
men to tuke place on Friday, July
10th, will be read with a good deal
of interest. On that date at 8 o'clock
a meeting of the G.W.V.A. will be
held for the purpose of winding up
ils business, preparatory to the proposed amalgamation with the newly
formed Canadian Legion. At the
conclusion of this meeting the provisional organization of the Cranbrook Post of thc Canadian Legion
will take place, officers being elected,
and other business carried out. The
meeting will be held in the Recreation
Club Imi Id ing, Armstrong Avenue,
which will give the veterans an opportunity of looking over thc build-
The Sunday School picnic of the
United Church held at Green Bay on
Wednesday was a grand success, over
400 sitting down to lunch. The organization wns complete in every detail and a most pleasant day for old
young was the result. The prize
winners will be announced next week.
Dr. and Mrs. W. A, Fergie returned on Wednesday of last week
from Winnipeg and Calgary They
motored tu Calgary where Dr. Fergie
attended the district meeting of the
Gyro Club, und from there travelled
hy train to Winnipeg, where he also
attended tbe Gyro International
meeting,
F. G. Morris left the end of last
week for the Coast where he *vill attend the annual training summer
school course being held at Vancouver. At the close of the course he
expects to return to Cranbrook and
may motor to Sceptre, Sask., where
Mrs, Morris and family have been
spending the  summer.
Mrs. F. M. MacPherson hud the
pleasure of a visit over the week-end
from Dr. and Mrs. R. L. Ross, of
Morris, Man., the visitors arriving on
Tuesday from Victoria where they
had been in attendance at the Canadian Medical association meeting in
that city. Thtjy left on Monday for
their hume.
Information drifting through with
regard to a game of soft ball played
at Marysville last night between the
Kimberley and Cranbrook Gyro Clubs
lead one ttt believe that the Kimberley team won. The Cranbrook
boys are out with a strong alibi that
unfair tactics were used by some of
the supporters of the gentler per-
stiusions from Kimberley.
Mrs. Loekwood entertained at
bridge on Tuesday of lost week in
honor of Judge Thompson. The
| guests were Mrs. Brady, Mrs. Shaw,
[Dr, and Mrs. Ewert, Mr. Fraser, Mr.
and Mrs. G, L. Buckham, Mr. and
Mrs. H. J. Clark, Mrs. W. J. Mc-
Rue and her sister, Mrs McLennan,
His Honor Judge Thompson and W,
A. Nisbet, of Crnnbrook, and G. S.
McCarter, of Revelstoke Mrs. Brady won the ladies' prize, Dr. Ewert
the gentlemen's, Mrs, McRae a special prize, and Mr. and Mrs. Clark
the consolation prizes.—Golden Star.
In the list of names of the successful pupils nl  ihe completion of
the Normal School year, at Victoria,
appears the name of Miss Ruth Sod-
erham, of Kimberley, and recently a I
pupil ut the Cranbrook High School.
It is announced that taking the two j
normal schools at Victoria and Vancouver together, there was a decreas- J
ed enrolment of 172 in both Institutions, and the passes this year were
127   less   than   last   year.
Writing to J, Fingal Smith, author
of the "Recollections of an Octogenarian," an interesting contribution
which hus been appearing in the
columns of the Herald weekly for
some little time past, Kev. T. S.
Glassford, of Alherni, Vancouver Island, who a year or two ago was residing in this city with Mrs. Glass-\°ro
ford for a time, indicates thut he, too, I ova
INSTALLATION NOTICE
A joint installation of officers of
the Crnnbrook and Kimberley Lodges
of Odd Fellows and Rebakuhs will
take place at the Auditorium on Monday evening next, July 12th. AH
visiting or sojourning members of the
order are invited to attend
The installation will be followed by
a banquet und dance, to which
friends are also invited. 20
Owing lo tbe rain lhal morning,
It was not possible for the Native
Sons to carry out tluir Dominion Day
flag-raising ceremony which wns to
have taken place at the Community
Playground Thursday  morning  last,
CARD OF THANKS
Mr. und Mrs. Parent and family
of Lumberton wish to extend their
thnnks to the people of Lumberton
for their assistance and many expressions of sympathy in their recent sad berenvment. 20*
Kimberley   Odd   Fellows  Officers
The following have been chosen to
can recall some of tho incidents oft
about three-quarters of a century
ugo, which have been referred to.
He says, "When reading your uC-j
count of the Russian War, I well r
member the first news wt
termination. ' 'Bastopol's taken,'
shouted a neighbor on bis way home
from the villiuge. Vour letters to
the Herald are to me very interesting leading, und I congratulate yuu
for placing them iu the paper for
the benefit of the public,"
fill the elective offices iu Sullivan
Lodge, No. :I5, I.O.O.F., for the ensuing leiin:
A. A.  Watkins   N.G.
W.  Carter           V.G.
Bro. E. Neshitt, P.G.     -.. Rec. Sec.
Bro. E. Lythgoe  Fin. Sec.
Bro. Dan Morrison  Treas.
Tbe date of the installation eere-
i wi-ii it- m°ny will be announced later. A
had of its iuillt Installation uf the Odd Fellows
and   Rebekahs
lodges  mny   be
with  the  Cranbrook
arranged.
WALDO GIRL MAKES
RESCUE OF MAN
TAKEN WITH CRAMP
WANT ADS.
BOOK-KEEPER-TYPIST _ desires
position; experienced thoroughly
in general office routine. Phone
No. 333, or Hox 1, Herald, Cranbrook. 19 tf.
Miss May MeKay, referred to in
the following clipping from a Vancouver paper, is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Billy McKay, of Waldo,
and is well known in Crunbrook:
Risking her life in the attempt,
Miss May McKay, nurse at the Royal
Jubilee Hospitul, rescued Mr. Andrew
MucQuire from drowning in Elk
Lake last evening.
Mr. MacQuire had been swimming
with Miss McKay and another young
couple. He was half way between
the diving float and the shore wlnu
he was tuken with di^uups. Miss
McKay, seeing his predicament and
hearing his gasping, swam to his assistance.
The young lady was dragged down
three times by the struggling swimmer before she could pull him ashore.
Although terribly exhausted from her
gruelling fight the nurse rendered
artificial respirution until further
assistance was given.
Constable Rankin, of the Saanich
police force, answered the call for
first aid immediately, later calling in
Doctor Denton Holmes, who declared
the man out of danger. Mr. Mac-
Quire was then removed to his home.
FOR SALK—Holstein Bull, coming
four years: also :it) Barred Roek
Hens. Apply IL Noyce, Kootenay Orchards. 20*
FURNITURE FOR SALK AND
Singer Sewing Machine. Apply
0, Friewalt, Slatervville, up from
D. Burton's, 20
CLEAN ROOMS TO RENT—by day
or month. Applv Mrs. C. Howard,
Herald  Building." IStf.
RESTAURANT     BUSINESS— Fur
Sule in Cranbruok. Good location.
For furtlier particulars apply Box
W,   Herald  Oftie*. 20-21*
WANTED—Poles, posts, piling, all
sizes. Quote prices, state shipping
points, quantity can furnish, when
could ship. Spot cash. Neider-
wergcr-Mnttin Lumber Co., Portland, Ore. 17-20
MODERATE PRICED Housekeeping
Rooms.—goud location, Apply to
Mrs. A. F. Roy, 1031 Pendaru
Avenue, Victoria, B.C. 20
TEAmTs-
TOILET SETS. DRESSERS AND
WASH STANDS, BUFFETS AND
DINING ROOM SUITES, SEWING
MACHINES, WASHING MACH-
the inks, TABLES, CHAIRS, REDS,
j BEDDING, OIL STOVES, ELU
GASOLINE
ing which may soon become their and take a run ont as we feel sure
permanent home in the city. that you will enjoy It
Mr. Slye, representative of the
P. Burns Company, hus been busy
the past week introducing to tbe retailers in his district the new butter
puck which his company have just
put on the market, called the Handy-
pats. This consists of a pound carton enclosing four saparately wrapped quarter pounds of butter. The
advantages of such a pack is readily
apparent, and will doubtless prove an
attractive selling point of Glendale,
the brand of butter that is being put
up in this way. See the big advertisement in this issue.
Wednesday evening a well-attended meeting of returned men took
place at Kimberley to discuss the
advisability of organizing a post
of the Canadian Legion at that
point. After considerable informal
discussion it was decided to postpone
definite action until after the meeting at which it is expected the Cranbrook G.W.V.A. will become a unit
of the Legion. At this meeting Major McDougall, Mr. Blatchford and
Mr. Bain will represent the Kimberley service men.
Sunday lust the evening service in
the Salvation Army Hall was in the
form of a welcome to the newly appointed officers of the Cranbruok
Corps, Captain and Mrs. Jumes Stob-
bart. This is their first appointment
since their marriage, which took
place last month ut Drumheller.
Mrs. Stobbart, formerly Lieutenant
M. Walker, comes here from Kum*
loups, while Captain Stobbart's last
appointment was at Kelowna, Comrades and friends of the Army here
extend a hearty welcome to these
new officers, and join in wishing them
every success in their work in Crnnbrook und district.
Sunday last Cranbrook Reach,
Smith Luke, was the gathering place
foi over two hundred of the citizens
of Cranbrook, whom, judging from
tho reports which we have had, enjoyed themselves thoroughly. Many I
who were there for the first time
wre loud in their praises of the ac-'
commodatlon which the manager, Mr. |
P. Eiigbright, hns provided. Last
Sunday the crowd somewhat overtax- j
ed his accommodation for picnic
parties but he is seeing to it this'
week that sufficient extra stoves,
benches,  etc.,  are  provided   in   the
meantime.   If you have not already11 one ^   0|||y _ Mon4|ay August 16th, under the joint auspices of the  Rotary  Club,  the  (lyro
ake, jump into your car I
Club, the Q. W. V. A. and the Elks.
Christian Science Jubilee
The    Christ ian    Science    mother
church at Boston celebrated on Sunday   the   50th   anniversary   of
Christian Science denomination.
Exercises  commemorative   of   thej COOKER,   OIL   AND
inception   of  the  body  on  July  -I, LAMPS.
1870, when  Mrs.  Mary Baker  Eddy!       Come in and look Ihem over,
and six others formed an organization j WILLIAM THOMPSON
called the Christian  Scientist  Ahso- i Pbaae 78       -       •       P. O. Boi 231
elation, will be incorporated in thej Second Hand Dealer
regular   services.     There   are   now; Cranbrooit
42,2fi0 churches.
j    We Buy, Sell and lixthange
The celebrated Coldstream Guards Band, who will appear at thc Arena Rink, Cranbrook,
visited the lake,

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