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Cranbrook Herald Jul 22, 1926

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Array THE CPANBROOK HERALD
«*** ■"£>
VOLUME 28
CRANBROOK,  B.C.,  THURSDAY, JULY 22nd, 1926
NUMBER    22
New Owners for
Aurora Mine
Well Known Moyie Property
Subject of Deal Which Has
Gone Through
new roadIeing BUILT
FERNIE MAN BEING
ASKED TO ALLOW NAME
FOR NOMINATION
A. B. Trites, Merchant and
Mining Man, Suggested As
Conservative Nominee
Dr. King Opens
His Campaign
ELECTION DATE
DEFINITELY SET FOR
SEPTEMBER 14th
Consummation of an Important,
mining deal that has heen pending
fur gome time came on Saturduy lust,
and confirms a change of ownership
in the Aurora mine, on Moyie Lake.
The Herald announced some time ago
that a deal was pending, and thnt
it waa not possible at that time to
give the details, for fear some un-
loolutd for development might be precipitated and a hitch develop in the
negotiations. On Saturday last the
second payment was made on the
deal, thereby assuring the completion
of the projected arrangements for a
change*of ownership. The new owners of the mine are known as the
Aurora syndicate, which is made up
of local men, well known In this
district and Fernie.
The previous owners were a syndicate who have held the property for
many years, Included In which were
Capt. San bum, of Portland, Ore., J.
D. McBride, formerly of thiB city,
the estate of the late J. A. Harvey,
O. J. Johnson, Chehalis, Wash., and
others. Satisfactory financial
rangements were made with this syndicate of owners for the transfer of
the property, which includes the Aurora and the Horseshoe claims, adjoining properties. The negotiations
in connection with the deal have been
going on for some months through
the office of Messrs. Beale & Elwell,
and have been assisted by J. F. Huchcroft, of this city, who has been familiar with the property for many
years.
The new owners are having a new
road built into the property from
Abridge, at ihe foot of Moyie Lake,
and development work will be carried
out on a vigorous scale, so that it
will probably not be very long before the name of tne Aurora mine
appears again in tha list of mines
snipping ore to Trail smelter. The
property is looked on as a most promising silver-lead mine, and exceedingly good values have been uncovered in the course of the development
work. About a dozen men are at
present employed there, under the
superintendent of Wm. Smith, an
experienced mining man. The vein
at the Aurora is similar to that at
the St. Eugene, on the other side
ot the lake, and is thought to be the
same vein. The road to the mine is
expected to be completed about the
end of the month, and there are about
five or six hundred tons of ore ready
to be hauled by truck to Aldridge
siding for shipment to the smelter,
and if satisfactory returns are received from this shipment develop
ment work in the mine will no doubt
go ahead actively.
Along with the reopening of th<
concentrator at Moyie, the new phase
of life which comes to the Aurora
mine will mean a good deal to Moyie,
and will lend encouragement to other
developments of a similar nature.
Late information in regard to the
Conservative nomination for Kast
Kootenny riding makes it dear that
pressure is being brought to bear on
A. B. Trltes, of Fernie, to get him
to accept nomination at the convention in Cranlironk next week, and
that Mr, Trites is considering the
matter, Whether ho will ultimately
■allow liis inline to go up, is not yet
known. The name of Sherwood
Herchmer, will-known Pernio barrister, has nlso been mentioned, and the
claims of Dr, Rutledge, who did such
splendid spade work in the cumpuign
last fall, will also have to come in
for proper consideration. It has also
been suggested that a man of outstanding calibre from outside the
riding he given the nomination, nnd
the name of It. L. Muitlund, of Vancouver, an able lawyer, and the president of the B.C. Conservative Association, is one that has been giveu
aierious consideration.
Coast ridings are again endeavoring to tempt Dr. King from Kast
Kootenay, North Vancouver being
the latest riding to hold out un inducement for Dr. King to run there.
No doubt there is little likelihood of
his accepting the offer, as he would
probably desire to stand or fall in
the East Kootenay, where all his
political fights have been staged.
Arrives In Cranbrook On Friday Last and Covered
The Riding
MAY BE THREE IN FIELD
Kaos Sunday School Picnic
The annual Sondny School and
congregational picnic of Knox Presbyterian Church will be held at Green
Bay on July 28th. Those going will
please meet at the school room ut
1 o'clock p.m., where cars will be in
readiness to convey them tu the
grounds.
Dr. King Will
Stand Here
(Special Despatch to the Herald)
Nelson, July 22.—Dr. King passed
through Nelson for the coast. He declared Liberal candidates would be
standing in ull the constituencies of
British Columbia in ten days' time.
Dr. King said he would not accept
the invitation given him by North
Vancouver Liberals, but would be
available for his old constituency,!
East Kootenay.
e mt.— —i.—
Axe Falls On
Customs Men
(Special Despatch to the Heruld)
Ottawa, July 22.—Nine customs
officials, inclndlng It- R- Furrow, deputy minister, R. I*. Clerk, A. E.
Giroux und John Landry, heads of
the service in Montreal, have been
dismissed as a result of the customs
committee report.
Beer Vote
Is Rejected
Late Baseball
<K|iHi'i»l Dmpltcll lo The HitiiIiI)
Vt.t.t*ta,'o Gain..—Am.rican
Lt-agHt
Al New York—Chicago, 4. 12, 1;
New York, 8, 8, 1| Blankenihlp nml
Ooune. Hoyt unit Bengough. Second gnme, Chicago, 4,2, 1: New
Work, 3, *, 1; Rdwaril, Lyons uml
S«halk, Pennock, Shawkey and Skiff.
Al Bolton—St. Louis 11, 10, I; Bos-
tan 1, 4, 8; Vangilder and Hargrave,
Suhniner, Weltier, Clower and
St-akoa. Second game—St. Louis 1
14, 1; Boston 4, 8, 2; Giard and
Srtang, Wingfield, Heimach, Russell
and Bischoff.
At Washington—Detroit 7,12,4;
Washington 6, 8, 2; Wells, Cooper,
Stoner and Wordall; Ogden and
Tlte. Second game—Detroit 7, 10,
2( Washington 10, 10, 3; Johns,
Stoner, Cooper and Hayworth; Jon-
son and Ruel.
At Philadelphia—Cleveland 6, 9,
0; Philadelphia 0, 7, 1; Leveson and
S.well, Ehmke, Gray and Perkins,
National LttflM
At Pittaburg—Brooklyn 0. 6, 0;
Pittsburg 1, 4, 0; Petty and Hnr-
g!i)ve, Onger and Gooch. Second
(Mw—Brooklyn 0, 9, lj Pittsburg
2, t, I; Vanct and Deberry, Aldridge,
Buab, and Smith. Spencer.
*,   ". li
(Specinl Despatch to The Herald)
Vancouver, July 2iJ—Beer parlors
wore rajeot-ed by Stlli votes in New
Westminster Wednesday. Thc vote
!, against, '181l>; for, 1451. with
T.I spoiled ballots, making a total of
3800 out of M'.'ll voters on the pro*
vlneial list.
Wired Briefs
(Special Despatch to The Herald)
Wreck   Near   Soo
Sault St. Marie, Mich., July
Steamer Hurry Jones, of the
land-Mnthen line, sank i
with steamer Francis House
mouth or the St. Mary's River,
crew WOW saved.
Killed   in
Hlockton,    Ala
were killed  in a
al Dixie   1.
Motfatt.
Exploiion
July    22.—Nine
gasoline explosion
of Moffatt Goal Co., at
Comervative   Candidate
CoWtenoy, B.C., July 22.—D. Mae-
Donald,   of   Cumberland,   has   been
nominated as Conservative candidate
for Comox-Alberni district.
Tunney   to   Meet   Damp-say
Chicago, July 22.—Tex Rickard
announced Jnck Dempsey will meet
Gene Tunney in Chicago, September
11, to defend his title. Rickard expects to obtain the necessary state's
licence through Chicago men who are
backing the fight.
Floods in Austria
Vienna, July 22.—A hundred were
killed nt Rnguvn Serbia when a hur-
rican  and   cloud-burst struck  town.
Forty bodies recovered.
With the arrival of Dr. J. H King
in the riding the end of last week,
ami the tour he has been making
since, the big campaign in the
dominion elections may be said to
have gotten under way. Dr King
reached Golden on Thursday of last
week, accompanied by Mrs. King, and
they came on to Cranbrook Friday
evening. On Sunday they were
joined by Miss Straith, secretary to
Dr. King. On Monday evening, after paying a flying visit to Kimberley, Dr. and Mrs. King left for Fernie,
expecting to spend somq days in that
end of the riding. It is expected that
Dr. King will not be remaining here
very long, as he will be expected at
the coast in time for the nominating
conventions there, as he is looked
upon as the director of strategy for
the Liberal campaign in this province.
On the Conservative side there is
increasing determination to remove from Kast Kootenay the reproach of being one of the only two
Liberal seats remaining in the province. Especially since the change
of government it ia felt there is less
excuse than ever for East Kootenay
retaining any Liberal preponderance.
Without the prestige of a cabinet
position, and with his party out of
power, it is felt that Dr. King's position is not at all secure. The Conservatives will naturally concentrate
a good deal of effort on those parts
of the riding where the Liberal majority showed up strongest last year,
in an effort to turn over the four
hundred and fifty votes necessary to
turn the scale.
The Conservative nominating convention is to take place in this city
on the 28th of this month. Delegates are now being arranged for,
Fernie and Cranbrook having already
named their delegates, while the outlying points are ulso arranging for
their representation at this big meeting. As to who will get the nomination, there are no new developments,
nnd no new names have come up for
consideration. The declaration which
Dr. Rutledge has made, that whoever
the convention sees fit to name as
the party standard-bearer, will get
his whole-hearted support, has created a good impression, and while leaving the mutter open, assures a unit-
id front being presented during the
ampalgn, iu the event of any other
nndidate being named.
It is not considered likely that the
Liberal party will hold any regularly
organized nominating convention,
since there is no question but that
Dr. King will receive the support of
his party followers individually.
There will probably be a meeting of
district Liberals called as last year,
attended by representatives from different parts of the riding, nt which
Dr. King would receive endorsement
ns the party candidate.
In some quarters is is considered
more than likely that a third candidate may appear in the running for
this election, as a representative of
organized tabor. There is considered to be a fairly strong labor vote
in Cranbrook and Fernie, and at
some points in the north end of the
riding, such as Golden and Field,
there might ulso be some support for
a labor candidate. The name of
James Sims, of lnvermere, is again
being mentioned in this connection.
Mr. Sims is a railroad man of many
years' standing and acquaintance in
collision j the riding, nnd is no doubt as strong
at tho j a man as could be brought forward
for the nomination, though the name
of Mr. Bryant, the president of t)ie
G.W.V.A. in Fernie, is also being
mentioned as a labor representative
who might carry a strong vote In
Fernie. As to whether a labor candidate would take away more support from a Liberal or Conservative
candidate, there as varied opinions.
It is probable that the matter will
continue to receive consideration
from the labor men until such a time
as the election date may be announced, when a definite decision would be
reached, so as to give a candidate an
opportunity to thoroughly go over the
ground. It is understood Mr. Sims
has received local endorsement from
some quarters already, but no district meeting has been held.
As was expected, it has be
cided to hold the Dominion tl
on Tuesduy. September llth.
was mude clear in the coura
rousing speech with which 1"
Meighen opened the campaigi
big meeting in Ottawa on T
evening. He was accompan
Hon. E. L. Putenaude, Quebe
suvative leader, and the new n
of justice, and Senator Gidoo
ertson, former minister of lobi
the course of his speech the P
indicated that the Consnvuiivt
would dwell on tho lack of a
ment of the Liberal adminin
while in power, ita preeuriou
tion ut all times, especi
the. lust session, as well
before the people the ri
customs probe, and the
of the late government ii
with  this.
i de-
tions
This
of a
smier
at a
•sday
nisler
Rob-
r. In
em ier
party
nous posl-
lly during
s bringing
ult of the
culpability
connection
Erickson Girl
Wins Medal
(Special Despatch to The Herald)
Victoria, July 22.—Margaret Kliz-
abeth Fraser, Brlckson scliool, won
the Governor-General's mednl for
Cranbrook division in entrance examinations.
Naming Their ,v
i Candidate
Conservatives   Preparing   to'
Nominate On Wednesday
of Next Week
I GOVT. SUB-AGENT
{   FROM GREENWOOD IS
TRANSFERRED HERE
P. H. McCurrach Assuming
Position at Government
Office Here
LOCAL DELEGATES NAMED
22.-
Piok
Tho
**************************
BIRTHS
**************************
BORN*—On Friday, July I ah, at
the St. Eugene Hospital, to Mr. and
Mrs. Chas. Mnidment, u son.
BORN—On Friday, July 10th, to
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney A bar, of Kitchener, at the St. Eugene Hospital,
a son.
BORN—On Sunduy, July ISth. at
the St. Eugene Hospital, to Mr. und
Mrs. Jolin Alexunder, of Bull Hiver,
a son.
BORN—At the St. Eugene Hospital, on Sunduy, July 18th, to Mr. and
Mrs. Julius Gustafson, of Wycliffe,
a son.
BORN—On Monday, July lilth, ut
the St; Eugene Hospital, to Mr. und
Mrs. Graham Donahue, of Wardner,
a son.
BORN—On Monday, July JiUh, ut
the St. Eugene Hospital, to Mr. und
Mrs. Albert Griffith, of Cranbrook,
a son.
BORN—On Tuesday, July 20th, at
the St. Eugene Hospital, to Mr. and
Mrs. Lawrence Service, of Lumber-
ton, a daughter.
BORN—At the St. Eugene Hospital, on Tuesduy, July 20th, to Mr. and
Mrs. Elmer Doner, of this city, n son.
BORN—On Wednesday, July 21st,
at the St. Eugene Hospital, to Mr.
and Mrs. Thomas Garwylitz, of Wycliffe, a son.
On Monday evening of this week
a meeting of the Cranbrook Men's
Conservative Association was held,
for the purpose of naming tht delegates to attend the nominating convention which will be held in Cranbrook on Wednesday afternoon of
next week, July 28th, when the Conservative candidate in the impending
federul elections will be named. Between fifty and sixty delegates from
nil parts of the riding are expected
to  be  present for this meeting.
Four delegates have been named
by the men's association of Cranbrook to represent this city at the
convention, it being decided to allow
the fifth delegate to which the city
is entitled to be named from West-
port, if desired. The four delegates
elected were F. H. Dezall, J. A.
Young, Dr. Rutledge und Simon Taylor, the fifth delegate named being
A. A. Robertson, who muy attend as
representing the West port people.
Delegates from Fernie have already
been named, and a meeting is being
held in Kimberley on Thursdny of
this week to name their delegates.
The women's association in Cranbrook named their representatives
to the convention at a meeting held
on Monday evening, these being
Mrs. J. Norgrove, Mrs. A. Shankland,
Mrs. W. B. MacFarlane and Mrs. F.
H. Dezall.
J. A. Young, president of the city
association, presided at the meeting,
and gave a few remarks of a very
ncournging nature, indicating just
why it was thought that the Conservatives bad every chance at.this election to reverse the result of last
year, and bearing on the issues at
stake. Dr. J. W. Rutledge, the candidate last year, also spok?| briefly,
assuring his support to th^ utmost
Tor whoever might be nominated by
.hi party to contest the riding in
lhe Conservative interests. -Various
other matters were also disenssed before the meeting adjourned.
THREE PARTIES IN
ELECTION FIGHT IN
EAST KOOTENAY
Mr. P. II. McCurrach has been
transferred from the Greenwood
office to the Cranbrook agency, and
commenced the duties of his new appointments on the 16th. These appointments are as follows: Provincial
Collector, Gold Commissioner and
Mining Recorder*
Mr, McCurrach has been In the ser-
vice for the past fourteen years, and
has, for some time past, been in
charge of the Greenwood sub-agency.
Before his departure, Mr. McCurrach
was the recipient of a presentation
from the many friends thut he hud
mude during his long stay in Greenwood.
These offices, which have been curried un by Mr. J. A. Stewart for the
past seven months, would mean that
Mr. Stewart is still responsible for
the   following:   Assessor  Cranbrook
und Fernie I.nnd Districts, Deputy
Commissioner of Lands, Government
Agent, Water Recorder, Registrar of
the Supreme and County Courts,
Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages. Registrar of Voters' and Issuer nf Marriage Licenses,
Eleven Drown
Near Toronto
(Special Despatch t
Lindsay. Ont,, Jul)
young mi n  and  boy*
10 to 22 wer
Lake, 86 ir
when the
had set, out
at their stu
Four in. ml
land after
craft for m
The   dnv
e drowt
noi tlu;
the Heruld)
22, — Eleven
ranging from
ied in Balsam
ut of Toronto,
var cano.. in which they
to replenish the supplies
inner camp, was capslxed.
ers of the party reached
clinging to the upturned
ore than five hours
vned.John Willington, Ol-
FIRES IN CRANBROOK
DISTRICT REPORTED
ALL UNDER CONTROL
Cincinnati 6, 13, 0; Hearn and Tay
Ier, May *nd P»»i«n.
Here   From   Alaska
Arthur Burch, formerly of this
city, who has been in Alaska recently,
returned to the city the end of last
week, and has been here for a few
days visiting with his relatives and
friends. He left again on Thursday
of this  week,  going to California,
Labor Party Will Enter Field
With Janes Sims, lnvermere, as Candidate
It has now been definitely determined that there will be three candidates in tht field here in the federal
elections which tuke place on September Uth. lt is learned thut Mr.
James Sims, of lnvermere, one of
the best known figures in Kast Kootenay organized labor circles, has
been advanced by the labor organization in this district, as u candidate
for the Dominion elections, and there
Is no doubt but thut he will receive
the eiidorsaiion of organised labor
In other pnrts of the riding. It
not be said that the advent uf u labor candidate is u surprise, as it hus'
been talked of before, and brings
back a recurrence of conditions i
the 11)20 election, when W. S. M
Donald, of this city, was entered ns
a third party cundidate, and headed
the poll in Crunbrook city. The
feeling will probably be now that lu-
bor has entered as strong a cundidate
as possible, and it remains to be seen
what headway he enn make us the
campaign progresses. Kight weeks
is not a long time in which to cover
a riding as lurge us Kast Kootlnay,
and no time is being lost by Mr.
Sims' supporteis in getting his campaign under way. It is hoped by
those who are backing Mr. Sims that
he will poll
railroad men
Reports filed at the office of the
forest branch here on Wednesday
show that all.the fires in th;s district may be said to be under con-
tiol, though there are a number still
burning. In the Cranbrook rangers'
district the fire near KimbeHtry. along
the McGinty Tijuil, is still going,
though under control, and it is not
in any very valuable timber stand.
Two recent fires were reported this
week in the mountains on this side
of the St. Mary's river in the vicinity
of Perry Creek, opposite Marysville.
A hundred men have been employed on the big fire which was raging
in the vicinity of Colvalli, and which
is presumed to have started from a
spark out of an engine. About fifty
men have also been engaged at u fire
in the vicinity of Fish Lake in the
Waldo district, and still another fire
that district has been combatted
on what is known as the Yahk reserve. Fires near Plumbob Creek on
both sides of the Kootenay River
huve also been leported in that district. The Fernie district has been
comparatively free of serious fires,
about thirty men being employed on
three fires in that district this week.
The Windermere district is also reported comparatively free from serious outbreaks. In the vicinity of
Yuhk there are four fires of magnitude in progress, where a hundred
and eighteen men are looking ufter
the  situation.
. Gordon Heale. Joseph
. Clark, W. Burton. F
Bigwell and Ray Shea,
in Toronto, while Ray Al
n Peterboro and H. Milh
Local Branch ol
Legion Formed
New Body Succeeds G.W.V.
A. in Furthering Returned
Mem' Interests
A GOOD START MADE
At  the   most  representative  meeting of ex-service men so fur held in
Cranbrook,   called   for  the   purpose
of  winding up the affairs of the G.
W.V.A. and organizing a bruncb of
the Cunudian Legion of the B.E.S.L.
held  in   the   gymnasium  of  the  Be-
reatioh  Club on  Friday, July   ltith,
it which between fifty and sixty ex-
men   were   in  attendance,  it
was unanimously decided to organise
branch  of the Legion.
Following is a list of officers elected to carry on the work of the new
organisation:
 J. A. Young
.. J. F. Scott
s A. Kemball
lunmittoe—D. Hulrrow,
J. A. Stewart, T. M. R.
Milne uml A. Murdoch.
A. Robertson, H. Fyles,
Clark.
uring a home for
iver Morton
Edwards, W
Burkett, H.
were all fro
len wu« fr<o ^^^^^^^^^^^^
of Gait.
The survivors, exhausted from their
Ijattle again-=tf a wa^i ry gc-ave, t*M a
story of seeing their companions |bse
their grip on the boat, and disappear
under thc choppy surface of the lake
one by one. The boat pushed off* from !
the camp conducted by the Brother-
hood of St. James' Cathedral, Toronto. A stitr breeze blowing across the
water made it choppy. Struck by a
squall just as the canoe was entering
the channel off Carnegie Point Gull
River, the survivors say, a heavy wave
caught it suddenly, turning it over,
with its human cargo. All th+- party succeeded in swimming to the upturned craft, anil grasping ita tdges,
but it is said that instead of drifting
with the wind, they fought to propel
lhe canoe against it. Ray Shea, supervisor and director of the camp,
and the four who escaped the fate of
their companions, tell of the heroism
of their leader, an older and stronger mun than the others. Shea wa.«
one of the la.-t half dozen left grasping the upturned boat. Declaring
that his weight was adding to the
burden of the canoe, he dropped his
hold und was drowned.
The four,    Arthur Lambden,    G.
President
1st Vice-Pres.
2nd Vice-Pres
Executive   Co
1>. Wilson,
Stewart, J.
Trustees—A.
and  J.   M.
The mutter of [
the   new   organization   wus   discussed
ut some length and  for this purpose
the   following were  elected a building committee to consider the available buildings at the present time or
the building of a new building:
Building Committee—Comrades H. C.
Kinghorn, D. Taylor, Rev. B. Wallace, J. A. Stewurt und W. R. John.
The following were elected to the
honorary offices of the organisation:
Chaplain        .   Comrade B. Wallace
Hon. Pres  Dr. F. W. Green
Hon. 1st Vice-Pres. .  . T. M. Roberts
Hon. 2nd Vice-Pres.     G. T. Moir
Considerable enthusiasm was shown
by ull present regarding membership
in the Legion and it was felt by all
present that an effort should be made
to have every ex-service man in Cranbrook fill in an application for membership.
Comrade Jas. P. Bain, of Kimber-
| ley,   was  present  watching  proceed-
i ing  as  in  the  very  near future a
branch of the Legion will be organised Kimberley.
At an executive committee mAV'
ing held at a later date Comrades H.
C. Kinghorn and V. Z. Manning were
appointed two more members of the
executive, and W. S. Johnston to the
office of secretary-treasurer.
B.G. HAMILTON NAMED
TO ACT AS RETURNING
OFFICER IN ELECTION
Waller, W, Wiggingt
O'Hara, all of Tor
were so utterly txhai
perience that a.- MOD
ceeded in crawling I
erenme them.
nt(
and Benjumin
declare they
ed by their ex-
I they had suc-
lund, sleep ov-
McKenzie King
for Pr. Albert
(Special Despatch to The Herald)
Ottawa, July 22.—With cabinet
ministers nearly all away in their
constituencies, the government is
currying out only routine work.
Salarlce are being paid by Governor-
General's warrants. Former Premier
King is understood to have decided
to run in Prince Albert, although
he has also been tendered the nomination nf his former riding of North
York.
McKemi*   King   Accepts
(Special Despatch to The Herald)
big votu among the |    Ottawa, July 22.—Mackenzie King
und that he will got  telegraphed  Liberal   Association    in
strong hacking also in Fernie.    He Prince Albert accepting nomination.
Is himself a railroad man, being cm- At the same time King communicated
where he expects to locate In the fit-1 ployed *t Uke Windermere station regret to Liberals of North York who
turt. ** *** foreman. also suoght to msmm him.
**************************
WEDDING
**************************
H1RT — PARNABY
Thursday a wedding took plaee at
the t'nited Church Parsonage when
Mr. Gottlieb flirt and Mi- Crtrude
Elinor Parnaby of this city were united in marriage. The witnesses
were Miss Parnaby'i brother and
lister, Raymond and Anle Parnaby.
Word has. been received from Ottawa announcing the formal appointment of Basil G. Hamilton, of lnvermere, as the returning officer for
the riding of East Kootenay In the
coming federal elections. Mr. Hamilton filled the same position in the
general election of 1920 to the satisfaction of all parties, and there is
no doubt his appointment again will
meet with genera) approval.
Other officials to be named
hortly, a.- soon as the election is
announced, in fact, so that the process of getting the voters' lists in
shape can commence, will be the registrars to compile the urban lists.
Three such lists have to be prepared
in the East Kootenay riding, for
Cranbrook, Fernie and Kimberley.
For Cranbrook the appointment of
J. A. Arnold as registrar has been
recommended, while for the other two
places, the appointments will be made
in due course. There is expected to
be some little difference in the compilation of the lists this year, giving
the registrars more discretionary
power. Formerly it was necessary
for an applicant to go on the voters'
list to appear in person before the
reiristrar, but it is stated that this
yeur this provision is being modified,
»o that a representative may be
empowered to vouch for any applicant's eligibility, to the satisfaction
of the registrar.
Good Crop Proipecti
According to the latest C.P.R, crop
report, received this week, prospects
generally throughout the west are for
n better crop than the average of the
last ten years has produced. Thc
rains experienced this week in various purts of the wist will tend to
still further improve conditions.
Very little hail has: been reported
from the prairie provinces, and the
grain in most places is heading out
nicely ul an economical height for
cutting. A few places are still in
need of rain, nnd the harvest will
mosl likely by in full swing by thc
second week in August. U is noted
thnt the dry areas of British Columbia have so far felt the lack of rain
us budly as any pnrts of the west, und
some of lh<- unirriguted fruit crops
will show signs of having suffered accordingly.
Labor Lady Elected
London, July 22. — Margaret
Bondfield, labor, was elected for the
Wall-end division, securing twice the
vote of the Conservative.
Only  Two Vacaacir*
Alt the positions on the school
tuffs in Cranbrook are now filled
with the exception of a principal for
the South Ward School, and a teacher for Kootenay Orchards, which it
is not anticipated there will be any
difficulty in filling. The high school
stuff is now complete again, with six
teachers ready to commence their
work, the new appointments necessury being Messrs. Buck and Fleming, of Vancouver and Creston respectively, u principal and vice-prin- PAQEFOUR
THE  CRANBROOK   HERALD
Thursday. July 22nd, 192*
CDc Cranbrook herald
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
MEMBER B.C. AND YUKON  PRESS  ASSOCIATION
r. A. WILLIAMS R. POTTER, B. Sc.
—i  ———~^*=^--*=*==       ii aeeeemss
•ob*criptlol Price  WOO Per leal
t« Bitted 8Mm 18.50 Pee leer
AdTwUilag Ratee on Application,   Change* ot Cop;
lor Adnrtlilni -jhtmld be handed In sot later than Wed
mn to eeenre attatlos.
THURSDAY,   JULY  22nd,   1926
A FORWARD STEP
FOLLOWING along the present day tendency
towards consolidation of allied interests, the
movement made in this city for the establishment
of a local branch ot the British Empire Service
League is one whicli will have the endorsement of
everyone, whether they are actually eligible for
mmbership or not. There can be sympathy shown
by those outside the ranks of tlie organization, that
would be oul\ slightly less helpful than the active
co-operation nf the veterans themselves inside the
ranks. In the minds of some the war has already
slipped back into the limbo of half-forgotten things.
Time is sometimes too kind as a healer, and human
nature i*, forgetful. Hut not everyone has forgotten,
least ot all those who hore the brunt of things,
either in the physical exertion of carrying ,'11111-.,
the suspense and mental anguish of watching and
waiting for the return that might nr might not come.
There is plenty to be done in caring for the interests oi those who served overseas, and their dependents, aud with the support that seems promised
for thc local branch as il is now organized, there
should be a record ot accomplishment that could be
had in no other way.
Kor would it be tilting to permit the local
branch of the G. W. V. A. to pass out of existence
without placing 011 record that the city in general
owes them a debt of gratitude for the work they
have done. There has been criticism, which might
be expected, but while that lias reached the public
ear, a lot of the quiet work done in behalf of the
veteran or his dependent, lias not been talked of
quite so much. From the point of view of the ex-
service man, the G. VV. V. A. has been au indispensable organization, and it has taken up just cause
for complaint without fear or favor, and many a
veteran who came to this town down aud out has
cause to thank the local G. VV. V. A. for a lift.
Nothing has been said of the relief work which has
been carried on unceasingly. What thc G. VV. V. A.
has done has been carried out with the motive of
helping others, and sometimes they have received
mighty little thanks for it.
PUTTING ON THE SOFT PEDAL
THERE is evidence tliat some of the better informed among the advisers of the Liberal party
and those who have political foresight, are in t taking very kindly to tlie hue and cry raised bv Mackenzie King when he questioned the impartiality of
the decision of the governor-general recently, iu
allowing dissolution of parliament to Mr. Meighen,
after denying that prerogative to Mr. King. The
former Liberal premier's statement on the matter,
and his attitude since that time, have been subjected
to microscopical dissection at the hands of newspapermen all over the countrj—all through the empire, iu fact, and authorities on constitutional procedure have given voice to opinions on the questions
which have been raised. So far as it is possible to
collate this mass of comment and opinion, some of
it biased and very much warped by personal prejudices, it is true, but a lot of it, at thc same time, the
calm aud considered finding of the logical mind, it
is apparent that there is a cooling of the first burst
of Liberal ardor when they raised the constitutional
cry, and sought to stampede the public into believing
that Mr. Meighen and the governor-general were
wrecking the bulwarks of Canadian constitutional
freedom.
Among those who are disassociating themselves from this hue and cry is Dr. King himself, who
iu an interview given out iu Winnipeg last week was
reported to have said that he had no criticism to
make of the governor-general. B. C. Nicholas, editor of the Victoria Times, is another prominent
Liberal who does not agree with the cry which Mckenzie King has raised.
It is not forgotten that the governor-general
gave the  Liberal government  the  opportunity  ttf
carry on last fall when in a minority as a party, and
that it was done with the a .sumption that they
would be able to hold the Progressive support.
When this failed, it i» obvious that the logical thing
to do was to call on Mr. .Meighen, and it is worthy
of mention that it was the desire of the new premier
to carry on the business of the house till the close
of thc session before calling an election, an end
wliich thc Liberals themselves blocked, and in regard
to which they have therefore no ground for com
plaint.
1  ..,1
WHO WILL IT BE'
IT has been said before that the desire of the Conservative party at this time is to see the strongest
man possible put into the delicto oppose Dr. King in
the federal elections. This will be done, and just
what next Wednesday may bring forth it is impossible to say. No one will be able to say that the
nomination did not go fairly and squarely to the best
man, and while a number of name* are being considered tentatively, it is safe to say that any one
of them would make a creditable representative (or
the district at Ottawa.
•   «   »   •   •
TO STOP THE SMUGGLING
TIM', new government lias taken some steps to
endeavor to cope with the smuggling and
fraudulent entry of dutiable goods into the country
that the recent customs probe at Ottawa showed to
be so rite. While in many cases there is no doubt
the deliberate intention and scheming to defraud
the government-on a large scale, there are also the
hundreds ot seemingly petty cases, where an indi*
idual thinks they are doing something really smart
10 "put one over" on the government, by bringing
something into the country without the proper
formalities. Like some of the liquor laws, there are
those who seem to think these statutes belong to an
entirely different code of laws than thieving, or some
ther more spectacular crime, and the consequence is
Ihey do nol look upon violations of them with the
same degree of abhorrence.
Thc remedy being put into force is to station
several hundred mounted police at points along the
border, and this force is to be increased if the situation demands it.   Instead of the talk of devitalizing
his splendid force, or drastically curtailing it, as has
been heard in thc past few years, if there had been
thc move made before to put them to preventative
work before, it is likely the smuggling evil would
never have assumed the proportions it now has,
he motilities have a way .with them, and carry an
atmosphere of authority that has done more to settle
thc northwest in its vicarious days than any other
.•lemem, and they can be depended upon to get to the
root of the present trouble.
yrom Our Exchanges
WHO IS THE BETTER LOSER?
Last fall, when the results of the election became known, Conservatives felt that Mr. King should
resign and that Mr. Meighen should be called upon to
form a government, the latter having the largest party
in the House of Commons.
His Excellency, the Governor-General, was at
that time faced with a delicate situation, but he concurred in Mr. King's plan when the Liberal leader declared his intention of carrying on in the hope of site
curing assistance from the Progressives.
There was no criticism of Lord Byng then, Mr.
Meighen accepted the decisions made.
Liberal members have made it part of their program to twit Premier Meighen with being a "bad loser."
He proved after the last Dominion election that he
was not a bad loser.
But what of Mr. King, now?
He got one dissolution and was refused another,
when, lacking enough strength in his own party to
support his government, he failed to retain the aid of
thc Farmer members. In the bitterness of his defeat
he has railed against the Governor-General, and has announced thnt he will fight the coming election on the
issue of whether Lord Byng did right in declining to
grant him a second dissolution.
Who is the poor loser—the leader who accepted
the situation of last autumn, though head of the largest
party, or the leader who blames the Governor-General
for his present condition after being given a chance to
show what he could do following his defeat at the
polls last year?—Calgary Herald.
NATIVE SONS GET
REPORT OF GRAND
COUNCIL MEETING
Wednesday evening tbe regular
meeting of Cranbrook Assembly, Na
tive Suns uf Cunada, was held in the
K. F. Hall, when the principal matter
coming before the assembly was the
reception of the report of the dele
gates to the Grand Lodge meeting in
Vancouver. Representatives Sullivan
and F. Ryckman were present, the]
latter presenting his report at this
meeting. It dealt principally with
the various resolutions which wore
adopted at the convention, aa well as
giving a sidelight on the circumstances in connection with the passing of
them. As has been reported in the
daily press, many of the resolutions
dealt with the status of Canada as a
part of the British Empire, the matter of the abolition of appeals to
the Privy Council; the matter of the
proper designation in the census of
those persons born of Canadian parents as Canadians; the question of
the employment of Canadians on the
Civil Service, and the appointee
to thc office of the governor-general
to be a Canadian citizen of the
least five years' residence in Canada;
and also that steps should be taken
to ehangii the position of Canada
so that she would enjoy the status
of a nution, and that thi.s status may
best be determined by the elected
representatives in parliament.
The secretary pointed out that during the discussions on the motions
thut anything savoring of purtizun
polities was tubooed, it wus pointed
out that the concensus of opinion was
that any question vitally affecting
the welfare of Canada must, of necessity, be a political one, und that
if ull matters of u political nature
were dropped, the activities would be
curtailed as to restrict their usefulness and their objects to a minimum.
Following the reading of the report which was recoived, Mr. W.
McRaye addressed the meeting. In a
short talk he reviewed the position
and relative strength of the various
assemblies of B.C., most of which
he has recently visited. He claimed
that unless a spirit uf unity prevailed, the great object for which the
Native Sons stood could never be at-
tuined. Personally, he' felt that it
would be in the Interest of the organisation to do uwuy with the requirement thut to bu eligible for
membership in the society one must
be   of   Canadian   birth,   instancing
many examples of persons of foreign
birth who were making excellent Can
udians. Mr. McRaye wag thanked for
his remarks.
FERNIE DELEGATES
TO COME TO CONVENTION HERE
A large meeting of local Conservatives was held in Victoria Hall last
evening for the purpose of organization work. Officers were elected and
a strong executive was appointed to
handle the campaign in this end of
the district.
Sherwood Herchmer addressed
those present on the political situation as it exists today, after which
the following delegates were elected
to attend a convention to be held In
Cranbrook on July 28: H. Bryant,
Dr. Corsan, S. Herchmer, D. Harvie,
Harold Minton, N. McCallum.
There was considerable enthusiasm
at the meeting and after the delegates were appointed a number of
those spoke and seemed to be hopeful for a successful campaign.
It was decided that West Fernie
should appoint a delegate to the convention, and • meeting will he called
for that purpoa*.
DRY WEATHER IS
RESPONSIBLE FOR
THREATENING FIRES
The high winds of last week-end
were stated to have fanned the
big forest firas in the Kootenay National Park into fresh activity, after
light rains last week seemed to make
the situation less hazardous. The
fires were centering at the beginning
of the week on Wardle Creek, and
were at this time not a great distance from Vermillion Crossing. At
that point every precaution was
taken to safeguurd the bridge and
buildings, a wide fire-guard having
been cut around tbe pluce, which lt
was not thought likely the fire could
cross, unless exceptionally high winds
arose.
Nearer home, there has been a fire
of some proportions on the McGinty
Trail, between Kimberley and Wasa,
which is covering a considerable area,
but it did not result in a greut deal
of damage.
Another fire near Wardner arose
lust week-end, nnd starting from the
direction of Culvulli, spread across
towards the site of the old East Kootenay Lumber Co. mill und on
towards the lake in that vicinity. Men
were gathered up here at the beginning of the week to combat this fire,
and it is now understood to be well in
hand. Other fires are ulso reported
from the Yahk area. The continued heat of the past three or four
weeks gave rise to quite hazard-
oue conditions, ufter u season which
up to now has shown exceptionally
favorable conditions for keeping
forest fires down to a minimum.
On Tuesday the situution was
somewhat relieved by the rain which
fell that afternoun, but unfortunately it wus not general enougli to put
the fires out. All the fires in the
district, however, are suid to be under control at present.
FROM THE HEART OF A LITTLE
GIRL
(By Annie Denman)
Duddy, if you know we're hungry*
Know that we are very poor,
It must break your heart in heaven
'Cause you never did insure!
Mamma wonders why you didn't
Save the dimes you.threw away;    j
But you felt too strong and healthy
For insurance, people say.
You were taken without warning,
Leaving us to fight alone.
Yuu'd have takm out insurance,
Daddy,  if you'd  only known!
'Twosn't thut you didn't love us,
I recall how dear you were;
But your little girl must suffer
'Cause you failed to save for her.
Mamma just can't make a living;
She is wearing out, she said.
I shall have to miss some schooling,
For the suke of daily bread.
When she's gone, I guess they'll take
me
To a pluce of charity;
To be clothed und fed; but Daddy,
lt cun ne'er be, home to me.
Mary's daddy  left insurance,
And their home will still be theirs.
They're not hungry. Sometimes Mary
Gives me cast-off clothes she wears.
They don't have to take in sewing.
Mary's mamma doesn't cry,
For her  Daddy left insurance;
But you didn't, Daddy — Why?
Courtesy   Sun   Life   Assurance   Co.
Word was with Cod, and the Word
was God. All things were made by
him; and without him waa not any-,
thing made that was made.—John 1:
3.
Fire hydrants arc being installed
on Baker Street, an additional protection aguinst the fire menace
which the business men greatly appreciate,
ANOTHER PETITION
MAY BE CIRCULATED
FOR A BEER VOTE
The Hotelmcn's Association of this
city have taken preliminary steps
looking towards the circulation of another petition to have another vote
in Cranbrook on the beer question,
the last petition having been rejected
by the provineiul government on the
grounds that it was based on an obsolete voters' list. A meeting of
the hotelmen was to have bee'n held
the beginning of the week to take
up the matter again, und to decide
about getting another petition under
way which would be put in order.
In the meantime the government
has decided to allow u plebiscite in
the Grand Forks-Greenwood riding
as to whether the sale of beer by
the glass In beer parlors shall be allowed, the vote to tuke place on Au*
gust 21st. In Vancouver a reverse
plebiscite may be held, prohibition
interests huving decided to circulate
petitions for u vote on the question of the abolition of the sale
of beer by the glass, The government hus indicated that if the required forty per cent of the names
on the voters' list is secured, and
the petition is found to be otherwise
in order, the petition will be granted.
TWENTY
YEARS  AGO
Extracts frttm tha Issue of
The Cranbrook Herald of this
w       Date Twenty Yean Afo.        T-h
**************************,
The King Lumber Co., No. 2 mill,
made a record cut one day this week
of 06,496 feet.
The Cranbrook band has made
some public appearances in thc district and has made a very good name
for itself. The bund consists of
twenty-fiva   pieces.
A Board of Trade was recently organized ut Marysville by a very enthusiastic attendance uf residents,
ranchers and prospectors of that district. J. F. Hutchcroft was appointed president.
W. S. McDonald, of the C.P.R.
Bridge aud Buildings Department
recently completed an inspection trip
to the Crow's Nest line between
Cranbrook and Dunmore Junction,
Six car loads of silver lead ore are
now being taken out of the Sullivan
Mine per day, and the lower levels
which have rceently been opened have
displayed some very attractive values,
insuring a long life of profit for
this mine.
THE WEATHER
July Max.
14 89
16  81
16   85
17  86
18  86
19  "  70
20   74
Min.
47
81
46
43
60
44
42
Ftrnie   Gel.   Road   Check
The city clerk of Fernie, at the
last, city council mtteting, reported
tlmt lie had received from the provineiul deportment of finance a
cheque for the sum of $4,202.96,
liehiK the city's share of the revenue
derived from Motor Vehicle licenses.
This amount shows an increase of
approximately |SUU over the amount
from the same sources last year.—
Fernie Free Press.
NATIVE SONS' MEETING
AT VANCOUVER WAS
EVENT OF IMPORTANCE
Delegates who attended tbe meetings of the Grand Council of the Native Sons of Canada, held at Vancouver last month, have returned,
and express the opinion that the gathering was the most momentous ever
held in thc history of the organization. Fred Ryckman, the secretary
of Crnnbrook Assembly, states that
much interest was evinced in the
sessions of the Grand Council in
Vancouver, and delegates were present from points as far east as Winnipeg and north to Alaska. The
growth of the organization is evidenced in the new branches that are being established, and the applications
for charters which are being made
from many points in the west. The
larger centres in the enst arc also
desirous of forming branches, it wns
apparent. Among the business put
through was a motion reaffirming the
desire of thc order to see u Canadian
appointed to the position of Governor-General of Canada.
Jas. Martin, of this city, who uns
the first grand vice-president of the
council, was uppointed us u member
of the grand organization committee,
Surveying Ihe Flats
J. G. Cummings, a Cranbrook civil
engineer, with 11 crew of ubout six
men, started work tbis week on the
survey of the Indian lands located on
Kootenay Flats. They have a cook
with them and are camped on the
work.—Creston   Review.
A Rich Mine
The great Hollinger mine in the
Porcupine district of Ontario, which
has produced to date over $100,000,-
000 in gold, is spending a quarter of
a million dollars in equipment calculated to save two or three cents per
ton in the handling of ore. The reason for this lavish expenditure is apparent when it is calculated that at
the present rate of production a saving of one per cent per ton amounts
to $20,000 per year. When the mill
tonnage is increased this yoar, one
cant saving will mean $30,000.
Friday, July 23
HOW GOD LOVES:—For God so
loved the world, that he gave his only
begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have
everlasting  life.—John   3:1(1.
+ •+■ •*•
Saturday, July 24
THR TENDER SHEPHERD:—
He shall feed his flock like a shepherd
he shall gather the lambs with his
arm and carry them in his bosom.—>
Isiuh 40: 11.
•*• + +
Sunday, July 26
THE RICHEST FRUITAGE:—
The fruit of the Spirit is love, joy,
peace, longsufferlng, gentleness,
goodness, faith, meekness, temperance; against such there iu no law.—
Gal.   5:22,   23.
+    t    T
Monday, July 26
AN OLD MAN'S TESTIMONY:—I
have fought a good fight, I have
finished my course, I have kept the
faith. Henceforth there is laid up
for me a crown of righteousness.—
2 Timothy 4:7.
+ + +
Tuesday, July 27
RETURN TO THE LORD:—Let
the wicked forsake his way, and the
unrighteous man his thoughts: and
let him return unto the Lord, and he
will have mercy upon him: and to our
God, for he will abundantly pardon.
—Isaiah 55:7.
*-    f-   +
Wednesday, July 28
ETERNAL LIFE:—Thou shalt love
the Lord thy God with all thy heart, j
and with all thy soul, and with all
thy strength, and with all thy mind: \
and thy neighbor as thyself.   This do,
and thou shalt live.—Luke  10:27,
28.
+   +   +
Thursday, July 29
THE ONLY CREATOR:—In the
beginning was the Word,  and the
27 YEARS AGO
The Dominion Day celebration held
in Cranbrook was the largest known
in the East Kootenay. Special trains
ran from east and west, und the duy
was an immense success.
REX CAFE
AND   ROOMS
—    CRANBROOK    —
OPPOSITE  DEPOT
Under New  Management
CAFE-
Two  Doors from  Baker Street
(iood Cooking - Prompt Service
All White Help
ROOMS-
Twenty Clean and Comfortable
Rooms — 50c - 75c per Night
D.  E.  GUS TIN
— Proprietor —
ffffffffffff.ffffffffffffffffffffff.fffffffffffffff.'f,
SERVK
X?
NO FUSS-NO MUSS
Zip-and It's Done
Changing the oil in tlie engine-case, differential
and transmission of your car is no task at all—when
your car rests high and dry on our special oiling
platform.
Why muss around home with an oiling joh when
we make no extra charge for changing oil? Then
too, you get the best motor oil on the market today
when you let ns put in MOBILE oil.
PREMIER SERVICE
Cranbrnok Street   ■   Between Bank of Commerce (nd School
TO-MORROW ALWAYS COMES!
The Pension Investment Bond for Everybody
WHAT IT MEANS :—
You can make yourself your own pensioner by the simple expedient of dedicating your small
saving to the purpose of securing your independence in later years. You can determine the nature
nnd amount of your own old age allowance. You cun command as your guurantee of your pension
the vast resources which stand at the bark of the Sun Life Assurance Company of Cnnndn.
WHAT IT IS :-
Here is a concrete example: A male aged 25 desires a pension of $100.00 per month, to
commence at age 05. He deposits with the Sun Life of Canada the sum of $1111.50 aunuully. (Employees with thc Consolidated Mining t Smelting Co. muy take this on a monthly basis), When he
attains the age of 05 his deposits cease. His total deposits in (he forty intervening years have
amounted to $5,260.00, but the Sun Life of Canada declare thc vuluu of thfl pension in cash at that
time to bc $14,028.80, and the bond-holder may surrender his bond for tbat sum if he so desires. If
he does not choose this option, the Company Immediately commences to pny a pension of $100.00
per month, and continues to do so as long as the pensioner lives. If he should live twenty years,
for example, he would receive $24,000.QO.
Should he die after payment of the pension has com minced but twfore the full value pf
$14,028,50 has been paid out in pension allowances, the unpaid balance would bu puid to his nutate
in one cash sum. For instance, he may die when he hus received 12 monthly pension payments, or
$1,200.00 in al); in this case the balance of thc cash option,—$12,828.50—would be puid to his representatives.
But perhaps this bond-holder never lives to receive his pension. What huppens? The
total deposits made by him to the Company arc returned to his estate. In u nutshell, he cannot lose
a cent he has paid to the Company should he die before pension age; should he live to pension age,
the most he can pay is $5,200,00, and the least he or his representatives can receive is $14,028.50.
Bonds can  be  had to  mature  tt ages  50, 55, 00 or 05.
Modified forms of the above Bonds can be had to suit Individual needs.
After three years, should a bond-holder from any cause whatever be unable to continue
making payments, a proportional paid-up bond can be had, vesting at the same time as the original
policy.   Thus every possibility is provided against.
Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada
F.W. ADOLPH   -   Agenti   -   WILLIAM ELDER
CRANBROOK nd KIMBERLEY Thursday, July 22nd, 1926
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
PAGE   THREE
]Bgggj|i B^i^jj^
iBeer Analyzed
By Experts
ALL theCeers purchased by the Liquor
Control Board of B. C. from the Vancouver Breweries Limited, Rainier Brewing Co. of Canada Limited, Westminster
Brewing Co. Limited, Vicloria Phoenix
Brewing Co. limited and thc Silver Spring
Brewery Limited, who are all members of
the Amalgamated Breweries of II. C, for
■ale at Government Liquor Stores und the
Licensed Beer'Parlors, have been and will
be analyzed from time to time by different expert firms of the continent for the
protection of Uie public.
THE aubstnce of these various analyses Instigated hy order of the
Liquor Control Bourd shows lhat tho
Been are perfect* the ta&tc agreeable and
malty. The foam Is creamy und stands
up well. The alcohol by weight is about
OS per cent, and the extract 5.49 per
cent, with an original gravity of about
1S.20. These analyses indicate further
that the Beers are of good quality, wholesome and free from any foreign substance.
ryiO make a good Beer wllh .hih-Ii health-giving
S Qualities lt requires a sMilrtl browmasler uml
an up-to-date hygienic plant, such un maintained
by the above mentioned Breweries. These plutils
are open for Inspection and visits ol Ihe public lire
gladly solicited. Only the besl materials obtainable en used in tbe manufacture ut the Beers.
'T^HE Brewing capacity of lhe abovo Breweries,
-*■ members of the Aiiwliiitmulril llrcwerlr-s of
B. C, Is about eight times ns liiriri* as the present
output, which gives hest assurance lo the public
of receiving only fully matured und properly
aged Beers for many years lo come.
This advertisement is not published or.displayed by the Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia
IIU"
|MP
■   nrovetf*
lAn't ii&    od the
0«tter     Carlo*
H
CHOICEST
Cf?£«ME«y
BUTTER
GOLDEN COCOON
^RUTH CROSS
SYNOPSIS
Molly Shannon, university student,
heart-broken because she has been
deserted by Stephen Renfro; her fiance, wanders aimlessly about at
night, anxious to escape life, to get
away from herself. Finally ?he enters n garishly-furnished house in the
slums of the town. But she Is distrusted at what she seas. A man
standing in thc hallway eyes her with
a narrowed, speculative stare. Molly
feels us if she were in the Inferno.
CHAPTER XIII—Continued
With a smothered cry Molly threw
ui* her hands to shut it out, let her
head sink, Nausea seized her—horror, disgust, Her very flesh winced
and cringed. She hud not supposed
! would be like that. She had not
thought how it would be. She turn-
ed stumbling and groping for the
iloor. She wanted to destroy herself,
but not like that—oh, not like that . .
"I'm afraid  it's locked."
She started, looked back over her
shoulder. For the first time, she noticed the man standing by the stairs.
He was smiling pleasantly at her, but
still with that narrowed, speculative
g&ze, He was sizing her up, appraising what, she might be worth as a
ntw sensation. His gaze became a
part of the pitiless, white glare in
the room. It was like an X-ray turned upon her, which she could neither
escape nor fend agatitttt. She stared
back at him dumbly. Terror crept
up her limbs, numbing and paralyzing. She told herself she must keep
her head, she must think; on no account must she stop looking at him.
Instead, she seized the door knob
and shook it frenziedly. She struck
at the panelings, beat thtfm with her
fists, threw her weight again and
ngain upon them. He was right,
It was locked. She tried to cry out,
but her voice fainted in her throat,
She faced round at last with an inert, unfinished gesture of appeal to
thc man by the stairs. It used up
the final atom of her strength. But
he only went on smiling at her out
»f the eyes that had seen everything,
experienced everything. ... If it
were not for this creeping numbness,
this dead mass of tons and. mountains
settling upon her, she might explain
to him—she might make him understand. She wan tad to 'destroy herself, but not like that—0 God, not
like  that!  .  .  .
The man, watching, saw her go
lown. ... i
the
jumping from one extreme to
other of the vast state in the interest of a certain political movement, was returning home after an
appreciable absence. He permitted
himself to be brushed down, and
handed tbe negro porter the usual
toe. He covered a yawn, as "he settled again in his section and gazed
out through the half-screen at the
grimy waste of tracks and the ugly,
tumble-down buildings along the
wuter  front.
He wus senior partner nf the
cupital's best and oldest law firm,
and he had un honorable term of
service on the bench to his credit,
though he bud recently resigned in
the latter capacity to go back into
private  practice.
As the express, which had been
switching and fussing about now for
a quarter of an hour, lurched to a
full stop still at some distance front
the stution, Cochran bent suddenly
nearer to the window. He pressed his
face almost against the screen—alwuys with the allowance for his deliberate und rather cumbersome manner. By the side of tho truck, so
close indeed, thut but for the screen
he could have put out his hand and
touched her, a girl stood waiting for
the train  to pass.
She wus plainly, but not unbecomingly   dressed,     The  drooping  brim
A -   PAT   -  A    -  TIME     /     M    -   REQUIRED
lIDITTniliriTTTTTTTni
CHAPTER XIV
The express from the North,
Mexico-bound, pulls into the capital
at four o'clock, which is just before
! dawn in summer, It dawdles about
: an unconscionable time in the rail-
; road yards, finally gets itself re-
| versed :n^j backs into the station,
: ready for the bridge over the river.
|    Gregory Cochran, who had   been
Chiysler'70'
Unchanged in Quality
Supreme m Value
NEW CHRYSLER "70"
PRICES
Modal   OtdPck..NcwPrlc«lS.vin|,
■*•«••        $2100 »10» «(•'.
Coach             219S 2033 160
R-j.-i.Kr         2S2S 2I9S 330
•owl Coup.   2710 2470 240
feovilum       2615 2540 27!
Sad..              2560 2260 300
tail hdn>   3020 2615 405
OowoS.J.1. 3170 2760 410
t. O. B. Wliulior, Ontario, (Fr.iiht
only t. be added). Th. above firkr,
lK[>id. all ta.ee. bumper, front and
nar, tear* tire, rirt covrr, and funk
* f OMtlM.
Today Chrysler "70", changed In no way except new lower prlcei
which save you '65 to '410, continue! more emphatically than
ever in its record-making history the car of American preference.
Everywhere it is acclaimed the greatest of six-cylinder values.
Everywhere it is welcomed as an Individual discovery by virtue
of its inbuilt quality, performance, grace, economy, comfort,
safety and durability.
We arc eager that you experience these revolutionary results
delivered by the Chrysler "70", which now offered at these sen.
satlonal savings, are as far ahead of contemporary achievement as
the compact and dashing "70" Itself outranks the older types.
CHRYSLER70*
heart nut of her numbed body with
the panpr of' finnl dissolution itself.
Farther along there was a spot where
one could climb down to n little buttress of rock which hun-ir low over the
water. Often she hud noticed it from
the train. To reach this it was necessury to cross the railroad trucks,
keep to the sidewalk for u few blocks,
th-ti double back toward the river.
A train was coming in and she had
to wait for it to pass.
A swift impulse, almost executed
before she' cduld check it, lifted the
heart out of her again. But no—
the train was moving too slowly—
backing in. She might only be mangled a little and go on* living—with
that cowed look of a trapped rat in
her  eyes  like   Mr.   Kreuzer.
The shrill grating of wheels, thc
echoing concussion of cars jerked to
a stop, caused her to lift her head.
She found herself staring into the
interior of a dimly lighted, palutial-
looking Pullman. Molly had never
been  in   a sleeping-car  in  her life.
After a time she became conscious
of a face at the window, of a pair
of eyes, questioning und keenly blue,
almost on u level with her own. She
tared buck dully for a little, then
let her head sink again on her breast.
An instant later she scarcely remembered to have seen the face at all.
Her brain was a camera without u
negative.
When the train had passed she
went on over the tracks—came out
presently at the river bank. It was
still dark despite the flare of color
in the east, and she had passed no
one, not even a policeman. She picker her footing carefully down thc
steep incline to the point which overhung the water.
(To be continued)
GEOLOGICAL MAPS
AND REPORTS OF WESTERN MINING DISTRICT
Her   arms   hung   straight  and   lax
her  aides.     Her shoulder,  sagged
inward.
Wilion'i Service Garage
Jas. Mitchell     -    -
-    Dealer
Dealer    •
Cranbrook
Kimberley
m
of a black straw hat concealed her
face, but she was young by the
slightness nnd suppleness of her
body, which was lined with minute
detail against thi1 red and gold of
the dawn. She stood in a sort of
pitched-forward attitude, like a slim
pine sapling1 blown half over by the
wind. Her arms hung straight and
lax before her. Her shoulders sagged inward. Cochran took in every
item of her appearance, even to the
limp   interlacing   of   white   fingers
toss the dark stuff of her skirt.
The train jarred to a start, wheels
began to grind. Soon the figure of
the girl was swallowed up in the
mists und half lights of the dawn.
With another muttered ejaculation,
Cochran turned his glance from the
window. The white, impassive face
hung distinct und compelling before
him; it neither receded nor grew dim.
The eyes, staring, sightless, were like
blank openings into a charnel house,
where ull that had once been held
beautiful or di-ur lay strewn about in
pitiful attitudes of death. She had
looked at him, but she had not seen
him.   ...
"Here, tinkle Ike"—he pointed
out his bags to the elderly negro
who bustled up at this juncture,
gleaming welcome from every black
pore and every separate one of his
wide apart, tombstone teeth—"you
take these things on to the house,
m going to walk."
The grinning black mouth stopped
grinning—to yawn ever more caver-
nously with astonishment and dismay. "Yo* gwine walk, Marse
Greg?" he stuttered. "Whut fer yo'
gwino do dut when Mis' Sary she
done an' sent me fer to . . .'
"I'm going to walk," Cochran repeated quietly. "If my mother is
awake, tell her I'll be on present-
ly."
Molly had been for upward of four
hours in the white house with the
pillars—most of the time unconscious. She had n blurred impression
that they had been vtry kind to her
there. They hud even wanted to send
her home in a cab, but she insisted
that she was quite able to walk.
Their kindness had tallen nothing
from the honor of that first searing
moment—from her nausen and re'
vulsion at the way that man had looked at her. It waa as if by that
mere glance she had been branded
for life—set aside us leprous and unclean. That she had escaped was a
mere external incident, lt meant no<
thing one way or another. The
thought wns what convicted one. She
had deliberately willed this thing.
She had taken the step. From that
she could never escape. But at
least . . . The unfinished phrase
had to do with her present destination.
She had considered thc railroad
bridge across the river, but it
so high. ... Tho vision of that
blank drop through space lifted thm
WEATHER BULLETIN
Tempi-rnturr.    at    Cranbrook
June                                    Min. Max.
2!l     45 HO
30   48 til
July
1   M 66
2 '.. 55 71
3   4'.i 87
4'  51 93
5   54 97
6  61 91
7   59 87
8   54 86
9   49 91
,10   51 97
11   50 97
12   50 98
13   60 97
— o	
It's getting prqtty hard to deter-
mine whether the movie rights to a
sensation nre more valuable than the
hot dog privileges.
Good far
the
A report by Dr. J. K. Walker on
the geology and mineral deposits of
the Windermere district, British Columbia, has been published by the
Geological Survey. The urea in underpin to a great extent by sedimentary formations of pre-cambrian age
Correlations are made between these
formations and similar pre-cambrian
sediments farther south described 1*>
Dr. S. J. Schofield and Dr. R. A
Daly. Tho age relationships of tho
Palaeozoic formations exposed in tbe
eastern part of the area are also mat
ters of careful consideration.
The most important mineral deposits are lead-silver and lead-silver-
inc deposits. They are of the fissure and bed-vein type and are generally associated with minor flexures
on the limbs of large folds. The
loading properties are described.
Copies of the report may be had on
application to the Director, Geologic
cal Survey, Ottawa, or 510 Winch
Building, Vancouver.
A geological map of a part of
southern Yukon on a scale of four
miles to one inch has been published.
It includes the Whitehorse mining
district and covers an area extending
from Windy arm to about eighteen
miles north of Whitehorse and Yukon
railway. Copies may be had on application to the Director, Geological
Survey, Ottawa, or 510 Winch Building, Vancouver.
SAIUNQ3
From   MONTREAL-QUEBEC
To   Liverpool
July 30 Aug. 27 Sep. 24 .. Montcalm
Aug.    6 Sept. .'! Oct.    I .. Montclare
Sep. 10, Oct.   8     "Mont-royal
Aug. 2ii Sep. 17 Oct. 16      Montrose
To   Bolfait,   Clasgow
July 29 Aug. 26 Sip. 23 "Montnairn
Aug, 12 Sep.   0 Oct   7     Metagama
To Cherbourg, Southampton, Antwerp
July 28 Aug, 2.". Sep. 22 Minnedosa
Aug. 11 Sep. 8 Oct. 6 .. Melita
To Cherbourg Southampton Hamburg
Aug. I Sept. 1 . . • Empress of
France
Aug. 18, Sept. l.'.t    . ' Empress of
Scotland
t Not calling at Hamburg
•   From   Quebec
f'ff.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.VeVffffffff
B. C. ROOMS
Clean   and  Comfortable  Room.
Hot and Cold Water
50c per Night
Durick Ave., opp C.P.R. depot
Next   F.   H.  Dezall (iarage
,  Cranbrook, 15. C. — Box 68
ffffffffff
PAUL
NORDGREN
YAHK, B.C.
For   that  new
STRAW HAT, SUMMER;;
SHOES - AND
WEARING APPAREL
see our  stock
— Best Quality —
MEN'S WORKING
CLOTHES
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
FORTNIGHT'S ORE
SHIPMENTS TO
TRAIL SMELTER
Following is a statement of ore received at the Trail Smelter for the
period July 1st to July Uth inclusive:
COPPER
Allenby Copper Co., Allenby ..   411
MILLING ORE
Bluebell, Riondel     754
Cork Province, Zwicky        38
Duthie, Smlthem      112
I.ucky Jim, Zineton     740
Home Stake, Louis Creek      67
Mountain Chief, New Denver ..      42
Metal Recovery, Retallack       67
Rosebery Surprise, New Denver     93
Ruth Hope, Sandon       45
Rambler, Rambler       25
Enterprise, Enterprise      162
Stemwinder, Kimberley  1037
Whitewater, Retallack       165
LEAD
Bell, Beaverdell       49
Queen Bess, Alamo        26
Goodenough, Ymir      53
Silversmith, Sandon       82
Hewitt, Smlthem        II
DRY
McAllister, Three Forks       104
Trevitt,  Republic        98
Yankee Girl, Ymir   1301
Quilp, Republic, Wash     278
ZINC
Silversmith, Sandon       45
Company   Mines   15003
Total Tons   20,87:
Milk and Cream
DIRECT FROM
Big Butte Dairy Farm
non it
Victoria Cafe
Whether you want a light
lunch or a satisfying meal
you will find our food tasty
and delicious.
After the Dance and Show
visit   the   VICTORIA.
Cranbrook's Popular Cafe
.fffffffffffffffffffffffff.
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
of Canada, Limited.
OFFICES, SMELTING AND REFINING DEPARTMENT
TRAIL,   BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS AND REFINERS
Purchasers af Oold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Ores
Producers of Oold, SMver, Copper, Pig Lead and Zinc
"TADANAC BRAND
■jniiiiiiiii:]iiiiiiiiiii:ui!iiiiiiiiii[wuiiii!ii:it]i!i:t!i!iMiHHimiiima«iwai!«w«iiNMioKiiiiHimi)i/iiitiH;i;[]iii(iiiiiiii[jiiiiiiiitiiia)iiijiiiii
NELSON BUSINESS COLLEGE
INDIVIDUAL TUITION -• COMMENCE ANY TIME
The best equipped Business College in British Columbia.
Tees only S1-.50 a month. Complete Commercial Course in
Shorthand, Typewriting, Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Spelling, Business Arithmetic, Commercial Law, Commercial English, Filing and general office procedure.
For partlculara, write
P.O. Box 14, Nelson, B.C.    ....    Phone 603.
Alberta Premier Coal Producer
During 1925 Canada produced some
13,134.968 tons of coal, valued at
$49,261,961, according to a report
issued by the Dominion bureau of
statistics. Alberta held the premier
position with an output of 5,869,031
tons, which was 679,302 tons above
1924 production. British Columbia
showed a slight advance of 2,842,262
tons In 1926. There wen 25,032
people, including 1,642 salaried employees, engaged In or about the
mines during 1926, te whom -$38,200,-
309 wu paid ia salaries aad wages.
THE
NEW HOTEL
Yahk, B.C.
J. MARKLUND, Proprietor
Whin ln Yahk make your bom* at
THE HEW HOTEL.
Thla Hotel li new from bottom to top.    Twenty-flvo nicely furnished roomi. All are clean
aad comfortable.
KKHTAfRANT IN CONNECTION. P A a E T w o
THB CRANBROOK HERALD
Thursdny, July 22nd, 1926
THE UNITED CHUR^Jti
REV. BRYCE WALLACE,  B.A., B.D., Minister
SUNDAY, JULY 25th
11 a.m.-"lDENTIFICATION."
12:15 p.m.—SUNDAY SCHOOL Adult Bible Class
HOME-
CHEERFUL RELIGION"
PBOFE8810HAI. CARDS
Drs.  Oreen   &   MacKinnon
Physicians  A  Surgeon.
Offlce at Residence, Armstrong
Avenue
OFFICE     HOURS
Afternoons  2 to 4
Evenings   7.30 to 8.80
Sundays 2.00 to 4.00
CRANBROOK,   B.C.
DR.   F.   B.   MILES
DENTIST
OFFICE HOURS
9 to 12 a.m.      1 to 6 p.m.
Han.on  Blk,  Cranbrook,  B.C.
F. M. MacPHERSON
Undertaker
Phon. 3BO
Norkary Ave., Neat City Hall
fffffff-ffffffffffffff.
H. W. Herchmer
BARRISTER
and
SOLICITOR
CRANBROOK   -   B.C.
— PHONE 61 —
aWeffffffffffffffffffffff
baptist Church
Rev. W.T. TAPSCOTT
213 Norbury Ave. . Phone 202
SUNDAY, JULY 25th
11 a.m.—"A Pastor's Prayer
For His People."
12 noon—Sunday School.
7.30 p.m. — "The
lernative."
(treat  Al-
AUK   CORDIALLY
INYITED.
I       THE GROWING POWER  OF  CANADA
* By Arthur J. Bean, Financial Edi tor, The Boston Post.
**************************************************
fffffffffffff.'
GEORGE   J.
BARRISTER SOLICITOR
NOTARY
CRANBROOK - B.C.
f*V*Wffffffffffffffffffff'
FOR   SERVICE,   QUALITY
AND   CLEANLINESS   THE
L. D. Cafe
CANNOT   BE   EXCELLED
Sanitary Electric Refrigeration
The writer spent some weeks recently in studying the Canadian financial and business situation. The
development of Canada is of great
moment to New England and to the
United States, and promises to raise
many interesting, not to say perplexing, questions in the years ahead.
As far as New England is concerned
the rapid growth in the manufacturing business of Canada is of great
interest. For example, the textile
business of Canada is being developed remarkably, and labor is much
cheaper than here. The decision of
many United States . manufacturers
to start plants in Canada, notably the
Ford Motor Company, shows that
Canada must bo reckoned with'indus
trinity in the years ahead. This is
bound to raise interesting tariff questions between Canada and the United
States. Two great industrial countries adjacent to each other provide
the setting for vexatious questions
and considerable friction, if world
history is nny guide, although the tra<
ditional friendship between the two
peoples is likely to offset this in
greut measure. However, it is well
to realize that Canada is becoming a
great industrial power.
The saying that Canada haa every-
thing is no exaggeration. She haa an
empire of rich lands, vast mineral and
lumber resources and abundant labor.
There is little doubt that she has
groat untapped oil resources. Contrasting with our policy of restricted
immigration, Canada is adopting a
benevolent attitude toward the emigrant, Our policy is resulting in
rapidly increasing emigration to Can-
ada. One can stand in the station
at Montreal and see long trains
crowded with north Europeans embarking for the Canadian northweBt
daily.
Much has been said about our prohibition law enriching Canada. While
there is something in this, Canada's
growing wealth is due to the rapid development of agriculture, manufacturing and mining.
Canada does not talk much about
her progress. Indeed, some Cana-
inns think they should advertise their
rapid growth more, but the British
policy of quiet penetration still pre.
vails.    For example, how many peo-
IODG1B AND SOCIETIES
!. Q, O. F.
KEY CITY LODGE No. 42
Meets every
.Monday night at
The Auditorium
Sojourning Oddfellows are cordially invited
N. G  F. RUSSELL
Rec. Sec. E. G. Dingley, P.G.
FOR RELIABLE
Shoe Rep airing
Take your shoes to tk*
-0. K. SHOE SHOP-
Norbury Ave. — Cranbrook
For Quality and value In
Men's Dress and Work Shoes
SEE US — VY. NICHOL Pro*.
**************************
For Good Value ia
GOOD   EATS
Go to The
ZENITH   CAFE
Cor. BAKER & VAN HORNE
**************************
Sainsbury & Ryan
RCILDEBB AND
C0STHACT0R8
totautaa W?» aa4 Wart
Oiarutaad
Talafkaa-M MlUM
CBANBBOOK     -     B.C.
WOMEN'S  INSTITUTE
Ma-ita la  tha
K.  ol  P.  Hal]
attar-noon ot tha
arat Taeadar at
I p.m.
AU ladlM art
eordlally Intttad
Pre.ident    Mra. NORGROVE
Secretary    Mri.  J. COUTTS.
SEE US FOR—
YOUR NEXT SUIT
Latelt aty'ei 4 fabric. $40-$60
H. C. LONG, Van Horne St.
Whea laa Think al laiarauae
— Oall Up -
BEALE & ELWELL
Cranbrook & Kimberley
Sole Afaata lor Ilnberlej TowaiHe.
MMOBi
J. P. SCOTT
Cranbrook Drug * Book Co.
NISBET & GRAHAM
Barristers, Solicitors, Ac.
Offices: Imperial Bank Bldg.
CRANBROOK. B.C.
OFFICBS at KIMBERLEY
IN K. of P. HALL
Open Every Thuradaj from
10 a.m. to ( p.m.
STRIP TICKETS
With and Without Coupons
For Qeneral
Admission Purposes
For Sal* at
THB
CRANBROOK HERALD
OFFICE
MADE
IN
CANADA
CONTAINS
NO
ALUM
pie know that Canada has the greatest gold  mine   in the  world?    The
Hollinger mine in the Porcupine gold
field ia without doubt the greatest
gold mine that the world has ever
seen.    Since the war this one mine
has produced  near $100,000,000  in
gold.    When one considers that, on
every dollar of gold a credit structure
of $11 ean be rearer, we get some
idea of the national benefit of gold
production.    In the Porcupine camp
there are several other great mines,
yet geologists say that the territory
is  hardly  scratched.    There   is  the
Dome mine, also a great producer,
and the Mclntire mine, which is one
of the big producers.    Incidentally.
the writer received a big surprise in
looking over this camp to note that
Boston, Lynn and Worcester interests were working what looks like a
promising mine; the Premier, Paymaster, upon which has been spent
over $1,000,000.    This property has
some   four   miles   of   undergroundl
workings and what looks like a big
body or ore. The first unit mill has
been completed, and plans have been
made to spend around $500,000 more
to bring the property to large production. E. H. Walker & Co., of Boston,
are the fiscal agents of this mine and
have apparently done a good job in
developing it.
Notwithstanding that American capital has penetrated Canada to some | . ——
extent, the big bulk of Canadian flames, which assumed alarming pro
business is handled by Canadian capi-1 portions, but the fire was under con
tai. Some of our biggest banking trol the following day.
interests are trying to obtain a foot-] The efficient work of Kimberley's
hold, but the British system of branch firemen, with many willing helpers,
banking puts financial control pretty j including many of the Company's
firmly in Canadian hands. Many staff, doubtless was the cause of
Canadians complain of this policy, checking the spread. of the confla-
and say that final decision rests with gration toward town,
those who do not know tho needs of
the local community. There is a
great deal of truth in this criticism,
but It is easy to see the position of
the Canadian banking interests. As
one banker put it: "We ure trying to
fight shy of the American money octopus."
While space will not allow a detailed account of the various phases
of Canadian growth, the writer would
suggest that American, and particularly New England, business Interests lose no time in making a study
of the march of events in the North
"«
YES-
you can easily
mate the most
delicious
Cakes,
Biscuits,
Doughnuts,
Cookies, etc.
with
MAGIC
BAKING
POWDER
C.W. GILLETT   CO. tTO.
TORONTO,  CAN*
A
**************************
WYCLIFFE NOTES
PEOPLE
MAKE A
PRODUCT
6§5S!
Pacific Milk is more than
grateful to the women of
this province. It is due entirely to their helpful cooperation that Pacific Milk
has become the best in all
Canada. British Columbia
will lead in other products,
too, if everyone helps even
a little.
PACIFIC   MILK
Haa*i    OAmi    Vimmw
FutorlM at U4mt * AkheUforJ
***************************
At the school meeting held last
Wednesday evening in the Wycliffe
Public Schools, Miss Lippett, of Cranbrook, was appointed teacher for
tho junior grades for the coming year
in succession to Miss Reekie.
Helen Marunchack underwent an
operation for appendicitis at the St.
Eugene Hospital on Thursday last.
Wc are pleased to hear she is progressing favorably.
Mrs. Lyman Taylor and daughter
Mary were Wycliffe visitors on Monday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. Grubbe and party,
of Cranbrook, were callers at Wycliffe on Sunday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Clark and party
spent Sunday picnicking at McBain's
".nke.
Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Crowe and
daughter Eileen were Wycliffe visitors on Wednesday and Thursday,
visiting with their many friends here.
Alex and Margaret Yager, the
nephew and niece of Mr. and Mrs.
Alex Yager, left on Thursday's tn n
for Swift Current, Sask., where they
will spend the remainder of the summer holidays.
Peggy and Pauline Cox were visiting with Mrs. Edwards In Carnbrook
for several days during the week.
Mr. and Mrs. L. Piper and daughter Jean were Cranbrook visitors on
Monday afternoon.
Mrs. Dennlson and two daughters,
of Fernie, are visiting at the home
of Mrs. S. G. Clark.
Mr. and Mrs. Lilly, of Kimberley,
were Wycliffe callers during the
week.
Mr. Stewart, post offlce inspector,
was in Wycliffe on Monday on official business.
Mr. nud Mrs. S. G. Clark and son
Thomas were among the Cranbrook
visitors on Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. P. Franzen were
Cranbrook callers on Saturday,
Mr. Ambrose Staples returned on
Wednesday from Spokane, where he
has been spending a vacation with
his daughter, Mrs. Lewis.
Mr. J. Brackett, of the Mutual Life
Insurance Co., was a business caller
on Monday.
The Wycliffe boys played the Kimberley boys on Monday night in the
final game for the junior championship baseball cup, and after a fairly
good game, the Kimberley team came
out on top by 13 runs to 10. Inge
Jahrens umpired the game in his usual
satisfactory style.
\ YAHK
| NOTES
The girls of the C.G.l.T. left on
Monday for a week at Aldridge,
where there has been a camp recently erected. The girls were very excited ubout their trip. Their leader,
Mrs. Royal, accompanied the girls.
Those that left were: Mabel Anderson, Frances Baum, June Hamilton,
Lena Nedelic and Helen Mclnnis.
Mr. and Mrs. John Wood and sons
passed through town on Monday for
Cranbrook, where Mr. Wood has se
cured employment. They expect to
make their future home in Cranbrook.
Mr. Roy Burch, fire ronger, pnssed
through town from Moyie en route
to Creston.
The Yahk Meat Market has recently changed hands, now being owned
by Gus Iderstrom.
The town of Yahk has been rather
smoky these last few days on account
of the forest fires not fnr off. Mr.
McCoubrey, Mr. Jarvls and the police
gathered spare fire fighters around
town,
Mr. Jim Vigors is back in town
again after being in the St. Eugene
Hospital, Cranbrook, for some time.
We are all very glad to see Jim
around again, and it is to be hoped
he will be able to put aside his walk-
ing stick soon.
Constable Davis and family, of
Fernie, have arrived in town to take
Constable Sharpe's place, who was
recently transferred to Elko.
The mumps are still raging in town
and seem to be staying a good while
in town.
The showers which came this week
were very welcome, as both gardens and fires needed the rain.
Th*e annual school meeting waa
held recently, and the old trustees
were put back in. The trustees are:
Mr. E. A. Lythgoe, Mrs. Harrison
and Mr. Baker.
The ball game played on Sunday
between Yahk and Creston was played on the Yahk diamond, the score
being 8-16 in favor of Creston. The
winners went home happy, but our
boys were disappointed.
On Tuesday last the clergymen of
Creston were canvassing for fundB
enough to start the new church,
which used to be the old school house.
It is hoped the church will soon be
ready. Those canvassing were
Messrs. Newby, Herdman and Appelt,
all of Creston. The church is to be
for the community of Yahk.
WORK COMMENCES ON
KIDDIES' PLAYGROUND
AT KIMBERLEY
Swimming Pool To Be Provided and Work to Start
At Once
Tuesday evening of lnst week
meeting was held   at  the  I.O.O.F.
Hall, Kimberley, to further consider
the question of a playground for the
kiddies there.
Mr. Fred Willis briefly explained
the origin and growth of the movement, and reminded the meeting that
as the July 1st committee had a surplus of approximately $600, the Gyro
Club (from sole of car tickets) $600,
and that as substantial aid is assured
from the Elks and other sources,
there is no reason for further delay
in getting to -worn. Emphasizing the
real need of a playground, he said
that the committee appointed at first
meeting (Messrs. Willis, Foote and
Gough) had thoroughly examined the
ground at the entrance of Morrison's
gulch, and recommended it as a desirable site. The speaker further
believed that a lease would be granted by the C.M. & S. Co. on favorable
terms.
Mr. E. G. Montgomery said that
the company had for a long time had
this site in view for some such purpose. There is another site near Mr.
C. Bennett's house, but this will be
more suitable for a covered rink at
a Inter date. Mr. Montgomery promised that, there will be no difficulty
in arranging a lease for such land
as is wanted.
Discussion ensued as to the size of
plot required, and as to the idea of a
public park in connection with the
playground. The necessity of leaving
shade trees was also mentioned.
It was moved that the committee ask the C.M. & S. Co. for a lease
on ten acres near Morrison's gulch;
and this was carrfed.
The question of appointing trustees to negotiate with the company
wns discussed and Messrs. Willis, E.
E. Jackson and Foote were elected
by acclamation.
The following gentlemen were appointed to act as a grounds commitee:
For the  Elks'  Lodge:
Booth.
For the Gyro Club: Dr. Tiffin.
For the  Knights of Pythias: Mr.
Leigh ton.
For the Loyal Order of Moose:
Mr.  Leo Johnson.
For the I.O.O.F.: Mr. E. Nesbitt.
For the Board of Trade: Mr. T.
Summers.
For the A.A.A.: Mr.  P. Murphy.
For the Citizens: Dr. Hanington.
Further discussion as to equipment
of playground, laying out of grounds,
etc., was left over on the understanding that sufficient ground be
cleared immediately for a swimming
pool; the cost of such a pool has been
obtained, but with the voluntary labor which will be furthcoming, this
cost can be cut by more than half, it
is expected.
It was nlso proposed that the construction of a swimming pool be proceeded with immediately; 60 feet by
00 feet; depth of water from 18
inches to  6 feet 6  inches.
A good start has been made toward
the attainment of a highly desirable.
objective, and there is no doubt I
of its early completion.
Best for
1 imbies
Free booklet on
the cave, and
feeding of babies
Send for it.
EAGLE BRAND
Condensed Milk
The Borden Co., Limited
VANCOUVER 13-26
U.S. Farmers Coming to Canada—.
Marked activity in the movement of
agricultural settlers from the United;
States to Canada is noted by the Do-'
minion Government department of
immigration and coloniation. In the j
month of June 1025 settlers, who with!
their wives and families represent]
312 persons, came into Canada from i
Fargo, North Dakota, bringing with
them cash and effects to the value of
$405,650, The Canadian National'
Railways colonization officials at St.
Paul, Minn., were responsible for a i
large, number of these farmer sett- j
leva emigrating to the Canadian
prairies, j
\\
Apply tlie liniment every few
hours to throat and cheat.
Carfllo with Minard's in warm
water.
Splendid for Bronchitis
and Asthma, 4«
maaasis!
i^fl'iJJ^
j§t AttttjotujH (fining
919 WEST 27th AVE.. SHAUGHNESSY HEIGHTS, VANCOUVER. B.C.
Jin Jlngttean, "Residential and T)ay School for Qirls
Provides a thorough education with careful moral and physical instruction.
First grade to junior and senior Matriculation. Art. Music. Physical Education
with indoor and outdoor sports. All the Mistresses hold degrees from the best
English and Canadian Universities. • |
For prospectus apply to The Mother Superior.
Dollars and Sense
| Motor Car Chats
5 -with Tom Greene
IF I had to start sell'
ing another line
of cars tomorrow—
I'd have to take on
a car in the $4000
class to use the same
language I use now
selling Studebakers.
DEZALL'S GARAGE
CRANBROOK • B.C.
STUDEBAKER
S2500.00 Club
For Particulars Apply lo
B.C. Mutual Benefit Auoc.
O. W. SPEIRS, BOX 240, PERNIE, B.C.
HOUSE AT KIMBERLEY
DESTROYED BY FOREST
FIRE LAST WEEK
In thc enrly afternoon of lost
Thursday the siren sounded a fire
alarm nt Kimberley and the volunteer
brigade was, as usual, promptly on
the job.
The outbreak was in the bush!
north of McGinty Trail and about a
quarter of a mile from town. The'
distance was too great for the hose'
reels, which were quickly in -evidence, i
to b-e effective, and the fire fightors' j
operations were thus restricted to,
making fire-guards and the felling of'
trees. One of the houses on the
Trail caught fire about mid-night and
was destroyed, the tenants having left
earlier. Residences on tho Morrison
sub-division were nlso threatened,
and the volunteer workers removed
articles of furniture and linen ns a
matter of precaution.
The    high    winds    favored    the.
NEW PRICES ON STAR CARS
—   Delivered at Cranbrook   —
Model 4s. Model 6s.
Standard Touring $ 915 • •        1260
Special Touring     985 - •        	
Coupe   1160 - -       1350
Coach       1175 - •       1420
Sedan   1300 - -       1600
Above Prices include Spare Tire, Tube
and Tire Cover.
RATCLIFFE & STEWART
CRANBROOK, B.C. PHONE 42
DEMONSTRATIONS AT    ANY TIME Thur»day, July 22nd, 1126
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
A ' PAQE SEVEN
filllllllt*******************************************I♦♦♦»»»«♦♦♦♦»«♦»»♦*♦♦*♦«♦♦<
Recollections of Octogenarian II
Reminiscences ol John Fl ngal Smith, of this city, as
Recorded by Himself.
**************************
WARDNER
NOTES
AFTERMATH OP THE AMERICAN
WAR
(Continued)
When one recalls the confusion and
alternate sum-uses uf the Federal
and Confederate armies, tlu- uncertainties thnt prevailed during the
years of the civil wnr, one wonders,
were It not but for the stability uml
siineness uf the great body of the
American people, thut the whole sys-
teni of the United States tin.I nut
broken up into hopeless sections. The
bitterest feeling wus exhibited by
both north and south* 1 htul been
told, when a while in Tacoma in 1K75,
by a soldier of the nurlh thnt after
the surrender uf l.ce, he, among
others, placed the union flag nt the
entrance of n church iu the south,
and ladies walked around through the
mud ho thnt even the shadow of the
flag would not cover them.
The famous "carpet-baggers" then
flocked southward to fill the offices
and places vacated in the south. The
"carpet-bag" wns not yet replaced by
the "satchel." There were fierce
riots In New York against conscription, and a great meeting of Fenians
at Philadelphia proclaimed an Irish
Republic. A long triul of John li.
Surratt for complicity in the nssinn-
tlon of President Lincoln ended in
the jury disagreeing, but, us I huve
mentioned, his wife wns hnnged.
Feeling Against Britain
Sir Edward Thornton, the new British ambassador, and Charles Dickens
were received by the president. It
was during Thornton's attendance
at the opening of Congress a "flag-
incident" took place. Suitors, who
are adepts at decorating, had one
Union Jack in a prominent place.
[ Objection was made at the sight of
it. It was removed and the space
, was left an empty spot. Thornton
saw that his country was not very
j favorably looked upon.
General Ulysses S. Grunt was etect-
| ed   18th   president   November   3rd,
1868.   Peabody, an American, made
I a fortune in business in London and
| was famed as a philanthropist both in
England and the United States; when
*" he died his body was conveyed by
i the  warship  "Monarch,"   the  most
' powerful ship in the navy.    It was
I noted at the time by the Scottish-
' American that all the way across the
[ Atlantic the "Monarch" could open
her portholes any day in  a great
storm and could sink the American
ships that accompanied her in two
[ hours.    This  international  courtesy
| may not have been appreciated, but
j Prince Arthur waa presented to Presi-
I dent Grant, 24th of January, attend-
I ing Mr.  Peabody's funeral.
President Grant was elected for
I a second term as a Republican over
J Horace Greely, the famous newspap-
I er man of the New York Tribune.
1 Grant, in his message of December
1 21st, 1872, says that the results of
J the arbitration left Gre/at Britain
| and the United States without a shad-
The main theme of conversation
this week is that of the numerous
forest fires, now raging close to
made famous bv his being credited Wardner. The fire at Colvalli, which
with the longest speech he ever de- sprang to life on Wednesday last.
llvered. As was natural, the ex- caused by an engine spark, it is believ-
presldent of the great republic and ed, has assumed large proportions,
great soldier received a warm recep- and extra gangs of fighters, numbcr-
tiou. The seven und a hulf million jng from twenty to n hundred mem-
dollars thnt was taken by false pre- hers each, have been rushed down to
UmcCB on account of tho supposed the blaze, which is now reported to
depredation of tho Alabama, wus the *» under control as much as a large
BUuJoct thai still interested many of fire ever cun be without rain, the
bis audience. Grant wriggled out of small amount of .moisture which fell
it  by his famous speech with no re-  on  Tuesday morning doing little  to
ults. President Grant declined to
receive a centennial address from
Irish home-rulers.
The Country   Settle*  Down
The   bouse  of  representatives  declared tliat thorp was no valid govern
meat in the south,
ihe Jurisdiction from President John
son to Grant, as general of the army.
The following, compiled from the
records, shows thi* enlistment and de-  Mile hill.    The two latter were soon
seition   of  soldiers   during   the   late   put  out,  however, and  caused  little
civil wnr from the "l'oalmdy Re pur- damage.
tw." I -
EnMed—natives, 1,088,8071 Ger-I Mrs- Juh" Taylor, of Waldo, spent
mans, IK«,2(i7; Irish, 144,881; Brit- Thursday and Friday of last week in
Ish-Amorlcnns, 00,040; other nlicns, Wnrdner, visiting her daughter, Miss
48,400; not doslgnntod, 80,455. '   '"'""' '  ""    '""'
Deserted—Irish, 78 per cent; Get'-
help the situation. The fire raging
in the Rock Creek and Plumbob
Creek districts is said to cover several
hundred acres and is still going
strong, huving been reported to have
burnt out two lumber camps in its
path. On Sunday last quite a fire
and transferred wlls m.„ llt Mayook, where u large
number of railroad tics were burned,
while during the evening a small fire
wus noticed at the top of the  Six
Grace  Taylor,  and
1 Frank Miles.
Mr.   and   Mrs.
[ ow upon their friendly relations.
General Grant  visited  Britain  ...  w.    •       TJ      .   , T, , ,     .     .
May, 1877.   His visit to Glasgow wa*w«.iupcg Board of Trade shows.
mans,   If!  per cent;  miscellaneous, 7
per cent; natives,  r> per cent.
American Debt* to France
Colonel Henry Wutterson, editor
of "The St. Louis -Globe-Democrat,"
was invited to lie present and speak
at the annual meeting of the Lafayette Fund in New York, on the occasion of the 158th anniversary of
the birth of the French patriot. Col.
Watterson wus unable to attend, but
wrote a letter. After announcing
thut "the true American rates no
country and no people, he loves oniy
his own," the redoubtable Colonel
continued:
"Under no circumstances, against
no plea of interest, no matter what
the argument or the cost, the present
generation of Americans cannot either with honor or safety or reason,
allow the people of France to be
driven to the wall, permit the French
republic to go down. Rather thnn
that, we should not hesitate to tackle Germany, even if it meant the
driving of every German reservist
in the land back to his own country,
where he belongs, and should as a
brave and loynl man have gone back
a year ago. So up with the tri-colour,
let it be folded warm in the embrace
Misses Astrid Johnson, Teresa Helman, Grace Taylor, Isu Taylor, Sophie .Mailer and Messrs. Corsan Anderson, B. Embree, J. Dow, F. and T.
Fitzsimmons, Wm. King, Ole Heiman,
B, Mader und Pete Hurry motored
to Jaffray on Saturduy evening to
attend the dunce.   The music for the
ErtKhSMff Riv.?e.»cd^l«- ™ "■■""'>■ "!>'.*<- ':>■ i'<- -""•
reported to have been a tremendous
success.
On June 28th, 1920, Commissoner
Rich, of the Salvation Army, presented a commission to forty-eight
young people win. had been studying at the Training College, Winnipeg. These young people are now
officers in various towns and cities
of the West. This College ha.- now
bten in existence for eight years,
and in that time has graduated four
hundred and fifty officers, many of
whom are now actively engaged in
Salvation Army work in foreign
lands, lt is stated thut the member-
ship   of   the   Army   throughout   lhe
ing the locals either to join the fighters or give proof of their inability to
do so. As each of them held positions in the local plant, with the exception of Mr. Sjoholm, who is a
dairyman, they were allowed to proceed homewards, with the stipulation
that they report to Constable Donahoe, of Wardner, on their return, for
purpose of verifying them if necessary.
be doubled within the last ten
+    +
Mu
Miss Astrid Johnson spent Thursday and Friday in Cranbrook, having
dental work done by Dr, Fergie.
The fire whistle nt the planing mill
was again heard on Thursday afternoon, whin the roof of K. Sekos'
house wus noticed to be ablaze. The
ing mill crew, anil little damage was
done  to   the   residence.
Miss  Mabel Embroo,  of Creston,'    %"■ JC"1'1   Lovick  and   children,
who is spending the summer month   LT'£„  i„m'7ihhv   °iw d ItW
.■.i-th !,„,. „i„i„-,  iu-,„  p  ti nor  home  In   Llbby,   Mont.,   alter
spending the past couple of weeks in
visitinp her grandparents,
here with her sister, Mrs. E. Thompson, left on Friday for a few days !B°'Jj'"*
holiday in Jaffray, as the guests 0f' w''"""''
Mr. and Mrs. S. Childs, returning to , ,,       .     ■ ,
Wardner on Tuesday evening. | -gjg"" >£  gSt^E
Pete Watamaneuk left on Friday 01se.n' who will spend the next few
for Waldo, where he has taken work ™k"  *J5B£j? J'^IZ   '   K
us a helped in the planing mill. Pete's {*&*'. *Pd J   '    /S"*0"' Jack
first work in that town however was, Hafstad, in  Warland, Mont,
not in the mill, reaching Wuldo just      u,„ ,     ,,    , , ,,       n,,
us the plunt wus shut down and the' , Wesley Montgomery left on Thurs-
whole crew put to work fighting fire («£ fc^S",?'' T"? J 5?U;
in the Plumtob Creek district, where ida> *•» mth Is P.aren»- expecting „
W.   T.
to the regret of the Baptist
rtnd  the  city generally,  Rev.
Tapscott will be relinquishing iiis pastorate very shortly. His
farewell messages will be given next
Sunday. After leaving here. Mr.
Tapscott will make a stay in Portland, where he has been engaged to
supply in thr largest Baptist church
in that city. The best wishes of the
community go with this veteran
preacher, whose long and faithful
ministry has been a source of
strength to muny. Until thc coming
of the new pastor, the local deacons
will  conduct the regular services.
Inert
i the
Using inteti st
give
that
instruinen
part of th
next Sund
lace.
Rev.  W
of  Westm
of the B.<
Church, oi
ond General
lately held in
interesting ac
of activities
now engaged
missionaries
dia, China ai
a   force   of
workers.    In
dian schools,
hospitals  and
settlements,   !
tions, 8 redi
sionary for
missionariei
revenue foi
i being show
n aii ervicea held i
! aftei tho Sunda
-. Assurance has bee
Sunday evening som
1 assist ni the muslct
vice. The speaker for
ill be Rev. Bryce Wal-
■   +   +
Smith. I>.P., principal
t* Hall, and president
iference of the t'nited
the sec-
Church,
a most
le range
 ly   is
foreign
to
tals return fr
uncil nf the
ontreal, gavi
mt of the wi
which this
It has 646
work In Afr
South Araerii
WILSONS
FLY) PADS
,lhr
2,162   native   Christian
Canada, it has 66 In-1 fi
64  Indian missions,  26 ■'
dispensaries,   1  social}
1  child   welfare   InstitU-   .;
Will kill many times more flies
fnr (he money than any other
fly killer. Each pad will kill flies
ail day, every day, for three
weeks. At all Grocers, Druggists and General Stores —
Ilk' and 25c per package.
Miss Jessie  Weir is spending the
veek with  Kimberley friends,
Art Higgins and a number of boy
lends motored down from Kimber-
t  Sunday afternoon.
n embers
if faith.
in the Plumbob Creek district, where
the  Baker Camps are situated.
to  return
month.
to   Wardner   in   about   a
the S'*„*s and St,'i„,'s. .Sound, the I ^ ™»» $$™efg%™™    Mre' C:h»s' »"m™ entertained
1 destination    at    present
old anthem—the Marseillaise concert
ed with the Star Spangled Banner;  0,    ,,     ,.     ... v;u.>.«'   ,i,.„„,.♦„„„ ,
And now as ever and aKyays, down  S,0?*^
. -tt.   *u     u „,.i „.™    „„ i   it ,L«.Bi i his brother arrived in town with mes-
lernV'       HapsburgS   md   Hohenaol-   SHges tQ ^ eff(,ct ^ their gnmd.
", ,        ...        .       mother was seriously ill at her home
The above  sounds well  in  print, | in Vancouver, a later message report-
but  the   aid  given   to  the  crushed  j„K death to have taken place,
French cnme very tardily.
Rev. W. A. Lewis, of Calgary, will
ppeak in the basement of the Baptist church on Thursday evening of
this week, under the auspices of the
Lord's Day Alliance.
+   +   +
On Monday, the 18th, the district
camp for the C.G.l.T. members opened at Aldridge, with un enrollment
of some 40 girls. Ynhk, Kimberley
and othei- points sent girls, as well
as the local churches. Miss A. Fountain, B.A., Vancouver, is in charge,
The fourfold program is steadily before the girls, and through supervised games, instructions and amusements they are learning how to "increase in wisdom and stature, and in gmfth
favor with God and man." A Jolly
and profitable time was reported to
the parents who visited the camp yesterday.
+   +   +
The building of thc Anglican cathedral in Victoria is one of the chief
topics   in   religious   circles   at   the
When completed, this will be'with Mr
y and dignified edifice, rival
Last Saturday night'?, dance was a
ely one.   Everybody voiced having
mptlve homes, and a mis- ., good time. A Cranbrook orchestra
:c of over  1006 ordained  filled the  bill   in  every term of the
and students.    Tho total  words.
the past year was more!
■*,-,, A joint far*; well party compliment-
than ?17,000,000, While 28,432 new  [ng ^  Kr;|nk j^    '   d Mrs. Mc.
Ided  by  profession  Lean, waa given on Wednesday last.
Music,  dancing  and  all-round social
lime  was the  order of the  evening.
"*' °   v A   lap  supper  was  served.     Messrs.
\,*************^   *\, Weir and Philip Conrad were the
"*" convenors  of the  pleasant occasion.
Mis,   Looney   left   for   Fernie   on
+ Thursday,   Mrs.  McLean leaving the
They
away   with   them   tho   best
f their many  friends.
j   MOYIE  NOTES
*
************************** following Sunday  for Burk
Miss  Flora  Hull
visiting wit!:
ker.
Mr.
, of Cranbrook, is
nd Mrs. Wm. Par-
Owing t.
Kimlierley,
down for
last week.
There at
ployed
shortage of
the mill he
.rs from
3  Closed
during
are about twelve men em-
t the Aurora mine. Millie  man  in charge.
| Jim Diamond is bi
I is tending bar at the
j I-
K. A. Smith is ivnioi
| store building ready fo
, poses.
A   goodly  numbi
young girls, ari cam
Blackburi
ck In town and
Kelly beer par-
ling his old
enting pur-
of Cranbrook
g at Aldridge
. their chaper-
1'ng
In tli
actual number of friends at tea on Monday ,
unknown, afternoon,  in  honor  of   Mrs.   Carl'11""
Lovick, of Libby, Mont. tejnl
some of the famous buildings
■ Old Land. The Bishop of Lon- ]
is expected to lay the founda-j
stone for the cathedral  in Sep.
Roy Lnnglnnds Is ov<
letting ai the Whitehe
Man. Glass   Sands  Find   Market—
Glass sands of Manitoba are displacing the United States product in western markets and now are being shipped as far as Japan, a report from
the natural resources section of the
[ tiWfflW-uW
|      Mrs.   Parker
.Phyllis, are lioni
at Green  Bay.
from Trail
il home.
■   daughter.
e!r camping
she
Mi
or    Gray
drowned   In   en
came    nenr    being
"ng   the   lake
Tuesday last.    We are glad that the
accident didn't  prove fatal,
Wc have another new store building about completed. Mr. Thomas
Christian, of Cranbrook, is the build-
Missfs Kmma and Thelma Pearson
are in by car on Sunday evening
ith friends  from Kimberley.
Mr. and Mrs. Gray from the Knst
e the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Stun.
Mr. Alex. Cameron suffered a badly
rutabd finger last Thursday, which
ecessitated his going to the doctor
jr  treatment.
The   electric   lights
throughout the town.
are   now   on
PANTS FOR NOTHING        PANTS FOR NOTHING
PANTS FOR NOTHING
We have been appointed sole representatives in
the Cranbrook District for the
J. L. TAYLOR CLOTHING CO., of Montreal,
and in order to advertise this High Grade Clothing
in this locality we have been authorized by them
to give ABSOLUTELY FREE one pair of Pants
with each suit sold during the month of July.
To anyone who can prove that this is not a
genuine offer of PANTS FOR NOTHING, or
that our prices were marked specially for this
occasion, they can have the Suit and Pants
free of charge.
Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty
Bring Your Work To Practiced Tailors
MUIRHEAD & GUTHRIE
PHONE 19 HANSON BLOCK
Adolph and Harold Anderson left
on Thursday for Vancouver, where
they plun on going to work, if positions cun he secured. The latter is
somewhat doubtful, ns good positions
are reported to be pretty scurce
around the coast. However, the boys
say, "Nothing venture, nothing win."
C. M. Pennock spent several days
last week attending a meeting of the
Mountain Lumbermen's Association,
in Culgary, returning to Wnrdner on
Mondny.
Miss Mildred Clark, nurse-in-training at the St. Kugene Hospital, Cranbrook, spent a few duys of last week
visiting friends in Wnrdner and Bull
River.
Mrs. Herb. Headdon spent last
week visiting at the Peppier cottage
on McHain's Lake.
Mr. and Mrs. Clark MaeKenzie and
family returned home on Sunduy
evening ufter spending the pust week
camping with friends ut Mud Lake.
Jnck Dow and Jack Cumberland, of
Lumberton, returned to Wardner on
Monday last, the night shift upon
wliich they were employed in Lumberton, huving closed down.
Chas. Simpson, of Skookumchuck,
pent the week-end at his home in
Wurdner.
Miss Ethel Dow, of the post-office!
Staff, is reported to be ill at her home
here with a severe attack of tonsilttis|
this week.
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Daye, Mr. and |
rs, J.  I\.  Scanland, together with j ■
their families, motored to McBain's[l
Lake on Sunday for a picnic outing.
Corsan Anderson and Billy Mader I
motored to Bull River on Sunday and
report seeing a large cougar cross
the road on the journey. Prank'
Thompson, while motoring home from |
Fernie on Sundny evening saw a coy-
otte puss in front, which hnd evident-1
ly pnssed through a fire, as every I
vestige of hnir was gone from the |
animal's body.
Mrs. Clark MaeKenzie and children, Grace nnd Bert, left on Tuesday
for Mud Lake on a camping trip fori
the balance of the week, Mr. Mac-|
Kcnzie nnd son Walter motoring
down for the week-end,
Geo. Armrecn, styling himself the
"Scandinavian Accordinn Specialist,"
held a dance at the outdoor pavilion
at Peckham's Lake on Wednesday
evening. Several of the local young
men motored to the lake for the oc>
casion, but feminine partners were
said to be very acarce. The local
boys attending included, Wm. King,
Geo. Killam, C. Anderson, F. and T.
Fitzsimmons and B. Mader.
Miss Dagne Nordmark left on Wednesday for Bull River, where she will
spend the next couple of weeks visiting relatives. Miss Nordmark's place
in the cookhouse is being filled by
Mrs, Geo, Powell during her absence,
Fire fighting almost became more
than a theme of conversation with a
party of Wardnerites on Sunday last.
Messrs. Gus and Alec Daye, Chas.
Hamrin and J. Sjoholm left during
the morning on a fishing trip up the
Bull River, and while on the journey
a bush fire of rather large proportions sprang up on thc Narrow Guagc,
The road was closed at once to further traffic and a gang of men rushed
up to fight the blaze. The local fish'
ermen were just about deciding to
return home, seeing the smoke and
coming to the conclusion of a nearby
fire, when the fire-fighter* reached
them, the Unman af tk* gang mrdn-
The Biggest and Best
Community Effort
Ever Attempted
Cranbrook B.P.O.E.
Kiddies Day
CMMIM
Thurs. ~ Fri. -Sat.
July - 29 - 30 - 31
Proceeds In Aid of
KIDDIES FLAG DAY PICNIC PAQE  SIX
THB  CRANBROOK   HERALJJ
Thursday, July 22nd, 1126
r
Egg  Production  Increases 70%— Creeks,   which    is   nbout   six   miles
Egg  production   in  Canada has  in- R"uth-en.st of Michel, B.C.
wmwi by over one million dozen, or J"*™°*e»^£™%
seventy per cent, since 1020, accord- 0t Canada, Ltd., ol Klmbotley, B.C.,
ing to .1 recent statement issued at by occupation a Mining nnd Smelting
Ottawa.    In 1925 Canada produced Company by their duly authorized
249 mUlion dozen eggs and consumed JJJg^« g^» ***& °<
26.8 dozen per capita, as compared Mining   Engineer,   intends  to   upply
with 149 million dozen produced and [ for a prospecting licence under the
16.8 dozen pt* capita consumed in
1920.
Possible New Industry  for  B.C.—
The establishment of a sugar beet industry in British Columbia will be
undertaken if the provincial government will subsidize the production of
sugar at the rate of $50,000 a year,
W. H. Watson, head of a Vancouver
syndicate, informed the cabinet recently. The proposition calls for a
factory ut New Westminster to cost
about one and a quarter million dollars und capable of handling one
thousand tons of beets a day. Tbe
subsidy asked of the government
would amount to one-half cent per
pund in all sugar produced up to ten
million pounds.
 „ ■
Attendance    Records    Shattered—
All attendance records of the Calgary Exhibition were shuttered during the unnual Stampede und Exhibition held from July 5 to 10, when
197,471 visitors passed through the
gates. Attendance has been steadily increasing your by year, but the
difference between this year and last
is close tu twenty thousand, while the
increase since the 1023 exhibition is
55,434. In addition to creating a
splendid record for the number of
visitors at the event, the management is convinced that the 1926 exhibition and stampede is the best
ever staged in the City of the Foothills.
Province of British Columbia
Phosphate-Mining   Act"   over   the
following described lunds:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.W. corner of the
claim about one mile south of the
S.W.  corner of  S.T.L.  013; thence j
north   80   chains;   thence
chains;    thence    south    80    chains;
thence west SO chains, und containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
126     18-24
situate on the west side of Alexander
Creek about six miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, whicli is ubout six miles
south-east of Michel, B.C. !
TAKE NOTICE thut The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—•
Commencing at  a stake or post
Province of British  Columbia
Province  of  Britiih  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5   (3).)
Notic
Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Proipecting  Licence,
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the west side of Alexander
Creek about four miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks which is about six miles
south-east of  Michel,  B.C.
TAKE NOTICE tliat The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
ugent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
ICimberley, B.C., by occupation
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
pluced at the N.E. corner of the
claim about one mile north of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 613; thence
south 80 chuins; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chuins; thence
east 80 chuins, und containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
127    18-24
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5   (3).)
Notice  OF  Intention  To  Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
	
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on thc west side of Alexander
Creek about two miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is six miles south-east
of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKechnle, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing  at   a  stake  or  post
placed at the N.E. corner of the claim
one mile south of the S.E. corner of
S.T.L. 613; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or ugent.
123    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Proipecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the east side of Alexander
Creek about four miles north of the
confluence of Alexunder and Michel
Creeks, which is nbout six miles
south-east  of   Michel,   B.C.
TAKE NOTICE thut The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Cunada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation u Mining und Smelting
Company by their duly authorized,
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kiniberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for u prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands;—
Commencing at a stuke or poBt
placed ut the N.W. corner of the
claim ubout one mile north of the
•S.W. corner of S.T.L. 013; thence
south SO chnins; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, and containing 040 ucres, more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
128    18-24
Notice  Of  Intention  To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the east side of Alexander
Creek about two miles north of the
confluence of Alexnnder and Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing nt a stake or post
placed at the N.W. corner of the
claim one mile south of the S.E.
corner of S.T.L. 613; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
124    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6 (3).)
Nolle* Of  Intention To Apply  For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the west side of Alexander
Creek about three miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which Is about six miles
south-east of Michel, B. C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
went, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E. comer of the
claim about one mile south of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L 613; thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, and containing 640 acres,  morn or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
125    18-24
Provlnco of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  6  (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
ast 80 ] placed at the N.E. corner of "the
claim about three miles north of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 613; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
i hains; thence north 80 chains;
ihence eust 80 chains, and containing
610 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th duy of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
131    18-24
thence north 80 chains; thence weBt
80 chains, und containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926.
1). C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent
140    18-24
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  B   (8).)
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section B   (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the east side of Alexander
Creek about six miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation u Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
M in ing Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
'Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the N.W. corner of the
claim, about three miles north of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 613; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains.
thence west 80 chains and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926,
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent,
132    18-24
In For^ Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the east side of Alexander
Creek near the confluence of Alexander and Michel Creeks, which is
about six miles south-east of Michel,
B C
'TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kiniberley, B.C.,
by occupation u Mining nnd Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to upply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—■
Commencing at a stuke or post
placed at the N.W. corner of the
claim, ubout three miles south of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 018J thence
south 80 chains; thonco enst 80
ehains; thence north 80 chnins;
'thence west 80 chains, und containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June, 1026,
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or ugent,
130    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5   (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  fo  Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lunds:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
claim, about three miles north of the
N.E, corn : L8518; thence north
60 chains, thence west 80 chains;
thence south 60 chains; thence east
80 chains, and containing 480 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926.
D; C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
14S    18-24
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   Ror
Proipecting  Licence.
_n Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the west side of Alexander
Creek about five miles north of the
confluence of Alexander und Michel
Creeks, which is ubout six miles
uth-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Cannda, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agont, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
claim about one mile north of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 613; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains, und containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th duy of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
129    18-2-1
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section B   (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  To  Apply  For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the east side of Alexander
Creek about five miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is ubout six miles
south-eust of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli-
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kiniberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
ngont, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.W. corner about one
mile north of the S.W. corner of
S.T.L. 013; thence north 80 chains;
thence enst 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926,
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
130    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6   (3),)
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and Notice Of  Intention  To Apply  For
situate on the east side of Alexander Prospecting Licence.
Creek about three miles north of the 	
confluence of Alexander and Michel Io Fort Steele Mining Division, awl
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section B  (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence,
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section fi   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate one mile north of the Forks
of Alexander Creek on the west side
of the main creek about nine miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
und Michel Creeks whicb is ubout
six miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd,, of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
fur a prospecting licence under ihe
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed nt the S.E. corner of tho
claim about one mile north of the
N.E. corner of L8B18; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chuins, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926
1). C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
141    18-24
Province of British Columbia
In Fort Steele Mining Division, nnd
situate on the west side of Alexander
Creek about one mile north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kiniberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
Brent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupntion u
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
claim, about three miles south of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 613; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chuins, and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th duy of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
187    18-24
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the west side of Alexander!
Creek about seven miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli-
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Compuny by their duly authorized
ugent, Donuld Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kiniberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
claim about three miles north of the
S.W. Corner of S.T.L. 613; thence
north 80 dhains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, and containing
640 acres, more or leas.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926.
D. C, McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
133    18-24
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5   (3).)
Notice  Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section B  (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the east side of Alexander
Creek about seven miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.W. corner of the
claim about three miles north of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 613; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent,
134    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice Of Intention To Apply For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the west side of Alexander
Creek near the confluence of Alexander and Michel Creeks, which is
about six miles south-east of Michel,
B C
'TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized^
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for u prospecting licence under the
"Phospnate-Minlng Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the N.E. corner of the
claim, about three miles south of the
S.W. corner ot S.T.L. 613; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature at applicant or agent
186    lt-24
In Fort Steele Mining Division, und
situute ou the east side of Alexander
Creek about one miles north of the
confluence of Alexunder nnd Michel
Creeks, which is ubout six miles
south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE thut Tho Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining und Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donnld Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation u
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.W. corner of the
claim ubout three miles south of the
S.W. corner of the S.T.L 613; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thenco south 80 chains:
thence west 80 chains, nnd containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated tho 17th day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
138    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  f>   (?).)
Notice  Of  Intention To  Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate near the Forks of the Alexander Creek on the west side of the
main creek about eight miles from
the confluence of Alexander and
Michel Creeks, which is about six
miles south-east of Mitchel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli-
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the N.E. corner of the
claim about one mile north of the
N.E. corner of L 8518; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chnins;
thence north 80 chains; thence enst
80 chains, and containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of Juno, 1926
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
139    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice Of  Intention  To  Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate near the Forks of the Alexander Creek on the east side of the
main creek about eight miles north
of the confidence of Alexunder and
Michel Creeks which is about six
miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining und Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of-
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at  a stake or post
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5   (3).)
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section B   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   Fo'
Prospecting  Licence.
Notice  Of  Intention  To  Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
Bituate three miles north of the Forks
of Alexander Creek und intersected
by the main creek, ubout eleven miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
and Michel Creeks which is about six
miles south-eust of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE thut The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kiniberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
ugent, Donuld Cowan McKechnle, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing nt u stuke or post
pluced ut the S.W. corner of the
claim, about three miles north of the
N.E. cornor of L8518; thence north
60 chnins; thence eust 80 chcins;
thence south 60 chains; thence west
80 chains, and containing 480 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
146    18-24
miles north of thc conflui|<«ei>f Alexander und Michel Credit which Is
about six miles south-east of Michel,
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly uuthorizea
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, ot
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—    •   -
Commencing at a stake or post
placed ut the S.E. corner of. the
claim about 1000 feet west of the
N.E. corner of L 8521; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 ehains; thence east
80 chains, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June, 1926.
1). C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
IBO    18-24
Province of  British  Columbia
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate one mile north of the Forks
of Alexunder Creek on the eust side
of the main creek about nine miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
und Michel Creeks which is about
six miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
ugent, Donuld Cowun McKechn'e, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for u prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.W. corner of the
claim ubout one mile north of the
N.E. corner of L8518; thence north
80 chains; thence e-ast 80 chains
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926
1). C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent
142     18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  B   (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate two miles north of the Forks
of Alexander Creek on the east side
of the west branch about ten miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
and Michel Creeks which is about six
miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the N.E. corner of the
claim about three miles north of the
N.E. corner of L 8518; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926,
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
143    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6  (3).)
Notice Of Intention To Apply  For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situato two miles north nf the Forks
of Alexander Creek, and intersected
by the main creek about ten miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
and Michel Creeks which is about
six miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKechnle, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing ut a stake or poet
placed at thc N.W. corner of the
claim about three miles north of
N.E. corner of I. 8518; Ihence south
80 chains; thence eust 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent
111    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence,
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate three miles north of the Forks
of Alexander creek on the east aide
of the west branch about eleven miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
and Michel Creeks which is about six
miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli-
dutod Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada,. Ltd.,of Kimberley, B.C.,
placed at the N.W. corner of the by occupation a Mining and Smelting
claim about one mile north of the Compahy by their duly authorised
N.E. corner of L 8618; thence south o^cnt, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
80 chain*; thence cast 80  chains; Kimberley,   B.C.,  by    ""   -
Province of  British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, uml
situate four miles north of the Forks
of Alexander Creek one half mile
west of the main branch and about
twelve miles north of the confluence
of Alexunder and Michel Creeks
which is about six miles south-east
of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kiniberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, o!
Kiniberley, B.C., by occupation s
Mining Engineer, intends to upply
for u prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
claim about three uud three-quarter
miles north of th" N.E. corner of
L 8518; theme north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence eust 80 chains, nnd
containing 640 acres,  more or less.
Dated the 17th duy of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or ugent
147     18-24
In Fori Steele Mining Division, and
situate two milOs north-west of the
forks of Alexander (-reek on the West
side of lhe west brunch about ten
miles north of the confluence of Alexunder und Michel Creeks which is
ubout six miles south-east of Michel,
B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Conaoli-
laled Mining & Smelting Company
of Cunadu, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining und Smelting
Company by their duly uuthorizea
ugent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimlierley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphnte-Mining Act" over the
following described lands :--
Commencing nt a stake or post
placed at the N.E. corner of the
claim nbout 800 feet south of the
N.W. corner of I. 6443; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chuins, und containing 640 acres,
more or loss.
Dated tho 17th day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
151    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5   (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  To  Apply  For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate four miles north of tho Forks
of Alexander Creek and intersected
by the main creek, about twelve miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
und Michel Creeks, which is ubout
six miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
ugent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for n prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.W. corner of the
claim, about three and three-quarter
miles north of the N.E. corner of
L 8518; tlu nee north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains, and
containing 640  acres more or less,
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926,
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
148    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section B  (3).)
Notice Of Intention  To Apply  For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate near thc Forks of Alexander
Creek, one-half milo west of the west
branch, about eight miles north of
the confluence of Alexunder und
Michel Creeks, which is ubout six
miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKK NOTICE that The Consoli-
dated Mining a\ Smelling Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining und Smelling
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation u
Mining Engineer, intends to upply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing ut a stake or post
placed at the N.E. corner of the
claim about loon feet west of the
N.E. corner of L 8B21; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chuins; thence east
80 chains, and containing 640 ucres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th duy of June, 1926
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent
149    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  6. (3).)
Notice Of  Intention To Apply  For
Proipecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
sltuato one milo north-west of the
forts of Alexander Creek on tho wait
■Mo of Ut weit branch abont bIm
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5   (3).)
Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  6   (3).)    .
Notice  Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate three miles north-west of the
forks of Alexunder Creek on the west
side of the west branch about eleven
miles north of the confluence of
Alexunder nnd Michel Creeks which
is ubout six miles south-east of
Michel, B.C. ■'■••: '
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Cunada. Ltd., of Kimberley, BX.,
by occupation a Mining und.Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowun McKeehnie,' ot
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation. A
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence undpr the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over . the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E. corner of tbo
claim about 8t)0 feet south of the
N. W. corner of I, 6443; thence north .
60 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 60 chuins; thence east
80 chuins, nnd containing 480 acres,
moro or less. .'.-■; Sj
Dated the 17th dny of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
152    18-24 »S?i    ;.
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section-5  (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate at the head of the first south
fork of Grave Creek and near tho
head of the west branch of Alexander Creek, ubout twelve miles north
of the confluence of Alexander and
Michel Creeks which is about ilx
miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli-
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B,C,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under tho
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing nt a stake or pest
placed at the N.E. corner of the
claim about 2000 feet S.E. of tho
N.W. corner of L 6781; thence south
47 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 47 chains; thence Mst
80 chains, nud containing 376 acres,
more or less.
Dutod the 17th day of June, 1926.
I). C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent,
168    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT.
(Section  B   (3).)     .    -
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
' In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate one-half mile south of Gravo
Creek, and intersected by the first
south fork of the above creek, and
nbout five miles eust of the confluence of Grave Creek and the Klk
River. j
TAKE NOTICE thut The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupntion a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKechnle, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:-*1
Commencing at a state or post
placed at the S.E. corner of tho
claim about 2000 feet D.E. of the
N.W. corner of L 6781; thence north
80 chains; thence west. 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence fast
80 chains, and containing; 640 acres,
more or loss.   . .   T
Dated tho 17th day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature ot applicant or I
1B4    18 24 Thursday, July 22nd, 1926
THE  CRANBROOK   HERALD
PAQEPIVE
Alan Graham, of Cranbrook, was
a Fernie visitor several days this
week. He was acting for the defence
in several fire cases that were up before Magistrate Cope.—Fernie Free
Press.
Fernie has been particularly fortunate in regard to bush fires during
the past twu weeks. While the whole
of the interior seems to be ou fire,
our district has only had a few small
fires of little consequence. Across
the Kootenay River on (iold Creek
is the nearest fire to Fernie.—Fernie
Free Press.
Mr. Bert Turner returned on Sunday from a week's visit to Bniilf,
and reports a very pleasant outing.
On the return trip they were held up
over seventeen hours at Vermilion.
Mr, Turner states that tho fire has
devastated a large portion which
heretofore has been one of the most
picturesque parks of the trip through
the mountains.
G. H. Fleming, who has been in
charge of Creston high school for tho
past two years, has resigned to become assistant to the high school
principal at Cranbrook, at an advanced salary. With the principal's resignation the trustees are now faced
with getting an entirely new staff, as
Miss Shannon resigned some weeks
ago.—Creston Review.
D. Nicoletti, proprietor of the Fernie Hotel, says that it is his intention to sell out and leave for Colorado, where he has a brother in the
mining business. Mr. Nicoletti has
been a resident of Fernie for over
twenty years and a prominent leader
among the Italian citizens, who will
sincerely regret to see him leave.—
Fernie Free Press.
Alf. Cummings gave his report of
the Denver Rotary Convention to a
joint meeting of Fernie and Cranbrook Clubs at the latter town on
Wednesday evening. A. Klauer's
quartette accompanied the Fernie
crowd and greatly assisted in the
program. The evening was one of the
most pleasant that the two clubs have
spent together.—Fernie Free Press.
It is stated that as a result of the
policy of the new government in extending the boundary patrol service,
with a view to preventing smuggling
of goods across the boundary, tho
Creston detachment of the R.C.M.P.
may be re-established before long,
and an officer stationed at Rykerts,
just on the border across from Port-
bill, this latter step having been recommended by the customs department.
Dr, Saul Bonnell, formerly of Fer
nie, but now holding a responsible
position at Vancouver in connection
with the C.P.R. employees' medical
association, pnssed through the city
on Sunday on his way to Fernie on
business.
J, McMillan, general munager of
ttilegraphs for the Canadian Pacific
Railway Telegraph Co., accompanied
hy W. 1). Neil, assistant munuger at
Winnipeg, passed through the city on
Saturday last. While in the city they
interviewed their local ugent, Mr. J.
McLean,
Mrs. (Hev.) Bryce Wallace, ufter
a visit of a week at the coast, returned on Sunday accompanied by her
mother, Mrs. Wright, on account of
whose health she hud mude u hurried trip to Vancouver the week previous. Her mother's health was so
improved that she was able to take
the trip to Crnnbrook for a visit
here,
Mrs. W. S, Johnston is spending
a fow days in Lethbridge this week,
going there by motor, accompanying
Mr. and Mrs. Butler on their way
back to Medicine Hat. Mrs. Butler
is n sister of Mr. Johnston, and the
party made a short stop here two or
three weeks ugo, on their way
through to the coast by car, from
which they hnve now returned.
Rev, W. T. Tapscott, who on Sun-
lay next is expecting to preach at
his farewell services here, is to be
joined here Saturday by his daughter, Miss Alice Tapscott, who is coming from Pittsburg, Pa., where she
has made her home for a number of
yeara past. They will travel together
to Oregon, Miss Tapscott expecting
to make hei- home with her parents
in the future.
Preparations are being made for
the reception of the celebrated Coldstream Guards band here on Monday,
August 16th, under the joint auspices of the Rotary and Gyro Clubs, the
G.W.V.A. and the Elks. Seats will
put into the Arena Rink for the
big crowd expected, and a bandstand
is to be erected in the middle of the
building for the musicians. Prices
on this work are now being invited
from the contractors. Altogether, it
is expected that this event will represent one of the biggest musical
events in the history of the district,
and thoso who have heard the band
during the course of their present
visit to Canada are unanimous in stating that nothing like it has ever been
henrd in this part of the country before.
WWWWWWWWVWVWMfl
Motorist - You Should Know I
Thst Balloon Tires cannot be successfully repilred in High-Pressure
Tire Molds, We have the only Balloon Tire Molds in East
Kootenay.
We Repair Balloon Tires according to the Goodyear Tire Co. Repair Manual—guaranteed to last longer than the tire.
We have a Toronto price list on repairs posted in our store—all
first class Vulcaniiers have adopted thii flat-rate price. You
pay the same price here that they pay in Toronto.
Our Repairs are flexible, strong and durable—no bumps, and no
weakening of the tire on each end of the repair.
We can repair any tire, any site, no matter how Urge the blow-out—
in 6 hours— and guarantee the job.
We will not repair worn-out tires, but we do recommend repairing
Injured tires, and our 15 years experience is at your service
In this respect.
WE   BUY,   WE   SELL,    WE   TRADE,   WE   VULCANIZE,
WE GUARANTEE  SATISFACTION  — OR  YOUR
MONEY   REFUNDED.
Wilson's Vulcanizing Works
CRANBROOK   -   B.C.
*****************************************************
—    SATURDAY   SPECIAL   -
Neapolitan Ice Cream Bricks:
At All Leading Confectioners
CRYSTAL DAIRY LTD. I
PHONE 88
CRANBROOK. B.C.   ',',
We have told you about Concrete — now we want to
my SHINGLES, and as it looks like rain this morning we
thought a word about shingles would be good advice.
Although there are two kinds of people who won't take
advice, we know them both. If interested ask us. We have
just unloaded a car of XXX B.C. SHINdil-S, and are ready
to supply your orders on short notice — so put out your
shingles.
The Doris Construction Co.
PHONE IM
P. O. BOX 768
By a 2-1 victory at Montreal over
a teum representing Enstorn Can
udu, the representative teum of the
Knglish football association concluded its Canadian tour last week. The
visitors won 21 gumes and lost none
during their trip across Cunada and
return.
C. E. Neshitt, of Dysart, Sask.,
left on Friday evening last to escort
the remains of his wife back to their
former home for burial. To press
representatives, Mr. Nesbitt has reiterated the statement that his party
was not warned of the impussnbility
of the rond through the Kootenay
Nutionnl Purk owing to fires, or if
they were, it" wus not so they understood the dunger, I'ark officials, however, maintain their attitude that due
warning was given, und that the purty nppurently chose to proceed ut
their own risk.
Mr. A. It. Swanson, C. 1*. R. agent
ut Kimberley, disposed of a very
desirable fruit farm located ut
Onnynn City, last week. Mr. Swanson purchased this property some
twenty yeurs ugo and after having it
1 cured, set it out with fruit trees,
which has now developed into a fine
orchard, heavily laden with fruit this
season. An irrigation project is now
under contruction in this section,
which will include this property,
greatly enhancing the value. The
purchaser, Mr. E. Hoglund, of Kimberley, expects to leave immediately,
with his family, to take possession.
The transfer was arranged by the
local office of Martin Bros.
Delivery has been completed this
week of the Cranbrook District fall
fair prize lists, and several hundred
of them have already been distributed by A. L. Hay, the secretary. The
fuir takes place on September 16 and
17, and if the ranchers and stockmen generally of the district, and
those who have exhibits, will do their
part towards making the fair a success with their displays, there is no
doubt but that the Gyro Club, who
are co-operating with the fair management in putting on the fair, will
do their best in providing attractions
of all kinds that go with the fair,
and so round it out into a very successful event.
Mr. Fred Laker, accountant for
Cameron & Sang, local tobacconists,
etc., returned to the city on Sunday
after a sojourn of two weeks at the
Coast, during which time he visited
the western Canadian metropolis as
well as looking over about one half
of Vancouver Island, including Victoria. During his stay in the terminal City, Fred took a few minutes off
to see the ponies run at Lansdowne
and Brighouse, and considers It a
strange coincidence that the homes
which he considered the most likely-
looking as far as speed was concerned, all turned out tp be of a very
modest, retiring nature, performing
the Alphonse-Guston stunt, as they
refused absolutely to come in first.
He otherwise had a most enjoyable
time nnd feels a whole lot better for
his holiday. Percy Foote and Doug.
Turner ulso accompanied him, Mr.
Foote returned home on Wednesday, while ft was Mr, Turner's Intention to remain for a longer period
on the Island.
Every week-end seems to bring a
report of an accident of some kind
on the narrow pieces of road from
Fort Steele to Wasa. between Doyle
siding and the bridge across the
ilough. There are passing places
provided, but situations frequently
arise where these cannot be taken advantage of, and it would seem to be
the wisest course for the government
road crews to widen the road there,
which can easily be done in most
of these narrow places. Being
on the other side of the Kootenay
River, the piece of road in question
is in the Fernie riding, but it is used
by Cranbrook people a great deal
more than by Fernie folks probably,
nnd it would therefore be quite in
order for the matter to be taken up
locally, either by tho Board of Trade
or some other body. Tourists, usually not knowing the narrowness of the
rnud ahead of them, often do not
slow down there, making it a difficult
mutter to stop when suddenly finding themselves confronted by another car coming round the corner.
After an absence of practically
two months in the east, Mr. and Mrs.
G. D. Carlyle returned to Cranbrook
on Tuesday last, having spent a most
pleasant holiday visiting with relutives of both sides of the family in
Ontario and Quebec, From June
10th to 20th, Mr. Carlyle waa In attendance at the. annual conference
of the United Church of Canada, being n delegate from East Kootenay.
The convention. was both well attended by delegates from all parti
of the Dominion, and interesting and
profitable. While in Montreal, Mr.
Carlyle had the pleasure of being
billeted at the home of Mrs. Bar-
rington, who is a sister of Mrs. Garden of this city. Previous to the conference, visits were made to the home
of Mrs. Carlyle's sister, near Trenton, Ontario, and after the meeting
Perth, Winchester and Vernon were
visited, It being over twenty-one
years since Mr, Carlyle had visited
what was his old home territory, Mr.
Curlyle wus in Ottawa at the time
thut H. IL Stevens delivered his address on the customs probe, but was
among the thousand or so that could
not gabs ■tfilwlin
FARMERS7 OUTING TO
INVERMERE ON JULY
31st ARRANGED FOR
Interesting Program  It  Arranged For; Good Attendance Expected
On Saturduy, July 31, the second
annual field duy of the Farmers Institute of East Kootenay will be held
at the Experimental Farm at lnvermere. To those who attended this
field day last year no advertising is
necessary as it was unanimously c
uldered a worth-while venture and a
day that should be made nn annual
event.
Although this field day is fo. lered
by the Farmers' Institutes of the district and i.s of particular Intorest to
the farmers, ut the same time there
are lines of work being carried on ut
the Experimental Farm that aro of
interest to everyone; flowers und
shrubs for the town lots in this part
f the province for instance, garden
vegetables and their cultivation,
lawns, nnd muny other problems thut
the citizens of the East Kootenay
towns endeavor to solve every spring,
can be inspected and a ureal deal
of valuable information gathered
thut would no doubt assist in the Hardening and beautifying of the city
lots.
According to tho program as drafted nt the present time everyone is
expected to arrive nt the farm about
noon, and the afternoon will lie spent
looking over experimental plots, etc.,
at the Experimental Farm. There
will be a meeting in the evening when
various agricultural topics will be
discussed. It is expected that, several of the Experimental Kami officials from Ottawa, the Minister of
Agriculture from Victoria, und Mr.
Peterson, of the Farm and Ranch
Review, C'ulgury, will he present.
The committee in charge Is endeavoring to arrange transportation for
those who have no cars, so that those
from the south wishing to attend
should send their names to the agricultural office at Cranbrook us soon
us possible; also, the committee
would appreciate it if those who have
vacant cars would assist in arranging transportation.
The   Program
(Special   to   The   Herald)
Inveremer, B.f!., July 21st.—Plans
ure neuily completed for the Farmers' Institute picnic, to he hold at
the Experimental Station, [nvermere,
Suttirduy, July 31st. Luncheon will
be served ut the Stutiou at lnvermere
ut 12.30. . This will be followed with
uddressis by His Honor H. Randolph
Brute, Lieut.-Governor; Hon. E, D.
Bunow, Minister of Agriculture: Ur.
G. P. McRostie, Dominion Agwstolo*
gist; and C, W. Peterson, editor of
the Farm nnd Hunch Review, Culgary.
Following this the vurlqus departments of the station wil lie visited
and tho work explained. Later in
the afternoon the work on the new
uren nt Windermere will be Inspected,
und Mr. Angus L. Huy, District Ag
rlculturlst, will conduct judging com
petitions. In thc evening a convention nf central institutes will he held,
A hearty Invitation is given ta
those interested in uny branch of
agriculture.
FIRE IN KOOTENAY
PARK NOW ABOUT
BURNT ITSELF OUT
Not As Much Damage To Big
Timber As Expected. Engineer States
(Special to The Herald)
Banff, Alta.—"Notwithstumling the
vurious stories that huve been broadcast of the destruction through the
forest fire thut hus been burning in
tbe Kootenay Nutionul Park in the
Canadian Rockies the past fourteen
days, there are two oustanding facts
that must not be lost sight of stated
J. M. Wardle on Tuesday. Mr.
Wardle is chief engineer of the National Parks of Cunada and has been
in active charge of the fire fighting
since the fire started. "The two
facts that are outstanding," continued Mr. Wardle, "are, first, the fire
has reached the Banff-Windermere
highway for only five and one half
miles out of ninuty-three miles within
the pnrk limits, nnd today the only
fires burning along the highway are
small and confined to a smull area.
The second outstanding fact is that
the fires have reached tho really
valuable timber to a very .-mall extent and though disastrous as any
forest fire is, that in the Kootenay
Park has ao far principally destroyed
second growth timber on areas that
were burned over probably thirty
years ago. Of course, for the five
and one-half miles mentioned it has
destroyed the scenic beauty and has
been a deterrent to thc tourist trawl
that was expected through the park
highway this year, and ns the highway was built especially for tourists,
every effort has been made to keep
the road open for them.
"The outlook today is very promising and no danger exists to the
tourist who will use good sen.se and
follow the rules thut we huve laid
down for their guidunce. We close
the road at night and keep it closed
tin the morning until our patrol has
been through the burned area to'
clear it from trees or brush that may
have fallen during the night. A
1 statement has been made that the,
driver of the car thnt was recently
caught In the flames was not warned
of the danger.   Tbe answer to thai
is thnt any person of mature years
who arrives at a point where forest
fires are burning and where In- can
see fire fightinK apparatus along the
road for many rods, where men are
working like galley slaves with hose,
axes and shovels to stop the spread
of the flames, the danger should be
apparent and that is the exact condition that confronted the driver of
the fatal car. Further, while I cannot say that I personally can remember this exuet cur, the member of
the Roynl Canadian Mounted Police
stationed at the entrance to the fire
tates that he distinctly remembers
the ear und that the driver was
warned."
Mr. Wardle nnd his fire fighters
are today very hopeful, as the finis confined to ureas where it is ex
pected to burn out on the mountain
lopes or else to stop ut the fire
guards of sufficient width to stop its
trogress.
Hr. .1 II. King and Mrs. King wen
{in Kimberley for a few houn oi
Monday, renewing old acquaintances
Mr.
party
Green
Bay'.
Mrs.  Jack   Holland  nnd
unday   afternoon   ut
LAKE
WINDERMERE
NOTES
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
(Special to The Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., July 17th.—Miss
Cleland is here spending: her summer
holidays with Mr. and Mrs. Cleland.
Mrs. Rodgers, of Creston, is visiting
her father, Mr. Joseph Heath.
Mr. J. E. Corn-well, manager of the
Bank of Montreal at Swift Current,
accompanied by Mrs. Corn well and
Miss Ferguson, spent the week in this
district renewing old acquaintances.
lnvermere, B.C., July 21.—Mr. II.
M< Ci-t wooii, federal poultry inspector tor the province of British
Columbia, with headquarters at Atr-
ssiz, B.C., has been making an official examination of the poultry department  at the Dominion   Oovorn-
nent Experimental Station ut   Wln-
leimere. On Monday he gave a field
lecture much to the onllghtment of
hose wh„ hml the pleasure of hearing him.
Miss Dora K. Bodecker lias received advice that the following are
those of hei- pupils who were successful in passing the recent examinations in music as conducted here
by Mr. Kgcrton Tidmarsh, the examiner from London, England, fertile Associated Board of the Hoyal
Academy of Music and the Royal
College of Music of London, Etig-
'and: In the primary—Fern Lara-
bee, of Wilmer; Nora Tompkins and
Barbara Scott, of this placcj lower
li\ision—fern Larnbce and Bernice
Ihompson, of Wilmer; Jessie Frater,
of lnvermere; higher division—Mar.
■ in Tunacliffe. of Wilmer; graoiniai
■if music, division 1 — Margaret
rompkins, of this place; division 2—
Marvin Tunnacliffe und Bernice
Ihompson, both of Wilmer.
Every preparation is being made
to make Farmers' Day at the Experimental Stutions of this district another crowning success. The last day
of the month is the day set. Amongst
others to be present will be His Hon
or R. Randolph Bruce, Lieut.-Govem
or of the Province,
Miss May Williams, of St. Eugene
Hospital, Cranbrook, Is here on a
visit with her father,
Mr. on.I Mrs. Tom Caldwell and
family enjoyed an outing at St.
Mary's over the week-end.
Iii. Hanington motored to Fairmont Friday evening, returning home
Saturday morning. The doctor was
accompanied <>n the return trip by
his wife and daughter, who were
holidaying at iln- Springs for a week.
Mr. nml Mrs. S. Alexander and
Mr. and .Mrs. Geoff. Warren spent
Sunday at  Wasa Lake.
E. Louis, Mr. Fioaul, Mrs. Morton
und .Mrs. Brown, .Mr. Coffee and party we're among those noticed iu the
pool ot   Radium  on   Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Young are
[pending a week at Fairmont Hot
Sprlngi.
J. S. Fisher and family spent Sunday  ai   St.  Mary|a_ Lake.
Messrs. Barton and Sutherland had
-    v;i;,   ,r.!:; Lssl'lll   i'l. h*',*:g   trip   m   the
St. Mary's district Sunday.
The fire on the McGiuty Trail is
now umlu: control, und the rain on
Tuesday helped considerably, although much more is needed.
Willis & Longman moved their
itock hist week into one of the Marsh
buildings   on   Howard  Street.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Carlson and Mrs
II. McLeod returned home from
Spokane tlie end of the week and re-
lorted the heat was terrific in the
•ity.
A. Foulkard nnd parly reported a
jplendid fishing uio to Findley Creek
over the Week-end, coming home with
a   fine  catch,
Word was received Ihis week in
town thai .Mrs. Marsden, who i- visit-
ing iu England, came across .Mick
Edmonds at Wembley. A
greal
wo I
and Mrs. H. Snell, of Calgaryi -Miss
swanson of Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs.
I* Murphy, Hull Hiver; .Mr. IL Ita*
Chell,   I'helis   Island;   Miss   .Songster.
Montreal; Mls« Shore, Seattle; Mrs.
laniellacli. Spokane; Mr. and Mrs.
Hodgson, ranbrook; Mr. and Mrs.
Coblance, Sanger, California; Mr and
Mrs. liner, Sao Francisco; Mr. and
Mrs. Whayatt, of ihe same place; Mr
and Mm E. Child, and Mr. and Mrs.
Bnby. of Honolulu; Mr. and Mr«
Hanley, Idaho.
trip to Klmberlt
within  ihe  m-xt
**************************
KIMBERLEY
NEWS NOTES
S. G. Blaylock, of Trail, genera]
manager of the C.M. It S. Co., paid a
visit to town on Wedntsduy of this
week.
it thc
se<  ii  seemed strange lhat
Kimberley should exchange
tine-.    Mickey i- mi his return
d should arrive
week!.
FINDS RADIUM CAMP
IDEAL SPOT FOR
RECUPERATION
LIST OF RESIDENTS OF
MORE THAN TWENTY
YEARS HERE BEING MADE
Old Timers' Association May
Be Formed Later In
The Year
An interesting register of the old-
timers in the district has been opened
by J. P. Fink, and has been placed
in the store window. A good many
signatures are being obtained for it,
and it is proposed a little later to
organize a function for these old
residents in the district to get together, when the possibility of forming an Old Timers* Association mny
be discussed, similar to the organization which Fernie has. On the
list there are now quite a number o*"
names of people whose advent into
the district dates back to more tfian
twenty years ago, and others go back
"nto the nineties. The long distance
record so far seems to go to X. A.
Wallinger, M.1..A., who arrived in
Golden in 1885, and has been constantly in the district ever since.
Among the ranchers of the district
there are some who have been in the
district f,.i- upwards of twenty-fhe
years, and no roster of the pioneers
"f Kast Kootenay would be complete
without their names. As the list of
name grows, the document will bi-
■oine quite a valuable one, and many
merest ing reminiscences of old
times will not doubt be roused by a
perusal of the list.
A son was born to Mr. and Mrs.
Webber at McDougall Heights Hospital, Wednesday morning, July 21st.
Mr. Webber, of tbe Mark Creek
store, was seen with a big smile receiving congratulations.
C. A. Foote, Mr. and Mrs. Neil
McKinnon and Miss Grace motored
to Fairmont Sunday, and were ac
companied on the return trip by Mrs
Foote and Chris.
Klltot Crowe, of Vancouver, is tht
guest this week of his brother, Lloyd
Crowe, of Crowe's Retail, Md.
T. Whittingham, editor of the
Kimberley Press, accompanied by F.
Jarrett, Miss Grace Jarrett, Mrs.
Hale and Miss, Peggy Hale, were
ampng those from Kimberley who
spent a few hours at Fairmont Hot
Springs on Sunday.
A good number of citizens turned
out Tuesday night to give what assistance they could in helping to clear
the land for the children^ playground. Some good work wus accomplished. This will continue as
often as convenient, so as to get
things in readiness for the big swimming  pool,
Vincent Sterba, of the Kimberley
Meat Market, left last week for a
holiday trip to Portland and other
cities, and will be away for some
time.
• Miss Jacobson, of Spokane, is the
guest of her sister this week.
Mrs. I,, Crowe and family returned home last week from a visit to
Grnnd Forks,
Mr. Tom Wilson has his young Hon
visiting him for a few weeks, from
Manville,  Alberta.
John McDonald, who was spending
a few days at Radium, returned on
Sunday last to attand the funeral
of fhe late Frank Michaud.
W. M. Archibald, of Trail, was a
visitor to town the end of the week.
Mr. and Mrs. Sorgie and Mrs. P.
Iieainan, of Pincher Creek, motored
in from Banff on Friday last nnd was
the guest of their uncle, C. A, Foote,
making the return trip home by the
Crow's Nest the following day.
Mr. E. G. Montgomery motored to
Radium Saturday, returning on Sunday accompanied by Mm. Montgomery mid Mlsa EUttn, who had spent
the wi k at th* Syrf»r
{Special to Tin- Herald)
To do away wiih Tedium
Instead of chewing Rigglpum
Drink,  swim  and  rest  at  Radium,
The Lourdes of the Millenium,
Ami t;. t Into your cranium
Thai lifo i.- one long Te Deum;
This is the way of    Radium.
So   think-   Miss   Ruth   Taylor,  the
beautiful  ami  talented  Enslish  act-]
ress, who last autumn played in Calgary, Lethbridge, Vancouver and Victoria  with  such   great   success,  and
who, since that time by her performances at  the  Repetory Theatre, has
taken Boston. Mass,, by storm.    After her strenuous work  Mi*s Taylor
has chosen Radium, B.C.,  (late Fairmont Springs)  as the ideal place in
which   to take  a  rest  cuiir.     At  the
same time her mother, Mrs.  Taylor,
who has just come from England, is
taking   a   cure   for   neuritis   a;   the
springs.
Miss Taylor arrived at Radium last
Friday, and is so charmed with the
place and its surroundings that she
has already decided to extend her
stay at the Camp for a period if vome
weeks. She may be seen there disporting herself, swimming and riding,
and generally entering into the spirit
of the Camp.
Radium Camp this year is much
improved, electric light has been in-
stallc-il and many other improvements
have been made. Three new bath
houses for cures have heen huilt
on Em nation Hill, of emnation rock,
and are, now being fitted up in the
most up-to-date and luxuriant manner.
Mrs. Vates, late of Vermilion
Crossing Camp, has brought her own
stall" and is managing the tourist
camp and restaurant with wonderful
results. Mr. R. W. Bartman !s finding his time fully occupied in attending to the numerous improve ments
he'H bringing into effect. Radium is
getting much better known and more
popular than ever before; many influential people are staying there,
other visitors being Mr. and Mrs.
MacMunen and party, of Edmonton;
.Mr.   and   Mrs.   Cox,   of   Moose Jaw,
UNUSUAL ACTIVITY
REPORTED FROM OFFICE
OF MINING RECORDER
Reports from the locnl mining recorder's offlce here would indicate
that the year lii'Jii bids fair to be
a record year for the recording of
work done on mines and prospects
in the Cranbrook district. The number of claims located and assessments
done far excetd the amount for a
similar period during the history of
this district. It is pleasing also to
note the interest taken in regard to
the location of phosphate claims.
This is a new departure, and if it
provts successful, will mean very
much for the added prosperity of the
Cranbrook district.
The following data has heen kindly furnished by the local mining recorder. Mr. P. H. McCurrach, covering period from January 1st to date:
New Locations   302
Assessments   331
Phosphate  Prospecting     185
From the records in the mining
recorder's office, it is estimated there
are 900 existing mineral claims in
the Cranbrook mining district at the
present time.
Meeting For Plebiscite
Tuesday evening a meeting of
those interested in the securing of
another plebiscite for the sake of
beer in Cranbrook took place in the
basement of the Hanson Block, and
was well attended by a iarge number
of citizens. Plans were made for the
circulation of another petition, and
the matter of the advisability of the
establishment of bear parlors was
discussed. Members from the Retail
Merchants' Association and the
Board of Trade were present.
PREVENT5
FORESTS
FIRES
YOU CAN
HELP
B. C. FOREST SERVICE
J/iyAaYle*faWa*Jtrtr\*iAter^^ PAQE EI0H1
THE  CRANBROOK  HERALD
Thursday, July 22nd, 192S
t*************************************************
Engagement
Rings
A Diamond Engagement
Ring that meets every standard of QUALITY and AP-
PEARANCE, and yet does
not cost too much, is easy
to find if you come to
Leigh's.
Our engagement ring prices
start at $18.50
GIFT SHOP   -   -   A. EARLE LEIGH
Watchmaker and Jeweler
**** * * * *.;.*.;. * * * * * * * ******** ******
*
*
Norbury Avenue *
;..;. .*..;. * * * .;• * * * ******
i1
LOCAL
'PEMNa\
Insure with Beale A Elwell.       *
Mrs. Mabel Eley and children left
on Monday for Revelstoke, for a visit
with friends.
Mr. and Mi's. J. h. Walker and
family  are  spending their   holidays
Martin Bros. Pay (or Aibes.
tf.
Students Tour in China and Japan
Indicating tbe great attraction wliich 'tbe Immemorial Kast" exercises on
the Occident; hero are a group of happy student boys wbo are determined
to see for themselves what everyone at .some time or other talks about and
discusses. They aro photographed on board the Canadian Paeilie liner Empress of Russia and sailed recently on that ship for the Orient from Vancouver for a six weeks' tour of China and Japan under tlie auspices of the Arts
Craft Guild. In that time they will see many of tbe famous shrines and cities
of the two countries and will come back with n wealth of new Ideas reinforced
by actual experience of tbe two greatest examples of the Kast. They will
return, to Canada on the Kmpress of Russia arriving at Vancouver Angus* 9.
From Savagery to Civilization
Five years ago they were unclothed suvafies of the wildest tribe
of Igorola in the Philippine Islands
and work was an unknown blessing
or affliction, according to tbe way
you look at It. Prom sun-up to
sundown there was nothing to do
except swimming, canoeing, fi.sblng.
and generally taking things as they
came and lite easy, To-day thoy
are garbed ln the dress or civilization as you see them here waiting
on tin- Windsor Sheet Station, Montreal, for their train to New York.
Bernard Manlwdo, 18, and .Tnvier
Cardenas, 17, forsook tbe care-free
life of tbelr ancestors and under the
expert training of two American
women missionaries, learned something of the meat white world beyond the .seas. They both picked
up English (inlckly nnd now speak
lt and write It fluently.   Tliey w
work through High School and University  In  the  t'nited  Slates.
They travelled the eight thousand
miles front Knyan, tn the Philippines, aboard the Empress of Asia,
landing at Vancouver, and Ihence
across Canada to Montreal on their
way to New York. All their tielong-
tngs are lu the three straw handbags standing beside them. "This
fs thc smallest quantity of baggage
over a trip of this length I have
seen In 25 years." commented T. 0.
Turnbull, Canadian Pacific steamship passenger agent, 'who ndvlsrd
them on their trip.
Cannibals nnd head hunters still
nourish In the Philippines, said the
two youths, but. they are now away
back in thr wtltls of thn Islands. It
will be many yours beforo they are
stamped out. Javier nnd Bernard
hop© to help In the stamping when
they have completed their training.
*****************************************************
FISHING
TACKLE
In our sports goods section is a complete stock of all
needed fishing equipment. Look over your tackle,
come in and equip yourselves for a good season.
But no matter what your sport may be—we have the
equipment you need—all priced as low as is consistent
with first.quality goods.
OUR STORE IS SPORTS HEADQUARTERS
IN CRANBROOK.
DELANY & SINCLAIR
I'HONI.M
l\ O. BOX 499
Kootenay Lake.
Mrs. A. Kummer, Hanson Avenue,
i.s enjoying a month's holiday visiting with her sister in Minneapolis.
Ask for Big Butte Dairy Ice
Cream — Cranbrook's velvet ice
ream. IStf,
Mrs. A Tanner and family left on
Sunday for Vancouver, where they
were to join Mr. Tanner, who is now
mployed there,
Miss Strnith, private secretary to
Hon. Dr. King, arrived In the city
on Sunday last and is registered at
the  Cranbrook  Hotel.
Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Hall are having the pleasure of a visit from their
grandchildren, of Vancouver, who
will spend the summer holidays here.
For the latest magazines and papers call at the Rex Cafe, near depot
ltf
Mrs. J. S. Dunlop entertained the
ladies of the G.I.A. to the B. of L.E.
to tea at her home on Tuesday afternoon, Mrs. J. Knox, of Revelstoke,
being the guest of honor.
Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Fink and family
left on Monday for Boswell, where
they will spend the balance of the
summer, Mr, Fink was expected to
be away only a few days,
Mr. nnd Mrs, H. E. Jecks sr. returned to the city on Wednesday by
ar from Lethbridge, where they have
been spending the last two weeks
with their son, H. E. Jecks, jr.
THEODORE    PADBERG,    piano
tuner;  player expert.    Phone  502,
81-tf.
After an absence of four years
from the eity, Mr. Eddie Spence returned to the eity on Sunday last.
He is now located in San Francisco,
California, where his father, Mr. J,
H. Spence, now resides.
For first class automobile repairs
Bee Ratcliffe & Stewart. SStf
Friends of F. Roy, formerly of the
local C.P.R. telegraph offlce, were
pleased to welcome him back to Cranbrook from Edmonton, where he is
now located, being still connected
with the telegraph office there.
Drs. W. J. Knox and T. Thompson,
of Kelowna, passed through the city
on Wednesday on their return from
a trip to Banu by motor, making the
trip from Vernon to Edgewater,
thence by lake to Kootenay Landing,
Mrs. J. Knox, of Revelstoke, has
been the guest of Mrs, A. J, Ratcliffe,
Garden Avenue, for the last two
weeks, during her visit here. They
took in the trip to Banff by motor,
Mrs, Knox returned to her home on
Monday last.
Three Fernie men, Nick Messinick,
Steve Meskovitch and Kelly Yako-
vitch, were each fined $25 and costs
on Tuesday of this week by Magis-
trnte Cope, of that place, for failing
to respond to u call to fight fire when
culled upon to do so.
Mrs. N. R. Park and family arrived in the city on Friday last front
Russell, Man., to join her husband,
who is now assisting Mr. W. H. Wilson. They have taken up their residence in the house formerly occupied
by Mr, Guthrie, on Garden Ave,
Mr. G. H. Abbott, of the Canadian
Bank of Commerce staff, left on Sunday for the coast, where he has been
transferred to a Vancouver branch.
Mr. E, A. Tackaberry, late of the
Kitsalano branch, has taken his place
at the ledgerkeener's desk here.
Little Evelyn Whitter, the
eight-year-old daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Berrington, has been lying at
the hospital in u serious condition for
the past week or so, and little change,
in her condition is understood to have
been apparent in the past day or two,
though an improvement is hoped for,
Negotiations opened last week between the Railway Association of
Canada and the Order of Railway
Conductors and the Brotherhood of
Railroad Trainmen, on the demands
of the men for an upward revision
of the present wage agreement. The
men are asking for a restoration of
the 1021 rates, which means an approximate increase of  10 per cent.
On Sunday next the union services which have been taking place
between the Presbyterian and Baptist congregations will be conducted
both morning and evening by the
Rov. W. T. Tapscott. Many will be
interested though sorry to learn that
it will be the last opportunity of
hearing Mr. Tapscott, as, after Sunday, he leaves for Portland, where
for a month he is taking the pulpit
of the largest Baptist Church in that
city and the state of Oregon. The
good wishes of a host of Cranbrook
! ! friends go with llr. Tapscott to hla
Anew field.
Mrs. A. J. Ironside and family left
on Monday for Banff, to visit with
her sister, Mrs. Selwyn, for n fort*
night.
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Sarvis and
daughter, Almo, left on a two weeks
holiday to be spent at the Fairmont
Hot Springs.
Miss Emily Platcher, formerly of
the staff of the Cranbrook Co-Operative Society, was a visitor in the
city this week.
Anything you want welded, take it
to the Service Garage. Work guaranteed. 22tf.
Dr. and Mrs. J. II. King arrived
In the city on Friday evening last
from Golden and the Windermere,
and left on Monday for Fernie for
a short visit.
Mr. Kumsey, C.P.R, trainman, nnd
party, of Cranbrook, went on a fishing trip up Goat River for a week,
W, Davis taking them up with pack
horse.—Creston   Review.
For prompt repairs and satisfaction go to Ratcliffe & Stewart'e garage. 20tf
Two young boys, whose names are
known, have bum stealing and destroying flowers in Mrs. J. B. Hall's
yard. Unless this is stopped Mrs.
Hall will have the police after them.
Sperry Phillips arrived in Crnnbrook Sunday last to spend his vacation in Cranbrook and district.
Sperry is now connected with the
department of agriculture for the
province.
Ask for Big Butte Dairy Ice
Cream — Cranbrook's velvet ice
cream, lfitf.
The Cranbrook District Co-Operative Society will hold their annual
picnic on Wednesday, August llth,
at Green Bay. The children who
will he attending are asked to call
at the store for their tags.
Miss Winnie Lippett, for the past
two or three years teacher at the,
Kootenay Orchards school, has resigned that post and has accepted the
position of junior teacher at Wycliffe.
The vacant position at Kootenay Orchards school was offered to
Miss Dorothy Hodgson, of this city,
who has been teaching at Fort Steele, I
but was declined.
Mr. Atl Bowness, son of Mr. A C.
Bowness, accompanied by Mr. and
Mrs. Behrens, Eddie Spence and J !),
Shelton, all of Los Angeles, readied
Cranbrook on Sunday last b> car,
Art and Eddie while in the city were
busy renewing acquaintances. Mr.
Bowness Is now associated wiin Coffin -Red'ington, wholesale druggi&'s,
of San Francisco.
Arrangements have not yet been
completed for carrying on the services of the Baptist Church till the
arrival of the new pastor, Rev. V.
McNeil), in the fall. Rev. W. K.
Roberts, who is ul present conducting Presbyterian services in Kimberley on Sunday evenings, may be in
Cranbrook on Sunday mornings, to
hold service here, and it is likely
that the evening service may be conducted by local supplies, an arrangement to this end having been under
discussion.
The Morrison sub-division fs rapidly becoming one of the popular residential districts at Kimberley. Among
the latest new residences now near-
ing completion is one of the finest in
the place, erected to the order of Mr.
J. Morrison, who will be occupying
it shortly. A walk through some
of the lots at the present time is
sufficient proof of the possibilities of
this tract from a gardener's standpoint, making it easy to realize what
a beautiful section this is to develop
into, in a short period of time. Several real estate deals have already
taken place in that section. Some of
the recent ones reported are Thos.
Gordi to James Douglass, formerly
of Roslnnd; John Lowry to Clifford
Vickers und James Ridell to Geo.
Pedrotti. formerly of Coleman. All
the transfers were arranged by Martin  Bros,
Messrs. J. Wright, E. T. Abbott
and Geo. Smith, all business men of
Armstrong, B.C., were visiters in
j Cranbrook on Monduy, stopping over
j long enough to renew acquaintances
with friends here, and former residents of the Upper Okanagan. A.
McDonald, W. Hill and others were
pleased to meet the tourists again,
who were on their return from a trip
to Banff.
The installation of additional
street lights on Cranbrook Street has
made a decided improvement to this
portion of the city. Tourists arriving from the north and east will have
a fur different impression of our city
as a result of this expenditure. Apart
from this aspect the streets of this
section were deserving of better
lighting than they previously enjoyed.
Mr. und Mrs. J. Ltnnox, of Coming, Calif., aud three daughters, und
Mrs. Barber are visiting in the city
ut the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. 11.
McLaren. The party ure on their
way to Calgary, und will remuin here
for ubout a week, Mrs, Lennox is a
sister of Mra. McLaren.
Many Deaths From Heal
Now York, July 22nd.—Death list
from heat in eastern Canada and U.S.
have exceeded hundred since Sunday.
Prostrations continue everywhere,
h,
ere an
dTh
ere
The heavy shower on Tuesday afternoon was a veritable godsend to
the district in many ways. Apart
from very materially assisting with
the control of the forest fire situation in the district, crops were helped
very considerably, particularly the
root crops, while the grain will be
filled out better. The city water
supply will be considerably augmented, and it was not found necessary
to impose restrictions this week on
the use of lawn services, which was
contemplated. Notice to this effect
had actually been drawn up and
placed in the hands of the newspapers for publication when the rain
ceme, and the proposed notices were
cancelled.
Mrs. R. T. Kirk, of Edmonton, and
her daughter, Mrs. Wm. Bell, and
non, of Wetaskiwin, have been spending a two weeks' vacation with Mrs.
Bell's daughter, Mrs. J. W. McDonald, of this city.
Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Collier left on
'Wednesday afternoon for Wasa Lake,
where they will remain on holiday
for a week or so, occupying one of
the little summer places which they
have there.
Tremendously rapid development
of forest and water power resources
of the Province of Quebec is indicated in the forecast of revenue
totalling $6,000,000 from these
sources for the current year. Last
year the same resources produced a
revenue of nearly $4,500,000,
Sixty men from the training camps
in Brandon and Claydon, England,
have been accepted by the Canadian
Government and sailed on the "Empress of France" at the end of June.
They proceeded to Winnipeg after
landing at Quebec and will be placed
on specially selected farms.
Saskatchewan exported last year
77.4 per cent, of its total production
of crtamery butter, according to m
statement made by the Provincial
Dairy Commissioner. The increase
in production in 1025 over that of
1920 had amounted to 126.8 per
cent., the output last year totalling
15,946,233 pounds.
Close on one hundred pilgrims
from St. Paul and Minneapolis
passed through Montreal recently on
their way to the famous shrine of
Ste. Anne de Beaupre, near Quebec.
They were the advance guard of the
great army of pilgrims that visit the
shrine every year. While stopping
off in Montreal they visited the St.
Joseph Oratory in that city, also
well-known as a shrine.
Hundreds of students and co-eds'
from Canadian and American universities have been passing through
Montreal recently to board ships for
Europe In connection with tht Overseas Collegiate Tours that have
grown increasingly popular of late
years. Many of these collegians
travel by Canadian Pacific boats, the
"Empress of France" on a recent
trip carrying over 250 of them.
Clad in gorgeous scarlet tunics,
plentifully decorated with gold braid,
forty members of the world-famous
Coldstream Guards Band, of London, reached Quebec recently on the
Canadian Pacific liner "Montcalm"
on their third visit to Canada, having
been here in 1904 and again in 1911.
Under the command of Lieutenant
R, G. Evans they will play at Brandon, Calgary, Edmonton, Saskatoon,
Regina, Vancouver and the Toronto
Exhibition.
The electrification of the main
line of the Imperial Japanese Government Railway system from Tokio
to Shlmonoseki, 750 miles, has been
long projected, and recently the 45-
mile section between Tokio and
Odawara has had experimental
trains drawn by electric locomotives
run twice a day between these points.
Owing to the great expense Involved
it is feared it will be many years before the entire main line can be electrified.
Founded 92 years ago in gardens
on the site of which the Canadian
Pacific Railway Windsor Street Station in Montreal now stands, the St.
Jean Baptiste Society of that city
celebrated that event on June 24th
last by having a memorial tablet
affixed to the walls of the station.
The tablet was the gift of Victor
Morin, former president-general of
the society, who was present and unveiled it.
Negotiations have been completed
for the erection, and work will
shortly commence, upon a terminal
warehouse and cold storage plant, to
cost about five million dollars and
to be built in Montreal. It Is stated
that it will be constructed within ten
months from the end of Juno, will
be ten storeys In height and will
have a total space of 600,000 square
feet, of which one-third will he fer
celd storage. The plant wlll be built
by the Montreal Rail and Harbor
Terminals, Limited, and coat will be
financed by Mulefe* Baaken' Cer-
*}******* ef !*****%
Specials for Friday and Saturday
PHONES  93   &   173
TOMATOES
Quaker Brand
tins  .*...,   40c
MILK
Pacific Brand, Tall
Size: 3 tins 40c
SWIFT'S LARD
Pure Silverleaf Brd.
3 lb. tins: each 75c
TOILET PAPER
8 Rolls for .... 25c
COFFEE   —Manning' t   Perfection
Fresh ground tb 60c
TEA
Manning's Orange
Pekoe:   1  lb 70c
FOR THE CAMPER
Jam—Strawberry, Raspberry: new
pack, in 1 lb. tins, with handy lid.
Each  A  30c
Lobster, quarters, per tin .... 30c
Chicken, halves, per tin   50c
Date Butter— 1  lb  for   30c
Meat with Spread, per tin   20c
Sandwich Spread, small size ** 25c
Premier Dressing, small size .. 25c
McCormick's Sodas,  packet       20c
Olives, Hoyal Jar: bottle .       48c
Pickles, Sweet Mix: jar ... ...   25c
Raspberry Vinegar, pt. bot.  .. 35c
MANNING'S
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
Apricots  for preserivinf
Crate  $2.25
Bing Cherries, crate   3.36
Raspberries, crate   3.35
Loganberries, crate   3.35
Bartlett  Pears,   tb       16c
Plums, 2  lbs  35c
Peaches,  2  lbs  35c
Apples,   Yellow  Transparent,
li lbs. for  26c
Tomatoes, Hot House: Ib 35c
Watermelon, whole, per Ib .07c
Watermelon, cut. per Ib.       08c
LIMITED
H,
ere an
dTh
ere
Stormont,' the beat mine in Nova
Scotia, when gold-mining in tiie
province waa an industry, is to be
re-opened. Until it closed down,
twelve years ago, Stormont mine had
produced over 575,000 tons of ore,
giving an average of free gold of
$4.13 per ton, or $2,225,000 during
its activity.
A record single shipment of Indian
motor-cycles, consisting of 85 cases,
from Armory, Mass., recently arrived in Tokyo, Japan, having come
forward by Canadian Pacific Kail
and steamer lines. The demand for
motor-cycles in Japan is a steadily
Increasing one, being a cheap and
convenient method of locomotion and
well Buited to the somewhat narrow
roads of that country.
Twenty-one British Rotarians recently came over to Canada on the
Canadian Pacific liner "Montclare"
en route to the International Rotary
convention at Denver. On their return trip they came back through
Canada, travelling to Winnipeg and
Fort William, and taking the Great
Lakes trip on C.P.R. steamboat to
Port McNicoll. They returned to the
Old Country by the C.P. liner "Montcalm."
The Canadian Pacific Railway has
just added two of the new Mount
Class observation cars to those running out of Montreal. Five more
•re Just about ready to run and the
balance of four cars will be ready
for lervlc-e shortly after these. They
are all-steel cars, made up of three
compartments, and one drawing
room with a parlor room and observation platform. They will be a
feature of long-run trains on the
CP.R.
The English football team now
touring Canada had one of the most
strenuous work-outs In the history
of any athletic body. Staying for a
week-end at the Chateau Lake Louise
they had a practise at an altitude
of a mile and a half above sea level,
where the thinness and dryness of
the air had a wonderful effect upon
them. Their captain thought It remarkable that prize-fighters in training had not utilized the marvellous
properties of this training camp.
A fourteen-car special Canadian
Pacific Railway train carried more
than a hundred of the most prominent representatives of banking and
financial interests of New York City
•nd State to Quebec, where they held
their 33rd annual convention of the
New York State Bankers' Association at the Chateau Frontenac recently. Included in the party was
Col. J. W. Mcintosh, Comptroller of
Currency, Washington; and W. J.
Donovan, Assistant Attorney-General ef the U.S., and several financial specialists of New York's leading newspapers.
While Canadian Pacific train No. 87
was standing on public crossing preparatory to taking passing track, an
automobile, occupied by four persons,
ran into the side of the train, badly
damaging the auto. In another case,
a driver said he saw the train and
heard tht whistle signals sounded,
but toe late to avoid running into
the tide of the engine. Yet irgaln, a
touring car, travelling about 25 miles
per hour, ran through the crossing
barriers at a public crossing in
Montreal but did not stop. No injuries were reported in all three incidents.
Representing capital running Into
billions ef dollars, a party of around
eighty prominent bankers, financiers
and men reproeenting commercial
and business interests, recently arrived at tho Windsor Street Station,
Montreal, from New York, and made
• tour of th* pulp and paper industries and tho new aluminum dis.
trtcta of tht St. Maurice and Sague-
nay Valleys in Quebec Province, with
a view to personal inspection of tho
prospects In those great develop-
■aaata. Tht party was accommodated with five twelve-section com-
pertments and drawing room tleep-
trs, two dining cars and tht private
•ar "MeDtssereacy," tha whole b*-
*m ft» ■■»■■■*. *
Miss Connie Sponco, of Cranbrook,
wns tho guest of Mra. T. Lawes. this
week—Fernie Free Press.
Mr. and Mrs. II. R. Hinton and
family hnvo boon spending a few
dnys' holiday thia week ut Fairmont
Hot Springs.
Mrs. Ernest Lamb, sister of
Mrs. Ci. F, Collins, accompanied by
hor husband, two children and a
niece, are visitors at the Collins'
home in Crauhrook. They expect to
leave on Tuesday next for Edmonton,
where tliey wlll also visit.
CARD  OF  THANKS
Mr. and Mrs. John Thomas Tipper
and family wish to express their sincere thanks to all their kind friends
for their beautiful floral tributes,
ond for sympathy shown them during
their recent sad lit reavment in the
loss of their son, Arthur Ronald, who
was drowned at Glonlily. 23*
Attention, Knights of Pythias
A joint picnic will be held at Wasa
Lake, Sundny, July 26th, Crescent
Lodge No. 33, North Star Lodge No.
05. and Sisters' Temples of Cranbrook
ond Kimberley. Transportation will
be arranged for at Castle Hall between 8.30 and 9.30. Those wishing
accommodation send your names to
the secretary. Visiting members invited.
22 L.   PERRON,  Secy.
WANT ADS.
HOUSE TO RENT—Furnished or
unfurnished. All modern conveniences. Apply 138 Hanion
Avenue. 22*
FOR SALE—$2650.00 or would rent,
the old Cottage Hospital, 11 rooms,
double plumbing; would make excellent boarding or rooming house,
3 lots. Apply C. A. Cock, P. O.
Box SI2. 22-23
WANTED—One good pure-bred Jersey cow, fresh or  coming   fresh
soon.    Martin Baker, Natal, B.C.
22-23*
FOR SALE—1 Roll-top desk; 1 bu-
reau; 1 wash-stand; 1 brass bed,
spring and mattress; 1 kitchen
table; 2 rockers. At Baptist Parsonage, 231 Norbury Ave. 22
LOST—At camping site on east aide
of Wasa Lake, a metal Brownie-
size Kodak camera — left there on
Sunday, July llth. Finder please
leave word at Herald Office.     22tf
WANTED—Cedar Poles, posts, piling, all sizes. Quote prices, state
shipping points, quantity can furnish, -when could ship. Spot. cash.
Niederweger-Mnrtin Lumber Co.,
Portlnnd, Ore. 22-26
FOR SALE—Dodge touring car. Me-
chanicolly perfect. Good tires;
over $100.00 in extras. No reasonable offer refused. Terms to rc-
Ifclili- parly. Apply Y.M.C.A.,
Cranbrook. 22tf
BOOK-KEEPER-TYPIST _ desires
position; experienced thoroughly
in general office routine. I'hone
No. 333, or llox I, lleruld, Cranbrooit. 10 tf.
CLEAN ROOMS TO RENT—by day
or month. Apply Mrs. C. Howard,
Herald Building. 18tf.
FOR SALE—Pinno, ns good as new.
Mason uud Risch. $360 cash. Enquire Box I., Crunbrook Herald
office. 2 ltf
TENT—14 >  17, 4 ft. walls, 10 fl
high.   Just like new except lb* prlco.
Also an AIR MATTRESS for sale.
COOK STOVES   •  DINING ROOM
SUITES   -   DRESSERS
BEDS aad BEDDING
9 a 12 CONGOLEUM RUG
TABLES   -   CHAIRS   -   ROCKERS
Ele.
A Dandy Library Salt*.
WILLIAM THOMPSON
Phon 76 P. O. BulM
3*MM Head Dealer
Wt Bay. S*a aad fm-x—si

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