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Cranbrook Herald Dec 10, 1925

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Array THE CRANBROOK HERALD
VOLUME    27
CRANBROOK, B.C, THURSDAY,   DECEMBER   10th,   1925
NUMBER     42
'—Banff 7-Piece Orchestra—
Auditorium, Cranbrook.
NEW YEARS BALL
THURSDAY
DECEMBER  31
B.O.R.T. & L.A. to B.O.R.T.
Local Member
Speaks Well
N. A. Wallinger Tells of Outlook For Mining In His
Riding
CRmClZES~~GOVERNMENT
The Legislature at Vicloria listened with interest on Thursday last to
a discussion of mining problems, nnd
tho benefits to be derived from a
change In the system of taxation on
mines. In the course of a speech on
the budget debate by Mr. N. A. Wallinger, member for Cranbrook. The
member spoke optimistically of the
future of the mineral development of
his district and was accorded marked
attention as he told of the manner
in which the Sullivan mines and other
properties in the vicinity were progressing.
"I want to tell this House," he said,
"that Kimberley will be a city of
from 20,000 to 60,000 persons in a
few years' time; that there is every
reason to anticipate a daily output of
6000 tons of ore for the next fifty
years at least. At the present time it
has a population of 4000 persons and
a monthly payroll of $200,000. The
day is not far distant when it will be
the largest city in the interior of
British Columbia."
Continuing, the speaker said that
recent diamond drilling operations
by the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company Limited, in the vicinity
of the Sullivan Mine disclosed an ore
body 140 feet in thickness. This was
encountered at a depth of 3000 feet
Mr. Wallinger made an appeal for
a change in mining taxes. At the
present time, he said, the system of
taxing the gross output was resulting disastrously to the industry. He
considered that a fair and equitable
system, and one that would meet with
the approval of the mining men and
encourage new development, would
be a tax on profits.
He instanced how one company
was producing ore worth $40 a ton.
After paying the various charges of
mining, transportation and smelting,
the return to the operators was $1
a ton. The tax amounted to 60 cents
a ton, leaving only a margin of 40
cents profit. On this the company
could not continue to operate and the
mine was closed. A tax on profits,
even if it had been as high as 6 per
cent, would have permitted the mine
operators to make a better profit nnd
continue  in  business.
He suggested that the Ontario system of taxing might be successfully
ndoptcd in British Columbia.
Mr. Wallinger took issue with tho
figures quoted by the minister of
finance in respect to mining returns.
lt would appear, he said, thnt the
miners of the province were in n prosperous condition owing to the fact
that $00,000,000 had been given ns
the value nf the output. The minister
should have pointed out thnt this
vnlue was based on the New York
prices nnd did not represent the figure which the operators obtained for
their products. It would be just as
fair, he said, to infer that the farmers obtained the full value of the
retail selling prices of their products.
The effect of the present system of
taxation was to vary the percentage
that was paid on thc returns. In
the case he had instanced, thc tax
amounted to 00 per cent of the profit,
while on the higher grades of ore it
would be proportionately less. He
advanced as a suggestion that the
cost of underground work could well
be used in rebate of tuxes until the
full amount was paid nnd a large rebate should bc allowed for depletion
of ore reserves. A paying mine
meant employment nud mom taxes
from the community to the public
treasury, and to continue n system of
taxation that would retard thc proper
development of the mineral resources
of thc province was a false economy.
Mr. Wallinger touched on one or
two matters of importance to his district, giving praise to the minister of
agriculture through the placing in
the district of a man who was doing
his utmost to assist the farmers and
create a new interest in farming.
He criticized the minister of lands
for having removed Major Hicks, a
competent and efficient public servant on the grounds of economy,
Major Hicks, he said, was in receipt
of $2700 annually. A new man had
been sent into the district and his
EVANGELISTS COMING I EXPANSION IN SCHOOLS
TO HOLD SPECIAL STILL CONTINUING: TO
SERVICES NEXT wr-l TART N£W CUSSES
R.v.F.A.rS'^w0,*UT«»"  .    t.     ,        ,
— - ......look continues to grow at an
Oninert tO I --..v« ol    (alarming rate, so far as its school
Meetings in Knox Church
Rev. P, A. Robinson, Ph.D., of Toronto, accompanied by Miss Grunert,
pianist nnd vocalist, are announced
to appear at the Presbyterian Church
in Cranbrook, commencing on Sunday next, Docember Kith, and continuing with their services for the
entiro week following. They will be
remembered from their appearance
in this city a year or so ago, when
their presentation of the vital messages they carry evoked much favorable comment. As formerly, the
other denominations in the city are
co-operating in holding these ser*
vices, and helpful meetings are looked for, which it is hoped will be quite
largely attended.
Mr. Robinson and Miss Grunert
were last week appearing in Grand
Forks, and concerning the services
held there, the Grand Forks Gazette
last week said:
"Although far removed from the
usual spectacular features of revivals,
the special services being held this
week in the United Church by the
Rev. F. A. Robinson, Ph.D., of Toronto, and Miss Grunert, pianist, have
un appealing force that are attracting large congregations dolly. Commencing Sunday morning, his congregations grew, until Wednesday
evening additional seating capacity
had to be provided.        '
"Mr. Robinson tells the story of the
old unadulterated gospel, but he tells
it with a vividness that is different
and with a practical application of
one who has a keen perception of
Canada's greatest need of the hour.
He employs none of the objectional
characteristics of similar meetings,
but he has a remarkably pleasing,
magnetic personality, whose presentations of the gospel messages have a
lustrous vitality which command the
keenest attention of his hearers. Nor
is there anything monotonous about
his addresses, or the meetings, which
are always bright and attractive.-
"In Miss Grunert, pianist, he has a
gifted assistant, whose work in the
service of song is hardly less outstanding."
PARLIAMENT WILL NOT
MEET AT OTTAWA
TILL JANUARY 7th
Ottawa.—The decision of the gov-
ornment to summon parliament for
January 7, avoiding a meeting that
inevitably would be interruped by
the Christmas holidays, indicates not
only the ministerial purpose of holding on and meeting the House, but
of preparing n fairly extensive legislative programme as well. The
speech from thc throne, it is believ-
ed, will forecast considerable legislation.
It is the intention to make financial provision for carryng out the immigration policy which has been indicated, nnd the expectations are that
a measure providing for rural credits, another for the alternative vote,
and very possibly u bill dealing with
the return of natural resources to
the western provinces, will be included in tho programme. The
completion of the Hudson Bay Railway mny he another undertaking.
A lengthy debate on thc address is
expected, for it is the indicated plan
of the Conservatives to bombard the
government from the start, while it
may also serve the purpose of the
ministry itself to protract the discussion. That is may run on into
February is considered very possible.
population is concerned. The matter
is giving some concern to the trustees, who arc continually being faced
with the necessity of engaging new
teachers, and providing new rooms,
At present there are sixteen divisions
at the Central School, and with a
class of about thirty beginners el-
ready lined up for commencement of
their school career at the opening
of the new term, it looks as though
the school board will have to provide a seventeenth division. This
would mean that six out of the eight
rooms in the new addition there
would be occupied for class purposes.
At the high school the situation is
even more pressing, and it is hard to
see what another year, with increased
enrolment, will bring forth. The
fourth year class, the sixth to be
added, iB being accommodated on
what was the stage of the auditorium
at the high school, which means that
all the space available there is now
occupied, or will be when the extra
teacher commences duty after Christmas. What will happen when there
is a necessity for more classes is
problematical, but it does not seem
improbable that within a couple of
years at the most the ratepayers may
be asked to sanction the expenditure
of a fairly substantial sum for the
construction of an addition to the
high school building.
ENGINE RAISED FROM
LAKE AFTER WRECK;
GOES TO REPAIR SHOPS
After the expenditure of a good
deal of effort, involving the employment of a great many extra men in
special train crews, diver, heavy lifting equipment, all entailing the expenditure of large sums of money,
the C.P.R. succeeded last week-end
in raising the engine which went into
Moyie Lake on November 20th, and
It was placed on flat cars, to be hauled away to the repair shops for attention. It proved a big job, there
being many awkward circumstances
that prevented the work going right
ahead without interruptions.
By a coincidence it is noted that
a similar accident took place on Saturday night of last week at Stika,
near Bonners Ferry, Idaho. Charles
B. McGuire, aged 33, head brakeman,
was killed and Engineer John Harrington injured, when a westbound
Great Northern freight train ran into
a rock slide at Stika. The locomotive
and 10 cars tumbled into the Kootenai river. Harrington and his fireman, Clarence Finn, jumped and
landed in the river. McGuire, who
was in the engine cab, also jumped,
but was covered by an avalanche of
coal from the tender. AU three men
resided in Spokane.
KOOTENAY ORCHARDS
SCHOOL REPORT
FOR NOVEMBER
Grade 7.—Eddie Gartslde.
Grndo G.—Frank Hern, Jim Stone.
Grade 5.—George Noyce, Hypol-
lite Ruault, Rose Noyce.
Grade 4.—May Stone.
Grade UB.—Bertha Gartside,
Mabel Sakata, Jack Langin, Evelyn
Hern.
Grado 2B.—Dorothy Thompson,
Ernest Ruault, Alice Noyce, Arthur
Hern, Agnes Noyce.
Grade IB.—Roy Sakata.
Average nt Attendance, 06.3.
WINNIFRED LIPPITT.
expenses for six months had amounted to (2600.
SCHEDULE DRAWN UP
FOR CRANBROOK CITY
HOCKEY LEAGUE
Dec. 22nd., hours 7 to 8.—Rovers
vs. Rink Rats.
Dec. 23rd., hours 7 to 8 Shooting Stars (practice).
Dec. 24., hours 8 to 0.—Y.M.C.A.
vs. Shooting Stars.
Dec. 24th., houra 0 to 10.—Rovers (Practice).
Dec. 26th., houra 7 to 8.—Rink
Rats (Practice).
Dec. 29th., hours 7 to 8.—Rink
Rats vs. Y.M.C.A.
Dec. 30th., hours 7 to 8.—Y.M.C.
A. (Practice).
Dec. 31st., hours 8 to 9.—Shooting Stars vs. Rovers.
Monday and Thursday nights from
7 to 8 have been alloted to tha two
ladies teams to practice or have
games as they may desire.
The first mentioned team in every
case shall be required to furnish
pucks for the game. All games to
start sharp at hour specified and in
the event of one team not having
five men at least on the ice at the
starting time the game shall be declared forfeited to that team which
has all their players on ice and ready
to play.
The rules of the British Columbia
Amateur Hockey Association shall
govern.
F. HARTNELL,
Secretary.
♦*♦♦**♦♦♦♦♦♦♦+*****+*****+
DID IT PAY ?
It wasn't a big ad., in fact it
only cost thirty-five cents. But
it was big enouith to do just
what it was intended to. A
man recently arrived here with
a family, and wanted to get a
home for them for the winter,
on a farm, or anywhere there
was work he could do, ond a
home for his family. There
hasn't been any lack of men
in this district this winter looking for work, so it was evident
that a job of this kind would
have to be hunted up. Nevertheless, the seeker for work
was not daunted. Twenty-
four hours after the paper appeared he came into the offlce
again. He had been offered
two jobs which were just what
he wanted, and hnd accepted
one, and was just on his wuy
out to it. And all the time
men, looking for work just as
badly had been walking thc
streets. But this man know
enough to advertise, and it did
the trick.
This is not a fable, but a
true story of what happened
in Cranbrook a week ago. Advertising will do the trick.
Why not let it work for you?
Fire Loss
About $30,000
Tourist Hotel at Bull River is
Prey to Flames Thursday Morning
CAUSE NOTYET KNOWN
Another of the well known hotels
of the district has been temporarily
effaced in the destruction by fire
early on Thursday morning of the
Tourist Hotel, Hull River. Word
reached the city about four o'clock
that morning that the hotel was in
flames, and later word came that it
was a total loss, along with two or
three dwellings close to the hotel The
wires to Bull River had not been repaired at thc time of going to press,
and the full particulars could not be
had of the fire, but is was presumed
to have arisen from the heating plant
at that time of the night.
The Tourist Hotel has been operated by Messrs. Geo. Thrasher and
Thomas Howard, and was a well
built and substantial place, built
about thirteen years ago. The loss,
if it includes most of hte furniture,
which it is understood are also consumed, will run not less than about
$30,000, which is partially covered
by insurance carried through the of-
fie of Martin Bros,, in this city.
Many enjoyable dances and social
affairs have been held at the Tourist
Hotel, and this summer a beer license was secured, and the place became a popular stopping with tourists, being on the main highway from
the Crows Nest to Windermere and
Banff. Among the other buildings
stated to have been destroyed are thc
dwellings occupied by Oscar Jostad,
and a butcher shop.
CONTRAVENTIONS OF
GAME ACT LEAD TO
SEVERAL   FINES
Several cases of interest to .sportsmen were heurd recently in Ynhk,
when three parties were arraigned
for various contraventions of the
game act. These were important as
showing that the officers who have
the enforcing of tho act in their
hands are alive to their duties and
are carrying them out without fear
or favor. Ragner Edmnn was charged under section 118 of the criminal
code for carrying weapons, and being an alien without a permit. He
was fined $5.00 and costs. Frank
Duckoff, under section 51 B of thc
game act, was fined $25.00 and
costs for shooting grouse and also
under the game regulation he was
fined $10.00 for killing a doe. Alec
Brown, under section 40 G of the
game act, was fined $10.00 and costs,
and under section 58 of the game act
was fined $10.00. Besides the above,
thc rifles were confiscated as well
as a number of traps and ammunition. The deCr hides were destroyed
and the meat sent to the hospital.
Thc important aspect of the case was
that the parties convicted occupied
a shack at Coal Creek, about eight
miles from Yahk, on C.P.R. holdings,
but they were within a half mile
from a place of supply and had,
therefore, no excuse for having game
WOOS AND ALMOST WINS
HAND OF LOCAL GIRL
IN RECORD TIME
Police Step In, However, and
Imposter is Detained
In Custody
Romance that had sprung up and
blossomed into flower in a very
,«hort time, and would have matured
into marriage in a day or two longer, was rudely shattered last weekend when a man who had been passing ns a moving picture magnate in
the city was taken into custody by
the police, and later confessed in
writing and by word of mouth that
he was an imposter. While staying
in the city he went by the name of
William Laemmle, claiming to be a
relative of Carl Laemmle, the well
known motion picture producer. He
cut quite a dash here, claiming to
have plenty of money, as an evidence of which he proffered a check
for two hundred dollars in aid of a
charity being carried on in the city,
but the funds for this later proved
nebulous, like a good many other
claims he made. In the course of
a week he had ingratiated himself
so into the heart of a girl of this
city, that tho engagement was announced,  and   the  lady in  question
minded that they are not allowed to
live on the country. Constable
Sharpe of Yahk and Game Warden
Gregory Thomns made the -arrests
and carried on thc prosecutions.
SANTA CLAUS AT STAR
THEATRE  FOR  FINK
MERCANTILE   CO.
in their possession. People are re-I*ttve u'} her Position forthwith, M
announced her marriage was to take
place in Calgary in the course of
two or three days, which would have
been just about ten days after first
making thc acquaintance of thc
gentleman in the case. Then the
intending bridegroom ran foul of
the police, who were looking for a
man wlio had beaten his board bill
in Fernie. The description given by
the Fernie police did not exactly coincide with the man here, but the
fact that he had received some broken ribs in a car accident, which the
police here happened to hear of by
chance, proved the connecting link,
and he was apprehended, while the
police in Fernie were communicated
(with. Then the history of the man
came out, and it was clearly shown
that he had made a good many pre<
tensions to which he bsd no right
It was found out that his proper
name was Albert Bradshaw, and that
other names he had gone by, in addition to the one he was using here,
were G. M. Morris and G. M. Shiely,
by which name he had gone under
in Fernie.
By his own volition he made a
written confession of some length at
the police station, detailing a good
many transactions he had been mixed up in that were not all they appeared to bc on ihe surface. What
the outcome of the case in Fernie
was has not been learned, but it is
expected he will be detained there
and elsewhere for some litt'j time on
the different charges an.-ins? out of
his escapades.
In the meantime friends of the
young lady who had been so capti-
ated that she seemed to have
reached the utmost pinnacles of joy
at thc prospects that had come to
her, were making some enquiries,
and when she heard with her own
ears that her dashing sheik who had
made his  way  into her  heart withj
Kiddies of District Will be
There in Force December
17 to Welcome Him
Children have been greatly inter
ested by the announcement made by
Santa Claus through the Fink Mercantile Co., last week, that owing to
the .big rush at their star? during
the past few years, when his annual
visit there took place, that he has decided to go to the Star Theatre this
year, instead of to their store. The
big event is to take place on the evening of Dec. 17th. It is announced
that there will be a special big picture there for the little ones, and
none over sixteen years of age can
be admitted, as the treat that evening
is strictly for the kiddies. Admission,
as in former years to the Fink Mercantile Christmas treat, will be by
ticket, to be obtained at their store,
which must be filled out properly,
and to which there will be a stub
which will entitle some of the holders
of the right numbers to prizes.
Watch for further announcements
from the Fink Mercantile Co. as to
the visit of Santa Claus to the Star
Theatre that night, which is one of
the big dates on the kiddies' calendar
in Cranbrook and district.
FORTUNE GOES DOWN
THROATS OF BRITISH
COLUMBIA PERMITTEES
Returns From Toronto
Mr. W. R. Grubbe returned on
Thursday last from Toronto, where
he was in attendance at the annua1.
meeting of thc Imperial Bank of
Canada. Mr. Grubbe reports that so
far as the general conditions are concerned there is a general betterment
and his bank is entering the new
Year with a decidedly improved outlook. While in the East, Mr. Grubbe
had the pleasure of being present nt
the fiftieth wedding anniversary of
his parents, who reside at Toronto.
Officials Visit District
J. J. Warren, president of the
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.,
was in the city for a short time this
week, passing through on his way up
to Kimberley from Trail. He was
accompanied on his inspection trip
by S. G. Blaylock, general manager,
of Trail, who has remained in Kimberley for a few days this week. On
their way to this city they stopped
over at Moyie to inspect the work fn
progress at the new concentrator being erected there.
Victoria.—The total value of liquor sold by the Liquor Control
Board in B.C, for the period from
April 1 to September 30, 1925, was
$6,823,401, made up of $5,771,378 to
permit holders and $1,052,023 to
beer licensees.
Among the chief items of sales to
permit holders are: Vancouver, $2,-
206,108; Victoria, $589,572; Prince
Rupert, $209,086; New Westminster,
$165,562; Nelson, $138,»29; Nanai-
nio, $138,406; Kamloops, $120,947;
Cranbrook, $111,152; North Vancouver, $65,358; Revelstoke, $64,487.
Vancouver beer licensees paid
$606,162, or more than half the total of sales to beer licensees in thc
province.
The proportion of liquor of all
kinds other than beer, imported into
B.C., was 64 per cent, 36 per cent
being produced in the province
Change In
Central Staff
School Board Fills Position;
Still Looking For High
School  Teacher
GRANT TWO INCREASES
The regular meeting of the school
board was held in tho council chamber on Friday last, all the trustees
being present.
Mr. G. C. Barclay of tho high
school staff was present und addressed the board, intimating that he had
been offered a position at Vernon at
a substantial increase in salary. Ho
itatod ho did not wish to leave Cranbrook, but that he felt that he was
entitled to sonic consideration in the
matter of salary. Ho was advised by
Chairman Dezall that the matter
would be taken up later in the meeting.
A letter from Miss Ruby Glaser,
resigning her position ns teacher at
the Central School, was read, ami the
hairman explained that Miss Glaser
had boen released nt noon of December 3rd, and thnt Miss Hopkins had
been engaged as substitute for the
balance of the term.
An application from Miss Irma
L. Ward for a position on the Central
school staff was road also, and a letter from the secretary advising thnt
she had boen appointed to the staff.
It was moved by Trustee Mrs. Jackson and seconded by Trustee Mrs.
Miles tha; thc appointment of Miss
Irma Ward to the Central school staff
be confirmed at a salary of $110.00
per month, and that she be given
grade o class.
A letter from Miss Baxter applying for promotion to grade 7 at a
salary of $1300.00 per annum including supervision of writing was read.
It was moved by Trustee Gilroy, and
seconded by Trustee Mrs. Miles, that
Miss Baxter bo given a grade 7 class
at a salary of $1250.00 per annum,
including supervision of writing.
Several applications for Central
school positions wore read, r.nd also
some applications for the vacant position on the high school staff. These
applications had all been gone over
by Inspector De Long on his visit
here, and none had been acceptable.
Some additional applications wero
also read, and the secretary was instructed to write for a report on one
of these.
Mr. Barclay's request was again up
for discussion, and a resolution was
finally moved by Trustee Gilroy and
seconded by Trustee Mrs. Miles that
Mr. Barclay be offered an increase
of $100.00 per annum, making his
salary $2000.00 per annum, effective
Jan. 1st. It was also moved by Trustee Mrs. Miles and seconded by Trustee Henderson that the secretary
write to thc secretary of the school
board at Vernon taking exception to
their action in the soliciting of teachers from their present  position.
Trustee Henderson, on behalf of
the building committee, reported on
the work on the high school, stating
that the partition had been erected
and tbat the blackboards were ready
uch lightning-like rapidity was not|/or installation, also that the storm
all that he had made himself out to
be, she left the city on Saturday, for
her home at the Coast.
So the flower of love was ruthlessly cut down, rudely blasted in an
unsympathetic world, but the general
opinion seems to be that unpleasant
as it was at thc time for the girl
who almost became a bride, it was
infinitely to be preferred than the
consequences which might have ensued had thc plans for the projected
wedding gone through and cruel disillusionment came afterwards.
windows would be put on during tho
week-end.
Moved by Trustee Mrs. Miles and
seconded by Trustee Henderson that
the insurance on the Central school
building be increased to $80,000.00,
and on equipment to $6000.00. Thc
usual accounts presented foi payment, totalling $0,141*08, were approved. :
LUCKY WINNERS OF
PRIZES WON IN ELKS'
SUNSHINE FUND RAFFLE
The Elks' sunshine fund is being
well augmented these days by the
_ _ ' large  number of chances that are
The  proportion of beer and ale j being taken on the attractive Man.
produced in  thc  province was
per cent.
8.4
Will It Be Hoodooed Dato?
Mrs. Norgrove anticipates spending the week end in Fernie, where
she will bc present on thc 13th day
of December at the 13th anniversary
of the wedding of Mr. and Mrs.
Walker.
kets that are now on display at P.
W. Willis' store on Norbury Avenue,
The lucky winners to date are as follows:
Mjsb Sarvis, C. Johnson, Mrs, R.
Frame, Gordon Jewell, Mr. Sullivan,
P. W. Willis, A. II. McKinley, Canal
Flats, Irma Ward, Alec Martin, Pat
Casey, Ray Melvin and one other,
name unknown.
VISITOR FROM CHINA
TO SPEAK AT UNITED
CHURCH SUNDAY NIGHT
A visitor of unusual interest will
speak in the United church next Sunday evening, Miss Klizabeth McLennan, B.A., of the province of Honan,
China. Miss McLennan is the principal of thc girls' school of Wei Hwci.
which has a staff of three teachers
and gives a seven-year course to the
one hundred and fifteen pupils in attendance.
Miss McLennan is a native cf
Glengarry, Ontnrio, and a graduate
of Queens University, Kingston.
She has been speaking in some of thc
larger churches of Vancouver City
and the Island, nnd fs passing
through Cranbrook on her way cast.
Crnnbrook will give her a cordial
welcome.
JAMES OLIVER  CURWOOD'S
| iiii'       STAR
[\     THEATRE
"THE ANCIENT HIGHWAY"
A ROMANCE OF THE CANADIAN NORTH WITH-JACK HOLT, BILLIE DOVE, MONTAG UE LOVE.
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
DECEMBER
18th — 19th     , j PAQE TWO
THB  CRANBROOK  HERALD
Thursday,  December IMS, 1923
Nelson Business College
The   Hest   Equipped   Business  College  in British  Columbia.
INDIVIDUAL TUITION
Sound Commercial Training in
Shorthand, Typewriting, Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Spelling,
Commercial Arithmetic, Commercial English, Commercial Law, filing and general office procedure
111,1? 1
A British Columbia Business College for British Columbians.
THE COLLEGE IN WHICH STUDENTS EITHER WORK
.    OR LEAVE
New Term Commences January 4th, 1926
Fees only $17.50 a month
Phone 603.     :::::::   P. O. Box 14, Nelson, B.C.
SIX SPECIAL DAYS
of Interdenominational Meetings In
KNOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Sunday, December 13th, at—
11:00 a.m., 3:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
And from Monday 14th to Friday 18th at—
3:00 and 8:00 p.m.
Rev. F.A. Robinson, M. A.
— SPEAKER.
Miss C.B. Grunert, Pianist.
Dr. Robinson and Miss Orunert have for several years conducted services throughout the Dominion and Newfoundland,
and their work is commended from Atlantic to Pacific.
WINDERMERE POTATO
GROWERS TAKE HIGH
HONORS AT SHOW
District Again Proves Possibilities As Producer of
High Grade Seed
(Special to The Herald)
lnvermere, B.C. Dec. 5—The
members of the Potato Growers' Association of the Lake Windermere
district again covered themselves
with signal honor, carrying off
amongst other prizes at the Provincial Potato show held last month at
New Westminster, the district prize
ClaHs F, for the best collection of
not less than eight lots of potatoes
grown by different persons, consisting of not less thnn thirty-two potatoes of the snme variety grown by
the same person from certified seed.
In this competition there were at
least six districts competing, and of
them all Windermere was declared
the winner. In the individual competitions Windermere took nine first
prizes, six seconds, four thirds, in
addition to many in the fourth, fifth,
sixth, seventh and special prize
class.
Messrs. Hugh L. Fuller, the President of the Association, It. Gladwyn
Newton Joseph Heath and R. Randolph Bruce were all present at the
show and report receiving every consideration and good treatment aa
visitors. They all returned home
last week full of a desire to improve
the local stock here and make a better showing next year than has been.
Mr. Joseph Heath also attended
the International Potato Show at
Spokane and has had the honor conferred upon him of being made a
judge of that organization for next
yoar. Incidentally as a result of the
visit of the members of the association to thc New Westminster show
there was sold a carload of certified
Netted Gem seed potatoes at a minimum price of eighty dollars per ton,
which is very gratifying.
The honor of winning the largest
number of prizes of any one from the
Lake Windermere district this year
falls to Mr. J. W. Morland, of
Premier ranch, Windermere, Mr. A.
J. Walker, of Ajax ranch, lnvermere, Frank Jones of Wilmer, coming next in order.
The following are the particulars
of the winning classes:
Early Rose, for which there were
five competitors; A. J. Walker, of
Ajax Ranch, lnvermere, won second
place.
Wee McGregor, Green Mountain,
Gold Coin,—for which there were
thirteen entries; Frank Jones, of
Wilmer, took first and special
prize.
Netted Gem,—41 entries, of which
George Johnston, lnvermere, took
second, R. Randolph Bruce, of this
place, fourth, and A. J. T. Walker,
also of this place, took sixth place,
a prize was also recommended for
A. J. Walker.
Sir Walter Rnleigh,—for which
there were 13 entries, Frank Jones
took sixth prize with 94,4 points.
Any other variety, late,— A. J.
Walker took 1st prize and a special
with  98.7 points.
Any other variety, late—for which
there were eleven entries, J, W. Morland won first with 98.05 points for
Rural Russett, and Frank Jones
third with 97.8 points for the same
variety of potato.
Early Whites,—16 entries, J. W.
Morland, of Windermere, won first
and a special with 93 points.
Early Colored,—13 entries, the
third prize went to J. W. Morland,
with 89 points.
In the late round, oblong or oval
class, for which there were 57 en-
trios, R. Randolph Bruce with Sir
Walter Raleight at 92 points won
4th place, and Frank Jones, of Wilmer, with Wee McGregors, won 7th
place.
In the late Long Variety,—for
which there were til) entries, A. J.
Walker won second with h'a* Netted
Gems; H. L. Fuller Bth, and George
Johnston 7th plaee with prizes,
In the Gardeners Specialist and
2nd division—for which there were
eleven entries, U. Ballantyne won
1st prize in euch class, also a second
and two thirds in othor classes, Percy
G. Docking, of lnvermere, winning
two firsts and a special prize in these
same  classes.
In two other of the Gardener Special prizes, R. Randolph Bruce and
Arthur J. Walker held the honors
between them over thirty seven ne-
trants, carrying off a first, u Becond
and two special prizes.
In the District Competition those
exhibiting were Messrs. 11. L. Fuller, Frank Jones, George Johnston,
R. Randolph Bruce, A. J. T. Walker,
Major F. B. Young, J. W. Morland,
A. J. Walker, Sr.
Stay not o'er misfortunes brooding—
Feeding on life's "might have
beens"—
On thy spirit's calm—intruding
Nightmares   of  regretful  scenes!
Cast them forth, with all their censure!
To thy vomit ne'er return!
'Misconceptions!'—'Misadventure!'—
By experience man must learn.
Darkest clouds have silver lining;
There's no need to droop or die!—■
Precious Flowerl—the  Sun is shining—
Lift thy petals t'ward the sky!—
Inhale  the  radiance  from  above;
In  God's  grace  thy   roots   drive
deep!
Breathe out the perfume of His love
Flapper—"What makes you Btare
at my nose so?"
Young Reporter—"Boss says to
keep my eye on anything that turns
up."
etWfeTWJeWWkr^^
,,:;1.,,.,;     ■;■■:*,,.* ■    ■ .,;;■; ■;,;■.,
| BROWN'S BUS LINE
For Better Service
Is now running FOUR TRIPS DAILY on the following
|j Schedule:
I   Leave Kimberley Leave Cranbrook
I 10 a.m  830 a.m:
|  11.15 a.m.<Daily except Sunday)     (Daily) 120 pJIl.
I     3 p.m.      (Daily)     (Daily except Sunday)2,30 pJQ.
j  6.00 p.m 5.30 pjn.
1  7 p.m. (Saturday only)
Fare $1.00
3 iiLirim*miMiicjiiiiin»nic3iMLiJHiiiicjiHMMLnncinM ]iCTii]iiLitiiitc3iiiHiiiiii]rjH*i>iH<rihtiAiMintttiica*iMiwiwwrili*eM>T—
I
! Solve One of Your Christmas
I Problems NOW
f     With Greeting Cards
|  — Complete with Name and Address, envelopes to Match —
$1.75 and up per dozen
Hie Cranbrook Herald
 Phone and our representative wlll call —
|   P.O. Box 287,   Cranbrook,  B.C Phone   18.
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
of Canada, Limited.
OFFICES, SMELTING AND REFINING DEPARTMENT
TRAIL,  BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS AND REFINERS
Purchasers ot Oold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Orea
Producers ol Oold, Sliver, Copper, Pig Lead and Zinc
"TADANAC" BRAND
asssssssss •==::: 11aat -.:--.i&£&s
osy Lessons in-
AUCTION
BRIDGE
New Series by WYNNE FERGUSON
(Author of "Ferguson on Auction 2bidgf
ejet
Copyright 1925 by Hoyle, Jr.
ARTICLE No. 10
NOVEMBER REPORT
OF  THE  SOUTH
WARD   SCHOOL
DIVISION 1.
Attendance, 82.5.    -
Perfect Attendance: James Haley, Billy McNeil, Eileen Pantling,
Freddie Shaw, Harry Solecki, Angelina Blefare, Walter Cox, Josie Garf-
fa, Philip Rombough, Catherine Rosling, Tom Barrett, Velda Coleman,
Camilla Romano, Eddie Woods.
Rank:
Grade 3a.—Margaret Cassels, Catherine Rosling, Harry Solecki, Se-
villn Rosevear, Paul Solecki, Billy
McNeill Edwin Berrington, Nina
Gordon, Eileen Pantling, Freddie
Shaw, Ellen Saunders, Wilfred Griffin, James Haley.
Grade 3b.<—Agnes Moore, Connie
Worthington, Muriel Miller, Angelina Blefare, Stanley Saunders, Lilly
Rosin, Walter Cox, Philip Rombough,
Tiny Sullivan, Liiu Campbell, Rose
Yadernuk, Steve Yadernuk, Josie
(inrffu.
Grade 2a.—Lloyd Colledge, Leslie
Colledge, Eddie Woods, Jon Thor-
leifson, Velda Coleman, Margaret
Russell, Camilla Romano, Joyce
Bond, Tom Barrett, George Strood.
S. W. HODGSON.
DIVISION II.
Attendance, 70.02.
Perfect Attendance: Jack Berrington, Alex Blefare, Franklin Eley,
Angelina Frisina, Maurice Haley,
Josie Romano, Jimmy Shaw, Milton
Solecki, Gerald Walsh, Billie Yadernuk.
Rank:
Grade 2b.—Franklin Eley, Irene
Curie, Frank Romano, Alex Blefare,
Maurice Haley, Donald Campbell,
Jimmy Shaw, Malcolm Sanderson,
Milton Solecki, Evolt Rosin.
Grnde la.—Gerald Walsh, Bruce
Cameron, Freddie Steeves, Mike Tito,
Billie Yadernuk, Alex Larsen, Jack
Berrington, Reggie Bevis, Fred Rosin.
Grade lb. — Billy Worthington,
Lloyd Cameron, Josie Romano, Frank
Rosling, Peter Thorleifson, Delia
Colledge, Charlotte Quaife, Phyllis
Griffin, Florence Johnson, Malcolm
Campbell, John Yadernuk, Angelina
Frisina, Daniel Rosin.
FLORA C. DOW (Substitute)
The writer wai much surprised the
other day to receive a letter from a
correspondent asking the definition of
:in "original bid." Perhaps there are
others who are in doubt. An "origin?!
1 iid" is the first or opening bid of the
hand, whether made by the dealer,
second, third or fourth hands. It is also
called the "initial bid." It is very important to understand this distinction
lor there is a very great difference between "original bids and "forced bids,"
that Is, those bids made after another
player has already bid. Original bids by
dealer or second hand must always
show two quick tricks, either in a suit
or no-trump bid. Original bids by third
or fourth hands must show at least
three quick tricks. These requirements
are arbitrary and should be closely followed. Original bids offer the best opportunity to give partner exact Information and unless these requirements
ure closely followed, partner is given
incorrect information, usually to his
disadvantage. After another player has
bid, however, bids may be made freely
that would not be justifiable origin:il
bids. For example: Suppose the denW
lias bid one club, the following hands
justify a bid of one diamond, one heart
and one spade respectively:
Hearts — 4, 2
Clubs—10,7,4
Diamonds — A, J, 8, 7,6
Spades— K, 10,2
Hearts — Q, J, 9, 4, 2
Clubs —7,2
Diamonds — A, 4, 2
Spades — 10, 7,6
Hearts-A, 2
Hearts — K, J. f
Clubs— 10, 6, 5
Diamonds — none
Spades— K, 10
Clubs—8,4,3
Diamonds —10, 3,2
Spades—K, J, 7,4,3
None of the harxh contain a justifiable
original bid. Mole, however, that in
each case the hand contains at least
one and one-half quick tricks aud at
least one-half trick in the suit bid.
The same correspondent also asked
whether or not original bids were the
only ones that could bc doubled in-
formatorily, that is, to force a bid from
partner. The answer to this ia simple.
The question as to whether or not the
bid doubled is an original bid b immaterial. If partner doubles before you
have bid and at his first opportunity,
his double is an informatory double and
is asking you to bid. It is always wise to
be able to distinguish an informatory
double from a business double, that Is,
one made to defeat the contract.
An informatory double is a double of
a suit bid of one, two or three, or of a
no-trump bid of one, if made at the
first opportunity and before partner has
made a bid. The fact that the doublcr
has bid Is Immaterial. If he doubles
after he has bid but at his first opportunity, he is still asking his partner for
a bill. For example, the dealer bids a
spade, fourth ha >ii ! ,i two hearts and
tlie dealer doul.lt s, 1. - in doubling at his
first opportunity and therefore asking
for a bid. Note the distinction very
carefully. But got this right. When you
have made a bid of one no-trump,
second hand bid.; two hearts, and your
partner doubles, he is not asking you '
(or a bid. He means] "Partner, 1 was
just aih.-.i to b!.i t .vo hearts myself, let
this double of mine nUud,'t
Aoawar to Problem No. I
"*•*.
Hearts-7,4,2 ._
Clubs-Q, 7,2 Tfc
Diamonds—none
Spate—0,6
Hearts —none
Clubs—1,4,3
Diamonds—J, 10,3,4,3
Spades — none
Hearts—O,10,6
Clubs—K
Diamonds — K, 6,2
Spades-7
1
Y
1
■ A
1
Z
Bl
I
There are no trumps and Z Is In the
lead. How can YZ so play the hand
that they will win five of the eight tricks
against any defense? Z should play the
king of clubs and Y should play the
seven so that he cannot be forced in the
lead on the third round of clubs. This
play by Y Is very important and the
key of the problem. Z'should now play
the seven of spades. A can either win
the trick and return spades or allow Y
to win the trick. His better play Is to
win the trick with the king of spades
and lead another spade which Y wins
with the queen. Y should now play the
queen of clubs. B can play a low club
or the Jack of clubs. If he plays a low
club, B will be forced in the lead with
the jack of clubs on the next round. He
will then be forced to play diamonds.
Z can take two tricks fn diamonds by
' refusing to win the first trick. If B plays
tbe jack of clubs at trick four, A will be
forced in the lead on tha next lead of
clubs and must lead a heart up to Z'e
hand thus allowing Z to make both his
heart trick and the kind of diamonds.
In either event, therefore, YZ must
win five of the eight tricks against any
defense. It Is an interesting and instructive problem because it Involves
many points of play that come up very
frequently, particularly forcing an opponent In the lead to his disadvantage.
Also note Z's play of the diamond suit
In case B won the fturth trick and A's
lead of the low heart when forced in the
lead on the fifth trick. Bad play by
either A or Z In these situations would
cause the loss of a trick.
Problem No. 7
There is another angle to consider.
Suppose A should win tne second trick
with thc king of spades and then lead
the king of hearts and follow with the
nine of hearts. How can YZ so play •
.'.gainst this defense that tliey may win
five ot the eight trie I.s? This point will
be considered in the next article.
TONNAGE TO TRAIL
SMELTER IS WELL MAINTAINED BY REPORT
Following is a statement of ore
received at the Trail Smelter for the
period November 22nd to 30, inclusive:
LEAD
Duthie,  Smithers    160
Federal Bounty Beaverdell      27
Federal Tiger, Beaverdell        4
Knob Hill, Republic   119
Lucky Jim, Roseberry     89
Rambler, Rambler    49
Silversmith, Sandon   53
Wolfe, Alice Arm      18
ZINC
Alamo, Alamo   52
Lucky Jim, Roseberry    52
Rambler, Rambler     35
Silversmith, Sandon   107
COPPER
Allenby Copper Co., Allenby .... 444
Boundary Merc. Co, Grand Forks 47
MILLING ORE
Bluebell, Riondel  695
Galena Farm, Silverton     65
Ruth,  Sandon     38
Mountain Chief, New Denver ....   49
Roseberry Surprise, Three Forks  51
Ruth Hope, Sandon   107
DRY
Quilp, Republic '.  334
Slocan Silver, Three Forks    38
Company Mines   9,624
Total   12,247
while smelter activity is evidenced
by a big increase in thc output of
coke.
There is a movement on foot to
have the drug stores close at the
same time us other stores do in the
evening. While there are some good
reasons for early closing let us hope
that the movement is not a success.
Since the window lights were put
on meter rate, half the windows on
Victoria Avenue are in darkness and
the drug stores ure practically the
only bright spots left on the street.
If the drug stores close then some
better scheme of lighting the main
street must be inaugurated or our
town will look like n country
village.—Fernio Free Press.
Ten of tho finest specimens of
Rocky Mountain sheep, nino ewes
and one ram, passed through Van
COUVOt by Dominion BxprOBB, on Frl-
duy, en route to Northern California,
and is the largest shipment of these
wild sheep to leave Canada. They
were purchased from the Dominion
government by I. S. S. Horne, nnd
will be liberated in u 21)0,000 acre
reserve surrounding Snnluis Obispo,
where specimens of wild life from
all ovor the world arc being gathered
for purposes of propagation and preservation. This uren is controlled
by the Pacific ('oust Sportsman Club.
The animals were cornllcd in thc
neighborhood of Banff. Each animal is crated separately and tended
with great care. Canadian wild life
is much sought after by Mr. Horne,
who is the head of Home's zoological
garden at Kansas City, und who has
the contract for stocking the California reserve. Not long ugo a fine
herd of prairie antelope was shipped
south from near Brooks, Alberta.
Mr. Horne expects to return in a
short time nnd secure a number of
Rocky Mountain goats.
The Baby's Cold
Continual "doling"
wllh Internnl medicine
Upset! delicate little
fitoniiictifi. Trent colds
externally with Vicke.
You just rub it on.
Purity in Soap
Women aud children must havea
pure soap, one which will cleanse
without irritating. Baby's Own
Soap has been used in thousands
of Canadian homes for five generations.
Its pleasant aroma add. to Us value.
Baby's Own Soap
Individual eartoal— 10c. ivirywktrc.
"Best lor you, and Bab, too" ,..,.
NISBET & GRAHAM   \
Barristera, Solicitors, &c.
Offices: Imperial Bank Bldg.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
OFFICES at KIMBERLEY
IN K. ot P. HALL
Open Every Thursday from
10 a.m. to E p.m.
itVffffffffffffffffffffmVff,
R-- in Season
Try some Stewed, Fried,
or on the Half Shell
— at —
VICTORIA CAFE
_    Cranbrook's Popular Cafe    _
f*Vfffffffffffffffffffffftn
<■* ****** **-j-s.*.S"* **************************************
REX CAFE   AND ROOMS
VAN HORNE STREET
(Opposite Depot, two doors from Baker Street)
THE REX is Cranbrook's newest cafe, just recently remodeled
—OYSTERS, CLAMS, SHRIMPS—
and all kinds of Fish cooked in any style.    All fish fresh dally.
— OUR SERVICE IS UNSURPASSED —
Phone orders for outside service promptly attended to.
Rooms in connection with Cafe
|   ROOM AND BOARD AT VERY REASONABLE PRICES.
if Sam Smith and D. Gustin, Props. Phone
1 ******************************************•'
Mineral Output of B.C. Increases.
—The mineral output of British Columbia this year will reach a total
value of $00,000,000, approximately one-fourth more than last year,
according to an estimate prepared by
the provincial mineralogist. The
value of mineral production last year
wns 148,704,604, while for the first
eight months of this year it has totalled $41,000,000. Gold production
shows a large increase, and a greater
output  in coal and sine  is noted,
*****************************************************
The
TRUE
GIFT
Somebody, Somewhere,
would like to get your
Photograph this Xmas.
Arrange for your Sitting
today
-PHONE 56-
Nelson's Photo Studio
****************************************************,
riIIIIIIITlIIIlTITITVTTTfTTTTTTITIITTTTT1
hester
CIGARETTES
•finest
BLENDED CIGARETTE
ON THE MARKET* Thursday,  December 10th, 1925
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
PAQE    THREE
COAL OPERATORS'
ASSOCIATION DECIDES
TO DISBAND ITSELF
Members and past members of thc
Western Canada Coal Operators' Association decided at a meeting held
recently at the offices of the association in Calgary to dissolve the
association.
This decision brings to a close an
organization  which  has  functioned
| C. EMSLIE HAS IT- |
£ Gifts for  |
! Christmas|
| Cheer   |
« Urge variety of IjicIIoh' em- 'ji
m broldored Handkerchiefs, in £f
® dainty houra; 3 for 36c, 50c, g
Oh 76c and 00c.                         jjjj
\w Single Handkerchiefs,           JjJ
C5 ... 16c each -Sa
t% S
4T Chllds' Colored Border          Jff
jS .... 6c and 10c ench tw
Vet "£}
t%  Exceld   26-c each «
S Ladles' Kosey Corner Slip- jjg
g  pers  11.60, »1.7B, $2.00 >jjt
M Show Towels, Colored Bor- W
M ders, guaranteed fast.... 75c jjf
* Ladles'   Silk   Stockings,   in ff
jg  Gift Boxes *1.60 pr. jg
<? Ladles'Silk and Wool Stock- --j*
%  lags  IWO pr. p
8 Men's Suspenders in   fancy jjj
«   boxes   76c, -S1.00 g
5 Men's Arm bands .. 26c, 35c £
K   Men's Garters  36c, 50c top
<2 Suspender and Garter Sets, j£$
g         U.00 |$
S Men's Romeo Slipper, leather -JS
•5   Cushion Sole »4.00 pr. tf
M¥ Men's  Kosey  Korner   Slip- gi
£r   pers  »1.«B V- g
R Men's Silk Ties and Knitted t.g
d£ Ties, large variety in Gift ■»»
jl   boxes   60c, 75c, $1.00 «
ff Men's Wool Vests—$2.75 up £}
» Men's Wool Sweater Coats, "«t
S    $4.60 to $8.00 jg
9L 'a
Men's Pyjamas  $2-75 jg
Men's Dress Shirts .... $2.00 JS
Men's Warm  lined   Gloves, '*
mt mens   nam.   ,...-*«     . j—
S in Fancy boxes .... $2.26 pr. £->
K 'aa
Men's Wool Socks ...75c pr -H
»« Men's Silk and Wool Socks, g
Jj{ checks and stripes .... 75c pr t-p
ff Boys' and Youths' Mocassins 'j$
ff       $1.30 and $1.00 pr. jj-j
ff Boys' Jerseys ..$1.75, $2.00 '£5
«"| Misses' Kosey Korner Slip- S
j per   $l-r>0 pr. «
ff ,. •*
JT Child's Kosey  Kornor Slip- JJ
ajjf pers   $1.16 "P- -jj
ff
*
I C. Emslie
§   Atmstroag Av.., Cranbrook j*
on behalf of many important coal
mining operations in AJberta and
South-easter!) British Columbia for
a period of twenty years. Formed
in 1006, und originally composed of
operators in thc Crow's NeBt Pass,
Lethbridge, Bankhead and Canmore,
he membership grew until at its
maximum thc association included
U5 of thc largest mines in the province with a maximum annual production of 5,000,000 tons.
The making of individual agreements lnst summer between members
of tho association and their employees marked thc initial break-up of
the* association: Thc men at that
time left their union, the United
Mine Workers of America, nnd the
operators similarly left the association. Since that time lhe association
has not been active, and thc decision
reached on Friday was thc natural
oxpoctod outcome of last summer.
FERNIE VETERANS
ENDORSE MOVE FOR
UNITY UNANIMOUSLY
At a mass meeting of tho returned
soldiers held in the Kernie G.W.V.A.
headquarters on Wednesday evening,
the Fernie veterans unanimously endorsed the formation of a united organization for all veterans in Cunada.
The meeting wns addressed by Dr.
S. Bonnell, who strongly recommended this step, and by Major H. B.
Hicks, of Cranbrook, who submitted
his report as delegate from East
Kootenay to the Unity Convention at
Winnipeg. He stated that the or-
gunizution had been formed under
the name of the Canadian Legion of
British Empire Service League, and
that Sir Percy Lake, of Victoria, had
thc honor of being elected the first
president of the new organization.
All veterans associations in Canada,
with thc possible exception of the
Army and Navy Veterans' Association, had signified their willingness
to entef thc Legion.
Without a dissenting voice the
locul veterans voted to endorse the
movement and it is now expected
that early next year, probably about
March 1, the G.W.V.A. will pass out
of existence and the CL. of B.E.S.L.
will take its place.
"No. There is no train at 8 o'clock. It only runs on feast days
und holidays!"
"Well. To-dny is the feast of St.
Euphrasie, and it is also my wife's
birthday!"—Pele Mele, Paris.
GEORGE   J. SPREULL
BARRISTER    :    SOLICITOR
NOTARY
CRANBROOK - B.C.
WHEN IN MOYIE EAT AT—
THE MOYIE CAFE
Firlt   CU.i    Meal.    Sirred   at
All Hour.
Good  clean   Room,  in   connection
f.V.Vfffff.V*Vfffff.Vfffff
Wkan loa Think tl Iitaiu-W
— (Ml Of —
BEALE & ELWELL
Cranbrook & Kimberley
tele Urals lor Ktaihectoy TowasKa.
F. W. GALLAGHER, D.C.
Member of thc U.C.A. and A.C.A.
CHIROPRACTOR
THE PATH TO HEALTH
-lies along
CHIROPRACTIC METHODS -as we
practise them. Wc have -perfected this
scientific method of Vertebral Adjustments, so that men and women and
children find their health vastly benefitted through its use. Let mc explain
to you in person.
McCREERY BLOCK
Office Hours:— 9.30 to 12;   2 to 5;   7 to 9.
BIG GAME HUNTERS
PROVIDE WONDERFUL
SUPPER FOR FRIENDS
Bear Meat on Menu at Kimberley Barbecue Last
Week
Brown Bruin was very fat and
leepy. He had been feeding up all
summer, and now the winter had
come. He had made his bed deep
in a warm hole and drawn thc
brush and pine branches around to
keep out the wind and frost. All he
wanted was to sleep. "I don't care
if I never wake up," said Brown
Bruin, as, {before lying down, he
took one look out upon the cold,
frosty world.
And so Ted Nagle und George Hol-
lund, two of Kimberley's big game
hunters, happening along and seeing
how it was with big Bruin and how
much he desired to rest, why, Qeorge
up and ballasted his heavy head with
a couple of bullets and Bruin lapsed
into bis long, long sleep.
And that is how the brown bear
willingly furnished the basis for the
bear barbecue last Thursday evening.
After a good season's hunting
Messrs. Mowich Limited Messrs. A.
A. Ward, Ted Nagle and George
Holland entertained their friends, to
the number of over a hundred, to a
dinner at the Canadian Cafe, Kimberley, on Thursday evening of last
week.
The menu, in which a bear steak
was the piece de resistance, is printed below:
— Soup —
Cream of Asparagus
— Fish —
Baked Salmon Spanish Sauce
— Salad —
Lobster,     Celery,     Stuffed Olives,
Mayonnaise
— Entrees —
Veal Steak Breaded
Mushroom Sauce
Braised Bear, a la Glasse
— Roast —
Stuffed Young Turkey, au jus Cranberry Sauce
— Dessert —
Pie — Raisin, Apple, Mince
English Plum Pudding, Fruit Sauce.
Fruit and Cake.
The whole of the dinner was admirably cooked and served by Mr.
and Mrs. MacKinnon and, when all
the guests were satisfied a progiam
was presented to the enjoyment of
all.
Mr. C. Oughtred acted as toast-
master and among the contributors
to an enjoyable program were
Messrs. M. J. Evans, Ned Hanley,
Frank Marsh, Cranbrook; J. W. Bell,
Mel O'Brien, H. R. Banks, W. R.
Ross, Austin McDonald, Cranbrook,
Bill Poole, T. Summers, E. G. Montgomery, D. C. MeKechnie, T. Nagle,
W. Forrest, Trail; F. Willis, Major
McDougall, Jack Sanderson, W. E
Aitchison, W. B. Caldwell and F.
Maclean.
Among the out of town guests
were Messrs. G. McKay, and G.
Monkhouse and R. P. Brown from
Moyie, W. Forrest of Trail and Ned
Hanley, Nelson.
The menu and program provided
for the guests was a "blue print" of
much merit, produced in the office
of the C.M. & S. Co., by Mr. S.
Alexander; the design and workmanship were of the best, and the sheet
contained some gems of humor on
which thc author is to be congratulated. Patcy's Orchestra provided
music during the banquet and accompaniment for the songs.
University men were present from
Toronto, Queens, McGill, Alberta
and B.C. nnd toward the close of the
evening the proceeding* wfere enlivened by a hearty rendering of the
college calls.
That the big banquet was a
pronounced social siccess is the
opinion of all who were favored with
the opportunity to be present, and
the promoters may be assured that
they hnve the gratitude of their
guests.
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Miss Florence Agland wu the
guest of Mrs. Frank Looney during
thc week.
Mr. L. E. Baldwin, representative
of the Kimberley Press, paid a short
visit to Moyie on Wednesday lost
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Gavel have
taken up residence in the Farreli
house.
Mrs. Lemon, of Marysville, spent
a few days here with Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Guindon.
Messrs. Monkhouse and George
McKay motored to Kimberley on
Thursday evening.
Mr. Algot Johnson, of the Sunny-
side ranch, was a Cranbrook visitor
on Wednesday,
Messrs. Blaylock and J. J. Warren
were here on Saturday looking over
the concentrator.
Mr. Mac Brogan, of Yahk, said
hello to friends in Moyie on Sunday.
Mrs. Cannady and son, Sherman,
of Creston, visited here with Miss
Mamie Farreli over the week-end.
Mrs, Alex. Cameron was the guest
of Mrs. Jack Taylor of Cranbrook
during last week.
Mrs. R. A. Smith took Sunday's
train for Cranbrook, coming home
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HARD-WEARING
GIFTS
Every shelf in this store is packed with gifts
that will still be on the job giving service, long after
Christmas is forgotten and years after the perishable
gifts have worn out.
SUGGESTIONS
QUNS SLEDS
SKATES       TOOLS
TRICYCLES      BICYCLES
PARKS HARDWARE CO.
"Specialists in Good Hardware"
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TRICYCLES
Finest Made
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on Monday.
Several of the yountr folk of Moyie hiked into Cranbrook on Sunday.
They arrived home Monday evening
none the worse for their long walk.
Miss Violet Agland and her brother, Walter, visited with Mrs. Weir
this week.
Mr. Edgar Montpelllcr was a Cranbrook visitor for several days.
Nelson Smith was in town on Tuesday, leaving that same day for Fernie. We're listening in for the
wedding bells I
Mr. Braiden and family, of Saskatchewan, have taken up residence
in the Laird home.
TRAGEDY STALKS THE
HENDERSON FAMILY;
NOW TWO DEATHS
Mrs. G. G. Henderson, wife of ex-
Mayor Henderson of Fernie, died
suddenly in tho Fernie hospital just
shortly after noon on Monday, following a heart attack precipitated by
the news that her eldest son Jack
was seriously ill at New Westminster,
B.C., and not expected t„ recover,
which came just an hour previously.
Mr. Henderson was out when the
telegram containing the had news
was delivered to thoir home, and Mrs.
Henderson went out to look for him.
When in front of the fire hall, the
heart attack suddenly calne on her
and she  fell  to  the  ground.
She was speedily rushed to the
hospital, but was found to be beyond
human aid and passed away without
regaining consciousness.
When Mr, Henderson was found
and the news of his son's serious illness and his wife's collapse wus
broken to him, he also collapsed and
is now confined to bed suffering terribly from the *^ock.
A telegram was received later
from New Westminster stating that
the son hnd died, but this news wus
not immediately imparted to Mr. Hen
dorson. Tho Hendersons arc well-
known old timers of Fernie, having
resided there almost continuously
since 18118. Mr. Henderson served
as mayor of Fernie for five consecutive terms prior to his retirement
from public lifo a year ago. It is
but a short time since a daughter of
Air. and Mrs. Henderson succumbed
after n short illness in Fernie.
Kimberley  I.O.O.F Officer.
At thc last meeting of Sullivan
Lodge, I.O.O.F., No. .'15, the follow-
ing officers were elected for tlie ensuing term:
N.G  Bro. E. Dickinson
V.O Bro. A. A. Watkins
R.S  Bro. J. J. Sargeant
F.S  Bro. W. i. Carter
Treas  Bro. J. Boardman
PRIZE WINNING POSTER
IN WORLD COMPETIT-
TION SHOWN HERE
lif;i"iis message, it bus been put up
by J. Norgrove, the local representative of the Poster Advertising Association, and represents n part of
a national campaign that body hus
been conducting in the interests of
religious development, social welfare and civic betterment. Thfl poster that Mr, Norgrove has put up
for the month of December is the
first uwnrd poster from n design
whicli won first prize in a world
wide contest last yenr, conducted by
the Association for a poster to depict the plnce of the church in the
world and its worth. Incidentally it
is worth mentioning that this poster
wus designed by a Cunadiun artist,
of Toronto. It shows a large figure
of the Christ in an attitude of extending uu invitation to the world ut
large to come within the sphere of
the church, which is also pictured.
Suitable legends also appear on the
poster which it is agreed is a particularly striking one.
And now the big colored poster,
the 24-sheet display, seen everywhere
on the billboards, has invaded the
sphere of the church. Not so long
ngo it was thought that the message
of the church was not one thut could
with dignity or appropriateness be
linked up to ordinary methods of
advertising, and though there are
still some church members who are
averse to their church body undertaking anything in the nature of direct advertising, the average pastor
today is alive to the fact that the
greater the message, the more need
there is of advertising it, and so welcomes the opportunity to make use
of every legitimate form of advertising.
There is now on display in thc
city, on one of the boards of the
Kootenay Poster Service, on Cranbrook Street, an excellent example
of the big display poster with a re-
"Hava you ever been painted before in full life-size?"
"Oh, yes; but I weighed a hundred'
weight less then!"—Meggendorfer
Blaetter, Munich.
XMAS — NEW YEAR'S
Dec. 16    Montclare 1 eerpool.
Dec.  T.\    y\u\v .. igow,
Liverpool.
Jan.    1    Monti 'gow,
Live rpool.
Special trains and thri ugh cars direct to ship'- side -' -
Excursion Rail — Low third class
ocean rates.
WHY NOT A CRUISE
TO THK MEDITERANEAN   FEB. 9
TO THK  WEST  INDIES, JAN  28,
MARCH I.
Apply  Local  Agent* or
R. W. GREENE
Ant.   General   Agent
Calgary
APPLES
 : FROM   TREE   TO  CONSUMER  :	
Now is your chance to lay in a supply of Apples —
NORTHERN   SPY,   WAGNER,   SPITZENBERO   OREEN-
INdS, BEN DAVIS, ALEXANDER, NEWTON, BAXTER,
ONTARIO, ROME BEAUTY, AT $2.00 PER BOX
SNOWS OR JONATHAN $1.50 AND $2.00 PR BOX.
DELICIOUS, $1.75  PER   BOX
See us for Chicken Feed -  %2.m per 1001b
We Deliver FREE To Any Part of the City
Christian Community of Universal Brotherhood
NORBURY AVE.        OPPOSITE STAR THEATRE
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BRING THE CHILDREN SIGHTSEEING IN OUR
TOY-WONDERLAND
Toy Wagons
Music Boxes
Fairy  Books
Dolls
Stuffed Animals
Play Dislics
Toy Autos
Magic Outfits
Wooden  Soldiers
Drums
Paint Boxes
Skates
All parents are cordially invited to lirinR the children
and show them through our
toy department. It will bc a
thrill they will always remember.
Drawing Bookl
Trains
Horns
Indian Suits
Boxing Cloves
Blocks
Blocks
Toy Houses
Games
Alphalwt Books
Blackboards
Zellophongc-j
Rocking Horse
BEATTIE-NOBLE DRUG CO.
THE CHRISTMAS  STORE PAOEPOUR
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
Thursday,  December 10th, 192J
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GIFTS
Call and impect our SPECIAL
50c, 85c, $1 Xmas Tables
the value and quality of goods on them will
surprise you
RAWORTH BROS.
C. P. R. Watch Inspector
Next to Post Office
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Cranbrook Ibevalb
PUBLISHED   EVERY  THURSDAY.
F.  A.  William.     -     R.   Potter.   B.Sc.
Subacription Price  $2.00 per year
To U. S. A  $2.50 per year
THURSDAY, DEC, 10th, 1925
*** -t"M. .>+•!• .j..!..!. ** •:.•>•>•!»!•>> *** ***
LOCAL   NEWS
**************************
Mr. Volse, formerly <>f Hurry's
While Lunch is opening up in the
premises formerly known at Lhe Club
Cufe and will conduct a first class
rosturant then: in future.
For sales and service Nnsh and Star
cars.   See Ratcliffe & Stewart.   33tf
Friday evening last li large num-
hcr of the High School students
journed to Mackenzie's Lake where
a most enjoyable Unie was had at a
Bkating party. About sixty made up
the number.
Quite a number of the Cranbrooit
younger set journeyed lo Chapman
ou Friday evening last to enjoy lhe
second edition of the Curlers Ball
which was held at the Recreation hall
there  lhat evening.
Norman Connelly, who has come
lo Cranbrook to Lake a position on
the staff of the government office,
returns to the city of his younger
days in coming litre. He is a nephew of Dr. Connelly, who formerly
practiced here, while his father at
one time was a member of the Herald
staff,   under   tlie  ownership  of  the
late Fred Simpson.
Last week-end the telephone
system of the Kootenay Telephone
Lines, which has been installed in
Kimberley on a separate exchange
was put into operation, there being
fifty or .sixty phonos now connected
up in the town. It is understood to
be the purpose of the company to
exlend Lhe system Ihere as soon ns
tlie need for it develops.
The Odd Fellows of this city put
on a very enjoyable card party and
dance on Friday evening of last
week, wliich was very largely attended by members and friends of
the lodge, and just as widely enjoyed.
For the first part "f the evening
cards were thc program, an innova-
Lion  being introduced in  that pro
gressive whist and bridge were carried on logelher, there being seventeen lablcs of whist and fourteen of
bridge in play, The whist prizes
were won by Mrs. Pantllng and John
Manning) who won Lho high scores,
and Mrs. Hrown and W. Soden the
low score prizes. In the bridge,
Mrs. E. 11. McPhee and Miss S. D.
While were the prize winners with
high scores, while Mrs. G. Sinclair
and Mrs. 1'. W. Willies were ut the
other end of the score lists. While
the scores were being computed Ihere
was a duet given by Miss Doris Mae-
kinrot and Miss Finlay, and later
on anoLher enjoyaldc number was
given in Lhe form of a vocal solo by
Miss Jean PaLrick. Robinson four-
piece orchestra was on hand for the
dance, which was kept up at a lively
pace till 2 a.m., and which was voted
very successful. An interlude was
made for the enjoyment of the very
appetizing refreshments which the
Rebekahs had prepared.
We can.7 * full llu* ol Hen's Women's and Mlssu' Hho*s. i
I                   W. F. DORAN.
Our Low Prices win every time
Mr. J. F. Dye, Ajax nnd Nash representative of tlie Begge Motor Co.
of Vancouver, was a visitor in the
city during the beginning of thc
week. Mr. Dye looks for a particularly busy season in the sale of Nash
and  Ajax  cars in  1926.
ARREST OF IMPOSTER
INTERRUPTS LONG
CAREER OF FRAUD
In bringing to a halt the operations of the impostor who was in the
eity last week carrying on fraudulent
ly in matters of the heart, ns well
as in material spheres, Chief of Po-
1 ce Halcrow evidently pulled up
someone whose reputation was already known unfavorable in other
pluces. This is indicoted from the
following wheh appeared in the Calgary Herald of Wednesday:
With thc arrest of D. A. Seitz, 29
year, ut Cranbrook, B.C. on charges
of false pretenses, the police have
completed a search which has been
going on for several weeks now, and
efforts will be made to huve Seitz
brought back to this city to onswer
several charges.
Chief Ritchie is now in communication wiih the authorities at Fernie
to ascertain what disposition is to bc
made  of   the  case   at  Fernie,  and
what steps will have to be taken to
huve him returned ot this city.
According to hte police, numerous
complaints were received regarding
this man, who was known ns Albert
Hradshaw, W. Laemmle, T. A. Noble,
E. E. Shecly, T. A. Neilun and "Hon.
Donald Mount Nelson." He is alleged to have taken orders here for
Christmas cards, representing himself ns an apent of the Caxton Press
Co., of Regina.
The police received aletter from
the Caxton firm, advising them that
Seitz was not an authorized canvasser and had no right to take orders,
lie had accepted orders from more
than 2.1 Culgary people when tho po
lice last heard from the company.
The police are prepared to lay several charges against Seitz, alleging
false pretences in connection with
cheques. He secured a suit of
clothes and an overcoat from a local
firm, and also received $25 from the
landlady of a house where he roomed, and is said to have represented
himself as a representative of a moving picture firm.
The police have received word that
Seitz represented himself as "Hon.
Donald Mount Nelson," son of a
millionaire, and gave a cheque for
$200 to a charitable institution at
Cranbrook, B.C. The authorities
claim that Seitz is wanted in Regina
and Medicine Hat, as they have received circulars asking for his arrest.
Sensational Ore Find in B.C.—A
despatch from Terrace, B.C., states
that samples of ore reaching there
<rom the latest big discovery near
Vanarsdol, a station on the Canadian National railway, a few miles east
of Terrace, are of a sensational character and have created much excitement among mining men. Assays of
the ore run $74 to $250 per ton.
But of equal interest is the size of
the veins and the great amount of
mineral they carry, nearly all high
grade with exceedingly rich streaks
or pockets. The veins on the Silver
Bow claim, which was located by the
original discoverer, William Van Meter, have been traced to adjoining
claims, and arrangements are being
made by Van Meter and the George
Little Syndicate, of Terrace, to drive
tunnels on their respective proper-
tics. The location is only two and
a half miles from the Canadian National railway, and is ideally located
for development work.
NEW 0RTH0PH0N1C
PHONOGRAPH GIVEN
PUBLIC DEMONSTRATION
Give Him
A "WEARABLE  GIFT" is a practical Gilt!    And to either man or .boy it's
**   the Gift that pleases most!    There is no doubt about it.
So if you want to see him radiate true Happiness this Christmas —- just
watch him when he unties the Gift Boxes addressed to him and containing
articles of Haberdashery selected from the attractive assortment at this store!
Note the suggestions illustrated and described here.   If what you have
in mind is not listed come in anyway.     If it's   something man or boy can
wear-WE HAVE IT.
Approaching the magnitude of a
mild sensation is the true description
of thc result of the first demonstra-,
tion in Cranbrook by the Beattie-
Noble Co., of the New Orthophonic
Victor, in the K.P, Hull and the
Star theatre this week. Newspaper
announcements had led us to assume
that the new creation was something
that wns worth hearing and that as
a sound reproduction machine it
would be an improvement on its predecessors. But it seems to be the
concensus of opinion that thc new
member of the Victor family so far
excels thc" others that it is absolutely in a class by itself. The demonstration was conducted by Mr. Austin McDonald who lias already gained a thorough grasp of lhe important features <>f thc new creation. The
Instrument used was the Crcdenaa.
a beautiful cabinet machine. Mr.
McDonald first explained In what respect the new machine differed from
the old. type, and then proceeded to
demonstrate with the use of many
records the salient features of the
Orthophonic. The new (instrument
presents an'entirely new principle
und hus beon declared to represent
100 per cent, increase in efficiency,
the throe defects of Lhe old machines
—limited range, limited volume und
failure to bring out clearly the tone
color—having now nil been removed
with the .result tliat the Orthophonic
is capable of producing the highest
note on the picollo to the deepest
tone of the buss viol. It can produce these tones from the merest
whisper to a shout, and in such a
way that each note of Ihr violin, the
cornet and flute can be readily
identified. The drum sounds like a
drum, the harp sounds like a harp,
and the piano like the piano, this
formerly being almost Vmpossible.
ful machine il firlUii daodtmrntrdadu
As soon ns one hears this wonder-
listehing to the original production
and one instantly becomes enthused
with the exactness with which you
are sure the reproduction is made.
The records chosen by Mr. Mc-
Donold were with the purpose of
showing up thc several points in
which the new machine is superior
to the old one. The first number
played was the "Soldiers' Chorus"
from Faust, this beautiful selection
carrying some very high notes, as
well as some of lhe low buss notes.
Thc exactness of which of which the
Orthophonic reproduces thc human
voice was conclusively demonstrated
by the rendering of record 19-718A,
"I Miss My Swiss." This was n piece
in which there was a preponderance
of s's, every one of which was distinctly ennunciuted. This is without
doubt the severest test to which the
new machine could be put. Other
records illusrtnting other features of
the machine were played clearly,
proving all the claims made by the
producers for it. F.very selection
was in itself most pleasing and the
concert was one which was of a very
high class. On Wednesday evening
ut the Star Theatre a demonstration
was made and from the applause with
which the variouf selections were
greeted, the new creation immediately won favor with thc audience, each
number being greeted with rounds
of applause. The new instrument
will   be   on   display   at   the   local
agents, Beattie-Noble, where it can
be heard at any time. It is little
wonder that the Orthophonic is the
talk of the town and with the range
in prices which the manufacturese
have placed on these it will without
doubt find its way into the majority
of homes in the city. Already many
sales have been negotiated in the
city for the new machines.
ELECTION OF OFFICERS
AT WOMEN'S INSTITUTE
MEETING TUESDAY
The regular monthly meetintr of
thc Women's Institute was hold In
the K. of P. Hall on Tuesday, with
the president, Mrs. G. Smith, in the
chair. After tho regular business
the Crippled Children Fund for
buildhiB a homo was Riven much dis-
cussion nnd tho Institute will in the
new yenr give its special attention
to raising funds for such a worthy
cause hy giving a dnnco nnd a pic-
lure show. The election of officers
also took place, the following being
appointed:
President—Mrs. Norgrove.
1st Vice Pros.—Mrs. Geo. Smith.
2nd Vice Pres.—Mrs. O'Hearn.
Secretary—Mrs. J. Coutts.
Treasurer—Mrs. Noble.
Executive—Mrs. Brown, Mrs. J.
McClure and Mrs. Gould.
Mrs. McCallum gave two solos
which were much enjoyed, after
which the meeting closed by singing
God Save the King, and later afternoon tea was served.
Bride-Elect Surprised by Shower
A very pleasant surprise was effected Wednesday evening this week
at which Miss Rachel Bardgett was
the guest of honor, when about
twenty of her friends met to unite
in a shower party, to mark their
interest in her wedding which takes
place shortly, and to convey to her
their good wishes. The affair was
held at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Fyles, and by a well planned
course of events Miss Bardgett was
brought to the gathering without the
least idea of what awaited her, the
surprise being complete. The room
was prettily decorated, and the
evening was spent In music, while
the big event, the presentation of a
miscellaneous show to the guest of
honor, was carried out when the
two young daughters of Mr. and Mr-?,
R. Leonard brought in a load of
gifts on a prettily decorated wagon,
and presented them to the bride-to-
be. Among those participating in
the happy event were the following
Mrs. Leaman, Mrs. D. Campbell, Mrs.
Hesson, Mrs. Llddicoat, Mrs. Finlay,
Mrs. R. Leonard and the Misses
Dorothy and Margaret Leonard, Mrs.
W. J. Wilson, Miss A. Sarvis, Miss M.
Finlay, Miss G. Bardgett, Mrs. T.
South, Mss Johnson, Miss Johnson,
Miss Nellie Phillips, Mrs. C. Bidder,
Mrs. J. Dunlop, Miss Grace McFarlane and Miss May Ingleby.
MOTHER OF LOCAL
RESIDENT PASSES AWAY
AT OLD ONTARIO HOME
On Tuesday evening of this week
Mr. Fred Belanger received the sad
intleligence of the death that same
evening of his mother, Mrs. Jos.
Belanger at Colibogie, Ontario, thc
fw*t-(jf •
NECKWEAR   75c   lo   $1.75
SLIPPERS  $1.75   lo   $.1.50
DRESSING QOWNS  $10.00
FANCY SILK MUFFLERS   $2.00   lo   $4.50
SUSPENDERS    7.1c   lo   $1.25
SHIRTS, English Broadcloth     $3JO to $5.00
HOSIERY   SOc     to   $U0
LEATHER BELTS $128   to   $3.50
(IARTERS   2Jc   to   75c
ARMBANDS, HANDKERCHIEFS, Etc.
E.   A.   HILL
MEN'S FURNISHINGS
■(.%!;
Nothing Better!
 than a box of cigars, a pipe, a jar of
choice tobacco or a carton of cigarettes.
The man who smokes loves the cool soothing enjoyment of tobacco. He has his favorite kind too, and we carry all popular favorites in stock, ready for your instant selection.
I -Gin SUGGESTIONS -
I Pipes, cigarettes,    tobacco,   humidor,
I    cigarette holder, cigar lighter, match box.
I
All pipes, cigar and cigarette holders
I   and stands, Humidors, etc., to be cleared out
at cost during Xmas sale.
DAN'S PLACE
*?WT9
Wm/Jliljl,ikiTf^^mr.i\
Our $1.00, $2.00, $3.00 and $5.00 Tables
have some Splendid Values
W. H. WILSON ■■- Jeweler
family home.
The late Mra. Belanger hnd reached the ripe old ape of 82 and had
been fortunate in practically not
knowing what a sick day meant.
About a year ago she was troubled
with an attack of dropsy, niul while
it was later evident that the alioted
span of her life had about been
reached, her wonderful spirit never
flagged. The late Mrs. Belanger
was predeceased by her husband 36
years ago at the age of 52.
Of a family of seven girls nnd
four boys the following survive; Mrs.
J. T. Mangan, Fernie; Mrs. Person,
Cranbrook;   Mrs.    P.   Dillon,   Mrs.
Charboneau, Mrs. Milne, and James
of Cnlibogie, and Fred and Joe of
Cranbrook.
Thc lnte Mrs. Belanger practically
lived her whole life within a few
miles of Cnlihogie and in the same
house for the last fifty four years.
Keep Your Money Whole
Beware of the stock salesman.
There nre mnny of them around these
days. In most cases it would be bettor to burn your money. You would
nt least hnve u little fireworks out
of it, instead of the other fellow
growing fat nnd travelling high on
the suckers of Cranbrook.
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WEEK-END SPECIALS
Orange Sherbet Bricks
Vanilla Ice Cream Brick with .Sherbet Centre
Orange Ice Cream Brick
Pineapple Ice Cream Brick
CRYSTAL DAIRY, LIMITED
— PHONE 88 -
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INVITING    ■   -    TEMPTING
Christmas Cakes
add a finishing touch of festivity to your
well arranged Christmas. We have them
both PLAIN and DECORATED.
Christmas Puddings
What is a Christmas dinner without a
pudding? You will find ours delicious-
They are all made by us from the purest
ingredients obtainable.
Mince Pies
Orders taken for our mince pies, made
the way that Mother makes them, with
our carefully prepared mince meat.
Kummer's Bakery
Phone 21.
Delivery all over city. Thursday,  December  10th,  1925
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Holiday Candy
FOR CHRISTMAS GIVING
We have English Fancy Boxes
specially put up for us for Xmas Trade.
All our Xmas Candies are made
on the premises. Our Xmas mixture
will be made fresh on the premises.
Xmas Sticks, Baskets and other
novelties on display.
We serve hot and cold drinks at all
times-  .Ice Cream In Bulk and in Brick.
PATRICIA CANDY  STORE
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1
NOTICE I
Turkeys and Geese
V From now on until tiie end of the month
if    the shooting and bowling for Turkeys and Geese
S   will be carried on continuously at the City Bowl-
%\
jja    ing Alley.   Come and enjoy a good time while
"jj,    winning your Christmas dinner.   Two special
§9   rifles will be available for the Turkey shooting.
| For Smokers'
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i CIGARS, CIGARETTES and 1
TOBACCOS
IN  FANCY  CHRISTMAS  PACKAGES,  ALL SIZES-
JUST THF. THING FOR HIS XMAS GIFT
Christmas
il DEARTH OF CONSERVATIVE LEGISLATION;        |
GOVT. HAS LITTLE POLICY TO ADVANCE £
■l.l.AAAJ.J..t.J..»..«..l     9   .»   .t.-t.-t.
(Special to the Herald)
Victoria, Dec. 6th.—"Only over
my dead body" will a commission of
enquiry into the problems confronting the fruit growers in the irrigation
districts be granted, Hon. T. D. Pattullo, Minister of Lands, informed
the agricultural committee of the
Legislature and later the House itself on different occasions during the
fifth week of the present session.
No recommendation of the agricultural committee of any measure
of relief for the farmers in the Hu-
mas reclamation area will be allowed
to reach the floor of the House, Premier Oliver informed a deputation
of Sumas landowners a day or two
later. It will ba ruled out of order,
he announced with absolute determination.
These two striking ministerial declarations illustrate the attitude of the
Oliver government towards the welfare of those who are endeavoring
to build up the basic industries of
the province by honest effort and
hard work.
• • • •
While this is the attitude of the
government towards the agricultural
settlers who have already staked their
all In an endeavor to make a living
and build up the province by their
labors, the government has been unable to screw its courage up to the
point of taking any decisive action
in regard to the Pacific Great Eastern Railway.
In spite of the many hours of caucusing spent by the government and
ita followers on this P.G.E. problem,
the probability Is after five weeks
of the session that no concrete proposal will emanate from the government this year, except the nebulous
land grant scheme which presumes
that a purchaser can be found for
the road.
R. H. Pooley, the opposition leader,
and J. W. Jones, South Okanngnn,
reviewed from various aspects the
staggering record of the present
Liberal government since its accession of office less than nine years
ago, during which time it hns spent
the extraordinary sum of $204,000,-
000, increased the debt of the province from $23,000,000 gross in 1916
to $97,000,000 at the present time,
increasing the annual debt charge on
the taxpayers from $922,000 to $4,-
600,000 in the present budget, and
running up deficits of $11,000,000
in the past five years.
Various Conservative members
demonstrated fallacies in lion. Dr. J.
D. MacLcan's analysis of the financial position of the province. Notwithstanding that he has hud to write
off $7,000,000 of tax arrears during
the past four years, the Minister is
still carrying last year's $2,000,000
as fully realizable, while in calculating the gross debt he still omits thc
$20,000,000 of guaranteed P.G.E, debentures for which he is thi.; year
providing a sinking fund.
• • • •
Severe comment was uttered also
upon Attorney-General Matison's entering a stay of proceedings in the
private prosecution launched against
M. B. Jackson, K.C, his own speciul
investigator of the Janet Smith mystery, accused with having conspired
in the same offence. Some members
regarded it as only a bad error in
discretion, but C. F. Davie, member
for Cowichan, himself a lawyer, dug
into the authorities and produced
proof that the attorney-general had
no legal right to step in as he did
at all. Confidence in the attorney-
general's administration of justice
had been completely shattered by
this culminating act in connection
with the Janet Smith case, he declared.
Bowling Tournament
The second game of the bowling
tournament which is being played
ut the City Bowling alley took place
on Wednesday night when the forces
piloted by G. Anton beat thc Geo.
Steseley bowlers by the score of 1981
to 1581. Foi the winners Geo. Anton distinguished himself with a
score of 200 in the first game. The
teams were Anton, Btggattim, W.
Belanger and Pete, nnd Steveley,
Sinclair, P. Belanger and T. Turner.
KIMBERLEY
NEWS NOTES
Hi. favorite brand ii to be had here—fresh, sew
shipment, of all high grade tobaccos. Christmas Is not
Christmas for a man unless tobacco is included amongst
kis gifts—or a pipe—or an ash tray. You'll find Ihem
nil hen.
*************************
Mn. Nidd, of Cranbrook, who haa
been visiting friends in town, returned to her home on Thursday.
On Thursday of laat weelc Mrs.
E. E. Jackson entertained for Miss
E. Neilson in the form of a miscellaneous shower. Numerous and pretty were the gifts that were presented
to one of Kimberley's most popular
nurses. Delicious refreshments were
served and a most enjoyable afternoon spent.
Tha attendance at school haa been
very low this month owing to the
epidemic of measles in town.
A curling meeting was held Wednesday night at the office of the C.
M. 4 S. Co., to decide on the various
rinks for the winter.
Mr. Monkhouse and George McKay, of Moyie, were among those
who attended the barbecue at the
Canadian Cafe last Thursday.
Mrs. Wm. Lindsay entertained a
few friends at tea Tuesday afternoon.
Mrs. E. S. Shannon and young son,
Billy, returned home on Wednesday
from an extended trip in the cast.
Mr. North, of the Bank of Montreal, left this week for a holiday trip
to his home in Vancouver.
Mickey Edmonds, of the C.M. tt S
Co. offlce, returned this week from
a holiday trip to the Coast.
Bob Murray was fortunate enough
this week while out hunting, to secure a fine young buck.
Dan Pierce and S. Mills, who have
been at Moyie for the past few weeks
in connection with the C.M. t S. Co.,
returned to town on Tuesday.
The new telephones are being Installed in town this week; and now
all you have to do is call Central.
Mrs. Lloyd Crowe, of Wycliffe, waa
a Kimberley visitor Tuesday.
Mr. Thomaa Wilson, who has been
employed by the Staples Lumber Co.
all summer, hu charge of the ice
making on the rinks this winter. Mr.
Wilson haa had some experience in
thla Una before.
Tha atom in town are putting on
a very Xmas appearance, although
the weather la very mild and feels
like spring.
Mr. 8. G. Blaylock and Mr. 1. 1.
Warren apent a few days in town
looking over the workings of the C.
M. * 5. Co.
Chaa. Morrison returned home on
Friday from hla trip to Calgary.
Mr. Sutherland haa enlarged hia
store considerably for the Xmas
trade.
held  a
gifts.   The proceeds will go toward
the building fund.
Principal Morsh of the Kimberley
school is spending a few duys at thc
hospital.
Mr. Cameron, of Cameron & Sang,
Cranbrook, was a town visitor on
Tuesday.
Bob Turner and Harry Morrison
were in Fernie through thc week.
Mr. Bowness, of Cranbrook, was
in town on Tuesday.
Mrs. Carlson entertained a few
friends at tea the first of the week.
Steve Clarke, of WyclifTc, was a
business visitor in town this week, in
connection with the Staple's Lumber
Co.
A hunting party consisting of Fred
Willis, A. A. Ward, Geo. Holland and
Ted Nagel went out Sunday lust, and
Mr. Nagel was successful in capturing a fine big buck.
A. Galante is spending a two
weeks' holiday hunting.
Monty Turner, of the Bank of
Montreal, returned to town this week
after a two weeks' holiday at his
home in Salmo.
Jack Taylor made a business trip
to town on Wednesday.
WYCLIFFE NOTES
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
* LAKE
WINDERMERE
NOTES
(Specinl to the Huraid)
lnvermere, B.C., Dec. .1—Captain
A. H. MacCarthy hns returned from
a hurried trip to the eastern states.
He expects shortly to leave with Mrs.
MacCarthy to spend the winter in the
mountainous parts of New Zealand.
The Girls' Auxilliary gnve n very
successful dance in McKay's Hull,
Athalmer, on Friday evening, while
Mrs. Kimpton gave a bridge pnrty
in the White House Lodge, Windermere, on Suturduy evening, both entertainments being in aid of the
funds of the Church of Englnnd.
The nnnuul meeting of the Luke
Windermere Crcnmery Limited wus
held ot the close of last week, when
full reports were presented by the
directors and officers. A change wns
suggested ns to the orgunizntion of
the undertnking, upon which the
hureholders voted in the affirmative,
and it is hoped by the directors thnt
this will go a long wuy towards put- children, Paddy ami his little
ting the work upon a more paying
basis. The Board of Directors were
re-elected as they stood, and most
appreciative votes of thanks were
passed them nnd others for the good
work performed during the yeur just
closed. Many were in attendance
from points us fur north us Brisco,
and ns far south as Fairmont Springs.
Mrs. Houlgrave, the wife of Commander Houlgrave, R.N.R., passed
away nt the General Hospital here
last week, leaving a newly born buby
firl to be without a mother's care.
n addition to her husband two young
lister,
survive the loss. The burin! l«»k
place from Christ church, lnvermere,
the service being conducted by the
Hev. K. G. Thatcher, Spiltimacheen.
The Interment tank plnce in the cemetery nt Windermere. Messrs. Fred
G. Ball, Arthur Newton. K. M. Siin-
dilunds, John S. Barbour, 1'. Mitchell,
Stoddart and Major F. B. Young
were the pull hearers. The late Mrs.
Houlgrave came to this part from
England us a bride in l'J ill, and except during the war period, when
her husband wus on Ben service in
the R.N.R., has. been constantly in
this part.
Gyroi  to  Help  Fair
Negotiations have been going on
for some time between a committee
of the Gyro Club and the Agricultural Association re the granting of the
concessions of tho Full Fair to the
Gyros. It is understood that mutually satisfactory arrangements have
been made and that the recommendation of the Agriculturul Association
that same bc confirmed will be
agreed to. Thc meetings of the
joint committee huve been well attended.
... SATURDAY SPECIALS...
Pot Roast Beef  10c per lb.
Shoulder Roast Beef  12 I-2c per lb.
Choice Brisket Beef   8c per lb.
Choice Rolled Prime Rib Beef 22c per lb.
Choice Milk Fed Veal
Shoulder Roasts  15c - 20c per lb.
Stewing Veal  10c per lb.
Choice Grain Fed Pork
Milk Fed Turkeys, Chickens,
Fowl, etc.
P. Burns & Co., Ltd.
CRANBROOK, B.C. j
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We take pleasure in announcing
that our stock of LADIES' EVENING and STREET DRESSES is most
complete—all are of the latest style
—and are priced to suit all.
OTHER SUITABLE XMAS GIFTS
We are showing a line of Belgian
novelty runnera and squares—these are
woven (rom pure thread silk. See these.
Gifts for all the family, Mother, Father,
Wife, Hubby, son or daughter, brother or
•liter. Fancy gift boxes. Shop early
and thus get the full advantage of the
large selection of goods that we have
made.
Make your Xmas Money Oo Farther
by purchasing your Xmas gifts at
THE   REASONABLE   STORE.
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KOOTENAY TRADING CO. LTD.
«
Pipes and Smokers'Sundries
Dunhlll,  Parker.  B.B.B.',  O.B.D.,  Comroy's,  Orllck, and
Petersen Pipes In all shapes — Companion Cases of Pipes
fmake Splendid Christmas (iifts
EVERYTHING  MODERATELY PRICED
-gg FOR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING
| CAMERON & SANG
PHONE 86    :    :    :    :    :    :    CRANBROOK, B.C.
Society
Wednesday
The  Caledonian  	
meeting In the K.P. Hall
evening to elect officers for the com*
ing year. -
Mrs. Burroughs and young daughter left last week for Victoria, where
they will spend the winter months.
Owing to so much sickness In town
among the children, the school concert which was to have taken place
on Dec. 15th, wu postponed until
after Xmas.
The sale of work at the Union
church on Wednesday afternoon was
a great success. The candy tables,
which were filled with home made
candy, were attended to by some of
the young girls of the church. Tea
was served during tha afternoon and
a very pleasant time was had. The
advantage ot thla sal. by
*t rwttsj me\ emlel Xaus
The usual weekly Recreation Club
meeting was held in the hall last
Wednesday evening. There were not
quite as many out as usual owing
to some being on the sick list. Altogether eight tables were made up
for progressive whist, which was
played for the first half of the evening, the remainder of the time being
given up to dancing—Mrs. Frenzen
and Mrs. Frederickson very ably officiating at the piano. Lunch was
served by the ladies, gentlemen paying for theirs, the cash taken going
into the club funds.
Mr. Larry Piper, of the Perry
Creek Mercantile Co., left on Friday
for Vancouver and other Coast
points, ana* expects to be away for
a week or ten days.
Mr. J. Foster, the St. Mary's ran
cher, was visiting Wycliffe on Wed-
nesday.
Miss Simpson, of Cranbrook, wns
out staying with her sister, Mrs.
Frenzen, last Wednesday and Thurs-
day,
Mr. Harry Hughes, of St. Mary's
prairie was in Wycliffe on business
on Monday.
Mrs. S. G. Clark and Mrs. L. Crowe
were taking in the sights of Kimberley last Saturday evening.
Miss F. V. Chelmiek, B.N., and Mr.
F. Willis, of Kimberley, were down
on Sunday visiting with Miss Chel-
mick's mother, Mrs. H. Edwards.
Mr. Morris Mindlin, the Calgary
tailor, was in Wycliffe several days
last week, soliciting business from
the boys.
Mrs. F. Charters was a Cranbrook
visitor on Monday,
Mr. and Mrs. L. Crowe and family
were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. H.
McLeod at Kimberley last Sunday.
Mr. Wm. Morris was in Cranbrook
on business on Friday.
Alec Derby, of the Western Grocers, paid his usual weekly visit on
Tuesday.
o
"I am sorry. I have broken my
spectacles, and so I can't read the
account. Call back with it in six
months' time!"—Meggendorfer Bla-
ettar, Munich.
FINE   MEATS
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SPECIALS	
FOR CHRISTMAS
TURKEYS
DUCKS
GEESE
CHICKEN
FOWL
OYSTERS
EXTRA PRIME
ROAST BEEF
What is Christmas without a big, fine, juicy bird — cooked until tender
—and browned to a golden glory? No wonder so many people are sentimental
about their turkey on Christmas—no wonder they are disappointed when it
doesn't turn out 'just right-' You need have no fear of disappointment when
you order your turkey from the Cranbrook Meat Market. We buy only the
highest quality.
Also chicken, geese and fancy roasts—fresh always and of guaranteed
quality—at the lowest prices in Cranbrook.
Our poultry are all Alberta Grain and Milk Fed especially for us — and
can be relied upon to be abolutely A.l.
Cranbrook Meat Market
PHONE 8
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fto>$*%\*3*^^ PAGE SIX
THB CRANBROOK HERALD
Thursday,   December lOtli,  192J
THE UNITED CHURCH
REV. B. C. FREEMAN       -
"For a* that, and a' thut,
It's coming yet for a' that—
That man to man the world o'er
Shall brithers be for a' that."
>—Burns.
Pastor
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13th
Junior Choir
Adult Bible Class
11 a.m- — Rev. W. T. Tapscott.
12.15 p.m.—-Sunday School.
7.30 p.m. — MISS ELIZABETH McLENNAN, B.A.,—Principal of Grils' School at Wei Hwei, Honan, China.
— Senior Choir.
— YOU WILL RECEIVE A CORDIAL WELCOME —
Cranbrook his headquarters for tho
next few months.
WARDNER SCHOOL REPORT
DIVISION I.
List of pupils with perfect attend*
Mr. K. A. Anderson and family ar-   ance:—Oscar  Helmnn,  Louise  Law-
nved back in Wardner on Thursday«son,   Forrest   Leard,   Edith   Bobery,
last   after   his   holiday   of   several  Jennie   Moberg,   Dorothy   Scanland,
months at the coast.    Mr. Anderson \ Kathleen Sheppard, Murray Sinclair,
expects to take over his ranch in the
Valley, which has been leased the
past year to Mr. and Mrs. Reed, of
Alberta.
Miss Jennie Eastwood left last
week for her home in Vulcan, Alta.,
after spending the past month here
visiting her sister, Mrs. Geo. Renick.
William Sinclair,
List of class leaders for November:
Grade 4.— 1st, Sigfred Bakken;
2nd, Josephine Rosieky and Dorothy
Scanland.
Grade 15.—1st, Edwin Bakken and
George Thompson; 2nd, Walter MaeKenzie.
Now that ehicken pox is rapidly \ „<£"deI   7—,st' WJSS   f"&
on the decline, Wardner ta Ao?,^2^&»ndjKrthto Shop*
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
Drs.   Oreen   &   MacKinnon
Physician.   &   Surgeons
Ofllce at Residence, Armstrong
Avenue
OFFICE     HOURS
Afternoons  2 to 4
Evenings   7.30 to 8.30
Sundays 2.00 to 4.00
CRANBROOK,   B.C.
DR.   F.   B.   MILES
DENTIST
OFFICE HOURS
9 to 12 a.m.       1 to 5 p.m.
Hanion  Blk.,  Cranbrook,  B.C.
Baptist Church
Rev. W.T. TAPSCOTT
213 Norbury Ave. - Phone 202
SUNDAY, DEC. 13th
11 a.m. - Rev. P. A. ROBINSON, M.A., will preach.
12 o'clock — Sunday School
7.30 p.m. - UNION SERVICE in Knox Presbyterian Church.
YOU   ABK   COBDIALLI
IKVITED.
F. M. MacPHERSON
Undertaker
Phone 350
Norbury Ave., Neil City Hall
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
H. W. Herchmer
BARRISTER
and
SOLICITOR
CRANBROOK   ■   B.C.
— PHONE 61 —
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WARDNER        I
NOTES J
J. Martinos made a present of
venison to his customers on Wednesday morning last.
Several oi the young people of
Wardner motored to Jaffray on
Thursday to attend the masquerade
given there by the Farmers' Institute. Although only about half ot
those -present were maskfcd, these
showed their ingenuity in the selection of their costumes. Two of the
prizes were carried off by Wardnerites—gentlemen's   first,  Jack   Cum-
outbreak of sickness in the form of \
measles, two cases of which are reported here this week.
Mrs. Theo. Thompson celebrated
her birthday on Friday last with a
small tea for several of her relatives
and friends.
Earl Kastwood, of Vulcan, Alta.,
arrived in Wardner on Sunday and
will make un extended visit here with
hit< sister, Mrs.  Geo.  Renick.
Mrs. Wm, Holton and daughter,
Maurinc, were business visitors to
Cranbrook between trains on Tuesday. Mrs. Clark McKenzie was also
a Christmas shopper in town
Thursday.
Both local stores have on display
this week a fine line of Xmas novel
ties, including crackers, toys, etc.
and the Company store has also i
window of fancy china, to delight
the hearts of the ladies of the town.
C. M. Pennock motored home from
Cranbrook on Saturday evening,
driving a new McLaughlin coach,
purchased from the Hanson Garage.
Gordon Jewell, of Caithness, spent
a couple of hours on Tuesday on
business in town.
"Wild Bill" Casey drove into town
on Friday last for a load of groceries
and feed. Bill declares he is stocking up for the winter and says that
although he does not imitate the
bears, and hibernate, he might just
as well  sometimes.
Paul Storey has installed a small!
Westinghouse radio at the home of
the Harris brothers. Several machines have been installed during the
past few weeks, and the owners appear to be vying" with each other in
obtaining stations. Radio yarns are
now equalling the summer's big fish
stories. At that we have heard more
than one of the new owners threaten
to kick the machine out on a bad
night.
Mrs. Herb Headdon spent Friday
evening and Saturday visiting in
Wardner, leaving Saturday evening
for her home in Wasa, to be in attendance at a farewell dance given
in her honor by the parents of Mrs.
Headdon's school pupils.
Misses Isa Taylor and Ethel Dow
and Ole  llelman  and Chas. Barnes
Grade 9.—1st, Murray Sinclair;
2nd, Ingrid  Bakken.
DIVISION II.
Perfect attendance.—Fred Coe,
Inieda Dave, Charlie Hamrin, Ruth
Hamrin, Blanche Harrison, Einar
Johnson, HjordlB Johnson, Tnkahira
Miyasaki, Swea Moberg, Georgette
Renick, Loretta Renick, Helene Wold.
Class leaders:
Grade  lb,—Ruth Hamrin.
Grade  la.—Frank Dow.
Grade 2b.—Takahiro Miyasaki.
Grade 2a.—Mary Rader.
nard, and Harry Lynn. >
Vice President— J. R. Charnock.
Secretary—C. Hesketh.
Treasurer—Geo.  Quail.
Executive—Thos. Shorthouse, J.
Payne, Wm. Whalley, John Cunliffe,
Bert Sawyer, Rev. W. Burns.
The annual fee was fixed at $1.00,
and Bert Sawyer, Arthur Harrison,
John Charnock and Thos. Short-
house were appointed on the membership committe to rustle members.
The secretary was instruced to secure all the necessary data in connection with the further work of organization and the securing of a
charter; also to find out what assistance the government rendered in
the holding of a fall fair.
The meeting then adjourned.
BACK HOME
I've hoard it
fff.V*VffffffffffffftVffff
LUMBERTON
CHIPS
Today I hoard a song
many  times;
It soothes, and never irksome sounds,
It has a strange attractiveness—the
lines,
The tune—the whole sweet thing in
melody abounds.
■+** + *
It draws mc on in longing wish, to
Bee
The things that it depicts; in soft
cadences,
Gently lilting. A black man's
melody—
And I am white—But the soft advances
Waive the color bar, and makes us
all us one.
* * * * *
Oh home, it was his home, and it entrances,
Twines round  the heart—It comes,
Appeals—To his—To mine—It loves
—-embraces.
Listen  again—It sings, to go from
here,
"Carry  me  back  to  Old  Virginia."
J. E. SIMESTER,
Victoria, B.C.
(Rights reserved)
SEE US FOR—
YOUR NEXT SUIT
Late.t stjr'et It fabric. $40>$60
H. C. LON(i, Van Horne St.
berlnnd, dressed ns an oldtime cow- ] motorea to Cranbrook on Saturday
buy, complete from hat to spurs; and ; to take in the show "The Man on tho
Pete Hurry, the best comic character, BoX|„ |ater pr0Ceeding to Wasa to
gaily attired in the beads and fringes att<!na the dance given there in honor
of an Indian squaw. The dance of Mrg. Herb. Headdon.
was carried on until the small hours _
of the morning, all having a splen-1 The Wardner Recreation Club
did time. Those present from Ward- ciub helll a finc meDting |n the hall
nor included Misses A. bholborn, D. on Th*aday evening. Although
Nordmnrk, Thora Muir, I. Taylor, these "before Christmas" weeks are
T.  llolmun and Messrs. F. T. Pltz-
SKATES
Ground Hollow
at Nicol
— O.K. SHOE SHOP-
Shoes Repaired
Montana Restaurant
Meals at All Houn
Cigars,  CiganttM tt Tobaccos
Cranbrook  St. Phon. 201
Opp. Bask of Comm.rc.
■ttakllaka* IHI
Geo. R. Leask
PIOHI1B IWII
All   0OXTBA0MI
OaMaHWark.
■sttaatas glraa m
uU nl ai tree*
•■eat Coraer Itftafy Areaae
Simmons, J. Dow, B. Embree, O. C.
llelman, .1. Cumberland, P. Hurry,
Alec and Ben Daye, Bill Mader, Hurry and Sam Thompson und Jack Allen. _
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Mindlin, of
Calgary, spent several days in Wardner last week, while Morris scoured
the town for the Crown Tailoring
Company of Montreal. He appears
to be keeping the male residents up
to the heights of fashion nowadays.
On Thursday Mrs. Mindlin continu-
d her journey to the Coast, where
she will make her home for the winter.    Mr.   Mindlin    intends   making
**************************
For Good Value ia
GOOD   EATS    |
Go to The
ZENITH   CAFE
Cor. BAKER ft VAN HORNE
AAlAAlllAAAAAAAAAlAAAlMii,
LODMB AND 800UTUI
C.  P.  R.
AOIANlf     (,ll,l'r"' Change In
intone/      TRAIN
1.«-«7    SERVICE
EffaUive, Sun., Sept. 27th, 192S
Time for Truina nt Cranbrook
Will Be
Westb'nd — Pac. Time — Eastb'nd
No. 87   Daily No. 68
ar 12 noon ar. 4:10 p.m.
lv. 12:20 p.m lv. 4:20 p.m.
Cranbrook-L.ke Windermere
No. 822 ar. 3:30 p.m. Wednesday &
Saturday.    No.  821  lv.  0:00  a.m.
Monday and Thursday.
To  Klmborloy
No. 823 lv. 12:25 p.m.; No. 8:25 lv.
4:30 p.m.
From Kimberley
No. 824 ar. 11:30 a.m.; No. 826 ar.
3:55 p.m.
Trans-Canada Limited has been withdrawn.
Noi. 823 and 824 connect at Cranbrook with Westbound No. 67.
Nos. 825 and 826 connect at Cranbrook with Eastbound No. 68.
For further particulars apply to any
ticket agent.
1. B. PROCTOR, D.P.A. Calgary
exceptionally busy for most people
a good attendance was in evidence.
Mr. and Mrs. Becker arrived
Wardner on Tuesday of last week
from their home in Germany, later
proceeding to Jaffray to join their
son, Fred. Miss Becker accompanied her parents (who formerly lived
here about ten years ago) back to
Canada.
Mrs. Pete Shields arrived in Wardner   last  week   from   her  home   in
Montana and will make a short visit
here with her daughter, MrB. Lee
Rader.
Wardner's new barber, Mr. Bcaty,
is now on duty at the Wardner Hotel
each evening of the week. The
bobettes appear to be waiting for
the other fellows' cut first.
Dan Loos and Andy Steverson
motored to Crnabrook on Saturday
evening to see a show.
womiro ncBTmrn
Heeta to
K. ef r. KaO
afUraooa ol the
Sn* Ta-Mday at
I SM.
Pre.id.nt:      Mrs.
Ste^TnaBwi
AU      	
•ordlelly tartud
GEORGE SMITH
Mn.   Flalaysea
I. O. O. F.
KEY CITY LODGE No. 42
Heeta every
.Monday night at
^^^^^^^" The Auditorium
Sojourning Oddfellows are cordially invited
N. G.     -    ■ F. A. WILLIAMS
Rec. Sec. E. G. Dingley, P.G.
WHO
STAKES
NICE
WAFFLES?
GOOD
PROPOSITION
For Rent
DEPOT ROOMS AND
TEAPARLOR
Thla   Building,   Recently
Constructed, Is Situated in a
flood Rooming District    In
Cranbrook
Tea Parlor may be used
lor Store
For Terms, Etc., Apply
H. C. LONG
VAN HORNE STREET
**************************
THE PLEA OF THE f
OUT-OF-WORK
**************************
The following effort was handed in
this week to the Herald by one of
the out-of-works in the district, representing his actual experience in
looking for work here recently. It
may not be particularly good poetry,
but the theme is worth devoting some
attention to, for it is apparently not
a rare state of affairs just at the
present time.
This out-of-work  poet   writes   as
follows:
"I've travelled all over, North, South,
East and West.
For five weeks, each day, has work
been my quest;
But ask where I will, I am met with
n 'No!»
Alas, for a job, where nm I to go?
I've spent what I mnde the last job
I bad,
And now I am 'busted,' down-hearted
and snd.
With clothes growing shabby; where
once there were soles,
In my boots, now, believe me, are
wide-open holes.
Some sneer as I pass, others give me
a frown,
As I tramp, hunting work, the streets
of each town.
But go where I will, I find nothing
to do;
I  can't even 'raise  the  price  of  a
'stew.'
I don't like to beg; I never could
steal;
But, God above! I am starving; I
|    must have a meal.
| Thus, gaunt with hunger, I'm driven
to plaintively bleat,
'Say, bo, can you give me six-bits to
eat?'
I'm weary, and I haven't a bed;
Believe me, I almost   wish   I   were
dead.
Tray why is it thus in this glorious
land?
Pray why are there thousands wolk-
ing the street,
With no work to do, and nothing to
eat?"
I. M. STONEY-BROKE.
Tho Lumberton Ladies' Aid Society held its regular monthly meeting
lnst Thursday evening in tho Lumberton Hall. The meeting was called
to order at 7.30. Tho gathering was
attended by a large number of the
members, and Mrs. Bowden, of Saskatchewan, and Mrs. W. A. Robertson were present as visitors, gome
new business was brought to the attention of the ladies, among which
was thc skating rink problem which
is being discussed in Lumberton at
the present time. The ladies have
always come through in anything
which would accrue to the good of
the community, and this was no exception, as they voted a sum of
twenty-five dollars to be added to
the amount already contributed by
the baseball club. This makes a nucleus of seventy-five dollars, and this
amount should be swelled considerably when the list is circulated among
those interested in skating for tbe
coming season. After the business
was transacted and the meeting adjourned, refreshments were served
by Mesdames E. J. Dobson and J. A,
Jones.
Mr. and Mrs. Ingram, of Spokane.,
spent a few hours in Lumberton on
Monday afternoon, in the interests
of the Hilgard Lumber Co., with
which firm Mr. Ingram is connected.
The Lumberton Club held Its regular weekly meeting last Wednesday
evening in the Lumberton Hall. Six
tables of whist were in play during
the early part of the evening. Refreshments were served after the
cards were concluded. The remainder of the evening was spent in playing cards. During the course of the
evening the members and their
friends were entertained by Mr. Gay,
who had been engaged to entertain
with slight of hand tricks and various
stunts of magic. The entertainment
proved very good.
an operation for appendicitis. As ho
is a very popular man with the hoys
nt the different camps, it is hoped
he will soon be back with thom again.
On Friday, December 4th, Constable Sharpe of Yahk, accompanies
by game' warden G. Thomas of Cranbrook, made a raid on the occupants
of Coal Creek cabin, R. Edman, F.
Duckhoff and A. Brown, and in their
possession found three deer hides,
one of which was the hide of a doe,
a large quantity of venison, one
freshly killed Willow grouse and
thirty-two steel traps. This was all
brought down from Coal Creek cabin,
about eight miles from Yahk, to the1
provincial police office at Yahk, nnd
was there used as evidence against
theso three men, later being confiscated to the Crown. In the evening
five charges were placed under ihe
Game Act against these men, who
appeareil before K. A. Lythgoe, J.P,
Four of these charges they pb'.id
guilty to, and the fifth were found
guilty on. The fines imposed totalled
seventy-two dollars, plus the confiscation of two Buns until May :iist
next, and the complete confiscation
of another gun. In the ease of Hex
vs. A. Brown, the accused was severely censured by the presiding justice
for having killed deer for fond ui
a prospector's licence, when opily half
a mile from a logging ciutqi, where
he could have bought supplies. The
Justice idso intimated that any future case of this sort thut earn.' be
HOCKEY PICTORIAL
BOOK OF CHAMPIONS
IS JUST TO HAND
fore him would be dealt with severely. The confiscated venison was
shipped in to Cranbrook Hospital.
The Sunday School concert held
at the Mill Hall, Yahk, last Saturday, was a great success, and much
credit is due to the different ladies
of Yahk who taught the children
their parts. An enjoyable dance followed the concert.
Art Levi and Cyril Radford left
last Monday from Yahk, to spend the
Christmas season with their folks in
the east.
Mrs. Bill Smith, of Camp 21, was
a visitor to Yahk over the week-end.
Mrs. Harrison was the children's
friend last Sunday, when she gavo
a fishing pond contest to them.
Every child got a prize.
Considerable excitement has been
aroused in Yahk over the wrestling
match to be held at Bonners Ferry
ou December [0th, between Bill
Koot, of Atlm], Idaho, and Nels Jepson of Yahk. The matelr is for a
side-bet of five hundred dollars, ond
will no doubt be n great one. A
number of Vahk fans will be making
the trip tn take this match in.
"Hue's hoping that Nels Jepson
brings back the bacon to B.C."
Mr. Jepson and his wife, from Alberta, arrived on Wednesday to pay
a visit to his brother, Nels Jepson, of
Yahk.
wLm
Mrs. Nanten is an Old Country girl who is trying to
learn Canadian ways ol
cooking. She is particularly
anxious to have a recipe for
waffles. We sent two, but
there is a simpler one—easier to make. Would someone
else help this young wile?
We would bc glad to lor*
ward recipes to her in your
name.
PACIFIC   MILK
Head    Ofi-t.i    Vaacoavar
Factor!., al Udaar ft AUatalard
tVffffffffffffffffffffffff
When In
KIMBERLEY
Stop at the
0LYMPIA
FOR THE BEST
CAFE, CONFECTIONERY and ROOMS
Our Cafe la Noted lor Ita
Firit Claw Cooking
A No. 1 Coffee
Excellent Cooking
WWMMfltaftAftftftMAAMflAftAAJ
The Herald has just received a
copy of the Hockey Pictorial, 192-8
edition, which is now on sale at all
■non-stands, and which is at once the
handsomest and most complete publication ever produced in the world
for any single sport. It is a marvel
in artistry and industry of achievement. It is impossible to speak too
highly of It.
The book represents years of effort, typographically and pictorially,
it Is a "masterpiece." From cover
to cover it is embellished with group
pictures of championship teams from
1888 to 1925, in fact, the history of
Canada's Great National Winter
Sport is told In pictures.
Old-timers will be Interested in tbe
handsome half-tones of the teams
who were prominent a generation
ago, while the younger enthusiasts
will enjoy the reproductions of the
more recent winners.
The book Ib not only lavishly illustrated, but is literally crammed
with much interesting information
regarding individuals, clubs and leagues throughout the country.
Local hockey fans will also find
very interesting group pictures of the
United States Amateur Hockey Association Champions, who are practically made up of former well
known Canadian players.
The book, which is published by
George King, 84 Victoria St., Toronto, a well known Toronto sportsman,
is a credit to the game and its publisher.
FERNIE DECIDES TO
FORM ASSOCIATION TO
HOLD ANNUAL FAIR
(Fernie Free Press)
About thirty representative citizens nnd members of the agricultural
community surrounding Fernie met
in thc city hall on Monday night to
discuss the formation of an Agricultural Society and thc holding of a
Fall Fair.
Mayor Irvine occupied the chair
and spoke at some length on the crying need for some kind of an Institution of this kind to assist In promoting thc agricultural Interests of
this district.
Tho matter was discussed pro and
con at considerable length and it
was finally decided to organize. The
following officers were then elected:
Hon. Presidents — W. R. Wilson,
A. B. Trites, Hon. Dr. J. H. King
nnd Thos. Uphill.
President—Wm. Dickon;
Hon. Vice Presidents—Capt. Bw-
Batho the affected part.! with
Mlnard's In warm water.
Quick relief assured.
Atww keep Miiiard's handy for
coldi, iprains, cuts and brnlici.    co
If
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
C. JOE BROS.
Ladies & Gents.' Tailors
We Are
RADIO
HOW TO BUY A RADIO
ERECT YOUR  AERIAL, THEN  INVITE  DEMONSTRA-
TION.   THE HEST MACHINE WINS OUT
EVERY  TIME.
We are Agents for the Neu—Perfection 5 tube
Neutredyne
This machine hns solved Ihe problem of clear and distinct reproduction of Radio Programs. (No cat fights nor
coyote howls.)
We will gladly demonstrate this machine against any
other make regardless of price, anywhere, at any time.
The Neu—Perfection is not sold on time payments anywhere in Cunada, as the demand far exceeds the production
at all times. You pay from 25 to 50 per cent more for a Radio
sold on time payments than the machine is worth.
Price $175.00, including tubes.
Trade in that old machine, and get a new one for Christmas.
Vulcanizing Works
The well-known storekeeper at
Eastport, Mr. Saunders, sold out his
stock and fixtures last week to Mr.
and Mrs. De Baum, who will continue
to operate the store. Mr. Saunders
and his wife are moving to Bonners
Ferry. Their leaving is much regretted at Kingsgate and Eastport,
as they were well-known for their
prompt and courteous service to all
their customers.
Mrs. J. Hamilton entertained at
her home last Tuesday.
Mr. Harry Woodhouse was the
holder of the lucky ticket in the raffling off of BUI Baum's Scripps car.
The number was one hundred and
thirteen. Paul Jepson, age seven
years, was the youngster chosen to
draw the lucky ticket from the hat.
Great improvements have Just
been completed at the Boundary
Cafe, Eastport The dining room
has been lengthened and the kitchen
completely renovated, and better
cooking equipment added bo as to
handle the Increased trade, to which
this cafe is certainly entitled, aa anyone that has ever had a chicken dinner there will verify.
Mr. Cowlc, camp paymaster for
the C.P.R. at Yahk, went'into Cranbrook Hospital last Wednesday for
Bruce Robinson
Pbone 296       Teacher of Mania P.O. Bos  TU
STUDIO — ARMSTRONd AVENUE
Third House from Presbyterian Church
ROBHISQIS ORCHESTRA-OINCES ARBM6E0 FOfl Thursday,  December 10th', 1925
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
PAQE SEVEK
HAY
Timothy and Upland
Ready far Immediate
Shipment
We Specialize in all kinds of
Farm Produce
TIMOTHY SEED
3-1 Purity and No. 3
Prices on Application
Wire, Phone or Write to
PINCHER CREEK
CO-OPERATIVE   ASSOC.
Pincher  Creek,  Alta.
PHONE 27 tf
Milk and Cream
DIBBCT FROM
Big Butte Dairy Farm
non h
Sainsbury & Ryan
BUILDERS AND
CONTBACTOBS
Estimates CHtsb aad Wait
Oaaimateil
CalepheiM MS aW M
CBANBBOOK      •     B.C.
**************************
See Ua For Vour
School
Supplies
Watch for arrival of our new
FALL   GOODS
Paul Nordgren Store
Oa Kala Hoad. atar aridf*
WHY OPERATE?
for Appendicitis, Gallitonee,
Stomach and Liver Troubles,
when HEPATOLA doce tho
work without pain and do
risk of your life nar lots ci
time.
Contain! no pottoa. TTiiUiilltirlniulrti
Mrs. Geo. S. Alms
sols H-uni.Acnai.1
ISO Fourth An. 8. PboMlMI
SASKATOON
PHra toUO-Pinel poat tie ratn.
STRIP TICKETS
With and Without Coupon!
For (Jenerol
Admission Purpoaea
For Sala at
THB
CRANBROOK HERALD
OFFICE
DR.   LARGE
Dentist
CP.R. T.Uaraph Balldiaf
Next to Y. M. C. A.
Office Hoars
9 to 12—1 to 5       Phone 204
t HURRY'S WHITE LUNCH
IS THE PLACE TO EAT.
I mite Help Only Ia Employed.
! Tea win IM thla Cale a Homer
Plaee ta Enjoy loan Koala
ALEX. HUBBY •   Prop.
THE
NEW HOTEL
Yahk, B.C.
J. MARKLUND, Proprietor
■ ■ i. i
When In Yahk make your home nt
THE HEW HOTEL.
This Hotel Is new from bottom to top.    Twenty-five nicely furnished rooms. All are clean
aad comfortable.
SBSTAUaUHT Dl CONNECTION.
-: TAKE NOTICE :-
$1500.00
Join the Fernie and District Fifteen Hundred Club
before it is too late.
ONLY  $7.00 llrst year
AND $2.00 each year after
PLUS  $1.00 per death
BUT:	
It la easier to find a dollar once in a while than It la to
find fifty.   For lull particulars apply to
O. W. SIM-IKS, Organizer, BOX 240, FERNIE, B.C.
SANTA CLAUS STOPS HERE
For his supply of Oranges, Apples, Grapes, Bananas, Nuts, Candy,
etc., because he only wants the best.
Call around and see for yourself
the excellent stock of Fruit, Nuts and
Confectionery that he has to choose,
and what's more Santa's Scotch, he
wants the best, but he must have
them at the very best price.
Moirs Fancy Box Chocolates and Xmas bulk Candy
at right prices.
K. MAIGAWA, VAN HORNE ST.
— Opposite depot —
OotrrrttU. mWt, Warmer Bros.
temm USMS llViSiM tmt, u a pittmUaUM « Uls stars tf lj
^^ WaSMl »M.^leUiM, Ian. _    JL
SYNOPSIS
Jim Fowler, young mail clerk, has
wandered aimlessly into the stormy
night on learning that his wife has
died in giving birth to a boy. Bob
Wilson, who had saved thc Limited
Mail, shields him from harm. Jim
is about to dash himself into a crater well when Bob snatches him
back. The two fight desperately and
Jim is getting the better of his rescuer when his senses return and he
bursts into a paroxysm of tears. He
Is enraged at the babe who caused
his loved one's death.
CHAPTER  IV
"You probably haven't forgotten,
Bob," said Jim one day about three
weeks after his wife's funeral, "that
I told you I was going away with
you—on the road, anywhere, everywhere—just as soon as things here
were settled."
Bob nodded from a comfortably
Indolent position flat upon his back
with a humorous foreknowing twinkle In his eye, though his face remained gravely attentive, and he
looked at Jim expectantly.
"Well," said Jim honestly and
without a trace of sheepishness, "I
can't go through with it."
The two men were seated on the
neat green lawn of the little postage
stamp backyard of the Fowler cottage, in the limpid sunshine of a
rare June day, making woeful efforts
to retrieve their boyhood skill at
mumbly-peg. It was by these little
artifices that Bob, in his interest and
liking for the slender, almost effeminately intense mail clerk, had contrived during the acute days of Jim's
dangerous moods of ingrowing melancholic brooding to which he was
predisposed.
"I don't know what drove you out
to roam. Bob; but I've seen enough
of the fine man in you to know that
it must have been something big—
something that justified you. But
I'm not like you. The open, rib-
bony roads that wind over distant
hills don't lure me—even now. But
from the wistful longing I've seen
in your eyes, sometimes when we've
been walking and I've caught you
staring off to the horizon, I know
they've got a powerful drag for you;
and that's made me appreciate whnt
It cost you to stay here—to   help
"Your chance," said Bob, handing him the rusty penknife, "I missed. It's 'backies' for you this time
—you're two ahead of mo!"
Jim was not to be distracted.
"You're made for that sort of thing,"
he continued, "I'm not. You're
hard.   I'm soft—"
Bob looked up sharply from his
dissembling efforts to smooth down
the pricked turf, smiling over a sudden realization that Jim had unwittingly uncovered a truth: which was,
that there was a good deal of protective "big brother" impulse in his
affection for Jim.
My five hundred mile run on the
Limited Mail ia vagabondage enough
for me," Jim went on, with a wry
smile. "Anyhow, I've been thinking
it over a lot the last few days, and
it just came to me once and for all
as wc sat here. It's no use, Bob, I'd
be leaving—her—"
"Didn't think you'd pull out with
me," said Bob laconically after a
brief silence punctuated by their
careless flipping of the knife into
the grass. "Hoped you wouldn't,
too. Because, old man, when it
comes right down to it, Mrs. O'Leary might make a good foster mother
for the kid, but she can't take the
GenuineAspirin
Proved Safe
Take without Fear as Told
in "Bayer" Package
sT *— ^V
thejlef"^
Unless you see the "Bayer Gross"
on package or on tablets you are not
getting the genuine Bayer Tablets of
Aspirin proved safe by millions and
prescribed by physicians over twenty-five yean for
place df—his mother. That's your
joh—mother and father, both! No,
you're not leg loose, like me, old
man!"
Sudden apprehension, an anticipatory fear of loneliness, dimmed
Jim's eyes as he grasped Bob's hand,
stopping him in the act of throwing
the knife, and stammered,
"Ymi, Hob—you're not—thinking
of—"
"I'm thinking I want to be—on my
way. There's nothing more here
I can do. Your leave is up thii
week-end and you'll be going hark
to work on Monday's run. I've liv
on you all this time, Jim—eaten
your food, worn your clothes, I'm
a liability ami I'm going to liquidate
myself by becoming scarce," he finished with a short laugh.
Jim got to his feet with a grim determination and stood over Bob,
frowning, like a defense advocate
before the bar of last appeal.
"Bob Wilson, you've done all the
preaching around here for nearly
a month, so now I claim the right
to crowd in a few words. I've guessed you've been in some big trouble,
but I know by your manner, your
speech, your—everything—that you
stand head and shoulders above the
average citizen of this town—that
you've been accustomed to the best
and not to thc meanest of this
world's goods. I don't know or care
why you choose to drift, but I wish
you'd let me be your anchor. I
haven't any right to butt into your
plans for your own life—but God,
Bob, in n little ovor three short weeks
I've come to love you as a brother.'
"What could I huve done if Providence hadn't sunt you in my path*
Killed myself, or gone to pieces—
with not a living relative to do for
mc what you, a—u—," Jim broke
down.
"A homeless bum!" prompted
Bob drily, throwing the penknife at
"Wouldn't it be (-real if you fot
to the throttle of the Limited heraelf
■ome day?"
Colda
Headache
Neuritis
Lumbago
Toothache
Rheumatism
Neuralgia
Pain, Pain
Each unbroken
"Bayer" package
contains proven directions. Handy
boxes of twelve tablets cost few
cent Druggista also aell bottle§ of
Mud 100.
n belligerent bumblebee.
"I'm sorry," he said. "Bob, I'm
going to bc old womanish enough
to advise you to do one of two things.
Thc first is, that if you are breaking
someone's heart by remaining away
and it is just something that can be
explained and forgiven, don't ruin
your life and others. Remember the
desolation you've seen that couldn't
be helped in my little home."
Jim poused anxiously, his eyes
watching for some sign of a break,
some hint of nn impression, in Bob's
eyes. But he looked in vain; Bob
stood monumentally — unblinking,
unsmiling nnd unanswering, Jim
continued slowly after a few moments,
"The second is, if you can't or
don't care to do the first, that you
settle down with mc here in Crater
City. You can bury yourself here
as well as any place. This town is
no more than a fungui knuckle on
a great transcontinental railroad,
with no prospects of a future any
different than its barren nnd laborious past. No unc ever comes here
who doesn't have to. You'll be as
isolated here as on a desert island,
and a damn sight more comfortable
than—hoboing!"
"It isn't the comfort I'm considering, nor the attractiveness of a
tramp's life," said Bob, speaking
quietly and very deliberately. "It's
just the satisfaction of knowing that
as a bum I would be, like every bum,
a living red flag of protest against
the tophenvy humbuggery of civilized society. Hobodom as a whole social gesture is a crystallized thumbing of the nose by thc least hypocritical minority of mankind at the
useless shams and cant of the smug
majority."
"Then why can't o mnn of your
attornments, who obviously combines breeding and intellect with a
lack of hypocrisy, be individulastic
in his expression of contempt for the
wholo social scheme," said Jim, his
words tripping on one another's
heels in his anxiety to put over the
happy inspiration thnt he had seized
upon. "Why can't you stay here
and get a job on the railroad and
demonstrate your own privet* eee>
tempt by helping to shuttle the 'smug
majority' back and forth over the
Mountain Division in their endless
gaddings?"
Bob laughed at the boyish revelation of Jim's confidence that his
eager enthusiasm would assure victory for his argument. And, still,
Bob could think of no good reason
for passing up Jim's proposal. It
would be safer here in Crater City
from chance contact with anyone
he knew than he would be roaming
around the country, even as a tromp.
If the town's name of "Crater City"
was geographically apt, then the social status of its citizens might be
well described as "encratered." Bob
chuckled with unholy glee; he would
become un oiler or a switchman;
something lowly, something "poor,
but honest." Oh, it was rich! If
only they—if only she—could know.
Bob was raised from thc daze of
reflections into which he had drifted
by a resounding crack on the shoulder from Jim, who misunderstood
the causation but not the consequence of Bob's chuckling.
"You'll stay," he rejoiced.
"If I con find work—yes," promised Bob, grinning as he grasped
and shook the hand that Jim thrust
out.
"Today—this afternoon—this very
next fifteen minutes—is the best
time to see about a job. We'll put
aside the delight of mumbly-peg—
we'll have to anyway, seeing that
you lost your knife—and hike right
down to see Morran, the Yardmas-
ter. He's a good friend of mine
and he'll steer you into the right
berth. Say, what job are we going
to get for you, anyhow?"
Tolking rapidly, foolishly, in his
excited interest, Jim had already lead
Bob out to the front road and off in
the direction of the widespread yards
thut made Crater City a veritable
cobweb spun with steel threads; a
chugging, heaving, smoking cobweb
over and around and through which
there fussed—by day in the sticky
glurc of an unshaded sun, and by
night in the yellow glimmering of a
thousand of its electric imitators—an
overalled and begrimed host of human ants, who, from time to time,
scuttled out of the path of the Mallet locomotives that sped across the
web like giant spiders.
"Will it be so easy for me to get
a job that I can have a choice?"
asked Bob as they swung down-grade
on the gravelly hill road. Bob
knew that despite his present grooming—so different from the stubble
and dirt on him on that fateful night
a month before!—and his neat, if
rather confined, appearance in Jim's
second best suit, he had become familiar to every child and householder
und trainman in Crater City during
his stay at Jim's cottage, as "the
hobo who saved the Limited." Therefore, he asked smilingly,
"Isn't it apt to be thought something of a social phenomenon for a
trump to be seeking work?"
"It sure is," Jim chuckled, "and
that's what will put you over.
They'll be flabbergasted enough to
make you roundhouse foreman.
Seriously, though, after Morran
sizes you up he'll fit you in some
place, all right."
He studied in silence for a few
moments Bob's straight, lithe figure and swinging, elastic carriage.
Then, with fond admiration,
"You're a husky customer, and I
guess Morran'11 put you to firing.
You can step up to driving, from
that, when you know the ropes.
Say, would'nt it be great if you got
to the throttle of the Limited herself some day, and we'd be making
the run together 1"
Bob smiled to himself at Jim's
naive summation of the ultimate
zenry. A small mark, to say the
goal of Crater City's ambitious citi-
lcast, for one of his. Still, outwardly he agreed in a flat tone that undoubtedly it would be an ideal
achievement, but too high and too far
to be dreamt of for the present.
They were down Into the town
now. Crater City, cupped in a jagged saucer of ancient volcanic foothills that surged over many broad
counties like congealed ocean waves,
was intolerantly conscious of its
standing as Mountain Division Headquarters of the great cross-continental, Trunsrocklan Railroad, and Impudently boastful of Its importance
as thc largest town—despite its
modest ten thousand odd souls—in a
day's run, east or west, over mountain or prairie. A tartly modern
Main Street rose in chicken and goat
haunts on the hill and flowed its cob-
blestoned way past thin banks of
houses and, finally, a block-long accretion of garages, stores and a bank
just before it mushroomed out into
the green, scraggly-flowered lake of
the Transrockian Depot plaza; thence
its commercial flotsam eddied into a
besmirched streetlet that ran parallel to the railroad.
(To be continued)
BAKE YOUR OWN BREAD
ROYAL
YEAST
CAKES
STANDARD OF QUALITY FOR OVER 50
HOME-BAKED BREAD IS BEST OFALL
filled at once. Letters were read from W. M. Ar-
Ninety-four players have, so far.chibald, president of the B.C. Curling
handed in their names for member-Association, and from H. W. Atkin-
ship and everything points to a sue-son, secretary, requesting the Kim-
cessful season. The opening compe-berley club to join the association,
tition will be president vs. vice-presi-On a vote being taken it was decided
dent, and will be played some Sundaythat the local club accept the invita-
when the weather is suitable. tion.
GIFTS   FOR   THE   TRAVELLER
The ideal Christmas gift combines beauty
with practicality what, then, could be more
acceptable than a gift of leather ? Such a gift
will prove useful for a period of many years We
have a complete stock, including travelling cases,
valises, suit cases — with many novel innovations.
at prices that are remarkably low. For Shoes,
Gloves, Mitts, Socks, Suspenders or Garters, —see
us.   These make useful Christmas presents.
Cranbrook Saddlery
VAN HORNE STREET.
Vffffffffff.Vffffff.Vfffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff
PATRONIZE   HOME   INDUSTRY
 By Using	
CRYSTAL CREAMERY
BUTTER
CRYSTAL DAIRY, LIMITED
— PHONE 88 —
fffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff
RINKS DRAWN FOR KIMBERLEY CURLING CLUB;
HUNDRED MEMBERS
A meeting of Kimberley Curling
Club, held in the office of the C.
M. -fi S. Co. on Tuesday of last week,
waa well attended.
The president, Mr. J. A. Hirofins,
waa in the chair, and Mr. A. A. Ward,
secretary, waa also present.
The executive selected tha skips
and third men, and Uu riaka will Iw
\
"Winning
and Holding Good
Will"
A Slogan based on
actual fact
.... *&&&*<...
OAKLANDJ
MOTOR  GARS
COACH & SEDAN
NOW ON   DISPLAY
I — at the —
I     Kootenay Garage
^OAKLAND SIX
%\f  » 0  ft V   C   T      OP      O t N  ft ft A b        ft  0  f   O   ft   0/
■~-   *--^W   ' ■    I I     SB—^f*g^ PAOE EldHT
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
Thursday,   December  10th,  1925
ffffffffffffffffffffffJV*^^
SILVERWARE
What  every  woman  wants
for    Xmas.   Our   Stock   is
complete
Bon-lion  and  Butter Dishes—
  from $1.25
Tea services — $19.00 .el and
up to $60.00
Half dozen small tea spoons in
gift boxes   from $1.90
— from $4.00
lo $15.00
from $4.50
lo $15.00
THE GIFT SHOP      A. EARLE LEIGH
Norbury Avrnu. Watchmaker & Jeweler
'fffffffffffffffffffffffff.Vffff^^
^8r *jl'f%^'"?^<!flt;s -■s"|ulwic■,, lv"ys -
clllil '%yg»> * Cato p,atcs	
LOCAL
Aappening*^
The Baptist Church Sunday
school Christmas tree and entertainment will take place on Monday, December 21st at 7.30 p.m.
LEIGH,
Cards.
the   Jeweler,   for
Xmas
42
&«>«*«> Wl
TOY   LAND
now in Full Swing at
Moffatt's Variety Store
—: Everybody  Welcome :—
Special Discount to all School and Organizations
GIFTS FOR BOTH OLD AND YOUNG
Dolls —Dolls —Dolls
Beautiful True to-life RaK Dolls  $4.50 to $7.25
Mama Dolls   75c to $5.00
Neatly Dressed Dolls, Hair and -Moving Eyes 35c to $4.50
Cupid Dolls  from 5c to $1.00
Latest Creations in Toyland
Electric Trains, Mechanical Trains, Mechanical Speedway
Over and Under, Maggie and Jiggs, Tinker Toys, Erector Sets,
Sewing Machines, Submarines and hundreds of other Toys.
Complete Stock of Books
Chums Annual, Girls' Own Annual, Boys' Own Annual,
Oirls' Camp-fire Stories, Hoys' Adventure Library, Burgess
Bed time Stories, Charlie Chaplin Comics, Foxy Grandpa and
hundreds of other Picture and Painting Books.
GAMES — GAMES
Latest sensation — Rota, Quoits, Bowling Alleys, Ten
Pins. (iolf. Parlor Tennis, Ups and Downs, Parcheesi, Ludo,
and Checkers, Horseshoe, Alali Jongg and scores of other
amusing Games.
Gifts for Mother and Dad — all in Xmas Boxes
Pane} Stationery, Handkerchiefs, Silk and Wool Hose,
Scarfs, Sweaters, Wool Gloves, Neck Ties, Cuff Links, Broadcloth Dress Shirts, Shaving Sets, Razors, Manicure Sets,
Collar Boxes, Laundry Bags nnd numerous other useful
gifts.
Beautiful Display of Fancy China
Elite Limoges Cups and Saucers from  90c to $1.90
100 piecs Limoges Dinner Sets   ;■  $60.00
Nippon Lustre Tea Sets  $8.50
21 piece Tea Sets at  $6.00
Dinner Sets froni   $26.00 to $40.00
The latest novelty in Cup and Saucer:—The Cup of Knowledge, with Book of Instructions.    Tell your fortune .... $1.85
Beautiful Line of Xmas Decorations in Spun Glass and
Gold
MAIL ORDERS PILLED   SAME DAY AS RECEIVED
Moffatt's Variety Store
Phone 393 Cranbrook, B.C., Box 726.
The Opportunity You Are Looking For to Secure a Variety of
dr*%        ^^Tr^T^-       ?V<
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Clearance Sale
of Seasonable Goods, suited to Christmas Giving.
China, Dry Goods, Toys, Fancy
Goods, Etc.
All to be cleared  at  GREATLY REDUCED PRICES.
Come in and Inspect Our Stock.     Quality Goods at Low Prices, and a Wide Variety of Staple and Christmas Goods.
— Sec Us Before Buying —
Cranbrook Bazaar
The    Salvation    Army    Christmas
Tree nnd entertainment will be held
the Salvation Army HaU Tuesday,
December 22nd, at 7.30 p.m.
See the Pine Tree for Christmas
Candy. 41,
See the framed pictures at "Photocrafts," the new Studio nnd Art
Store, Cranbrook. 40tf
Donald Cnmeron, son of W. Cameron, of Skookumchuck, is progress-
ng at the hospital here, after undergoing a serious operation.
For prompt repairs and satisfaction go to Ratcliffe & StewartV garage. 20tf
Chris Bergstrom, well known railroader of this city, is a patient at the
hospital at present, having under
gone an operation a few days ago.
LEIGH, the Jeweler, has the new
Octagon shape English Dinner ware,
!)7 piece set, $42.00; 62 piece set,
$26.50 42
Mr. Morin at present holds the
high score in five pins, seventy four
being the number which he recently
chalked  up  at   the   City   Bowling
Alleys.
Mary Lamont, one of the young
patients who suffered a severe attack of typhoid recently, was able to
leave the hospital this week after being confined there for many weeki
Where your Heart is your Portrait
ought to be. Let Photocrafts Studio
see to it for you. 41
A. K. Leiteh, who now makes his
headquarters at Calgary, has been
in the city for a few days, arriving
nt the  beginning of the  week and
leaving again on Thursday.
For Beds, Linoleums, Congoleyms,
or Card Tables see the BIG 22,
Armstrong Ave. 39tf
In setting up the list of flowers at
the funeral of the late W. J. Selby,
one name was inadvertently omitted,
that of Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Doris,
whose flortal tribute of friendship
was a spray.
Two cabinet Gramophones at bargain prices at Kilbys. 41lf
Workmen are now busy on the interior of the United Church this
week. The pulpit end of it hns been
cut away so as to bring in to use
the addition that has been built to
it and which will take care of the
choir and pulpit and permit of the
seating capacity being extended the
full length of the old building. The
official opening will be on Sunday,
December 13th, and it is expected
Rev. B. C. Freeman, of Cranbrook,
will preside.—Creston Review.
Special prices on new Batteries at
Service Gaiage.   Phone 34 ltf
The beer licenses for the city of
Fernie have been reduced from $500
a year to $350. None of the beer
parlors have been able to make a
dollar during the past year and
number had decided to close up if
the license fee was not reduced.-
Fernie Free Press.
Many went without turkey on
Thanksgiving t don't take chances on
the supply running out for Xmas.
Phone 8 today for reservation.    41tf
We have a fine selection of special
cards for Christmas and we enn
make them up to your special order,
See the selection while the range is
wide—something new nnd tnsty
for the yule tide season. Thc Cranbrook Herald.
A sale of tea and candy will In*
held by the "Marion Oliver Mission
Band" on Saturday, December 12th,
in the Knox Church school room,
from three to six p.m. 42
Mrs. Loasby was a Cranbrook visitor at the end of tho week, Master
Billy Moore returning with her to
stay with his parents, after almost
a year's visit with the Loasbys.—
Creston Review.
Order your turkey early from the
Cranbrook   Meat   Market,   Phone   8.
41 If
John Loftus, an employee of the
B.C. Spruce Millff, Ltd., met with an
accident lately at his work, and is
now confined to the hospital here
with an injured leg.
Eric Stone, another employee of
the company, is also progressing after having received a broken wri?t
and injuries to his head.
Now is Lhc time to order your
cards for Christmas, The Herald
has a splendid assortment to choose
from at very reasonable prices. Order them now, before it is too late.
Highest prices paid for old sacks,
at H. C. Longt Chinese merchant,
Van Horne Street 35tf
Mrs. Gordon Burns, who has been
seriously ill for some time, has been
removed to the Cranbrook hospital.
She was accompanied by Miss Ellen
Andeen, who wns on her wny to Kimberley to spend a few days with Mrs,
W. Barr.—Creston Review.
W. F,
carload
Springs
Make yo'
Bortment
these
long.
Doran has just received a
of Beds, Mattresses and
which are now on sale.
ur selection of this now as-
early,
lines
With his low prices
they   will   not   last
40tf.
Nels Moo left on Thursday for
Spokane lo fill nn engagement in
wrestling and boxing in 'that city,
and later In Seattle. Mr, Moe here
by challenges Nels Jpeson and Nick
Bozina for a wrestling match at any
time.    No limit to be set.
Red edged, blue edged, gilt edged
and plate sunk cards in stock, suitable for invitations, or may be used
for Christinas greetings, when a
special wording is requried. In
various sizes, See samples at the
Herald  Office. 38
WANT ADS.
LOST—About n week ago, bunch
of keys, somewhere near Baker
street. Finder please leave at
Herald  office. 41
WANTED—Help wanted, preferably
school girl. Principally to attend
to children. Apply Box T, Herald
Office. 39tf
ARMSTRONG AVENUE
CRANBROOK
Snap.*—For Sale.—1925 Ford Sedan, only run 3,000 miles, or will
trade on Ford Touring. Box 488:
Cranbrook. 34t£
FOE SALE—Silver foxes, pedigreed,
large, prolific 40 to 00 per cent,
silver. Real money makers. $676
per pair (no brokers' fees). One
or five pairs. Owner, Mr. Morris-
, on, 6 McLeod Blk., New Westminster, B. C. 40-42
FOR SALE—Safe, in good condition,
Inside measurement about 24 in.
square. Any reasonable offer accepted. Particulars at Herald office. 31-tf
FOE   SALE—Heavy  team   suitable
for    logging.      Standard    ranch,
Cranbrook.
33tf
SKATES
BOOTS & SKATES, BABY
SLEIGHS
Many people take great interest
and pleasure in looking over our
stock.     We shall be pleased to
have you come too.   You are assured    of   every   courtesy   and
prompt service if you wish to buy
or sell anything.
— AT —
WILLIAM THOMPSON
Phone 76 P. O. Boi 238
Secon-i Hand Dealer
Cranbrook
We Buy, Sell and Exchange
CARD OF THANKS
Mrs. Alice Selby of Cranbrook,
and Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Selby, of
Kimberley, desire to thank all thc
friends who showed their sympathy
with her at the time of her recent
bereavement, nnd whoso condolences
were expressed by way of floral tributes, and in many other ways
Cranbrook
Board of Trade
The regular monthly
meeting of the Board
will be held in the City
Hall, Cranbrook, on
MONDAY, the 14th instant, at 8 p.m.
CAMPBELL J.  LEWIS
Secretary
G. W. V. A.
Christmas
Tree
Children of the ex-service men are requested
to send in their names to
the secretary or Steward
of the Cranbrook G.W.
V.A. not later than December 15th in order
that provision may be
made for the purchase
of gifts.
PARENTS:-TAKE
NOTICE
Cranbrook taxidermist
Mr. and Mrs. V. Paulson and child
loft on Sunday for a visit to California. They expect to be gone about
three weeks.
THEODORE    PADBERG,    piano
tuner;  player  expert.    Phone   602.
Sl-tf.
Constable Cameron went to Cranbrook this morning to bring back a
man who is alleged to have jumped
his board bill.—Fernie Free Press.
H. M. Cowie, C.P.R. paymaster at
Yahk, is a patient at the hospital at
present, recovering from an operation for appendicitis which he under
went last week.
Piano in Fumed Oak, condition
food •■ new. A $500 instrument at I
a sacrifice—$295.   At Kilbys.    41tf
Friends of Miss Porter, formerly
of the High School teaching stuff,
will regret to leurn thut through a
nervous breakdown she has been
obliged to relinquish her position on
the staff of the New Westminster
High School.
Oysters in any style at the Victoria Cafe.   Try some on the shell.
35tf
Mrs. W. E. Haslem will hold her
annual sale of needle work, suitable
for Christmas gifts, at her home on
Norbury Avenue, opposite the High
School, on Wednesday and Thursday
afternoon and evening, December
16th and 17th.
SPECIAL:—Tungsten  tamps,  10,
25, 40, 60 and 60 watts; 20c each.
75 anl 100 Nitrogen for 50c.
W. F. DORAN
Our low prices win every tiwe.
Shareholders in the famous Premier gold mine are to get a nice
Christmas present in the form of
another substantial Premier dividend.
The sum of $1,600,000 has already
been paid out in dividends this year,
and the one now being declared
makes nn addition to this sum.
BOYS' SUITS, five to seven years
$6.00. Boys' Two Pants Suits,
eight to sixteen yean, $10.00. Our
low pices win every time. W. F.
Doran, Cranbrook Exchange.        tf
Miss Ruby Glaser, recently of the
Central School staff, left last Saturday for the Coast. Her place on the
staff is being filled temporarily by
Miss Hopkins, who will act till the
end of the term, when the vacancy
will be filled by Miss Irma Ward,
who has been appointed by the school
board.
Dolls of all descriptions at Eaton
prices at Kilbys. 4ltf
On account of the absence of Rev,
B. C. Freeman from the city on Sunday next, the morning service at the
United Church will be taken by the
Rev. W. T. Tapscott and the evening
service by Miss McClennan, returned
missionary from Honan. Miss Mc-
Lennan is a speaker of more than
irdinary ability and well worth hearing.
For first class automobile repairs
see Ratcliffe ft Stewart. SStf
At the city bowling alley a turna-
ment of ten pins has been started.
The first game between teams of
the Messrs. Towriss and Morin was
completed on Tuesday night, the
Morins (The Bee Lines) winning by
a score of 1869 to 1715. The captains of the other teams in the
tournamnet ore Messrs. Steevely, Anton, Whittkier, Taylor and Sinclair.
Crnnbrook Meat Market turkeys
■re the finest that can be procured.
Phone your order to No. 8. 41tf
The Ladies' Aid of the Presbyterian Church feel well satisfied with
thc results of their efforts, which culminated in the bazaar held last Saturday afternoon in the schoolroom.
In spite of being the last of many
events of its kind in the city of late,
and coming close to Christmas, the
proceeds will amount to over five
hundred dollars, and the event was
u thorough success from every angle.
Look! We will sell you Half Dinner sete or full dinner sets at Eaton
prices.    Kllby. 41tf
On December 22nd the members
of the local Knights of Pythias Lodge
arc to entertain the sisters and their
friends to an At Home at Castle Hall.
Thc brothers are keeping everything
a dark secret, it being their intention to try to reciprocate in a small
way for the hospitality shown from
time to time by the sister lodge.
Through the modesty of our informant the above is in error—Geo,
Anton being the host.
Dining Room Suite In Fumed Oak.
A bargain at $98.00, at Kilbys.   41tf
Those who were fortunate enough
to be present at the Presbyterian
Church on Sunday evening last, as
well as at the organ recital, afterwards were favored with * musical
treat when Mr. Wuest, pipe organ
expert, of Calgary, favored with several selections on the organ. Mr.
Wuest, who has been engaged by the
church for a number of days, In
going over the organ has succeeded in getting it into first class shape.
His musical selections were very
much appreciated.
Co-Operative
EVERYTHING FOR XMAS
MIXED NUTS, S lbs. for $1.00
FINEST MIXED NUTS, 3 lbs. for $1.00
BEST WALNUTS, in shell, per Ib 30c
BEST ALMONDS, soft shell, per Ib  35c
BEST BRAZILS, per Ib  30c
BEST FILBERTS, per Ib 35o
XMAS STOCKINOS, ALL SIZES.
SHELLY'S PLUM PUDDINGS   $1.00
HEINZ TOMATO CATSUP, 3 bottles   $1.00
HEINZ MIXED PICKLES, per bottle  30c
HEINZ RED KIDNEY BEANS, Med., per tin   ISc
ALUMINUM KETTLES, and 10 bars White
•     Naptha Soap   $1.80
LIPTON'S TEA, Red Label 80c
BOVRIL, ALL SIZES.
Flour is good buying; get your winter supply now.
BLUE OOOSE ORANOES AND OOADER LEMONS
(let the best, It pays-    Our prices arc all competitive.
Cranbrook Dist. Co-Op. Soc.
PHONE  104
The Annual Meeting
— OF THE —
CRANBROOK FARMERS' INSTITUTE
— WILL BE HELD ON —
DECEMBER 19th, in the CITY HALL, at 2 p.i
All members are urged to be present to hear the annual
report and elect officers for the year 1926.
A special set of by-laws will he brought up for consideration,   These are to conform with thc new regulations
of the registrar of stock companies office of
Victroia.   A full attendance is requested.
THE
G.W.V.A
Monthly General Meeting will be held on Saturday Dec. 19th.
The report of President Hicks, Delegate to Unity
Convention, will be heard at this meeting.
The Annual General Meeting
Nomination and Election of Officers will be held on Saturday,
December 26th, at 6.30 p.m.
— AND —
The Annual Banquet
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26th AT 8  P.M.
""Members are privileged to invite one guest to Banquet.
Tickets for Banquet  $1.00.
iaaaaa»aaaa*a»a»»aaiw»»»*a^
c
c
S
■55
%
9Jt
I
I
£
7*1
ANNUAL G.W.V.A.
TURKEY SHOOT
COMMENCING
-Friday, December 18th-
10 A.M  TO  10 P.M-
A good opportunity to win a Turkey for Christmas.
Arrangements can be made for private parties using
their own rifles, otherwise all shooting must bc done with
rifles and ammunition supplied by thc G.W.V.A.
43-44
I
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