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Cranbrook Herald Jul 9, 1925

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Array THE CRANBROOK HERALD
VOLUME
27
PBOBINC1AL LIBRARY
Apr- 1-
CRANBROOK, B.C., THURSDAY, JULY 9th, 1925
NUMBER    20
Computed B.Cs.NL.cicu rro-
duction Will Soon Reach Billion
Fort Steele Mining Division Retains Production and Value Record Above All Other Mining Sections
Hritish  Columbia   is   rapidly   np-j
prniiebing the billion-dollar murk in
mineral production, Tbis is shown
by John 1>. Galloway's first report ns
provincial mineralogist of Hritish Columbia, as submitted to tlie lieutenant governor by tlie minister of
mines, the Hon. William Sloan. It
bus just come from the printer, bowing the date of March fi, 1025,
Mr. Calloway has succeeded W.
Fleet Robertson us provincial mineralogist. He formerly was assistant
mineralogist and later resident government engineer for tbe Northeastern district, at Hazolton. W. Fleet
Robertson wns provincial mineralogist for 27 yeurs.
The report shows 815 shipping
mines in the province during 1924,
of which ill shipped more than 100
tons of ore. These mines employ 3,-
854 men, 2,265 being underground
workers and 1,589 above the surface.
In addition to the shipping mines
there were 26 working mines and 04
idle, a total of 90 not on the shipping
list. These mines employed 179 men
—88 underground and 91 above.
Cross value of mineral production
wns $48,704,604, an increase of $7,-
400,284, or 18 per cent over the preceding year. This is the greatest
mineral production in the history of
the province, the previous record being that of 1918, a war year, when
the figure was $42,290,402.
Metalliferous production—that is,
gold, silver, copper, lead and zinc—-
amounted to $35,058,997, an increase over the preceding year °f
$10,191,935, or 39.6 per cent.
Dividends of record are given as
$2,896,174, nnd this note is added:
"Profits accruing to private companies and individual mining enterprises as a rule are not given publicity
as dividends, as is the case with tbe
large companies, so that no record of
these profits, which in the aggregate
nre considerable, is available."
The gain in reported dividends is
nearly $90,000. The companies reporting are: Premier Gold Mining
Co. Ltd., $1,715,000; Consolidated
Mining & Smelting Co., $041,043;
Howe Sound Copper Co., $198,415;
Silversmith   Mines,   Ltd.,    $175,000;
Wallace Mountain Mines Ltd., $59,-
400; I. X. L. (Trail Creek), $50,000;
ttell (Greenwood), $48,000; Apex
(Slocan), $1,834; Mountain Chief
(Slocan), $1,482.
Fort Steele mining division, in
Mast Kootenny, leads the province's
production records, both in tonnage
and values, with 1,0.'{3,714 tons und
$17,415,302 as the 1024 murk. This
is the third consecutive yeur in which
Fort Steele division has led the province, tbe immense production at the
Consolidated's Sullivan mine, at Kimberley, being responsible,
Nuss River division (which in- j
eludes Alice Arm and Anyox) held
the leadership in 1921, but was in
third place the next year, both Fort
Steele and Portland Canal forging
ahead. Since then Nass River has
led Portland Canal by a narrow margin.
Fourth place goes to the Vancou
ver-New Westminster division, which
includes Howe Sound.
Tonnage from Portland Canal is
comparatively light, as the chief mineral here is gold, more than half the
gold production of the proivince being from  this division.
Vancouver Island virtually dropped out of the production lists in
1924, bcing credited with only $500,
all placer gold, as against $103,364
in 1923.
Figures showing the total production of the province are given as follows:
Plocer gold, since 1857, $77,382,-
953.
Lode gold, since 1892, $118,473,-
100.
Silver, since  1880, $68,824,579.
Copper, since 1803, $187,489,378.
Lead, since 1886, $70,548,578.
Zinc, since  1908, $32,171,741.
Coal, since 1835, $235,732,743.
The aggregate production of all
mineral products, metal, coal, earths
and miscellaneous deposits, for all
years to and including 1924, is given
as $859,427,380.
At the present rate of operations
British Columbia will pass the billion-dollar mark in mineral production in less than three years.
CONSERVATIVES NAME
DELEGATES TO N0M
INATING CONVENTION
On Friday evening last, the Cranbrook Men's Conservative Association met at the K. P, Hall to elect
their delegation to the convention
which is to be held in this city on
Wednesday next, when a Conservative candidate for the federal riding
of Knst Kootenay will be chosen.
There are to be sixty delegates in
nil, twenty each from Cranbrook,
Fernie and Columbia ridings, ond of
the twenty from this district the city
Men's association elected five, and
the  ladies' organization  four,
A. ,1. Balment, president of the
association, was in the chair, II.
W. Herchmer acted us secretary, and
there wus a good attendance of the
active members of the association
present.
After ballotting had taken place
for the five delegates to be elected,
the scrutineers announced the following as having received the highest
number of votes, and thus become
the delegates: H. W. Herchmer, W,
Stewart, F. H. Dezall, Simon Taylor,
W. F. Attridge, Alternates were announced as follows, being the next
highest on the ballotting: W. F, Cameron, J. A. Arnold, Dr. W. A Fergie, S. Malcolm, A. C. Bowness. Prox-
are to be arranged through the
secretary, and no delegate can hold
more than two proxies.
took place, and an appeal for books
After the election of thc delegates ' Was made, to which a liberal res-
the chairman called   upon a number
of those present for short speeches,
and all spoke optimistically of the
outcome at the geueral election when
it la called, while emphasizing the
need for cohesion and hard work for
the party. Among those who spoke
at this time were N, A. Walllnger,
M. P. P., A. C. Bowness, Dr. J. W.
Rutledge, Major H. B. Hicks, W. F.
Cameron, W. F. Attridge, and J. T.
Sarvis, £
WOMEN'S
INSTITUTE
wwvwwwwvwwwwww
KEY CITY AND SULLIVAN
LODGES HOLD JOINT
INSTALLATION MONDAY
The joint Installation of officers
of Sullivan Lodgo, No. 35, I.O.O.F:,
mul Key City Lodge, No, 42, was
conducted al the Auditorium on
Monday night, by llro. \V. P. Gilcoy,
D, 13. O. M., assisted Ily Bro. II. Andrews. P.O., ns D. II. fl. Marshall,
nnd the following officers: Bro, \v.
S. Oreene, r.fl., n. D. U. Grand Treasurer! Bro. S. Fyles, r.fl., as 11. 1>.
Grand Chanlainj Bro. T. A. Wallace,
r.fl.. ns 1). I), flrniul Herald, Bro. W,
s. Johnston, P.O., as D, D, Grand
See.; and tiro. II. Burch, I'll., aa D.
li. Grand Warden,
Tlie officers Installed were us follows: f
Key  City  LDdgo
Bro. P.  A. Williams      N.fl.
Mr,., a. Kemball  V.O.
llro: Wl Hall        Warden
llro. F. Iioodson    Conductor
Bro. II. S. Brown   Chaplain
Bro. 0, M. Wallace R.S.S.
w. Randall, P.G
W, Soden, P.G
. W. ,1. Leigh
. F. Bamford
llro.
Bro.
lire.
llro.
llro.
Urn.
llro.
llro.
llro.
Bro.
llro.
Bro
Bro.
Bro
L, 8. S.
B, S. N. fl.
U.S.N.fl.
. U.S. V.O
L.S.V.fl.
I.O,
O, fl.
FINALS PLAYED OFF
IN TENNIS TOURNA.
MENT OF LOCAL CLUB
nro. ii: Bowley
Qi Stevely 	
II. V, Moffatt, T. (
Sullivan   Lodge
P.  Willis    N.C.
ES,   Dickenson       V.O.
A. A. Watklns    .  . Roc, Soc, j
W. .1. Carter    Fin: Sec:'
J, K! Walker  Treas.
Mark Beduz   Warden
S. Smart   Conductor
S. S. Sergeant Chaplain
H. Bernard   R.S.S.
E. Taylor   L.S.S.
D. Morrison R.S.N.G:
E. Hines L.S.N.G.
Bro. G. Hutchison   R.S.V.G.
Bro. I. Hooper L.S.V.G.
Bro, E. Lithgoe I, G.
Bro. O.  Hellier   O.O.
There was a large attendance of
brethren from the Kimberley lodge,
seven cars making the trip down, in
spite of the weather. At the conclusion of the business, the members
from both lodges, about seventy-five
in all, adjourned to the stage of the
Auditorium, where the social committee had provided a supper, following which there was a program of
short speeches and music, the gathering breaking up with the singing
of the National Anthem.
Saturday last was an outstanding
day at the courts of the Cranbrook
Lawn Tennis Club, when the finals
in most of the events in their annual
local tournament were played off.
There were some exceptionally close
games, ami the finalists without exception proved themselves tennis
players  of  merit.
The events played off resulted as
follows:
Men's Singles—G. P. Simpson
beat Dr. W. A. Fergie 2-tl, 0-4, 8-fi.
Mixed Doubles—Mr. mid Mrs.
Simpson beat Mrs. Mcintosh and Mr.
Evans 7-5, 4-6, 0-7.
Ladies' Doubles—Mrs. H. A. McKowan and Mrs, I), M, McDonald
brat Mrs. Simpson and Mrs, W. A.
Fergie 0-4, 0-3.
Ladies' Singles—Mrs. Fergie won
from  Mrs.  Mcintosh 7-5, fl-2.
In the men's doubles, which hnd
been played down previously, Messrs,
Simpson and Stewart proved the
winners.
Tea was nerved during the afternoon, and the onlookers enjoyed a
pleasant social afternoon as well as
seeing some good tennis.
The elub is now putting some further improvements in, particularly
ou tho building, adding a new verandah and also erecting a second
shelter   there.
j Lnst week-end n number of player- from the Crnnbrook club visited
Kimberley, nnd pluyed a number of
[interesting games with the club
there, In the aggregate Cranbrook
was adjudged winner of the tour
nament by ten sets to six, Cranbrook won the men's doubles three
sets to none; thc men's singles six
to two; the ladies' doubles broke even one set each; Kimberley won the
ladies' singles two sets to none, and
Cranbrook won the mixed doubles
two sets to one.
Among those who played at Kimberley in these games were Mr. and
Mrs. D. M. Macdonald, Dr. and Mrs,
W. A. Fergie, Mr. and Mrs, G, P,
Simpson, Mrs G. S. Mcintosh, Miss
A Woodland, N. A. Wallinger, Mr,
Evans nnd Mr. Blumenneur,
Leaving for Holiday
Library Now
An Actuality
Formally Opened on Saturday Lait By Mayor
T. M. Roberti
HAS 1300 VOLUMES
To those responsible for the starting of the movement for the establishment of a library in Crunbrook,
the opening cermony at the new library in the post office building, on
Saturday evening last, must have
been n source of gratification. In
response to the announcements in
the press, and the invitations sent
out to the heads of various local organizations in the city, a number of
citizens were present when Chairman Spreull of the library board,
called the meeting to order. In
his opening remarks, he gave a
short sketch of the work that had
been done in bringing the library
to its present stage. Some representative citizens had felt that a library in Cranbrook was desirable,
and after a few meetings had determined to take steps to establish one.
A successful canvass having been
mode for memberships, organization
BUSINESS VS. PLEASURE
(Contributed)
Tuesday afternoon witnessed nn
unusually large gathering of the
members of the .Women's Institute
fur-the-homb of ita pres Went, Mrs.
George Smith, who had with unflagging energy converted her dining
room into a veritable hall, with seating accommodation for the many
members attending, Business occupied the first pnrt of the afternoon,
for although o combination of business nnd pleasure made the occasion
attractive, in no way was the latter
allowed to prdominnte over the former,
A letter wns read from Mr. T.
Menzies. superintendent of Neglected Children. Victoria, for support
and co-operation along this line.
Child welfare always had a prominent place in all Institutes, nnd the
communication therefore received
every consideration.
A motion to raise funds by a bazaar was lost by a big majority, and
it was in turn voted that each member be requested to contribute the
nominal sum of one dollar.
Following the business session, a
demonstration was given by the president on a delicious fruit salad and
new dressing, each guest receiving a
dish of thc luscious delieacy, this,
with tea and other toothsome dainties being dispensed on the lawn,
which with its greensward, roses and
rtthcr flowers left nothing to mar the
surroundings. The lost item on the
program wns a request from the president thnt all rally before her camera for an Institute picture.
This terminated one of the most
enjoyable meetings on record.
PUPILS SUCCESSFUL
IN L. CM. PIANOFORTE
AND VIOLIN EXAMS,
Mr. and Mrs. Q, F. Collins are lea
ving this week-end for St. Mary'i
Lake where they will spend a holiday. I mondson.
i 1
Following are the results of the
London College of Music examinations, held In Crnnbrook, June 18th,
by D. J. Jennings, Esq., T. U. T,
VIOLIN
Mr. Theodore Padberg, passed,
A. L. C. M.
Intermediate Pupils
Roy Llnnell   (honors).        Willie
lence, First Class Certificate, Mary  MacDonald, First  Class Certificate.
Elementary
Allen Patmore   (honors);    David
Weston, First Class Certificate.
Mrs, R. W, Edmondion't Pupils
Pianoforte
Elementary — Mildred Bridges,
and Kathleen Edmondson, First Clnss
Certificates.
Primaries — Lily Matson and
Ruth Lundy, First Class Certificates.
Eugene Ingham, passed.
Certificates will bc presented to
these pupils in the early fall by the
|local representative, Mrs. R. W. Kd-
ponse was gfvfen, with the mult
that at the opening of the library
there were over n thousand books,
counting the three hundred which
had been obtained from thc government library association. So far
all liabilities had heen net from
whatever funds had been obtained
through the memberships, no canvass yet having been made for subscriptions of large amounts, from
those who might be willing, and in
a position to give. Mr. Spreull referred to the kindness of Dr. King
in the exercise of his good offices in
securing for the library the use of
the room in which it was housed.
The nominal rental which they had
to pay meant that the financing of
it would be much easier. It would
need, however, the support of everybody who could possibly give, to
keep the library up to the mark
that the committee had In view.
At the present time one could
not expect a largo number of members, or much enthusiasm with respect to the library, but with the
return of cooler weather more were
expected. To put the library in the
position thnt it was, "much work
had been done. 'Assisting the library board, and to whom he wished
to pay tribute, was a committee of
young ladies under the chairman^
ship of Miss Jean Wilson; these
were the Misses Delia Baxter, Betty Green, Edna Home, Audrey McKowan, Dorothy McKowan, and
Hester Thompson,
In asking Mayor Roberts to open
the library, the directors had
thought it not only, fitting on account of his official position, but also on account of his willingness at
ull times to assist in an endeavor that
might be of a public benifit.
After expressing his pleasure at
being present at the opening of the
library, his worship said that he anticipated that the library would be
a great benifit to the city. To his
mind it was but another sign of the
awakening of better community spirit in the town. He congratulated
the directors on the work that they
had accomplished, as was evident
from the well filled shelves, and bespoke for the new venture the hearty
support of the citizens. He would
be pleased to do anything possible in
his official position, or in a private
capacity to assist. Likening his position to that of one launching a
ship, he said that he took much pleasure in wishing the good ship "Lib-
rnry" and its officers bon voyage,
and declared the library open.
At the request of the Chairman,
his worship then took the first book
from the library.
Mr. Allan Graham, president of
the Rotary club, on being asked to
speak, made some very timely remarks with respect to the attitude of
the average citizen in regard to
movements such as the one which
was just being started. In urging a
fuller support than that which had
been given similar undertakings in
the past, he stated that he regretted
that the community spirit to which
his worship the mayor had referred
could be a whole;lot healthier without doing any harm. No matter
whether the reason assigned for the
failure of previous undertakings such
ns this were correct or not, he was
sure that It wns starved for want of
public support. No community was
more apathetic than Cranbrook,
There was too much of the "let
George do it" spirit. As a remedy
he suggested that all take the matter seriously into consideration, and
at all times talk library. Tell your
friends about it, have them come up
to see it, and if this is done he bad
ENJOYABLE DANCE
MARKS RE-OPENING
OF K. OF P. HALL
Friday, July 3rd, will go down as
another red-letter day in the history
of the local order of Knights of Pythias, for on that day the merry
knights fittingly celebrated the reopening of their hall, improved as
it had been with the addition of what
they called a kitchen, but more correctly termed a banquet hall and
kitchenette. Despite the fact that
the day had been a hot one, those
who had previously experienced the
hospitality of the knights and their
ladies could not possibly refrain
from taking part in the big affair.
The result was that a good crowd
was on hand to participate in a very
pleasing evening.
About ten o'clock the floors were
cleared and the dance was on, Robinson's orchestra dispensing the music, which from start to finish was
much appreciated by those present.
A pleasing inovation was the refreshment booths, operated by a
number of the ladies. This proved
very attractive and might be well
copied at other functions of its kind.
Soda water of a well known brand
and ice cream cones were for sale.
At about twelve the supper was announced, and guests to the number of seventy-four were asked to
take their places at the first sitting
in the beautiful new hall which had j
been built at the rear of the present,
platform in the larger auditorium.
After expressing their admiration of
tbe new hall, the guests could not
resist partaking of the many
tempting dishes that they found before them on the prettily laid tables.
Mere words seem hopelessly inadequate to do justice to the feast thnt
the Pythian sisters had prepared for
their brother knights and their
guests.
RETIRES AFTER SERVICE
OF FORTY SIX YEARS
ON RAILROAD
Conductor J. B. Hall, who has been
a passenger conductor on the Crow
line for the past twenty years, and
who went on the superannuated list
at the first of July, was pleasantly
surprised at Sirdar recently when he
was presented with a handsome pipe,
the gift of a number of Sirdar and
train crew friends. Doc. Williams,
mail clerk on the Halt train, made
the presentation speech, and his remarks were ably supplemented by
others of the train crew. Proceedings were enlivened by a number of
piano selections by Mrs. Dennes and
other similar features, the affair being much enjoyed by all. Conductor Hall has just completed 46 years
of railroading, and stands very high
with the company, its employees and
the general public, and his smile and
kindly greetings for all and sundry
will certainly be missed.
MRS. ROSA COE
With feelings of deepest regret,
residents of Kingsgate, Eastport, and
many in Cranbrook and elsewhere,
learned of the death at Kingsgate on
Friday morning last of Rosa Eaton,
beloved wife of Mr, Percy Coe, the
Customs officer at Kingsgate, The
late Mrs. Coe had been a resident of
Kingsgate for the past thirteen years
and her kindly disposition had endeared her to all with whom she became acquainted. Being one who
took pleasure in helping others, her
passing is mourned by a large circle
of friends.
The late Mrs. Coe, whose maiden
name was Rosa Eaton Kightly, was
born fifty-two years ago at Bourne-
moouh, Hants,, England, where twenty-three years ago, her marriage
took place. Coming to this country.
Mr. and Mrs. Coe settled in the East
Kootenay, Mr. Coe being then with
the freight department of the C, P,
R„ For the last thriteen years the
family home hus been at Kingsgate.
Their only daughter, then seventeen
years of age, passed away about six
years ago at Kingsgate,
About a year ago the lnte Mrs. Coe
showed symptoms of kidney disease,
and steps were taken to get rid of the
trouble. Six months ago specialist
medical aid was sought in Vancouver, and much benefit resulted. She
returned to Kingsgate, but recently
a relapse took place from which the
patient suffered much, and death finally brought relief.
In his sad bereavement, the sympathy of a large number of friends '
goes out to Mr. Coe, who with a '  '
ther of the  deceased  at  Bos'
near Bournemouth, are left tt    confruU
the passing of a loving wife ana fa?"1
fectionate sister.
On Monday morning in this city
the funeral took plnce from the
Presbyterian Church, where Rev, M.
S. Blackburn delivered the funeral
address, which was marked by a
depth of feeling and sympathy. A
large number of friends from Kings-
gate, Eastport, Cranbrook and other
points were present, and followed
the remains to their last resting
place     here. The   pall   bearers
were Messrs. W. F. Attridge, Lester
Clapp, J. P. Fink. H. Linnell, C. J
Little and W. E. Worden.
no doubts that it would flourish.
As president of tho Womens' Institute, Mrs. Geo. Smith wished the
library every success and stated that
she would have pleasure in taking
the matter up in the institute at its
next meeting, and that she was confident that if there was any way In
which they might be of assistance
it would be authorised.
For the Gyros, Pres. R. J. Collins
offered the support of that club.
In doing so, he said he was forced to
agree with the remarks of the president of the Rotarians with respect
to the lack of appreciation that existed in the city for matters of this
kind. He felt that tha right chord
had been struck by Mr, Graham in
that a personal interest should be taken fn affairs of this kind, and if
this were done there would be no
question as to its success.
Major H, B. Hicks was pleased to
see the progress that the library committee had made, and speaking for
the G. W. V. A. said they could count
on them, not only for their moral,
but their financial support also. He
could see no reason why It should not
grow to many times its present size,
with the fine start that this library
had got, and with the continued cooperation of the citizens, he was sure
of its success.
As representative of the Board of
Trade, Mr. W, H. Wilson said he was
delighted to be present to see the
hopes and dreams of a few public
spirited citizens realized. With the
small overhead expense, he was sure
that with the assistance of the citizens not financially alone, the library would see many years of usefulness. In concluding, he considered that the thanks of the citizens were due Dr. King for his good
will, as evidenced in his securing for
them the room for the library at n
mere nominal rental. On motion of
Mr. Wilson seconded by Major Hicks,
Mr, J. G, Cummings was asked
to convey the thanks of the association to Dr. King.
Following the addresses, Miss
Rumsey, the librarian, had a busy
time giving out books to the members present.
WWUVWv^W^WvV
OBITUARY
SUNDAY'S GAMES PUT
KIMBERLEY AT HEAD
OF BASEBALL LEAGUE
Wycliffe and Lumberton Are
Tied for Second Place;
Complete Schedule
Conservatives
to Nominate
Convention Wednesday Will
Name Federal
Candidate
WILL BE 60~DELEGATES
The Conservatives of East Kootenay are taking a bit,' Btep In preparedness for the federal general
elections, thought to be impending by those who feel themselves
competent to interpret the portents
in political skies just now. On Wednesday next the Conservatives of the
federal riding, from the districts of
Fernie, Cranbrook and Columbia will
meet ot the K, P. Hall to nominate
the candidate who will contest tin-
riding in their interests when the
lection is called.
The gathering will take plnce in
the afternoon at the K. P, Hall, when
sixty delegates from all parts ,,f the
riding will be present in person or
by proxy. There will bo twenty
delegates from each of the three provincial ridings.
Mr. Chlsholm, of Windermere,
who wns the Conservative candidate
the last provincial election for
Columbia riding, will preside nl tin-
convention, as the president of the
Conservative Association for tho
riding, and Mr. Sherwood Herchmer,
of Fernie,   will   net   as   secretary.
Delegated   	
f»-; ^une fi 	
June 7        ^^^^^^^^
June 8   TH        88
June 9     00        :ls
June 10   r>£
Jj"**1..-  Gte'd   at
present, there will te two mimes
come up before the nominating convention. One will be Dr, J. W.
Rutledge, of this city, and well
known in all parts of the district,
and an active worker in political
circles' for the past fifteen years or
more in this section. There is no
doubt that many delegates will go
to the convention prepared to support Dr. Rutledge'? name to the utmost.
Another name which it is also expected will come up before the delegates is that of Major H, B. Hicks,
also of this city. 'As president of
the Ioce! G.W.V.A.. pn*1 afon until
recently, the district water rights
engineer. Major Hick? ir well known,
and it seems a foregone conclusion
at this time that the nomination will
lay between these two.
The question as to the possible
Liberal candidate is not exercising
the Conservatives a great deal, the
feeling being that their organisation
|svill be prepared to give anyone who
will run in the government interests
a hard contest. But there is a feeling growing stronger every day that
when the time comes for a Liberal
candidate to enter the field, it will
be found necessary to transfer tho
mantle of Dr. King to the shoulders
of another. It is known that any
one of the Coast ridings would bo
glad of the opportunity to give their
l'J
■'im-.l
04
■12
(14
43
Sunday last the second last series
of games in the Selkirk baseball j
league was played. Cranbrook went
to Wardner, where they defeated
that town's ball team by 14 to 11,
while Lumberton took the Wycliffe
team into camp at Lumberton, taking the long end of a 2 to 1 score.
Kimberley defeated the Concentrator, which, with Wycliffe losing to
Lumberton,    gave    Kimberley    first
place in the league, and assured them 'nomination to Dr. King, and it seem:
of the cup. Next Sunday Kimberley questionable whether it would be
plays at Lumberton, while Wardner good policy from the government's
meets Wycliffe at Wycliffe, standpoint to allow Dr. King to run
Wednesday evening Cranbrook's again in this riding, where the op-
baseball team played its last schedul-'portunitie? for public works developed game in the Selkirk baseball lea-1 ment arc so meagre. This follows
gue, the game was to have been the suggestion, unofficial it Is true,
played next Sunday, but in order made by the late Ii, B. Beattie dur-
to accomodate the Concentrator, theiing his last visit to the city, shortly
Cranbrook team journeyed to the before his death. There Is another
mill town and played the game. The'suggestion made, that Dr. King mny
game was won by the Concentrator, be given one of the vacant senator-
4 to 2 being the score. Bamford "hips that will have to bo filled
and Logan did the hurling for Cran- shortly. Who may succeed Dr. King
brook, while Bamford and Lewis lis pure conjecture, but two names
caught. The result of the game. being mentioned as possibilities unmakes Cranbrook record an even Mr. A. I. Fisher, Fornlo barrister,
break, they having won five and lost'and Mr. J. A. Buckham, of Golden,
five, and gives the Concentrator, in,who would hnve to resign the spea-
its last game of the series,, its first kership of the provincial house wora
win, having previously lost nine gam- he to consider seriously accepting
es in a string. the nomination.
It is not unlikely that there will
be a third candidate nominated, to
represent the labor vote in the constituency, though it is known that
the Fernie end of the riding does
not fnvor such a course being taken.
FIRST DEMONSTRATION
IN STOCK JUDGING
HELD LAST FRIDAY
Junior Live Stock Judging work
is off to a good start again this year,
Thc first demonstration was held at
Mr. Austin's farm on Friday last,
when thirteen boys nnd girls took
part. Quite a fow entered for the
first time this yenr, and in view of
the fact that thore are good local
prizes offered at the Fall Fair, there
is an added interest taken in the
work by nil those taking part.
Survey Crewi Out at Work
Messrs. DeWolf & Ham nre this
week puting out two survey parties
Into the section of country lying between Wasa and Kimberley, the intention being to redefine mineral lo-
rations, Mr. B. A. Moorhouse also
hus a survey party engnged in similar work in the valley of the Bt. Mary's.
Sho
For  Rcent  Bride
Tuesday evening n pleasant function took place at the home of Miss
Ermi McNeill, when Mrs. F. Briggs
was the recipient of a miscellaneous
shower. Many of the friends of Mrs.
Briggs, who was formerly Miss Len-
ora Finlay, wore in attendance,
and wished her bon voyage. Little
Miss Bernice Sullivan mnde nn efficient shower mniden, wheeling in
the stand with the many useful articles contributed by the bride's
many friends. A jolly time was had,
and after refreshments were served
little dance wns held. The room
was made most attractive with decorations of pink nnd while, streamers
of those colors giving a most pleasing effect. PAGE   E I (i H T
THK   eUlKIBUOK   I1UU
Thursday, July 2nd, 192S
****************************
****************
The Fountain of Youth
;; in the case of Jewelry — is the GIF I SI!()l' Workshop.
Here out-of-date designs, things t <>.. old fashioned for you to
wear, are made new and charming again.
Designs and estimates are furnished free of charge, and effic-
;;   ient operation makes the cost of remodelling very reasonable
indeed.
THF  fIFT  SHOP	
A. EARLE LEIGH, JEWELLER   norbury avenue
-^^•h. .*.-->•* .>..K,*-*i,,i'•!•■<••;••>•:■ ♦***-:-****-X'*****;--*:'-X' •:-t',>,i'**'
GUARANTEED TIRES & TUBES
IIU x :i 1-2, heavy fabric ..........   $7.50
30 x 11 1-2, heavy cord   $8.00
30 x 3 1-2, heavy lubes   $1.80
Why semi uuL of town for tire* anil
tubes. - -Wilson's Vulcanising Works,
Cranbrook, 13H
Willi everything completed for its
opening, tlie public ure invited to be
present nt the Library Kuuni in the
Fust Office cm Saturday ovenlng next
ut 8 p.m., when Mayor Roberta hus
kindly consented to be present and
declare tho new institution tormnlly
opened. At :i meeting of the librury
committee last week Jliss Rumaoy j of I
wus appointed lil
For sales ami service Nash and Star
■ai*s.   See Ratcliffe & Stewurt.   33tf
Sunduy lasl Green Bay was the
.i*i.ni* of "in- "I' On- largest picnics
lhat has ever been hold al this popular resort. Tho occasion was tiie
flrsl annual picnic of tin- Scandinavian Brotherhood of Knst Kootenay,
ami representatives of these countries, wlm Imvo I n such a factor In
the development of tho Enst Kunte,-
imy, wen- presenl from all over the
district, from Sinlar to Crows Nest.
I**,*,,,„ early morning to late at night
ihe road ivns rilled «itli ears, most
bedeckeil with streamers, go-
imlng fi i tho picnic, win
,*U.S    l,|.|..,n.i.  ii     ui.... i. ■■-■
+t+<.<.....:..K..H,.;..:..:..:..;..:..:..K..:.*.M..|..:. 'the huge crowd had tl.,- times nf their
* hives.     A tug-of-wnr mid othor gnni-
-p,    , || | es, tbe best of-cals and drinks, made
Fairmont not *'" ns u11 u,ni '"° ci™ml-
Springs
| j   A Popular    Ri-sorl   with many |
natural    attractions,    75 miles ...
from   Crauhrook on   the  motor ...
higliwDy to Banff 3,
MAGNIFICENT SCENERY X
Warm Radium Baths
tl
*
*      SPECIALi — Tungsten lamps, 10,
ti -i!i, -10, T'O anil Ull watts; 2.1 e eueh.
jj; I at — W. !•'. DORAN'S.
Our Low Prices win every time
(ffffffffffffff.:
I      STOP!
J CANAL FLATS
Open Air    Swimming Tank |IJ ]yjea|s g|1j |j J,t ^hes
with individual Dressing     •:• »
I!   Koiiins    also Curative itaths .-.
;: FULLY EQUIPPED *
TENTS FOR CAMI'INO •:•
RESTAURANT & ROOMS *
OASOLING, Oil. AINIt .   •;•
QENERAL STORE        $
--- Cli;»rt;t-s Moderate — .*.
RADIUM   -   -   - B.C. I
**************************
Served
Just a nice run frnm Cranbrouk
Finffil Fishing & Hunting in
|li(. runt.try  right here
\ |li,. rounlry  righ)
J  Gasoline, Oil, (iroceries and
Oilier Provisions for Ihe
Motorist
A. H. McKINLEY
fffffffff.
**********
When in Kimberley-
looking around, drop into the old |
INTERNATIONAL CLUB*
and at sitclil ynu know you will lie treated right.
There you will find
First Class Bowling Alleys
Soft Drinks and Confections
Up-to-date Cigar Stand
;  Prizes are being offered, consisting of $20.00 in Gold,
for the highest score in three straight games of
Five Pins or Ten Pins
'.'•      WAKI-. UP, CRANBROOK, ANII SHOW VOUR STUFF!
—Cume Along, and Try Your I ink
THE TWO PETES      .---      Managers
t****************************************************
Liquidation Stock
Sale
We have bought the balance ol the stock of the
late Noble Foundation, Ltd., Store, Nobleford, Alta.,
at a very low price on the dollar. We can and will
give high class merchandise at prices never heard of
before. Although we are overcrowded with goods,
the temptation of high class merchandise at such low
prices made us buy this stock. In the next Fifteen
Days it will pay you to visit the store every day during
this sale, as we are unpacking goods ns soon as room
is made.
I7
MAPj
LOCAL
'PEMNGS
Store Closed All Day Thursday
SALE OPENS
FRIDAY, JULY 3rd
at 9.00 a.m.
B. Weston's Store
Baker St. The Store That Sells For Leu
Insure with Beale & Elwell.
Luwn Social at St. Mary's Rectory
Thursday, July ltith, followed by u
dance at the K. P. Hull. Be on hand
to share in the usual good time at
this function. 19-21
For prompt repairs and satisfaction go to Rutcliffe & Stewart's garage. 20tf
On Priday night, at 8 o'clock,
thore will be a welcome meeting In
the Salvation Army Hall for the new
olllcers of the Cranbrook Corps,
Lieut, K. Baker has been promoted
to captaincy, and is going to Rossland to take charge ol' the Corps
there.
Special prices on now Eateries at
Service Garage.    Phone 34 >        ltf
Mrs. J. II. Jordan and family left
on Wednesday of this week for Vancouver, where iu future the family
will reside, Mr. Jordan and liis son
having preceded them a few weeks
ago. Mr. and Mrs, Jordan have been
residents of the city for over fifteen
years.
Mr. A. A. MacKinnon left Friday
evening last for Toronto, where ho
Will meet Mrs. MacKinnon and proceed with her to Montreal, where Ihey
will take the boat for Glasgow, on n
two months' visit to the Old Country. During their stay they will visit the Wembley exhibition.
For first class automobile repairs
see Ratcliffe & Stewart. 3Btf
Following the closing of school on
Friday last there was an exodus of
school teachers from the city to their
homes, or to other places whore they
planned to spend their holidays, Sn-
urday, Sunday and Monday also saw
n large number of families leave for
various points, a number going lo
Kaslo and other lake points.
W« C&A7 * full lint of Ilea's Worn-
en's tnd Uliiu' Show.
W. r. DORAN.
Our low prices win mry ttnfc
The regular monthly meeting of
the Womens' Institute will be held
on the lawn at the home of the Pres.,
Mrs. G. Smith, on Tuesday, July 7th,
ut il o'clock. A demonstration on
"Fruit Salad and Dressings" will be
given, and afternoon tea will be
served. The executive would like to
see a good number of members
present.
In the sport chronology, the year
nineteen twenty-five can justly In1
culled revival year, so far as ("ranbrook is concerned. What with the
good, old game of lacrosse apparently u permanent fixture, and the opening of the Great War Veterans'
lawn bowling green on Friday last,
there is nothing left but cricket tt
be brought again into bing to ninki
the list of new old games complete.
Now that the schools hnve closed
we can naturally look for a heavy
increase in tourist traffic aud iu its
wake the starting of fires and accidents. With u few hot days such
as we suffered lust week, il will md
be long before the whole district
will be dried up, and the match
thrown by the many careless Individuals who pass through the forests
will soon find u resting place wliich
will put the whole district iu danger.
Thursday .evening n bee is lo be
hold ut the new city park, to whicli
everyone is usked to go. An axe, or
u ruke or suw will admit anyone to
the grounds that evening. Come along und do your bit to make this tlie
finest purk in the country. Baker
Park is beautiful in itself, and all
thut is required is a little pruning of
the trees, and clearing the fallen
trees away. Comparatively few
people have ever seen the park, but
those who have are loud iu thii' praises of it. The new bridge at tlu1
ntrance is now complete, and the city men are hard at work gelling Ihe
tourist part of the big estale Into
shape for the many visitors expected
here tins mimmer. Be on hand th*
Thursdny evening.
Mrs. ll. [,. Harrison and son Cyril
are visitors al Fort Steele just now,
at the home of Mrs. Richardson, at
Westport.
Mrs. F. W. Green and family left
on Sunday for iheir summer home ut
Mirror Luke, Kaslo, where they will
spend the holiday season.
Keep Thursday, July Kith open—
it's the date of the Lawn Sociul at
St. Mary's Rectory, at 8 p.m., to
be followed by a dance at the K. P.
Hall, from 10 to 1. 19-21
Mr. und Mrs. il E. Jecks, of Ha-
lldoue, left on Wednesday of this
(ok liy car, to spend a two weeks
holiday ut the home of their sou iu
Lethbrldgo.
C. Godderis who has been a pat-
nl  at  lhe hospital for the lnst Iwo
oeks or so, is leaving this week to
return  to  his home,  having made a
good recovery from his recent opera-
lion.
Additional work is being done on
tlu- road from the Mission lo Wy-
elill'e, oil tho rise up from Ihe St.
Mary's river I" lhe prairie. Tho
bridges which have beon iu use over
Ihe draws in the hillside are gradually heing replaced with fills ami
culverts on lhal particular piece of
road.
Mrs. N. E. Ryckman left on Tuesday of this week for Spokane, whence
she leaves for Yellowstone Park,
where she will spend about a week
before leaving for Los Angles and
other California points. She will conclude a pleasant holiday by a visit to
Victoria.
A mooting of the Women's Con
sorvativo Study Club is to be held
on Thursday evening at the homo of
Mrs J. H. Meighen, when the ladies'
association will elect its delegates to
act at the nominating convention for
tlie East Kootenay federal riding, in
anticipation of on election which may
he. held shortly.
Mrs. T. A. Wallace and family left
on Thursdny of last week for the
east, und will be away about ten
weeks, enjoying a vacation on a farm
near Toronto, wliich is owned hy a
brothe,. nf Mr. Wallace. Mrs. Richards, Mrs. Wallace's mother, who
has boon staying here, has left for
Couer D'Alene, on a visit with relatives there,
The Labor meeting advertised for
Friday night last, to be addressed by
Mr. A. E. Smith, of Toronto, did not
materialize, owing to the meagre attendance. Mr. Smith has been
a speaking (our of the west, and
stafed to lie a speaker of no mean
order. He was formerly a Method
ist minister, lieing a pastor at Nel
son in the early days.
Miss F. E. Magee-is spending a
few days with Miss A. Woodland lie-
fore returning about the end of the
week lo her home in Saskatchewan
where she will spend the holiday. In
leaving Cranbrook at this time Miss
Magee severs a connection with tho
public and high school staffs extending over a mTmhi>r of years, during
which she has made some warm
friendships.
A. IO. Leigh, the jeweller, reports
having had a good many unusual jobs
to handle in his business, bul is now
up against something he does not
like lo put his hands on. It is noth-
thing less than a swarm of bees
which lias settled in his backyard.
Whnt to do with them is something
af a problem, and the advice of an
,'xpert apiarist will be sought in or-
ilor to dispose of the swarm of uninvited guests.
The baseball team of Ihe Wind
mere Indian Reserve paid Cranlironk
u visit Friday evening lasl, when
they met a tenm of ball players of
this city. As the game was not advertised, there, wore but few spectators when the game was called. While
the visitors lost to tho home team,
they put up a good gnme, and witli a
few weak spots strengthened, could
give a good account of themselves.
The game opened with the Indians
getting two, followed by three from
Crunbrook in their half of the first.
From this on the home team were iu
(lie lead, the final score being eleven
to five. Mortimer held down the heaving end for Cranbrook, ami with
pretty fair support, he had little difficulty in holding the visitors down.
The good nntured banter between Uie
('ranbrook men antl Dominic, the Indian catcher, kept the crowd in roars
of laughter throughout the game.
The visiting pitcher had a nice col- mny hav
lection of eurvrs, it wan noticed,     the error.
The result of the Nova Scotia elections held on Thursday lust proved
onsldcrablc shock to the ensteru-
in this district, who were aware
the  Libera] regime, and how its
long record    under    four premiers
stretched back Into the obscurity of
■or forty years ago.      Forty Con-
rvalives   were   elected,     including
e who had formerly been known as
labor member, but who this time
n under the Conservative banner.
Tho other throe seals were captured
by tho government, two of them lieing in Anligonlsh.
Septimus Hurmmd, of Calgary, a
woll known master printer in the Al-,
berta city, was a visitor by motor to
Cranbrook and Kimberley this week,
aud wont ou to the border to meet
some friends who were touring
through from Los Angeles. Mr. Bur-
nand was a short time ago attracted
to Kimlierley as a possible field for
a new printing venture in which he
intended to interest himself at that
time, bin agreed on looking over the
field now thai the situation was being handled adequately by the office established there already.
f i m ^■**ms***sm0*Mmm* osw* » ^-^r^^-.^-^r^^-^r^^>>>x^i-^>-^^-%j->^vjn-rx-r
FURNITURE
^^^
Judging by information that we
believe to be reliable, we think that
you will fine in this Store one of she
largest and best assorted slocks of dependable Furniture to be found in the
west. Not long ago we quoted prices
to a party who bad been in Tornto,
Winnipeg and Calgary, and we were
told lhat our prices were the tame ai
Toronto, fifty dollars lest than Winnipeg, and a hundred under Calgary.    We
got the order for over $700.00, and this party paid ns spot cash, so was under
no obligation to "blow us up."
We have no objection, in fact we welcome,  anyone to come   along and
bring their catalogue and compare Quality and Prices.       Eastern prices look
fine on paper, but when you add 35 per cent, to the cosl for freight, they look
different.
You want to buy as
cheaply as possible, and we
want to sell at a profit, but
all that we can reasonably
ask is that you give us the
same chance as   Tim,  orj
Bob, or Jerry or David. We
are willing to give them a
little the best of it — we don't want your money till you get tbe goods, they do.
Just come along and let us prove to you that we do carry Good Furniture, and can sell you that order for the new home just ns cheaply as anyone
anywhere.
i
**************************
I    WEDDINGS    1
++++++*+♦♦♦♦♦♦
BRIGGS — FINLEY
Saturday evening, June 21!, a wedding of much interest to Cranbrook
people was solemnized at the United
Church Parsonage, when Mr. Frederick Harry briggs aad Miss Margaret Lenorn Finley. wore united in marriage Mr. Archie L. Finley, brother of the    bride,    supported tho
groom, while the bride's •ister,    Mri.
W. Wilson, wus matron of honor. Rev
B. C. Freeman officiated.
WANT ADS.
J. E. Beat.»u is making a good re
covery from his recent stroke, aud
wus last week-end able to enjoy a
cur ride for a short distance. He
is recovering the use of his side in
quite a satisfactory way, his friends
are glud to learn.
NOTICE
KEY CITY LODGE, I. O. O. F.
On Monduy evening next, July 0,
a joint installation meeting will be
held with Sullivan Lodge, Kimberley. This will be followed by a sociul session, and a lurge attndance
of brethren is requested, Sojourning members ulso invited to attend.
Lodge opens nt 8.IIU p.m.
E, 0, DINGLEY,
19 Recording See.
.♦. —
NOTICI
STRAYED—to my cuhin on Kinluy
Creek, un nged chestnut liorso,
white socks behind, uml white
blaze on face. Branded lefl hip.
Owner may huve same by paying
charges.  It. A. Ballentlne.    IP-'Jn
64 SHEEP FOR SALE. — Flock
young grude ewes, IiiiiiIis, Oxford
ram.    E. Jolly, Golden, B.C, /
18-2(1
WANTED. — Experienced girl for
housework in the country. War
es $85.00 per month, Apply Mrs.
R. Gladwyn Newton, lnvermere,
B.C. is.-JO
FOR SALE — 5 passenger touring
car,  six  cylinder, Nash,  in  good
I condition, five good tires. Apply
lo llenlc St Elwell or Ratcliffe *
Stewart. 4tf
WANTED—Girl for office help. Stenography and bookkeeping. State
particulars of experience and sal-
nry expected, by letter, or call at
Herald olllce, a-10
V1CTROLA AND RECORDS
Tlirco Dining Room Suite.
Sideboard. • . Dresser.
Upholstered Chair.
Electric Fan Sewing Machine.
Cook  Stove.  .  Beds
nod Other (ioods Too Numerals* ta
Mention
WILLIAM THOMPSON
Plione 76 p. o. Bai 131
Sei ond Head D.at.r.
Craakrwk
Till-
COLUMBIA GRAF0N0LA
Made-in-Canada
Mri. Ediar Worth, wat Annie Banks.
My wife, having left my hed und
hoard, 1 will not he responsible for
nny dehts incurred hy her nfter this
date.
Fernie. B.C.. June 2Gth, 11)25.
EDGAlR WORTH.
wwwwwvww^wwww.
With regard to nn nnnouncement
last week that committees of the various service clubs of the city were
lonsldcring the staging of u carnival on August 7th, it is now stated
lhat Seplemher 7th Is the correct
date, the occasion of the Fall fair,
and not the Childrens' Day, which
August fith, the date when the
Kiks lodge are going to hold the biggest childrens' day thut has yet been
put on in these parts. It is hoped
this will correct any impressions that
been made on account of
RYLEY
DINING ROOM
and BAKERY
KlMBBRLBY • B.C.
COMMBKCIAI. MEN
APPRECIATE
HOME COOKINd
WHEN AWAY FROM
HOME
All White Help
■fffffff.Vfffffffffffffffff
DO YOU
REAUZE-
That When
You Buy A
GRAMA*
PHONE
Other Than
Canadian
Made
One-Third ol
the Price x-nes
for Duly?
When you buy
Canadian-made
goods you nave
that much.
HENCE THE
LOW PRICE
ON THIS
.. MACHINE
MODEL X   •   Price $85
— POR SALE AT —
$2 00 DOWN
Puli One of
These
Machinei
in your home.
Balance Leu
than
$2 A WEEK
l:lve Record!
FREE with
Each Machine.
Many exclusive
Features
ASK FOR A
FREE TRIAL
Patey Bros.' Music House
CRANBROOK. B.C..' THE CRANBROOK HERALD
VOLUME
1
27
CRANBROOK, B.C., THURSDAY, JULY 9th, 1925
N I Al B K R     2 0
PKOB1NC1AL
LIBRARY
Apr. l-l'**
Computed B.C's.lVLiicidi Traduction Will Soon Reach Billion
CONSERVATIVES NAME
DELEGATES TO NOM
INATING CONVENTION
Fort Steele Mining Division Retains Production and Value Record Above All Other Mining Sections
Hritish Oolumhin is rapidly approaching the billion-dollar mark in
mineral production. This Is shown
'by John D. Galloway's first, report ns
provincial mineralogist of Hritish Columbia, as submitted to the lieutenant governor hy the minister of
mines, the lion. William Sloan. It
bus just come from the printer, boor-
Ins the date of March fi,  1925,
Mr. Galloway has succeeded W.
Fleet Robertson as provincial mineralogist. He formerly was assistant
niinerahiKist nnd later resident kov
eminent engineer for the Northeastern district, at Hnzolton. VV. Fleet
Robertson waa provincial minora
agist for 27 years.
The report shows 8(> shipping
mines in the province during 1924,
of wliich !!7 shipped more than 100
tons of ore. These mines employ 'A,-
Kfi'l men, 2,2Gfi being underground
workers and 1,581) above thc surface,
In addition to the shipping mines
there were 20 working mines and 04
idle, a total of 90 not on the shipping
list. These mines employed 179 men
—88 underground and 91 above.
Gross value of mineral production
was $48,704,604, an Increase of $7,-
400,284, or 18 per cent over the preceding year. This is the greatest
mineral production in the history of
the province, the previous record being that of 1918, a war year, when
thc figure was $42,290,402.
Metalliferous production—that is,
gold, silver, copper, lead and zinc—
amounted to $35,958,997, an increase over the preceding year of
$10,191,935, or 39.0 per cent.
Dividends of record are given ns
$2,890,174, and this note is added:
"Profits accruing to private companies and individual mining enterprises ns a rule are not given publicity
as dividends, as is the case with the
large companies, so that no record of
these profits, which in the aggregate
are considerable, is available."
The gain in reported dividends is
nearly $90,000. The companies reporting are: Premier Gold Mining
Co. Ltd., $1,715,000; Consolidated
Mining & Smelting Co., $(Ml,04:i;
Howe Sound Copper Co., $198,416;
Silversmith   Mines,   Ltd.,    $175,000;
I
Wallace Mountain Mines Ltd., $59,-
400; I. X. L. (Trail Creek), $50,000;
Boll (Greenwood), $48,00(1; Apex
(Slocan), $1,834; Mountain Chief
(Slocan), $1,482.
Fort Steele mining division, in
Mas! Kootenny, leads the province's
production records, both In tonnage
and values, with |,038J714 tons and
$17,415,802 as the 1924 mark. This
is the third consecutive year in which
Fort Steele division has led the province, tiie immense production at the
Consolidated^ Sullivan mine, at Kimberley, being responsible.
Nass River division (which includes Alice Arm nud Anyox) held
the leadership in 1921, but was in
third place the next year, both Fort
Steele and Portland Canal forging
ahead. Since then Nass River has
led Portland Canal by a narrow margin.
Fourth place goes to the Vancouver-New Westminster division, which
includes Howe Sound.
Tonnage from Portland Cnnal is
comparatively light, as the chief mineral here is gold, more than half the
gold production of the proivince being from this division,
Vancouver Island virtually dropped out of the production lists in
1924, being credited with only $500,
all placer gold, as against $163,304
in 1923.
Figures showing the total production of the province are given as follows:
Placer gold, since 1857, $77,382,-
953.
Lode gold, since 1892, $118,473,-
190.
Silver, since 1880, $G8,824,679.
Copper, since 1893, $187,489,378.
Lend, since 1880, $70,548,578.
Zinc, since  1908, $32,171,741.
Coal, since 1835, $235,732,743.
The aggregate production of all
mineral products, metal, coal, earths
and miscellaneous deposits, for all
years to and including 1924, is given
OS $859,427,386.
At the present rate of operating
British Columbia will pass the oil-
1 Ion-dollar mark in mineral production in less than three years.
On Friday evening last, the Cranbrook Men's Conservative Association met at the K. P, Hall to elect
their delegation to the convention
which is to be held in this city on
Wednesday next, when a Conservative candidate for the federal riding
of East Kootenay will be chosen.
There ure to be sixty delegates in
all, twenty each from Cranbrook,
Fernie and Columbia ridings, and of
the twenty from this district the city
Men's association elected five, and
thc ladies' organization four.
A. J. Balment, president of the
association, was in the chair, II.
W. Herchmer acted as secretary, and
there was a good attendance of the
active members of the association
present.
After ballotting had taken place
for the five delegates to be elected,
the scrutineers announced the following as having received the highest
number of votes, and thus become
the delegates: H, W. Herchmer, W.
Stewart, F. H. Dezall, Simon Taylor,
W. F. Attridge. Alternates were announced as follows, heing the next
highest on the ballotting: W. F. Cnmeron, J. A. Arnold, Dr. W. A Fergie, S. Malcolm, A. C. Bowness. Proxies ore to be arranged through the
secretary, and no delegate can hold
more than two proxies.
the chairman called upon a number
of those present for short speeches,
and all spoke optimistically of the
outcome at the geueral election when
It is called, while emphasizing the
need for cohesion and hard work for
the party. Among those who spoke
at this time were N. A. Wallinger,
M. F. P., A. C. Bowness, Dr. J. W.
Rutledge, Major H. B. Hicks, W, F.
Cameron, W. F. Attridge, nnd J. T.
Sarvis. fr
KEY CITY AND SULLIVAN
LODGES HOLD JOINT
INSTALLATION MONDAY
The joint Installation of officers
of Sullivan Lodge, No. 36, I.O.O.P:,
nml Key City Lodge, Nm 42, wns
conducted nt the Auditorium on
.Monday night, by Bro. W. 11. (iilniy.
I). 1). O. M., assisted by Pro. II An
drews, P.Ot, as It. 1). C. Marshall,
mot the following officers: Bro. \v.
s. Greene, P.O., a. 1). I). Grand Treasurer) Bro. S. Fyles, P.O., ns D. D.
drand Chaplain; Bro. T. A. Wallace,
P.O., as II. 1). Orand Herald, Bro. \V.
s! Johnston. P.O., as ll. ll. Grand
See.; and Bro. It. Burch, I'll., as I).
I). Orand Warden,
Tho officers installed  were us  foi-
FINALS PLAYED OFF
IN TENNIS TOURNAMENT OF LOCAL CLUB
llro.
Bro.
Bro:
Bro.
Bro,
Hi,,
llio.
Bro.
llio
III,,
Bro
Iln,
llro
Bio.
Bro.
llro.
llro.
Bra.
Bro,
Bro.
Bro.
Bro,
Bro
Bro. I)
llro. I-:
Key City Lodge
V. A, Williams     N.(i.
A. Kemball -  V.O.
W: Hull Warden
1-'. Doodson Conductor
II. S. Brown Chaplain
C, M. Wallace B.S.S.
Randall, I'll L, s. s.
Soden, IMI II. S. N. O.
,1. Ulgh L.S.N.d.
Bamford B.8, V',0.
Bowley    .    ,      .     L.S.V.C.
Slowly       LO,
P. Moffatt, I'- tl-        <>• <i.
Sullivan Lodge
1-'.  Willis    N.(l.
K.  Dickenson   V,Q.
A. A. Watklns   .   . Roc. See.
W. J. Carter   Fin: See:
.1. K. Walker Treas.
Saturday last was an outstanding
day at tho courts of the Crauhrook
Lawn Tennis Club, when the finals
in most of the events in their annual
loeal tournament were played off.
There were some exceptionally close
games, and the finalists without exception proved themselves tennis
players of merit.
The events played off resulted as
follows:
.Men's Singles—G. P. Simpson
heat Dr. W. A. Fergie 2-0, (1-4, R-ti.
Mixed Doubles—Mr, ond Mrs.
Simpson heat .Mrs. Mcintosh and Mr.
Kvans 7-6, 4-0, tl-7.
Ladies' Doubles—Mrs. II. A. McKowan and Mrs. D. M. McDonald
heal Mrs. Simpson and Mrs. W. A.
l-'erttie 0-1, 0-3.
Ladies' Singles—Mrs, Fergie won
from  Mrs. Mcintosh 7-B, 0-2.
In the men's doubles, which had
heen played down previously, Messrs.
Simpson and Stewart proved the
winners.
Tea was served during the afternoon, and the onlookers enjoyed a
pleasant social afternoon as well as
soolng some good tennis.
The cluh is now putting some furtlier improvements in, particularly
ou thn building, adding a new verandah and also erecting a second
shelter   there.
Last week-end a number of plny-
ers from the Cranbrook club visited
Library Now
An Actuality
Formally Opened on Saturday Last By Mayor
T. M. Roberts
HAS 1300 VOLUMES
To those renpoosible for the starting of the movement for the establishment of a library in Cranbrook,
the opening cermony at the new library in the post office building, on
Saturday evening last, must have
been a source of gratification. In
response to the announcements in
the press, and the invitations sent
out to the heads of various local organizations in the city, a number of
citizens were present when Chairman Spreull of the library board,
called the meeting to order. In
his opening remarks, he gave a
short sketch of the work thnt had
been done in bringing the library
to its present stage. Some representative citizens had felt that a library in Cranbrook was desirable,
and after a few meetings had determined to take steps to establish one.
A successful canvass having been
mnde for memberships* organization
(took place, and an appeal for books
After the election of the delegates was made, to which a liberal res-
WOMEN'S
INSTITUTE
WUWWlMANVWUWWWWW
BUSINESS VS. PLEASURE
(Contributed)
Tuesday afternoon witnessed an
unusually large gathering of the
members of the .Women's Institute
•atth* -homfe of ttrs president, Mrs.
George Smith, who had with unflagging energy converted her dhiing
room into a veritable hall, with seating accommodation for the many expected.
members nttendinp. Business occupied the first part of the afternoon,
for although a combination of business ond pleasure made the occasion
attractive, in no way was the latter
allowed to prdominate over the former.
A letter was read from Mr. T.
Menzios, superintendent of Neglected Children. Victoria, for support
and co-operation along this line.
Child welfare always had a prominent place in all Institutes, and the
oniniunieation therefore received
every consideration.
A motion to raise funds by a bazaar was lost by a big majority, and
it was in turn voted that each member be requested to contribute the
nominal sum of one dollar.
Following thc business session, a
demonstration wns given by the president on a delicious fruit salad and
new dressing, each guest receiving n
dish of the luscious delicacy, this,
with tea and other toothsome dainties being dispensed on the lawn,
which with its greensward, roses and
other flowers left nothing to mar the
surroundings. Thc last item on the
program was a request from the president that all rally before her camera for an Institute picture.
This terminated one of the most
enjoyable meetings on record.
Kimborlo;
Murk Bodui Warden ,.
' „   ,   ,     interesting
S. Smart   Conductor!..
S. S. Sergeant ....        - Chaplain
11. Bernard  B.S.S.
E. Taylor   L.S.S.
Morrison  R.S.N.C:
Hines L.S.N.G.
Bro. G. Hutchison   R.S.V.G.
Bro. I. Hooper L.S.V.G.
Bro, E. Llthgoe I. G,
Bro. O. HelHer   O.O.
There wos n large attendance of
brethren from the Kimberley lodge,
seven cars making the trip down, in
spite of the weather. At the conclusion of the business, the members
from both lodges, about seventy-five
in nil, adjourned to thc stage of the
Auditorium, where the social committee had provided a supper, following which there was a program of
short speeches and music, the gathering breaking up with tho singing
of the National Anthem.
nnd played a number of
games with the club
there. In the aggregate Cranbrook
wns adjudged winner of the tournament by ten sots to six. Cranbrook won the men's doubles three
sets to none; the men's singles six
to two; thc Indies' doubles broke even one set each; Kimberley won the
Indies' singles two sets to none, and
Cranbrook won the mixed doubles
two sets to one,
Among those who played at Kimberley in these games were Mr. and
Mrs. D. M. Macdonald, Dr. and Mrs,
W. A. Fergie, Mr. and Mrs. G, P.
Simpson, Mrs G. S. Mcintosh, Miss
A Woodland, N. A. Walllnger, Mr,
Evans and Mr. Blumenneur.
Leaving for Holiday
Mr. nnd Mrs. G. F. Collins are leaving this week-end for St. Mary's
Lake where they will apend • holiday.
PUPILS SUCCESSFUL
IN L. CM. PIANOFORTE
AND VIOLIN EXAMS.
Following are the results of the
London College of Music examination*, held In Crnnbrook, June 18th,
by D. J. Jennings, Esq., T. U. T.
VIOLIN
Mr, Theodore Pndberg, pnssed,
A. L. C. M.
Intermediate Pupils
Roy Llnnell (honors). Willie
Spence, First Clnss Certificate, Mnry MacDonald, First Clnss Certificate.
Elementary
Allen Patmore (honors); David
Weston, First Class Certificate.
Mrs. R. W. Edmondson'. Pupils
Pianoforte
Elementary — Mildred Bridges,
and Kathleen Edmondson, First Clnss
Certificates.
Primaries — Lily Matson and
Ruth Lundy, First Class Certificates.
Eugene Ingham, passed.
Certificates will he presented to
these pupils in the early fall hy the
local representative, Mra. R. W. Ed
ponse was gitltit, with the result
that at the opening of the library
there were over a thousand books,
counting the three hundred which
had been obtained from the government library association. Ko far
all liabilities had been met from
whatever funds had been obtoiaed
through the memberships, no canvass yet having been made for subscriptions of large amounts, from
those who might be willing, and In
a position to give. Mr. Spreull referred to the kindness of Dr. King
ln the exercise of his good offices in
securing for the library the UBe of
the room in which it was housed.
The nominal rental which they had
to pay meant that the financing of
it would be much easier. It would
need, however, the support of everybody who could possibly give, to
keep the library up to the mark
that the committee had in view.
At the present time one could
not expect a lotgo number of members, or much enthusiasm with respect to the library, but with the
return of cooler weather more were
To put the library in the
position that it .was, touch work
hod been done. 'Assisting the library board, and to whom he wished
to pay tribute, wju a committee of
young Indies under the chairman.
ship of Miss Jean Wilson; these
were the Misses Delia Baxter, Betty Green, Edna Home, Audrey Mc-
Kowaa, Dorothy McKowan, and
Hester Thompson.
In asking Mayor Roberts to open
the library, the directors had
thought it not only fitting on ac
count of his official position, but also on account of his willingness at
all times to assist in an endeavor that
might be of a public benifit.
After expressing his pleasure at
beiag present at thc opening of the
library, his worship said that he anticipated that the library would be
a great benifit to the city. To his
mind it was but another sign of the
awakening of better community spirit in the town. He congratulated
thc directors on the work that they
had accomplished, as was evident
from the well filled shelves, and bespoke for the new venture the hearty
support of the citizens. He would
be pleased to do anything possible In
his official position, or in a private
capacity to assist. Likening his position to that of one launching
ship, he said that he took much pleasure In wishing the good ship "Library" and its officers bon voyage,
and declared the library open.
At the request of the Chairman,
his worship then took the first hook
from thc library.
Mr. Allan Graham, president of
thc Rotary club, on being asked to
speak, made some very timely remarks with respect to the attitude of
the overage citiwn In regard to
movements such as the one which
was just being started. In urging a
fuller support than that which had
been given similar undertakings in
the past, he stated that he regretted
that the community spirit to which
his worship thc mayor had referred
could be a whole j lot healthier without doing nny harm. No matter
whether the reason assigned for the
failure of previous undertakings such
as this were correct or not, he was
sure that it wns starved for wont of
public support, No community was
more apathetic than Cranbrook.
There was too much of the "let
George do It" spirit, As a remedy
he suggested that all take the matter seriously into consideration, and
nt all times talk library. Tell your
friends about lt, have them come up
to see It, and if this ia done he had
Friday, July 3rd, will go down as
another red-letter day in the history
of the local order of Knights of Pythias, for on that day the merry
knights fittingly celebrated the reopening of their hall, improved as
it had been with the addition of what
they called a kitchen, but more correctly termed a banquet hall and
kitchenette. Despite the fact that
the day had been a hot one, those
who had previously experienced the
hospitality of the knights and their
ladles could not possibly refrain
from taking part in the big affair,
The result was that a good crowd
was on hand to participate in a very
pleasing evening.
About ten o'clock the floors were
cleared and the dance was on, Robinson's orchestra dispensing the mu-
which from start to finish was
much .appreciated by those present.
A pleasing inovation was the refreshment booths, operated by a
number of the ladies. This proved
very attractive and might be well
copied ot other functions of its kind,
Sodu water of a well known brand
and ice cream cones were for sale.
At about twelve the supper wos announced, and guests to the number of seventy-four were asked to
take their places at the first sitting
in the beautiful new hall which had
been built at the rear of the present
platform in the larger auditorium.
After expressing their admiration of
the new hall, the guests could not
resist partaking of the many
tempting dishes that they found before them on the prettily laid tables.
Mere words seem hopelessly inadequate to do justice to the feast thnt
the Pythian sisters hud prepared for
their brother knights and their
guests.
ENJOYABLE DANCE
MARKS RE-OPENING
OF K. OF P. HALL
tVf.Vff*V*Vfff*Vff*VfeVfffi
OBITUARY
RETIRES AFTER SERVICE
OF FORTY SIX YEARS
ON RAILROAD
Conductor J. B. Hall, who has been
a passcnger conductor on the Crow
line for the past twenty years, and
who went on the superannuated list
at the first of July, was pleasantly
surprised at Sirdar recently when he
was presented with a handsome pipe,
the gift of a number of Sirdar and
train crew friends. Doe. Williams,
mail clerk on the Halt train, made
the presentation speech, and his remarks were ably supplemented by
others of the train crew. Proceedings were enlivened by a number of
piano selections by Mrs. Dennes and
other similar features, the affair being much enjoyed by all. Conductor Hall has just completed 46 yean
ot railroading, and standa very high
with the company, its employees and
the general public, and his smile and
kindly greetings for all and sundry
will certainly be missed.
MRS. ROSA COE
With feelings of deepest regret,
residents of Kingsgate, Eastport, and
many in Cranbrook and elsewhere,
learned of the death at Kingsgate on
Friday morning last of Rosa Eaton,
beloved wife of Mr. Percy Coe, the
Customs officer at Kingsgate, The
late Mrs. Coe had been a resident of
Kingsgate for the past thirteen years
and her kindly disposition had endeared her to all with whom she became acquainted. Being one who
took pleasure in helping others, hev
passing is mourned by a large circle
of friends.
The late Mrs, Coe, whose maiden
name was Rosa Eaton Kightly, was
born fifty-two years ago at Bourne-
moouh, Hants., England, where twen.
ty-three years ago, her marriage
took place. Coming to this country.
Mr. and Mrs. Coe settled in the East
Kootenay, Mr. Coe being then with
the freight department of the C. P.
R.. Por the last thriteen years the
family home hus been at Kingsgate.
Their only daughter, then seventeen
years of age, passed away about six
years ago at Kingsgate.
About a year ago the late Mrs. Coe
showed symptoms of kidney disease,
and steps were taken to get rid of the
trouble. Six months ago specialist
medical aid wns sought in Vancouver, and much benefit resulted. She
returned to Kingsgate, but recently
a relapse took place from which the
patient suffered much, and death finally brought relief.
In his sad bereavement, the sympathy of a large number of friend*
goes out to Mr. Coe, who with a '-
ther of  the  deceased  at   Bos--
near Bournemouth, are left t(
the passing of a loving wife ano"\;..
fectionate sister.
On Monday morning in this city
the funeral took place from the
Presbyterian Church, where Rev. M.
S. Blackburn delivered the funeral
address, which was marked by a
depth of feeling and sympathy. A
large number of friends from Rings-
gate, Eastport, Cranbrook and other
points were present, and followed
the remains to their last resting
place     here. The   pall   bearers
were Messrs. W. F. Attridge, Lester
Clapp, J. P. Fink, H. Linnell, C. J
Little and W. E. Worden.
Conservatives
to Nominate
Convention Wednesday Will
Name Federal
Candidate
WILL BE 60 DELEGATES
The Conservative-: of Knst Kootenay nre taking a big step in preparedness for the federal general
elections, thought to he im-
pending by those who f,*,-l themselves
competent to interpret tlu* portonta
in political skies just now, Oo Wednesday next the Conservatives of the
federal riding, from the districts of
Fernie, Cranbrook and Columbia will
meet nt the K, I1. Hall to nominate
the candidate who will contest the
riding in their interests when the
lection  is  called.
The gathering will take place in
the afternoon at the K. I'. Hall, when
sixty delegates from all parts of the
riding will he present in person or
by proxy. There will be twenty
delegates from each of the three provincial  ridings.
Mr. Chlsholm, of Windermere,
who was the Conservative candidate
thc last provincial election for
Columbia riding, will preside ;,t the
convention, as the president of the
Conservative Assoeintion for the
riilin-?. ond Mr. Sherwood Herchmer,
of Fernie, wtyj. . act as secretory.
Delegate.-  " "^ -■ .-imeil
fr   .
SUNDAY'S GAMES PUT
KIMBERLEY AT HEAD
OF BASEBALL LEAGUE
Wycliffe and Lumberton Are
Tied for Second Place;
Complete Schedule
no doubts that it would flourish.
As president of the Woraens' Institute, Mrs. Geo. Smith wished the
library every success and stated that
she would have pleasure in taking
the matter up In the institute at its
next meeting, and that she was confident that if there waa any way ln
which they might be of assistance
it would be authorised.
For the Gyros, Pres. R. J. Collins
offered the support of that club.
In doing so, he said he was forced to
agree with the remarks of the president of the Rotarians with respect
to the lock of appreciation that existed in the city for matters of this
kind. He felt that th* right chord
had been struck by Mr. Graham in
that a personal Interest should be ta
ken in affairs of this kind, and if
this were done there would be no
question as to its success.
Major H, B. Hicks was pleased to
see the progress that the library committee had made, and speaking for
the G. W. V. A. said they could count
on them, not only for their moral,
but their financial support also. He
could see no reason why lt should not
grow to many times its present size,
with the fine start that this library
had got, and with the continued cooperation of the citizens, he was sure
of Its success.
As representative of the Board of
Trade, Mr. W. H. Wilson said he was
delighted to be present to see the
hopes and dreams of a few public
spirited citizens realized. With the
small overhead expense, he was sure
that with the assistance of the citi-
xens not financially alone, the library would see many years of usefulness. In concluding, he considered that the thanks of the citizens were due Dr. King for his good
will, as evidenced in his securing for
them the room for the library at a
mere nominal rental. On motion of
Mr. Wilson seconded by Major Hicks,
Mr. 1. G. Cummlngs was asked
to convey the thanks of the association to Dr. King.
Following the addresses, Miss
Rumsey, the librarian, had a busy
time giving out books to the mem-
ben present.
present, there will be
come up before the nominating convention. One will be Dr. .1. VV.
Rutledge. of this city, and well
known in all parts of the district.
and an active worker in political
circles for the past fifteen years or
more in this section. There is no
doubt that many delegates will go
to the convention prepared to support Dr. Rutledge's name to thc utmost.
Another name which it is also expected will come up before the delegates is that of Major H. B. Hicks,
also of this city. 'As president of
the local G.W.V.A., em' sis.-, -until
recently, the district water rights
engineer, Major Hicks is well known,
and it seems a foregone conclusion
at this time that the nomination will
lay between these two.
Thc question as to the possible
Liberal candidate is not exercising
the Conservatives a great deal, the
feeling being that their organization
will be prepared to give anyone who
will run in the government interests
a hard contest. But there i.s a feeling growing stronger every day that
when the time comes for a Liberal
candidate to enter the field, it will
be found necessary to transfer the
mantle of Dr. King to the shoulders
of another. It is known that any
one of the Coast ridings would be
glad of the opportunity to give their
Sunday last the second last series
of games in the Selkirk baseball
league was played. Cranbrook went
to Wardner, where they defeated
that town's ball team by 14 to 11,
while Lumberton took the Wycliffe
team into camp at Lumberton, taking the long end of a 2 to 1 score.
Kimberley defeated the Concentrator, which, with Wycliffe losing to
Lumberton,    gave    Kimberley   first
place in the league, and assured them 'nomination to Dr. King, and it seem*
of the cup. Next Sunday Kimberley!questionable whether it would be
plays at Lumberton, while Wardner good policy from the government's
meets Wycliffe at Wycliffe. standpoint to allow Dr. King to run
Wednesday evening Cranbrook's again in this riding, where thc op-
baseball team played its last schedul-lportunities for public works developed game in thc Selkirk baseball lea- ment arc so meagre. This follows
gue, the game was to hove been the suggestion, unofficial it is true,
played next Sunday, but in order'made by thc late R. E. Beattie dur-
to accomodate the Concentrator, the'ing his last visit to thc city, shortly
Cranbrook team journeyed to the before his death. There is another
mill town nnd played the game. The [suggestion made, that Dr. King may
game was woa by thc Concentrator, be given one of the vacant senntor-
4 to 2 being the score. Bamford ships that will have to be filled
ond Logan did the hurling for Cran- shortly. Who may succeed Dr. Kinc
brook, while Bamford and Lewis | is pure conjecture, but two names
caught Thc result of the game(being mentioned ai possibilities nre
makes Cranbrook record an even Mr. A. I. Fisher, Fernie barrister.
break, they having won five and lost|ond Mr. J. A. Buckham. of Goldon,
five, nnd gives the Concentrator, injwho would have to resign the ipen-
its last game nf the series,, its first kership of the provincial house wero
win, hnving previously lost nine gam. he to  consider seriously   accept!
es In a string.
FIRST DEMONSTRATION
IN STOCK JUDGING
HELD LAST FRIDAY
the nomination.
It is not unlikely thnt there will
he a third candidate nominated, to
represent the lahor vote in the constituency, though it is known that
the Fernie end of the ridinj: docs
not favor such a course bolng taken,
Junior Live Stock Judfiinjr work
is off to a good start again this yenr.
The first demonstration was held at
Mr. Austin's farm on Friday last,
when thirteen hoys and girls took
part. Quite a few entered for the
first time this yenr, and in view of
the fact that there are (rood local
prizes ofTercd at the Fall Fair, there
Is an added interest taken in the
work hy all those taking part.
Survey Crewi Out mi Work
Messrs. DeWolf & Ham are this
week puting out two survey parties
into the section of country lyin& he-
tween Wasa and Kimherley, the intention being to redefine mineral locations. Mr, B. A. Moorhouse also
has a survey party engaged in similar work In Ihe valley of the Rt. Ma-
r*%
Shower  For  Rcent  Bride
Tuesday evening n plermmt function took place at the home of Miss
Ermi McNeill, when Mrs. F. Briggs
wns the recipient of n miscellaneous
shower, Many of thc friends of Mrs.
BriRjrs, who wns formerly Miss honors Finlay, were in attendance,
and wished her bon voyage, Little
Miss Bernicc Sullivan made an efficient shower maiden, wheeling in
the stnnd with the many useful articles contributed hy lhe hride's
many friends. A jolly time was had,
and after refreshments were served
little dance was held. The room
was made most attractive with decorations of pink and while, streamer*
of those colors giving n most pleasing effect. Thursday, July Oth, 1925
THI   CSANBBOOK   HERALD
l«A<IB   TWO
THE HERALD SERIAL  STORY
CAPTAIN BLOOD
A ROMANCE OF THE SPANISH MAIN
By RAFAEL SABATINI
Copyrighted, 1922, by Rafael Sabntint
"CAPTAIN BLOOD," m Vitagraph picture   with   J.   Warren   Kerrigan   in
the title role, it an adaptation of this thrilling novel.
SYNOPSIS
Captain Peter Blood, buccaneer,
rescues Arabella Bishop, with whom
he is in love, and Lord Julian Wade,
an emissary uf King James, from two
Spanish ships. Lord Wade offers
Bloud a commission under James,
hut the buccaneer had been sent as
a slave tu the Baihadoes by this same
King, and he declines, To place Arabella in safety he sails into the teeth
uf the British fleet, commanded by
Colonel Bishop, governor of Barbn-
does, whom Blood bad once mode t>>
walk the plank, Blood's crew would
fight tu lhe end, but  Bb>ud orders
the ship to heave to lhat Arabella
may be landed safely.
CHAPTER   XVII—Continued
"Again ynu misapprehend me,"
cried Lord Julian, between concern
and indignation. "That is not intended. Your followers will be included in your commissions"
"And dye think they'll ku with
mo to hunt their brethren—the
Brethren uf the Coast?    D'ye think
could take a commission of King
James".'        I   tell   yuu   I   wouldn't   be
soiling my hands with it—thief ;
pirate's bands though they be.   Thief,
and   pirate   is   what   you   heard   Miss
Bishop  call  me  today—a   thing   of
scorn, an outcast.      Who i
thut?    Who  made  me thief and  pirate?    D'ye  dream,  man, what it is
to he a slave?    But there! I grow hot  you.    C
for nothing at all.   1 explain myself,  thing tn
I think,
custom. I ;
Julian, for
I am sn. I!
haps. Ve lo
Lord Julii
watching Uu
nwny  towari
id God ki
lellii
' hi
de.
grateful In you, Lord
inir kindly Intentions,
ye'll understand, paras if ye might."
stood for a moment,
all figuro as it moved
the laffrail. Then
is fall helplessly to his
um, he ileparled.
Lord
CHAPTER   XVIII
IK SEKVlCK  OF   KING
Miss   Arabella   Bishoi:
vory enrly nn the follov
■  by   the   l.ru/en   voice  <
I ihe Insisting clanging
the ship's   helfiey.     In
Julian   wos  already
JAMES
was
bugle
a   bell
I til
anil
•dly   dn
About him in
last   night  bad
there was a frcn-
of  some  three-
, Immediately/
id Lord Julian, ste
i  altercation with
whose    head     v
Cotton kerchief, a
at the sume time gratify his personal
rancour against me. I'll send him a
message offering to surrender nboard
his ship, taking Miss Bishop and Lord
Julian with me, but only on condition
(hat tbe Arabella is allowed to pro-
ceed unharmed. It's a bargain that
he'll accept, if I know him at all.'*
"Ye're surely daft even to think
of it, Peter!"
"Nut so daft as you when you talk
of fighting that." "Before we've
run another half-mile we shall be
within range."
Wolverstone swore elaborately,
I hen suddenly checked. Out of the
tail of his single eye he had espied
a trim figure in grey silk that was
ascending the companion; So engrossed had they been that they had
not seen Miss Bishop come from the
dour of the passage leading to the
cabin. And there was something else
that those three men on the poop,
and Pitt immediately below them,
bad failed to observe. Some moments ago Ogle, followed by the
main body of his gun-deck crew, had
emerged from the booby hatch, to
fall into muttered, angrily vehement
talk with those, who, abandoning the
of you as muy choose to follow me.
And even those of you who do not
choose to follow me shall share the
immunity of all, and shall afterwards
be free to depart. Those are the
terms upon which I sell myself to the
King. Let Lord Julian, the representative of the Secretary of State,
say whether he agrees to them."
(Continued in our next issue)
\ LAKE |
" WINDERMERE'
NOTES
(Special to the Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., July ■!— Mr.
James L, McKay, of Athalmer, motored to the Coast recently and returned in the same manner with Mrs.
McKay and Marguerite .MeKay, his
daughter, together with Lionel nnd
Cordon McKay.
m 0m§m
•*.JL !/*N\\*k&.i«".Mj ■'
I'll- I'^S?  ffliar
I'll iee Colonel Bishop in hell or ever 1 liei to for him."
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Our Shamrock Hams and Bacon
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P. BURNS & Co Ltd.   1
?4   Phone 10        -      -      .        . Cranbrook, B.C.   5
gun-tackles upon wK.ch they were
laboring, had come to crowd about
him.
Even now Blood had no eyes for
that. lie turned to look at Miss
Bishop, marvelling a little, after the
manner in which yesterday she had
avoided him, that she should now
venture upon the quarter-deck. Her
Isence at this moment, and considering the nature of his altercation with Wolverstone, was embarrassing. Captain Blood bared his
id and bowed silently in a greeting which she returned composedly
and  formally.
"What is happening,' Lord Julian?"
she enquired.
As if to answer her a third gun
spoke from the ships.
"They ure the ships of the Jamaica
fleet," Ins lordship answered her.
Before more could be added, their
attention was drawn at last to Ogle,
wlm came  bounding up the   broad
bidder, and to the niVm lounging aft
in ids wake.    Blood, confronted him.
What's  this?"   tlie   Captain   demanded   sharply.     "Your  station   is
n  the gun-deck.       Why   have   you
•ft it?"
"Captain," Ogle  said,  nnd  as he
spoke  he  pointed  to   the   pursuing
ships,   "Colonel    Bishop   holds   us.
We're  in   no  ease  either  to  run  or
fight."
"Ogle," said he, in a voice cold
und sharp as steel, "your station is
on the gun-deck. You'll return to
it at onco, and take your crew with
ynu, or else . .* ,"
"Threats will not serve, Captain."
Captain   Blood's  hand closed over
the butt of one of the pistols slung
before him.
Nor will   that servo you,"  Ogle
warned    him,    still    wore    fiercely.
The men arc to my thinking, and
they'll have their wny."
"You come to give advice), then,
do you?" quoth Blood, relenting
nothing of his sterncss.
"That's it, Captain; advice. That
jjlrl, there." Ile filing out a hare
arm to point to her. "Bishop's girl;
tiie Governor of Jamaica's nipce
We want her as a hostage for
our safety."
"Aye!" roared in chorus the buccaneers below.
It's a providence having her
aboard; a providence. Heave to.
Captain, and signal them to send a
boat, and assure themselves that Miss
Bishop is here. Then let them know
that if they attempt to hinder our
sailing hence, we'll hnng the doxy
first, nnd fight for it after. That'll
d Colonel Bishop's heat, maybe."
'And maybe it won't." Plow nnd
mocking came WolvcirstoneY voice to
answer the other's ronfident excitement, and as he sjHtke he lulvnnced
lo Blood's side, nn unexpected ally
"If ye're counting on pulling Bishop's heartstrings, ye're a bigger fool,
Ogle, than I've always thought you
was. We've got to fight, my
lads . . ."
"How can we fight, mnn?" Ogle
i'.tormcd nl him.
Then louder than before roared
a gun away to leeward.
"They nre, within range," cried
Ogle.
"Wait!" Blood bade him, interrupting, and he set a restraining
baud upon the gunner's arm. "There
is, 1 think, a better way. Mine is
the safe and easy way. Put the helm
down," he bade. Pitt. "Heave her
to, and signal to them to send a
boot."
A silence of astonishment fell up-
i the ship—of astonishment and
suspicion nt this sudden yielding.
Captain Blood turned and beckoned
Lord Julian forward. Briefly and
clearly he announced to all the object nf Lord Julian\ voyage to the
Cnr)'lbean, and be informed them Of
tiie offer which yesterday Lord Julian had mnde to him.
"That offer I rejected. But now,
outsailed, and likely to be outfought,
as Ogle has said, I nm ready to take
the way of Morgan: to accept the
King's commission and shelter us ull
behind it."
The main body of them welcomed
the announcement ns only men who
had been preparing to die can welcome a new lease of life.
"No man need follow me into the
King's   service   who   is   reluctant,"
Blood went on.   "Thnt li not In the
'bargain.    What is in thth bargain is
tbat I accept this service* with such
Rev. Jules Zaetschky, of Calgary,
who is u director of the Lutheran
Immigration Board, accompanied hy
Mr. Moyer, of that eity. the solicitor for the Board, motored in over
the Banff-Windermere highway, and
spent some time in looking over the
newly acquired properly of the
Board situated at Edgewnter.
Professor William T. Maeoun, Dominion horticulturist; Dr. Weaver, of
the veterinary branch, nnd Supt, El-
ford, of the poultry department, all
of the Department of Agriculture,
Ottawa, were in this week paying
an official visit to Supt. R. Gladwyn
Newton, and looking over thc development on the experimental station here nnd at Windermere.
A donation of twenty-five dollars
has just been received by the district Rod nnd Gun Club from Colonel
J. S. Dennis, of Montreal, who offers
it as a prize to the member of the
club killing the greatest number of
crows between now and the end of
the yenr.
Miss E. M. Brookes left on Tuesday for a six weeks visit to the Coast.
Mr. Mel Accenbach, of Windermere, the telephone linesman, is off
enjoving a holiday. He is being relieved by Mr. Davis, from Notch Hill.
Mrs. Vogwell, of Norwich, Kng-
land, is here on a visit to her sister,
Mrs. James Sims, of lnvermere
Heights. Miss Sims is now on the
office staff of the lnvermere Hotel.
Miss M. Cleland, of Rellaw, Alberta, is visiting her brother, Mr. W.
Howard Cleland, together with Miss
Guthrie, of Reston, Manitoba. They
were motored in from Calgary over
the Buntf-Windermere highway.
Amongst the recent visitors by motor, registered at Hotel lnvermere
ure: Mayor and Mrs. T. M. Roberts,
W. R. Flummerfelt, district Supt. of
Forestry, Mrs. Geo. Hogarth, Mrs.
M Forest and Mr. T. V. Hogarth, all
of* Cranbrook. Miss Millington, of
Spokane, and Dr. Ilsley.
Dominion Day was quietly celebrated in this part. The weather was
perfect throughout, and mnnv took
advantage to visit the Hot Springs
of Fairmont and Sinclair, which were
patronized to the limit. Others
crossed the mountains to Banff. A
baseball match was played off in the
ufternoon between teams from Ath-
nlmer-Wilmer against lnvermere.
The score ended f! to IS in favor of
lnvermere. The event of the day
was the district hospital Ball in the
David Thompson Memorial post.
This wns undertaken by the directors and officers to raise funds towards the installation of an X-rn>
machine. The work was lore-civ ta
ken over bv the ladies, credit being
due to Miss E. M. Kittle, Mrs. II.
B. Jackson. Mrs. William Weir and
Mrs. B. G. Hamilton fur the aid given
in connection with the ball and in
tagging throughout the day. Many
of the younger ladies gave valuable
assistance in this respect, amongst
whom mny be mentioned the Misses
Vachon, of Athalmer, Erickson and
Ilillier. of lnvermere, nnd Prust, of
Canal Flat. At the ball in tbe evening a novelty was introduced in
the nomination and voting upon
queens for the successive dances nnd
the evening. The contests were very
spirited, Miss Muriel Pitts, Miss Annie Frater, Miss Winnifred Sinclair
and Miss Gladys Laird being those
who were most prominent. The contest, as carried through by the sun
porters, was a very hot one, and ended finally bv a small margin in favor of Miss Gladys Lnird. The Lake
Windermere orchestra very generously donnted to the fund the amount
due lo them for furnishing the splendid music of the evening. Tlie proceeds raised by the different efforts
put forward to that end were very
gratifying. These were supplemented by generous cash donations from
Colonel J. S. Dennis, of Montreal,
Charles McNabb, of Waldo, B.C., and
Mr. R. Randolph Bruce, of lnvermere. bringing lhe total receipts for
the day up lo a net amount of $fi00.
Fraser Canyon Road Ready by Fall
Visitors over thut portion of the
Akamina road already built, are surprised at the amount of work which
has already heen accomplished. This
is the scenic road which runs from
the Waterton Lakes National Park,
south to connect with the Glacier National Park across the line. For a
distance of aboul a mile and a half
the road hus been built to a minimum
■width of about twelve feet, and graded quite smooth. From all points
on the road there will be wonderful
views of mountains, lakes, canyons
and waterfall-*, aud from a point a
short distance ont, on the last slope
to the townsite there is a really fine
panorama, and in tlie anticipation
that there will be many cars drive up
to this point for the view, there has
been an extra wide turning point
graded out a little beyond.
LARGE FAMILY PARTY FOR ALBERTA FARMS
MANY moro inquiries are being
made iu the United States
fur fnrm homos in New Ontario thnn ever before, according
to a Dominion Government official
stationed at Detroit, but Manitoba
nnd northern Saskatchewan and
Alberta is the objective of must nf
those now bolng sent north or who
fro negotiating to cross the line.
"I am sending a number this
spring tn northern Alberta, around
Lac Labiche," said this agent.   "In
June, 1028,1 sent from hero to lhat; many
plnco M people  in  one cur,  ALL   Lriii.l
T1IM FAMILIES OF THE FOUR an ex
PLAMONDON BROTHERS. Thoy per cei
lived   at   Prnvenient,    Mich.,    and  the line I
their parents originally came here  New  (In
from Quebec.     Those peoft'e were  lans going
exptvienced farmers,   hnd a little have prov
money nnd   prospered   from   the inn farms,
first      They have written  their     Photogr
friends and relations and are re- dim fnnill
sponsible for many more going into Cat
Alberta.   There nre many Quebec ing   thntr
French in Ohio and Michigan ami Photos.
them are returning to
il, I dn nut think it is
ration to say that fifty
f nil those now crossing
loth to Uu- prairies and
rio, are former Canad-
home or Americans who
iusly resided on Cnnnd-
ph shows the  Plamon-
•   when   they  left the
National train on reach-
lusiination. —C. N. IL
Tin- photograph* reproduce*  _ , , „„     	
Laurentlnna, North <>f St. Fauitln on the Canadian Paddc, In learcU of big cum.-. A-.
,, the mims? mid door bring plenUful^tilM iwuwn7*The ukti
transport lo the rlvw, und tlte tow.
Not the easi>
iias heen si
problem in till
Alittlaan
or pioneer farn
A few mill
the team tardll
progress is po: i
reposes upon t
Transport
towed behind :
natural beauty
It's a di!li«
hunter will ajrri
forest iu autum
by a piiriy <■! Montreal Spurlnnu-ri whu entered Mi
*i of big Hants; As will bo pm,
■how a kill limiiiiiiii in tin-
lordet', packed on a "Jumper" for
■st ir least exciting phase of mnose hunting is getting the prizod trdphy out of lhe woods after lt
-cured. A thousand pounds or so limp moose takes some handling at any time, but constitu' s a real
heart of the woods, remote from the conveniences of civilization,
ow on the ground Is invaluable. A team of horses and a jumper in the posi i ■.■mm of some woodsman
ier are suddenly at a premium. Convenient river transportation is of ril thii
7 transport through the tangled heart of the primordial constitnti
y snakes its way between trees and through underbrush and in plan   I
lively haired. The most difficult stage of the journey has been accomp
be river bank,
down a tranquil river is not only easy but enjoyable. A mouse carco     ; 'il
i canoe.   This process makes fur somewhat tardy journeying, but con
thai might otherwise he skimped.
ulf matti r oftentimes to get a moose out of tlie woods to civilization. 1  i
"■■ he eats his steaks with all modern appointments and the extjulsiti
■ most to be desired.
ay'B laborious work, as
must dear a way where
i when the giant carcass
float and can be readily
B leisurely browsing on
nently worth while. Any
memory of a Canadian
New Colonization Scheme for Maritinies
M&A:'     ..-*t->:^-- .*'?V<>~^'- •■'
,;;:^i^^^**"|i*v; .,;
\i..m<- la n view of one mt thm
(troiprrotut frull rum* hIumm lh*
lho- of llu- ll. I, It. The ln«rt photo-
i-.r'ie'i    allOWN    H l'J    Hie    In nn   !■   In
Mul, a nourlablna condMlaa, whllo
Iho  M'Mie   helon   In  our  uf  miulfcar
ihmI ijjihnl  Nova Si'oIIhii farm.
colonization work In the
tlvltles which wtll bring
l year a substantial block
wlll be divided opproxl-
U m' land has been suh-
. particularly lhe produe-
la trying.     Apples grown
nnd is woll served with
r firewood, llectanooga
.:* will have ready access
With tffr coming of spring lhe Canadian Pacific Hallway will undertake cut;
Province of Nova Scotlfl Which, ll is hoped, may be the commencement uf
many settlors to the Maritinies, Endeavor will first be made to settle in the t
of land in the vicinity of llectanooga, on tbe Dominion Atlantic Railway, will
mately Into LOO acre farms. A very thorough survey to which this particular I
Jected has resulted in :i very favourable report as to Ks suitability for mixed farm
tlon of vegetables or all kinds, small Hulls, as well as sheep and hog rearing nr
In that area are of a particularly hardy type. The country Is of a rolling nail
water, ample wood being also available Tor the erection of farm buildings nnd
station Is but 10 miles from the port of Yarmouth nnd 41) from Dtehy ro thai sol
to tbe markets of Itoston and adjacent territories.
Farming along the lovely territory adjacent to the Dominion Atlantic Railway, where the tang of tho
Atlantic is always In the air and the sea is frequently visible, combines successful business with the most
satisfactory living conditions. All along the line, which has become known ns thc Evangel Ino Route, conveniently situated to lt, are tenant loss little farms of surpassing beauty and the plonsanlest of living conditions. In tbe almost old-world atmosphere which pervades tho territory, these should appeal lu a particular manner to settlers from the British Isles, who will find duplicated thoro many Of the features that
go to make Iheir own rural life so dimming-
It I.i a falbcy to conclude that these farms hnve no productivity because thoy hnvo been abandoned,
since the reason for their abandonment belongs to tho economics of n. past era. There aro many peculiar
advantages particularly In the way of markets, to the pursuit of agriculture in Nova Bcotln. The Annapolis
Valley exports about 1,600,000 barrels nf apples annually, nearly nil lo England. Tho Province's crop of
potatoes Is each year in greater demand over a wide area. Sheep raising Is very successful, and the province markets about om* and a half million pounds of wool per year, being tbe third ranking province te
this regard.
\ i Thursday, July 9th, 1925
«b cuimooi hmuld
PA QE    THREE
G*
K9
after every meal"
Parents- encourate the
children to cart for toeir tath/
fllve them Wrigley's.
It removes food particles
front the teeth. Strengthens
tiie o,uins. Combats acid
mouth.
Ht-freshlng and beneficial!
yWUWVWWWnVWnVWVnVnVVnWl | buying balls and bats for a Moyie
"~  ball team.
Mr, and Mrs. Ronpe and Miss Thelma Pearson motored down from
Kimberley lust  Saturday  evening,
Miss Alma and Emlie Desaulniers
are home spending their holidays,
Mrs, Thomas Ruder and Miss Ma-
die Kader, Mr. Axel Rudberg und
Mr. Albert Paeper, of Spokane, spent
the Fourth of July at the home of
Miss Mamie Farreli.
The Rocky Mountain Ramblers
will be with us again on Saturday,
the llth; come and be one to swell
the crowd.
Apply JMinard's every day nnd
rob it in well with thu finger
tips, lt penetrates and heals.
Removes inflammation.
Mrs. Bryant and two children arrived here last week from tbe Old
Country.
Mrs. R. A. Smith and son, George,
motored |,o Kimberley last Tuesday
ovenlng, spending tlm first there.
Mr. and Mrs, .lames Whitehead,
Mrs. Taylor ami Miss Sadie Whitehead spent Dominion Hay in Kimher-
loy, "
Mr. ami Mrs. McLellan and Misses
Audrey aud Beatrice Mehellau were
visitors  to  Creston   last week,
Mr. Hrown is here from thfl prairie
visiting with bis sou, Charles Brown.
Mrs. Tlppett nnd sons spent last
Wednesday   visiting   at   Moyie.
Mr. and Mrs, Cameron, and Cranbrook friends, Mr. and Mrs. Taylor
uml I wo sons, motored to Aldridge
on a picnic trip on Dominion Day
Mr. uml Mrs. Lundy nnd daughter,
Ruth, and Mrs. Henderson, also Mrs,
Stevely and hoys, were the guests of
Mr. and Mrs. Parker on the 1st.
Mr. and Mrs. Monkhouse nnd Mel
Villa took a trip to Radium on the
1st.
Miss Gertrude Conrad and Geo,
MeKay swam the lake on Friday
evening,
Mr. Tim Farreli, of Mullin, arrived
iu town on Friday, returning on Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. James Whitehead,
Mrs. Cameron und Sndie Whitehead
took in the K. P. dance at Cranbrook
on  Friday night.
A social dance wns given last Saturday evening for the purpose   of
Canadian Cafe
and Rooms
VAHK, B.C.
Opposite Oarage, Near Bridge
Comfortable Rooms wltb !
Cafe In Connection
We Solicit Vour Patronage *
A. Hjort - Prop.
'itSkeS
**************************
t T	
I   PAUL   NORDGREN
STORE
•:• Spring Is Here
*j. Come in and have a look at the
T New Shipments , Just Arrived
T Men'l Fine Drew and Work Sox
•:• Fine   Drni  Shirti  in  Silk*  and
'£ Cottnni.   Men's Heavy and
;•; Light Work Shirti, Dreit
and Work Shoe*
*
*   Ladlci nnd Children's Shoe* A
.;.       Snnd.-ili.     Sultcaiei,  Trunin
X nnd Other Goods
x Paul Nordgren Store
£        nn Kain Road, near bridge
♦♦++++++♦+♦♦♦
For Goad Value in
GOOD   EATS
Go to The
ZENITH   CAFE
Cor. BAKER * VAN HORNE
**************************
1. F. SCOTT
Cranbrook Drug & Book Co.
(■■an i nt ■ I   ae* mt tunmmittmst
HURRY'S WHITE LUNCH J
IS THE PLAS1E TO EAT,
Whllo Help Onlj- l» K.mjlojet i
Yon uili IM thii fate • H.m«j f
Dare lo Kiijoy Yoar Memli
ALEX. IIUKKV •   Prop.   |
Milk and Cream
DIRECT FBOM
Big Butte Dairy Farm
nous i*
THE
NEW HOTEL
Yahk, B.C.
J. MARKLUND, Proprietor
• m    % \  \
Wlirn Iii Yahk make your home at     \t\
THK NEW HOTEL. 'If
     r        * >
This Hotel li new from bottom to top.    Twenty-five nicely furnished roome. All are clean
and comfortable.     4, ,V
*        P    ih 1,11r
RESTAtBANT IN CONNKCIHON. \    '    '\
CRANBROOK CARTAGE & TRANSFER CO.
TOWRISS A ROBERTS
AganU for Hard and Soft Coal.    Distribution Can a
■poelalty.   ■tctltat Warohoulnf.
■AND and ORAVBL \     \
OPPOSITE C.P.R. DEPOT
TelephMn 4)        .!.        .:.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
.:. P .0. Bw 214
Nelson Smith spent the week-end
Ot hla home here.
Mr.  nnd   Mrs.   Juck   Martin,   of
Cranbrook, spent Sunduy evening
Moyle.
Miss Mnmie Farreli ami Vivian
Kader were the quests of Mrs, Hrem
ner at Kimherley on Dominion Hay
Mrs. Hnope, of Kimherley, is visi
ting with Mrs. Weir.
Mr. Brown and Mr, McKay look i
trip to Kimberley on Monday even
ine.
Miss Annie McBurney, nf Cranbrnok, was the guest of Mrs. Roy
Burch over the week-end.
Misses Lillian nnd Gertrude Con-
rud took in the sports at Kimberley
on Dominion Dny.
Those registering at the Cameron
House during the week were:
Bert Song, James Martin, Miss
Vera Baxter, Miss Clara McKenzle,
Mr. A. Burch, Mr. R. Burch, L. M.
Slye, A. G. Calhoun, N. M. Potter,
Cranbrnok.
WARDNER        I
NOTES I
**************************
R. B. Reed journeyed to Cranbrook
on Tuesday lost between trains, for
a consultation with Dr, Huffman,
Wardner was full of commercial
salesmen the beginning of last week.
Mr. Gray held a demonstration of
Wear-ever aluminum in the urt of
steam pressure cooking at the home
of Mrs. Elmer Thompson, to which
were invited the Indies of the town.
Mr. Gibb, of the Fuller Brush Co.,
spent Tuesday delivering brushes and
mops of all descriptions. Mrs. Brown
was in town a day or so taking orders
for Spirella Hosiery, ond Mr. and
Mrs. Mindlin spent some days taking
orders for suits and dress goods for
the Crown Tailoring Co. So, among
them no doubt, they flattened pocket-books considerably.
George Sinclair arrived home on
Tuesday evening from the St. Eugene Hospital, Cranbrook, nfter being confined there for the past
month, recovering from an operation
j for uppendicitis.
Horry ond Sam Thompson motored
to Cranbrook on Tuesday evening,
and on Wednesday motored to Fernie tO attend the celebration and nlso
the dance, reporting on their return
:i "whale of n time."
John A. Lawson drove in with his
new car, n Studebaker, on Tuesday
evening from Cranbrook, and on
Wednesday, accompanied by Angus
McRae, tackled the rood to Fernie.
for the big hall game held there between tho Fernie and Great Falls,
Mont., teams, the latter winning the
game by a score of five to three.
We understand that the high monies
bet on the outcome of the game by
each teams' fans, were almost as interesting to bystanders as the game
itself.
Ben Embree. P. Hurry and J. Dow
took the evening train for Fernie on
Wednesday evening, to attend the
big celebration dance, motoring back
next morning in company with Dyer
Elderking, who spent the dny there
taking in the sports and dance.
lames Brackett, district agent for
the Mutual Life Co,, wns in town on
husiness for his company on Thursday.
Mr. Jackson, J.P., and constable
Donahoe held court at the local police station on Thursday evening,
when two local men were up for
trial, the first for driving without
lights, for whieh he was fined five
dollars and cents, and the second a
much heavier fine, amounting to
fifty dollars and costs, for having
beer in his car.
Misses Marjory and Rene Bryant
arrived in Wardner on Thursday for
a week's visit with their sister, Mrs,
Frank Thompson.
Mr. and Mrs. B, Hyaclnthe and
daughter spent Sunday in Wardner
visiting Mr. and Mrs. Alec Daye.
Mr. Lars Lawson, of Kansas City,
arrived In town on Saturday lust,
and will-spend the summer months
here visiting Ms brother, John tow-
son, of the Wardner Hotel,
Mr, and Mrs. Fred Wynne and family, accompanied by Mrs. Wynne's
aunt, Mrs, Williams nf Saskatoon,
and her son, Gordon, left on Saturday on a two weeks' motoring trip,
which will take them to Spokane,
Seattle and Vancouver, where they
will visit friends before their return
home. %
Interest and excitement over the
series of ball games being played
between the Bull River nnd Wardner
junior teams, reached its peak after
the finish of the sixth game on Friday evening, -which was won by Bull
River by a score of twelve to five,
giving the Wardner kids their heaviest licking so far. Of tho six games
played, each team"hns won three, and
adults and kids alike lire up on their
toes anticipating the next game.
At Friday evening's game Wnrdner,
as usual,'• started .out u-flying, and
continued so until about the sixth inning, when they copied the antics
sometimes tried by the big teams,
md "want wttd.** allowing their op-
pvwntils mak* several scores, te
only being played. Harold Antler
son pitched for the home team, whili
Holman, later relieved by Douglas;
handled the ball for Bull River. Bun
Embree ncted as umpire. The usual
large crowd of adults were present,
and a collection was taken up for
the kids, which amounted to about
ten dollars. As three games have
now been played in each town, it is
thought that it will be tossed for to
decide whether the next and deciding game between the kids will take
place in Wardner or Bull River.
Meanwhile, plans are being made by
the Wardner kids' team for a game
against the Crauhrook junior team,
to take place in Cranbrook on Wednesday evening next.
Mr. nnd Mrs. Paul Storey motored
to Cranbrook on Saturday evening
on a shopping trip. Other'Wardnerites motoring to town that evening
included Mr. and Mrs. Vic Lundbum,
Mrs. Donnhoe, Sr., Mrs. H. Haney,
Theo Thompson and sons, Harry and
Sam, and Alec Daye,
The Bull River kids' hall team
were unable to get down to Wardner
to play the junior hall tenm here on
Tuesday evening, as per schedule.
However, not to he done out of their
fun, n number of the married men
of the town organized a scrub team,
and played against the kids for a
seven inning game. Tho married
men were not nearly so skilled at
baseball as they thought, for the kids
easily beat them out to the tune of
seven to four, after almost a riot of
fun and laughs.
Mrs. Clark MaeKenzie and children left on Tuesday evening's train
for Fernie, where she took in the big
July 1st celebration, and spent the
ensuing week visiting friends in Cokato and Fernie,
Don Loos, C, MaeKenzie, A, Stevenson and Walter MaeKenzie motored to Fernie on Wednesday for the
sports.
Mr. and Mrs. Chas, Hamrln ond
family, Mr. ond Mrs. Alec Daye, Mrs.
II. Haney, Mrs. Theo, Thompson anil
son, Rollie and George, formed a pa*.
ty on Wednesday, the first, and spent
the day picnicing out at Peckhnms*
Lake. Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Reuick,
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Daye, and Miss
Maclntyre were also picuicers at the
lake that day.
Miss D. Nordmark left Wardner
on Wednesday for her home in Jaffray, called there, we understand, by
the serious Illness of her grandmother, with whom sh" has made her
home,
Mrs. Williams, of Saskatoon, nnd
son, arrived in Wardner on Wednesday on nn extended visit to her niece,
Mrs. Fred Wynne and family.
Mr. and Mrs. Jnck Scanland and
family, and Misses Ingred Bakhan,
Jennie Moberg and Kathleen Sheppard motored out to Garbutt and
Alleno, six miles from Bull River,
on nn outing, on Wednesday, July
1st,
Several people in Wardner were
very  pleasantly  surprised on Tues-
lay evening to be called upon by
an old friend, in the person of Mrs.
Applin, of Kellogg, Idaho. Mrs, Ap-
plin is well known in Wardner, having resided here six years ago with
her parents, Mr. nnd Mrs. Fcldhaus-
n. before her marriage, the family
later removing to Rose Lake, Idaho,
where they now make their home.
Motoring over to attend the big celebration at Kimberley on July 1st,
Mr. and Mrs. Applin grasped the opportunity to motor down and look up
Id friends here.
Mr, nnd Mrs. Tony Thompson and
family, and Miss Edith Maclntyre1
motored to Bull River on Tuesday
for services.
The Anderson boys and Bill Mailer motored out to Big Sand Creek
on Sunday morning for a few fish.
J. Martinos was a business visitor
to Fernie on Monduy, making the
journey in his truck for supplies,
Tom  Beck  and  daughter, Jessie,
were visitors in Wardner on Monday
from Fernie, Mr, Beck looking over
the insurance business of the town.
Mr. Haney, assisted by his son,
Tom, has been busy during the past
week cutting hay, his land this year
having produced an excellent early
crop of fine alfalfa.
Roy Barrows journeyed to Cranbrook on Monday, for an examination by Drs. Green and MacKinnon
of his forefinger, which was hurt in
Sunday's ball game when struck by
the ball. The finger was found to
be broken, necessitating his laying
off work for some days.    '
In spite of expectations to the contrary, Wardner again lost their league gnme on Sunday, when they
were beaten by the Cranbrook team
to the tune of fourteen-elcven, playing on the Wardner diamond. The
Wardner t«nm held down the visitors
hard until the fifth inning, and then
went to pieces absolutely—letting
the Cranbrook team make ten scores
In the one Inning, mainly through
errors, nfter two mon were down.
Reed stnrted the gnme for the home
tenm, but was relieved by Dow in
the sixth jnning. the latter pitching
excellent ball. Two decisions caused
a groat deal of argument on the part
of both teams, during the game.
Outside of the one inning, the boys
plnyed fairly good ball; but, however,
not good enough to help them any,
being over confident and careless.
The Crauhrook tenm also succeeded
in making a lot of erram/and the
fact that they won the gome may be
attributed greatly to the big god,
"luck." The next, and lnst, league
game of the home team takes place
on Sunday next, when Wnrdner will
journey to Wycliffe to piny that
team.
em*
The newly organized Wardner
football team has challenged the
Cranbrook team for a game, to take
place in Cranbrnok on Wednesday
evening. July 16th. The baseball
season being closed hy thnt time, nt
least, os far as league gomes nre concerned, we enn now travel with, ond
boost along, the football team, always remembering that n little enthusiasm will go a long way.
Corson Anderson left nn Mondav
for Worland, Montana, after spending the past week here, visiting his
parents, Mr. and Mn. A. Anderson,
of tt* section koasr.
DR. KING FAVORED
FULL REIMBURSEMENT
TO HOME BANK VICTIMS
Says Fernie Residents Have
Withstood Well Series
of Calamities
acr
The Hon, Dr, King, speaking in the
recent dehate on the Home Bank
question, said: "This is a claim made
by the depositors, many of whom
lost their all in the unfortunate occurrences that took place in the years
11)16 to 1918^ Without laying any
blame at the door of anyone, there
were conditions existing in the country that did create moral claims, and
many moral claims have been assented to by tbis government. As far
as the constituency I have the honor
to represent is concerned, I know
the people resident there. Many of
them come from the eastern provinces, from the Maritinies, many
of them from the Old Country, Scotland and Wales, and many of them
from the continent of Europe. I had.
lose associations with these people
for o number of years, and they are
not the type of people who appeal
for compassionate allowances,
have seen them under great trials
and tribulations. I was in the city
of Fernie following the explosion,
where one hundred of the husbands
ond sons of the mining people had
been killed in one blast. I have
seen them when fire destroyed their
homes, practically wiping out the city
completely, so that they were required to move out for n period, t have
seen them olso during the periods of
epidemics, when there wns sickness
in every household and death ot their
doors. I refer to the epidemic of
li)18. I know the fortitude of these
people and I know that they accepted the situation on every occasion
as something beyond their control,
but they met it standing up. When
I visited the City of Fernie on New
Year's day in 11124, I found a body
of men ond women of an entirely
different mind and disposition from
that which they possessed under other trials and tribulations. I think
therefore, that this is one case
probably in the history of this country when we can take a different
view without establishing a precedent
because I hope in our time and generation wc never will have conditions
existing in Canada such as we experienced during the war period,
when it was necessary for ministers
on account of the war and conditions
then existing, to do probably what
they would not have done under normal conditions. 1 do not think the
amendment should be considered for
a moment. This subject was under
discussion in parliament in 1914.
The legislation for the relief of the
Farmers' Bank passed this house on
that occasion, but unfortunately it
did not receive the support of the up
per chamber. However, those conditions were not comparable with the
conditions existing in 1916 and
1917, and I quite agree with my
honorable friend from Calgary (Mr.
Shaw), and as the representative
from East Kootenay, I say that it
would be agreeable to me to see their
total loss made good to the depositors. The depositors' committee, I
think, hove shown good judgement
and foresight in the fact that they
have, considering all conditions surrounding the claim and the circumstances connected with it, indicated
that if the government of Canada or
Parliament will vote $5,450,000 to
be expended In liquidation of their
claims, that should be accepted as
reasonable and fair compensation for
their losses in this connection. I
trust that this resolution will receive
the same support this evening as was
accorded it this afternoon. I find in
every part of the house a desire on
the part of the members that there
should be some measure of relief,
and I trust the bill will carry successfully through this house and also
through the upper chamber."
■    ■     «>i
ROAD FROM BANFF TO
GOLDEN WILL OPEN
IN FALL OF 1926
Will Give Alternative Rwte
Through Yoho National Park
Work on the last nine miles of th.
highway from Lake Louise to Field,
B.C., Is under way, but it is not likely that the road will he opened before next year, according to J. M.
Wardle, chief engineer of the Canadian National Parks.
i This important announcement will
be welcome news to tourists who
have longed for the opportunity to
travel through and enjoy the beau-
tics of the Yoho Valley, reputed to
contain the real grandeur of the Canadian Rockies.   !
The Field-Golden road will be
rushed after that, and will he open
iu the fall of 1920.
It will make a wonderful motor
tour from Banff through Lake Louise and on to Golden, the run from
Banff being 94 xk miles. From Golden south, the route to Cranbrook is
direct, being 175 miles. It is 80
miles from Golden to lnvermere, and
95 miles from lnvermere to Cran-
brook.
Oo  Um   pment Banf-Uvenwio
route, the distance is 104 miles, and
after Ihis year, tourists will have the
option nf proceeding to Golden, or
going directly down the Windermere
route to lnvermere. Tlio new Golden highway will open much attractive country, abounding in scenic1
beauty and plenty of fishing.
Mr. Wardle says nine and a half
miles on the old grade are ready for
use on this Banff-Field route, but it
will have to undergo a certain
amount of repair yet, and this will
also be completed by this fall. From
Field to Golden is a run of 30 miles,
and of this, 111 miles are included in
the Yoho Valley park, and the balance of the highway is to be constructed by the B.C. government.
Nine miles of this route from Golden east have already been done by
the government, and a contract has
been let for another six miles to be
done right away. It is costing be-,
tween $26,000 and $.'10,000 a mill
z   When using \
WILSON'S   x
FLY PADS
,,    RfAD   DIRECriJNS
"^ CABEFUl.Y  AND
" '-- FDLL0V*  TIEM/
\"\      EXiCTLY/i
Bast of all Fly Killers 10c
per Packet at all Druggists,
Grocers and General Stores
By Arthur Brisbane
YES, WE ARE VERY RICH.
$5,000 FOR GUESSING.
FLYING IN THE ARCTIC.
ONE LADY LEARNS.
This is a frightfully rich nation.
The countries of Europe owe us
ten thousand millions and will pay
US, including interest, THIRTY
THOUSAND MILLIONS in the
next 61 years.
European debts due to private
American purchasers of Europe's
obligations amount to eight thousand million dollars. These securities, averaging high interest
rates will compel Europe to pay
our citizen* (1500.000.000 a year—
with the principal when due.
Old Rome, with her consulj
pouring in money and slaves from
eonquered territory, was not nearly as "well fixed" as Uncle Sam.
No wonder some of our friends in
Kurope worry, ami ask "Did we
flght each other onlv to make
Uncle Sam rich!"
Our answer is "We didn't ask
you to right.   Be wiser next time."
The American Society for the
control of Cancer is cheerful. It
reports excellent progress. Thousands of lives, now needlessly sscri-
fleed, would be saved, if people
were informed and would keep
away from quacks. The society
denies the statement recently made
Ot a convention of doctors that "nobody really knows anything about
cancer."
"Cancer is not contagious or inherited," says the American So-
dsty. Take the cancer In the beginning when it is only local.
David Cowan, a young Canadian,
won $5,000 for the best essay predicting the developments in electrical industry between 1920 and
1980. At the end of 1930, the
American Superpower Corporation
wffl gtt* $10,000 to the essay
wiMar whose predictions come
■wast to the truth.
Ysmur    Cowan    kn*w    iw*V**»«»
about electricity, when BeeMgh*
k Co. offered ths prise. He assd
his brains, studied tba history of
electricity in industry, 1st Us imagination work, and WON.
The Moderation League reports
that drinking "in the South" haa
Increased 120 per cent In thirty-
four cities, under prohibition.
Why pick out the South? There
is no more drinking there than
elsewhere. In any part of the
United State:; ynu can drink as
much as you like. The only trouble
Is tbat what you drink in the way
of whiskey is a little worse poison
than it used to be.
"Why," asks a newspaper man,
"do you say it would be less dangerous for tlie Shenandoah to go
tn Spitzbergen and hunt for
Amundsen than to go from Lake-
hurst to Minneapolis and back?"
ANSWER; Because at this time
of year crossing the Atlantis with
the prevailing winds helping, going on to Spitzbergen from England, with the Patoka waiting
there ns a base, and exploring the
Arctic Ocean a few hundred miles
north would be simple. It would
only mean flying the big Shenandoah in the midsummer climate of
the Arctic, at no great distance
from her bass.
A trip from New York to Minnesota and return through the tons
nf midsummer thunderstorms will
be sufficiently safe, as helium does
not explode or hum. But It would
be more dangerous than a trip to
Spitzbergen and on North at this
season.
Careful inquiry in restaurants
shows that corne<! beef and csb-
bage is the favorite food of the
American public.
Four thousand five hundred and
twelve votes behind came the
vegetable dinner. Nevertheless,
corned beef, excellent for thoae
that live by their muscles, is not
good for thinkers.
Any process that makes DECAY difficult also makes DIGESTION DIFFICULT. While your
stomach is struggling with corded
bssf, or salt pork, your brain can-
aot do its best.
Ons lady, tired of life, killed herself In New York ami left all her
money to her first husband, whom
she hod divorced. Sho cut off
her real husband without a penny,
her lost Utter saying how ldnd
ths Asst husband had been to hsr.
I lhawf to wives oa their eyes
***** toward divorce. Sometimes
**M nt vary well off anl do not
is
It is quite likely that the contract
for the remainder in the Yoho Valley park will he let this year and
work commenced on part of it at
least. The entire run through to
Golden from Banff should be completed by the fall of 1920.
Part of the highway ont of Golden
runs along the mountain side at a
height of -100 feet above the Kicking
Horse river, and affords -wonderful
scenery for the tourist. It is a section that motorists have been anxious to enter for years, hut have heen
prevented hy the incompleted highway. The road from Golden to Cranbrook is in good shape, and ready to
receive heavy traffic as soon as the
link from the east is run in to Golden.
JUNE TEMPERATURES
RISE FROM NEAR FROST
TO EXCEEDING WARM
Following art1 tho daily miurfmum
and minimum temperature.*, record-fid
in Crnnbrook for the month of Juuo,
Max     Min.
■Juno  1    70 88
Juno 2   07 II
Juno   :i      07 -III
Juno 4   02 30
Juno   S       l'-2 46
Juno il   01 -I-i
Juno 7   0-1 43
Juno S   711 .'IS
Juno  9           00 :iS
June 10   OS 43
June 11   Of. 12
June 12   Oil 53
June 13   r.-l 4S
June 14   08 60
June 16   80 42
June 10   70 46
June 17   77 60
June 18   82 40
June 19   SO 02
June 20   94 02
June 21   91 00
June 22   80        61!
June 23   86 49
June 24   83 -10
June 25   05        46
June 20   97        -IS
June 27   98        60
June 28   97        0-1
June 29   83 02
June 30   88 48
PRIZES AWARDED
AT INVERMERE
SCHOOL AT CLOSING
(Special  lo the  Herald)
Invtrmere. B.C., July -1—The prizes won and awarded by the children
attending the lnvermere school, under the care of Mips E. H. Brookes,
were awarded at the closing exercises on the last day of June. These
comprised:
Essay prize, given by thn Native
Sons of Canada, and won by Jessie
Frater, the subject being "Two Heroines of Canada."
For the year's work, prizes given
by Mrs. George A. Bennett, were
won in the Senior Division by Jessie
Frater, and in the Junior Division by
Barbara Scott, with 80 per cent.
For needlework— 1st prize, Jr.
Division, Barbara Scott; extra prize,
Jenny Weir.
For handwork—Jr. Division, 1st,
Ong Moon Wai; 2nd, James Frater.
For gardens— Prize given by K.
Randolph Bruce, won by Georgie
Sims.
For care of trees— Prize given by
R. Randolph Bruce, won by Esmond
Taylor.
For bird box— Pri'.e given by Miss
Brookes, won hy Jenny Weir.
The following certificates were
given to those whose names are
shown below:
For  Proficiency—Ong Bin  Nam.
For Deportment—Norah Tompkins.
For Punctuality and Regularity—
Barbara  Scott.
Proven beat
Since 1857
time tested;
baby food
Write Borden Co. Md.. Tu.
mw, l«r t Vak, UoeU PAOE FOUR
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
Thursday, July 9th, 1925
■Ny«WftM^^Aft^^^vw.^wftflA^^^^^^^■.v.^■.^v.v.v.v.^■.^■.v.,;
ami
YOUR MOST PRICELESS POSSESSION
Gel the Facts Alinut Your
Eyes.
— Special Attention Given to Children —  ..
RAWORTH Bros:
NEXT DOOR TO THF. POST OFF1CF.
DISPENSERS OF JOY
itV*V*Vfffffffffffffffffffff^
**************************
I        TWENTY
!     YEARS  AGO
*
*      Extracta  from  the  liaue of
X    The Cranbrook Herald of ibis
| ;j;        Date Twenty Years Ago.
I * . .. . . . ......*. ^.,.*.*..*.
I Bishop Dart of New Westminster
has beon a visitor in the city this
week, a guest ut the home of Mr.
and Mrs. V. Hyde Baker.
Tenders are being asked for the
removal <>f the Presbyterian Church
building to the rear of tbe lot, and
the erection of a new edifice.
One death has resulted from tbe
accident at the C, P. R. depot, when
the building collapsed as it was being
raised for the addition of another
storey, ^_
Rev, .1. P. Westman preached his
flrsl Bermon to bis new congregation
ai Ibe Methodisl Church on Sunday.
I,. P. Sullivan uf Winnipeg is the
latest addition to the Herald stair,
nnd will ht- working ou tbe typesetting machine,
K J, Peane, editor and proprietor
of the Nelson Dally News spent a
few day:; iii CrflJlbvook this week.
The Moyie Lumber Co, plant commenced operations again last week,
and is employing a force of about
twenty-five men.
Mr, and Mrs, .1. P. Fink and family haveslefi on a visit to the Portland Tail'.
Mission of Mercy
Gbe
Cranbrooit Ifocralfc
PUBLISHED   EVERY   THURSDAY.
F. A. Williams    -    R. Potter, B.Sc.
Subscription Price   $2.00 per year
To U. S. A.    $2.50 per year
ADVERTISING  RATES  ON
APPLICATION.
THURSDAY, JULY 9th, 1925
************************ **
LOCAL HAPPENINGS
**************************
Miss T. Pelkio loft on Tuesday to
spend a short vacation al, Lethbridge,
Wins Mildred Edwards, of Vnhk, Is
a visitor nt the homo or Mr, and Mrs,
John Martin.
IL IL Pimmocknntl C. li. Garland
of Creston, were up from tho fruit
city on Friday last.
Miss Pauline RfcDonaltlj of tin-
Central School stair, left on Wednesday for her home in Kalso,
Bert Sung left on Tuesday for
Lethbrldge to attend the wedding <>f
bis sister in thnt city.
Mrs. G, Kay is visiting with her
■inter. Mrs. Patterson, of Golden, having left on  Monday  for that [dace.
Wednesday c.r tbis week Dr. .1. W.
Rutledge ami A. C. Bowness left on
an auto trip for Windermere nud
Golden.
Miss Myrtle Martin Is enjoying a
two weeks* vacation visiting at the
home of Miss M. McCaslln, of the
Central School teaching staff.
Fred Adolph and Mr Elder, representative." of the Sim Life Assurance
Co., were business visitors in the city this week.
Tin- regular monthly meting of
tbe Union Church Ladies' Aid will he
held nl lhe home of Mrs. McNeil,
Garden Avenue.   Tuesday, duly llth,
James P, Fnrnham, prominent mining man of New York City, passed
through Crnnbrook this week on his
way to sevcrnl properties in the vicinity in which he is interested,
Mr, Harry Collier and family are
enjoying a few weeks' vacation, camping in various plnces in the vicinity.
They have ns Iheir guests Mr. Collier's brother, Godfrey, and his family, from  Vulcan, Alia.
Bob Armitngo, formerly one of Hie
R. G. M. P, stationed here, hut now
..I' Lellibrldge, is expected in the cily Thursday lu make a short slay over ..n his wny to the toast, lie will
visil Corporal IL Wilson.
W. .1. Bulley, of the Bentlie-Nqblc
stnff, who is enjoying a two weeks'
vacation, returned to the city on
Wednesday to .meet his brother, Mr.
A. (I. Bulley, of Vancouver, who was
passing through the city,
Miss Gladys Nicholson leaves on
Sunday for Saskatoon when she will
spend Lhe summer months with her
sister. Mrs. \V. T. Webb, before go-
intf in fo ihe hospilbl, where she in
lends taking her (nrfiiiiig-as a nurse.
The names of Cameron & Sung,
and Millhank Cigarettes were
brought very much to the front by
the appearance on the streets this
week of a new delivery car with tin1
body bearing the names of the firm
and lhe fnvorlte brand of cigarettes
mentioned. The decorating is well
done, Ross Carr beipg responsible,
The daily papers this week published Hie announcement from    London
that the judicial committee   of   the
rivy Council had decided for the de
fendant company, in the appeal on
the case of Thos. Caven, of this city,
versus the 0, P. R. The case was
presented to the Privy Council by
Calgary lawyers about n month or
six weeks ugo,
.lames Martin is enjoying life at
the present time on the prairies, ha
vlng left on Tuesday for Lethbridge
and intending to visit tbe Martin
Bros, ranch at Pincher Creek before
returning.
While assisting in the replacing of
a spare wheel on the rack at the back
of his ear on Monday last, Mr. W. H.
Wilson was tbe victim of an accident
through wliich he hud the end of
tho first finger on his left hand taken off above the nail. It appears
that while be wus assisting to put
the wheel on tbe ruck, it missed the
holts over which it goes, allowing it
lo drop. Mr. Wilson who was waiting to tighten up the nuts, had his
finger resting on the rear fender,
when the iron wheel struck it, practically shearing it off. It was necessary to hnve tlie finger treated by
Or. MacKinnon, who completed the
operation of removing the piece of
lacerated finger.
. Friday evening last members of
| Ihe Rotary Club held a bee in the
new tourist park, when a good nuin
her turned out to help put the new
cump grounds in better shape. With
axe and rake, it wus not long before
a marked improvement was made in
the new grounds. The work not being entirely completed, another bee
is planned to take place Friday evening next, when it is anticipated
that in cvompuny with the Gyros the
grounds will be put in good shape
ready for opening ubout the middle
of the month,     Those who have vi-
teil the park and ure acquainted
with the plans thut are proposed, feel
confident, tlmt the. Cranbrook    park
Mediterranean Was Once Whole World
EMPRESS   OP     S*j^fy"'GJm\
scotland* /•*
[at fung ha l
mao&ira /,: |
*f*a*» -V-vf ■
m
3*
l    «.'. -***.<: *■*.*,<
4'N *..*.,<    , *•* .,.», .  I
^ -^ . :| >-><* /i'. |; P | v4       *        **,
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■:' Jit.    -U      j -J*-* -   ~ -.- ?■' = ir** * >•>*'*'    '   v   ■'•-• ■'---
WAILING PLACE  Of
JEWB    IN
OCHUbALEM
The Mediterranean was once tho
whole   world   from   a   murine
standpoint; to-day it is hut a small
fiart of the marine world, hut whan
he traveller of this century passes
through the strait of Gibraltar and
makes a tour of the gateway ports
covering Algeria, Greece, Turkey,
Syria, Palestine, Egypt, Italy and
Mon.ici. he has visited the very
birthplace of the world anil seen
most of the thingn he has longed
to see from early youth. Wanderlust in in every breast, younjj and
old, and to<day the world h on tin-
march, seeing ntrange peoples nml
violtlng places  looming Large on
History's pages. "Have you looped
the tooji around the Mediterranean?" is a phrase much in vogue,
nnd each yeur thuusands of
wanderlust folk nre able to say
"Yes!" and wish that they were
going to lonti the same old loop
again.
The "Empress of Scotland," if a
hig steamship of 2f>,UUU tuns gross
register and 87,600 tons displacement, could be interviewed, would
say that she was departing on her
fourth annual cruise of the Mediterranean from New York on Feb.
'.i, 11)25, nml that although she
could find her way around in the
dark she would much prefer daylight so that she would' not miss
any of the wonderful scenery of
the Mediterranean. Passengers on
thu "Empress" will see Madeira,
then drop in to pay a call upon Lisbon, Portugal, as well as another
call upon Cadiz, Spain, with Seville
ns ft side trip. Gibraltar, the famous
"Kock" next gets the once over,
and then Algiers, capital of the
French colony of Algeria is visited. Athens, Greece, Constantinople and the Bosphorua are next,
iiiul when the ship visits Beyrout
nnd Haifa nil the famous places ot
the Holy Land are within a short
distance of the vessel. "The storied
Nile" awaits the "Kmnress" and l'i
days are spent in seeing tbe cities
of Alexandria and Cairo, the Pyramids, the Sphinx, etc.; then Naples,
Pompeii, Rome, Monaco,' Cher-
l'ourg, Southampton and other
idacw. One can see a lot In 62
days in and about this cradle of
civilization, and that's the job of
tbe big oil-burning "Empress of
Scotland," the largest vessel In tba
whole Canadian FocUto float
Mrs. II. W. Wade, formerly nf
New Orleans, is now in New York
from the Philippines to champion
a million dollar drive foi thc leper
colony in the islands.' Her husband, Dr. Wade, is ajtlng chief
than.
the yeur just closed.
The report of thc High School
inspector, Mr. DeLong, was received
und filed.
A quotation from the Ajux Coal
Co. was received and filed.
A letter from Mr. Angus Hay, secretary Cranbrook Agricultural Association was received, asking that
Sept. 16th be declared a school holiday, to enable the children to attend the fair. The letter was laid
over to be dealt with Aug. 7th,
Requisition for supplies from the
various principals of the schools were
received, and the supplies wanted
were authorized to lie ordered.
Miss McCuslin in u letter to the
Board accepted the Increase of $50
per annum.
Miss Lippett wrote signifying her
intention to remain at Kootenay Orchards school for another yenr.
An application of Miss Wright for
an increase to $1250 per annum was
received nnd held over to be dealt
wilb at the meeting to be held Aug.
tli.
Accounts amounting to ?;i04*i.4i
were passed  for payment.
will not be excelled in beauty or appointments by any park 111 the north
west. The committee are desirous
thut u good number be on bund on
Friday to insure a good job being
done.
pet*
Miss Smith and Miss Laura Gieger-
Ich. both of Kaslo, have been appointed to vacancies on the stub* of
the Crunbrook high school. The former hus been teaching ut Kuslo, und
Miss Giegerich, who has been on the
stutr ut Fernie, is a sister of Mrs. G.
E. L. MacKinnon. The school bourd
hus u good number of applications
for the remaining positions still open on the stall' and enquiries are
being made us to their experience
and standing with the inspector he-
fore the appointments ure made.
While these beautiful evenings are
not very conducive to large atendan-
ces ut indoor meetings, everyone
who possibly can should leave the
garden for one night, or give the cur
u night nt home, und make it a point
to be ut the city hall ou Monday evening next, when the regulur monthly meeting of the board of trade will
take place. As hus been previously announced, these meetings are now
to be held regularly the second Monduy in each month, and the board
are anxious that the greatest possible
interest be taken In them by the public generally. Mutters of interest
to every member of the community
are discused at these meetings, and
much could result from a free discussion of all the questions brought up.
It is not the desire of any limited
number of members to determine
this or that policy. The fact, is,
however, tbat in many cases matters
have to be decided in board of trade
councils, or by similar bodies, and the
decisions are conscientiously arrived
at, only to be criticized by thc man
in the street with "they did tbis,"
and "they did that," whereas "they"
would only have been too glad to
have had the opportunity of hearing
the opinions of others before coming to a decision. At the meeting on
Monday night two or three timely
questions are likely to come up, so
be on hand.
REGULAR SCHOOL
BOARD MEETING ON
FRIDAY EVENING LAST
The regular monthly meeting of
the Hchool bourd took place on Friday evening last in the Couneii
Chamber, trustees Gilroy. Hendernon
and Mm. Jackson, and chairman Dezall being present.
Miss Woodland, principal of the
Central School, gave an interesting
review of the wo-rk done at the Central School, and of the conditions
existing there during the year, Tn
regard to the work of the seveal teachers, she mentioned the numes of
several whose excellent work was deserving of special note, as well as
the names of others who had shown
considerable improvement over the
work done in the previous year. She
also took the opportunity of thanking the members of thc Board for
their co-operation and support.
In voicing thc nppeciation of the
Board for the faithful services of
the prinripul and the majority of the
teachers, chairman Dezall stated that
the results were a great source of
satisfaction to the Board.
The resignation of Mr. Porter ns
principal of the High School was received and accepted. It was moved
by Trustee Gilroy, and seconded by
Trustee Mrs. Jackson, thut the secretary write Mr. Porter expressing
the regret of the members of the
Board at his leaving, and their appreciation of his services during his
two years as principal.
It wns also moved by Mrs. Jackson and seconded by Trustee Hen- Thur.day, July 16
derson thnt thc secretary write the LET   US   REASON   TOGETHER,
various principals, Misses Woodland, SAITH    THE    LORD:    THOUGH
Curley und Lippett, expressing the YOUR   SINS   RE   AS   SCARLET,
appreciation of the Board of the ef- THEY SHALL BE AS WHITE AS
forts of the various toothers during SNOW.—Iia. 1:18.
CONCENTRATOR WINS
FROM LOCAL FOOTBALLERS BY SMALL MARGIN
Wednesday evening un interesting
game of football was played nt the
local grounds when the Cranbrook
eleven met the Concentrator squad*
Before a very smull crowd, a good
majority of whom were from Chap*
man, n good game was played. The
Cranbrook team put up a better game
than they have for some time, their
back line being particularly effective
tive. Thc score was I to nothing in
favor of tho Concentrator, the lone
goal being scored soon after the start
of the second period. It was a slow
ball which looked ensy to stop, but
got by. Considering the fact that
thc Cranbrook team is hardly ever
out except at a game, their showing
was particularly good. Gib, Sinclair
made his first appearance of the season, und turned in a good game, and
with Henderson and Malcolm, the local defence kept the Concentrator
guessing. Russell,, McDonuld and
Eceleston put up strong games for
the visitors. Reeves, for Cranbrook,
was the pick of the home team.
The line-up wns:
Cranbrook — W. Smith, G. Sinclair, Scotty Malcolm, W. Henderson,
W. Johnson, W. Reeves, Bert Bell,
E, Dingley, II. White, C. Emslie and
W. J. Bailey.
Concentrator — Dickenson, Sar-
gcant, Kccleston, Holdsworth, Russell, McDonald, Crane, J. Evans, C.
Evans, H. Kvans, Danny Nee.
Bill Kilgour of Kimberley, ref-
ereed,
Friday, July 10
WITHHOLD NOT THOU THY
TENDER MERCIES PROM ME, O
LORD: LET THY LOVJNGKIND-
NESS AND THY TRUTH CONTINUALLY PRESERVE ME.—Psl. 40:
II.
• * • •
Saturday, July 11
WHOSOEVER WILL COME AFTER ME, let him deny himself, and
take up his cross, ond follow me. For
whosoever will save his life shall lose
it; but whosoever shull lose bis life
for my sake and the gospel's, the
same shall save it.—Mark 8:34, 36.
• •*•'•
Sunday, July 12
REMEMBER NOW thy Creator in
the days of thy youth, while the evil
days cume not, nor the years draw
nigh, when thou shalt say, I have no
pleasure in them. Let us hear the
conclusion of the whole matter: Fear
God, und keep his commandments:
for this is the whole duty of man.—
Ecc.  12:1, 18.
• • • •
Monday, July 13
HOW EXCELLENT is thy loving-
kindness, O God I therefore the children of men put their trust under
the shadow of thy wings. They shall
be ahunduntly satisfied with the fatness of thy house; and thou shall
make them drink of the river of thy
pleasures.—Psalm 30:7, 8.
• * • *
Tue.d.y, July 14
PURE RELIGION and undefiled before God and the Father Is this, To
visit the fatherless and widows in
their affliction, and to keep himself
unspntted from the world.—James 1:
27.
• * * •
WednMdiy, July IS
CAST AWAY from you all your
transgressions, whereby ye have
transgressed: and make you a new
heart and a new spirit: for why will
ye die, O house of Israel? For I have
no pleasure in the death of him that
dlcth, saith the Lord God: wherefore
tarn yourself nnd live ye,—Ezekiel
18:81, 32,
Where Are You Going To My Pretty Maid?
Ml'M going to Canada, sir," she said.
1 And here she ls, ln Montreal;
suitcase, dolly, dimples and all.
Her name Is Miss Llla Mary Cour-
tenuy, and she Is two and a half years
old. She comes from Bromley, England, and crossed the mighty Atlantic
nil nlone on the Canadian Pacific
steamship "Mlnnedosa," rested a day
ut Uie Canadian Women's Hostel,
.Montreal, where she Is shown above,
inil then proceeded still unaccompanied to Culgary, Alberta, where her
fntlier met her and escorted her
r-nroe to Edmonton.
She ls, ns you see, not much bigger
than a minute am) prettier than most
pictures. When she arrived at tho
Women's Hostel, sin- came straight to
tho point and nskotl anxiously
"Please, is my daddy here". But,
after a few tears ot disappointment,
she made herself nt home ami smiled
happily at the Tunny man' with the
camera. She had a long, Ioiik way
to go lint the Canadian Pacific officials ai! nlong the route had been
notified of her coming and although
actually unaccompanied, she enjoyed
her trip Immensely.
f*^oV*VftVftVeVtVk*eVftiVftVf^^
Co-Operative
Phone 104     -GROCERIES-    Phone 104
APRICOTS FOR PRESERVING
LEAVE VOUR ORDER, AS THB SUPPLY IS LIMITED.
STRAWBERRY JAM, per glass .
GINGER SNAPS; 25c per Ib.	
HERRINGS IN TOMATO SAUCE
CLARKE'S GOVERNOR SAUCE,
DOG BISCUITS, per package 	
SALLY ANN, the Rreat Cleanser ...
— This week only — ONE TIN FREE —
We are selling agents for MAPLE LEAL' FLOUR.
We carry a full line of Feeds — Prices Right
  25c
  5 lbs. $1.00
  2 for 35c
per bottle 25c
  50c
  2 tins 25c
Cranbrook Dist. Co-Op. Soc.
vww*iwwvwwi«wAvyvAwwwvwA"
" ""Vffffffffffffffffffff
THE CENTURY CAFE
Is Now
Under New Management
From WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17th
The Dining Room Hai Been Altered and the Service
Improved
WEEKLY ROOM & BOARD AT REASONABLE PRICK
LEE DVE, Proprietor
The OM Location   ■   Van Horne St., Opposite C. P. R. Depot
Vf*Vffffffffffffffffff
Preserving Apricots
$3:25 per Case
LOOK!- JELLYTUMBLERS
75c and $1.25 per dozen
OUR CROCKERY SALE
Is Still On
John   Manning
PHONE 173
OFFICE 93 Thursday, July 9th, 1925
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
•:::vffffff*vfffffffffff.vfffffffffffffffffffffffffff
Kimberley and Wycliffe
Notes
UVV%VVSWJWMAM«AVA«WWiV%%\SWMWyVVWVWVVVWW«V
WYCLIFFE NOTES
***********************
tee
lite
A Chinaman known uh Charlii
wns injured ltist TluiiHiluy ut
auwmill. He was struck by a tie
wliich hail fallen from the rollers,
nml which was thrown forward with
ureal forco hy the carriage, atrlkttui
lhe man in the stomach. Al. first it
was l.elieved he was very seriously
hurt, hut it uow appears thai hu is
making good program,
Itoliilnyinnkors from this point
Rpnttorotl far and wide during last
Wodt)outlay, the majority B|iQlldlng
ihi' cloy at the big colobrutlon in
Klmborloy, while others collected
their riahlllg taekle and hied forth to
make thlligfl interest Ing for the fin-
n,\ liilie. Picnic parlies wore numerous, and many look the opportunity in enjoy a swim at G 1*00)1 Hay
or Smith's Lake, lhe aquatic centres
of tho district,
W. Ciiillioano, who was injured al
lhe planing mill some time ago, has
heen aide lo resume his work. Ho
has recently heen joined hy his family, who hnvo boon residing iu ('run-
Miss Frances Chelmiek, R.N., of
the St. Eugene hospital nursing staff,
was a visitor at hor homo horo during
last woek.
Heintz Hollmnn had the misfortune to injure his right hand while
at work in the plaiting milt on Friday, having suffered u broken hone
in the member, which will keep him
on tho hospital list for some time
to come.
Miss Mary Parks, of Vancouver,
is a visitor at the home of her sister,
Mrs. .1. L. Crowe.
Sunday's boll game ut Lumberton
proved to he hud medicine for tho
locnls, who, after the question had
been argued for eight and one hulf
Innings, found themselves burdened
with the misery end of u 2-1 score.
Hob Mitchell, prominent resident unci
dangerous pitcher of the neighboring
put the quietus on more than ono,
hy retrieving the pill on the third
strike, and slamming it down to first.
On the other hand, Hinton kept tho
strike-outs to the clean-cut variety,
very apparent on either squad, as the
Individual work in the field was not
main taSfie was being engaged between the rival twirlors on. the hill.
However, the majority of the spectators agreed that it was unite a ball
gamo, but otic had to bo a bona fide
resident of Lumberton to fully no
predate' tlie   result.
Summary:'
UiSn--i.fr ,lohren, 5; of! Mitchell.
I, Buses on bulls—by .lohron, 1;
by Mitchell, ff, Struck oui—bv Johren, II); by Mitchell, 12. Hit Hats
tnan—lohren, 1 (Dwelley. Wild
pitches Johren, 2, Innings pitched
- by Johren, 8j bv Mitchell, lt, Twn
base hits- Lavoie, Mitchell, Stem-
berge. Stolen base—Piper, Double
piny—Lumber ton, Downey to Hognrth lo Mason, Field errors—Wy-
elill'e, 1 (Piper); Lumborton, 7 (La-
vole 4, Hogarth 3), First huso on
errors—vVyclill'e. 2; Lumborton, 1.
Left on bascfi—Wycliffe, 4; Lumherton, U. Umpires—Caverley und Brogan.
Following Sunday afternoon's
game, the Wycliffe players and supporters took the occasion for a swim
n Smith Lake, whore the manager
tried to end his remorse and sorrow
ver the late festivul of grief by diving oil' the high board. He was not
successful, but he enjoyed a close-up
view of the hike bottom.
PAQE   FIVE
Fire Truck Gobi to Ktmhrriry
************************* ;
1   KIMBERLEY
NEWS NOTES f
* i
*************************
T. A. Bnxter returned the end of
the week from the const having spent
n two weeks' holiday there,
Fmraett Pierce left Thursday for
Boston, where he will visit for some
time, returning to Kimberley ufter
Uie holidays.
Dominion First Aid Champions.
At the Place Viger Hotel, Montreal, last week, and for the firat time since the war, first aid teams from McAdam,
N.B., and the Weston Shops, Winnipeg, Mun., met in competition for the grand challenge cup, presented by
the Canadian Pacific Railway, to the C.P.R, centre ef the St. John Ambulance Association for amiuaf competition
between the champion teams of Eastern and Western Lines, representing the championship of the systemT The
McAdam team (left of central figure) won the trophy, gaining 352 points out of a possible 460 while the Winnloeir
team gained 832 points. Dr. H. A. Beatty, chief Surgeon and Medical Officer of the company acted as judge
W. M. Neal, assistant to the vice-president of the company In presenting the award at the conclusion of the
S&SPfPiSSf at?d tha^ mnce th9 Cana(lian p«ci(ic branch of the St. John Ambulance Association was formed in
J? i.V21 ■.' c° em.P,°y(jes bave received instruction in First Aid. The contestants are:—Loft to Right—Front Row
O. W. Gehan, McAdam; Wm. Dawson, McAdam; A. G. Shakespeare, Instructor; Thomas Manshridire and W
Reynolds, Winnipeg Middle Row: C. Bogart and C. W. Ue, McAdam; Dr. H. A. Beatty, F. Perkins and £ G
Noble, instructor, Winnipeg.   Buck Row: W. F. Bailey, McAdam. E. J. Bull und H. Shaw, Winnipeg.
mill town, did n whole lot of fancy|£"'"rJ
throwing, nnd wus elegantly support- ' roctoi
ed, at times, by his fellow employ
ees. His sole gift to the fracas was
n single, the endowment being received by Larry Piper, who, to show
is appreciation of Scotty's generosity, went around the sucks while the
Lumberton nine played hnndhall
with variations, recorded in the book
as   "errors,"   ami   volplaned   home
from the hot corner, while Mitchell |tl|rning th(, SiM of lhe week
and Lavoie were vainly trying to . .,.,... , ..,! . aV
transact some put-out business.enjoyed the glorious fourth in the
Lumberton made their mark early, j inland-empire city. They were ac-
two singles and n double accounting companied by Mrs. Guy Mahaffey, of
Mrs, Frank Carlson and Iris left on
Sundny for a. two weeks' visit    ut
They will be the guests
of Mrs. J. P. Fink of Cranbrook.
to this for some time, aud fully deserved the success achieved,
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Wells of Cran
brook wore Kimberley visitors ovor
the first.
Mrs, It. A. Smith und son George
of Moyie WenJ Kimherley visitors
over the 1st.
Mr. and Mrs. H^dley McLeod motored to Spokane on Thursday lnst, re-
They
for two tallies in the initial frame
the total that was not improved upon during the remainder of the session. Restrained footwork prevented the locals from grabbing a counter in their share of tho first. Hinton being thrown nut at the plate on
Clark's fielder's choice. Piper's solo net entertained the capacity house
in the seventh, coming nt n time
when a shut-out soomed to be just
n little more thnn a rumor. Mitchell undoubtedly threw one of the
Lest games nf the season, but while
ruminating on the fact, it occurs to
us that Johren did a stretch of chuc-   , ,. . .
king that deserves plenty of promi- [dnnce on Friday night on the open
nonce. After Lumberton s three hits [air pavilion at the school (grounds,
in the opener thoy garnered but twoj^rfi will he one of the events of the
more from his delivery. Further
more, the single that did tho damaging work in the score column was
one   of  those   perpendicular   loftorsl     _,   ,       .,, ""     . «      . ,,
that only get into the base hit class       ™W ^munn    of Ferine    paid
once or twice in a season.      Both'Kimlierley a visit on Friday.
cut  their quota of am-
'■ f ranhrook. . .       - •;•■
j The funeral of the late Mrs. Mc-
il.eod in Cranbrook lust Thursdny was
] largely attended by Kimberley people who wore friends of the family,
also by many from Cranbrook. The
funeral services were held at the
Presbyterian Church. The sympathy
of the community is extended to the
beeaved family.
The  Gyros are giving their first
season, and should be well patronized.
Litioi
slrlki
hatters   over   the    sorrowful
mil   troll,   but   Lavoie   had   t
NISBET & GRAHAM
Barristers, Solicitors, &c
Office!: Imperial Bank Bldg.
CRANBROOK, Hi
OFFICES al KlMBBRLBY
INK. of l>. II AI.l.
Open Kvery Thlli-mlay from
II) a.tn. tu 5 p.m.
The firsl of July celebration went
Off with i' lijintr us usual —■ something
doing all day long. Large crowds
attended tho celebration.    The floats
'wero numi-rous and pretty, nnd the
owners Of theflt ami the ears deserve
great crodlt. all being greatly ndmir-
i...1 hy the crowds of people who witnessed the parade.
I The Angtirnn Phitroh I.ndies' Aid
held a lawn aoclal nt the North
Slar Hotel on Wednesday afternoon.
The ladies have hoi-n limiting forward
Dr. Davis has ns his gliosis this
week his father anil mother.
Mr. ami Mrs. Tom Summers nml
family spent Sunday at Green Bay.
A largo bush fire started the first
of the week on tho Meailowbrook
road and at last reports considerable
dnmnge had been done to tho Staples
property. Ruin fell, which dampened the country somewhat, and with
the assistance of the flro fighters,
the blaze is now under control.
Mr. and Mrs. E, G. Montgomery
and daughter Eileen returned from
the enst on Sunday last.
A tennis tournament, and picnic
was held in ICimberley Sunday lost
and a very enjoyable time was had.
Cranbrooit was greatly in evidence,
und carried oir most of the honors,
although Kimberley received iis
share.
Mr. Joe fiiegorich is leaving shortly for Chili. South America. Joe
will certainly be missed by liis many
friends in town, and it is hoped he
will meet with every success in his
new venture.
Mr. E. G. Montgomery left the
first of the week for Trail.
Mr. and Mrs. Win. Lindsay were
Cranbrook visitors on Saturday.
C. A. Foote antl family spent Sunduy nt Green llay.
The big fire in the early hours of
Saturduy morning at tho Elite Cufo
caused considerable excitement for
some time. At first it looked as
if the whole block would go, bul
there being but little wind at the time
the excellent work of the firemen
held the flumes down. Thc Elite is
a complete wreck and considerable
damage was done to the ltitz Cnfe.
only opened a fcw days before. Aid
was sent for from Cranbrook, hut
before the engine arrived with Chief
Adams the fire was under control.
The hotel nnd cafe were both well
insured.
Frank Carlson opened up his beer
parlor on Howard Street for tho 1st
of July. His hotel will he completed
shortly, and certainly utlds to the (appearance of the street.
Mr. and Mra. E, Louis spent Sunday at Green Uuy.
The Gyros will meet ut the Glen
Cufc on Thursday.
Mr. Gilib, the Fuller Brush man
iias spent a busy week in town, having been here for several days.
The first ruin for some time made
its appearance on Monday, and wus
certainly appreciated.
The two barbers are again opened
up for business in Carlson's Hotel,
They closed up for a short time on
account of the place being remodelled.
Wednesday, the 8th, wns one of
the largest pay days in the history of
Kimberley.
Pete Lowcn of Moyle spent thc Ist
if July in Kimberley,
Experienced   Dressmaking
and Sewing
MISS   DINGLEY
— PHONE SU —
Responding to a hurry call from
Kimberley in the early hours of Saturday last, Fire Chief Percy Ailnms
took the new truck up to Kimberley,
having first been given permission by
the Mayor to leave the city. The
fire was at the Elite Cafe, in the
heart of the business section of Kimberley, and for a time it treatened
to clean out the entire string of buildings on that side of the street. The
fire seemed to originate in the basement, and cleaned out the entire
first floor, and considerably dainag-
ing the rooms of the Kings Hotel
on the upper floor. The work of
the Kimberley firemen, who were
soon on the job, was extremely effective, und with the assistance of
many hose lines brought down from
the mine, the fire was put out before
it broke through the roof of the building. The apparatus from the city
truck was not put Into use, but the
chief assisted in finishing up the
work of putting out the fire, and the
Kimberley people have show,, their
appreciation of the assistance given
them in a substantial manner, At
one time the fire looked to be so
serious that a number of Cranbrook
people with business interests in
Kimberley were notified by telephone
and a number of them made an early
morning trip up.
CARD OF THANKS
Mr, P, Coe gratefully acknowledges the kindly sympathy extended to
him by tho friends of Kingsgate,
of his recent bereavement, these evidences of friendship being keenly
appreciated when the clouds of sur-
row are hanging low.
Kimberley', Big Day A Su
Warren Bowness, son of Mr and
-Mrs. A. C, Bowness, recently arrived
Cranbrook to spend his summer
vacation here. He lias attended the
Hill Military Academy for the pasl
three years. Ile has participated In
all the school activities, and lias mado
ptionally fine record during
[tho past past year.      In the taltltnrj
Notwithstanding various  setbacks
encountered, and unexpected    difficulties, it is gratifying that the Kim-  department lie was *.
berley Amateur Athletic Association r00****- lieutenant.     In
will have a fairly substantial balance wl" e,,,,'r his sonlor j
remaining from their big first of Ju-
ly celebration      The special train ur
from Crunbrook was very poorly pat
ronl-zed,   but the Kimlierley   people I
supported their big day to the limit j
und the surplus is expected to amount
to seven  hundred  dollars.       There!
were some Cranbrook entries   in the
ports, Stanley Moffatt taking a good j
number of prizes.     He won the cup
for the   1(11}  yards  flat  race,     Eric
MacKinnon coming second, and Stanley Moffatt also captured the first in
thc sack race and the potato race,
besides a second in the three-legged
race.    V. Woodman    won the pole
vault event,  and there were a few
other local prize winners.     Kimberley people generally hove not failed
to register strong complaints of the
lack of co-operation from Cranbrook
in the staging their celebration, when
Kimberley has so consistently supported events of this nature in Cranbrook.
nl.i
lie
' Bayer''
Unless  you  see  the   "Bayer
Cross" on tablets vou are not
getting the genuine Bayer product proved safe by millions and
prescribed by physicians for 25
years.
O fe/* Accept "Ji? I
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MOUNTAINS TEMPT LOVER OF OUTDOORS
When tea Thlas el lumm
— Call Up -
BEALE & ELWELL
Cmnhronk & KImherley
■ale Areata Ier Materia; TowasHa.
FOR RELIABLE
S h oe  Repairing
Take Your Shun lo the
-O.K. SHOE SHOP-
Norlmry Ave.     -     Cranbrook
For Quality & Value in
Men's llress ft Work Shoe*
SF.F. US   —   W. Nichol, Prop.
*****************************************************
DR. C. W. HUFFMAN, Chiropractor
KlMBBRLBY
(Over Kimberley Hardware)
Mondays, Wednesdays &
Fridays
10 to 6
And by Appointment
CRANBROOK
(Hanson Block)
Tuesdays, Thursdays &
Saturdays
11 -12 and 2 - 5
Alio by Appointment
*****************************************
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
ol Canada, Limited.
OFFICES, SMELTING AND REFINING DEPARTMENT
TRAIL,   BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS AND REFINERS
I'urchaiera ol Oold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Orel
Producer! ol Oold, Silver, Copper, Pig Lead and Zinc
"TADANAC BRAND
whichcontains proven directions
Handy "Baver" boies of 12 tablets
Abo bottles of 54 and 100—Drnggista
A>plr!n 1, tb* ,n&. marl* , r.-v-l--,-r.-l in
CiMdai of Biter M-oiar-n-li**-.- <jf ll,-*.*
•C*t!c«cl-Jt!ttr of i-alic-flkaclj.
Fr'm MONTREAL-QUEBEC
To Liverpool
Jul. 24, Aug. 21, Sept. 18  Montcalm
Jul 31, Aug. 28, Sept. 25   Montclare I
Aug. 7, Sept. 4, Oct. 2  Montrose
Aug. 14, Sept. 11, Oct. y fMontroyal
To Cher'b'a S'bampton Antwerp
Jul 29, Aug. 26, Sept, 23 Minnedosa '
Aug. 12, Sept. 9, Oct. 7 Melita
To Belfait, CUifow
Jul. 30, Aug. 27, Sept 24 tMontnairn
Sept. 3   Montreal!
Aug. 13, Sept. 10, Oct. 8  Metagama
Aug. 20, Sept. 17, Oct. 15....Marburn
To Cher'bf, S'thampton, H.mburj
Jul 22, Aug. 19, tEmpress of France
Aug. 5, Sept. 2 .. tEmpress of France
t From Quebec
Apply Local Agents or
R. W. GREENE
ONE of the finest Alpine territories to be found anywhere
on the North American Continent is that surrounding Mount
Robson, (13,008 ft.), highest penk
in the Canadian Rockies. Here thc
visitor finds magnificent peaks,
awe-Inspiring glaciers and delightful Alplno valleys with their mag-
nlfleenrc of wild flowers to charm
the heart of the nature lover. In
1924 the Alpine Club of Canada
held its annual camp on the shores
of Berg Luke, shown above, ond
numbers of that organization,
-many of whom have climbed in dif-
i parte of   tbo   world, wan
unanimous in declaring that Canada held no more splendid Alpine
and scenic territory than this.
Nor is it necessary that tho visitor be an experienced Alpinist to
enjoy the beauties of the Mount
Hudson district, for there are within a short distance of the Berg
Luke bungalow, splendid peaks
which are easy enough in ascent
for thc tyro and yet offering splendid views of the surrounding Alp-
lands.
Tho photograph shows Mount
Robson, the monarch of the Canadian Rockies, and llerg Lake, so
of   Uw   icebergs
whicb arc constantly floating on ita
surface. Beneath is one of the
Swiss guides from Jasper Park
Lodge, coiling his rope in preparation for lending an ascent on
Mount Ilobson, while to the right
he is shown making his way round
one ef the difficult ice peaks of the
climb.
Ponies and guides are available
at Mt. Robson station to conduct
tourists from there over tho magnificent Robion Trail to Berg Uke,
where comfortable bungalows are
maintained, which provide an excellent starting point for many
wonderful excursions into tba
-CJMfcl
ANNOUNCEMENT
SIMON WEX
Upholsterer and
Furniture Repairer
has opened  a  new place <>(
business in
THE VENEZIA HOTEL
BLOCK on HANSON AVE.
From time to time he will
have pieces of newly upholstered and other furniture,
which it will pay anyone to
look over.
All Repalra Promptly Done
PHONE 69
and a party will call for your
Goods, or five you *n estimate.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
Phone 69 • Venezia Block
CRANBROOK, II.C.
•-♦-♦ -•-♦*♦—•
Children's Coveralls,
Khaki, trimmed red,
age 2 to X years
$1.50
Khaka Two-Piece Suits,
age 2 in k
$1.50
Boys' Khaki Cveralls,
9 lo I-'.
$2.00
Boys* Overalls,
A gee 9 to lfi
$1.25 pair
C. EMSLIE
Armstrong Ave.
GENTS' FURNISHINGS
BOOTS, SHOES, Efc.
iWilillloiliiiiiiiinrilliniiiiuiaiisoiM
CRYSTAL ICE CREAM
• JUST WHAT YOU NEED FOR THAT PARTY —
Get Crystal Creamery Butter
FROM YOUR GROCERY OR BUTCHER
— We Have Some Nice Fresh Buttermilk —
CRYSTAL DAIRY, LIMITED
— PHONE 88 — MOB    SIX
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
Thursday, .Inly 9th, 1925
THE UNITED CHURCH
tin The Methodist Church Building)
REV. I'.. C. FREEMAN Pastor
"Come 1 li..ii with us, and we will do thee good."
SUNDAY, JULY 12th
11 a.m. Junior Choir
12.15 — Sunday School and Adult Bible Class
7.30 p.m. Senior Choir
— YOU   WILL   RECEIVE  A  CORDIAL   WEI-COAIE  —
TO SEARCH FOR TREASURE IN FAR NORTH
KNOX   I
Presbyterian \
Church     i
Rev. M. S. Blackburn >
SUNDAY, JULY 12th j
Morning  Service   11   o'clock J
Subject, "ARRKSTINO A j
iil-MIS." >
Sunday School ;il   12.15 S
Evening   Service   nl   7„I0 S
Subject, "THE AMBITION *.
OF SERVICE."
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
FBOFKNSIONAIi CABD8    ?l
D R.   \V.   A .   F E R (i I E I
DENTIST I
Campbell Manning   P.liul,   ff
Phone 97 Ofl'i.,.  Hours       J
9 to 12; 1 to 5 p.m. Sat. Stall
Drs.  Green   &   MacKinnon
Physicians   &   Surgeons
Ofllce at Residence, Armstrong
Avenue
OFFICE     HOURS
Afternoons   2 to 4
Evening 7.110 to 8.30
Sundays   2.00 to 4.00
CRANBROOK,   B.C,
DR.    F.    I!.    MILES
DENTIST
OFFICE HOURS
II to 12 a.m.        I to 5 p.in.
Hanson   Blk.,   Cranbrook,   B.C.
Baptist Clmrrb
Rev. W. T. TAPSCOTT
21.1 Norbury  Ave. . Phona 202
SUNDAY, JULY 12th
Service Mill be conducted by
Principal II- I. Porter
The regular evening service
is withdrawn during llu- absence ni lbe pastor from Ihe
cily.
Villi   ARE   lllltllMI.I.V
INVITED.
Five men from Hull, England, all unmarried and of ages ranging from 22 to 50, sailed from Liverpool recently by Canadian Pacific S.S. Montclare on the quest of a rich vein of silver, said to be hidden in
'•No Man's Land" of the Great Northwest.   The i 	
, „ „ quest ..         ._ __
mine is claimed to be in the vicinity of the Mackenzie
River, District of Alaska, and Is located In a cliff hundreds of miles trom civilization. The last port
before striking the trail will be Wrangell, Alaska. The party ia led by John Riley, engineer, aged 59,
who had much experience In the Klondike gold region. The rest of the party are Thomas Tbompson, sailor,
aged 26; Joseph Millard, jeweller, aged 22; Robert Flemming, engineer, aged 35, and Ernest Starke, confectioner, aged 32. When they find the mine, they will stake it and return to England to form a company for Its development As they passed through Saint lout, N.B., the party wai full of confidence
mi hooe to return to the OU Country by next October,
CRANBROOK
CLEANERS & DYERS
Every Garment sent In us tu
In* Cloaneil or Dyed is given
Our Ulmosl Cnro
Our knowledgo of tlie business
is  your  assurance  ul'  satisfac-
liuii horo.      Phono mul we will
call, ur bring us your work
Wp   Clean   &   Dye   Every I hi ng
PHONE    157
MISSIONARIES EXPRESS STRONG VIEWS ON UNION
AT MEETINGS OF PRES BYTERIAN GEN. ASSEMBLY
H,
ere an
dTh
ere
ffffff*V.V.Vfffffffffffffft
L. 13. Cafe
(l.illlc Davenport)
When yon wir.li something good
to eat, en tn tlie L.D.
I.ODOKS AND SOCIETIES
P. M. MacPHERSON
Undertaker
Phono 350
Norbury   Ave,   Next   City   Hall
'ffffffffffffffffffff
H. W. Herchmer 3j
BARRISTER S
and 3
SOLICITOR 5
CRANBROOK   ■ B.C. ij
— PHONG 61 — 6
iHVffffffff.VffffffffffffJ
JOHN GARD
PAINTER &
PAPERHANQER
tea Um* ot Wall Paper
Ia  Stock.
Mora, Hanuan Avenue
Pkeae *** at all
(BAINOOK    -    .
C.   P.   R.
General Change in
TRAIN
SERVICE
Effective,  .Sunday.  MAY   17th,   1(28
Westb'ml       l'.*io. Time —« Knslli'nd
No. 07    Dally No. lis
ar. 12 noon .     .. nr. 4.10 p.m.
Iv. 12.1(1 ii.m.     ..   .       lv. -1.2(1 p.m.
To Kimberley —No. 823 Iv.  12.25 p.
in.; No. 8.26 Iv. 4,30 p.m.
From Kimlierley -    No. 824 ar, 11.30
a.m.; No. 82G ar. :!.r.r> p.m.
CRANBROOK . I.k. WINDERMERE
No, 822 Arrives 3.30 p.m. Wednesday A Saturday. No. 821  Leaves 9.00
a.m. Monday and Thursday.
TRANSCANADA   LIMITED,  Nos. 7
and 8 (Standard Sleeping Cora only.)
between Montreal, Torqnlo, and Vancouver will be resumed, first     train
leaves each  ol heso  puiiri.s  on  Mny
17th. 1925,
THE MOUNTAINEER, Trains Nos.
13 and 14, lii-luei'n Chicago and Van-
eeuver will bo resumed, first train
pa&sinK through Cnlrury westbound
June 3rd nnd eustbpund <lnm. Oth,
For further particulars npply to nny
ticket ugi-nt.
J. E. PROCTOR, D.P.A., Cl,..,
WOMFN'8  INSTITUTE
Ueett   IB   the
li.   el  P.  Ball
afternoon of tbe
drat Tuiada; at
I p.m.
All ladlas ue
medially Invited
President:       Mrs.   GEORGE   SMITH
Doc-Treaureri    Mrs.    I'lnlajson
1. O. O. F.
KEY CITY LODOR No. 42
Meets every
.Monday night at
  Tin- Auditorium
Sojourning OddEollows are cordially invited
N. (J.     -     - !•'. A. WILLIAMS
Iter. Sec, E, (1. Dlngiey, I'.O.
PACIFIC
GETS
POPULAR
"Pacific Mill, has so tunny
good uses llial I find il diffi
will to even try to mention
Ihem all/' utiles Mrs. Albert
Johnson of North Vancouver. "My sister began HsiiiK
il three yeurs ago, and finally from watching her I came
lo use Pacific Milk in the dit'
tVrrtii things I was making*
It's very splendid milk, and
I'm glad we ran get it."
PACIFIC   MILK
Head     Office:     Vancouver
Farloi-ii's  nt  Ladner &  Ahliotiford
Continued trom Last week)
The fifty-first general assembly o£
Uie Presbyterian, Church in Canada
was constituted in tho time-honored
formality in tlie Mllh of June last.
Reports from every section of the
church wen' given, A good ileal of
humor and sly sarcasm entered into
many of the speeches of ten minules,
the commissioner frnm the home of
Dr. C. W. Cordon —- Ralph Connor—
contributed great merriment when he
said that the house Ralph Connor was
horn in was now his henhouse Thc
representative from North Saskatchewan was brought 111» a Baptistt but
found it, necessary to go into another
■ .'oiniuunioii, and joined the Presbyterian, iu which he is now an elder,
("for you know," ho said, "a Baptist
always*, makes a better IVeshyterian
that] a Methodist." The point was
raised in the morifing sederunt that
there might be some objection to
any but regularly appointed commissioners taking part. Dr. Wardlow
Taylor moved a motion to empower
Lhe elergmau and one elder from
eaeli church to constitute the Assembly, and the committee upheld this
motion. "Now everyone enn take
part," said Dr. Taylor. Dr. Taylor
and J, W. MeNamara were appointed
clerks of the session, and Dr. Frank
Baird was associated with them. Without discussion the Assembly ordered Moderator Scott's splendid inaugural address to be printed in pamphlet form, to be pi need before every
Presbyterian, so that they might be
in possession of tho true situation
concerning union. Hev. D. S, L. McKerroll presented to tbe Moderator
one of the gavels sent by Rev. John
Buchanan, rcprcs entative of Victoria Chureh among the Bhile in India
to be used at the Assembly. The
Moderator named as a committee to
suggest three names for the Assembly's representatives on the federal
property commission, two Toronto
men, (1. Tower Ferguson and Thomas
McMillan, with Rev, Thomas Eakin
of Montreal, This body is made
up of nine persons, three Presbyterians, throe Unionists and three to be
appointed by the chief justice. There
were present two M.P.'s, far apart
in homes, side by side for their faith,
Win. Duff, M.P., Lu nor burg, N.S. and
Fred Stork, M. P. for Prince Rupert,
B.C. Rev. It, W. McDonald, of Korea, who expressed his pleasure nt
being in an Assembly, Presbyterian
in name, nnd also Irue to Presbyterian standards, told of the effects
of Bolshevism in that country, where
many of the young men who have accepted the teachings of propagandists from Russia, that property belongs to alt, and that money contributed to the church is wasted, "We
have co-operation in Korea, and do
not need union," said the missionary,
who did not agree with Rev, R. P.
McKay's idea of the need of union in
the foreign field, "We have the
Presbyterian Church of Korea co-operating with oilier denominations in
a federation, I believe that Presby-
terianism is needed in Korea, because
of the appeal it makes to the people.
Wi1 have our own theological colleges
.for a very good reason. When the
, Korean Presbyterians were ordered
| to go to the Methodists they refused. Even if (here were no Presbyterian church, we would have one in
Korea. You never saw such people
for the Shorter Catechism. There
jis no room for union there. There
are no Canadian Methodists there to
unite with. They do not appeal to
■the Koreans as the Presbyterians."
Mr. McDonald read greetings from L,
I.. Johnston, another missionary in
Korea, who is remaining Presbyterian, as are four other missionaries.
The question put to the missionaries
was, "Are you so strongly opposed
to union that you ure unwilling to
work under thc foreign mission hoard
of the United Church? For himself
he said be notified the board that his
connection ended on June IU, "I
never had much faith in union, and
I have less now," said Mr, McDonald, who told that there had been nothing but cuts in salaries in every
^department of the work, lie volunteered to go anywhere under the
I Presbyterian Church, but his heart
was in Korea. Faithful to the kirk,
G. E. McDonald, from the Central
India Mission said that five foreign
'missionaries were remaining Presbyterian. He himself ministered to a
population equal to that of Toronto,
"We can come to on Assembly such
as this and feel that we have you at
our backs," said Dr. Wilkie, of Gwal-
ior, who said that he had been notified that as he was not going into
union his salary would not be continued after a certain date. If the Presbyterian Church could only rise to
the occasion and multiply its forces,
a hundred-fold, he would not be surprised to see the whole system of
Hinduism overthrown. "And that
is not missionary gush," said Dr, Wilkie, who tobl of the changes he had
seen during the nearly half u century he has served in India, "Perhaps not, but there nre so many
things I want, said Dr. Wilkie, who
has been in India since 187H, I want
un industrial plant, and other things
to place the mission on a sure foundation, and give Christ a chance to
win India for Himself."
"Nothing in this union campaign
on the Pacific const has so impressed
the people as the victory we put over among the Chinese, where they
were unanimously in favor of main
taining Presbyterianism," said D. A,
Smith, missionary to the Chinese in
British Columbia, who said that the
celestials has explained their opposition to union by their ignorance of
it, while they understood the Presbyterian Church, to which many of
their people here nnd in Chinn had
belonged. The Chinese, if they lose
their property, will begin over again.
"But they must not lost their property," said Mr. Smith, They are prepared to go to court to preserve it,
if necessary. There wus a real challenge to the church in Canada to take
up this work among the 20,1)00 Chinese in British Columbia. Only one
of the eight has gone into union,
he suit).
Rev. Dr, Rochester, addressing the
Assembly on behalf of the Lord's Day
Alliance, paid tribute to the late Dr.
Shearer, who gave the Alliance shape
and to whom more than any other,
the Lord's Day Act was due. Mrs. D.
T, L. McKerroll was elected president of the Presbyterian Women's
Missionary Society by acclamation.
Mrs. McKerroll addressed the vast
audience in a fine clear voice, and
gave u splendid report of the Society. Other women, like Miss Bessie
McMurdy read excellent papers, and
showed the true womanly devotion to
the Auld Kirk. One of acts of the
unionists had been the dismissal of
Principal D. J, Fraser of the Presbyterian College, Montreal, The
Presbyterian Assembly revoked the
previous action of the College Street
assembly by which Principal Frnser
ami Prof. Thos. Eakin were removed
from their positions at the college.
The appointments of R. E, West,
principal, and A, K. Gordon, Chas. B,
Beiler and E. M. Best, made by the
College Street assembly were revO'
ked and Drs, Fraser and Eakin given
their positions back. The board of
management committee of the col
lege to be appointed by this assembly was authorized to take action to
maintain and defend the right of the
college for the Presbyterian people,
The new board was also authorized:
in conjunction with Principal Fruscr
to make such arrangements to carry
on the work there as may be necessary through the coming session.
J. F. SMITH, Commissioner,
Ktiox Church, Cranbrook.
The Good Roads Depu-wient of
Manitoba expects to complete the
Tram-Canada Highway through
that province by October the first.
This will complete the road from-
Brandon west to the Saskatchewan
boundary.
The city of Halifax, N.B., ti planning to re-establish its Provincial
Exhibition this coming fall according to Mayor Murphy. The fair has
only been held once or twice since,
Ihe war prior to which it was an'
annual event.
The Canadian Trade Commissioner
at Liverpool, England, li taking
steps to Interest Canadian business
men in tbe export of crushed oyster
shells to Great Britain. The United
States exports 20,000 tons of crushed shells annually to the British
Isles.
The official opening of Crystal
Garden, Victoria's latest and finest
Amusement Park will take place on
June 20th. Celebrations, including
a ball, processions, and sports, wltl
mark the occasion and are scheduled
to continue until July lat.
Navigation on the Great Lakes
and the St. Lawrence is now open
and has provided employment for
hundred* of men from Montreal, Toronto and other cities who have
been idle during the winter. Shipping circles are 'Optimistic concerning   the   season   just   commenced.
It is announced that (be Banff,
Alberta, Pow-Wow and Indians Day
celebration which takes place annually, will be held this year, July
23 and 24 in the Yoho Valley. On
these days the Stoney tribe of Indians in full regalia, hold their
Pow-Wow and compete in contests
of every kind.
There are approximately 2,200,000
persons attending school In this
country. Of this number, 1,600 are
at institutions for the blind and
mute; 81,000 at vocational schools
or classes; 14,000 at Indian schools
and the remainder attend colleges,
universities, subsidised and private
schools and institutions for training
teachers.
With a view to arranging a new
trade and transportation agreement
between Canada and the British
West Indies a conference Is to be
held at Ottawa in June which will
be attended by representatives of
the Governments of Canada, Bermuda, Leeward and Windward Islands,
Barbadees, Trinidad, British Guiana,
Jamaica and British Honduras.
The geld mines of northern Ontario are said te have yielded a
higher Income during the first quarter of 1926 than In any similar period in their history. -Estimates
place the income of mining companies in- the- Porcupine district at
nearly six million dollars and In the
Kirk land District at one and a quarter millions.
Holidaying   at   Skookumchuck
Mrs. Peter Farreli and family left
on Monduy for Skookumchuck where
they will spend u holiday ut the logging camp of the Crows Nest Pass
Lumber Co. of which Mr. Fnrrell is
in charge. Jnck Farreli, who hud
been out there a week previously,
was brought it) lasl week after huvlng met with an accident in which a
rock It'll on his body, but he was
able to return again with the rest of
the family to continue his holiday.
Montana Restaurant
Mull at AH Henri
Clfen, Clnnttw * T-akaacos
Craaareok SI.    •
Op,. Buk ol Ci
Sainsbury & Ryan
 .tkn
ooxsBAoeoas
ttir—1 Mm *m WMt
B.C.
ClASBBdOK
THERE'S   JOY
In dining :il i Rei tmirant where
things nro Icopl Immaculate, Die
service prompl -ami Lho fodd ex*
ceptlonnlly tiiRty nnd whole-
BOino. That's why you'll enjoy
dining 1h*i<> (hu- dully nil-mi
always InrludoA innuy delight*
ful dishes.
VICTORIA CAFE
ffff.Vff.Vf.Vffffffffffff*f
Vfff.",.::"s,::::::vfffff
COT1 Aid: HOSPITAL
Maternity   &   General   Nursing
Terms  Moderate
Mrs. A.   CRAWFORD
Matron
Garden Ave. Crnnbrook B.C.
ifffff.vfff,::vff.vfffffff
********** ****************
TASTY FOODS
Carefully selected — prepared by t'niiKS who know how
— and servi d to you in an
appetizing and appealing
way - is whal you get when
you dine with us. Krompt
and cotirtous scrvce.
CLUB CAFE
i "o 165
*************************
•f.:::'.,:'fffffffffff
For  First Class
LAUNDRY WORK
Call I QUONd   CIIONO
.     Opposite \V. n. HUl'a More
J   tl     ARMSTRONG    AVENUE
trtVfffffffffffffffffffffi
Mabllnliml lflflK
Phon* Ut
Geo. R. Leask
riOM-:;:". imilder
AMI   (<»THACT01
Cabinet Work.   i'Mure
Estimates tires em
til clashes of wort
OtSoei Corner Nnrbnry At*
•Id  F-lririts Htm*
OLBANINO - I'KUaaiNO
— REPAIRING —
Ton Will Huh.' No Mistake
In Ordering that
NEW -SI'RINI! SUIT
Oil OVI1KOA.
H. C. LONG,
a:
The Tailor
Van  florae Street
Opposite 0. I'- It. Depot
Plione 41(1     i:     I'hone 4M
Bruce Robinson
Phone 295       Teacher of Manic I* .o  ii„x   702
STUDIO — ARMSTRONG A.VBMIB
Third House from Presbyterian Church
imHm-IKBTU-ttKES Thursday, July 9tH, 1925
Hi*.   CHAN BROOK   H IS K A l.D
I'AGI- SEVEN
nt Forest Fires-
**************************
LUMBERTON    I
CHIPS I
.-.,.** ********♦****«♦«.♦♦!
1,,-isl Sunday':-, gnmo bellied move
tlio Lumberton bnsebnll leam up un-
ulliei- notch in the percentage ladder, ro,. lhe local team is now in n
dondlock for bocoiuI plnce by virtue
i.r its win over the strong wyclllto
nggregntion un lhc Lumborton fiold.
Little tlmo w.-is losl by tho locnl crew,
I'm* il cornered Its two runs in the
firsl Inning, when Frits Hollmnn
knocked n side ono ns u lend ell', tol-
iowed by l.avnic, wlm nlsn connected,
which placed two men in ■coring P"
Mlinlt, ami il rclllllilleil fer-lial MllBOIl
io nun tho trick, which gnvo a*; our
only scoroa uf tho ontlro gnmo,   Wy
lill'e made.its lone tally in thc sev-'one or two  nf its  men  through  in- passed the ci-iars round to the boys,
nth,   when   Piper   managed  to   get jury.    This is thc second time these
n and work his way around to third.itwo teams have met this season, and
lli< scare-was mode oh-a passed bolljthls avenges the defeat  we  received
I*
b,
Mr. and Mrs. T. Myron, who have
been residents of Lumberton for the
ni'e." The game wits o*very good|at Wycliffe the first time we played >""" -«•■"' »nd a hall' left far their
fr„m lhe slarl, after the flrsl thnt learn.      Coverloy handled   the f,"™,"' h"mp "> C.*>]**V last S-"tu'
lining Johren w
.umburtoi v
hiinccs I,, score
lirough wilb ill
ring lhe men In
hard In hit, and gnmo in n very satisfactory minim*
ami- ajifl    or    twn,The game was witnessed by a liu-gi
mt could nol conied-or-awd,      Nexl Sunday will sec thi
necessary liils to,Kimherley ;.api perform mi the local
lt.,1 li pitchers were diamond; lhc Inst time .ve p'nyed tin
day where tliey-will make tli
in the future.
ir home
i  Hi
riil-
-ham
■milled
Lumberl
wan liiu
CO Ily.   a
 I  Id
Wyl ill',
a** Hie ■:
omowh
Hid
d   OB
..1*1
support, aad each hnd)tooin rrom the mining lown, we re-
ihe mound, Mitchell I celved n very severe drubbing, but
ith eleven strlku-outs. we are going In dn nur best In make
i team is certainly a amends I'm- that, and will make a
station ovor thnt which powerfully despei-ale scrap to stay
lime Ugo, and nil lhe; up there in secnad position. It
nit grunt guns, Thoro should he a gaud game, and we want
error, which was al nil >to see :i Inrgo crowd fm- this fracas.
11,-j., xvils K ii*, o which Is tho lost gomo on the regular
•   ,   ,1.     I,,,.,,i   ni,,,-   league schedule, excepting Un- play-
n1""1    ""      """' 'Inll's.     The    following   Is   tile   linn-up:
played a greal gnmo,. WynllfTo -Lloyd Crowe, 2b„ Hlnton,
cily Indlontm, and was1,.,, staples, ss.. Larry Piper, 8b.,
Ilooppotl by lho loss ol|Stove Clink,  lh., Ilinky Johren, v
      (Inlo St
MOTHER
Messrs. Melv. .Slater, Jack Critch
and Albert Woodske spent the flnsl
in Pernie. They were hack an the
Jul, again th,- aftoi '■" uf 'Im soo-
"llll   s„   all   is   WClL_
Mr. and Mrs. (I. X. Jocolwon and
Mr, .1. Goodman matured lo Fernie
mi Saturday oftornoon where thev
spcni the week-end with friends.
Mrs. W. A. Barter uml Master
Glendon spent several days ut last
week at Jaffray visiting with friends.
Miss Caroline Harris of Spokane
arrived in Lumberton nn Friday oftornoon.ond is spending u few weeks
| at th home nt her uncle ami aunt,
Mr. nud Mrs. W. A. Barter,
IDoc Huffman, (-r„ Jlmnilo -limes, ir,
Damon Fostor, rl'. Lumborton—
Frits Hnllmnn, ss.. Pal Downey, 2b.,
13d. Lnv-olo, r., Huh Mitchell, c, Jim I    Notlco hus nn.„ received from the
lb.. Tom nogarth, lb., Bor-\0n>n „f thl. provincial Bocrctnry af
iiherg, if., l.es Iiwelley, Ir..,tllt. appointment at lhe postmaster,
I Mr. L. Hilton, tn the olllce of justice
.*_   un*   cm
5 Prod L,
cf.
r thu peace in Lumber! on,
Sask., wlm hnve been visit-i    Another closed car has hev
h  "
pr.
•JI     Mr.   and   Mrs,   Harvey   Neutl,   of
jC|Tensdnlo, Sask., wlm have been visit-
£iing at the home of Mr. and  Mrs. J.jto Lumberton's steadily growing list,
■C J Kosscn, departed fur their home last, this time it  being 'Iim, Mason    win
Messrs, Harold anil Kenneth Piper
£ I left for Spokane on Tusday, where
iJ tlie former will spend a week's holi-
has traded  in  his Chevrolet tmiria;
model for a sedan of tho same make.
Notices have hpen posted in   conspicuous places announcing a meet-
lay before returning to Lumborton. j Ing   of   the residents of Lumherton
,n  Monday  evening,  -Lily   12th,  nt
in« !u?   which lime a trustee and an auditor
u>-     "'"'  will he elected on the school board to
take the places of Messrs. 0. N. Jacobson and IT, I". Klinestiver, whose
terms have expired.
Mr. E, Wood, who is ompl
carriage rider during the t
Sjlh'ad  the  misfortune to  break three
£ hones in his right foot last Thursday
5 morning.    He  was  removed  to  thc
P i St.   Eugene  hospital.
PHONE 23 FOR A TRIAL ORDER OF
Bread, Cakes or other Pastry
Our Soda Fountain is now At Your Service—Cool
Refreshing Drinks At All Times
A TRIAL ORDER OF GROCERIES
Will  Convince You  That  We  Can
-SAVE YOU MONEY-
CITY BAKERY
PHONE 23
f     The regular monthly  meeting of
Jithe  Lumherton  Ladies'  Aid   .Society
JSiwus held last Thursday nfternoon in
Pi tho  Lumherton   Hall.    Tho   meeting
V wns   well   attended.      Refreshments
" wero  served   hy   the   committee   in
I charge,   after   thc   regular   business
j meeting had come to nn end.    Mrs.
>(!, Hunter, of Cranbrnok, wns n visitor nt tho meeting.
|     A meeting of the Lumherton basehall club was held last Thursduy evening in the Lumherton flail,    Very
.little business  cume  up  before the
'meeting, nil the hills were passed on,
and the treasurer reported the cluh
in u vory sound financial condition.
the hest report which has ever been
2j given of the affairs of the organiza-
■C tion   at  this  time  of the  year,  and
5 from   all   indications,    the    treasury
K should he even better off at the end
5 of the season, if the patronage at the
Sj Kimberley game comes up to c\\
F. BELANGER, Proprietor 5 W™\    ..-.     .  „
' r 3J      A  hnhy girl wns born to Mr.
W^WA'i'\ftMWWW«AW -Mrs. J. P Conroy lnst week,
oxpec
Mr. nnd Mrs. F, Andrew, nnd son
-John, were week-end visitors at Sinclair Springs.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Perkins, of Calgary spent a few hours in Lumber-
ton on Thursdny on business.
Lumherton School, .Tune examinations, promotions in the various grades in the order of standing:
tirades 7 to S—Tims. Hazell, !l to
7—Manning Melntyre 7S, .lack Robertson 77, Elizabeth Gritliths 59, 5
to fi—Lome Robertson 63. 4 to 0
—Margaret Hutchison Ho, Alice Stevens HI. 4 to 5—Richard .Lines hi,
,1 to B—Doris Hutchison 88 !l to 4
—Albert Griffiths 7fi, William Griffiths, Edward Kydd 61, Wiliam Trusler 63. 2 to 4 — Phyllis Dwelley
Si!, Elsa Stevens 81, To pass into
(irade .'I. or on trial in Grade 4— Lily Griffiths 7)1, Harry Hazell 75, Itoh-
hert Stevens (.fi. Graded 2 to <) on
trial—Clifford .Jones 45. Grade 1
to 3 — Jean Hutchison 75, Gladys
and: Gritliths 78. Grade 1 to 2—Myrtle
Con! Gourlle     76,     Glendon   Barter    03,
Frank Gourlie G2, Florence Lavoie
61, Joan Woods (on trial) 36. Rolls
of honor awarded to the following
pupils — Proficiency, Doris Hutchison; deportment — Lily Griffiths,
regularity and punctuality —■ Peter
Kossen, Richard Jones, Clifford Jones. Two prizes, the first consisting
of $5 and the second $2.50 for lhe
tun hest scholars, donated by the
Lumherton Ladies' Aid — 1st Ph>l-
lis Dwelley; Snd Mary Hazell, McLean Writing Certificates awarded to
bhe following — Grade 8, Peter Kos-
sen;   Grade 7.   Elizabeth Griffiths;
Grade 5, Mnry Iluzll; Grade 4, Alice
Stevens, Grnde II, Doris Hutchison;
(irade 2, Phyllis Dwelley, Klsa Stevens, Robert Stevens, Harrv Hazel!,
Clifford Jones, Hilly Griffiths, Grade
I, Myrtle Gourlie, Frank Gourlie.
Gladys Gritliths. Glendon Barter, Florence Lavoie, Joan Woods,
—Miss A. C. Johnson, Teacher.
• On Friday afternoon tbe pupils of
Lumberton School    presented iheir
teacher. Miss Johnson, with a beautiful ivory tray and a box of handkerchiefs, as n mark of their appreciation and the high esteem in which
she is held by her pupils.
BUY TRACT OF LAND
IN COLUMBIA VALLEY
TO BE SETTLED ON
Colonizing Company   Takes
Over 14,000 Acres; To
Bring Families In
(Special to the Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., July 4— A deal
has just been consumated and the
contract signed whereby the Columbia Valley Ranches, Limited, turns
over to n syndicate comprised of capitalists nnd expert agriculturists
from Portland, Oregon, and thc
neighborhood of Cratgmyle, Alberta,
their fourteen thousand odd acres of
developed agricultural lands, lying
along the hanks of the Columbia
River, commencing about twenty
miles to the north of here.
One of the conditions of the sale
is that the new company is to at once
place 20 families of agriculturists
upon the holdings, who are to be followed as the land develops to the
number of 10(1 families. All of these
are experienced dairy, bog nnd sheep
producers, diversified farming being
their strong point. They will be
drawn from the Pacific State and
from Alberta to begin with, but later
these will he augumented by settlers
from the home countries in Europe.
The proposal ,,f the company is to
take out letter patent under the
great sea] of Canada, which will give
them widely extended trade powers,
and when properly organized, they
will go into extensive farming under
trained experts, making cheese and
producing pork products. For this
the experiments carried out by the
Dominion government on the local
experimental station show that the
country is admirably suited. Tin'
work will he carried on under an irrigation system, of which many miles
of ditches and flumes for the carrying of water have already been built,
having been put iu by the original
holders, who were the Columbia \ alley Orchards,  Limited.
The Columbia Volley Ranches,
Ltd., whi. have ju-t disposed of iheir
holdings, were comprised chiefly of
Dr. W. It. Gaddoa and hi- brother,
and Dr, Thompson, all of Vancouver.
Dr. Gaddoa has for some time been
giving the holdings his undivided attention, having resided at Edgewator
with his family for the past twn
years.
The representative settlers and j
lenders of the movement are now ]
present making the preliminary nr-
■■angenienls, Messrs, Mais tor and
Dorr, uf Portlnnd having been there
some time, were yesterday joined
by Messrs. J. C, ami K. J. Schults,
nud Eugene Gonzclman,   of   Craig- j
myle, Alberta, and a talented expert
gardener and journalist   of   tlisUnc- !
tion, Mr. Dim Andersen, from near '
Copenhagen, Denmark.    Mr. Andersen is an authority on tlie intensive i
agricultural work of his native country, on which subject he has written I
sevral text books.    He has spent the
last eight months  in  examining pre-
positions in different pari- of Alber-j
ta, and comes with the highest of ere-
dontfals in his line.
way will be ready for general tourist u^e by next year.
Planning  For Scout Camp
It is expected lhat the 1025 Boy
Scout Cam]) will commence on or abut July 20th, at a site to be mutually decided upon hy the various troops
interested. This camp will give the
Fernie scouts a splendid opportunity of meeting brother scouts
throughout the East Kootenny.—Fernie Free I'ress.
PATRONIZE THE
ROYAL CAFE
Opp. McCreery Bros.
Where Ihey employ only
while   help,  and   where  the
cooking is June hy a lady
The Service will Please You
- TRY THE ROYAL —
Mrs.   M.   ROWE
Proprietre»»
YU0N   ROI
LADIES' & CENTS TAILOR
193 Armstrong   Avenue
Next to W. P. Doran
SUITS
— Fit  and  Slvlr Giinrantrcd —•
We are here to cater to your business
aad at Prices thnt lire Right
We Do Cleaning ami Pressing
Prompt Service
— P. O. It<>\ 598 _
Nw Scenic Rond .it Waterton
October hns heen set as the appro-j
ximate date by which the present
work on the B, C. Trans . Provincial highway, now in progress, may !
be completed. Thi-; is the stretch
from Hope to Lytton, nnd will provide the missing link in the highway
across the province. Hon W, II. Sutherland, provincial minister of public  works, announces  that the  high-
STRIP  TICKETS
Willi and Without Coupons
For Qeneral
Admission Purposes
For Sale at
THE
CRANBROOK HERALD
OFFICE
i P A (i P.   I- I (i II T
»«i cbajummm nam
Thursday, July 9th, 192S
*** * * * * * ******
*************************
PRECIOUS STONES and 3
JEWELRY \
re now displaying a "$.
Splendid  Line of 3
DIAMOND
ENGAGEMENT RINGS I
Wi
LOCAL
HAPPENINGS
The
st  mountings.
Prices start at—
$25.00
— THE GIFT SHOP-
A. EARLE LEIGH, JEWELLER   norbury avi-nuh
Tuesduy evonlng lust at tho regular meeting of lho Gyro t'lub, Mr.
Ross Pascuzzo entertained tin- members with un interesting paper on the
Kuril motor plant. Thu paper -.vaunt- tlmt was much appreciated by
the members.
0. T. Moir, nccompi
Annie  Moir  uml  linn
Monday tor Portland,
they will spend a vocntl
ui so.     Mis. Moil
tended to tollo* I
arrival ol tin- lull
nied  by
ry.    loll
Oro„   wher
;\l Iss
nil
Mill
nnd
Mill,
W. II. Sm
ty, mul moro
whero be is
I'. II. shops,
holiday nf n
Mr. Smith ii
Installations i
und machine
er stuy in lh*
has
veck
I  Iln
shop
C. I'.
- <luii
Miss Eva i
later on i
■  NolBon,
■rly .,f tins I
„l' Vuncouvi
oyod ni tho
-ii   spending
so  in  llu- ,-,i
the olectrli
bou
Theodore
Padburg, A.L.C.M.
Teacher of Violin
I'HONE 502 —
l.asl Year's Successes in
I.. C. Al. Examinations
INTERMEDIATE
Roy Honry Llnnell
Mary Wilson  McDonald I
Willie Spence       lsl Class
ELEMENTARY
Allan William Put '<•
IJuviil Weslon .     Ist I'ln
Honon
nil
Pnssei
For sales mn] service Nash and Stur
nis.    See Ratcliffe & Stewart.    HUtf
P. -/., Cuvorhill, chief Forester of
iilniiu. and R, C. St. I'luir, uf Nel-
iii, wen- in tin- city evei- tho week-
Hu- Mounl
ml. being reglslci
ul.er hotel,
A mosl unfortui
idem   nreurred In
fie
Mrs. Pi
nicking,
keep
-. win.
•   slei-i
uili
ii,- mul fatal ne'e   mi   Thursday
lllll   nl'   llttIO   MlSS
old daughter ul
Payetto, Whllo
milling sinne wood in
the lire going im-
was absent berry
.' ..I' Uie child's
. inu.'i.i rue. Her eries attract-
immediate attention from her
lui. who ilienelieil Ihe unfortu-
.'iil wiih n i.iiil uf water, but
before tho clothing hnd been ul-
i. entirely burned, and tlie In-
>s -from Hie burn aud the shock
i the wale,- proved Inu iniieh for
dentil ensuing nt uii early hour
iundny, despite Hie best nf modi-
■iiic l.y llr. Purni'tt, mul the ton-
4 ol nursing by the sorrowing
I'lie fuiioru] took place un
Creston cemetery, the re-
It* taken un the eastliuiiiiil
mnny citizens ueeumpii-
ly u last tribute uf re-
Inst snd rites were eull-
Mondiiy
mains In*
train, nml
nyiiig 1., i
spect. Th.
ducted by
Musters l.e
Andy I lui'.*.
pallbearers
 nl  Mr. i
le of frie
isl tl'lbuti
emhrunce
.v. .1. Ilerdmnn, with
i uml Whitman Abbutt,
uml Manuel Irving as
In tlieir hoavy bereove-
Mrs. Payette have the
sympathy nf a wide
ils, many nf whom paid
uf respect with floral
.—Creston Review.
We carl}- a full Mat ol Ilia's Women's and Misses' Shoes.
W, F. DORAN.
Our low prices wlu every tlae.
Fairmont Hot
Springs
A  Popular     Rfnort    with   mnny
natural     attractions,     75   niili-s
from   (.'ranbrook   On   Hie   niolnr
Iii-tjliw'v   In   Banff
MAGNIFICENT SCENERY
$    Warm Radium Baths
Open Air    Swimming Tank
with individual Dressing
Nonius    alsu Curative Italhs  •
PULLY EQUIPPED ;
TENTS FOR CAMPING •
RESTAURANT & ROOMS •
.  GASOLINE, OIL AM)     •
OENERAL STORE        I
'— Chnr^i-K Moderate — .
RADIUM   -   -   - B.C. :
Ay************************.
Public
otice
The regular monthly
meeting of the Cran-
brook Board of Trade
will I >o held in the City
Hall, Cranbrook on Monday, July 13th, at 8 p.m.
Ihr public    is   wel-
Insure with Beale ft Elwell.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Collier and family are enjoying a holiday in camp
at Green  Bay just now.
Mr. und Mrs. Frank Doodson and
family are leaving on Friday for
Vancouver, where they will enjoy a
holiday for thre« or four weeks.
Sterling Harrison, accountant in
the .fotin Monnlng store, left on Sunday fur Calgary on his vacation, expecting to be away two weeks or so.
After almost a three months' stay
at his ranch here, A. K. P. Bernhunl
left ou Sunday to take on his old
job at the Paradise mine near lnvermere, antl will be away until
riiHstmus.—Creston   Review.
Robert Turner, of Kimberley,
barber, passed through town on his
way to Sandon on Tuesday, lie is
renewing acquaintances in the Sloe-
mi mining town. —■ Kaslo Kooten-
aian.
sm*
T.awn Social at St. Mary's Rectory
Thursday, July   ltith, followed hy a
dance at the K. P. Hall.    Be on hand
to share in the usual good time at
this function.
lti-21
STOP!       \
ffff.Vffffffffffffff*Vffff
RYLEY
DINING ROOM
and BAKERY
KIMBERLEY - ll.C
CANAL FLATS ||
Meals and Light Lunches 'f, \\
Served
I
Juil a nice run from Cranbrook
Pineal    Fishing  &   Hunting     in
tli,.  country  right  Itrrc
(itisoliiie, Oil, Groceries and
Other Provisions for thc
Motorist
A. H. McKINLEY
v.:::':vf'ffffffffffff
commercial men
appreciate
home cooking
\viii:n away prom
HOME
All White Help
fffffffffffff
OUR SALE Wil! Continue
Until Saturday. July 18th
Every day wc arc adding new articles to the
list. Wc have just unpacked One I lundred and Twenty Pairs in lhc latest styles ol LADIES' SHOES. We
have retagged them so llial you can save from two to
four dollars on a pair. Have you Simpson's Midsummer
Sale Catalogue? If so, look up Slmc No. 40 V 654
and 55 and 56. Wc have lhc same Shoe, but we
are selling ihem at $2.50 instead of $2.85, and you
don't have to wait.
TRUNKS. — You can buy   these   from us at
wholesale prices.      Why pay more?
CLOVER LEAF CUPS and SAUCERS, at - $1.25 doz.
B. WESTON'S STORE
Baker St. The Store That Sells For Lew
Qeorge L, Spring, James Barr and
Jflmes G, Regan appeared he fore
the eourt recently here on a charge
of housebreaking and entering illegally, They were found guilty, and
their sentences, the first named of
have heen tuken to Nelson to nerve
six months, and the other two a couple of months apiece.
For prompt repairs and satisfaction go to Ratcliffe & Stewart's garage. 20tf
At this season of the year Kaslo
and Mirror Lake draw a considerable
number of Cranbrook people for the
vacation season, and at the present
Cranbrook is well represented in the
list of summer visitors at these Kootenay Lake points. Among those
who nre taking vacations there for
longer or shorter period;!, at the present time are: Mrs. F. V. Harrison
ami family, Judge and Mrs. G. H.
Thompson and family; Mrs. G. J,
Spreull and family; Mr. and Mrs. W.
A. Nisbet and family; Mra. F. VV.
Green and family.
Special prices on new Baterles at
Service Garage.   Phone 34 ltf
Southern Alberta livestock is making an early impression on livestock
judges at the fairs, says the Lethbridge Herald. At the Brandon
summer Fair the Clarindale Stock
Farm, Vauxhall, Alberta, owned and
operated by the Oth. Staples Lumber
Co., of Wycliffe, secured first for
Tamworth boar pig of one year, and
in the Berkshire class the same farm
won the championships in both sow
and boar. The Clarindale Farm also
captured the trophy donated by the
British Berkshire Society for the best
animal of the breed, male or female,
shown.
SPECIAL: — Tungsten lamps, 10,
25, 40, 60 and 60 watts; 25 c each,
at — W. F. DOBAN'S.
Our Low Prices win every time
Miss Murielle Millington arrived
home on Saturday from Cranbrook,
where she has just completed her
third year course in the high school
in that town. Everyone in the area
will hear with regret of the decision
of the Millington family to make
their future home at the coast. Mrs.
Millington, who suffers from heart
trouble, finds the altitude too high,
and has been ordered to a lower location. She has been active in church
and Sunday school work, public
school affairs, and every community
endeavor, and the family will be very
much missed.—Creston Review,
On Monday, June 20th sitting of
the police court Douglas Deane pled
guilty to a charge of operating an
auto without sufficient lights thereon, and was fined $5.00.    That evening Joe Frank McCoy, a suspect,
was arrested on a vagrancy charge.
He pled guilty at Tuesday's court,
and was sentenced to six months in
juil, having tt previous record,    the
warrant   being  withheld     for    24
hours to enable Mm to leave the city.    At the same court Larry Green
pled  guilty     to    an    Intoxication
charge, when the usual fine was inflicted.     For operating automobiles
contrary to regulations on July 1st
two other hutomiblllsts were fined
$5.00 and their drivers' licenses endorsed.      On July 4th John Elge
and John  Fitzslmmons were arrested on vagrancy   and    intoxication
charges, and both pled guilty at the
nxt morning's court.      John  Lancaster for obstructing    a    funeral
procession and driving to the common danger pled guilty and was fined $5.00 and had his driver's license endorsed.      For operating an
auto without    the    required headlights being lit, H. Chester contributed $2.50 to the city finances.   As
the result of a phone message from
the Kimberley   police,   George Jennings was arrested on the 8th inst.,
being wanted at that point for failing to pay a hoard bill.
W. U. Ross returned on Wednesday from thc coast, and hus returned
to   Kimberley.
Mrs. J. H. Cassidy left last week
for the Coust, to spend u visit with
relatives there.
Cecil Reade, who is employed in
the superintendent's office of the C.
P. R., is being transferred shortly
to Vancouver,
Among the guests at the Mount
Baker hotel this week were Mr. and
Mrs. W. D. Bleaker, of Constantinople, Turkey,
Miss Helen Worden returned to
the city last week nfter completing
a most successful term nt the Toronto College of Music
Keep Thursday, .'"ly 10th open-
it's the date of the Lawn Social ut
St. Mary's Rectory, ut 8 p.m., to
be followed by a dance ut the K. V,
Hall, from 10 to 1. 10-21
Local road maintenance men state
the new butloon tires the motorists
are adopting arc harder on gravelled
and crushed rock roads than the older mukes. They suck up more of
the smaller road material.—Creston
Review.
His Honor Judge Thompson, who
has been in the t'ity severul days this
week, went home very happy on
Thursday, having made No. fi hole
ut the local golf course in one stroke.
The judge says he is liable to quit
golf now after having accomplished
this wonderful feat.— Fernie Free
Press.
Sundny last, while returning from
u trip to West Kootenny to his home
in Calgary, Mr. A. K. Leiteh, formerly of this city, was taken suddenly ill, and on arrival at Cranbrook
was removed to the hospital, where
he is at present tinder medical supervision. Mrs. Leiteh and family
are visiting in Bonners Ferry,
For first class automobile repairs
see Ratcliffe & Stewart. 33tf
Mr. and Mrs. II. L, Grady, and
Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Moffatt and son
Ronald, returned on Sunday evening
from a motor trip round the circle,
going by way of the Banff-Windermere road, and back by wny of the
Crows' Nest. They report the devastation on the new rond to Banff
through the Vermilion district, still
very much in evidence owing to the
recent storm by which hundreds
of trees were uprooted, and the ef-
ect of it hns tended to spoil the scenery somewhat. Some of the Alberta roads, especially south from Calgary are also reported by the travellers to be in poor shape, heing now
under repair.
On Thursdny evening of last week
the Women's Conservative Study
Club met at the home of Mrs. J. H.
Meighen to nominate four delegates
to the nominating convention next
week; The following were chosen:
Mrs. F. H. Dezall, Mrs. A. C. Shank
land, Mrs, W, B, McFarlane,
Mrs. W. C. Marshall.
Work has been under way recently
by Mr. J, G. Cummings of making n
survey of the road between Cranbrook and Kimberley, which will put
the government engineers in a position to see how any alternative route
proposed would compare with the existing road, as to grades, roadbed,
etc. An alternative route proposed
would take the road out towards the
McPhee bridge, near the site of the
old ford on the road used to Pen-
Creek in the early days. This road
would run through Kenneth Greene s
ranch, and the bridge would cross
the river near thct point.
The Baptist Sunday School picnic
took place on Wednesday of this
week, when a departure was made
from the usual picnic venue, and
cars conveyed the picnicers to Green
Bay. With perfect weather for
such an occasion1, the big crowd enjoyed the outing to the utmost, not
the least satisfactory part of the picnic being the supper which had been
so satisfactorily arranged by the ladies.
Lester Patrick, of Vancouver, was
a visitor in the city on Sunday last.
Cecil Reude made nn nuto trip to
Spokane last week-end with his ta-
mily, returning on Sunduy.
Patey Bros, received a large con
signment of Columbia Grafonolas
this week, most of the machines being already sold. Some good instruments of attractive design are to
be seen at their music house.
H. L, Porter is leaving to"wn this
week to spend some weeks with a
survey party which will be working"
in the Kimberley district during the
next couple of months or so. He
plans to spend the week-ends in the
city, however.
Miss Porter, recently of the high
school staff here, has accepted a position which wus offered to her on the
high school staff at New Westminster, at a salary of $200 per month.
Miss Porter is now enjoying a vacation at her home in Victoria.
Mr, Ci. ,1. Spreull was a Kimberley visitor last Thursday, being there
as the guest of the Kimherley Gyro
Club at their weekly luncheon. Mr.
Spreull's address on the Kuglish law
courts, which was so well received
here, wns equally well appreciate!)
by the Kimherley club.
I    COMMUNICATION    ;
SHOULD   NOT   HAVE  BUILT
NEW ROAD
1025
NOTICE
Mrs. Edgar Worth, waa Annie Banks.
My wife, having left my bed and
board, I will not be responsible for
any debts incurred by her after this
date.
Fernie, B.C.. June 25th, 1025.
EDGAR WORTH.
Wasn, July 8th
The  Editor,
Crunbrook Herald
Dear Sir:
Your editorial of the 25th
June, under head, "May Soon Be Too
Late, in which you call attention to
the danger thnt the timber between
Wasa and Canal Flat may soon be
logged off, is somewhat of a puzzle,
While the object that you have in
view is admirable it should be borne
in mind that where it is at nil possible roads shotdd be built ulong
routes that ure already well timbered. Therefore, it would be logical
for you to follow up your article
with some explanation of the agitation conducted by Crunbrook people
that resulted in the construction nf
the road on the west side of the Koo
tenny River, from Wasa tn Sheep
Creek, mostly through burnt off and
barren land,
It would be very interesting to
some of us who dwell "Far from the
madding crowd," if you could now
explain why it was necessary to build
this piece of road, when by the expenditure of much less money the old
highway between Wasn and Sheep
Creek, on the east side of the river,
could have been put in condition, and
thc object you now have would have
been partly accomplished, because
most of this route is through a well
timbered country, and incidently it
would hnve taken the tourist very
close to that beauty spot, Premier
Lake.
Perhaps, Mr. editor, you may feel
that you could now support a movement to hnve this latter road repaired and made passable. If you are
not henrtily In favor of this, then I
am afraid your editorial of the 25th
of June will remain a conundrum,
Your's truly,
J. F. Mannell
(Ed. Note. — The piece of road
referred to particularly in the editorial mentioned by Mr, Mannell, was
the stretch north of Sheep Creek. As
to why it was found necessary to
build nn entirely new road from Wasa to Sheep Creek, it is scarcely fair
to credit this to an "agitation" by
Cranbrook people, since it was the
proposal of provincial government
road engineers, in conformity with
the policy of straightening out existing roads, or re-locnting them entirely, as motor traffic became more
and more insistent in its demand for
n different type of highway than
formerly existed, In regard to grade,
road bed and angle of deviation. The
old road east of the Kootenay River serves a good number of ranches, besides being the outlet for a
big stretch of wooded country, and
It will not he found that Cranbrook
people arc in favor of neglecting
It in thc mntter of repairs, It is
worth mentioning in this connection
that this latter road is in the Fernie
electoral district, which made co-operation In the matter of the road to
Windermere all the more difficult).
Please
Be
Patient
Our Customers who havo ordered Columbia
Grafonolas will receive their machines within the next
week. The shipment arriving lliis week will be distributed to the best possible advantage. Of course,
the parties who ordered their machines first must get
the first arrivals.
The low prices, easy terms and exceptionally
good value of Columbia Grafonolas have swamped the
factory with orders. They aro working all hours in
an endeavor to catch up. If yon would like a Graf-
onola on the prevailing easy terms, you should order
it now, as at the present rate <>( selling the demand will
soon overrun the supply.
We don't want you lo wait.
Sincerely Yours,
Patey Bros.
Price
Only
$55.00
Music Dealers, Cranbrook.
P.S. — Terms
are $2.00 down
balance at $2.00
per   week   and
up.
Table Models
at $3.1.00
with   one year
to pay.
Miss Sarah McCallum, teacher at
Cranbrook, reached home here flrat
of the week for a visit with her father, after which she will go to Spokane and the coast cities for pnrt of
her vacation.—Grand Forks Gazelle.
WANT ADS.
LOST— On Perry Creek rond, on
Sunday, June 28, a grey sleeveless
sweater. Finder please leave ut
Herald office. 20
FOR RENT— 4 Rooms, partly furnished — reasonable rental. Apply 239 French Avenue. 2i)
GOOD FARM in going order for sale
cheap. Owner, Hox 32, Gulden,
ll.C. 20-22
STRAYED—to my cabin on Finlay
Creek, nn nged chestnut horse,
white socks behind, und white
hlnze on face. Branded left hip.
Owner may havi' same by paying
charges,   li. A. Ballentlne.   19-20
54 SnEEP FOR SALE. — Flock
young grnde ewes, lambs, Oxford
ram.    K. Jolly, Golden, B.C.
18-20
FOR SALE— Estate of Joseph
Young, 121 acres at Fnirmont Hut
Springs. Good barns; four roomed house. Five minutes walk
from Post Offlce. Further particulars can be obtained from tho
offlce of A. I. Fisher, Fernie, B.C.
Must be sold to settle up estate.
20-2:1
FOUND. — Lady's coat, between
Concentrator and Cranbrnok.
Owner can have same by applying to Police Offlce, Kimberley,
and paying for this adv.       20-21
FOR SALE. — Fresh milch cow and
calf. Also lady's bicycle. Apply
E. Corbett, Mission Rond, Cranbrook. 20-21
FOUND. — On Banff-Windermere
road, Sunday, July 5th, lady's
handbag. Owner may have same
by proving property, identifying
contents and paying for this advertisement. Apply at Herald
Offlce. 20-21
WANTED. — Experienced girl for
housework in the country. Wages $35.00 per month. Apply Mrs.
R. Gladwyn Newton, lnvermere,
B.C. 18-20
FOR SALE — 5 passenger touring
car, six- cylinder, Nnsh, in good
condition, five good tires. Apply
to Heale & Elwell or Ratcliffe A
Stewart. 4tf
WANTED—Girl for offlce help. Stenography anil bookkeeping. State
particulars of experience nnd salary expected, by letter, or call at
Herald ofllce. 9-10
YOU ARE INVITED TO COME IN
AND  LOOK OVER OUR STOCK
Wc  have  n  Good  Variety  to chooie
from:
DINING ROOM SUITES
DIVANETTE      •       -      BUFFETT
Brunswick & Portable Victor Grama
phone*
CHAIRS    •    BEDS    -    DRESSERS
COOKSTOVES, Etc.      Etc,
.WILLIAM THOMPSON
Phenr 70 •       P. O. Boi 2.18
Second Hand Dealari
Cranhrnob '
if****************************';
FARMERS' INSTITUTE
MEETING
Notice it hereby given that a meeting of the
Cranbrook District Farmers' Institute will be held in
the City Hall, Cranbrook, on Saturday, July 18th, at
8.30 p.m.
BUSINESS — Arranging for Farmers' Picnic
at lnvermere Experimental Farm, August 1st next.
:•*■:••:••:• •>***<•*+++*++++
When in Kimberley-
looking around, drop into the old
INTERNATIONAL CLUB
•nil at night you know you will ln> Irenlod right.
There you will find
First Class Bowling Alleys
Soft Drinks and Confections
Up-to-date Cigar Stand
Prizes are being offered, consisting oi $20.00 in Gold, $
for the highest score in three straight games of
Five Pins or Ten Pins
WAKE UP, CRANBROOK, AND SHOW VOUR STUFFI      f
—Come Along, and Try Vour Link
THE TWO PETES     ....     Managers
*********************************.

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