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Cranbrook Herald Nov 21, 1924

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Array THE CRANBROOK HERALD
VOLUME    2f
WEST-
packages
CRANBROOK, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21st, 1124
NUMBER  39
AUDITORIUProb"'cul UBJURr
TUESDAY & WEDwd^...       Apr '»»
November 25th and 26th
YRO PIERROT CONCERT
SONGS, CHORUSES, VAUDEVILLE SKETCHES
In Aid of the St. Eugene Hospital
RESERVE YOUR SEATS
at the
Cranbrook Drug & Book Co.
Hearings On
8 Hour Law
Lumbermen    Present    Case
Against Further Restrictions
of the Business
WORKERS ALSO HEARD
Tha sessions held last Friday by
the board uf adjustment under tho
Flours of Work Act, relative to tho
coming Into effect of the eight hour
law, wliich is fixed for the first of
Jununry next, created a good deal ol
interest, there being many present to
hear the question discussed by the
three commissioners. .T. I). McNWen,
deputy minister of labor at Victoria,
wns the chairman of the board, the
other commissioners being F. V. Foster and T. P. Patterson. The sessions
were to have been held in the
courthouse, but some cases being on
there, and there being a fairly large
attendance, adjournment was made to
the city hall.
Most of the local lumber companies
were present at the sessions during
the day and on into the evening, and
in addition Mr. I. R. Poole, secretary
of the Mountain Lumbermen's Association, was present to put the case
for the operators against the policy
of fixing the hours of work for this
section. Among the prominent lumbermen noted at the hearings were,
E. L. Staples, Otis Staples Lumber
Co., Wycliffe; G. C. Robson, late of
the B. C. Spruce Mills, Lumberton;
Mr. Barnstead, A. MacDonald Lumber Co., Galloway; C. M. Pennock,
Crow's Nest Lumber Co., Wardner;
C. E. Curran, Paulson-Mason Lumber
Co., Kitchener; Messrs. H. A. McKowan and \V. P. Attridge, Cranbrook Sash & Door Co.; and others.
Many representatives of the lumber
workers were also present and took
part in the discussions, advocating the
eight hour day without any exemptions. As in other places their affiliation with the I.W.W. was apparent,
and the questions they sometimes introduced seemed to be very wide of
the subject supposed to be under discussion.
Mr. Toole presented a memorandum for the operators, which summarized their arguments as to why the
eight hour law in this territory would
tend to the further restiction of thc
indUBtry( which is already in a very
unsettled condition. Some of the
conditions peculiar to the lumber industry in tho Interior of British Columbia and which severely handicap
the production of lumber in ihis territory Mr. Poole said were:
"1. Climatic conditions are such
as to make year around Operations
uneconomical if not impossible.
"2. Comparatively poor quality of
timber and scattered nature of stand
Of limber.
"H. Lack of local markets to absorb the lower grades of lumber and
mill refuse.
"I. Approximately Ho per cent, of
the production of interior mills is
marketed outside of the province.
The total production is marketed by
rail, and the hauling of lumber from
BOO to 3000 miles by rail to markets
is in itself n tremendous handicap.
"5, long distances from centers
of population and distribution. This
Condition renders difficult tbe securing of labor, skilled labor in particular, and adds greatly to the cost of
supplies nocouarj to the operations.
"The application of any measure
restricting the hours of work to eight
hours per day, or is hours per week,
would most injuriously affect the pro
gross and development of the lumber
IndUltrj in the interior of Hritish Columbia, and at the same time would
he detrimental to the interests of
thoiO dependent on said industry for
n livelihood."
Climatic conditions in the interior
are such as to prohibit woods and
mill operations during each month of
the year, Mr. Poole pointed out. Kx-
COStlVQ snowfall and severe weather
prevents logging in certain districts
during some of the winter months.
Again, lack of snow often hampers
nnd delays the transportation of logs
by sleighs."
Thc application of an eight hour
day to woods operations would seriously interfere with production, and
greatly enhance the cost of logs,'
While it may be true that woods operations for some years past have
been run on an eight hour basis,
meaning eight hours work for the
majority of the crew, yet to maintain
thc operations on an eight hour basis
it is necessary thut certain members
of thc woods crew actually work more
than eight hours, such as blacksmiths
and helpers, cooks und helpers, teamsters, men employed on locomotives,
donkeys and other machines connected with producing logs.
"The application of an eight hour
9%*$ to lumber manufacturing would
OFFICERS APPOINTED
AT SCOUT ASSOCIATION
ANNUAL MEETING
INCORPORATION OF
LOCAL OIL COMPANY
ALMOST COMPLETED
* * ***************** *
WEDDING
******* DISTR2CT FORESTER
1   LEAVING GOVERNMENT
SERVICE SHORTLY
There was not a very Luge
dance at the annual meeting
Cranbrook  Boy Scouts' Assoi
aboul n dos
V. H, C. A
last week,
the nssocinl
oner I
in alt guthorl
Thursduy e<
F. Scott, pn
nml oaslstni
ir Fast Koot
md F, C. Mi
the rbairni
iv ary.
The secret ary road a l'i
statement for the year, whi
adopted, Bubject to the custom
.lit. A number uf accounts
necliou with the summer car
remain unpaid.
A statement was read from Scout
master J. M. Clark regarding the purchase of troop flags with money loaned by the association, a balance on
hand of $1(1.50 being shown, which
has been received by the secretary.
Scoutmasters M. T. Harris, J. M.
Clark, li. L. Porter and F. G. Morris gave a short report of the standings of their various troops, and the
chairman gave a short ntldiess on the
progress made in the past year. He
thanked tlu scoutmasters for their
efforts, and suggested that a proper
board be eppoii ted to take care of
the tests require I for King's scouts.
Tlje troop at thc Baptist Church seemed a little weak, the organization
there apparently being a choice between the scouts and the tuxis square.
The scout camp had been a success,
in spite of la-k of numbers. Mr.
Scott also BUggeHted that a vote of
thanks bc accorded to Messrs. G. Salter and F. Constantino for their assistance at the camp, and also to Mr.
Mannell,.of Wasa. This was duly
carried out by motion.
Officers for the corning year were
elected  as follows:
Hon. Pres Dr. G. E. L. MacKinnon
Hon. Vice-Pres.     W. E. Warden
President   J. F. Scott
Vice President   W. M. Harris
Sec.-Treas.   C. J. Lewis
The district commissioner. Major
H. B. Hicks, called on for a few remarks, thanked the association for
their efforts on behalf of thc movement. He would like to see a large
annual summer camp ami bad urged
the provincial headquarters to send in
a man to help in the detail work of
scouting. The provincial council
wns to meet in Vancouver shortly,
and the commissioner asked for suggestions as to any matters which
might be brought up then, lie himself hoped to attend the Gilwcll sum
mer course for scout officers next
year.
Scoutmaster Clark brought up thc
f cheap .22  rifles of foreign
atten-      Further stepB have been    . • n dur-
if the ing the pas! fow days lowai Is the ul-
atinii. tiniale establishment in ibis city of an
ng ui. ihe j oil refining plant. The process of
'oning of Incorporation of the company, to be
indent of known as the Cranbrook oil &■ Re-
t district fining Company Limited, has been u!-
may was ^ most completed, the necessary papers
.iris see-j having gone forward to Victoria, and
| the formal advice of incorporation te
financial expected in a day or two. The first
viih board of directors were named at a
iu- meeting held on Saturday afternoon
sn- last, when the incorporation papers
till
******
•:•**•:■•:•
A -
■i\ i
The iitin
man Moure
a number c
NACLEHODGSON
luiet wedding was loien
the   home   of  Mr.  and   .Mis.   Harold
Staples, Sao Francisco, Cal., Dn Nov-   govern
ember 16th, when Miss Helen Moffatt [month
Hodgson, elder daughter nf Mr, am
.Mrs. A. W. Hodgson of iln i tty, wai
united in marriage to Dr. Hilton Al
oxander Nagle, younger sou uf Mr
A. W. Nagle, ut Nelsoi, B.C.   Rt ■.
.hum- Ho
formerly ■
of
allfori i
Mode
f tills prov:
iu tlie presence of a number of inti
mate friends of the bride and groom
were completed. I among them being several old Nelson
Messrs, K, C. Guilbault and Mentor j Hes: Mr. and Mrs. Turner Sr., M
und Mrs. Richard Turner {nee Mis
Gertie Annable), Miss Lottie Aniiobl1
Etnyre who have been connected with
the promotion of the company, have
been in the city during the week. The
former returned to Lethbridge on
Saturday and will be back again this
week, when it is expected that the
campaign for C raising of thc required capital will be put under way.
topic
manufacture,  whicli   i
found to be dangerous
was asked  to  prepare
the local pr£S8 in rcga
on te
l ihe i
I to this
wen
er. Hi
Re
R. C. Freeman spoke on
pott of thc work, saying    tliat
Work done by tbe scout troops
not be too highly spoken   of,
will meet with the
the  parents.       Rei
up-
tbe
ould
a in!
il support of
E. W. MacKay
ntioncd that among others Scoutmaster! -1. M. Clark and .1. C. Fmslu
were doing especially good work. He
fell that perhaps there was a lack of
contact between the boys and the parents, and something should be done
to bring the desired close) contact He
felt there should he a permanent sum
mer camp. Wherever thore is a
scout troop there are always mon
who are giving up valuable time to attend to the work.
HEAD OF LADIES' AUX-
ILIARY TO B. OF R. T.
VISITS CRANBROOK
Aii unusually interesting meeting
of the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen was
held on Wednesday evening nt the
Maple Hall, taking the form of a banquet and social gathering in honor of
two visitors of eminence in the lodge,
Mrs. Clara Bradley, of Columbus, Ohio, the Grand President of thu Auxiliary, and Mrs. Lenore Lee, of Edmonton, a past president of the lodge;
there. Members of the kindred railroad organizations had been invited
to be pres( nt, and tlie gathering proved an exct ptlonally enjoyable one.
Mrs. Bradle> gave a very able and
impressive address, and among the
other speakers were some from the
visiting lodges, Mr. Jack Beaton, and
others.
On Thursday afternoon at the
home of Mrs. P. Dallas, a tea was held
in honor of Mrs. Lee, when many ladies took the opportunity of meeting
the visitor and enjoying an exchange
of social amenities.
Presentations were made by the
local Auxiliary to the visitors while
here, Mrs. Bradley lieing given a silk
scarf, and Mrs. I.ee a piece of hand
painted china.      The presentations
were  made by  Mrs.   R.   W.   Leonard,
president of the local lodge.
The committee in charge of the
banquet on Wednesday evening car-
'ried out their plans most successfully,
| it is admitted on all sides. The com-
! mlttee consisted of Mrs. P. Dallas,
Mrs. R. W. Leonard, Mrs. P. C. Hartnell ami Mrs. W. Laldlaw,
Mrs. Bradley left on Thursday noon
for thc wesl, and Mrs. Lee travelled
east tlie same evening. Members of
iiu local lodge were at tlie station to
bid their visitors goodbye, the feeling
being that their visits had been most
timely and acceptable, Tlie enthusiasm of the member
found expression    in
Cliri«tm«i  Mnili  Per Overall!
Parcels and ..ther mail matter fm
delivery in European Countries BEFORE CHRISTMAS, should be mailed at as early a date BS possible,
PREFERABLY WITHIN THF NKXT
TWO WEEKS and at the very latest
to connect with the steamer Minnedo-
IB, sailing from St. John on December
Hh.
Friends of Mrs. 0. .1. Lewis arc
glad to learn that she is recovering
quite satisfactorily from her two recent operations at the hospital.
Returns From Extended Holiday
ncoment  that Mr. Nor-
listrict forester here for
vents past. Is leaving the
lent sorvli e Bt llu end of this
comes as a surprise tn many
>f bis fri nds,   Mr. Moore !> taking
i position with the B.C, Spruce Mil! .
t Lumberton, as I. eh i iroman,
I*. i      Succeeding him    » district toy (Bier
■ ■' here, Mr. C, I>. 0 -chard has already
i, urrived from Victoria, Mr, Orchard
1.1 ins been in the central administration
i-11 ranch of the forestry department as
b nie of the junior foresters.
1 ■ Mr, .Moore lias devoted much ener-
■ gy to his position, making himself
i j familiar with conditions in every part
'■ ] of    his    big    district    and    gaining
Risk and thorough Information relative to for-
id Mrs. Nu- est and timber conditions, In the
Francisco, f||*e season his position has not been
ing the pro- tla enviable one, permitting no limitations us to hours. Statistics during
; tin? past two or three years show that
| tlie Cranbrook district has become the
'third largest in the province mcasur
The Iloswell Memorial hall was the!e(1 by the extent of tlie lumborin«
scene Monday afternoon, November operations carried on, and the value
10th, of a very pretty wedding, when °* its ,imht'r P^iicte, Vancouver do-
Rev. C. Reed, of Balfour united In '•"» nn (':is-v fir8t' '""' Princo itu,,('rl
holy matrimony Harriet, the eldest second,
daughter  of   Mr.   aud  .Mis.   Andrew e~m~+	
Mi
Frieda Hume, Mr*
Bessie Risk. Mrs. a
gle will reside in San
where the doctor is practii
Cession of dentistry.
HUNTER-KENNEDY
(From  Lhe Nelson News)
Kennedy   of   Uosuell,   uoi   Wilfred WWW
Laurler, the eldest son of Mr. and 5
Un. ti. Hum,,-, of Lumber! In th. 5   MUSICAL SOCIETY
presence of over 80 guests.   The noil 5 ..—^.^.^
5j NOTES
ffffffffffffffffffffff
presence of over HP guests. The hatl
had boen appropriately decorated
with autumn flowers and foliage,
whilst a rustic arch of silver birch
logs, decorated with chrysanthemums
and erected just in front of the altar
sheltered the bridal party.
The bride, who was given away by
her father, wore a very pretty gown
of silver grey panne velvet, trimmed
with powder blu crepe and silver tissue. Her hat was of tlie same material, trimmed with gray ostrich fealh-
witli powder blue crepe and silver tis-
wore a black fox fur stole, the gift of
the bridegroom, and carried a shower
bouquet of pale pink roses.
The bridesmaid was Miss May Kennedy, sister of tlie bl >. She wore
a dress of turquoise blue crepe-do-
chene trimmed with silver beads, and
a hat of beach velvet ornamented with
the same material and silver tissue,
and carried pink carnations.
Little Miss Agues Grey of (.'ranbrook made a demure little flowc
girl, attired in a very pretty frock of
pink organdie trimmed with beuch
velvet ribbon and hat to match, and
carrying a basket of pink carnations.
The groom was attended by A.
Duff, of Wycliffe.
Mrs. Kennedy, the bride's mother,
was gowned in black satin trimmed
with cream lace, and a black velvet
hat, whilst the groom's mother, Mrs.
G. Hunter, wore a dress of black
crepe relieved with white lace, and a
hat of black and white satin. Miss
Jessie Hunter, tiie gloom's sister, was
dressed in brown crepe, with brown
of  the  lodge | velvet hat.
the following |    Miss Anne Allen, the bride's cousin,
id a
yWWAVWV.
"yell." a copyrighted composition the  wore a areM ()f „hrimp hati„
origin of wliich i> understood to have   Mack velvet hat.
•d to
ne local member of
Iieen trace
the lodge:
Wc we
Who nro wci
We are the ladies of tlie ll. R. T.
Arc we in il?        well I guess!
Ladies' Auxiliary •- Yes! Yes! Ye
The bride's gift tu the groom took
f i form r : a gold . nd pear' tiepin,
whilst the groom's git-.:* were, to th"
bride a black fox fur stole and muff;
to tic best man a gold tiepin, to the
bridesmaid a gold ami pearl brooch
und to the flowei girl a blrtlistonc
ring.
During the
Cf','
While in the city on Wednesday the
scholars of ihe high school were treat- j "O   Perfect   Lin
ted to a talk from Rev.Clarence Mac-1 Heavenly Futile:
Ktnnon,  moderator of  the   Presbyte-  sung, v.hilst Mrs
rian   Church   iu   Canada.     Principal brook sang as a
Porter look advantage of having thc j Sweet." Mis. W.
visitor, who is principal of Pine Hill nt the organ and ihe bridal parly en-
Collcge. Halifax, and a lending edu-|tered to the strains of thc wedding
catlonallst, in the city, to have him march.
ony  the  hymns,
,"   and   "Lead   Us,
Lead   Us,"   were
Norgrove, of Cran-
>lo, "When Song is
u Hepher was
giv
a short talk to the pupils.
How  It  Looks To Fernie
When one looks at the prosperity
of such towns as Trail, Kimherley,
Wallace and Kellogg, etc., where wages are comparatively reasonable,
thut is from $•! to $<l a day, and
where work is steady, aud compare
them with some of our coal towns,
where wages are from $7 to $10 per
day, and work is very occasional, we
are led to believe that the high wage
stuff is more or less of a snare nnd a
delusion. When W. R. Wilson, manager of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal
Co., offered his employees a five year
contract at fair wages, with every
prospect    of steady work,    he    was
On Wednesday of this week Principal II. L. Porter of the high school
welcomed home again Mrs. Porter,
who since the summer holidays has
been visiting in the east. Accompanying Mrs. Porter was Miss M. M.
Porter, who for some years hus been ' Iaughed and howled at in derision by j bled on the wharf to say farewell, and
a nurBc in Boston, Mass., where Mrs,
Following the signing of the register the guests sat down to a dainty
wedding breakfast. The wedding cake
which had throe tiers and was beautifully ornamented, was made and
presented by Mrs. t). A. Cray, of
('ranbrook. During the breakfast
Mrs. W. L. Hepher sang "Mate o'
Mine."
Capt. J. K. Calls proposed the toast
to the newly married couple which
wns duly honored with music, nnd Mr.
Hunter replied for Mrs. .Hunter and
himself.
Thc bride's travelling dress was of
navy tricotine trimmed with green
satin, and a hat of black velvet relieved with green salin, and a eont of
grey velour.
The majority of the guests assem
Porter spent two months previous to
returning home. Little Miss Evelyn
Smith, sister of Mrs. Porter, makes
the fourth member of the party as it
will be constituted this winter. Miss
Porter is contemplating staying for
thc winter to seo if the climate will
benefit her health, and Mrs. Porter's
sister, Evelyn will probably remain
Sherman and his hand of faithful! confetti was much in evidence. Ai
followers. To-day, with little or no the Nasookin pulled out for Nelson
work in sight, the men are beginning'three hearty cheers and a tiger were
to realize that he was not handing|given. Tho honeymoon will bo spent
them  a Hue of hot air.    No ono in! in Spokane.
this country is more interested in the In addition to the local guests
welfare of his people than Mr. Wil-[there were present from outsiil
son, hut when men refuse to listen to .points Mr. and Mrs. O. Hunter and
reason and common sense, they must Miss J. Hunter, Lumberton; A. Duff,
pay lhe penalty.   There is u limit to
here for n number of years, attending thu price that industry will pay for
school. coal.     (Fernie Free Frees)  )
WWW-VAWW.
The members of the Musical Socle
y are requested to be on hand ot
Tuesday evenings instead of Wcdnc-
day evening:: in future, for the regu
lur practices.
To Develop Big Oregon Plant
Mr. ii. C. Robson, formerly of tl
B. C. Spruce Mills, Lumberton,    ai
companied by Mrs. Robson, left o
Wednesday   for  the  Coast,  and  will
proceed from there to LaGrande, Or
egon, where Mr. Robson will superintend u big lumber plant installation,
the program for which will involve a
capital outlay of about a million and
a half dollars, and will take about fifteen months.
RESIDENT OF CITY
IN EARLY DAYS PASSES
_AWAY AT VANCOUVER
Word was received in tbe eity by
members of the family today, Thursday, that Mr. Dan Evans hud passed
sway suddenly at his home on Howe
Street, Vancouver, this morning, lie
had been ailing for some lima, and
the end had not been altogethei unexpected on account of his advanced
years. The lute Mr. Evans was formerly a resident of Cranbrook, and
had many friends here. It is twenty
years since he left to make ids home
tt the coast.
He leaves a wife and two children,
the widow being thc youngerdaughter of Mrs. M. O. Finnis, of thi* ci-
ty. Other members of his family by
first marriage are .Mrs. w. [..
\\ light and Dr. J. R. C. Evans, 0f
Brandon College, Mrs. E. II. McPhee
this city, Mrs. Bert Dryden, of
Believuo, Alta., and Mr. Harry Kvans of Vancouver.
The late Mr. Kvans had reached the
age of upwards of sevent) yea''-, in-,
terment is being made at Vuncouver,
CATHOLIC BAZAAR AND
DRAWINGS RESULT IN
PROCEEDS OF $800
The ladies of St. Mary's Church
arc again to be congratulated on the ,
success nf tlieir annual bazaar, which j
event took place on Wednesday last, j
After months and months of effort'
-n the pnrt of the ladies the success
is all the more appreciated.
The Knights of Pythias Hall was
again the scene of their activities, the
hall being arranged so that it represented^ a mlnature fair. The fine dis
play of wares of different descriptions made a pleasing sight. While
the crowd in attendance was not as
greal as lasi year, considering the
difference in conditions it was remarkably good.
The whist drive in the evening was
well attended al the conclusion of
which the lucky winners of the prizes were drawn for, Mayor Balment
being tbe master of ceremonies in
tbis feature. The following were thc
owners of tlie first ten tickets drawn:
1. Mahogany Eight Day Clock —
T. J. Dillon, Bull River.
2. Silver Plated Autostrop Shaving Set -— Mrs. K. Lodge. Cranbrook.
:t. Boston Cluh Bag --- J. K. Cardinal, Cranbrook.
t. Smoking Set — Mrs. Alan McDonald, Cranbrook.
5. Majestic Heater — T. D. Mc
Crea, Lumberton.
(t, Grandmother's Quilt (gift of
Mrs. L. Paquette) — P. W. Burgess,
Cranbrook.
7. Watercolor Miniature—A. Neuman,  Lumberton.
N. Ten Pounds White Honey (gift
0f ]i. .1. Murphy) — Mrs. W. H. Lewis, Crnnbrook.
P. Turkey —0. W. Patmore. Cranbrook.
in. Pyrcx Ovenwaru — Mrs. Be-
langer. Natal.
From the above it will be seen that
there was a fairly equal distribution
between the winners resident in the
city and those from outside point*.
While there were few members at
the church who were not in some way
connected with and contributing lo
lhe success of the undertaking, those
more directly responsible for the
same were as follows:
Mrs. R. J. Collins wa.< general convenor, and to her must be attributed
a large share of the credit for the
success that was attained. Assisting
her as convenors of the several com-
Opening New
Curling Rink
Rinks To Be Invited From
Outside Points For
Event
CURLERS ELECT OFFICERS
The enthusiasm with which the
curlers went at their re-organization
for tin- coming season last Priday,
when the annual meeting took place,
apparently was too much for thc weather man, who has since rescinded
from the stand thai seemed likely last
week to provide ice within a very
short time for curling and skating.
The meeting took place in the city
hall, Dr G. K. I.. MacKinnon presiding, and K. il. MacPhee, secretary,
recording tho business.
There were about twenty curlers
present and the first business was the
reading of the minules and receiving
the statement covering last season,
which was submitted by the secretary,
season  were elec-
! booths at the bazaar were:
i     Apron Booth—Miss Delia Greavt.-.
j     Woollen Booth—Mrs. H. Fisher.
Candy and Soft Drinks—Mrs.    H.
Doris.
Fish Pond—Mrs. J. Bertoia.
Kitchen L'tensils—Mrs. D. Ryan.
Tea Table—Mrs. Mackie.
Cooking—Mrs. J. A. Genest.
As a result of their work the sum
of over $S00 was raised.    While this
was not as large as last year, still the
ladies  are  more  than   pleased  as  it
came up to and beyond their expectations.
Imped* Dominion Governmenl Bid?
Mr. W. Brown of Victoria, wai a visitor in the city on Monday and Tuesday, and while here made an inspection of the post office building, looking over the recent repairs made to
lhe place. Mr. Brown is on the architectural staff of the federal governmenl buildings department.
Wycliffe; Mrs. O. A. Gray, Miss A
Gray, Mrs. .1. Norgrove and Miss F,
Chelmk'k, Cranbrook; Mrs. II. Irving, homu here for the present.
Wynndel; anil Miss A. Parnaby, Nel-
■i.
K. Wallace and It. Holiday Smith
were ushers.
Prom 7 p.m. until ".lu- early morning thc guests enjoyed music ami dan*
I in the Memorial ball. Mr-. .1 \
Norgrove delighted with st" i-ral
I joined Mrs. Hepher in the duet,
"Whispering Hope." Mrs, S. ll. Bher
lean played for several dances.
During tbe week-end .Mrs. A. Hepher entertained the groom, W. 1..
Hunter, and Miss A. Hunter, Miss F.
Chelmlck and A. Duff: Mrs. G. H.
Hartley enterlained Mr. aad Mrs. (!.
Hunter and Mrs. Irving: Mrs. W. L.
Hepher entertained Mrs. J. Norgrove,
Mrs. and Miss Gray.
UPHILL-BENNETT
Monday morning at Fernie an event of interest to many Cranbrook
people took place, when Miss Delph-
ine Bennett was united in marriage to
Mr. Howard Uphill, of that city. The
scene of the wedding was the home
of Mr. nnd Mrs. Thos. Uphill, Mr. Uphill, member for Fernie at Victoria
being the father of thc groom. The
wedding wns of a <|uiet nature, those
in attendance being Mrs. T. Uphill,
Mr. Bowen of Fernie, uncle of the
groom and Mr. Sam Bennett, brother of thc bride, The bride and
groom took the train thai morning
for Ciunbrnok, and are making their
Q-qftn i^iii 4ftw  *Vs-j I
'Coming Events
.' ..   i- ** i
1
t'ri.. Nov. 21: Ancient Order of Foresters' Whist Drive nnd I lance at
the K. P. Hall.
Friday & Saturday, Nov. 21 & 22:
Welsh Male Choir in Knox church.
,Tues.  &  W"dnes.7*Nov.  25 and 28i
!     Gyro Club Concert.
jWed. & Thur., Nov. 2(1 & 27: "Sin-
I     nets in Heaven," at the Star,
Friday, Nov. 2R: Shrine Club Dance,
I with Banff Orchestra, at Auditor-
|    ium.
Fri. A Sat.,-Nov~2H &2fl:"Lllles of
!     the Field," nt the Star.
Friday, November 2H: Missionary
Concert by Marion Oliver Mission
Band, in Knox Church schoolroom
at 7.30,
Wednesday, Dee. 8l Meeting to dis-
i    cuss formation of Burns' Club, at
8 p.m. in Y.M.C.A.
Friday & Saturday] Dec. 6 A 0: "the
Varsity Coach/' presented by hijth
school pupils, U th* Auditorial,
Officers for the
ted as follows:
Hon. Prea. Dr. F. W. Green
Hon. Vice Pres, R. F. Beattie
President       Dr. G. K. L. MacKinnon
Vice President ... W. M. Harris
Sec-Treas      c. T. Spence
Executive—Jus. Milne. W. F. Cameron, A. S. Ward.
Chaplains:  Rev.  F.  V.  Harrison  und
Rev, B. C. Freeman.
Umpires: T. M. Roberts. D. Halcrow.
Ice Committee: A. C. Bowness, S.
Fyles. G. B. Willis.
A strong membership committee
was appointed to bring in all the old
members and as many new ones as
possible, in this connection word was
received from the Elks Lodge tha*
they expect to put in two rinks of
seasoned veterans, and would put in
also ten new players providing the
due- for the latter were fixed by the
club at half the regular due-. This
OSsm -<*■**. kcvV-^d, thc dues being
fixed at $12 for the season for old
curler?, and $C> ior any who have never curled before.
The membership committee was
named as follows;
Jno. Martin D. A. Burton, W. F.
Cameron, R. J. Collins, J. P. McLaren, P. McK. Morrison, A. J. Ironsides, C. J. Little, W. J! Barber, W.
D. Gilroy. G. Sinclair, M. McCrindle.
The matter of making the draws
for the rinks also came up and it was
finally decided to proceed the same
way a.- in former years. The players
will be classified, skips chosen and
the players drawn for. The under-
staiiding seemed to be that there
should be the same privilege ai had
obtained in previous years of effecting exchanges on the rinks before the
Competitions open. In the matter of
getting the competitions started, it
wa^ decided to write to Mr. Sherwood
Herchmer of Fernie and get from him
the method of working out their competitions, by whieh they seemed to
be aide to maintain a higher pitch of
enthusiasm throughout the season,
Four groups of rinks are chosen and
each plays against every other rink
on a schedule arranged for lhe entire
lesion, ar.d play-offs are arranged
for the final championship-'.
, Alone with the movement to get
more new players into thc club, it
wa? decided to appoint a committee
of instructors, whose plnce it will be
to coach the new men on the niceties
of the game, and also another to instruct in points competitions.
Fernie having expressed u willingness to send down four or five rinks
for the occasion, it was decided if
possible to make the formal opening
of the new eurling rink "omething of
an event. Kfforts will he made to
get rinks from Bull River. Kimberley,
Wycliffe Lumberton. Etc., so as to
make a representative event of tho
opening of the new rink. A banquet
may also be held in connection with
the affair.
Addr-.ir. C.G.l.T. Workers
Miss Allison of the religious educational department of the Methodist
Church in Canada, who is at present
on a tour of the western provinces in
connection with this work, stopped
over in Cranbrook on Monday last to
meet the workers in the Protestant
denominations interested in the C. G.
I. T. movement and other similar endeavors. Miss Allison spoke to a
meeting in the Methodist Church on
Monday composed principally of
Methodist workers, while on Tuesday
afternoon she addressed a meeting of
all denominations in the city. Here,
as in other places, Miss Allison's addresses were of an inspirational nature, and much benefit was derived
therefrom. In B.C. the Methodist
and Presbyterian churches art co-operatively in this branch of their work. £ MM *we
TS!  CBANBEOOI   HftAX*
Friday, November 21st, 1924
KIMBER
d WYCLIFFE
INTERESTING ITEMS CONCERNING HAPPENINGS IN AND ABOUT THE BUSY TOWNS ON THE NORTH BRANCH, WHEHE MINING, LUMBERING AND FARMING INTERESTS ARE SUPREME
iiiiiiiiiuiitiiiiiiHiiitiniiiiiiiii!ii[]iiiiiiiiiiii(iiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiniiHiit)iiii
I     KIMBERLEY     I
MEAT  MARKET
"GOOD   MORNING,   Mrs. I
Brown, Can we -.end vuu.i
|
ni) a Nice Steak today?" §
I
|     WE CAN  RECOMMEND IT    |
I =
fi or our =
fi    FRESH HOMEMADE
I   KIMBERLEY   !
I NEWS NOTES J
»«4.-t*n~(-*n-*l-*i-H-^-i"!"l"H"H--l"l">i?
Bofore Hecldlue on tliat uew build-
log or that repair work see Geo. R.
Leask, tha Pioneer Builder ot Kim
berley and Cranbrook. 18t
I
SAUSAGE
I All   orders   called   for   are
| carefully filled and delivered
I BUTTER,  CHEESE,   EGCS,
; and  LARD  alwayi  in   Stock
I SWIFT'S    PREMIUM HAMS    |
D and BACON                     fl
uiinniniiiiiiiiitintimiiiiDiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiim
THE GLEN
KIMBRRLEY, It.C.
KIMBERLEY'S
LEADING CAFE
FIRST CLASS SERVICE
OPEN AT ALL HOURS
TABLES  RESERVED  FOR
LADIES
Your   Patronage   Is   Solicited
Mra, Hannay entertained at tea on
Friday afternoon.
Mr, Rutherford »f Calgary, is in
town, and Intends starting up in business in the mining centor in the near
future.
Mrs. Donahue roturned home tlu*
end of the week fom the St. Eugeno
Hospital.
Mrs, C. Cook, of McDougall, has
been spending u few days nt Cranbrook during the past wek.
List your property with Martin
Bros.     * 28tf
Arrangements have been practl-
jcally  completed  for thc showing of
the Cranbrook Gyro Pierrot troupe
j in the Orpheum on Thursday evening
i next, the proceeds to go towards lho
Christinas tree fund.
A community Christmas Tree is
being planned for the children of
Kimberley und no doubt this will
moot with the approval of all.
The Elks are putting on a big dance
on November 20th, in the Orpheum
Theatre. The Banff orchestra will be
in attendance. Admission will be
$1.51) per couple. This will be one of
the events of the season. Everybody
come.
On Monday evening, November 24,
the Elks are having a social for the
members <>f the lodge and their
friends, commencing at nine o'clock.
Dr. Wilson Herald, ear, nose,
and tin-out specialist, will be in Kimherley next week, and ean be consulted at the Kimberley Hospital on the
afternoons of November 26th aud
28th. .'10
MARTIN BROS. PAY FOR ASHES
Better see ihem und gut a fire insurance policy in :i strong Hoard
Company, before your turn comes to
check up ynur ashes. i'hone 14,
Crauhrook, B.C, 82tf
On November 24th, in the Orpheum
theatre '"The Trail of tlie Lonesome
Pine" will be shown. Admission will
Ue 76c. Fifty pel' COnt of the proceeds lo the Union Church. It is to
be hoped that as many as possible will
soe this picture,
BORN—To Mr. and .Mrs. William
Lindsay, at the St. Eugene Hospital,
on Saturday, Nov ember loth, a son.
Both the mother and baby are doing
well.
Mrs. C. A. Foote and son Chris
were   Cranbrook   visitors   on   Satur-
Ml's. McLellan and Mrs. Amos were
visitors to Cranbrook on Saturday,
Mrs. Lord, of the'Concentrator, hus
been spending thc past week in Trail.
New Mcrchnnt Opening Up
Anion;; the neur,
ley's   evev-Increash
i io Klmbor-
fraternity of
A tea wus given In the Sunday
School looms of tho Union Church
on Thursday, for tho Ladies' Aid and
all ladies of the congregation, A very
enjoyable afternoon wus spent by I merchants IsiL II. Chatson, who bus
nil, just opened up a brand new confec-
— j tionery, cigar ami news stoic, in the
Thursday evening a barbecue was Fisher building, which has just been
given at the (Hen Cafe, when the completed on the lot adjoining the
young bear which was shot by Mr. n08t office. Mr. Clintson comes from
Nagel was roasted. Between thirty Drumheller, Alta., in which eity he
and forty sat down to u sumptuous carried on a similar line of business
Bpread, and Mr. Bear was thorough-, tn the ono he is Parting hore, and
ly enjoyed along with all the other | where he onjoyoil lhe respect of the
good things to cut. An enjoyable time I citizens of the town.
was spent by all present.
A tea was given hy Mrs. Slid Smith
in honor of Miss Hilda Smith, who
left for her home iu Grand Forks, after spending two or three weeks on
lhe  bill
Thursday evening last a whist drive
and concert was the feature staged by
th.' Knights of Pythias iu their hall.
a fine time was reported aud not the
least pleasing feature was tiie generous spread of refreshments.
C. F. Sherman, who has been cm
ployed in  Kimberley for some time, [sand tons of or
has left for Nelson, to act. in the ca- ment   on   the
pacity  of  general   foreman   in   the | Coughlan, which sails November 15.
Blue Hell mine, his company having
Heavy Ore Sh'jinitnts to Europe
Ore shipments from tlie mines of
tlie Consolidated Mining & Smelting
Company nt Kimberley, to Belgium,
sent via the CP.lt. from Kimberley to
New Westminster and by ocean-going
steamers from the Fraser river front
to Europe, totalled 11,306 tt.as in
October. It is expect") that 11,000
tons will be shipped in November also. Four thousiiiu! tons have been
loaded iu New Westminster aad ure
ready for shipment, while seven thou-
■c awaiting ship-
niship   JIargaret
recently reopened the mine, and is intending lo underwater the mine and
carry out development work along
witli extensive repairs to the surface
equipment.
New Hotel
WANTED TO BUY
10 Dressers, 4  Sideboards and
S Dozen Chain. Will pay a
good price.    If you have one or
more, write at once.
J. PETERSON,
Box 496  •   KIMBERLEY, B.C.
When Vou Think ol Iniurance
— Call Op —
BEALE & ELWELL
Cranbrook & Kimberley
Sole AfenU lor Klmlierlej Town-site.
Be iit the Shrine Club Dance, Frl-
ly, November 28th, Auditorium
Dull, Cranbrook. Si-cure tickets from
your Shrine fririuls or ut the hall
door. This will Lu- tho event of the
season. 38
This is the time when many subscriptions to tlu- Family Herald and
Weekly Star of Montreal an- [alllt.g
due. Remember these can 1.: loft at
tbe Herald oilier ami receive prompt
attention. In addition i. ..in ' i? combined very advantageously \v\h this
paper. Special combination price—
Tho Cranbrook llc-.al.i and .he Family Herald and Woe!'.,: '.j....; with premium picture, %u.2ii. Your r* .ing is
Toe.   Phone 18, or call. 3otf
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff. I
ffffffffffffffffffe-fffffff
f    Morrison & Burke
KIMBERLEY
JEWELRY STORE
KIMBERLEY   ■     •     B.C.
Six Crates New China Just
Opened Up
Anil priced Must Reasonably
Six Shipments Fine Jewelry
Just Received
Make Your Selections Early
Dr. L. G. Rice
DENTIST
Office —
Over Kimberley Hardware
KIMBERLEY,    ■    B.C.
:: For SERVICE —STOP ::
,1
at lhe
,. ..
il Sutherland !!
ii ii
Garage
!! Kimberley's Leading Oil, i!
Gasoline and General
Service Station.
:; COMAIODIOUS STORAGE 1',
:   — 24 HOUR SERVICE—   ;\
Brown & Sutherland
PROPRIETORS
*****************************************************\
| ANNOUNCEMENT! jj
* We bog to announce that we have opened onr pi; ce of   t
%    business adjoining the Post Office, which will be known as j
* "CHATSON'S" %
% Our aim is and will be to serve the citizens of Kimber-.   *
9    ley nnd district to the very hest of our ability, and wc respccl=   %
* fully solicit a share of your patronage. *
X      Confectionery - Cigars & Tobaccos - Newspapers      *
I  & Periodicals   -   Ice Cream & Soft Drinks in Season. |
* ::    L. T. CHATSON     :: |
++*********.H*******-*******t *************************
SURT WALLACE'
— and --
HAS
MADE
KIM
FAMOUS!
Just Try His COFFEE, CAKES and PORK PIES -
and yon will agree with us.
— TRY OUR ELECTRIC BREAD —
WYCLIFFE NOTES ".
A meeting tot the discussion of
winter sport and the formation of a
hockey dub waa held in the elub
house on Friday evening last. L,
Crowe as acting chairman, opened the
meeting and invited discussion as to
Bkntlng rink maintenance, procuring of funds and the formation of
tho Wycliffe hockey elub. As u result of the discussion the hockey or-
; nlzation came Into being with the
following as officers of the elub: E.
I,. Staples, Hon. President; II. Munroe, President; W. Jolinson, vice-pro*
si dent; I.. Crowe, see.-treas; J. Jones,
manager. The meeting decided to
canvas the town for the funds necessary to carry on the rink and it was
unanimously agreed that families
whoso children use the rink be requested to pay the sum of three dollars, and seniors who play hockey
the sum of five dollars. With the cooperation of everyone in Wycliffe
the amount thus received should meet
the wages of an ice maker and caretaker, thus assuring everyone of the
maximum of skating during the sen-
son without the task of clearing the
snow and flooding the rink by voluntary service—a plan that has been
tried in former years and found wanting. W. .Johnson und B. Johnson
were appointed as canvassers, It is
hoped that everyone will fall into the
spirit of the effort and assist the
canvassing committee with their contribution, for the popularity of the
rink with both young and old proves
it to be an asset that provides the
chief and best enjoyment of the winter months,
The idea of a local hockey league
was also reborn during the evening
and it was found that there wore|
players in abundance along this line.
Four teams will probably be entered.
Their line up has not yet been decided
but the following captains were appointed; J. Jones L. Crowe, W.
Johnson, I. Johnson. We wish to
state that as a result of the foregoing
discussion it was decided to receive
application for the job of rink caretaker at once.
An entertainment committee to
handle social events during the coming winter months wns nssembled,
and is made up of the following: L.
Crowe, chairman; P. Franzon, J,
Jones, B. Bourgeois, F„ Staples, V.
Swanson,
Mr, F. Wilson, salesman and baseball fan, who represents Simonds
Canada Saw Company, was a business
visitor on Wednesday last.
Mr and Mrs. A. Yager entertained
a few friends nt dinner on Tuesday
night of this week.
On the occasion of Master Thomas
Clark's thirteenth birthday a very en
oynble party wns held nt his home,
in wliich several of his boy friends
participated. They were Geoge Tanner. Harold Johnson, Harry Ireland
and Alex Yager.
That parasite, and well known in
sect, the radio bug, has apparently
invaded Wycliffe in dead earnest. C.
O. Staples, L. Crowe nnd T. Ireland
have recently heen bitten and others
Bcom to have the same general idea,
A flock "of technical terms can be
heard in the store and office ut any
time during the duy, and travelling
salesmen who can't talk amplification,
antenna, static and reception find
themselves at a disadvantage with thc
more highly informed brothers of the
fraternity who can.
What Do YOU
Expect?
When you are planning to build a home, a garage, a trellis, in fact anything, just what do you
expect from the lumber dealer besides lumber?
You will find that
we maintain a building
service that cheerfully
answers your questions
and includes .everything else that is essential.
If you are not sure
of the type, plan, arrangement or any other detail of the structure you want to erect,
just say the word—no
obligation.
Remember, a home
will last a lifetime.
What other investment can offer you as
much!
twwwwuww^^^^i^^MMmiMmMUMmi
R0Y4L CAFE AND ROOMS
KIMBERLEY,   B.C.
If you wish Rooms that are Clean and Comfortable
TRY THE ROYAL
Our Cafe for Service and Excellent
Cooking   is   Uwwrpassed
ICE CREAM IN SEASON    -    -      CHOCOLATES
FRUITS   -   TOBACCONISTS
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
of Canada, Limited.
OFFICES, SMELTING AND REFINING DEPARTMENT
TRAIL,   BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS AND REFINERS
Purchasers of (iold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Ores
Producers ol (iold, Silver, Copper, 1'ig Lead and Zinc
"TADANAC" BRAND
OUR WEEK-END SPECIALS
WILL BE
REAL BARGAINS
Boiling Beef
Pot Roast Beef
Stewing Veal
Veal Roast
5c to 8c per lb.
-     8c, 10c and 12' Ub.
3 lbs. (or 25c
12HC, 15c, 18c and 20c lb.
Beef By The Quarter
TRIANGLE 8c per lb.
FORES 8cperlb.
HINDS 13c per lb.
SOCIAL   DANCE  ON   SATURDAY
A social dnncc in tho club house,
Wyellffo, will be given on Saturday
night, Novomber 82nd. Dancing ii to
111 Broach's orchestril from Kimberley will supply tho music.
Olvo —
MY VALET
A Trial
HIOH CLASS LAUNDRY
— Dry Cleaning tt Preiling —
Near Saih A Door Co. Office
P BURNS & Co. Ltd
KIMBERLEY, B.C.
NEW YORK
CAFE and ROOMS
Kimberley, B.C.
Spokane Strut
ROOMS ARE CLEAN
and COMFORTABLE
— Hot and Cold Water —
CAPE IN CONNECTION
The Otis Staples Lumber j
COMPANY,  Limited %
****r**\*********************************************
The  change  in  the  weather  hns
postponed operations on thu rink, but
affords an opportunity    of   gettirtr j
everything in  readiness  before  the
inevitable freeze-up.
Bert Crosby bagged a fine buck
deer on his last trip to Premier Lake
with building supplies.
DAN'S TAXI
Stand:  WYCLIFFE  HOTEL
— Trips Anywhere —
— Prices Reasonable —
Special  Trips  Arranged
Cars for Hire with or Without
Driver
W. W. PARNELL
PLASTERER
Lathing & Chimney Building
Kirc Places
ROOM 2       ■       DIMOR'S
fffftrVfo\VfftVf.Vfffffffff
KIMBERLEY
ATHLETIC and SOCIAL
CLUB
:   Kimberley, B.C.
Under the Management of
J. LOMBARDI
Everybody Made Welcome.
fftVtVffffffffffff
S. R. WORMINGTON
— Painter —
KIMBERLEY   -   B.C.
- ♦    ♦    ♦    »    4    ♦
-♦--»■■♦    »■♦-
A. Johnson
Mens' Furnisher
HOOTS AND SIIOBS
Suit Cases and Trunk*
OVERALLS
Booti anil Shoei Neatly H*palre,i
VfkV
,?s
CUT DOWN WINTER COAL BILLS.   Add
to the comfort of your home. Install storm
doors and windows. Enclose the back porch.
Fix all roofs.
— Be Prepared When Winter Comet —
We can supply you now with the needed
materials so you can do the work during
these crisp fall days.
ECONOMY IN GOOD BUILDING
Cranbrook Sash & Door Co. Friday, November 21st, 1924
THF   ClUmiBOOK   lltl-MIA
PAGE      THREE
IIWAMWMMMmWM-^-^WWWWlAMMMniWW.W
Resolutions at Institute Conv'n
(Concluded From Last Week's Issue)
Resolution  No.  4—It was  moved aside for immigration purposes could
nnd seconded that a bridge to span
river at Cokato is badly needed, that
we urge upon the authorities to take
the necessary steps to grant our reasonable request,
Mr. Draper pointed out the necessity of having good roads and that
they wished the bridge across the
Elk river to connect the settlement of
Cedar Valley and Cokato as they
have to go all the way to Keniie and
(lien to Cedar Valley from Cokato
and often markets could lie found for
farm products such ns hay but it does
pay pay to haul it around this long
route and then the school children
from Cedar Valley could use the
school iu Cokato. Also it WOtlld develop trade with Keniie, and also by
Connecting tho three places make for
social life and make tho district more
attractive to live In.
Resolution No. fi — Wilson Crock,
Kaisner road, No. 17, whereas,
believe that the money appropriated
this year for the completion of tht
road was sufficient, if the amount had
been properly spent, resolved that wo
solicit the support of the Cranbrouk
Convention in requesting that this
nmney be spent as intended.
Mr. Brady explained that this money had been appropriated for this
road and some work had been done
on it but that the vote had been recalled on account of luck of funds
but that this road would be finished
as soon as funds were available.
Resolution No. 6 — Resolved that
our delegate be instructed to use his
best influence at the convention to
secure equity in procuring burning
permits.
Mr. Mansfield of Natal, stated that
owing to rood conditions the fire warden can not travel through territory
under jurisdiction with the result that
only one or two get premits to burn.
Mr. Moore explained that the reason
that burning permits hnd not been
issued to more than two people in
thut district while others wished them,
was that these were sufficiently protected by having men to fight fire
and were near water and the regulation distance from inflammable material and the humidity of air was
correct to allow burning with safety.
There is no discrimination in issuing
permits as to who the farmer is, but
there is as to weather conditions.
Resolution No. 77—That the Hon.
Minister of Agriculture be approached with a view to having a better-
farming train tour the province. —
Cnrried.
Resolution No. 8—That this Institute is in favor of some action being
taken with a view to holding the Land
Settlement Board and the Soldiers'
Settlement Board responsible for the
eradication of weeds on lands control-
ed by these two boards and now abandoned in settled communities. These
abandoned farms are now so infested
with weeds that tliey constitute a serious menace to adjoining farms.
After considerable discussion an
amendment was drafted out as a possible solution of tlu- matter, ,aml the
original motion would stand with the
following clause. "This action could
be carried out in an economical man-
ner by leasing it at a moderate
rate, or by turning over such weed-
infested property gratis, to neighboring fanners, provided that these farmers take steps to cultivate anil keep
down the weeds. To futher protect
naid boards it is suggested that thej
seed sown on such lands pass the In- *B"'e
spection and approval of the board's
representative, i.e. a district agriculturist.     Motion Carried.
Resolution No. D—Whereas the reduction of the Provincial government
grant to small agricultural fairs is
making it extremely difficult for agricultural associations to carry on
successfully, and whereas many small
agricultural fairs held iii the center
of large districts will have to be discontinued unless the grant is materially Increased, therefore be it resolved that the size of the grant be based
nol only on thc amount previously
paid out by an association in prize
money but also that the extent of the
territory which the fair serves be taken into consideration. - - Motion Carried.
Resolution No. 11—That the government be asked to give a little more
of their lime to the consideration of
reholutioiis sent in by Farmers' Institutes. — Motion Carried.
Resolution No. 12—That if the Advisory Board continues to exist for
the future, that it be asked tu convene at an earlier dnte in relation to
the opening of the legislature in order
to have their recommendations prepared in such time as to give the
members of the government ample
opportunity to consider their intent.
— Motion Cnrried.
Resolution No. 18—Whereas there
is a feeling that the advisory board
of the Farmers' Institutes of B.C.,
fail to keep thc respective Institutes advised of their efforts to obtain required legislation from the government, and feel that the board is
failing to function ns intended, therefore be it resolved that unless the
advisory board can show more definite results in the future it bc abolished. —Motion Carried.
Resolution No. 14—That we respectfully petition the minister of the
Interior for the Dominion of Canada
to serioiwly consider m* to whether or
not ami might not be spent more advisedly and advantageously, in the
main in the improvement of home
conditions in i'nnn life, especially for
the betterment of conditions for the
women folk. — Motion Carled..
Resolution No.   IB—Whereas    tlie
present regulations in running beef
cattle require a bull to each certain
IWS over 24   months of
■ens nil stockmen under
number of
age, and wl
stand   Unit
ers
mt<
breeding age before thai age and are
therefore a drain upon tho herd bull,
be it resolved thai  wo requosl  that
bo revised reducing
llmll of females on
d of 24,
•oilhs
-Whareo
i  niniiin
domam
tho
beef
thm
these regulatio
the brooding n
the range to IS
Motion carried,
Resolution No. 10-
preseut regulations i
cattle mi the range
stockmen ranging thirty females o
the major portion thereof also rang
a bull of a good beef type and whereas in certain districts there nn
number of these stockmen and ids
number of small stockmen ranging a
smaller number tho onus of provi
ding the bulls for the entire range
falls on a few of the larger stock
breeders, therefore bc it resolved that
the Animals Act be amended in cuch
a way as to compel these small stockbreeders to arrange among themselves to place on the range sufficient
bulls for the number of females on
the range regardless of ownership.—
Carried.
Resolution No. 17—Resolved that
we at the convention assembled appeal to the goverment for further
protection from the gopher pest, than
we are obtaining at tho present time,
the present bounty being insufficient
to interest the children, who in pervious competitions did great work.—
Carried.
Resolution No. IS—Whereas in the
work of the Fanners' Institutes there
is great necessity for more correlation of aims and objects as between
thc different Institutes of each district and whereas the recent visit of
Mr. Bricker to each herd in district
"I" has given great satisfaction
throughout tlte district, and has undoubtedly given Mr. Bricker as a
Board member a much better idea of
the needs of the work in this district
thnn any former board member has
ever hnd, as welt as arousing much
greater interest within the Institutes,
therefore we believe thnt a more certain provision foi Uie Advisory Board
members to enable them ench year to
make a visit without fail to each local as a part of their official duties
and such provision not only cover
their expenses but also a per diem
allowance for thoir time while &WA]
from home.   Motion carried.
Resolution No. 19—Whereas it is
expedient for our Central Institute
to be financed and for our Advisory
Board member to be paid a per diem
allowiuice while on Institute worfc.
Therefore be il resolved thnt this condition suggest that half of the grant
from the Department be paid direct to
the Central Institute of tlie district
the local contribution to the i en-
tral's expenditure, —Motion carried.
Resolution Ne. '.'i1 That the gov-
irnment be requested to establish an
Illustration or Demonstration Farm
in the Fast Kootonay District.—Carried
Resolution No. 21  — Whereas the
U Don have lost and are still
losing, through erosion by the waters
of the Kootenay river, a large portion
of the best ..t their Inml. for some of
which a high price has been paid; and
whereas tliey have hitherto had their
requests to the government tn furnish
a pile driver and operator to thi the
work necessary to protect tlieir pro
perty turned down, though the said
settlers were willing tn furnish the
piles and supply all the other labor in
connection wiih the work, which
would mean some PO per cent of tho
total cost; und whereas the government hns engaged in various reclamation and land clem ing projei is in other districts with the view of Increasing the agricultural lands of the province and has assisted various municipalities and other parties to prevent
toss by erosion; resolved that wherever it is necessary for any party or
partios to do work to protect their
property from lois of this nature, it
should be the duty of the government
to supply any mechanical appliances
necessary for the work together with
the skilled labor to work such appliances and expert supervision for the
whole undertaking.
Resolution he sent direct to Public
Works at Ottawa and Victoria, with
information that there is a pile-driver
at Fernie.—Motion Carried.
Resolution No. 22—That the government take steps to improve the
grasses on the range and keep the
pasture iu the state it is now.
Resolution No. 2','.—Whereas it has
been understood that technical men
and district representatives of the department of agriculture are entitled
to n statutory increase in salary a
sum of $I2U per year and whereas it
Is important that men in such positions receive the impetus in their
work of the evidence of appreciation
which is best shown by a llttlo added
amount on salary therefore we request that these men would much better serve their work by receiving the
r—T—"T   Mt aaauranc*
regularly forthcoming as deserved
Carried.
Resolution No. 24—Resolved that
the provincial department of agriculture be approached with a view to
seeming a special freight rate between the four western provinces on
seed potatoes similar to that already
in effect on the shipment of grain for
use as seed.
Resolution No. 25—Owing to the
inadequacy of the present Workmen's
Compensation Act with regard In
farm labor, we ask that the Act be
amended so as to cover farm employees and employers in all occupations
constructive and operative, We do
not ask that the farmers be compelled
to come under the act but thnt it remain optional. •— Carried.
Resolution No. 2G- -Resolvi .1 that
ur Advisory Board member be paid
per   diem   allowance   of   (5,00   per
ay from the Central Institute while
QCttvoly engaged t.n Institute work.—
rrlod.
Resolution No. 27—Moved by Mr.
Smith, Newgate, seconded by Mr. Bo-
that Central Institute put nn an
excursion of the farmers of the district to visit-tin- experimental farm
at lnvermere on or about the first
week in August,—Carried
A letter was read from Fernie Farmers' Institute with regard to Mr.
Bricker. Moved by Mr. Smith, Newgate, seconded by Mr, Crowe, that no
action be taken on this letter hut that
a vote of confidence in Mr. Bricker
he passed for the work he lias done.—
Motion curried.
Mr. W. II. I.yne, from Vancouver
gave an address on 'lie importation of
nursery stock and fruit, as well as the
fumigation work in connection with
this. Questions being raised as to
the expenditure on plant at Vancouver, Mr. I.yne showed that this was
necessary as there were sometimes
five or six carloads of bulbs or fruit
trees to be inspected or fumigated
at one time and while the fumigation
did not take a long time many of the
shipments arrived in such condition
that first aid was necessary and space
was necessary to allow for this work
being done Farmers here wished to
know if they could not be allowed to
bring in trees, etc., from some of the
prairie provinces without the same
having to go to Vancouver for fumigation.
Development nf irrigation in British Columbia. This was a paper compiled by E. Da' i--, chief engineer,
Water Rights Deportment, and read
by Major Hicks-at the Institute banquet. It wns entitled "The Price We
Pay For Neglect." It was in part as
follows:
"On many of our British Columbia
irrigated farms, owing to agricultural
depression and other causes, irrigation systems have boen allnwed to get
in bad repair, and huge spurns must
now be expended to put these systems
in shape to carry water, whereas, had
a small amount been spent on upkeep
each year, our systems would have
been in fair condition to-day.
So much fur the systems. Now let
us see whai the land has been doing.
We find that poor preparation has
made sound irrigation methods Impossible, Grades have not been considered, having lo flood certain areas
ch others, washouts occur as a
luinee. heme more trouble to
irrigate the entire field, lu depresses where water stands, wild grasses
grow and even rushes appear, the
land becomes sour and legumes are
killed out. In sumo cases alkali has
come to the surface. Yields nre
greatly reduced. Many farmers tell
f the wonderful crops that grew
on these lands nnd produce photographs as visual evidence, then ask,
why not now?" The reason is a
repetition nf irrigation history the
world over.
"Fortunately for agriculture, these
ommerclal fertilizers or expensive
run down soi!s are not culli.ig for
roatmont, hut rather for lhat old,
ft-repeated and much neglected
old 'humus.'
The  old saying that   live stock  is
poses was granted. '
The recording of a right to the use
of water at this early period ui the j
existence of the province established !
a precedence which was the forerun- j
ner of tho present water licenses
which are issued today.
"It has been said by competent authorities from the United States that
had California adopted such a system
of recording rights with respect of
use uf waters within that state the
endless litigation in the courts would
imt have occurred.
"In I860 Governor Douglas issued
a proclamation known as the 'Gold-
fields' Act,' providing for the acijuisi-
tion of a water right and also issued
rules and   regulations tu   be  Used   in
connection then'with. It required
lhat the applicant in making the formal application should state the quantity of water desired, the locality uf
distribution and the time within which
tbo works were tu be completed, If
he refused ur neglected in take, within the time mentioned in the application, or within such further time as
the Gold Commissioner might allow,
the whole of the quantity ol water ap.
plied for, he wa.- deemed ut the end
of the time granted, only the quantity taken by him actually and the
surplus could be granted by Uie
Crown to another person.
'The title of the act seems to confine
it to the use of water in connection
with gold mining although numerous
rights wore granted for tho use of water for irrigation between the years
I860 and 1K(i") in which hitter year
definite provision was made for agriculture.
It will be seen thnt this early enactment embraces a principle basic to
tho provisions of the Water Act iu tho
form iu which it is now in use in British Columbia; that is what may bo
termed tho principle or doctrine of
beneficial use.
"Subsequent water legislation was
enacted under various titles until
18!)7 when the 'Water CJuusgb Consolidation Act wus passed, consolidating and amending the several laws
respecting the use of water. This act
is considered to be a highly commendable conservation enactment
and marks the greatest advance up to
that time made in the water laws of
the province.
"Owing lo the greater use being
made of the water resources aud to
the laxity in the making of the records and to thero being nn real supervision over the use of water, tho
necessity was realized of reviewing
and defining thc existing rights and
at the same time more closely guarding the granting of new rights. The
act nf 1009 was passed with thai
end in view nnd it marks a still further advance in water legislation,
The Board of Investigation has examined tho status of 7.000 records
and has ordered the issuance of licences where bona fide use was being
made of the privilege or ordered cancellations whore nu use was being
made or where claimants to the light
could not show that it was apurtenant
to their uand, appeals from this semi*
judicial board were required to be
taken to the Court of Appeal and it
is interesting to note that only three
appeals made against the decisions
hnvo been allowed.
In 1914 ihe Water Act was ag;tin
revised and a section provided therein
for the organization uf co-operative
irrigation districts.
Owing, however, to the financial
and other conditions into which the
larger irrigation companies subsequently became involved, this section
of the Act was not altogether suitable
and it v.'as repealed in li>20 und a
new section substituted.
In 1918 the B. C. government realizing the difficulty irrigation districts
had in arranging finances for the rehabilitation systems which had been
nred ft em the involved companies, enacted provisions In the Wator
Act for tho loaning of money to thu
districts.
The B.C, acl as it stands to-day is
the basis uf good farming is still true, I considered to he one of the most ad-
viding the manure of live stock is 1 vanced water codes on theis continent
perly made use uf.    I am sorry to and it is often quoted as embodying
lhat   tho  hay  crops  taken from;the best in irrigation laws.
most   of our  farms nro  fed off the
tkr c£Sic6&aJ'—
Try'*
land.     We   find  our  winter  manure
p in the bush or under the pine
trees, iu soma cases feet deep where
tattle have hunted shelter.
"Those methods cannot go on much
lunger. Mother earth is a kindly creu-
lurc but she will not stand neglect
for ever. The price the farmer Is
paying is half to one ton per acre,
instead 'of two to three tons, ulso the
reduced amount of stock on the farm.
If we want to increase our herds,
bo thoy beef, dairy, pig or sheep, we
must first consider cheap winter feed,
I know of no cheaper way than by increasing acre yields.   To do this we
must prepare irrigation Innds to avoid
humps und hollows, shorten the water run  nnd apply wuter often  in
small amounts instead of large quun-
tities ut long intervals.   Full irrigute
when needed, study how water penetrates the different boiIs; tnke enre
of every pound of manure.    Plan o
proper rotation of crops to suit your
particular clnss of funning    Humus j eminent be
must be supplied in some form or ter   very
other because it enlivens und  mcl-jsuch wato
lows baked, run down soils, Increases sold   pulp
fertility, makes plnnt food available,, though the latter
increases    water    holding    capacity, | failed somewhat l<
makes soil warmer, increases bactcrln,
in  case  of  manure,  adds  nitrogen,
phosphorus and potash.
The earliest dote when irrigation
run  be said to have officially com-
Although it has boon said that irrigation is young in the province, the
wise procedure required in the early
days In the matter of acquiring rights
to the use of wator was in advance of
thc methods in vogue in Culifornin,
and the foregoing remarks indicate
tbat while tho country has passed
through a number <>f viscissitudos
which have occurred in the older
countries, considerable progress has
heen made in Irrigation matters.
Resolution No. 2S—Whereas it is
public knowledge that an electrical
power company is npplying for water
powers on a site on tho Klk river near
Philips Canyon, wliich was provisionally allotted some years ago to u pulp
mill undertaking; nnd whereas nn undertaking of the bitter description
would not only afford more employment than a power company, but
would also greatly encourage farming in the district by tho creation of a
township whose needs would afford i
good market; resolved, that the go\
Have you been shopping, or working
hard to-day? Are you feeling tired
out and "just ready to drop?" Now is
thu time you will appreciate a cup of
FRY'S—80 delicious, so refreshing.
As you sip FRY'S your tiredness
seems to melt away. Vou (eel soothed
and strengthened, for nature's kindliest stimulant—theobromine is preserved for you in FRY'S, though
often lost in cheap cocoas.
Methods of manufacture perfected
through 200 years of experience and
thc skilful blending of the world's
finest cocoa beans, give FRY'S its
world-wide superiority.
Dainty to Drink
^Powerful to
relieve fatigue
Try*
of this
Institute
highly il
QStl
nblo Unit
tho Wi
tor Rlgh
s Brunch
mi
ko n sur-
v,-j- of
Tl'l'ks III
il Inrgor
trc
llllri Willi
;l view
In locnti
ig roserv
nu
sitw, wo
fllttllel
recontii
ond Unit
ll
i- Water
Rights
Departn
rut tako
Fill
li action
ns will
result ii
thoso sit
i-s
icing re-
Bowed hy tin- Crown. —
Sai
'i.-il
Reao
iitinii N
j. 30—Tl
nt
tin- gov-
t-riimi-nt nf B.C
slmulil 1
e 1
itltionod
That il was decided at meeting to ap-1
point directorate of five, throe to be
a quorum, Au executive to Include
president,    vice-president,    secretary
and two others. Moved and seconded
that Mr, fttoreland and Mr Cameron
bo other members of executive. Directors left for Institutes to choose.
Discussion of pooling transportation expenses of all locals. Moved
to have a closer examination mado of I ftnd Bocondod that transportation to
small Irrigation projects throughout this convention be pooled among tho
the province with the end in view "f I Institutes. — Motion cnrried.
Stopping wastage through natural j
causes, such as might easily be pro-;
vented at small cost, ami also tho )
Abilities of developing further small
irrigation projects.    Further, that If
the government determine on the examination of any large areas of land
for the purposes of encouraging irrigation projects, that they should first
turn their attention to works of this
nature which are already in existence,
with the end in view of carrying such
projects through to completion, or the | thank?
revival of them, having in mind thnt' for us
this might be done at comparatively
small cost. ■— Carried,
Resolution No. 81—Whereas in tho ;
case of infraction of water regula-1
tions by land  owners Inking use of j
water to which they havo no title and !
actually  in  such  cases robbing the
man who has the license for this wa-i
ter, the Water Department states thi.t j
action against the man stealing this
water must be by civil action in tho i
courts which may postpone any rem-;
edy in the  matter indefinitely; and
whereas the use of water is vital to
the owner of the water license and ,
summary action    is    really the only
remedy sufficiently quick to avert loss-
to the license holder, therefore we ask
that   power  to  take  action  at  once
against persons unlawfully diverting
water, bo vested in the engineer of
the Water Branch for the district.—
Motion carried.
Resolution No. 33—That the do-!
i, rtment be petitioned t» have a closer examination made of all small Irrl-
gallon projects throughout tho pro-j
vince with the end in view of stopping
wastage through natural and other j
causes; and further, .hat the department first lend their assistance to1
irrigation projects already under way. i
—Carried.
Resolution No. 31—In view of the.
fact that the government has in many
cases subsidized other industries, and
has spent thousands of dollars on
roads for sottlers who have -in ■<• bit
the country owing to the lack «'f water, therefore we rocommond that
grants bo made \<> deserving Irrigation projects, care being taken tn tec
tbat there is a reason bis pro i ed
of the project being succosi Tol. Carried.
Resolution No. 3.". That a ucoi d
survry bo mndo as low down Vermilion Creek us possible to get a ditch'
to benefit the greatest numbei of settle!*, to bo diverted from North Ver-!
mlllon Creek to smith of Columbia
river. — Cnrried.
Resolution No. 80—Resolved that
we petition tho Post Office Department to establish a post office eleven
mites south of Golden
Moved and seconded that Confer-
once be hold in Cranbrook next year.
—Motion carried.
Moved and seconded that Mr. A.
B. Smith be member of Advisory
Board for East Kootenay for 1925.
Mr, Moreland was nominated as alternate delegate t" the Advisory!
Board in the event of Mr. Smith no:
being able to attend.
Moved and seconded that vote ofj
be sent to City of Cranbrook
of the City Hall for the con-
ntioii.
POR THAT
Bad Cold
VOU   MUST   TAKE
eps
MREDE/EEB PRICE 25.
Nice Weather, Isn't It?
No clothesline ever breaks from the
strain of the wash which the modern
girls have to hang out to dry.
>********************
,]MVih
PILLS
ror SiclL Headaches
GIRLS! A GLEAMY MASS
OF BEAUTIFUL HAIR
"Dandcrine"   So   Improves
Lifeless, Neglected Hair
TASTY FOODS
Carefully -elected — prepared by C'i»«»k> who know how
— and served to you in an
appetizing and appealing
way ^ whnt ynu get when
yuu dine with u-. Prompt
nnd courtOUS servec.
An     abundance jf*
ot luxuriant hair, /^5>*
full of gloss
gleams and life
shortly follows a
genuine toning up
of neg I e c t c d
scalp- with depen- v—
dable "Dander-
inc."
Falling hair, itching scalp and the
dandruff   Is   corrected   immediately.
iry,  wispy  or  fading  hair  is
ICLUB CAFE
Phona 105
**************************
t
*
*
*
♦   Thin.
.frl quickly invigorated, taking on new
J I strength, color and youthful beauty.
f I "Danderlne \- delinhtful on the hair;
•> ( a refreshing, stimulating tonic— not
.sticky or greasy! Any drugstore.
meneed in Hritish Columbia waa in irrigation, and in view of the  fact
tho your IH5H, when the tint right to thut more laud is coming under culti-
that thaw I in mm Will be thc use ot water Cur agricultural pur- vation each year, it ia, in the opinion
- ,     Mr. Newton suggested that Instill tutes do everything to arrange talks
with various officials of the govern-
urgeiI lo consider the ma1- j ment and find out the real work of
carefully before granting j these men and co operate with them.
powers  to  any  but the      Resolution  that meeting SHOW ap-
mill    undertaking   even  preciatinn for those in charge wnO
arranged the mooting and gave papers. — Motion carried.
Moved by Mr. Quail, seconded by
Mr. Crowe thnt Mr. A. B. Smith be
re-elected president of the District
Farmers' Institute; moved and ROCOn-
ded thnt Mr. Quail be vice-president;
moved and seconded that Mr. A. I..
Hay be necrctnry.
Directorate   brum   eaih Institute:
i:y have hitherto
bservfl the terms
on   which   they   were   provisionally
granted  such   powers.—Motion  carried.
Resolution No. 2\\ —-Thut In view
of the serious shortage of water for
CUNARD
ANCHOR-ANCHOR DONALDSON
Special Xmas Sailings
To Old Country
PROM HALIFAX
TO GLASGOW
S.S. Saturnia, Dec. 8
TO PLYMOUTH, CHERBOURG LONDON
S.S. Anilaniu, Der. 8
TO QUEENSTOWN AND LIVERPOOL
S.S. Cmninnin, Dec. 11
PROA! NEW VORK
TO QUEENSTOWN AND LIVERPOOL
S.S. Caronla, Dec. C; (armaniii, Di-c. 13
TO GLASGOW
S.S. Tuncania, Der. fl; Colombia Dee. 1.1
TO PLYMOUTH, CHERBOURG,
SOUTHAMPTON
S.S. Maurotania, Dec. S
TO CHERBOURG AND SOUTHAMPTON
S.S. Aquitnniu, Deo, 18
I nil information from Agenti or Company'! Offices,
622 llaatinica Street West, Vanvouver, ll.C.
THE CUNARD
way is the
best but
INEXPENSIVE
Mail) ot our most
particular travellers
arc delighted wllh
the new third cabin
Cunard travel. PAGE FOUR
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
Friday, November 21st, 1924
fffffffffffffffffff.'s. ffff,
\ ENGLISH
DINNER   CHINA   WARE
RAWORTH BROS.
ff.Vff.Vfffffffffffffffffff.Vffff.
Il will surprise you if
you will kindly make j{
enquiries. 5
OUR PRICES AND $
QUALITY ARE    i
RIGHT. I
Next to Post Office $
V.VffffAVfffffffffffffffffff
the Cranbrook herald
Published Every Friday
ll.  t'OTTKK, 11   Ki:
f A. WILU.lMii 	
«ub»crli>Ucm 1'rll-e  W.00 Per Vear
To United Stales  *-Vl" l'w *"'**
Advertising lluleu on Application, Changes ot Copy
lor Advertising -should lie handed In uot Inter than Wednesday noon to socure attention.
NOVEMBER 1924
SUN HON TUI WID THU FRI »AT
1
2 34567 8
9101112131415
1617 1819-20 21 22
13 24 25 26 27 28 29
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21st, 1924
TII
IIICII WAGE BUBBLE
THE SITUATION whicli has now arisen al l-'mii.
from the temporary closing down of the mines
ai Coal Creek is a reminder that w ill serve to impress
upon all observers thc lesson that
always spell prosperity. Tin
ccd il»' wages un.   During tl
! wages do m
miners gradually foi
e war years then- wa
NOTE \.\n COMMENT
TWENTY   YEARS   AGO
Isxtraeta trom 'lhe Cranbrook
Herald of this date, 1903.
The North Stnr Hotel at Kimberley
hits been sold under a mortgage anil
Harry Drew has secured control of
the pluce.
L'TTING THE I \R1 he
apt wn) ol describing ll
nl to tlu
hor
*   full,
kIii-.ii-
prop,
ered
mid -i
-trad ol waiting i
thc onus oi pro\
affected, if the i
gallon to bc of
should In* pul hu
ii a provision b)
I: -ur-. lv i 1 llii- ■ -
it was an ill-emu
. iV.     Us    Itppll
em tn have
The time
.vi mid af ft
III il
linrdshi
it., i-1 nel, and placlll|
m tin- industric
The Port Steele Prospe
started on its tenth yea
tion.
.1. li. Cummings is ten
flee from Fort Steele tc
will also move liis t,niiiil.\
ly.
The Methodist church
opened uu Sunday lasl
musical service being i
the chureh choli  led b
Mill.
The dam put In Iwo
the foot of M-'.ue Lobe
Kootenay Lumber <'.>,,
this week by llu* compii
proved ti Bouree of troti
who were mnking use o*
■ has now
publlca-
ilM.i
W. I'litiiini-e, Helhany; .1. C. Pitts,
Woodlands; Ed. I. Paterson, Tiverton;
George B. Powell, Russell; Roy C.
Proctor, Corunna; Ernest F. Post,
Winrton; Henry Plumtree, Muskokn;
Jas. W. Pritchard, Franklin; Thos. P.
Rnffelly, Yatton; J. W. Rutledge,
Strathroy; Fred S. Ryckman, Water-
down; Vim. J. Keid, Lucknow; Her-
but li. Roberts, llnliluirton; Wilfred
t.. Rutledge, Jlarkdnle; Bert Rawson,
Clearwater; Frank C. Stockdale,
Courtwrlgbt; Gilberl Sinclair, Seu-
forth; A. los. Scholl, Formosa; Cliff
S. Sinclair, Sutton; Wm. S. Santo,
London; John Stevenson, Lindsay;
Jos. T. Sarvis, Seaforthj Earle S.
Shannon, Hltrriston; .1. H. Spence,
Watcrdown; Goorgo 11. Salter. Hal-
iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiDiiiiiiiiiiiioiiiini iiiiiiiniiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiuniiiniiiinimiii]
olT
A.
benefit 1
i rl ft-
wliit'l
way
ii
ii after
in ge
si I
cral, it
t furthwith, but to attaeli tu
it can be completely nullified
if camouflaging the fact that
lived measure to wliich u joker had
il having
In- attached lor safety
C"
ICISM
llu* p:ist
always nu 1   |
show him whi
year tlie budget bri
first time in many
il the
when
Hi tin
c the ,
owrmncut's financial policy in
economies were urged, were
cry From Premier I Uiver to
•oniiinies could lie made. This
,111 down in the house for the
ears shows  the expen
justification for it. and no opposition was met when
the increases were lacked on to the price o( coal,
because every,,in- expected to pay more, in keeping
with lhe general trend of things. Hut in later year*,,
there lias been :i feeling among lhe eimsii-
mlng public lhat the trend oi things should he downward. This feeling was apparent in tin- markets
where the Fernie coal was to bc sold and
gradually the product of the minis became more and
more difficult to dispose of. Still the wages k,-pt up,
and work became less plentiful. Strike succeeded
slrikc. finally disorganizing production so lhat the
supply became independable. That was the finish
ing touch. Industry that uses coal in large quanti
ties cannot hazard anything on its fuel supply. Now
the mines must close till different conditions permit
them to re-,,pen on some stable basis.
ll is worth noting that the company offered tinmen a five year contract at what seemed fair wages,
though a little lower than had been paid under '.in
previous contract and there was then every prospect
of steady work-. Union leaders scrned the proposition, and preferred lo wait a settlement for lhe entire
district. But the men now find that there are other
things to consider besides how much the miners are
to get out of it. Which would have Iieen prcl'oiT.ihk. I
continuous work al slightly lower wages, or little or I
no work at higher wages?
The people of fernie have seen many vise
tildes during the existence of the city, and while il j
must be a serious blow to I lie business men and those i
with property interests it is safe to say there|
are men of courage and resource wlio nil! he
able and willing to adapt themselves to tlie new am!
somewhat more stringent conditions now presenting
themselves, and so hold the .situation in hand till
better fortunes coin,- llu-ir way. A city that can
stand fires of tlie magnitude of those which have
swept Fernie, and can also stand the rocking of a
bank failure thai annihilated nearly a million dollars
of its cash resources, will probably meet this latest
catastrophe with more stoicism than oiher places
whicli have not been so severely tried.
lures
for the coming fiscal year pruned down till they
come well within lhe estimated revenue. This seems
tantamount l" an admission tliat the cry of the
opposition iu the past thai economies must be made
were not idle and destructive criticism alter all. Feeling themselves running uncomfortably close to thc
danger line in the matter ui a majority in the house,
the government has decided thai then* is -cope for
economy after all. Public works expenditures are
to be reduced, and also administration costs in various directions, but il is significant also that no increase is anticipated in revenue, lhc feeling being
apparent!} tlte every
out oi lhe taxpayers
dollar possible is being squeezed
\^l
Tom Our Exchanges
atea season their
f the most intriguing
not for irony," says
be ;i forest without
WHERE YALE STANDS
The irony with which impartial
decrees regarding mankind is one o
things in nil history,    "If it were
Anatole France, "the world would
birds."
Take tho case of the by-electiofl in Yale, which concluded with a victor> for tho Conservatives. Mr, Mackenzie Kinjr assumed office three years ago without a working majority in the house. He wished to make an alliance with the progressives, but eastern interests at first
vetoed this [dan. Lnst session he achieved his purpose
i conferred on the West. A low
busc such ns lbe prairies wished,
I given with a view to attracting
■i rt. The East was still skepti-
mler longed ■• dangle before ils
■ess, a real Vt esurti constituency
Conservatives.
Hut here the ironical fates played him a trick worthy
of Puck. The only available Western constituency was
Yale, the one agricultural riding in the country where a
low tariff meant only low prices for produce, where the
Progressive anti-dumping legislation wai an ithcma and
where the Crows Nest rates spelt ruin. Tbe premier did
his best. He campaigned in the riding himself, though it
was far from the capital, He brought several uf his ministers with him, and be pleaded the government's need of
some encouragemnl, oi' some sign that tbe West appreciated tbe efforts that were being made in ils behalf, It
was all no use. Yale heard the prmier courteously; but
it remained Conservative. — Vancouver Province.
..n 1 I avor after favor wn
tariff, an anti-dumping c
Crows Nest rates were a
and holding Westeir i|
eai, however, and the pn
eyes as a proof of his i ue
be had snatched from thi
riu
ember
rs n f
C    r;
C
an
h
ti.
- j
ela
ir
l'i
ok Asia the
lirdtli-
ogratn
Th
sf
el!
on the
n the
"!.*
of
rin
Novo
■e   Ed-
ONTARIO NATIVE SONS
PUTTING ON FROGRAM
DECEMBER   THIRD
On VVednesdi
lird, the mcmb<
sembly, Native
province of On
place are pultiiv
for thc occasion
nights put on b
Scotia, New B
ward Island and Quebec, but the native Sons of Ontario are pli .ning to
eclipse them all. Ii' quantity counts
for anything they should I ave no difficulty in doing so — for there are
over fifty names on the nn ibershi]
roll of the Assembly who hail from
that province. From such a plethora of latent talent Dr, .!. WW. Rutledge, who has been named :: • chairman for the program committee, has
had some difficulty ii
items could best set
its of old Ontario.
that far from beiag ;
izo them in a single t
that rot less than a w
quired to prsenl the
shell.   Thero is no do
ni: A. B, Smith, Morrisburg
I'.. Sleightholm, London; Davit
peers. Ivy; JudgO ti. II. Thonip
Toronto! Arthur Taylor, Bur-
; Iteubeii T. Tiffin, laiekuow;
i, A, Towrlss, Arthur; (loo. B,
shcr, Madoe; John A. Ward, Arn-
i; Chas. It. Ward, London! Harry
ie, Markhum; W. Arthur Wilson,
iy Creek! Hen W. Werden, Stir-
ii:iii!it)iiiiii!iiiii[]iiiiiiiiii]i(]iiiiiiiliiiOitiniiiii
HEAD OF PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH ADDRESSES
MEETING ON TUESDAY
dec
hat
thc
mi'
It is even said
hie to summar-
'.■ening, he feels
•ok would be re-
case in a nut
iht, at any vale.
Giants and White Sox on Honeymoon -
Four of iho hiiHo bidl nlayeifi ehotw to turn thn Europium tour of tho New York < limitn and tlio ChioiiRo White Hoi into
JT a honeymoon trip. PbotogrAPhcd Aboard tha (<Mindiun I'acHiii N.N. Montroynl upon their wriviil ut Liverpool are,
tram lift to right, Mr. and Mis. Iluutilugtr, Ur. aad Mn. Btuofel, Mr. and Mrs. Miller Md Mr. wd Mrs. Youugs.
but that on thc night of tbis meeting
a program well worth while will be
presented.
Following it; the compute roster ol
members from Ontario:
H. E. Briggs, Camburaj G. Frank
Bond. Mnnitoulln Island; F. W. Burgess, London; J. W\ Umber. Ciuelph;
Frank E. Bamford, Brantford; II. J
Brock, Hnwkesbn y;   A.   C.   Blaine
Komptvllle; A. I!. Bullock, GananO'
que; .1. F. Belnnger, Colabogie; Mai
colm R.  Bclanger,  Arnpriof; Elwin
Cumberland, ListOWel; Jas. II. Cam
eron, Perth; Wm. Geo. Cowan, Bly-
iheswood; T. 1). Caven, Picton; .1. I'.
Cochrane, Fenelon Falls; (!. W, Don-
ahoe,  Kincardine;  Dan  Dezall,  Bad-
geroUSJ   Peter  Dallas,  Seaforth;   \V.
\l*\ Doran, Guelph; F. !1. Dezall, Bad-
I genius; Arthur Duff, Berwick; John
| T. Flstone, llalihurton; J. A. Fori tier,
j Byron; J. It. Finley, Little Current;
' Dan  Finlayson,  Campbellton;   Harry
Ferguson, Calabogie; Chris A. Foote,
Cobourg;   Thos.   A.   Fulton,   Grand
| Head;  Wm. S. Green,  Parry Sound;
j P. J. Gougeon, Cambrook; VV. D. Gil-
my,  Carterton; Jas.  D.  Grant,   Wil-
iinmstown;   V.   A.   Heise, Arnprlor;
Ed,   A.   Hill,   Brussels,   VV.   D.   Hill,
Brussels; J. F. Huchcroft, Cardinal;
!l. W, Horchmer, Kingston; Herb. ll.
Heard, Scotia Jet.;  Albert   fl.  Hill,
Simcoe Co.; Joseph ff, Hall, Ganano-
[quo; G. 13, Kennedy, Arnprlor; Koht.
I Kellock, Perth; Harry C Killins. Wal-
Ikorville; D. A. Kay, Listowol; Lionel
I.I. Leask, Gore Bay; W. V. J. Leigh,
I Delhi; A. Karle Leigh, Cottam; Chas.
J.   Little,   Moffatt;   Angus   Musser,
{Grand Bend; John Martin, Craigleithj
James  Martin,   Crnigleith;   Fred   W.
Mitchell, Cloyre; V. Z. Manning, Exe-
ter; John A. MacDonald, (llamis; Dr.
G.   K.   L.   MacKinnon,   Alexandria:
John T. Millar, Orillia; Elmer A. Miller, Picton; Fred W. Mackenrot, To
ronto; l*\ M. MacPherson, Wnoler; J.
Mat tin   McCreery,  Simcoe;   Wm.* J,
McFarlano, Hartley; Duncan McFarlane, Argyle; J. P. McLaren, Lanark:
R, A. McBurney, Teoswotorj James
McCarthy, Kinhurn; II. A. McKowan
Bowmanville; John  McDermld,  Har
riston;   Robert McConuiek,   Borvio;
Neil A. McCrimmon, Dunvegan; Wm
D. McLeod, London; D, A. MacDonald, Glands; John H. McClure, Peel
Co.; Peter L. McLaren, Lanark; E. II.
' McPhoo, Mackeys; W. A. Nisbet, St.
Thomas; A. Cleve Neily, llalihurton;
Dr.    Clarence    MacKinnon
Urges Church to be Alive
To Opportunities
A fair sized audience greeted Dr.
Clarence MacKinnon, moderator of
the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Canada, when he
spoke in the Presbyterian Church on
Tuesday evening lnst.
Coming from Halifax, where
he is principal of Pine Hill College,
tne moderator is Hearing the end of
tlie tour he is making of Canada in
connection with tbe work of the Presbyterian Church.
Speaking of the work of the church
in general Dr. MacKinnon dwelt on
tlte importance of the church making
the most of opportunities as they presented themselves.
Analyzing tbe word "opportunity,"
the speaker pointed out that from
the Latin, "op" meant "near," and
"port" meant "harbor," and as ships
sometimes make miscalculation and
miss tbe harbor and thus become shipwrecked, the church was to be advised to guard against a similar fate. In
connection with the political world.
the publication of Winston Churchill,
called "Tbe World Crisis" was cited
as an illustration of the harm done
through lost opportunities and mistakes at Gnlipoli.
With reference to the manner in
which the church seized its opportunities he suggested greater zeal with
respect to the spread of the doctrines
which we pretend to uphold. As a
beautiful example of this he mentioned the instance of John St. Chrysos-
tum, a celebrated Greek churchman,
wlio when in Constantinople about
400 A.D., proudly referred to the fact
th;.t Christian immigrants had touch-
ed the British Isles. Again in connection with the founding of the
Methodist church in Ontario there
was the devotion of Rev. Matthew-
Bangs.
Dr. MacKinnon concluded his address with an urgent appeal to the
church not to miss its opportunity.
Following the meeting a conference
on the subject of church union took
place when many questions wore asked and answered by the visiting head
of the church. In connection with
this it was made clear that there were
certain fundamental motives for
church union the principal one being
economic, as was readily apparent
when conditions on the prairies were
considered. There, denominational
churches could tiot exist, whereas
union churches could. The East had
been influenced—they were unxious
to do something in order that the life
of thc country communities could be
made the more passable. Under union
more effective work could be carried
on than otherwise. One pleasing feature in connection with the work of
organizing for union was the discovery of tho spiritual unity that existed. They were to a very large
measure, one at heart.
wwwvwwwwwwwww
I    WEDDINGS    I
-V.VUW//.V.WWWUAV.VAV
KENNEDY-STAFP
Knox Church manse was the scene
of a qulol wedding on Tuesday morning at 11 a.m., when Robert Mark
Burns Kennedy, of Bull River, wus
united in marriage to Miss Jennie
Catherine Staff, of Yahk, B.C. The
couplo were attended by Mr. and Mrs.
L. Howard Haney, of Bull River. Rev,
K. VV, MacKay officiated.
DAY-McNTOSH
Saturday afternoon, November 15,
a quiet wedding was solemnized nt
Knox church manse when Miss Irene
Christcnn Melntosh became the wife
of August Daye, Rev. E W. Maekny
officiating. The couple were attended by Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Daye
nf Wardner.
Classified Advertising  Pay*
A little advertisement published in
ihe Herald at the cost of only a few
cents has brought half a dozen replies
or more. Another For Sale ndvor
t.isement sold a lot in the city for the
owner in a few days. Try the dn-s-
sifUwl columns. It costs little and may
do a great deal.
Cranbrook Studio
BAKER STREET :: Over McCreery Bros. Store
Special Christmas Offer
Come in and see us and arrange for your sitting NOW
A LIMITED NUMBER OF COUPONS WILL BE ISSUED
Lei us solve your Christmas problem
for at least twelve presents
C. Van Braam
iiiiiiiiiitUiiiiiiiiiiittliliiiiiiiiiKiiiiiiiniiiitliliiiiiitiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiit] Illtll nntiiii iiiiu tniiioiniiiiiiiiitiiiii nn minimi
Saturday, November 22
ASCRIBE YE GREATNESS unto our
Lord for his goodness,
wonderful works to the
men.—Psalm 107:21.
tnd for 1
children
Christmas Card* Moving
Orders for Christmas Cards
sent to distant points have been
God.   He is the Rock, his work is per- in« lnto tho HerflId fliirlV f^ely dur-
feet; foi- all his ways are judgment; a
(I of truth ami without iniquity,
just and right is he.—Deut.32:3,4,
• i   t   •
Sunday, November 23
THIS IS THE CONFIDENCE that we
have ir, him, thnt, if we ask anything
according to his wilt, he heaeth lis,—
1 John 5:14,
• *   »   •
Monday, November 24
BOAST NOT thyself of tomorrow; I
for thou knowest not what a day may j
bring forth.—Prov. 27:1.
Tuesday, November 25
• t    •    •
PEACE I LEAVE WITH YOU, my!
peace I give unto you: not as thc
world giveth, give 1 unto you. Let'
not your heart be troubled, neither let |
it be afraid.—John 14:27.
• •   •   •
Wednesday, November 26
MASTER, THIS WOMAN was taken
in adultery. Moses commanded us
thnt such should be stoned, but what
sayest thou? . . He said unto them,
He that is without sin among you, let I
him first cast a stone nt her.—John I
8: 4,5,7.
t   •   •   •
Thursday, November 27
BUT NOW IS CHRIST RISEN from i
the dead and become the first fruits i
of them that slept.—1 Cor, 15:20.
• •   •   •
Friday, November 28
OH  THAT MEN  would  praise  the
ing the past few days. Order now
while the selection is good. A wide
variety of samples, and many orders
ean be executed from stock forthwith.
No delays, and satisfaction assured.
NISBET & GRAHAM
Barristers, Solicitors, &c.
Offices: Imperial Bank Bldg.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
OFPICES at KIMRF.RLEV
IN K. of P. HALL
Open Every Wednesday from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
NELSON BUSINESS
COLLEGE
— LEARN TO EARN —
Shorthand, Typewriting, Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Spelling,
Rapid Calculation, Commercial
English, Commercial Law, Filing,  General  Office  Procedure.
Individual Tuition
Commence Any Time
New Term Now Commencing
P.O. Box 14-Phone 603
VENEZIA BOWLING ALLEY
TEN DOLLARS will be Riven free t.i llu- lady making the
highest score in three games uf ten pins
Fur lhe Gentleman making the highest score in ten pins TEN
DOLLARS is being offered.  Same conditions as above
These prizes are offered fur three straight games
Drawing for Prize Every Saturday Night from
Numbered Tickets
CONTEST STARTS
SATURDAY,  NOVEMBER 15th and closes
WEDNESDAY,  DECEMBER  24th,   1924
*+*+**.i.*++-*++-**
***********************************
All Requirements Can Be Met For Your
Fall
[Reading Matter
| Are You Interested In—
The Ladies' Home Journal
The Saturday Evening Post
The Country Gentleman
These are only three from a list we have uf over two thousand
periodicals, made up uf the most important publications in
Canada, the United Slates and Great Britain
TWO OR MORE PUBLICATIONS CAN BE COMBINED
TO SAVE YOU MONEY
Let Us Quote You a Combination Price
The Cranbrook Herald
Phone 18
BAKER-STREET
Phone  18
CRANBROOK, B.C. Friday, November 21st, 1924
THE CRANBROOK HFKAL1)
PAUK FIVK
HEARING UN
EIGHT HOUR LAW
(Continued trom rage 1)
most seriously curtail production, and
greatly increase thc cost of lumber,
During the operating period the maximum amount of lumber must be produced in order to maintain the cost of
production at the lowest possible
level. The expense of having plants
tied up for over five months each
year is a heavy one.
"It is not practical to operate mill
plants in the interior more than one
shift per day. Pinning mill plants,
lumber yards, housing accommodation, logging operations, etc., are laid
out to handle production on a ten
hour basis. Tin; Instability nf the
lumber market does not warrant the
expenditure of the enormous sums of
money which would be reipiired for
additional logging oqulpmont lo handle the Increased cut.
"The production of lumber on an
eight hour basis would greatly increase the cost uf production.   Tho
uncontrollable expenses and overhead
would be as heavy on an eight hour
production as on a ten hour basis,
though the output would be reduced
by about twenty per cent, on the former basis.
"The workmen engaged in the lumber industry will also be most .seriously affected by the enfocement of an
eight hour day. Due to tbe handicaps
und instability of the lumber industry
referred to above, the business of producing lumber in the interior of this
province has not been a profitable one
and as a result the remuneration that
workmen hnve received has not been
as high us that paid in some other
industries. Employees generally are
paid on a per hour basis, and the adjustment of wages to an eight hour
basis would be most serious to those
engaged in the industry, particularly
to those with dependents, and who depend solely upon the lumber industry
for their livelihood.
Different speakers for the lumber
workers urged on the commissioners
that the eight hour law was in effect
in some places south of the line, and
that it could be put into effect here
similarly. During the discussion the
old question of the fortnightly payday was also introduced the workers
claiming it was a dead letter in this
part of the district. Mr. MeNiven
invited them to show any specific instances where this wns being disregarded by the companies, but none were
forthcoming.. There is almost without exception ihe regular pay day for
mill workers, but out in the camps,
where it is mil found practicable, and
where tbe money would be no use if
it were paid, the system of handing
out time checks which can be cashed
at any time is followed generally,
and without objection being made to
it.
From Cranbrook Mr. McNlven went
on to Fernie to look into the situation
at Coal Creek, intending to join the
other commissioners when they made
the trip up to Golden for further
hearings on Tuesday of this week.
BLOCK ON FENWICK
AVENUE AGAIN RESERVED FOR TOBOGGANING
Insure will:
HORN' -- On .SiUunli
15th, at the St. Eugene
Mr. uml Mrs. A. C. Blaii
y. November
Hospital, to
One Fl
■ good
tbunks-Morse 0 h.p. engine,
a new, fnr sule ul Dezall's
38-39
Beeeh is Bpenaing i
time ot Yahk, expecting it, remain
there till about the middle ni December. Her son Ray accompanied her,
and spenl a few days there with liis
brother Norman, who is employed ai
camp 21. Hay returned to llii* city
on   Monday.
McBri-
i Ang<
I.   I-'.   Dene
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
LAKE §
WINDERMERE?
:" NOTES I
(Special to the Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., Nov. 19.— Constable Vachon who has been relieving
Chief  Sutherland  of the   provincial
home duly
at    Golden, has returned    tc
the
fr
[Hheries
depart
was u \isit
cussed
Robins
Cranbrook, B.C.,
November 18, 24
The Crnnbrook Herald,
City.
Dear Sin :
At the rogulnr meeting of tho City
Council hold laid ovenlng, a resolution wus passod closing l*'i nwlck Ave.,
from Edwnrda to l.oul» Streota, to
provide accommodation fro the children ol the city In the I'min ol tobogganing, Will you bi good enough to
have nn announcement placed In your
issues of Novombor 1 Ith and 21st,
similar to those published lust year.
Yours vory truly
r. VV. BURGESS,
City Clerk
MINERAL ACT
(Form F)
For first class automobile repairs I mj: it badly
vhich he suffered ubout thn
igo ,*,i liis ranch at Gold 'Ye*
i tog rolled over on to his Icj
nimn,
of
fisheries. Nelson,
tor here last week and dis-
tuin features with the game
of tin- Windermere Board
k, who:
. I,rea:,
Hli
winter
ivail.
Ratcliffe * , i
3-§M
lie
li
making us
in be i-xii.*,*
idprogn
ted.
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
"Watson" and "Kootenay King''
mineral cla! ns, situate in the Fort
.Steele Mining Division of Enst Kootenay District.
Where located:—Near the headwaters of Victoria Creek, a tributary of
Wild Horse Creek.
TAKK NOTICK that I. John (1.
Cummings, B.C.L.S., F.M.C., No.
Too.'tOC, acting as agent foi- William
Myers, Free Miner's Certificate No.
7434HC, intend sixty duys from the
date hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of ob-
talning a Crown Grant of the above
claims.
AND FURTHER TAKE XOTICK
that action, under Section Hy, must
be commenced before the issuance of
such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 5th day of October, A.D.
HI24. 89-47
WWMftVAW.V.W.VAVil
The homeworkers or thc Anglican
urch put i'H a \ery successful Bale
at the Parish Hall on Saturday after-
»ii last, aboul .Moo resulting from
their work,   There were all the cua-
.mnry articles made by clover fen.
Ine fingers which usually find ready
sab- especially at this time of year,
heiritf much in demand as Christina;
Kifts, and there were also tables of
superfluities and dolts' material. The
candy and home cooking tables were
the scene of much activity, and the
scout's and cubs, in helping to serve
afternoon tea did tlieir bit towards
making the afternoon quite successful.
White cups a
cup and saucer.
lit saucers at 20c per
at Kilby's. 35
(I. F, Collins, credit mann
Western Grocers, is spend ii
nr so in thi Wos( Kootcna
Nelson branch nf the Wei
cers. IU- accompi nied Mr.
genera] credit manager foi
tn Nelson, .Mr. Coven ha\
the week-end here as the ui.
and Mrs. Collins,
Everybody i;: going in i
concert on Tuesday anil \
at the Auditorium   A tun
Bale uf seat.-: has been nu
rush occurred Thursday \
plan opened at lhe Cranbl
& Book Co.
Mis.-.
Stewart,
of
th
- tele.
limine
who has
In
away
lay, hus return
.1
.i ,
llt.V.
Mi. 1
. Tillol .
n.
if
lalbea
ind, w
1,. hai  Ih
ell
Vis
ting 1
i-luw,
Mrs. Grii
VI
Ri
ierta,
,*eks.
lills  retll
in
1
to      ll
E. (I
the
ail,unci
i> and a
leu tin
nk Drug
New Arrivals of
CHRISTMAS TOYS, DOLLS 1
AND GIFTS
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION ji
Ladies Hat Shapes and Rowers (or Trimming ^
Come in and look over our stock of Christmas Goods ■:
While the Selection is Best '<•
Drake's Variety Store
16 Armstrong Avenue
******************************■..******** ********* *****
Announcement was made in the
legislature Wednesday by the attorney-general that the government proposed to bring down legislature very
shortly providing for the licensing of
motor car drivers, a reform which has
heen strongly urged by municipal and
other authorities in Vancouver and
elsewhere.
See all sides of college life in "The
Varsity Coach," put on by the hi<rh
school pupils, al the Auditorium, Friday,  December 5th.    Also splendid
patriotic pageant.
38-41
That the true < hrlstlan spirit permeates the activities of the local
branch of tbe G.W.V.A. was fully exemplified during the week-end. when
the members took full charge of the
remains of the late James R. Kisher,
who was killed as the result of a car
accident at Klko. Nothing was known
about the deceased beyond tbe fact
that he was a returned man, as no
trace could be found of any relatives.
The Vets took command and fifty of
the members conveyed the remains to
the Soldiers" Hot in St. Msinraret's
cemetery. President Geo. Bowen delivered the last charge due all veterans, and Rev 11. C. Oswald performed
the Anglican church rites. — Fernie
Free Press.
Be at tbe Shrine Club Dance, Friday, November 28th, Auditorium
Hall, ("ranbrook. Secure tickets from
your Shrine friends or at the hall
door. This will be the event of the
season. 88
According to word received in ll
city from Rev. P.. G. McBeth, me.
illgs are shortly expected to be lu
here under the auspices of the Pn
byterian Church Association, to pr
sent tbe case for the continuance
the Presbyterian Church, as oppos*
to tlie idea of church union.
Violin, bow and case, good a
new,
$12.   at Kilby's.
mt
Members of Ihelloard nf Rt
it way
Commissioners   passed   throug
the
city on Sunday on their way t
. Cal-
gary  where  they  held  session
!   this
week.   They had been silling a
Wi
son, and among the questions c
nning
up there was an application fn
ni the
C.P.R. to close the agency whit
h haa
been maintained tit Lurdcau.
Special prices on New Batteries at
Service Garage. Phone .'1*1. HI
Dr. Clarence MacKinnon, of Halifax, moderator of the general assembly of the Presbyterian Church in
Canada, who was a visitor in the cits*
for a short time this week, was a
guest of Rev. and Mrs. K. W. MacKay, at tbe Presbyterian manse on
Tuesday evening. Ile left for the
west on Wednesday's train.
Rah
Parol  Rates To Britain
Real Bargains on
SATURDAY SPECIALS
1     Announcement is made hy post of-
; flee oilicials of an increased rate on
{parcel post to Great Britain.        Thej for
\ new tariff went into effect on Satur-
I day.
i Tin new rates mi parcel post packages to the United Kingdom are ns
follows:
\ One pound,24 cents; two pounds,
! 12 cents; three pounds, Co) cents; four
j pounds. 78 cents; five pounds !t(5
I cents; •■':■ pounds $1.1-1; seven pounds
$1.32;   eight   pound*,   $1.50;   nine
;    ten    pounds,    •; 1.80j
i, $2.04.
With reference to the mentii
made last week of the school boai
meeting and the board's treatment of
the request of Jas. Logan, janitor oi
the Central School, Mr. Logan desires it made clear that the request he1
made was for two weeks' holiday,
with pay, which he felt was his due,
lie had worked full time during the
remainder of August to make i|p the
full two weeks after the board had rescinded the half time arrangement,
and his request was for pay during
the other two weeks as his holiday
pay. What the board granted was
pay for the time he actually worked,
leaving his two weeks holiday unpaid
pounds
1 eleven
For prompt repairs and satisfac
tion go to Ratcliffe & Stewart's garage. 20tf
At their mc
the Crnnhriiol
tangible   way
.■ting on Tuesday last
Rotarians in a very
showed
; the
a tor,
;ho Federated News, of Alhambra.
lounces that Mr. M. .1. Lorraine's
-k,  "The  Columbia  Unveiled," is
v off the press    It was published
by the Times-Mirror, of Los Angeles.
The book covers some 400 pages descriptive  of   the   trip  wliich   Mr.   Lorraine made fnm Canal Kbit to Asto-
.Li, down the Columbia River in the
17 foot skiff whicb he built at Ward-
.    it is fully illustrated.
PIANO  —  brilliant lone,  for
46, at Kilby's.
Mother And Daughter Service
Of special interest nn Sunday evening will be the Mother ami Daughter
.rvice iu the Methodist church under
the auspices of the C.G.l.T.    Members  of  that   organization   will  take
rial part in the service in the giving of appropriate readings. Mrs.
Klnghorn will sing "My Task," and
thc   anthem, "Remember   Now   Thy
ator," will be rendered by the senior choir tinder the leadership of
Mrs Warren. .Mothers and daughters
are asked tu sit together iu the center front. Will each girl bring
mother with her as her guest at the
service.
miles distant, where tbe mines are
situated, is about 1,000. Many of the
miners live and have homes in Fernie,
others occupying company houses at
Coal Creek. Formerly several lumber companies operated in the vicinity
of Fernie and their payrolls helped tu
swell the business turnover. TIk*c
mills, during the past two or three
years, however, discontinued operations so tbat tbe mines were practically the only revenue on which the
town depended.
Some yeurs ago when the mines
wero running steadily, about 1200
men were employed, but the number
has been gradually reduced through
falling markets until the number had
dwindled considerably when the mines
closed down.
While the Coal Creek mines are
Ferule's largest individual reliance
for business, lumbering is also an important source of revenue and that
will not he impaired in any degree by
the shutdown reported.
"THE VARSITY COACH"
TO PLAY FOR
ONE NIGHT ONLY
house will be only seventy-five
cents for adults and fifty cents for
children, including alt school students. This should meet with popular approval.
The play is progressing satisfactorily, lt is a comedy of modern
college life, full of laughs, and uproariously funny in places, but with
a serious thread, giving opportunity
at times for rea! drama. It is sure to
please the average theatre-loving
public.
Next week we will give a personul
sketch of the characters taking part
in the play.
"Britannia" will include forty
students, nnd is sure tn be well received. Mr. Robinson is assisting
with a high school orchestra, nnd
Mrs. R. Potter is training a group of
students iu the glee elub. In al.l
about sixty-live high school students
will take part. Don't miss this bit
of the season'., amusement
With tbo multiplicity of enter-;
tainment being given in Cranbrook
it this season, the high school
students have decided to put their j
play on for one evening only, Dec.
5th, Friday, unless when the ticket
sale opens they receive such support
that two evenings will be necessary.'
Therefore tickets will be sold for
Friday evening. Tickets will be on
sale on Monday, November tbe 24th,
students calling at homes and places
of business. These can be exchanged later for reserved seats. Stu-:
dents feel that one bumper crowded
house will bo better than two small |
houses. Also,   in   order   to   make
tlieir first effort popular, they have!
decided to place their price at a popular figure. One dollar will he
charged for all seats in the first
eight rows, but all other seats in the j ^WV^SVWYWWW^S
m  *> a- m  *> *-*  a   ♦  »  •-
♦ ■»■♦ ■♦ —k—
COAL STRIKE FORCES
COMPANY TO CLOSE
MINES AT COAL CREEK;
Announcement   Made   Last
Week Means Hard Blow
To Fernie
QUALITY — — SERYICI
CRANBROOK   CO-OPERATIVE STORES
\l'. 4 bars i.-r ..   .
PALM ni.ivi
FANCY CORN. tSer iiu
FANCY GOLDEN BANTAM O IRN ON COB, per tin
FRUIT CAKE, per IK
By the slab, per lb	
II. II. TOMATOES, per 11..
BRUSSELS SPROUTS, |>«-r I'..
SPINACH pe
i,h
1"
' 5c: Saturday,
25c
. 20c
■40c
50c
..45c
20c
35c
20c
45c
$1.25
$1.25
Choice Beef, fore quarter
Choice Beef, hind quarter
Choice Pot Roast Beef
- -     6c Ib.
- -     10c lb.
10c to 12' c!b.
al ChrUtmai Greeting Cards
u- we hml n vory fine sol-action
f.-mls t.i choose from, which mot
i' approval of a groat many. This
av the BOloctlon is a llttlo larger and
thc best wc have ever had.   Call in
1'rr.o
Ut! >l
of
ime Ribs of Beef, Boned and Rolled - 20c lb.
-    -    -    20c Ib.
-    3 lbs. 25c
Choice Round Steak
Choice Boiling Beef
GRAIN FED PORK
Special Pork Loins
Special Pork Leys
Special Pork Shoulders
Special Side (Belly) Pork
-     22c Ib.
18c to 20c lb.
16c to 18c lb.
-     -   18c lb.
DAIRY FED VEAL
Fore Quarters Choice Veal -   6c lb.
Special Veal Roast - - 12^cto ISclb.
Choice Round Bone Roast - -- 18c Ib.
Special Stewing Veal 3 lbs. 25c
CHOICE SPRING LAMB - GRAIN FED MUTTON
CHOICE SPRING CHICKENS, FOWL, Etc.
P. Burns C& Co., Ltd.
—PHONE     10—
Cranbrook, B. C.
imi  Inspec
them.    Th
1   prices  arc
Uili lower.
It is now t
nie to place
vmir ordoi
for  cards
for   the   OH
lountry. -
- The Cranb
•oiik Herald.
33tf
"Y" TEAM BEATS
HIGH SCHOOL AT
BOWLING MATCH
A very interesting bowling: mutch
was played on the Y.M.C.A. alleys,
November Uth, when the Y.M.C.A.
bowling team met the high school
boys. There was considerable cheer*
Ing and the high school boys gave a
good account of themselves although
they were defeated:
High School 1st    2nd    3rd
frame game game
II. Godderis   136     146     124
G. Parkin   116     149     146
.1. Brogan 124     114     124
N. Parker  143     133     133
B. Tuylor  IU       88
A. Shankland   153
636
Y.M.C.A.
t!. Simpson   177
.1. Lundy   160
A. MacDonald   122
V. Woodman   101
P. Wooley 134
U. Sinclair 	
694
63U     680
Kill
143
162
134
801    741
been in the putting on of tbe recent
!'• tary Plpyground Carnival. The
hi,, bought i block . f sixty .Ykct>
and in. (he opening m,..i t expect, to
occupy the bald-headed rowa. This
a matter of much encouragement
the embryo actor-Gyros. They feel
that most of their brother clubmen
nre sympathetic and wilt go with u
recollection of a fellow feeling, while
with regard to any who are not they
feel that the short range will not be
conducive to good shooting Tbe
Gyros have been practicing hard and
doubtless give a good account of
themselves, In the short time at
their  disposal  they  have  done  very
well.   They promise everybody their
money's worth or their money refunded. '
It costs you nothing to try. When
ordering your bread to-morrow, just
ask for one loaf of City Bakery
Bread. 86tf
Coming from Nolson on Friday last.
possibly it was the change of altitude
or change of drinks that affected
Charles Clip, who registered nt the
B.C. Rooms that night. Thc proprietor, Mr. Saknguichi. admitted him to
bis rooming house hut did not notice
anything out of the ordinary then.
During the night he did hear t;omeonc
pacing the hull rather vigorously, hut
still did not investigate. The next
morning, however, when be went up
lo make tip the rooms at about ten o'clock, Clip was in his room and would
not let the proprietor in, saying there
was someone wonting lo shoot him.
As a protection against these missiles
("lip had two socks tied around his
chest thinking these would ward off
the bullets. At about five o'clock that
afternoon the police got him from bis
den. After examination Clip was
sent to New WcstininHtor. He went
hy several aliases it was found on investigation.
Tbe official notice posted by the
Crow's Nest Pass Conl Company that
its Coal Creek mines will close down
indefinitely through lack of business
has come as a very serious blow toj
Fernie, which has had a chequered j
career as a mining town.
This notice was the official state- j
ment of that company that they tire!
closing down the mines at Coal Creek,
for an indefinite period. It read as
follows:
"The Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, through failure to retrieve suffl-;
cient business to operate the Coal
Creek mine, regret the necessity fow
having to inform the employees of the '
said mines tbat the Coal Creek Mines'
will be closed down indefinitely. Un-,
der the circumstances, we advise the i
employees of the company to try and ;
secure employment elsewhere. Com-,
pany officials will bring all the miners',
tools out of the mines to the surface
building at Coal Creek, where the
appreciation | men owning the tools will be able to
get them.
(Signed)  The ('row's Nest Pass     I
Co:.l Company. Limited."
The mines are probably the most;
extensive ami best equipped in Western Canada, but in various ways have
suffered interruption in operation
during thc past ten years.
In 1P08 a fire practically destroyed '
the town and recurring strikes have j
made business very insecure. Thej
latest decision of the company to:
close the mines, comes at the end of a
strike wliich lasted more than six
months. During tlie ^'.rike the man-'
sgement of the company endeavored1
to deal with ils men on ti1'1 basis of;
a long term contract at a wage whicb
would have given the miners comporn-'
lively steady work. The wage then
offered was between tin and fifteen i
per cent, more than the scale obtaining on Vancouvor Island.* The men
preferred to wait for a settlement
made by the whole district, and the
company, which is a member of the
Western Canada Coal Operators' Association, accepted the settlement
which was made recently although il
was not ns favorable as was proposed ,
to their men.
Until the miners struck last spring;
the Crow's Nest  Pass Coal Co. sup-]
plied the smelter at Trail with coke.
The strike with the consequent shut- <
down of thc coke ovens, it is common'
knowledge, forced thc Consolidated toj
plnce coke orders in another market.,
The coinpnny made it clear thnt i
while accepting the settlement it was
such as would enable the mines only
to secure one or two days' work  a
week.    Apparently the change in the
market conditions during the time the
Fernie mines were idle has made tin-
situation even worse than the company  contemplated,  with   the  result
thnt the mine* are now closed indefinitely.
The population of Fernie, including
that of thu village of Coat Creek, six
QUEEN OLIVES. Ret
QUEEN OLIVES, 40 oz. jar   .
QUEEN OLIVES, Stuffed, lo oz. jar
CHRISTMAS FRLTTS OF ALL KINDS
ASSORTED CRYSTALLIZED FRUIT
CRYSTALLIZED PINEAPPLE RINGS
FRESH APPLE CIDER,   FRESH COCOANL'TS
We have bought a large shipment of Peek-Frean & Co.'s Fancy
Biscuits, direct from the factory in London, England,
They will arrive via Panama and Vancouver
this week, or early next.   See this famous line
We also carry a full line of     FRESH and CURED .MEATS
Cranbrook Dist. Co-Op. Soc.
m  a-ta-rn'mt ■*»■»
Bruce Robinson
Phone 295        Teacher of Mule P.O. Box   762
STUDIO — ARMSTRONG AVENUE
Third House from Presbyterian Church
HOBIHSflR'S 0HGHESTR1-DIKGES IflatHGED FOR
*
335QS
3QE33ER
IY ArfOINTMENT
PUKVEYOM TO
HU MAJESTY
UNO GEOf.CE V.
Reputation Cannot Be Assumed.
It Must Be Earned.
"Radian (Bis)
WHISKY
have been popular in Canada
for over half a century.
They are the same in quality
today as they ever were.
77icj/ are thoroughly matured in Oa\ Cash\s.
DISTILLED AND BOTTLED IT
HIRAM WALKER & SONS, LIMITED
WALKERVILLE • ONTARIO
kk
Montftil. C^t.
Distillers of Fink
Whiskies shut M5S
London. Enf.
New YorV, U. S. A.
Tliis advertisement U not publiahcrl or displayed Ity the Liquor
Control Board or by thc (iovernment of Rritiah Columbia. w,(
HT PAOE    SIX
THB  CBAHBBOOI   HKRAI.D
Friday, November 21st, 1924
SMbodist £burcbBEV u c FfiEEK
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23
Bunyan's description uf the church ut' Jesus Christ is
the Palate Beautiful
"This house was built by the Lord of the Hill (Difficulty) und he
built it for the relief and security of pilgrims."
11 a.m. "UNREALZ1ED RESOURCE" junior ci„i.
12.15 — Sunday School.
SPECIAL
7.30 p.m. MOTHER AND DAUGHTER SERVICE
Tlu- Canadian Oirls in Training will give appropriate readings.
Mothers and Daughters are asked to sit together in tho centre front
Subject ol Address:—"THE SOVEREIGNTY OF WOMANHOOD"
tielo:   "My Task" . .. Mrs II. C. Klnghorn
Anthem: "Remember Now Thy Creator"  (Emerson)
VISITORS AND STRANGERS CORDIALLY WELCOMED
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
W. R. ROSS, K.C.
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR, Etc.
209   ROGERS   BUILDING
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Dra. Green & MacKinnon
fbrsleUni wid Surgeons
Offlce  at   residence,   Armstrong
Arsnue
OFFICII  HOURS
Afternoon!  t.OO to 4.00
■renins.   7.30 to 8.30
Innd.jl   1.00 to 4.00
CRANBROOK, B.C
UK. F. B. MILES
DEMIST
OFFICII HOURS
I lo 11 >.m.     1 to I p.m.
Union Blk., CRANBROOK, B.C.
F. M. MACPHERSON
Undertaker
PtenlM
Hortirj kte, »eit to Clt» B»U
LOD-8E8 AND SOCIKTIK8
ffOMFN'S  INSTITUTE
Meets ln the
K. el r. Hal.
atternoon ot the
tret Tueedei at
I p.m.
All ladles are
cordially InTlted
President!  Mrs.   W.   ff.   Wolfer
8ee..Treaurer:    Mrs.    Finlayson
I. O. O. F.
KEY CITV LODGE, No. 41
i,W~1' Meets e?ery
tZraEkT&L Monday nl|ht at
fK?35?Tn* Auditorium
Sojourning Odd Fellows are cordially InTlted.
N. G.       ...       A. Burtch
Ree. See.  B. O. Dingley, P.O.
Montana Restaurant
Meals at All How
IMgett, (HfueNes aad Caadlee
OMeml SI Pkea. Ml
On. Baak ef Ceaneree
EelablUhed llll Fkeae 114
Geo. R. Leask
PI01-I1H ICTXDSI
11TD   CONTRACTOR
Cakliet Wert   rietira Praailng
bUaulee |Itm ea
all
OBeei Cenec Herkary l.eaae
aad llwarls Street
INARD5
Tht old reliable retni ly for rheu-
iii.i'.isiii, neuralgia, j>ure throat aud
I.plltillS.
Best Liniment Made
i idnri
jU**%]    "„\t   :'.u\y,\'ul"'t r.;-
m&  **;',- ^-v..'
V*ML'       ■ ■<.-... ii :;■.- i,l t run-
Min it.I'. I.inlttirnl
llwiyi glVM *..infection.    Tor   Ml
(.■■ii* or I'l.n.   it
|fVM in  mih tcliif.
Mlnard's Liniment
Cu., I.lmttcil
Virwouili.   -  -   N.S,
Baptist Cburd)
Rev. W. T. TAPSC0H
SUNDAY, NOV. 23
10 it.m. Brotherhood Bible
Class conducted bv Mr. II.
L.   Porter,
11 a.m. Sermon by tbe Pastor
"The    Spirit-l-illeil    Life"
12i
, Sunday Scliool.
"..SU p.m. Sermon by tbe Pastor.   Subject:
"The Tango Tongue"
yiiu  tut; rnitin.ii.i.v
IJiVITEl).
iiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiii[]iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiitiiiniii[]iii|iii]i!
I C. JOE BROS. |
| LADIES' and GENTS' 1
| TAILORS |
1 - SUITS MADE TO ORDER — |
■ CLEANING & PRESSING |
§  Crunbrook SI., Oj-|i. Ilk. of Con. |
CRANBROOK.ClEANfiRS
AND DYERS
Itery Garment sent to aa to be
Cleaned or Dyed la (Iran
Oar Utmost Care.
Our kn3T.lt.ln of the kuslnees
la your assurance of eatlsfaetlon
kere.   Phone, and ire wlll call,
or krlng aa yoar work.
We Clean aad Dye Irerytbtac.
PHO.VE  MI
CLEANING — PRBSSINO
— REPAIRINO —
Von Will Make No Mistake
ln Ordering that
NEW SPRING SLIT
OU OVERCOAT
— From —
H. C. LONG,
The Tailor
Van Home Street
Opposite C. P. R. Depot
Phone 416     tt     Phone 411
STEADY
EMPLOYMENT
JVAK*ME».
m^
A stead) demand for liri
(ish Columbia Products
means a steady output In
British Columbia factories
which in turn means steady employment for thousands of local workers. So,
take stock of your pantry,
and if you find anything
there produced outside of
the province, make a note
of it.
RETURNED SOLDIER
LAID TO REST AT
FAMILY HOME
John Swanson, Who Died As
Result   of  Train
Wreck
(Contributed   by   Henry   McMastor,
Portage la Prairie, Man.)
The funeral of the late John Swan-
son, of Kamloops, B.C., was held on
.Monday afternon, November 3rd, al
:, p.m., from the residence of Mrs.)
Swanson'a father, Henry McMaater,
50 Campbell Street, Smith Portage la
Prairie, Man., interment being mado
in Hillside Cemetery. The service
was conducted by Rev. S, P. Riddoll,
Methodist pastor on tin.1 Prospect circuit. In referring to the deceased ho
voiced the sentiments of all In the
words, "To know him was to love
him." Tho pall bearers wero six]
brothers in law: Messrs. Roy, James,
Russell and Leslie UoMaitor, W. J.
McCracken ond Charles T. Prater,
Tho beautiful floral tributes included a wreath from tho family,
wreaths from tho li. of LP. & K., No.
-li'iS. Kumloops, of which he was a
member, ond the IJ. of L.K., Xo. 821,
Kamloops. a spray from Miss Ross,
Portage la Prairie, and wreaths from
Mr. and Mrs. l*\ ,1. McAvinn, Kamloops, and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cope,
New Westminster.
The lato Mr. Swanson was born in
John O' Groats, Caithness, Scotland,
August 8th, 18i>2. Besides his widow
he is survived by his parents Mr. and
Mrs. David McDonald, two brothers,
Sinclair and David, and three sisters,
Fanny and Georglno at home and
Mrs. Donald Poison all living at Wick,
Scotland. Mr. George Manson, 528
Clinton Steet, Vancouver, is an uncle.
The deceased came to Canada in
1011 and upon liis arrival at Cranbrook entered the services of tbe C.
P.R., as locomotive fireman and since
then has worked out of Cranbrnok,
Sirdar, Trail, Revelstoke, Field and
Kamloops,
On May 5th, 1015, he answered the
call of King and Country, enlisting
with the BOth Canadian Battalion at
Calgary. In 1016 he arrived at
Sliornclifl'e, England, and was drafted to the Hist Battalion of Calgary,
to reinforce Canadians in France.
After the "June scrap" at Ypres, on
Tune ty, 1916, he was sent to the hospital at Manchester, Rug., for five
months. Later he returned to France
with the Fifth Canadian Railway
Troops as sapper. He was again invalided to England. At Armistice ho
hud completed nearly four years of
service, of which two years had been
spent in France. He was invalided
to Canada in 1019 antl received his
discharge March 20th of the same
year. Owing to ill health he spent
six months of L921 visiting his parents in Scotland. September 18th,
(.923, he married Miss Jean McMastor, of Portage la Prairie, Man. Two
months later thoy went to reside at
Kamloops, Mr. Swanson firing the
yard engine there. The deceased had
been under the care of Dr. J. S. Burns for over six months and had just
started back to work on September
29th.
On October 2!)th, at G.30 p.m., he
WPJ fatally injured when the yard engine he was firirr- was struck by a
freight train that was pulling into the
yard. He was rushed to tho Royal
inland Hospital and his wife reached
him a few minutes later. Every
thing possible was done to relieve his
suffering but he passed away at midnight. His death came as a great
shock to bis many friends anil the
sympathy of all Is extended to the
young widow in her sad bereavement.
"    FORT STEELE
NOTES
the winter here.
Mrs. B. Reid returned to her home
in Cranbrook on Wednesday, after
spending a fow weeks with Mrs. J.
White.
Mr. Archibald hod a breakdown
with his car while returning Trom n
bunting trip, and had to walk from
Horse Shoe Lake, a matter of ten
miles.
J. White is turning the Forsyth
house into a garage.
Tom and Jim Fulton returned from
Waldo last week.
Two  men  from the  Windermere,
Messrs. MacMillau and Wooler, ran
nut of gas while on the road to
Fort Steele and bad to walk
fourteen miles lo Ta Ta Crock to get
the necessary gas to enable them to
reach here.
The bridge crew arrived on Monday to re-plank the Westporl bridges.
Ted Baker bad a breakdown with
bis ear while on tho way to Bull River recently.
Mrs, Chaining and children were
visiting Mrs. Cretney lust week.
A meeting was held 111 the schoolroom last week to arrnngo for the
children's Christmas tree, when il was
decided to make a collection of the
town for funds.
Tho Liberals of Westport havo had
poor treatment from the public works
department this week. At the lost
election the Liberal Vole was 11,
(Taylor); ami 5 Wallinger. Now
there is a little work to be done Taylor's supporter.-; do not seem to have
teams suitable for the job, so one
was brought out from Cranbrook.
But there! 'Twas ever thus!
Gladys Dawson has returned from
Windermere, where she has been for
the summer.
.Mr. Wallinger in his speech:
"1 have failed to see the reason
for so much optimism," he added.
"Prosperity does not exist in British
Columbia as it once did. and 1 see no
chance of a change if the government
carries on in tbe future as it has done
in the past."
Mr. Wallinger recorded his objection to the Timber Royalties Act, and
urged that a downward revision be
made. lie! itive to agriculture, he
contended that the industry had been
drifting steadily backwards, and that
conditions now were much more serious than they were ten years ago.
In th< Crnnbrook district there was
room t <•■ fifteen or twenty thousand
settlers, At present only about seven
hundred vere located there.
Mining formed the major portion
'of  the  Crnnbrook  member's  speech.
jlated iu mining throughout the east-
lie believed that a great  future 0X»
I tho government would first huve to
prn sections of British Columbia, but
tako Btepa to onconrago the industry.
A prospector had not been seen in the
Cranbrook district for a good many
years, ho declared, and a new discovery ui silver-lead ore, which was the
j principal mineral]nation, hnd not been
made for twelve years,
I lie reviewed lhe possibilities of development ami the effect of such action upon the general prosperity of
j the province. Cranbrook contained,
j lie said, the largest silver-lead mine
Iin (be world, aud from it alone, a
large payroll was distributed.
\ Continuing, Mr. Wallinger said that
ibe Sullivan mine had produced (170,-
000 tons of silver-lead ore, which had
been shipped to the smelter at Trail
and to Antwerp, Belgium.
j Concluding his speech, the Cran-
1 brook member spoke about the civil
I service, and charged that men had
i been ''pitchforked" into jobs ovei the
(heads of departmental chiefs and ser-
. vants who were entitled by their ser-
Ice to promotion.
LOCAL MEMBER TAKES
PART IN DEBATE
AT LEGISLATURE
DR. KING NOT SURPRISED BUT DISAPPOINTED
AT RESULT IN YALE
Urges More  Encourar ;ment
Be Given To Mining
Industry
Mr. X. A. Wallinger .ne local
member, has again been pic ed on the
mining committee of thi legislature.
He made his opening speed of the
session on the d I:-',,1 i :i .no reply-
to the speech from tiie th:. ue.
Previous addres^s ma.1" by Liberal members had made CO] us references to the prosperity of ibe province, and this was rcfi  red to by
Hon. Dr. J. H. King, minister of
public works, before returning east
after directing the by-election in Yale
riding, expressed himself as disappointed but not surprised at the result, declaring the district inherently
Conservative.
D. King stated: " While naturally
disappointed at tho result of the by-
election in Yale I was not surprised at
the result. The district has been inherently Conservative since the time
of Duncan Ross, when in 1908 there
was a deferred election in this riding
and despite thc fact that Sir Wilfred
Lnurler hod swept the country as a
whole, antl tlie electors knowing this
gave an overwhelming Conservative
majority. In the provincial elections
heltl only a few months ago Ihis rilling gave approximately a 8000 adverse vote against the Liberal party.
We had, however, hoped lhat the people of Yale might realize lhat Liberal
policies as enunciated by the prime
minister, which means the building
up of Western Canada would be appreciated by the agricultural people
of the district of Yale, where they
specialize in fruit growing, but
they have failed fully to realize the
Importance of the issue to themselves.
"However, I am not going back to
Ottawa discouraged, as I feel sure
that the people of this province are
behind me in my efforts to develop
Bi'iti^h Columbia, and especially thc
coast cities of Vancouver, Victoria,
New Westminster ami Prince Rupert
nnd that when the general election
comes around I will be given their
support to assist me in carrying on
the work which I have started in the
development of Pacific coast trade,
which means the development of British Columbia and Western Canada as
a whole. The people of this province
must realize that their destinies are
tied up with the King government,
the policy of which government aims
to help ant! stimulate the great basic
industries from which all wealth
flows, or, in other words, a Western
Canada policy."
Boy, Oh, Boy
Soph:  "Some  kids  kicked a  foot-
hall   through   lbe   window   ami   hit
Clailys right iu the ribs."
Othor Soph; "Did it hurt her'."*
Soph: "No, but it durned near bus-
led three of my fingers."
Crazy—Like « Fok
What do you think of a man who
gets nut of bod at midnight when it is
pouring rain ami goes horseback riding
1 think he's crazy.
H'm—our friend, Paul Revere.
Pacific Milk Co., Ltd.
Head Office, Vancouver, B.C.
Factories at  Abbottford and Ladner
The Boy Scouts are having a competition for a Christmas prize they
are divided into two patrols.
C,   Smith,   C.   Howard,   and   F.
Crooks aro baching for the winter in
the .Joe Robertson cabin at West-
port.
O. J. Knight and Warren Wood-
lands run out of gus on November the
Mb, while out duck hunting at Twin
Lakes, near Rampart, and had to hoof
the six miles home.
.Martin Hoffman returned on Wednesday from the prairie.
Mr. McKinley, of Wild Horse, along
[with bis wife iinil child, are spending
Get Your
Reservation
FOR
CHRISTMAS SAILINGS TO THE
BY
• j->M*S«r
OLD COUNTRY
SPECIAL
TRAIN
From Winnipeg lo W. St. John N.B
9.304 DEC. 2nd & 9th
DIRECT TO THE SHIP'S SIDE
For Sailing S.S. Monti-lure Dec. 5 for Liverpool
For Sailing S.S. Montlaurier Dec. 12 for Liverpool
THROUGH TOURIST SLEEPERS
To \V. St. John N.B. Leave Medicine Hat 8.10 a.m.
Dec. 1 for S.S. Montclare  Sailing Dec. 5 to Liverpool
Dec 6 for S.S. Minnedosn Sni'ing Dec. 10 to Cherbourg
Southampton, Antwerp
Dec. 7 for S.S. Aletngamu Sailing Dec. 11 to Belfast, Glasgow
Dec. 8 S.S. Alontlaurier Sailing Dec. 12 to Liverpool
Dec. 12 for S.S. Montcalm Sailing Dec. 16 to Liverpool
FULL INFORMATION FROM ANY AOENT OF THE
CAstm
IT SPANS THE WORLD
37-40
JOHN GARD
PAINTER &
PAPERHANGER
Fill Line of Wall Paper
Ib Stock.
Store, Hanson Avenue
Phona 4M tt all bow*
CRANBROOK     .     •     .     B.C.
| HURRY'S WHITE LUNCH
J IS THK PLAJE TO EAT.
f White Help Only Is Employed.
+ Yon will find thin Cafe a Homey
* Place to Enjoy Your Jfcalu
t ALEX. 1IURKV • Prop.
**************************
BABY'S COLDS
Children's delicatt digestions are eahiiy
disturbed by too much "Hosing." Still,
the little ones' cold troubles cannot lie
neglected.
At the very first rign of croup, sore
throat, or any other cold trouble, apply
Vicks VapoRub over the throat and
chest There is nothing to swallow—you
just rub it on. Colds go over night, croup
is usually relieved in 15 minutes.
Milk and Cream
DIRECT FROM
Big Butte Dairy Farm
FBONK   III
Sainsbury & Ryan
BUILDERS AND
CONTRACTORS
BntlmilM QItiu and Wort
OunmtMtf
TflepkolM IM ■■< M
CRA NBROOK     -     B.C.
A. E. Jones
Contractor & Builder
CRANBROOK, B.C.
Plans Drawn & Estimates
Furnished
Phone 386 :: P.O. Box 192
ALL   WORK   GUARANTEED
L. D. Cafe
(UttU DnilHM)
WhM yea wkb wttMag loo-i
to ttt io to the "L.D."
yfffrrfffkVfffff
Canadian
Cafe & Rooms
JOE  I YEM.ITSU, Proprietor
Van Horne St. Opp. C.P. Depot.
NEWLY RENOVATED
THROUGHOUT
Comfortable Rooms
First Clans Cafe -Service
PHONE 98
CRANBROOK - B.C.
CRANBROOK CARTAGE & TRANSFER CO.
TOWRISS ft ROBERTS
Agents for Hard and Soft Coal.    Distribution Can a
Specialty.   Diceltont Warehousing.
SAND and ORAVEL
OPPOSITE CP.R. DEPOT
Telephone M        .:,        .:.
KMMIMMM
CRANBROOK, B.C.
P .0. Box 216
r.0LKS
IN OUR
TOWN
Spoke
Too
Quick
By
Edward
McCullough
AVTOCAimt
ABOUT  THAT  HIKE
feLEANOAE WE v-JEBE
TAUK1N'   ABOUT
LAST   NI6HT - LET'S
TAKE   IT   A  WEBK.
WOM   Tt>-WV-6H.'
6Af  CUfiLV   I'M  GOIN'  OVER
To   SEE   LAWVER.   PECK. PER.
AWHILE -   YOU MIND TH'  6TDPE
AN'   8V TH' WAV
8o8 .   VJHEftE'5
■VOua. STENO& ?
rlirt HW
THAT HOMELV
8«T MAB8IED ?
WHO WAS FOOL
EN006H  TO .
MAHBV HER? Friday, November 21st, 1924
TBI  CKXHBKOOK   HEIAT.V
PAQE SEVEN
MID-WEEK PICTURE Al
STAR HAS SETTING IT
SOUTH SEA ISLAf
DS
tlu
"THE SIGNAL TOWER" IS
OUTSTANDING HUMAN
PICTURE; FULL OF REALITY
"The Signal Tower," Universal
super-Jewel starring Virginia Valli,
which will be Bhown nl the Star, l*'ri-
day and Saturday this week, is a
photoplay that. Bonda tho BpoclatorB
homo wondering just how many families thoro aro in this laud whoso Blory
might havo furnished tlu- material for
this drama.
"True tt> nature" whon applied to
this drama, may bo a mil ure that must
porsons have very lit tie knowlodgO
about It i» true not all of us are
railroad om ploy cos dostlned to earry
<»v their duties in a lonely stretch of
forest, but all know quite well what
the joys antl tragedies are that enter
the homes of the average in this country.
"The Signal Tower" achieved success in two ways: one in the convincing ability of the characterizations,
und the other in the reality of the externals. The vital dramatic interval
of thc story is set in the swirling environment of a storm at night within
a mighty forest. A train wreck comes
to add its chaos to the tormented
mind of a man who believes that by
devotion to his task—that of saving
the lives of those who ride by rail—
he would wreck for ever the happiness of his homo life.
Miss Valli never has been seen mi
lhe screen in ;i more appealing ride
than that, of Sally TolHver, wife of
a man who weeks in lbe signal lower
Donald.
'The Signal Tower'' is a photoplay
thai should not be missed.
ol
'  11
rail
1 1
1     lllll:
i Un
■mil:
ll   11
lo
holy
for
ost.
But
1 lii-ri-
is
llll
lonol
Incss
in
thu
111
IIIH'
11 IV
Ill'
III
IM
I'miiil.i
ol
lim
,,..._
fl;
ithor
, mt
lllll
T  1
lllll
child
Ni
■Hili
r ia
a
101'Q
tru;
tea;
,-    I
ill
Un- i
uiihi
l'A i)
*f u
second man, also a signal lower niiiii,
who, againsl tlie desires of tlie wife,
is taken into (he family.
The story that develops from then
on is just as true as is the story of
the happy days that came before,
Throughout, the picture is full of
human touches tbat appeal.
The cast includes llockliffc Fcl-
lowes, Wallace Beery, Frankie Darro,
a child actor who goes through his
pnrt as though it were no "part" but
just "doing things'
ro w.-
James 0. Bar-
, Dot Farley, and J. Farreli Mac-
'CONSIDKR THF. LIUFS—"
SEE BIG WEEK-END FILM
AT STAR NEXT WEEK
"Lilies of the Field" is tbe title of
Ihe picture to be shown at the Star
Theatre. Friday and Sat unlay of next
week, November liH ami 20, It is a
society drama of rare strength ami
magnificence.
Mildred darker loved her husband.
As is often the way of a man with a
maid, Waller Barker's only tie to his
wife was tlieir three year old daughter, Rose.
On the night the story opens Walter calls his wife from the office saying that he would be detained until
late and for her to call Ted Conroy
who was coming to dinner, and ask
to have the engagement postponed.
Unable to reach Conroy, Mildred
waits till at the appointed time Conroy appears. He persuades Mildred
to visit the home cf Louis Willing,
America's richest bachelor.
In thc apartment of Maizle Lee, a
lily of the field, a meeting of her
friends is in progress, Malzie is dressing also in preparation for the Willing party.
At the Willing home Mildred wanders in the library, enchanted by thc
thousands of books. Louis Willing,
tall, debonair, but with a slight touch
of cynicism, fin tis Mildred looking
more beautiful than ever, perched on
a ladder examining a rare volume.
| Naturally he is intrigued.
At home, Walter Ilarkcr appears
just as Mildrd is repulsing Ted. The
divorce that follows rocks New Vork.
Willing returns and makes violent
Marker leaves with bis new bride for
California, taking baby Rose.
love to Mildred. She refuses to see
[him again. In order to win her hand
in marriage, Willing attempts to recover baby Rose for the disillusioned
mother.
On a stormy night, alone anil miserable, a telegram comes for Mildred
saying that Hose has died.. She considers life not worth living and goes
to Willing, ready for anything rather
than her own thoughts. She faint
in Willing's arms. He receives a telegram from Harker saying that Mildred's wire hnd been sent by his wife
in a fit of jealousy and that Hose was
j leaving for New York.
The realization lhat Willing really
loves her conns to Mildred when she
learns of the struggle he has made to
secure Rose, and thry pledge eternal
devotion.
Wrecked from a hydroplam
South Seas, what could an attractive
young couple do but fall in lovi and
get married? How it all happened,
and how an obscure English village
took tbe new.'' i.s seen in "Sinners in
Heaven," the feature lo be shown at
the Star Theatre, next Wednesday
ami Thursday.
Barbara Stockley, straight-laced
daughter of a conventional English
family, who lives in a prim little
English village, is persuaded by her
intimate friend, Mrs. Fields, to go
on a round-the-world flight in a
hydroplane with her brother, Alan
Croft, a flier of international fame,
Barbara leaves ber fiance, Hugh
Kochedale. with a promise that when
she returns the following Chri tmi
she will marry him.
Tbe  fliers get caught in a South'
Sea typhoon and ure wrecked off tbe '
coast of a small island in the tropicB.
nil are lost but  Barbara and Alan,
who manage to get to shore Bafely.
To their dismay  they  find that  the
island is inhabited by savages.  How- I
ever, with thc aid uf the radio outfit which    he    salvages    from    tho
wreckage,  Alan  scares the superstitious  natives into  believing thai he
is a white god.
As time passes Alan and Barbara I
realize that they love each other. I
Finally they plight their troth he-;
fore God, ami without clergy, per-1
form a marriage ceremony. When
hope of rescue is almost gone, an ,
aeroplane suddenly appears on the:
horizon. Just in the nick oi" time!'
For the natives, having discovered i
that Alan is not a god, decide to kill ■
them both. In the fierce battle
that follows, Alan is shot by a native,
and left for dead, while Hai barn i
nnd the aviators escape.
When Barbara returns home, slic? j
finds the town outraged at tne news j
of her unconventional marriage. Although believing Alan dead, liar-
barn nevertheless defends her action.
But   happiness   comes   to   her   at
last, for Alan  miraculously  appears
So Barbara and Alan renew the vows they had taken on the
desert island.
WILL THE I.W.W. AND
LUMBER OPERATORS
COME TO GRIPS AGAIN
(From the Calgary Herald)
, The I.W.W. organization, while still
active in the Kootenay country, will
not be able to repeat its campaign of
last year in tying up the lumber industry in interior British Columbia.
This is the opinion of lumbermen who
\isited Calgary tbis week.
The lumbermen expect a fight with
tin- wobblies this winter when the
bush work stints but they are confi-
di it that tbe agitators will not suc-
ceed in their plan to binder operations.
Two factors enter into the specula-
tioi of tin- lumbermen. One is that
the I.W.W. have lost much of their
support in the lumber districts the
other is that there will be much less
employment this winter ami lhe labor
supply is large.
The lumber market is not brisk at
tin ; resent time. Large tie contracts
mad a great ileal of work last year
b;i tu date this season fewer contracts ol this nature have been awar-
di d. Therefore there will be much
less i  tivity in the woods.
The wobblies have maintained the
akelt Ion of their organization in
Cranbrook, where they have kept a
headquarters open all summer.
MS
Mother: "Did tliat young man put
hi.- arms around you last night?"
Daughter; "Yes, mother, throe
tines."
-Mother:    "Heavens — what   long
Superior Value
VIfn a very superior article can
ii.itl at the same price as an in-
tlie buyer has no hesitation in his choice. This should be
your rule regarding reading for yourself and family. In addition to your
local paper, you should read the Family Herald and Weekly Slar of
Montreal, hy long odds ihe best week-
lv in Canada. It costs the same ot<
other weeklies, not in the same class
—two dollars n year—and includes a
beautiful art calendar and a free opportunity to win as much as Five
Thousand Dollars cash. Handsome
ami useful awards are given for new
subscriptions. Hy subscribing to the
Fnmlly Herald ami Weekly Star of
Montreal yon will get the best value
for your money obtainable anywhere.
g    LUMBERTON
CHIPS
Winter sports in Lumberton have
gotten away to a good start already.
Coasting on the hill which leads to the
houses has heen very good, especially
last week, while the ice on the pond
was in excellent condition. Several
of the boys got together last Saturday and cleared a large space of snow
so the stage was all set for the following day and many Lumberton enthusiasts enjoyed thoir first skate of the
Aspirin
Insist on BAYER TABLETS OF ASPIRIN
Unless you see the "Bayer Cross" on tablets you are
not getting the genuine Bayer product, proved safe
by millions and prescribed by physicians 24 years for
Headache
Neuralgia
Lumbago
Rheumatism
Accept only "B:tyer" package which contains proven directions.
Handy "f!ayor" boxes of 12 unlets—-Also bottle of 24 and 100—Druggists,
A'| trln U tbe traile mark (Kflttmd In Cai.aJo) of Ba»t Micur.-ictuPe of Moix>*c-*1 if-
ncttattcr "f SiilK'jll-.i.'iil i.Wivl Sail.vile Ai-l.1. "A, s. A."), While n h ««•!! known
that A-j.Ji-t:. nii'aiiH Bwm punufictuw, iu -raut Um p-oMk igiUui UaiuUwi, Um satHtta
or Ba/er Goupuy win Im ■limpet) wtu» ttdf c-tMttl traiie m-irk, ■.,.-.' "Bijw t'c.-w
.season. There has been very little i
work done on the ice rink thus far
this season. Arrangements were made '
some time ago at a meeting of thei
hockey enthusiasts, to make everything in readiness; the boys were to
t on the following Sunday morn-J
ing at tlie rink and put everything iu
first class shape. The usual thing
happened, for out of twenty-live who j
attended the meeting only three up- \
peered on the scene of action, so very .
little headway was made. Something'
will have to be done soon or we will
havo the same experience as we had ,
a year ago.
The regular weekly meeting of the
Lumberton Club was held last week I
in the elub rooms.    Eight tables of
empire whist were in play during the
early part of the evening.    The high
scores were made by Mrs. G. C. Rob-1
son and Mr. J. Bartle.   A lunch was ,
served  by  the  committee   after  the
supper waltz had been played, which ■
was followed by tlancing till the hour
of twelve.
Mr. and Mrs. L. T. Dwelley enter-
talned a number of their friends last
Friday evening in honor of Mr. and-
Mrs. G. C. Robson. The time was
spent in playing empire whist, which
was very much enjoyed by everyone
present. Prizes were awarded to the
followin: Mrs. K. B. Mitchell, ladies'
first j Miss Jessie, Hunter, ladies' consolation; Mr. G. C. Robson, men's*
first ami Mr. K. Issler, consolation. A
very tasty lunch was served by the
hostess during the course of the eve-;
ning. The guests departed at a late j
hour after having spent a most en-}
joyahle time,
Messrs. Patterson, Foster and'
Rayne, of the special commission;
which is making a trip through Bri-1
tish Columbia investigating the sen-.
timent of the people and manufacturers with reference to the eight hour
law, spent Saturday of last week at
the B. C. Spruce Mills camps. The
gentlemen were accompanied on the
trip by Mr. Klinestiver, manager of
the mills. The idea of the trip to
the camps was to obtain some first
hand information with regard to the
conditions which prevail at the logging camps. At the time of the hearing in Nelson one of the men connected with the I.W.W. organization testified that tho camps at Lumberton
were above the average. However,
this was contradicted when the hearing was held and it so happens that a
member of the same organization told
the commission that they had been
misinformed while at Nelson in regard to the conditions nt the B. C.
Spruce Mills camps. The visit to the
camps at Lumberton left no doubt in
the minds of the commission as to the
authenticity of the testimony  which
was given at the bearing at Nelson.
The new Holt cat is making it*
dally trips to the camps with very
little trouble. It has no difficulty
whatever in making the round trip
to camp one in a day, allowing lots
of time for the loads to be put on for
the next day. Tbe return trip from
camp one has been made in lens than
3 hours. Heretofore it has required
two days to negotiate the round trip
with the four horse teams.
WANTED
SOOTHING
mmmo
| PAUL   NORDGREN
*
* Wben You
I CALL AT YAHK
* Do not forget tc viilt tht
I Paul Nordgren Store
% On Main Road, near brldg*
* New   Shipments   of   Se*»on»bl«
* Good* Alweyi Arriving.
Canadian Cafe
and Rooms
YAHK, B.C.
Opposite Garage, Near Brldga
Comfortable  Rooms  with
Cafe in Connection
We Solicit Your Patronage
A. Hjort - Prop.
THE
NEW HOTEL
Yahk, B.C.
S. MARKLUND Prop.
When In Yahk make your home at
TIIE NEW HOTEL.
This Hotel ls new from bottom to top.    Twenty-fly* nicely furnished rooms. All are clean
and comfortable.
	
RESTAURANT IN CONNECTION. PAGE Elfltll
THE  CRANBROOK   HERALD
Friday, November 21st, 1924
jimMWUvuw>^AWww--ww\l''''Mvwww>AnwMM>''U'Wi>M^'y
j Special This Week at THE GIFT SHOP £
BLACK or GREEN ONYX & PEARL RINGS j
inlOKandHK i
LOCAL
WEMNGft
Regular $4.50 and $5.UU, SPECIAL for .
Regular $6.00 and $7.00. SPECIAL for .
$3.00
S4.50
-A. EARLE LEIGH,
WATCI1HAKEB & JEWELLER Norbury Ave.
We ean.y a full line ol Men's Worn-
on'i aud MUseH' Shoes. *
W. P. DORAN.
Our low prices win every time.
The children can enjoy the Gyro
Concert as well as the older ones
Bring them along. They will have
a tfooil time, ami you will be doing
the hospital n good turn. 38tf
ANNOUNCEMENT
ski-:
PATEY   BROS.
FOR MUSICAL
Al E R C II A N I) I S I-
ACCESSORIES
ALL MUSIC
2 Sheets of Alusic for $1.00
Cranbrook   Bazaar
COLUMBIA      GRAFONOLAS
NOTICE   TO
PLACER  MINERS
Offers will l-i- received up I"
January 1st. 1925. for tile
purchase nl llu* interest of
the Estate nf Robert Brown,
deceased, in the Lake Creek
Piacer Mining Claim, situate
mi Lake Creek, Easl Kootenay District, about four and
iine-half miles (rom Lumber-
ton, B.C.
ALEXANDER BROWN
Administrator
Robert Brmvn Estate
Sussex und Portland Streets
311-1(1       New Weitmin.lor,  B.C
SPECIAL SATURDAY ONLY
43 Piece Dinner Sets in beautiful
china, only $17.50 a set.
MOFFATT'S VARIETY STORE
The music pupils nf Mr. Bruce Ito-
binson aro giving a rocltal nt the
Presbyterian Schoolroom mi tlu- evening ul Monday, December 1st.
On Friday last A. Macdonald nml J.
McKinnon   assaulted   a   Chinaman
[somewhal -.evenly, sn Unit lhe unfortunate victim uf the affray has been
I I'm- two duys in hospital, und is nuw
recovering. The enso will como up
before Magistrate Leask mi Tuesday
| next, when the accused will fine a
charge of assault und causing bodily
harm.      The men were arrested ut
| Lumberton after an exciting chase
past Smith's Lake, the snow in some
I places being two feet deep.
SANTA   CLAUS"  IS   NOW   IN
l-ULL SWINti
i In our departments. Only Five
i weeks to Christmas. Cume in ut
once and pick nut your gifts nnd I
will put them aside fur yuu till Christ,
mas Eve.
MOFFATT'S VARIETY STORE
DU -x :!"._„ regular $1*1.00
tires,    while tliey last,
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
5DEP0T   R00MSS
•.ii. i
VAN HORNE STREET
CRANBROOK, B.C.
if C.P.
Opposite  Smith  end
Depot J5
Comfortable   Home for f
The Working man 4
QEORGE MASSEY ]•
249           Prop. :l'J t
•ffffffffffffffffff
****************
;.*****************•:
THE
•  Monthly General Meeting   j
I " Of   The j
I       GREAT WAR VETERANS' ASSOCIATION       j
5 Will   Be   Held   at   tbe   (i.W.V.A.   Building •■
SATURDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 24th. :
>    BE ON HAM), as matters of   Importance arc to be Discussed   I
it *
******************************************************
MEN'S UNDERWEAR. — We carry a Full Line of
Men's Underwear, Pants, Boots & Shoes, Dress Shirts,
also a Full Line of Ladies' & Children's Apparel.
See the Latest Styles of Ladies' Dresses.
WE SELL EOR LESS — Quality Guaranteed or Your Money
Refunded.
If You Want Your Money's Worth, Call at the
Kootenay Trading Co., Ltd.
CRANI1ROOK.      -       Across the Street from P. Burns & Co.
fff.vfffffffffftVtffe^ffffffffftVfioVffff.'.^
fffffffffffffff.
STRANGE & SCHIAVO'S
ELECTRIC
SH0EMAKING
SHOP
Boots and Shoes made to order   by hand or by
machinery.     A pair of shoes made by us will outlast
two pairs that you may otherwise purchase.
WHICH  IS  THE  CHEAPER?
Prices for SHOE
REPAIRING
NOW LOWERED!
10 Only,
guaranteed
J11.00.
WILSON'S VULCANIZING WORKS
33tf
George Kolianlck, wus charged at
the city police court on Thursday of
this week with receiving stolen property. Tin: case wns remanded till
Friday aftornoon.
Tom Poulos, tin.1 popular dispenser
of the liquid refreshments at the Pa
trlcia, left mi Monday fur a well deserved holiday in Edmonton.
Al! those interested in the formation ui' a Burns' Club are requested
i.. moet in Uu- Y.M.C.A. on Wednesday, December 3rd, al s p.m.     88-40
Mr. Collier, of Lethbridge, waa a
Cranbrook visitor Tuesday and Wednesday, coming in for a short stay
with his brother Harry ni' this city.
Wo curry a rail lino of Men's Women's and Children's Rubbers,
W. F DORAN.
Our low prices win every time.
The open moeting nl' the Baptist Women's Mission Circle will he
heltl in the church on Thursday, November 27th. nt 8 ii.m. At this meeting tin- membors of the C.O.I.T. will
give a musical sketch in native costume. A collection will he taken for
missions.
Don't fail to hear the Welsh Male
Choir in Knox Chureh, Friday and
Saturday, November 21st and 22ad
Tickets $1.00 each.
By thc installation of an up to
date bread mixing machine, Hummer's bakery are keeping up with the
times in thc matter of the manufacture of bread, cakes, ele. The new
machine will mix a barrel of flour in
a very short time, ordinarily a hard
and tedious job by the usual hand
methods.
Floor Covering — Congolcum —
75c per square yard at Kilby's.
30tf
The Patey brothers this week have
started in the musical supply business, as may he noted from their advertisement in another part of this
paper. They have taken space in
tlie Cranbrook Bazaar on Armstrong
Avenue, .where tliey have put in a
stock of musical merchandise antl accessories and all classes of music.
Mrs. W. Allen of Spokane, who for
the past four weeks has been visiting
at the home of Mrs. George Lunn, returned to the hub city on Sunday.
Piano in Walnut, in splendid con
ditlon, good as new, $2;i"j at Kilby1
?   RESERVE !
CHRISTMAS        I
GIFTS
PAY AS CONVENIENT
Early selection of Christ-
mns presents is most advantageous in every way. You
escape the confusion of
crowds, choose more wisely
and economically,
A deposit will reserve any
article. Payment is completed as convenient he''ore
Christmas.
Diamond Jewelry Clock*
Cold Jewelry     -     Silverware
Bracelet Watches - Cut Clan
Pearl*      -      Leather   Goods
Novelty  Jewelry  -   Ivoiy
Men'.     Watehea
Cigarette   Caaea
The   most   complete   stock
COUpIed    with    quality,   style.
I,.
1"
W.H.Wilson
JEWELLER
**************************
Cranbrook    TAXiDEtlMIST
With "The Varsity Coach" to he
put on hy the high school pupils at
the Auditorium. Friday, Dec. 5th, is
a patriotic pageant, "Britannia," embracing every part of the British empire in costume. Keep the date open for this. 38—4]
For sales ami service Nash and Star
cars.1  See Ratcliffe & Stewart.   ;i:Jti
"I'm glad you liked tint! bread. No
I tlid not make it myself, wo get il
from the City Bakery." i'hone 2'
and have the boy call. 8Ctf
One Fairbanks-Morse
(i h.p. engine,
as good as new, fur g
lie  al   Dezall's
Garage.
.18-,'! 9
Afternoon tea will h
• served at the
home  of  .Mrs.  (!.   II.
Thompson on
Thursday, November 2
7th, from 3 to
<i p.m.    Proceeds    in    ;
id   of   Christ
Church Women's A us
liarv     Every-
body welcome.
30
Dr. Wilson Herald, car, ik
and throat specialist, will .-rive in
the city on Novei liter 24tli remaining
for some days, ami ean b i consulted
at thc hospital. 3D
Thc Marion Oliver Mi -ion Band
will give a Missionary Cot cert in the
Presbyterian schoolroom on Friday,
November 28th, at 7.30 p. i.. Admission: Adults 3Bc; Children 15c.
89-40
To more efficiently handle tho bu:
iness he has built up in the making
and sale of boot:: and shoes. Mr. A.
Strange lias taken  into partners!)!]
;j2tf M< 1- Schinvo, who
nt arrival
Tenor  banjo,
by's
A  bargain,
in Cranbrook.
SPECIAL: --- Tungsten lamps. 10.
25, 40, 50 and 00 watts; 25 c each,
nt — W. F. DORAN'S.
Our Low Prices win every time
<>7 PIECE WHITE AND (jOLO
DINNER Sins
Regular   $30.00,     Saturday only,
^,2^.00 a sei.
MOFFATT'S VARIETY STORE
The Elite China Shop
The new mc
t Kil-jtho firm is a qualified sho
32tf|and with his help the work
repairing etc., will be expo
handled.
WANT AOS.
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
i FOR ALL YOUR t|   723, i
REQUIREMENTS *
FOR SALE Oil EXCHANGE
of heavy lugging Blcigha < h
trade foi- lighter not. Also
power wood cutting ninchiuc.
fm* cosh, Apply ('. Walla!
3, Cranbrook, B.C.
- Pair
up, or
horse*.
Clieo]
}, Box
.'I'.lt!
TRUNKS      ■      VALISES
HANDBAOS
Or anything in Leather
Also for
\ Shoe,   Rubber.,   Sol-Ii*.   Over-
f nil,, Glove,  Etc.,
J It will pay yuu lo visit our store
"f. THE
Cranbrouk Saddlery Co.
WANTED—Woman  wants
work bj
day or hour,    Hou&ewo
k, offices
etc. Apply Box T. Herali
offlce 111
FOR SERVICK — Flrat class Yorkshire boar, shipped into district by
Dominion Livestock Branch. This
boar stands for service at \V.
Selhy's and the charges are $3,00,
88-40
LOST. — Diamond cluster stick pin.
Finder please roturn tu Crnnbr
Herald. S87tf
£   Van Horne St.    Crnnbrook B.C.
':vfffoVfffffffffffffffffff j rOR SALE-Lee-Enfleld"
************************** j   ,,|j. u. Wraton,
?   FOR GOOD MEALS   *l -
ifle.    Ap
At    the   prices   which
we quote below, it will
pay you to SAVE YOUR SHOES and have them
made   like   new   by   us
MEN'S RUBBER HEELS    -    -     -     -     50c
LADIES'RUBBER HEELS      -     -     -     35c
MEN'S HALF SOLED & HEELED     - $250
LADIES' HALF SOLED & HEELED -    -    $1.75
OUR WORK ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED  OR
MONEY  REFUNDED
ARMSTRONG AVE. Opposite Imperial Hotel
and Comfortable Rooms  *    *,,.-''
(IO TO— J
The New Cafe I
•;• ********** *** * * * * * * ******
5 Save Money \
'i FRESH MILK 10c Quart I
\\    GODDERIS' DAIRY    5
V Rural  Telephone 5
iVfffffffffiiVf.Vffffffffff
White Wyanclotto iral
April hatched,   Good laylni
strain,    f 1.00 ench.     llox (I., lie:
aid. .'Mitt
1	
FOR SAI.K, BARGAIN — Ono 7
passenger McLaughlin-Buirk Tour
inn car. First class condition.
Sec G. C. Robson, Lumborton, CC
mill
FOR SAI.K—One steel bottom, top,
and front Queen Heater, with
hearth and .uni-ini rails. Apply te
liox 468, or Mrs. A. II. Blumon-
auer. Hit
Had Better Hurry and
Secure Your
RESERVED SEAT
GYRO
Pierrot Concert
GIVEN HY THK
IN THE
CRANBROOK GYRO CLUB
AUDITORIUM
Tuesday <S£
Wednesday
November 25 & 26
Overture at 8.30 sharp.
TICKETS  One Dollar Each
Please Hi* Seated by thnt Time.
CHILDREN   Fifty Cents f-ach
(let tickets from any member i i the GYRO CLUB or thc
Specal Canvassing Committee anil exchange same nt Crauhrook Drug and Hook Company for Reserved Seal Ticket,
after Thursday, November 20th.
This Is A Real Treat - Don't
Miss It!
Deapito the date, Thursday, November 13th, waa a very lucky day
fnr the kitchen nf the Baptist chureh
when in tlie evening at a Bhower for
this very important department it
was literally deluged with utensils of
all descriptions suitable for cooking
ami otherwise caring fnr the corpora! wants of the members of the congregation. Many a housewife who l
iniiled her.self on her kitchen equipment now looks with envy nn the
church cupboard.
Don't forget the Ancient Order of
Foresters' Whist Drive ami Dance in
the K. r. Hall, Friday,   November
21st.      Gentlemen 70c, ladies 50c.
86tf
The Kootenay Loaf made by the City Bakery is making a great hit um-
ong the lovers of good bread. Do
nut take our word but try a loaf fnr
yourself.    Phone 28. SCtf
There is a special soup; for your
wife at the Gyro Concert, November
27i and 20. She will sure like to
hear it. .'iStf
DECORATED CHINA
TEA
21   Pieces. Special Saturday only,
$7.00 aud $8.50 a set.
MOFFATT'S VARIETY STORE
The Elite China Shop long.
I     The Salvation Army Home League
SETS   will hold their annual Snle of Sewing, Fancy Work, Etc., on Saturday,
November 22ml.      Keep tbis date <:i
mind,  and  don't forget to come al-
84tf
SHRINE GLUB DANCE
Friday, November 28th
AUDITORIUM - CRANBROOK
Music By
BANFFDANCEORCHESTRA
DRHSS: As You Please. Refreshments.
Get Tickets From Your Shrine Friends
Mount Baker
Hotel
30 Newly Furnished Rooms,
All with running water (Hot
and Cold) some wiih private
Iralhs,   sonic   with   shower
haths
BAKER ST., CRANBROOK
Only absolutely first-class fireproof Hotel in thc eity.
BUY A CAR NOW AND SAVE
MONEY 1
We have a Chevrolet Baby Grand.
$300| nl™ Pord Touring, min, $iso.
Both overhauled and in good running
order. — Also
Sewing Machine, Drencr, Chcffonier,
Table., Chain, Sleigh Pole.
Heateri,    Coolcatovea,    Rubber,,
Blanket., Etc.
WE  BUY,  SELL, OR  EXCHANGF
THOMPSON & HARROP
Second Hand Dealer.
Cranbrook
Box 238       ...       l'bune 7i>
TF your car is sensitive to the finer gradations of tone, no other
phonograph but a Brunswick can really satisfy you.
The Brunswick alone possesses a method of reproduction that is
fully in accord with acoustic laws and which plays all ty|M-s of
records with equal perfection.
To prove this—simply HEAR the Brunswick. Your nearest local
Brunswick Dealer is able to show you exactly WHY thc Brunswick
is best beyond all comparison.
y~yct tht Sign ofSMtisical Treslige -
Jartmmdck
PHONOGRAPHS • RECORDS • RADIOLAS
CRANBROOK DRUG
& BOOK GO.

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