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Cranbrook Herald Jul 15, 1926

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Array THE CRANBROOK HERALD
VOLUME 28
Ready to Get
Into the Fray
Both Pu-tiei Will Become Active As Soon Ai Election
Dste ii Known
CRANBROOK, B.C., THURSDAY, JULY  15th, 1926
CONVENTIONS SOON
All that is lacking now to start another election campaign going strongly, and one which it is predicted will
be possibly the hardest fought election the East Kootenay has teen, is
the announcement of the actual date
of the election. This is expected to
be held in the middle uf September,
and just as soon us the, exact date
Is known, It is likely thut both the
Conservatives and Liberals will call
their nominating conventions, and
get their candidates in the field.
East Kootenay is one of the three
remaining seats held by the/ Liberals,
and if Dr. King Is again nominated
by the Liberals, he will be fighting
with his back against the wall, with
the odds against htm, instead of fur
him, as in the campaign of twelve
months ago. He will lack the prestige of a member of tha cabinet, and
one argument which has been freely
used by his supporters in the past,
will this time act as a boomerang
against him—why should East Kootenay return a member of the opposition? There, is no question that
British Columbia is going to remain
just as strongly allied to the Conservative cause as in the past, and
looking at the chances of the two
major parties disinterestedly, it is
hard to see how there is likely to
be any other conclusion than that
Premier Meighen will go back with
on increased backing. The electors
are not going to allow the so-called
constitutional issue to be drawn
across the trail as a red herring; what
Is more likely to be discussed is what
it was that actually forced the Liberal government to resign—to give
up before they were actually beaten
In the house.
The Conservatives have already
discussed some of the details of their
organization work for the coming
campaign. A meeting of the district executive was held in this city
last Thursday evening, with representatives present from Pernie and Columbia ridings, and several matters
bearing on the campaign were discussed. The appointment of a returning officer will be made, it is expected, as soon as the election date
Is announced. This will leave only
about two months for the campaign,
which is little enough for covering
the ground as thoroughly as it will
have to be covered this time. From
the Conservative aspect, special efforts will be made to see that proper
presentation of the Meighen government policy and viewpoint is given in
Fernie, Kimberley and the north end
of the riding, where majorities were
piled up for Dr. King last year.
Nothing definite has been done iu
regard to bringing out the Conservative candidate. There is a feeling
that undoubtedly Dr. Rutledge would
make a better showing this year than
lost, being more familiar with the
riding, and knowing where to concentrate his efforts, but at the sume time,
there is a disposition to make sure
that the strongest man the party can
show is put up, und to see that united support is given whoever is put
up. It is most likely that a nominating convention will be held towards the end of this month, if the
election is to take pluce the middle
of September.
UEUT.-G0VERN0F"«o1),JV   —     .1   FV   «mAJ
APPRECIATES "' L****r    WWlied
WELCOME GIVEN Him
The following letter from His
Honor Lieut.-Governor R. R. Bruce
was reud at the meeting of the city
council on Mondny evening, expressive nf the appreciation of the welcome which wus extended to him in-
forinully on the occasion of his recent
vsit to this city:
T. M. Roberts, Muyor,
('ity of Cranbrook.
Dear Sir,—I am directed by his
honor (o express to you und to your
COUncil his warm appreciation of the
courtesies extended to him upon his
reception nt tbe station upon the occasion of his recent visit to Cranbrook. lie was particularly struck
by the decorations displayed und wus
much touchod with lbe kind attention
shown him.
Yours faithfully,
A. M. I). FAIRBAIN,
Acting Secretary.
Sphere of Prov.
Police Grows
■*».
at Glenlilly
Bathing in Moyie River Sunday Lait, Suddenly Sinks,
and It Loit
NO HELP AT HAND
fffffffffffffffffffffffff
CRANBROOK LIBRARY
The attendance at the library during the last month has been 434, and
the directors are agreeably surprised
j that it has kept up so well, being
! in fact, only 34 less than last month.
The new books from Victoria are
| now o" the shelves and are available
for tbe members.
A number of subscriptions expire
at this time, and the members might
renew   these   with  the   librarian.
There was another drowning accident in the East Kootenay on Sunduy lust, when Arthur Ronald, age
nineteen years, lost his life in the
Moyle Kiver, at Glenlilly, near Yuhk.
JOINT INSTALLATION
OF ODD FELLOWS' OFFICERS MONDAY LAST
(Special Despatch to The Herald)
Victoria, July 14.—All British Columbia, outside Vancouver and Victoria, will be policed by the provincial force within the neur future,
probably by tha end of the year, it
is believed at the attorney-general's
department here, following the decision of three more municipalities
to call in the government's law enforcement machinery.
ALDRIDGE BOYS'
CAMP PROVED A
THOROUGH SUCCESS
Decad ttent i„ the river to b.the, Kimberley   and   Cranbrook
at ubout four o'clock in the afternoon,
in a swiming hole in the river near
his home, his little brother and sister watching him from the shore.
Suddenly they saw him throw up his
hands and  sink  beneath the water.
City Receives\
Check for Roads
FOREST FIRES IN
KOOTENAY NAT. PARK
DO IMMENSE DAMAGE
(Special  iu  Tin-   Ilciald)
i     lnvermere, B.C., July  uth.—The
fdamage that has been dom- by forest
fires throughout the   Kootenay   Na-
D.(..-.)    _J    D..t:._  «< M^nr  tional r"1'k is beyond estimate at the
KCtUnil   Ot    rOrtlOn Ot mopor   present time.     Dry weather has pre-
Licence Revenue
It Made
REGULAR SESSION
i
Lodges Join Forces; Banquet and Dance Follows
On  Monday evening at  the Auditorium,   the   joint   installation   took
.._..„„  ......  .......  „«,•«..»«   """■'•, j)|at.e 0f the officers of the Odd Pel-
Unable to give any aid themselves,1; .  _ /■.   .   .   , , „.
,.      .      , -j '     .   .    .   . ,.       flows  and  Rebekah   Lodges  of Kim-
they hurried away for help, but there   .    , ,   _      .      ,      ,_.
*,    ».    v j   i a* i.    j I berlwy  and   Cranbrook.    There  was
was none to be had close at hand, I ,      '   , . , , iL
.  .,       ... „„, a good attendance of members of the
and thev had to go some little way ..       ,   ,       ,        ...   ,    . ...
'        , „ ,, -.   *   two lodges from Kimherley, und the
to give the alarm.    Some time after-  , .   . . 1,    .
,    n -,. .   -,   ..  home lodges were also out In force,
wards   Royce   Thompson   and   Cecil   .       ,.      , ... „ ■ .   .    , .,
in spite of the unusually hot night.
Bro. P. Johnson, P.G., of Sullivan
Larson, of Yahk, hurried to the spot,
and were able to recover the body
of deceased, which was found in. six
feet of water, in swimming attitude,
face downwards.
Constable Smith, of this city, was
summoned to Yahk by news of the
accident, but the body had been recovered by the time he an Wed on
the scene. He made a thorough investigation, and on his report Dr. G.
E. L. MacKinnon, coronor,
that no inquest was necessary, death
being purely accidental, and probably
the result of deceased being suddenly
seized with cramps. The body was
taken from the water to his home
close by, and interment took place nt
Two Murderers
Pay Penalty
  rYahk.
The camp of the Trail Rangers and
Tuxis boys of the Presbyterian
Church of this city come to an end
on Monday of this week after an outing of ten days. Tho camp was held
at Aldridge, at tbe lower end of
Moyie Lake and is an ideal location
About 30 boys attended the camp and
it was a real success, both financially
and from a camper's standpoint.
The surplus received from this camp
will be used to assist in conducting
the work of these organizations during thc coming fall and winter.
That everybody had a good time
and enjoyed themselves may be evidenced in the remarks of the boys,
all thinking that the ten days passed
far too quickly. They all hope,
however that the camps to be held in
tho years to come will bo as enjoyable ■w^^^^^
ns the recent one. j Sun utm Convention
On behalf of the management  of |     Mr. W. Elder returned on Satur- __
the camp, we wish to thank all those | day from Victoria, where he has been  orchestra made up of W. B.  Mans
(Special Despatch to The Herald)
Vancouver, July 14.—Death claimed two murderers, Alexander Debor-
toli and Benito Pasquale, in Oakalla
jail at four o'clock this morning,
when they expiated their crimes on
the scaffold. Neither of the condemned men mude a statement and both
walked without assistance to the'
icaffold.
Lodge, who is the District Deputy
, Grund Master for this district, was
I in charge of the installation cere-
I mony, and he was assisted by Sister
i Mary West, of Maple Leaf Rebekah
' Lodge, who is the District Deputy
! President for thnt branch of
I the order, und who also acted as the
| District Deputy Grund Warden.
"derided Other °ftlce,s assisting in the in-
' stallation ceremony were Bro. Harold
Andrews, P.O., of Sullivan Lodge, as
D.D.G. Marshal; Bro. Fred Willis,
P.G., of Sullivan Lodge, us D.D.G.
Treasurer; Bro. W. S. Johnson, P.G.,
as D.D.G. Secretary] Bro. S. Fylea,
D.D.G. Chaplain, und Bros. E, G.
Dingley and R. P. Moffatt, as D.D.G.
Herald and D.D.G. Guardian respectively.
The installation ceremony was carried out quite impressively. Tbe
members from Kimberley who took
part carried through their work
very creditably.
Following the ceremony the meeting was closed, and dancing commenced, during the eai ly stages of
which a bounteous supper wus served
on the platform by members of Maple
Lt-af Rebekah Lodge, assisted by
some members of .Key City. This was
a particularly enjoyuble repast, and
one which did everyone connected
with its preparation much credit.
While it was also very warm for
dancing, there was a good crowd
on thc floor till about two o'clock,
when the gathering dispersed. The
music   was    furnished   by   u   local
who so willingly assisted in any way
to make the camp such a success as
it wns, especially those who made
donations and assisted in giving transportation for the boys to and from
the camp. »
REV. M. S. BLACKBURN,
CampM,eader.
.1. SHERMAN  HARRIS.
Ass't Camp Leader, Tuxis Treas.
Bowleg mi Bull River
The Cranbrook Lawn Bowling
team journeyed to Bull River on Sunday last and played a return game
with the team of "power" city. The
result was a victory for the Crnnbrook players by a score of 2N-22.
Pull River gave the visitors a
score when in the third and
uri'ond lost end they scored five uud
eight respectively. The boys report
a good time. The Cranbrook teum
were G. Sinclair, Geo. Anton, J.
MUne and J. McGregor, skip.
Married in Chicago
After an absence of several weeks
tn the east Mr. Harry Lingas, of the
Patricia, returned to the city on
Wednesday of this week. Dating
from this year July 1st will have for
Mm more than the usual signifacance
of thc union of the Provinces of the
Dominion, for on that day in Chicago
Harry wm himself united in the
bonds of matromony to Miss Helen
Fotos, B.A., (McGill). With his
bride he bos taken up his residence
at the Venezia apartments. Mrs.
Lingas, whose home Is in Chicago,
and where for the last year she has
been enjoying a fellowship in the
ftyiversity of phicagp in the old
preeit language, is no stranger to
Canada, having lived for twelve years
fH Prince Rupert and four years in
Mpntneal in attendance at McGill,
whore oh* graduated ao a Bachelor
ft Arta, sgitWJofcM to tbo ancient
Don  Owner*  Prosecuted
After having advertised in the
press last January, and posted public
notices, also served notices by mail
regarding the necessity of securing
dog licenses, the City Police issued
summonses for twenty defaulters in
securing dOg tax. Convictions were
registered in each case on the 13th
inst., and in addition to payment of
dog license, costs of one dollar were
collected.
Going Ut Eft-stern Convention
Mr. P. W, Adolph, of Baynes Lake,
was in the city this week. Friends
of Mr. Adolph will be pleased to learn
of his recent nppoiutment as vice-
president of the Western Association
of Sun Life agents, this position automatically going to ths agent writing
the second highest amount nf insur-
' mice in the'dislrlct. As n result of
his good work, Mr. Adolph will be
entitled to attend the Eastern Convention of Sun Life agents, which Is
to take pluce this fall at St. Andrews
by-the-Sea,  N.B.
attendance at a convention of, the
Sun Life Insurance Company agents,
which took place in the capita- city
from the 1st to the 4th of July.   Mr.
field, saxophone; V. Slye, violin; T.
South, mandolin; Charlie Price,
drums, and F, Woods, piano. Their
music wus quite well spoken of, and
Elder, though but a short time in the ' it is hopud that further opportunity
district   for the  Sun  Life company, | will  arise  for them to be  heard.
was very' successful, as might be indicated by the fact that this
convention was open only to Macau-
lay club members, whose membership
is  limited  to  agents writing $100,-
Those installed as the elected and
nominated officers of the various lodges for the present term are as follows:
Key  City  Lodge,  No. 42,   I.O.O.F,
000.00   worth   of   insurance   in   one  N. G   Bro. F. Russell
year.    Mr. Elder reports a very en-j V. G  Bro. G. Sinclair
thusiastic meeting, and from the re-  Rec. Sec. .... Bro. E. G. Dingley, P.G.
ports  presented  by  the  various of-  Fin. Sec  Bro. W. D. Gllroy, P.G.
ficials, the condition of the Sun Life  Treasurer   Bro. A. Kemball, P.G,
company is a flourishing one.    The, Warden   Bro. S. Whittaker
principal speaker at the conference  Conductor     Bro. F. Doodson
was the president, T.   B.  Macaulay,' Chaplain   Bro. F. Woods
who is considered by many to be the  R. S. S.   Bro. A. Pantling
'old man" in insurance.   Mr. Macau- \ L. S. S  Bro. Marsden
lay   and  party  passed   through  this  R. S. N. G.  . Bru. R, P, Moffatt, P.G.
city on Friday evening, being on tho' L. S. N. G,
delayed,   detpured  train  from  Van*' R. H. V. G
coii ver.
L. 8. V. G.
I. G	
O.G	
  Bro, Stevely
Bro. W. Mansfield
  Bro. Kennedy
  Bro. Atkinson
. Bro. S. Fyles, P.G.
Crystal Dairy Add to Plant
Lust week u representative of the
Nizer Corporation of Detroit, Michigan, completed an installation at the
Grystal Dairy of an ice cream freezing cabinet. The cabinet is of two
units, each containing ten holes for
the freezing of five-gallon cans of
ice cream, and one compartment at
the end of each for freezing of ice
cream bricks. Tbe machine, operates
from an ordinary light, jacket, any
desired temperature being maintained in the cabinet. At present it is
operating at zero. A freezing mixture is obtained by the circulation of
an ucid through another chemical solution. The ice cream, which is drawn
from the freezer in semi-liquid state,
Is placed in this case for hardening,
which is accomplished in about
ten houra. The Crystal «now have
about everything tbat Is manufactured for an up-tn-dat* creamery.
Cerbondslr Cei.li, Ul
Jos. Fontana has returned to tho I   Sullivan  Lodge,   No.  35,   I.O.O.F.
city this week, after spending some N. G  Bro. A. A. Watkins
time in Calgary In the Interests of  V. G  Bro. Carter
the affairs of the Carbondale Coals,  Rec. See.   Bro. Neshitt. P.G.
Liniitod.    He has visited the mine of  Fin. See  Bro. Lythgoe
the company at Ardley, Alta,, which  Treas   Bro.   Dan  Morrison
he states is in very good condition,' Warden    Bro.   Buckstrom
and where it is hoped production will  Con.     Bro.   Boardmnn
be resumed again very shortly.   Pro-' Chaplain Bro. Leo Johrstone
visional directors were appointed at  R. S. N, G  Bro. P. Johnson, P.G.
u    re-organization   meeting   of   the' L. S. N. G.
company, in which the shareholders  R. S. V. G
in this district are going to be repre-' L. S. V
sented.    To ensure the complete sue- R, S. S
cess   of   the  re-organization   of  the' L. S. S.
company, it will be necessary to raise ' I. G.
G.
a further $30,000 with which a coal, O. G.
Bro. Hooper
Bro. Walker
Bro. Bailey
Bro. Dolon
. Bro. Holt
Bro. Beduz
Bro. June*
The regular monthly meeting of
the city council was held in the coun
cil chamber on Monday of this week
it having been postponed from Thursday of last week on account of lack
of a quorum.
Following the reading of the minutes of the last meeting a number of
communications were dealt with as
follows:
Cheque   Received   for   Roads
A letter was received from the Department of Finance, enclosing a
check for $2074.78, being one third
of the fees collected undur the motor vehicles act in this district. The
act provides that the municipalities
receiving these grants are to use
suing for the maintenance of the
public roads within the municipality,
A letter from Mr. J. M. Nichols,
of Victoria, re waste containers for
the city streets was received. He will
be asked to complete his contract
at once, or have same cancelled. Letters from Messrs. Edmondson and
Curson re certain improvements on
their properties were received and
filed.
A letter was read from the secretary of the board of trade conveying
a request to the council from the
bourd that un amount equal to two
months salary of the clerk in the
tourist information bureau be paid
out of uny surplus that might accrue
front the collection of park fees.
The letter, on motion, was received
and  filed.
Com-mission on   Poll Tti
A letter from the office of the
minister of finance wag read with re-
?ard to the matter of the deduction
of the poll tax by employing corpora-
lions. The letter intimated that
•ertnin corporations having advised
them that such collection was un inconvenience, the government had
agreed to allow the amount of 5 per
cent, of the tax to the body collecting
same; they asked the sympathetic
consideration of the council. On
motion of Aldermen Jackson and
Fink it was decided to allow the matter to stand over for the consideration of next year's council.
A letter from Mr. T. S. Gill applying for a rebate of taxes in connection with the old Recreation Club
property was read, and after much
consideration it was decided that the
matter be held over till the next meeting of the council. It was pointed
out that Mr. Gill had apparently not
teceived the consideration to which
he had been tt.ntitled by the parties
using the building from time to time,
the public being largely those who
had benefitted thereby.
Light Department Report
The electric light dept. showed that
during the month 24 street lights
were renewed, six lights were cut in
and six cut out. The location of
three street lights were changed to
give better service. Cross arms were
put on 16 poles; wires changed and
old poles taken down. One transformer in Slaterville burned out and
was replaced. A secondary wire was
grounded and two pairs of service
leads changed. The line to the rock
plant was begun on June Uth and
completed June 24th. The consumption for the month was 57,400 k.w.;
last month was 58,600, and June
HI25, 53,800.
Chairman Flowers reported that
the committee recommended that the
cost of the brewery light extension
be credited against their tight con-
supmtion, and the council concurred.
Fire   Department   Active
Fire Chief Adams reported in part
as follows:
During the month the following
alarms were received and dealt with
us indicated:    June 3rd,  11.40 p.m.,
vailed since the duys of the rain when
lightening is thought to have been
the means of starting the fire. This
commenced nbout forty-five miles
north-east of here at a point near the
crossing of the Kootenay River and
in spite of the strength of unlimited
numbers of fighters under the best
of heuds it hus gone on burning ull
before it and spreading In every direction. The hottest weather chat has
been known this season has prevailed with accompanying wind -tonus
at intervals. The whole of the Col-
umbia-Kootenuy trench is overshadowed with a dense pall of smoke so
that the beautiful scenery on either
side of the vullev is completely shut
off.
The fight for control still goes on,
but as long us the dry, hot weather
continues it is one uguinst hope.
Forest Fire
Menace Grows
NUMBER   21
Four Tourists
Lose Lives
Trapped By Forest Fire On
Banff-Windermere
Road
THOUGHT FIRE WAS OVER
(Special Despatch to the Herald)
Vancouver, B.C., July 16,—Peril
of fire increased in the timber land*
uf British Columbia on the northwest stutes today, und in .several sections of the roust und iu the interior,
flames were sweeping across extensive areas, while hundreds of fire
fighters are trying desperately to
halt their advance. Thousands of
acres of forest have been  laid waste.
especially on Vancouver Island and
at Stillwater in thc coast region, and
in the Kootenay country.
ROTARIANS HEAR
OF BIG INTERNATIONAL
MEETING AT DENVER
Wednesday evening the Rotary
Clubs of Fernie and ("ranbrook met
in joint sesion at the K.P. Hali on
Cranbrook to hear the report of Alfred Cummings. representative from
Fernie to the recent International
meeting of Rotary in Denver, Colo
About twenty-fiv members from
Fernie joined with the Crunbrook
club and after doing justice to a moot
excellent, dinner were entertained by
an interesting program for which tht
company were indebted in a large
measure to the orchestra quartette
and other contributing artists from
Fernie.
As speaker of the evening, Rotarian
Cummings gave an interesting and
exhaustive report of his trip to Denver and the doings of that Important
gathering of fellow Rotarians from
all parts of the world. There were
gathered 9000 Rotarians and their
families, 1833 clubs being represented in person, while 196 (foreign
only) were there by proxy, making
in all !*<)'. of the large family of
Rotary clubs. The election of officers resulted in the election of Harry-
Rogers, of San Antonio, Texas, as the
next president, and James Davidson,
of Calgary, as Canadian International Rotary director.
Interesting in the extreme was Mr.
Cummings' description of his trip to
Denver, as well as of the city itself
and the surrounding district.
Outside of matters particularly interesting to Rotarians his description
of the grand pageant which took
place in the large stadium of the
University was perhaps the most interesting, illustrating as it did in
tableau the progress of western civilization, the advent of Rut ary taking
mportunt position in connection
therewith. Possibly of equul interest
was the insight he gave as to the
origin of a new unit in the many
boy organizations existing today.
This is a body of Denver boys between thc ages of !i and 13, with a
membership of 3400, 1000 of whom
on the large stage gave a unique demonstration of the many activities
of their organization. The speaker
call to Watt Avenue, turned out toj went on to explain the four-fold pro-
(Continued on Page Four) gram of the organization which had
for   its  object  the  production   of  a
On Tuesduy evening what proved
to be one of the most tragic ncci-
dents occurring In the west for some
time took place near Kootenay
Crossing, on the Banff-Windermere
motor road, when, partly as a result
of a forest fire raging in the district,
the lives of two women and two
young children wire lost. It appears
thut Mr. T. I. Watts, C.P.R. agent
u Dysart, Sask., accompanied by his
wife and two daughters, and together
with Mr. N'esbit, school principal of
the same place, and his wife, left
Luke Windermere, going north, under
the impression that the fire which
bud been raging had beon subdued.
When they renched Koot 6 n a y
crossing, it is surmised, that the fire
blocked the way. and turning the car
around, it was hacked Into tho fire.
The baggage on thc rear of the cat-
took fire and the gas tank exploded,
resulting in the death of the four
occupant* of tho buck part of the
car. Mr. Watts, who is in the hospital
at lnvermere, is in a very bad shape,
«hile Mr, Nesbit is recovering. The
latter, who bus just been recently
married, was returning with Mrs.
Ncsbit. accompanying the Watts, on
their  honeymoon  trip.
.Mr. Watts is an old friend of Mr.
J. Young of this city, whom he has
known since boyhood, and who visited Mr. Young a couple of weeks ago
when they were going through Cranbrook to the Coast. His home is in
Sunderland.  Ont.
Tho body of Mrs. Nesbit was to
have conic to Cranbrook on Wednesday, where it now rests. The other
three victims were buried at Windermere on Wednesday.
Word of the mishap reached this
city late Tuesday evening, and early
Wednesday morning four caskets
were despatched for the remains of
the victims.
The car was a Chevrolet closed
model, and it was later totally destroyed when the flames* reach->-? it.
Stories vary as to just how the passengers met their deaths, but it is
understood that they had left the car
and were overcome by the dense
smoke as they sought wildly to reach
safety. Only a short distance from
whore they met their death, it is
stated, there is a small lake where
they could have taken refuge, had
they but known of its presence. It
eemi that their advance in th" car
roi blocked by fire and fallen trees,
and a retreat was found impossible
from the fact that trees had fallen
ince they had passed.
Dr. King Will
Run, He States
(Special Despatch to The Herald)
Winnipeg. Man., July 14.—Hon.
Dr. King, former Minister of Public
Works, in Winnipeg today, unnoune-
ed bis intention of stunding ugain in
his own constituency, Kast Kooten-
British  Columbia.
Returns For Holiday
The many friends of Cecil Reade
ore pleased to welcome him back to
Cranbrook for two weeks' holiday.
Cecil, who has been for the last year
connected with the Vancouver ofllce
of the C.P.R., arrival on Tuesday
last.
cutting machine can be installed, and Maple Leaf Rebekah Lodg*, No. if
put into operation.    There is at pre-JN. G  Sis. K.  Dingley
sent a small crew of men at work . V. G  Sis. II. A. Campbell
cleaning out the  mine, In  prepara-  Rec. Sec.    Sis. A.  Liddicoat
tlon  for starting mining operations,' Fin. Sec.  Sis. Jean  Patrick
which it is expected may he in Au-  Treas.  Sis.  S, Uumun | V.  G   Sis.  Walker
gust or September, according to jtpt  Warden   31s- K- Sadler, Rec. Sec  Sis. B. Boardman
how long it takps tp cpmplpte the fi-  Con  Sis. M.  Keer'Fin. Sec  Sis. Crewdson
nancial arrangements,   Mr. Fontana R. S. N. G.   Sis. M. West'Treas  Sis. Boardman
is confident that t^e iidditionftl awnjl* S. N. Q  Sis, G. Leonard I Warden     Sis.  Sargeant
required can be raised in,  ft sp,cirt' R. S. Y. G  Sis, A. Dremr'Con  Sis. Robertson
time, nnd states that the B.C. sharp-ll-. g. V. Q  Sis. J. Fennessey  R. S. N. G Sis. James
holders who have bean at tho mi|»e R. S. 8  Sis, E. Gilroy  L, S, N. G  Sis. Bidder
this summer are very  enthusiastic! L. S. S,   Sis. Palmer R. S. V. G Sis. Smith
about  its  prospects.    The  name  of  I. G U. Sis. A. McCallum   L. S. V. G ! Sis. Crooks
N.  W.  Burdett, of Kimberley, hos'o. G  Bro. J. Manning|R. S. S  Sis. Neilson
been advanced as one of the provl-1 Pianist   Sis. F. Pantling t* S. S  Sis. Holm
sional directors from B.C., along with Chaplain   Sis. N. Johnston I. G  Sis. Weaver
P. Carosella, of Fernie, and Dr. Rose, I Kimb.rl.y  Rebekah Udga, Ne. 41 O. G  Sis. O'Brien
of Nelson, and others. IN. G  Sis. Andrews!Chaplain   Bi*. Jebasten
Fight ing   Near*   Peking
London, July 14.—Peking ha? been
cut off from telegraphic communication with the world for twelve hours.
lt is presumed that fighting is in progress near the  city.
Tbe Heritage circus which was
here on Saturday last drew the customary good sized crowds, though on
account of thc excessively hot day,
nnd the reputation for dust that the
Athletic Grounds have, it is probable
that not ull were there who otherwise woubl have been. All the usual
cirrus atmosphere wns there—sawdust and smells, clowns and would-
be downs, pretty oqucstriennes and
far from pretty comediennes, clever
horses and dogs, acrobats, roaring
lions and tigers, dirty elephants, and
even an immense camel, and this is
not mentioning such commonplace
occurrences as the raucous roustabout". Some of thc animal acts were
better thun usual, and there was an
impressive wind-up to the program
with a big lion anil tiger act. Some
clever tight and slack wire walking
acts were given, and also a few trapeze tricks. There was an indefatigable band that did valiant service all
through the performances, and the
parade that day at noon was an attraction thnt took tho, kiddies down
  town in force at that time.   The wild
calves need not necessarily be pure j west show at the clcs« of the shows
bred. was n good feature.
healthy, Christian gentleman, the
plan he considered u great success.
The group is known as the Highland
Boys ,
Time and space prevent a more detailed account of Mr. Cummings' interesting report being given at this
time.
Stock   Breeder!   Offer   Priiet
A meeting of the Cranbrook Stock
j Breeders' Association took place on
Saturday evening last, when Mr. Geo.
Hay, secretary of the B.C. Stockbreeders' Association, intimated that
the Canadian Shorthorn Breeders'
Association would donate this year
the sum of $50,00 to bc given for
best Shorthorn calves shown by boys
or girls under IS years of age. Thc
prizes would be divided as follows:
$20.00,   $ir..00   and  f.VOO.      These P A a E  T W 0
THB CRANBROOK HERALD
Thursduy. July 15th, 1926
THE UNITED  CHUR^i
REV. BRYCE WALLACE, B.A., li.li.. Minister
SUNDAY, JULY  18th
11 a.m. —"IMPERISHABLE WORMS."
12:15 p.m.—SUNDAY SCHOOL   Adult Bible Class
7.30 p.m. —"DWELLING PLACES OF HOPE."
—   "THE CHURCH Ol- A CHEERFUL RELIGION"   --
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
D R.   W.   A .   P E R (i 1 E (
DENTIST )
Campbell-Manning   Block I
Phon. 97        Offio Hour. I
9 to 12i I lo S p.m. S»t. 9lo 1 I
-    -   «  r» t**» it—i ii— -
Drs.   lireen   &   MacKinnon
pbyiician.  & Surgaoni
Office nt Residence, Armstrong
Avenue
OFFICE
Afternoons 	
Evenings 	
Sundays
HOURS
  S to 4
7.30 tn S.itO
... 2.00 tn 4.00
CRANBROOK.,   B.C.
DR.    F.    B.    MILES
DENTIST
OFFICE HOURS
9 to 12 n.m.       1 to 0 p.m.
Huion   Blk.,   Cranbrook,   B.C.
F. M. MacPHERSON
Undertaker
Phono 350
Norbory   Ave.,  Neil  City   Hall
ffffffffffffffffffffff
H. W. Herchmer \
BARRISTER        j
and *
SOLICITOR
CRANBROOK   -   B.C. :
— PHONE 61 —
ffffffffffff.:::
Baptist Cimrri)
Rev. W. T. TAPSCOTT
2U N.irbury Avo. . Phone 202
SUNDAY, JULY 18th
WAYMAN K. ROBERTS
—    of Kimberley    —
Will Preach Next Sunday
in Knox Church in Aiuming,
In Baptist Church in Evening
Sunday School 12 noon
Services     in     the     Uaptist
Church in the morning—and
in    Knox    Church   in   the
evening,
ABE   I'OIMIAMiY
ixvnmi.
-K***++++*+****+**+*4>**+++
WYCLIFFE NOTES
************+*<+**********
(Received Too Late for Last Week)
Severul Wycliffe ladies uttended
the musieale given by the pupils of
Miss .Janet MeKay at Kimberley oh
.Monday, June 28th. The local child-
ion who took part were Margaret
Yager, Annie Ireland, Suzanne Staples, lone Frederickson and Otis
Staples, The entire performance re-
fleeted great credit on the work done
by both teacher and pupils during
the year. Among the friends wHo
were present were Mrs. C. 0. Staples,
Mrs. Ambrose Staples, Mrs. L. Piper,
Mis. A. Frederickson, Miss R, Curley
nnd Miss A Reekie.
C. 0. Staples and
Kaslo on Tuesday,
spend the summer
GEORGE   J. SPREULL
BARRISTER     •     SOLICITOR
NOTARY
CRANHROOK   -   B.C.
fffffffffffffffffffffff!
I-'OR
ANU
SERVICE,   QUALITY
CLEANLINESS   THE
L. .1). Cafe
1 A
CANNOT    BE
Sanitary  Eloctri.
EXCELLED
Refrigeration
LODGES AMI NWIK.T1K8
KEY CITY LODGE No.  i-'
,jf
^i^\          MnetH everv
£L
■QJj* Monday niBl,t*t
WA
(>f^?9ttt Tlie Auditorium
Sojourning Oddfellows are cor-
dially invited
N. G
.... I-'. RUSSELL
Rec.
Sec. B. G. Dingley, P.O.
FOR RELIABLE
Shoe   Repairing
Take  your thoei  to the
—O.K. SHOE SHOP-
Norbury Ave. — Crnnbrook
For Quality nnd value in
Men's Dress and Work Shoes
SEE US — W. NICHOL Prop.
***************
For Good Value i
GOOD
Go to
ZENITH
Cor. BAKER ft
**********
EATS
The
CAFE
VAN  HORNF.
Sainsbury & Ryan
Bi;ai)Eus am'
COHTR-ICTOHS
tern  Ol.n-a ent  Worl
Qwrmnt-M-d
felepkoiti lit a.* Mt
CHANHItOOK       •       H.C.
EEauay^i.j': *r i
,'   •SBIB"
Developinit
WOMFVH  INSTITUTK
M-uti   In  tht
Eg. K.   ol   P.   IIM,
■    .**        .flellK-dll ot 111.
V   *■ "*i-Y       tret TumiIm tt
^'^C.:S-,^***    *» **"•*> *r*
cordially In-rlMfl
President Mrs.   NORGROVE
Secretary       Mri.   J.  COUTTS.
WHY OPERATE?
: >r Appendicitis, Gallstones,
Stomach and Liver Troubles,
when HEPATOLA docs the
work without pain and no
risk of your Ufa nor lusa of
DbMai no poison.   Not mid by druggliti.
Mrs. Geo. S. Almas
101 T. MANUFACTL'HBH
1< Fourth Aft. 8. Plione USB
SASKATOON
P-ic- V, SO- Pared |Ki',t 2.1c «trm,
When Yuu Think of influnmec
— Call Up -
BFIALE & ELWELL
Cranbrook -S Kimherley
■inlo ,l|(fiit» (nr  Klmlli-rlej Tonnllte.
STRIP
Willi
TICKETS
ind Without Coupons
l-'or (ieneral
Admission Purposes
For Sale at
THE
CRANBROOK HERALD
OFFICE
Mv. mul Mra.
family left for
whore they will
vocation.
Mr. Normun McClure. Mr. Hurry
Stevens und Mr. -luck Hughes, all
St, Marys ranchers, are among the
visitors to the Culgary Stampede.
A small presentation waH mado io
Miss Curley and Miss Reekie by the
school children at the elose of the
school torin us u mark of appreciation
and esteem. __
The Wycliffe ball team journeyed
to Yuhk one Sunday recently to try
their skill.    They won the gam*' by
the score of 7-B.
Miss Reekie left Wycliffe on Wednesday en route for Vancouver.
Mr. and Mrs. .1. S. Staples were
visitors to Smith Lake on Sunday.
Jimmie .lone.'!, Everett Staples and
Art Duff sp*mt the 1st of July after
the "finny tribe" at Meacham's
Ranch, above St.  Mary's Lake.
One of Wyeliffe's oldest residents,
Mrs. Kdwards, left on Wednesday to
make her home in Cranbrook. She
arrived in Wycliffe in August, 1906,
und hus resided here since that time.
The rivwr seems the magnetic spot
these real summer days. Morning,
afternoon and evening the old swim-
niin' 'ole seems to be well patronised,
and what could be nicer when the
thermometer registered 96 in the
-shade?
Miss Nancy Miles was visiting at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. 0.
Staples on Monday.
Wycliffe was well represented at
Kimberley's big day on July 1st,
which looked doomed first thing on
account of the heavy rainfall, but fortune smiled on the committee's efforts afler all, and a splendid time
was enjoyed from start to finish.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Johnson
were cullers tit the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Fred Clark on Sunday evening,
wliere their son, Harold, Is spending
part of his summer vacation.
Mr. George Carson, of the Imperial
Lumber Co., Ltd., Moose Jaw, accompanied by Mrs. Carson, were the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. C. 0. Staples
for several days last week.
Mrs. Bryce Wallace left for Van*
couver on Saturday last on receipt
of word of the serious illness of her
mother, the wife of the late Rev. J.
Knox Wright. Mrs. Wright has not
been in good health for some time.
Or. and Mrs. H. L. Large left on
Saturday to spend the week-end with
friends at Kaslo.
Miss Marion Miles left on Saturday to spend a few weeks as the
guest of Mr. and Mrs. E. Home at
their summer residence at Boswell.
berry   pickers   this   week.
Swat the fly
with
GILLETT'S
LYE
A teaspoonful of
Gillett's Lye sprinkled
in the Garbage Can
prevents flies breeding
Uot Gillett's Lye for all
Clmaning and Disinfecting
Coits little
but always
effective
Gilbert Hundley nnd Mr. Morrison
otored down from Kimbtrley on
nesday.
Wo were glad to see Jimmy Campbell, Harry Hogg, Mike Bonner ond
Thomas Summers down from Kimberley mi the occasion of our opening
dance.
A Kimberley orchestra played to a
crowded house here on Saturday,
11th. The opening of the Fator Hall
was a decided success. Not having
the lights as yet was the only drawback. However, Mr. Fator announced that a dance would be held every
Saturday night in his hall. A Cranbrook orchestra will play this week.
and Mrs. Bob MacDonald WfljW
in  Cranbrook  over the week-
Mr
in fi
•nd.
Mr.    and
Monkhouse
history, overtopping 1924 by 72.2%.
'While this phenomenal string of
shattered monthly salqs records dates
back twenty-two months with u single
exception—that of November 1925,
when Nash output wus arbitrarily
curtailed to bring in production the
"Enclosed Car" motor—a steady increase in Nash sales has been going
on for many years. A glance at the
annual production figures since 1921
tells the story of Nash growth: 1921,
20,850 ears; 1922, 41,052 cars; 1923,
56,077 ears; 1924, 53,620 cars; 1925,
90,121 cars; first six months of 1920,
78,172 cars.
Long   Detour   for   Truin*
Mrs.
and
Qnlb
en   Hi
Parker, Melville
Albert Nicholson
id Clmrcll picnic
y   mi   Wednesday
taking In all the attractions of tho
circus, accompanied with his usual
car-full of youngsters.
LAKE \
WINDERMERE?
NOTES        ^
fffaffffffffffffffffffffff
\    LUMBERTON    \
5 CHIPS |
■■•"•■'ffff.-.f.fffffffffffffff
aire. I-', li. Walker nnd family left
horo Tin* Vancouvor on Monday.   Mr.
j Walter was ono of tho victims of
_ tin-  unfortunate  drowning  accident
.thnt occurred in the mill pond hore a
'fffffffffff |slmi*t time ago, und tho widow leaves
with the sympathy and best wishes
-nf evoryone In  Lumberton.
NISBET & GRAHAM
Barristers, Solicitors, &c.
Offices: Imperial Hank Itldi;.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
OFFICES at KIMBBRLSV
IN K. of P. IIAI.I.
Open Every Thursduy from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
PACIFIC
MILK
KEEPS
WELL
Wm
'i   JVAPffiATft!
I ItfJLfl
Airs. C. <i. L., of Twenty
sixth Avenue hns taken the
trouble to tell us thnt all
during the lust week in
June when fresh milk has
soured she has not had any
trouble with Pacific Atilk
and she uses it  for all her
Cookings
Note—Pacific Milk ihoutd be
treated   exactly   ihr   tame   us
frmh    milk    aftrr   the    tin    it
opened.
PACIFIC   MILK    I
Heed     Officvt     Vancoavvr
ictorlM ti l.«da«r *% AM»ufor4
The annual school meeting was
scheduled to be held on Friday evening last, July Uth, but it was found
necessary to adjourn it to a later
date owing to a very sparse attendance.
Mr. C. O. Staples arrived home
un Monday last from Kaslo, where
he has heen visiting with his family
fm- the past week.
Miss L. Staples, of Ladner, B.C.,
was visiting at the home of her brother, Mr. J. S. Staples, for a few
days lust week, on her way back from
Minneapolis, where she has been
spending a vacation.
The Yahk baseball team played
off the return match on Sunday after-
iMiuii on the Wycliffe diamond. The
result of the game was 17 to 9 in
favor of Wycliffe.
Mr, S. G. Clark entertained the
Wycliffe ball team to a picnic lunch
on the lawn Sunday evening, after
the   game.
The visit to Cranbrook of Heritage's circus afforded a number of i
Wycliffe grown-ups a good excuse to
visit same, looking after the welfare
of their children in viewing the animals, etc.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Frederickson and
party were Sunday visitors to Wasa
Lake.
Mri. R- H. Trew and children arrived home on Monday from Portland, Oregon, where they have been
visiting for the past two weeks with
Mi. and Mrs. Harold Comery.
Miss R V. Chelmiek, R.N., was in
Wyollffe on Friday Irst, saying goodbye to her friends before, leaving for
Loi Angeles, where she intends to
make a stay of some duration. She
will he uccompanied by Miss H. Hall-
liauer, R.N., a recent graduate from
the St. Kugene Hospital, Cranbrook.
Wt^WWW^^VyWAVASW-V
(Special to The Heraldl
lnvermere, B.C., July 10th.—Mlsa
Maye Starke, of Montreal, has returned to take up her residence here,
having joined the staff of the Columbia Valley Irrigated Fruit Lands,
Limited.
Commander J. C. Powles returned
last week from a cruise in his Master
Six Buick over the prairie. While
away he visited Edmonton. Calgary,
Banff and the oil field of Wainwright
in addition to other places of interest,
A meeting specially called confirmed the action of the directors in setting Friday and Saturday, the third
and fourth days of September, as to
to ones on which to have tlie Lake
Windermere district's sixteenth annual fair. Mrs. R. M. Sandilands, of
Wilmer, is Fair secretary and manager, His Honor Dr. R. Randolph
Bruce has beon asked to be present
in his official capacity as Lieutenant
Governor, to open the fair.
Memoir 148 covering the geological and mineral deposits of the Windermere Mining Division of Hritish
Columbia map area as issued by the
Department of Mines, Geological
branch, for the Dominion of Canada.
has just come to this part from the
department. The work was compiled
by J, F, Walker, of the department,
and covers an area of -- miles north
and south by 35 miles east and west.
It is the result of many years ot
labor, the work having been started
when a topographical map was made
under the department during the seasons of 1911 to 1918 and geological
field work carried on in the seasons
of 1921 by Dr. S. J. Schofield and
continued by Dr. Walker during the
seasons of 1922 to 1924 Inclusive,
Palacontological determinations wire
also made by Dr. C, D. Walcott, head
of the Smithsonian Institute at Washington, D.C., and by Doctors Rued*
mann and Edwin Kirk. Dr. Walker
is a graduate of McGill University,
Montreal, and took a post graduate
course in Princeton University. The
work covers some sixty-nine pages,
highly scientific in its character and
furnishtd with numerous maps and a
number of interesting illustrations.
This publication marks practically
the first exhaustive one of its kind
which has ever heen out in one issue
since the early report of the late Dr
George Dawson in 1888 and should
be of great value to those desirous of
studying the mineral deposits of this
heavily mineralized district, . Dr,
Dawson's publication is long since
out of print as is also the Blue Book
issued hy the Imperial Government
covering the explorations carried on
under the direction of Captain Palli-
ser on or about 1869. The only
other exhaustive concrete report
known to the writer which has been
published in the intervals is the report of the provincial minister of
mines for the year 1898, when an
exhaustive report was made by Fleet
Robertson, late Provincial mineralogist; and the Minister's report for
.191-5 whene there was published a report by J. D. Galloway, the present
Provincial Mineralogist, of Victoria,
B.C.
Miss Tertia Miller left Lumherton
on Friday last for her home in Vicloria. Miss Miller taught the senior
classes tn the Lumherton school during the past term, and proved herself
a very successful teacher. It was a
disappointment to the parents of her
pupils wlun they learned that she
had resigned and, would not be available  for the  coming term.
A daughter was horn to Mr. and
Mr*. L. T. Dwelley on Thursday last,
at the Grandview Hospital, Vancouver. Both mother nnd daughter are
reported doing well.
A large mud slide occurred about
a  mile west of Albert Canyon  on
Tuesday night, and blocked the line
for  traffic     Westbound  passenger
trains were detoured over the  Kootenay Central from this point.    On
Wednesday, train No. :i, which passed here at  12.05 that  morning,  was
compelled to return from Albert Can
yon, und this train  also wen!  south
that evening.    This is the third time'
that the Kootenay Central branch has!
been  utilized  for the  detouring of
traffic owing to the blocking of the'
main line twice and the Crow's Nest;
line  once.    Traffic  was  resumed  on'
Thursdny morning by trains No. 3,1
westbound, and No. 4, eastbound.— i
Golden Star.
Mrs. 11. Gobbott. Following the extreme heat of the day, the two boys,
in company with others, had gone to
what is known as the "second bend"
of the Coat for a cool-off swim.
Both had taken a plunge or two with
Arthur remaining in the water.
Whilst swimming around he was taken with an attack of heart trouble,
and almost immediately began to
sink. Spectators immediately alarmed Harold, who dived in to help his
brother, but was unable to bring the
body to the surface at the first, attempt, bul on coming up shouted to
those on the hank lo go for help,
and went down the second and lost
time, ns he, too, never rose to the
surface again.   -Creston Review.
Drowning   at   Creaton
Apply Minard's at once. It
lialts the pain and stops inflammation. Removes all poison
irom cuts and sores.
Keep a bottle on the shelf. H
Miss Car
is spending
guest of JI
im. Harris, of Spokane,
ier holidays here as the
and Mrs. W. A. Barter.
,   of   Wardner,   is   now
on the night shift.
ettei
Lieut. Harold Clark, of the U.S.A.
Air Force, accompanied by hh wife,
were visitors at the home of his
brother, Mr, S. G. Clark, for a couple of days last week, They were
on their way to Dayton, Ohio, where
Lieut. Clark has been transferred
from Honolulu.
Mrs.  Ranklns, of Cranbrook, was
a guest at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
C, Piper on Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. Val Anderson and
family were Cranbrook visitors on
Saturday  afternoon.
Mrs. Kenneth Greene and daughters wore Wycliffe visitors on Thursday evening.
Dr. Rutledge was a Wycliffe caller
on Sunday morning.
I  MOYIE NOTES |
************* *************
Messrs, E, Mines and Austin were
motorists down from Kimberley on
Tuesday last.
Mr. Oeorgo, of Calgary, opened liU
barber shop this week.
Mr. and Mrs. ,1. J. Warren and
eldest son registered at the Cameron
House on Wednesday last. They motored in from Kimberley.
Mr. Frank Looney, Fernie, spent
over Wednesday last here with his
family.
Misses Nellie and Robertiua Miller are guests in from Cranbrook,
staying with Miss M, Farreli.
Mr. W. A. Vaughn, of Blairmore,
spent over Friday  in town.
Irs. Keyes, from Kimberley, and
baby, visited with Mr. and Mrs, Fator over the week-end.
Tom Mills is saying "Hello I" to us
all this week.
After about three days' visit here,
Miss Ida Pearson returned by train
to  Portland,   Oregon,
Master Billy Saunders is the little
guest of Edward Looney.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Summers
and Mrs. Wm. Cavanagh were Sup-
day motorists to town, renewing numerous old acquaintances.
W. K. Grimes, of lhe Western Development "Co., Kimberley, was *i
visitor here on  Wednesday.
A. 11. Stewart's mother and brother, from Kelowna, were visitors here
last week. After spending a few
days in thi.s district, they left for
Hnnd' on   Sunday  by car.
Mrs. Heagle, wlio has been visiting
her mother. Mrs. Parent, left for
Calgary on  Monday.
ngo Lodge picnic was held
at Green Bay, and proved
access. A record crowd
mid did full justice to the
('Ogroin and inexhaustuble
jood eats supplied by the
lyone wanting first hand
Information regarding the number of
ice cream cones a youngster can tuck
away, please apply lo Jake. Ile had
his hands full supplying the wants
of the crowd at the refreshment
booth. Races were held on the beach,
and football and baseball indulged in.
The main attraction, of course, was
the lake, and never was the water
at a better temperature for swim-
mint;'. It was a happy crowd that
returned to Lumborton in the even
ing, and the members of the Orange
Lodge nnd others who helped make
the. day such a signal success are to
be congratulated on the way they
put' the picnic over.
Tlu-
On
in Sui
ihu
a  itt'ti
it   s
Curm-i
iplend
suppl)
odge.
out
A
The lives of two of Creston*b must
promising young men were tragically
ended on Mondny night in a double I
drowning in Goat River that claimed |
Harold, aged 25, and Arthur, aged
23, second and third sons of Mr. and;
919 WEST 2?ih AVE.. SHAUGHNESSY HEIGHTS. VANCOUVER. B.C.
Jin Jlnghcan, flesidential and 'Day School for Qirls
Providei a thorough education with careful moral and physical instruction.
First grade lo junior and senior Matriculation. An. Music, Physical Education
wiih indoor and outdoor sports. All the Mistreiie! ho!J degrees (rum the best
English and Canadian Universities. ,'
For prospectus apply to Thc Mother Superior.
RECORD OF NASH
SALES SHOWS STEADILY
MOUNTING VOLUME
Swinging through June with a sales
and production total 68,7% higher
than the greatest previous June in
Nash history, Nash Motors now adds
anothtr month to its chain of broken
records.
"This makes twenty-two consecutive months, with one exception,"
says K. IL McCarty, general sales
manager of the Company, "that Nash
sales have surpassed lhe figures set
by the corresponding month of the
previous year. The June total
brought the volume for the first six
months of this year to a point 88.3%
above the sales mark for the first
half-year period of 1025.
"We have produced and sold," says
Mr. McCarty, "as many cars in the
first six months (If this yenr as we
did in a full nine months of \M2W,
This   accomplishment   becomes  still
re notnblo In view of the fuct that
!B was the greatest year in Nash
Dollars and Sense
Motor Car Chats
with Tom Greene
m~t$0$cmcb(&cmc$Ci
IF I were buying a
car instead of sell*
ing them—and knew
what I know about
the way motor cars
are built—my choice
would be among two
cars. And I'd buy a
Studebaker because
the other one sells for
twice as much.
DEZALL'S GARAGE
CRANBROOK - B.C.
STUDEBAKER
$2500.00 Club
l:or  I'arliciititrs  Apply lo
B.C. Mutual Benefit Auoc.
(i. W. SI'lilKS, HOX 240, FBRNIR, ll.C.
W» aiitind lu») ItRMB «•     Our billa ue peopled with hucklc-
NEW PRICES ON STAR CARS
—   Delivered at Cranbrook   —
,          .                                  Model 4s. Model 6s.
Standard Touring  $ 915 ■ ■        1260
Special Touring      985 - -        ........
Coupe .    1160 ■ -        1350
Coach       1175 - ■        1420   -
Sedan   1300 - -        1600
Above Prices include Spare Tire, Tube
and Tire Cover.
RATCLIFFE & STEWART,
CRANBROOK, B.C.    •   - PHONE 42
DEMONSTRATIONS  AT      ANY TIME Thursdny, July 15th, 1926
THE  CRANBROOK   HERALD
I'AOE   THREE
IfiiliiJIllI eap\^ip^hi>tit- BE.eB<;^^3^
Beer Analyzed
By Experts
ALL the Beers purchased by the Liquor
Control Board of B. C. from the Vancouver Breweries Limited, Rainier Brewing Co. of Canada Limited, Westminster
Brewing Co. Limited, Victoria Phoenix
Brewing Co. Limited and the Silver Spring
Brewery Limited, who are all members of
the Amalgamated Breweries of B. C, for
sale at Government Liquor Stores and the
Licensed Beer Parlors, huve been and will
be analyzed from time tip time by different expert firms of the continent for th*
protection of thu public.
'"pilK substance of these various anal-
S- yses instigated by order of the
Liquor Control Board shows that the
Heurs ure perfect, the toAte agreeable and
malty. The foam Is creamy and stand*
up well. The alcohol by weight is about
4.25 per cent, and the extract 6.49 per
cent, with an original gravity of about
18.20. These analyses indicate further
that the Beers are of good quality, wholesome and free from any forelgmsubstance.
'T'O milk,. « good Deer Willi such health-giving
S- qualities It require* • skilled hrewmasler and
nn up-tn-dato kyglenlo plant, such us maintained
hy Iho nhovo mentioned Breweries. These plants
nro open for Inspection and visits of the puhlie are
Hindi}* solicited. Only Ihe best materials obtainable are used In the manufertuae of the Iteers.
•"TMIE llrctvlng capacity of the above Unliveries,
S. ini-iiibrra of the Amalgamated Urewerles of
II. C, Is nbout eight times ns largo as the present
output, which gives best assurance to tbe public
of receiving only fully matured and properly
aged lleers for many years lo come.
TjTt^iSi^SpuRS. BEER.
m
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Fees only $17.50 a month. Complete Commercial Course in
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For particulars, write
P.O. Box 14, Nelson, B.C.    ....    Phone 603.
^GOLDEN CO£QON
^^RUTH CROSS'
SYNOPSIS
Stephen Renfro, engaged to Molly
Shannon, State University student,
hus left town suddenly. Now comes
announcement of his marri&ge in the
east to "the rich Miss Dilworth."
The boarders discuss the nffair at
breakfast, but show sympathy and
consideration for Molly. At night,
Molly, hel on and dressed for the
street, leaves the In,aiding pluce,
telling Mrs. Purker. the landlady, she
is going to spend the night with,
friends.
CHAPTER   XII—Continued
"But, my dear . . ." Mrs. Parker
began, then In-nice off uncertainly.
She looked careworn and distressed;
there were lines in her already welt-
creased brow Hint had not been there
four dny- earlier,
"I'll he buck in the morning,"
Molly went mi, taking no apparent
note ul' the Inconclusive objection,
"I hope yuu won't need me in the
meantime."
CHAPTER   XIII
Emerging from the campus into
the open city streets, Mnlly wulked
rapidly. Her nm- thought was to
get uwny from the section of town
where she might at any moment meet
someone she knew.    She had no des-
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Victoria Cafe
Whether you want * light
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you will find our food tasty
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After the Dance and Show
visit   the   VICTORIA.
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MOM   I*
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New Pries* .So.ni«
Phaeton  •   • Mo,* * 65
Coach -   -   - 203S 160
Roadster -   - 2195 -U0
Royal Coupe 2470 240
Brougham   - 2S40 275
Sedan  -   •   - 2260 300
Royal Sedan. 2615 405
Crown Sedan 2760 410
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Wilson's Service Garage
Jas. Mitchell    -    -
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Dealer    -
Cranbrook
Kimberley
tination in mind, no purpose. The
story about spending the night with
friends had Wen merely a second
gesture of defence; not instinctive
this time, hut deliberate, planned.
She must be outside where she could
walk; she wanted never to stop walk-
g. She went uu and on, turning
up one street and down another, paying no heed to locality or direction
or the deepening twilight. At nightfall she struck intu ont; of the country roads in which the street dlssolv-
:1, and walked on and on.    She felt
u fear.    She was past harm as the
dead are past harm.
She had heen walking for hours
when it occurred to her suddenly
that she was very tired. She must
have come a long way. The night
wus   soot-black,   without   moon   or
tars, aud she could just make out
by a single lower light gleaming
faintly in the distance that she was
the open country. There wus
not a sign of human habitation.
She sat down on a pile of stones by
the road, rested a while, then dragging herself Up, started back to town,
her eyes fixed on the light for pilot.
Here in the hollow the lights were
almost hidden. She recalled dully
how'they hud streamed out that first
evening across the plains—like golden auroras of promise and hope. And
all the time she hud h^en coming to
this.
Now  and   then   the  headlights  of
an   automobile   drove   her   behind   a
clump   of   bushes   for   concealment.
She   had   u   morbid   fear   of   being
seen—perhups   questioned.     Several
times   she   sut   down   again   to  rest.
But  at  last  she   reached   tho  place
He watched Molly through narrowed, -speculative -eye-f that had lecn
every rhinf.
ew*
±i
where the car line began. The houses
grow closer together. Still she went
on walking Up one street and down
another, u slim, quietly dressed figure which awakened no curiosity in
the occasional policeman she passed.
Folded away between tha railroad
tracks and the warehouses which
fringed the river front, were several
blocks of large, white houses, elaborately bt pillared'and -Deporticoed; the
type of houses iich ranchmen are apt
to build when they first move into
town. They had, in fact, been residences at one time, but the best
streets had long since lifted their
skirts out of the soot and grime and
moved north and west, leaving these
grandiose mansions helplessly trapped
between the railroad and the river.
As Molly crossed thq tracks and
started down one of these blocks,
she glanced up indifferently at the
white Colonial pillars, the plate-glass
doors, the French windows with their
closely drawn blinds, around which
narrow rims of light could be discerned. Somttone had pointed out
this row of houses to her once from
the train—with u moaning smile, a
mumured adjective. She knew, of
course, that every city of any pretensions had its similar row of houses.
The fact had never interested her
particularly. It did not interest her
now. She hud none of the unhealthy
curiosity about sex that often repelled and disgusted her in other
girls. She had seen it at too close
range; all the ugly, sordid utilitar-
laaness of it. In her love for Stephen, that had been mercifully shroud*
ed, veiled in splendor, glimpsed but
dimly through clouds of star dust . . ,
As she entered the second block
of houses, still mechanically circling
toward the river, she began to discover that she was very tired indeed.
Her feet dragged leadenly. From
the waist down she was numb, all but
insensible. For four night,-* she had
not slept. For four days she had
scarcely tasted food. Somewhere a
clock struck midnight. She had been
walking more than five hours. It
was impossible to go on much longer,
and yet she could not stop, A policeman—they were not much in evidence here—looked ot her queerty
when she passed under the street
light at a crossing.
Suddenly a blind at a window overhead, sucked in by a breeze from the
river, flapped—startlingly. Almost
at the same instant a hurst of crazy,
drunken laughter—a woman's laughter—jarred and jangled on the night.
Shivering, Molly put her fingers to
her tan.   Then she stopped dead in
ber tracks and looked up. She had
a fleeting vision of a woman's face,
ghastly white and more ghastly red—
of dead, straw colored hair, of garish
tinseled silk . . . The curtain flapped
buck  into place.
AH the blood in Molly's body
surged up thickly to her temples,
but dampeningly in her brain. She
caught at a lamp-post near by,
lurched heavily against it. Window,
street, lights, even the policeman in
the next block, rotated about her in
a swirling black vortex, spun and
reeled and raced with her like a chip
at its axis—then joltttd to an abrupt
halt, Everything seemed to flatten
out, to shine in the clearest und most
brilliant perspective she had ever
seen. That woman had found the
way—to destroy herself—not merely
the outward shell of her body but
the very core and nucleus of her
being . . .
She wanted to destroy herself.
She wanted nothing else on earth.
She throbbed and pulsed and quivered with the intensity of that desire. Physical destruction would
not suffice—would not yield the ease
und oblivion she coveted.
She loosed her hold on the lump-
post, moved quickly up the walk—
there was neither gate nor fence.
As she mounted the wide, white
steps and glanced incuriously about
her, she recalled having heard that
this row of houses belonged to "Old
.lim" Dilworth. But that did not Interest her. She pressed an urgent
finger against thc bell. Her only
concern was lest the policeman had
seen her—might try to interfere . . .
Presently thc door opened—aud
closed behind her.
On the other side of the door,
she stood blinking dazedly. There
was light everywhere, nothing but
light—white, blinding, terrible. It
blazed from walls, stairs, ceilings.
The moment's illumination in the
street was darkness in comparison.
Here all the light in thc universe
had been gathered up, focussed on
this one spot—focussed on her. lt
beat down cruelly, pitilessly. She
was like a moth, wings scorched,
fluttering to earth, charred, consumed. She threw up her hands to
shield herself, leaned buck almost
insensible against the  door.
She did not see the man who stood
over by the stairs. He, too, had
evidently just come in, for he wore
still his high hat and a light cout
above his evening things. When the
servant offered to relieve him of
them, he shook his head and motioned her to withdraw. He was rather
tail, slight of build; forty-five, perhups, though his hair showed grey
ut the temples. He watched Molly
through narrowed, speculative eyes—
eyes that had seen everything. He
knew there was no sensation left
unproved, yet he could not stop
searching .  .  ,
As Molly's vision accommodated
itself a little to the awful glare of
light, a velvet hanging at the rear
of the corridor was jerked violently
apart. Against a background of
garish luxury was framed a scene
which seared itself forever into Molly's brain—a table strewn with the
wreckage of a feast, a bottle overturned and its contents oozing slowly
into the yellow mop of a woman too
drunk to know or care. It was like
one of the circles of the Inferno.
(To   be  continued)
Comrades then proceeded to tho Citadel, which bad betn tastefully decorated by the members of the V.I'.
Legion, and whero ;i bountiful repast
was enjoyed.
Our bei i wishes go with Captain
und .Airs. Stobbart
li may interesl readers to know
thut both Captain and Mrs. Stobbart
were members of the "Valiant"
Training Session. The Captain has
been stationed os Lieutenant at
Macleod, Coleman, High Kiver. and
as Commanding Officer at Calgary HI
and Kelowna. Mrs. Stobbart's appointments have been Kamsack,
Melville.    Weyburn   and    Kamloops.
PAUL
NORDGREN
YAHK, B.C.
For  that  new
:: STRAW HAT, SUMMER
SHOES       AND
I   WEARING APPAREL
see  our  stock
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Jj   Durick Av... opp C.P.R. depot
•j  Next   F.   II.   Dezall   Oarage
5  Cranbrool., II. C. — Hox 68
iV.".VJ,."V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.S\\\%\SVV.VS%\%%\S-V^%VWW
prevent)
FOREST
FIRES
SALVATION ARMY
OFFICER'S WEDDING
AT DRUMHELLER
(From  the  War Cry)
A very happy event took pluce in
the United Church, Drumheller, on
June 7th, when Captain James Stobbart and Muetenant Margaret Walker were united for service under the
Army colon, by Staff-Captain Merritt. The groom wai attended by
Corps Cadet W. Walker, and Captain
Grey acted ax bridesmaid. The
bride's parents were also present.
The church was well filled with
Comrades and friends gathered to
witness the ceremony, and the Corps
Rand occupied seat* on the platform.
The audience joined heartily in sing-
ng the opening song, "Come, let us
all unite to sing, God is love," and
ufter this Sister Mrs. l.angford invoked God's blessing upon the solemn
service, praying that the liven of
these young people might be long and
successful in the service of their
Master, Mrs. Captain Hammond read
a portion of Scripture and the hand
played  an  appropriate selection.
Following this the Staff-Captain
read the Articles of Marriage, and
then conducted the marriage ceremony, the vows being pronounced
clearly   by   the  contracting   parties.
Captain Grey, with whom the bride
had been stationed, and also Captain
Hammond, with whom Captain Stobbart had at one time worked, each
spoke of their happy associations
with our Comrades and wished them
God-speed. Both Captain and Mrs.
Stobbart were called on to apeak,
and gave their personal testimonies,
saying they were confident of the
leadings of God in the important
step they  were undertaking.
Brother Henderson, uncle of Mra.
Stobbart, was present and gave some
timely advice to the young couple.
' After some more music by the band,
' the Rev. Mr. Thompson, pastor of
the church, pronounced the benediction.
Tht bridal party ami m nwiWr mt
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Children Crujel
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To avoid imitations, always look for the signature of  CsXaet/fT&tcJ&A*
FWn directions oo carl; pacliam:.   Physician, everywhere recommend it.
THE
NEW  HOTEL
Yahk, B.C.
J. MARKLUND, Proprietor
When In Vahk make jour home at
THK NMV HOTKIb
Thla Hotel la new from bottom to top.    Twenty-five nicely furnlahrd rooms. All are clean
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He*
KKSIAl IUNT IN CONNKCTIOl-l. PAQE POUR
THE   CRANBROOK   HERAU)
Thursday, July ISth, 1926
Che Cranbrook Kerala
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
MEMBER B.C. AND YUKON PRESS ASSOCIATION
W* A. WILLIAMS ---.--      R. POTTER, B. Sc.
di
•nbwrfption Price  f>M Per Year
f o United States .. • 12.50 Per Tear
Advertising Rates on Appliqation, Change* ot Copy
lor Advertising thouM be handed la not later thau Wed-
Mtday noon to seeare attention.
THURSDAY. IULY 15th, 1926
THE NEW CABINET
BRITISH Culuinbia has two trusted and tried
representatives in. the new government, the
composition of w'hich yvas given ont this week by
Premier Meighen. Hon. H. II. Stevens ami Hon.
S. F. Tolmie are men who .are well acquainted with
the western viewpoint,-and the interests of British
Columbia ean he,.quite safely put iu their hands.
There has only been one better minister of agriculture, so far as B. C. is concerned, and that was
another B. C. man, Hon. Martin Burrell. Mr.
Stevens' appointment t«,i the customs department,
of course, is an acknowledgment <»f Ins acumen and
persistence in bringing nr light the conditions of
laxity and worse'that have existed in some branches
of the customs service'.'
Quebec \\*%s been given good representation
in the cabinet, Premier'Meighen having taken the
courageous course of naming his ministers from
that province at thr-'sWne tilfle as thc others, without waiting ivr an election to show the seals in
which one might safely*be placed. There is a good
sprinkling of experienced ministers in the personnel
of the new government, and the Conservatives can
come u> the country, with every bit as good a cabinet as the late government, and just as widely representative. The west i* well served with four
ministers, including the Premier, and if given the
proper backing at the polls, lo enable them to get
representation in the house clear of al! other parties, tliey could do much to settle the policy of the
country into ;i more settled condition.
*    »    *    f    *
TRAdEDY STALKS CLOSE
IT seems doubly tragic that the summertime should
bring such a record of sudden death to those
wdio are taking enjoyment out of the beauties of
nature in this district.    Almost every lake and river
e lo
in the
waters hav
i,|v    stalks
has not been in
Windermere roo
of scenic beautv
trict has its history
',t swallowed up man
f tragedy, aud the
i bright life.   Trag-
all  tin-  time.    The  baseball  field
inline from it. and now the Han IT -
1. unparalleled for the bewilderment
crowded into a few miles, reminds
the travellers that there seems to be a price placed
on the rude invasion of the beauteous solitude of
those mountains. Every year there is >oine tragedy
lo record from that district.
li is not always that due precautions are uot
taken. Every care is taken in fact, and vast sums
of money are -pent in an endeavor to keep that area
especially immune from the ravages of the forest
five. But the forces of nature are greater than tlie
precautionary powers of man. and they will break
out. and claim tlieir toll of life from those who happen to be within reach of the fell stroke. Some
of these accidents are preventable, while others seem
inevitable. They all- tend to remind us that the
natural forces which are abroad cannot yet he hampered, harnessed or completely nullified by man,
and must at all times be treated with respect.
=WAWW
.V/MW.
PROHIBITION VS, MODERATION
That declaration uf war against government control of liquor in British Columbia, just announced by
prohibition forces in this province, signifies more than
mere local dissatisfaction with the mechanics of British
Columbia's liquor law, It is part of the new and greater
interest in the liquor problem that is engaging the attention of the entire civilized world.
Moderationists who sincerely believe that government contiol of liquor tends to discourage and minimize
thc use ut' alcohol cannot regret the action of the pro-
hlbltionlstB in reviving the subject. Certainly, at thfo
Btage, no one can sit down and say that the problem is
permanently solved by any law or any legislative device.
Tlie liquor problem is progressive. It is continually
changing. What was true last yenr is not altogether
11 ut* today.
It will probably require decades of discussion, years
of experiment and perhaps generations of moral evolution to definitely adjust nlcohol in the social scheme for
the irretitcst good to the greatest number.
It' this new drive ngainst moderation succeeds in
raising public interest even five per cent in the economic
and social aspects of the problem it will have accomplished a great deal,
And to achieve maximum results, both sides should
go into the fight with that purpose in view.—Vancouver
Kvening Sun.
CITY RECEIVES
CHECK FOR ROADS
INTEREST IN ELECTION BEGINS TO
SHOW ITSELF IN THE KOOTENAYS
W«it Koottnay Liberals to Nominate
West Kootenny is the fir^t of the
British Columbia constituencies to
get in readiness for the federal fight,
notices having gone out from Liberal
headquarters at Nelson for a convention to be held in lhat city on Thursday, July 29, for the purpose of organization and .selecting a stnndnrd
bearer. ■ •
West Kouteuiiy is mnde up of the
provincial ridings of Creston, Nelson,
Revelstoke, Trail, Rossland and Kas-
lo-Slocan, and the early call to arms
is probably due/to the fact that the
Liberals are poorly organized, due to
having no party standard bearer in
1925, while four years prior to that
the first nominated Liberal candidate, Dr. Hamilton of Revelstoke,
withdrew about "a week before nomination day, and R. H. Staples, of
Creston, stepped into the breach with
but two weeks to work a constituency
that requires almost two months to
thoroughly  eovej\
The preserit-CfighL coming so suddenly finds no decided opinion aa to
possible candidates, but it can be
definitely stated Mr. Staples will not
be in the running. It is not expected
the Former-I.abor party will nominate for this contest, and a keen two
party fight is looked for.
W, K. Ksling, of Rossland, who
won the West Kootenay sent for the
Conservative party last full, is in all
likelihood to be iu the running again,
and it is not considered likely that
there is any Liberal who can be
brought forward who can seriously
endanger Mr. -Hiding's seat.    He has
lar cundidate in Columbia and Cranbrook districts.
Return
i was imposed by Magistrate Leask.
John Milford,  for vagrancy, was
brought up and let out on suspended sentence tbe same day.
I    On the same day, Mike Nazerenko,
I for purchasing liquor from a person
I other than the government vendor,
. drew a penalty of $50 or forty days
1 in jail.
'     The following day, Tuesday, an out
prominence to the following: 1 of town man Ml 'oui of the city
"According to what can be learned   police, ond was fined $2J or thirty
today, one of the bombs which the' days for being intoxicated, and for
uepainiir     t o   fa(,|      tQ produce  an  aut0   driver.g
of Sir Robert   .. «     . .
er of Canada' 'lmiw otl rt'M"*'st was fined an ad-
' ditioual $10 or five days.
A  stiff  penalty  was  imposed   on
Will   Sir   Robert   Borden
Politics?
"Le Devoir," organ of Henry Bour-
assa, former M.P. for Lnbelle, gives
Conservatives
launch is the re-entry o
Borden,   former  Premie
1911 to 1919, into active politics in
order to assist Mr. Meighen with his
counsel   and   direction   during   the' Mrs. James McDonald or Brown, of
forthcoming■electoral campaign.    Mr. j Fmich   Avenue(   when   f(>p   R     .
Meighen, withm the hist few weeks,
has hastened to secure Sir Robert
Borden's advice. The latter received
him cordially and inspired certain of
his decisions."
beer on the premises for sale, she
was fined $400 or three months in
juil, by Magistrate Leask.
ALBERTA REGISTERED
NURSES ORGANIZED
INTO ASSOCIATION
JVVWWWVWWWWWWWV/
The newly elected members of the
Alberta Association of Registered
Nurses, held their first council meeting at the Hollingshead Commercial
College, 22U Eighth Avenue West,
Calgary, on Saturday, July 10th, at-
two o'clock. There were present
Miss   Guernsey,   Miss   Clark
Mr, E. S. Hopkins, seed and soil
inspector for the Federal Department
of Agriculture, was a visitor to the
experimental stations here last week.
served the constituency well, and is   R N   Qenwa, H     |UI Ca, Sp(S
an   extremely  energetic   representative.
General M.  L.   Hornby, of Leth-
Miss  bridge, is here looking over his large
Black, Mis. McDonald, Sister l.av,rty *gj lj«gg^j*r»Wl* f0r """
and Miss Mcl'liedran.   The following'
officer* were elected; President, Miss
Beatrice Guernsey, R.N., Royal Alexandra   Hospital,    Edmonton J    First
Vi(f-Presiilent, Miss Sadie McDonald,
A.    H    Trite*   Suggested   For   EmI
Kootenay
(From the Fernie Free Press)
The local politicnl situation is he-
ginning t<> create considerable inter-
6lt The Hon. Dr. I. II. King will 1
doubtless be Ithe Liberal candidate ut
the comihg.lilectlon, The Doctor
piled up such a fine majority at the
last election that he will hardly look
for a new i!onslitut-ney. He is expected to arrive in the district next
week, when jv.convention will be held
and the Liberal campaign launched.
The Conservatives are looking
around for' material of sufficient
strength to gjve Dr. King a run for
his money. ,l)r. Rutledge would like
to try his lu*k.again, but many strong
party men fbel that he could not win
out. The name of A. B. Trites is being brought; forward, but it is doubt*
f*4l if he cpuld bc persuaded upon
to accept tbe' nomination, as his extensive business interests keep him
pretty well] ^occupied. However, if
Mr. Trites -wmihl accept the nomination, he isfonc of'one best single-
handed caevussers that ever took
part in an election fight, and would
no doubt make, the Doctor extend
himself to;(the limit. So fur as thc
Fernie end/M th^district is concern
ed, Mr. Trites wonhi*have ubout t
solid backing, and his extensive min
ing interests should make him a pupu
ond Vice-President, Miss Kleanor Mc-
Phedran, It.N., Central Alberta Sanatorium, Calgary I Secretary-Treasurer aud -Registrar, Miss Elizabeth
Clark, R.N., Public Health Department, Parliiimwii Huildings, Edition*
ton.
HOT WEATHER BRINGS
RUSH OF CASES INTO
CITY POLICE COURT
According to -reporti from the police COUrti U)0 hot weather of late has
been enough to drive some people to
drink, and n few were unfortunate
enough not to U> able tfl follow the
government requirement! us to the
manner in which one's thirst may he
quenched. On Monday morning Knut
Amor was fined $8B or -to days for
being intoxicated, ami Joseph Per
rault drew a similar penalty for u
like offence, Martin Mattson, charged
the same day with causing damage
to an auto, and failing to report the
accident to the police, was fined $50
or 10 days, and for being intoxicated
in a public plnce was fined $25 or
'di) daya. In addition, for driving an
automobile while intoxicated, he was
given seven days in Jail.
Jean Hhic*|uire, on Monday, for
being disorderly, drew a penalty of
$5.00 or five days in jail, while for
purchasing liquor from some one
other than the government vendor,
a fine of $50 or forty dnys in jail
Mr. and Mrs. Godfrey Vigne, .of
Vulcan, Alberta, with their three
boys, motored across the mountains,
arriving here on Monday afternoon.
They will remain for one week.
Mr. VV. Heap Holland, the owner
of the fine property about Radium
Springs, is here on his annual inspection tour. He is accompanied
Mrs, Holland. The last stage of the
journey from Kngland to Fairmont
Springs was made by automobile over
the famous Banff-Windermere high*
way, accompanied by Mr. R. W. Bartman,  Mr.  Holland's  local  manager.
Mr. Hymn Harmon, the well*
known photographic artist of Hun IT,
motored across the mountains from
that summer city on Sunday, and returned, leaving here in the early
hours of Monday morning. His family are remaining for the summer
months, occupying thc comfortable
bungulow which Mr. Harmon has erected on Windermere Heights.
New  Electric   Refrigerator
Many have heard of fireless cookers and jceless refrigerators, but today anyone who cares -ran actually
see an example of the latter ii| what
used to be the old ice chest of the
L. D. Cafe, where now i-a installed
the latest type of what Ib known as
sanitary refrigeration. The miniature ice plant is operated by a Delco
set, by which, through a process of
circulating one liquid through an-
other, a freezing mixture is obtained
The plant, after it has been in opera.
(Continued from Page One)
be fire ot Loco; June Tth, H p.m.,
bush at corner of Watt Ave. and Dennis St. put out with chemicals, no
damage; June 8th, S 45 a.m, fire
at Major Hick's wood shed and garage, put out with water, no damage;
June llth, 4.50 p.m., Baker Street,
tar pot on fire put out with chemicals, no damage; June 16th, 5.35
p.m., call t0 lot opposite High School
where it was found that a large fire
was under way through owner, Mr.
Clapp, burning stumps, same being
protected bith small hose; June 21st,
12.15, call to Chinatown, where it
was discovered that downstairs of
Chinese Masonic hall was on fire
Fire wos found in a closet under
stairway, same being extinguished
with chemicals. There was evidence,
according to the report, of Incendiarism, aa there was quite a quantity
of coal oil thrown around the floor,
and one of the long paper spills used
by  the Chinese to light their pipes
was   carefully  placed  on   tho   fl	
with several nmtchus, placed mi (tie
spills, the heads just touching so that
when the fire reached them, they
would explode and ignite lhe coal oil.
The matter was reported still under
investigation.
Worki Department
Four new water service connections were made, requiring ninety
feet of trench. Five lenks and two
defective valves were repaired and
640 feet of two-inch pipe laid on
Dennis Street.
During the month a wash-out of
twenty feet occurred on the Gold
Creek ditch, due to heavy rains, which
also caused several cave-ins in the
deep cuts. Five dnys were occupied
in making repairs, etc. Baker Street,
from Van Horne to Cranbrook, was
finally shaped and rolled and two
coats of tar applied for an area of
4050 square yards. One coat of
screening between the coats of tar,
and one final coat of screenings and
sand were also applied to thia area.
The rock crushing site was removed to the new site. A power line
of 3600 feet was installed and GOO
feet of roadway constructed. The
crusher was dismantled and re-
erected.
Two dry wells were placed on Nor
bury Avenue.
Street Work
25 feet of old wooden sidewalk on
Cranbrook Street was removed and
replaced hy gravel fill, covered wi
tarvia.
On Hanson Avenue 608 feet of
curbing ond sidewalk were laid, and
130 feet on Louis Street,
Tarvia was used on 390 feet of
sidewalk on Baker Street and Cranbrook Street, as well as 300 feet
on Hanson Avenue, covering an area
of 6800 square feet in all. 706 loads
of material of different descriptions
were hauled.
Thc regular inspection of streets
had been made and two orders given
for clean-ups.
In connection with thc report of
the works committee the matter of
the paving of Baker street came up,
the engineer explaining the situation
with regard to the difficulty in getting
the rock out. An effort will be mndo
to expedide this work as soon as possible. It was reported in answer to
an enquiry thnt Baker Street should
be completed by the end of thc
month.
Accounts amounting to (18 051,43
were reported on und passed for pay
The report of Dr. Rutledge showei
that the work of inspection was being
properly looked after, and the matt
of the cream test was being carefully
done; a couple of cases where two
dairyics hud fallen below the cream
test standard were reported and dealers notified.
There wns but one case under
health and relief, a minor case.
The city electrician reported that
it would cost approximately $60.00
to install a light at the corner of
Dennis and Hanson Avenue corner.
The mutter was left over for later
consideration,
On the suggestion of Mayor Roberta it was decided to make an extension of the water pipe at the cemetery.
City Hall Tender*
Tenders wore opened for the painting of the city hull nnd the flooring
of the city clerk's office.
After consideration J. Norgrove
was given the contract for the painting of the outside and the kulsomin
ing of the inside for |87B.OO, the,
next lowest tender heing $485. A.
K. Jones was awarded the contract to
take up the old flooring in the city
office and replace it with a maple
flooring for $120.00.
For the month of June Mr, A. S.
Ward reported that there had been
2H3 ears enter the park, with !>80
persons, the fees collected being (145,
The city will acquire two additional
acres from the govevrnment nt the
rock quarry site.
The matter pf the construction of
the sidewalks on Armstrong Avenue
was reterred to the Works committee.
The offer of Mr. T. J. Doris of
$162 taxes* on old laundry site property was accepted, the consideration
being that a charge against thc old
**************************
LOCAL  NEWS  ITEMS
*************************
Mrs. II, Bryant roturned on Sunday from Cranbrook, win re she has
been spending a vacation with her
parents!—Fernie Free  Press.   .. .
Mr. and Mrs. II. Blumenauer and
two children, of Kimberley, were Friday io Sunday visitors with Mr. and
Mrs, C. II. Have, en route to New
Denver for a mouth's vacation, and
travelling in quite a classy new Star
sedan.—Creston Review.
F, 1
Itivei
llevet
staff.
M;i
i, Graban, manager of the local
i of (lie Imperial Bank, left
lav for a trip east. He is being
il her- hy A. Ashworth of the
lere branch, who in turn is re-
by S. Wilson of the local hunk
Golden Stnr.
iters Marshall am) Allan MacPherson, wlm hnvo been spending
nboul two weeks in Calgary as the
tuesta ..I' Mr. and Mrs. Archie Leiteh,
arrived home on Wednesday of this
viel,.    'riu- Stampede wns no small
pail   i.f   llu-   enjoyment   of   the   trip.
They were accompanied on their re-
Iurn by tin- Misses Donna Aseneth
and Elaine Leltch, who will visit for
» time ni lhe MacPherson home.
Tih- Windermere District Farmers'
Institute and Agriculture Association
have doclded tu continue theh Fall
Fair this year, ami il will again be
llu' Friday and Saturday be-
boi Day, September 3rd and
e Lieut.-Govcrnor, Hon. R. R.
will again be asked tn of-
at lhe opening of the fair,
e past years thu Lieut.-Govor-
f the province has usually per-
•d Ihis duty. The prize list for
iir is now in hand at the Herald
and will be issued shortly.
held oi
fore I.
4 th. T
Bruce,
fieialo
as in I
nor i
form
iln  f
office
Mr. J. Christ, of Sand Point, Idaho, registered at the Cranbrook Hotel
on the 12th.
S. Herchmer and Dave Ilaivie at-
tended a meeting of thc District Conservative Association at Cranbrook
yesterday.—Fernie   Free   Press.
Ring 18 and give The Cranbrook
Herald the information about guests
entertained or inemburs of the family On vacation. If not convenient
to phone, a signed communication
giving the facts, will be greatly appreciated.
The new ballasting of the C.P.R
between Golden and Beavermouth is
probably one of the neatest pieces of
railway work to be found anywhere.
The lower edge of the gravel is set
with a straight edge of small rocks,
similar to a flower-bed, -stretching for
miles.—-Golden Star.
Mrs. Lloyd Crowe and daughters,
Pauline, Isabel ami Eileen, have boen
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur F.
Crowe all week. Mrs. Crowe ami
Eileen will return lo Kimlierley lo-
morrow. Misses Pauline and label
are remaining for a longer visit. -
Grand Forks Gnzellc
During the routing nf the main
line trains through Cninlirook lhe
end of lasl week, twn eostbountl
trains reached here within n Phorl
time of each other, wore consolidated,
and » train of about seventeen cars
pulled out for Golden, ono of the
longest passenger trains ever seen
here.
A.  .1.   Chisholm,  of  Windermere,
vna in  the eity   for a  time thc end
if last week,  having been in ntten-
lancc   at   the   Conservative   district
xeeufive meeting held here Thursday
vening.    Mr. Chisholm is somewhat
f a constitutional history student,
and can adduce precedents  to show
that the governor-general did not exceed  his  authority  in   refusing the
dissolution  of the  houses  of parliu-
imnt to former Premier King, and
granting it a little later to Premier
Meighen.
With the growth of the summer
colony ut McBnin's Lake, steps should
be taken hy the provincial health authorities to see that a proper system
of sanitation is Inaugurated. There
should also be some steps taken to
guard against the danger of bush
fires. The timber in the vicinity of
tho lake is of u very resinous nature
and a file would spread very rapidly
and burn all the summer homes. Notices warning the public to be very
careful of fire should be posted up
in many places surrounding the lake,
The exterior of thc Queens Hotel
has bicn given two fresh coats of
palpt, greatly to the improvement of
the building itself and also to that
part of Baker Street. G. Higginson
undertook the work.
A. A. Dennys, the Dominion entomologist, who is bundling the potato bug outbreak in the Valley, was
recalled to Cranbrook at the end of
the week, hul will he back in a few
days to commence extermination operations. All the equipment is here
and spraying will be gone on with on
his return,—Creston Review.
TI
jolldated Mining & Smelting Company is continuing its policy
of thoroughly projecting the area
near Michel, where phosphate deposits ure known to occur, Their
field men have heen working north,
and a big area north of the railway
Um, in a wild mid inaccessible dis-
trict la Hie latest lo be blanketed for
thorough prospecting, Naturally a
good many of the chnins will he dropped as worthless, Imi others where
the do posits are al all extensive, may
'"' token up. The purpose of this
oxplornllon is to obtnln a phosphate
supply by which use can be. made of
H.c sulphur which occurs in the Sullivan ore, and which can be used In a
commercial fertilizer to advantage.
Al present lltO big supplies of phosphate iii lhe world are understood to
occur in Idaho, Florida and in Mor-
nceo, ami Hore is au increasing demand for commercial fertilizer in the
farming districts, as a means fur enriching the soil and so increasing the
yield.
—Fernie Free Press,
In o
on time
tiniQ to
tion for a short time, becomes a little
ice castle, which acts as a huge block j'laundry company be cancelled.
of  ice.     In  the  machine are small]    The question of the removal of the
drawers in whh'h pure water Is plac-  memorial from its present site- also
ed, which when renn>v*i<J contains a came up und wns discussed, the mat-
large number of small blocks of ice   ter being left over,
for water cooling purpura. The council adjourned at 10.50.
er to issue the paper
ist week and at the same
ve it as news when it was
news, the account of the United
Church picnic was not as full ns it
otherwise would have heen. It is
a privilege to record such events as
this was, when a large number of
nun and women put their shoulders
together and, working together like
:-kwork, gave the children such
a good time. The thanks of the children and parents are due to those
who, white also enjoying it them-
solvis, saw to it that the work was
dune.
License   Plates   Found
Three licence plates from autos
have been found and turned in to the
provincial police. Licence No. 15-
558 is nt the provincial police office
in Cranbrook, while at the Wardner
offlc* licence plates No. 14-945 and
14*004 have been turned in, awaiting
their owners.
Taxi drivers
of t
fore,
they
ifflCI
lemindo
he
ami to
mi   wl
fixed
tlons
stage
is and stage car drivers
1 lhat by the provisions
ew   act   recently  put  inlo
by tlu-  provincial government,
re required to register with the
of public works in  this city,
file also a copy of the schedule
ilch  they  run,  if  they havo a
route.    Ci rluin other restrie-
have also been placed un the
drivers, which those concerned
Should familiarize llieniselves with at
once, and the provincial  police have
recoived Instructions to enforce the
act, uml it is already deemed to hnve
gone into force.
The regular meeting of the K. V.
Lodgo was held in Castle Hull on
Tuosdny evening, when despite the
heal of tho day n large numher were1
present, it bolng a mattoi* of record'
lhat every one of the newly elected
officers was in his place.    The rank
The possibility of building a enn
centrating plant at Greenwood is Ining thoroughly ennvnssed by K. A
Haggen, mining engineer nf Vancouver, who hns been at Greenwood making full enquiry into ore possibilities. It is understood that the Barrett interests of California are willing
to finance the Mill if it can be shown
there is profitable business in sight.
—Grand   Forks   Gazette.
John Lyall, of Kimberley. broker,
who has been under arrest foi the
alleged misuse of funds entrusted to
lum for investment, and the conversion of securities placed in his charge,
was last week committed for trial
at Kimberley, nnd is now out on
bail of $2,000, in five sureties It
is understood he has elected for jury
trial, and the case is being defended
by G, .T. Spreull, of this city.
The Premier Service Station, for
the sale of gasoline and nit. is again
open on Cranbrook Street, next to
A. E. Jones' factory. The Premier
is equipped to take care of the motorists' wants in the way of gasoline
and oil or fer the replenishing of;
filtered water or air supply. At thej
depot is an up-to-date oiling rack,
by means of which il is but a simple
matter to have one's car thoroughly
lubricated. Mr. O. L. Colbome is now I
in  churge of the  stutlon.
On Saturday last a ease which occupied the attention of the city court
for three days was concluded when,
after a lengthy argument hy oppos-1 f
ing counsels the case of Frnnkhanel', *
vs. Wallinger was dismissed by the *
magistrate. Thc case in question | ^
was one in which O. G. Frankhanel, j T
Kimberley, accused Noel Wallirger -, *
of driving to the common danger on ! *
June fith on the six-mile hill between ' f
Wasa and Fort Steele. The plain-; *
tiff was represented hy J. W. Brault, *
of Kimberley, while IL W. Herchmer j %
was acting for the defendent. For : £
two days evidence wus submitted by ! *>
the contending parties while practic-' *
ally a whole day was taken up with |
the argument, which resulted us in-1 *
timuted above, in dismissal.
REX CAFE
AND   ROOMS
-     CRANBROOK    —
OPPOSITE   DEPOT
Under  Now   Management
cafe-
two Doors from Bitker Street
(iood Cooking • Prompt Service
All While Help
ROOMS-
Twenty  Clean  and Comfortable
Rooms — 50c - 75c per Night
D.   E.   GUSTIN
— Proprietor —
SEE US FOR—
YOUR NEXT SUIT
Lat.it ity'ea & fabric. $40-t60
H. C. LONU, Van Horne St.
*******************
. i
NOTICE
Shortage
Water
The Corporation ol the City
of Cranbrook
Owing to the exceulv-a <
heal thc water In the reservoir on St. Joaeph'a Crtek
is xt'tthiK low and the public
arc hereby requested to UM
* as little water as possible for
j  lawn service.
;•;     If thc hot weather contln-   -
<*   lies and care is not used III
* thc use of water, It will bo [
J  necessary for the Council to
* place restrictions on th* use
.'.'   of water for outside pur-
X  poses.
j F. W. BURQESS,
City Clerk
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦.
i QXempllfiod nn n woit-
i.r knight w
injr candidate. It waa decided at the
meeting In join with Kimberley in
the holding nf ii joint picnic ut Waaa
Lake on July 2l)th, it lieing expected
thnl nt this time, the K.P's ond their
Pythian sisters of both Kimberley I
and Crnnbrook will be present,
Tin- K. P. Lodge, on the suggestion j
of their new Keeper of Records and j
yenls, .1. I'enrson, huve issued n small
publication known as the Creaccnt
Lodglings; this is a single page sheet,!
which reflects tlie doings of the lodge I
imi undoubtedly will be the means
of stimulating interest in the lodge.!
Many Favorable comments were
hoard with rogard to the issue, nnd
it was decided to' publish others. Thursday, July 15th, 1926
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
PAOB MVB
republican party, opposed to the
president, moved a resolution against
the restoration of southern states to
the Union. After a great deal of
dissent ion, vice-president .Johnson,
who became president on the assasin-
ation of Lincoln, retired, and General
Ulysses S. Grant was elected 18th
president. The trial of .Jefferson
Davis was dropped. The impeach-
if  Johnson   was   defeated   in
I
Lothi
During these t
was a great de
pressed towards
Danish    West    I
unuoUB years there
of antipathy exeat Britain. Two
inn    Islands   were
Recollections of Octogenarian j
Reminiscences of John Fingal Smith, of this city, as
Recorded by  Himself,
************************ **%,** ************************
AMERICAN CIVIL WAR
(Continued)
The American civil war undoubtedly was one of the greatest struggles
recorded in history. The south had
clearly the ablest military commanders in Jackson and Lee. The southerners were more united for there
was fewer of an alien element in
their army, and hence fewer desert- t ,
ers. Both sides were becoming ex-1l" r.
hausted and the "flea-bite" war debt °-n&"
became unbearable. President Lincoln, towards the end, needed more
money to terminate the rebellion
which was evidently approaching.
Canadians should know who contributed to this. Lincoln applied to
George Stephens, manager of the
Bank of Montreal, for a few millions.
Of course, the percentage was tempting. Without consulting the directors the loan was granted. In time
this was repaid in full. Slephens
then informed the directors. He wns
thanked but naked uot to risk tin-
like again. So If we wire Incllnod
to boasting we could claim "we won
the war." These are facts not generally known but may as well be
put on record.
Barbarity has not shown in history
anything worse than the destruction
caused by Hheridun's "march to the
sea." What can be more atrocious
than the treatment of Federal soldiers, prisoners ut Andersonville, who
under a burning sun, without any
cover or shelter, were made targets
of from the outside by men who
seemed to have lost ull sense or feeling of humanity. Capt. Wirz, after
a long military trial, was executed for
cruelty to the federal prisoners. A
negro convention at Charleston appealed for justice and generosity, and
ex-president Buchanan published his
justification.
The Opening of  the  39th  Congreai
President Johnson's message wus
conciliatory and firm. He required
from the southern states repeal of
their acts of secession, abolition of
slavery and repudiation of confederate debt. The southern bank bills
were now of no further value hut as
a relic of which I possess a one dollar bill. Even the "green-backs" issued by the north were not accepted
on their face value in the western
states until many years later. All
agreements made stipulated tbat all
Payments were to be made in gold.
he state of California contributed
virtually nothing to the war und wus
inclined to withdraw from the union.
The vast distance over a desert country was a barrier until the Central
Pacific Railway was built. The fanatical followers of Brigham Young at
Salt Lake were for a time safe from
aggression. The Mountain Meadow
massacre was pne of the interesting
episodes connecting the attempt to
escape pf a number of deluded people
who refused to he ruled by a tyrant.
The State of Utah was refused entrance into the union while poliganiy
was the leading doctrine. This was
easily got over and there was an overflow into Canada.
The   Aftermath
Johnson was a democrat and the
The open air service was carried we hear the statemei
out as planned by the Ministerial As- Church is dying. This
Bodation.    Unfortunately the instru- been disproved by the
ment of Dr. H.
known statistic!
for the past tw
this period 40,16
wen erected, oi
mentalists were not in evidence
This is to be remedied at later meet
ings however. A fair number of curs with the number
und listeners assembled around the the churches in
bandstand, which wus filled by thos>
desiring seats. But, by the way,
where ean one find a better seat
than on the grass of the playground!
Bring a rug along and be present
next Sunday. You will enjoy the
music and the message; Capt. Stobbart, of the Salvation Army will be
the speaker. Time, next Sunday
evening at 8,80] place, Community
Playground] message, "Old News,
New   News,   and   Good   News."
<. Carrol, the w<
, in which he dea
and membership i
the United StaU
„tv-five years. I
new buildings ba\
five new churclu
Kev. W. T. Tapscott will preach
in Kimberley next Sunday, while Mr.
Huberts will tuke the combined Hap.
tist und  Presbyte.rian services here.
There is a type of mind which is
always "knocking."   From this cluss
igltt for another $7,500,000. John
p Motley was appointed minister at London.    Motley wns the distinguished  historian  of the  Netherlands  uud  whllo  minister  in   Britain
lined u greal deal of the injustice
the United Statod press and poll-
■tans,    lie  was viciously  attacked
f ihis ami returned to Greut Brit-
i. when- In- spent the remainder of
i useful life.
MiiiUleri    in    Trouble
No country could or can reconcile
the average American newspaper.
When   Minister  Lincoln, sun  of the
ildeiit, wns appointed to tin- Court
t. .lames, Queen Victoria, respecting lhc name ns well as the repre-
tentative of a great nation, had one
if the roynl princes take in the royal
■ouch the American minister to the
residence of so august a man The
American press poured ridicule on
the act and showed what a coarse,
vulgar type of people Lincoln came
to represent. Yet this wus in keeping with thc type of miin representing the President of the United
States ut the funeral of King Ed
ward.    It was a studied insult.    Hi
wns a mining engineer in South Af ri-1 ^	
ca and took a trip up to Cariboo    On      ,,      v, .. M v- „„„ „„ ,  .„„„.!.*--.,.
&&IiW  chat?!? ^efe'fr '°-^d- *?.*»""*« •»
around swaggering a huge revolver.
What he would not do to the Britisher! One Britisher, the conductor,
would not be soured by a drunken
bully, snatched his gun from his fist
nnd   administered  a  few  expressive  -   —  ----,
kicks to his corporation, which set- her home in Alberta,
tied him  for the rest of the trip. * *  * *
Another vicious onslaught occurred]    Mr. nnd Mrs. E. S, Shannon are
when at a reception, where the time- spending their holidays nt Christinu
honored rule was that guests should i Lake,
appear in court dregs.    The United * * * *
Stutes of America  this time bud a I    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Carlson, Bob
minister of the low order try to en- Turner, and Mrs. Hedley McLeod und
ter without the prescribed dress.   He son, Burton, motored to Spokane lust
wus refused admittance.   Needless to .Sunday,
suv the doorkeepers had no idea who *  *  *  *
this Individual was.    The American!    Air. and Mrs. Fortier, accompanied
press, instead of expressing shame atiby Mrs. S. Evans, of Anyox, motored
a day. Communicant members have
increased by almost nineteen thousand. The total number *>f Communicant members being now placed at
44,458,522, as againsl 20,085,009 in
1000. The gain of the R.C. chureh
is six times that of tlie largest   Pm
testant church, which is tin- Methodist ESplsoopal. The next largest is thc
Northern Baptist, while the third
Is tin- Southern Baptist Tha cIobc
of the first quarter of tho twentieth
century, Dr. Carrol declares, thul despite all controversies, there is abundant evidence of a mure vigorous
Christian life everywhere.
■apidly
■1,000
md is HOW
inhabitants,
************************** I has grown very i
|   KIMBERLEY   KT'' °'8b0Ut
i    NPWQ   NHTFQ    11    "Whereas there is a great deal of
?-   . . 1.a.... .   . . ... I . * traffic   between   this   town   and   the
************************** j t.jtJ. 0f Cranbrook, there being about
l    Mr. und  Mrs. Tom Caldwell  and
family motored to Fairmont Tuesday,
spend" the week.
i liesuay,   id   npvuu   iu«   ..„..—,,.
her husband, Neil  McKinnon.
* * • •
Mrs. (Or.) Hanington entertained
u few friends on Friday evening in
honor of Miss Willows of the hospital
staff, who left town  this week for
] 25 automobiles per day, and
"Whereas the district of Kimberley
is a greut revenue producer for the
province, and therefore is entitled to
suitable   access   and   egress,   and
"Whereas the government is doing
very little  work on  this  road, '
'Therefore, be it resolved that the
I government be and hereby is respectfully requested to complete (he work
on the Cranbrook-Kimberley highway
and to make a surface which can be
used all the yeur around."
This resolution was approved hy
the committee and, on submission lo
the  board, was passed  by   Ihem.
Mr. Crerar said the matter of roads
had been taken up by the board <>\
trade with Mr. MacLean, Minister of
Education.
the ignorance of tlieir representative,
savagely attacked Queen Victoria
and all she represented. King Edward, Prince of Wales at the time,
said this was not more agreeable to
him than to any of the others, but
he had, like others, submitted to custom. When the Queen heard of it,
she gave orders thut thereafter nn
American minister might appear in
whatever garb suited him. So international relations were disturbed by
thc cut of the cout-wear.
(To bc   continued)
Mr. Shannon reported that, in con-! **>
equenca of \he letter from Rev. ff, J
. Crick, he had made- enquiries as toil
lie establishment of au undertaking *
larlor in Kimberley, hut was inform- \*
d   lhat   thc   town   was   not  yet   big1!
i gli to warrant the outlay neces-|T
tar)  fm- such a purpose. . *:*
Mr. Foote reported I'or the rouds; *
:'..iii!iii!tt e nnd, in this connection,^
Mr. Willis referred to the proponed^
cut-off from McGinty trail to Wusu, ;*
saying thnt John Taylor had recom- \%
mended un alternative road, and re- *
quested  that it  be surveyed. I*
Board   to   Back   Playground I *
Mr. Willis culled the notice of the |
board te the importance of immediate ,^
action in the matter of a children's****
playground—the Elks and Gyros have ; *
taken this up und. as a result of the *
July 1st celebration, the A.A. A. huve It
funds in hund. The president sup- i *
ported Mi1. Willis, and on motion of; J
Messrs. Summers and Gough, it wuslx
agreed to hold a meeting ut the close | T
of the business i,i' the bourd. , *
KIMBERLEY TAKING g
ACTIVE STEPS FOR     if
KIDDIES'PLAYGROUND!I
i-***************************f
G. W. V. A.
An extraordinary general meeting of the members of the G.V. V. A. will be held in the
gymnasium of the
RECREATION   CLUB   ON
Friday, July 16th, at 8 p.m.
purpose of winding up the affairs of
foi  tl
the G. W. V. A.
I,usl week at the conclusion
• ■i tlie business of the Kimberley
Hoard of Trade, a citizens' meeting
took place tn consider the matter of
a playground for children.
.Mr. Willis said thut he thought the
time favorable for doing something
definite in a mutter which hnd already been considered hy the Kiks
und Gyros. The A.A.A. had funds
available, and it would be a good idea
lo make a start now.
Mr. Shannon was appointed chairman, and supplemented the remarks
nf Jhe   previous  speaker.
Mr. O'Neil moved the appointment
uf a grounds committee uml this was
seconded by Mr. Crerar and carried.
Messis. Willis, Foote and (rough were
appointed to meet committees from
the Kiks nnd Gyros, and tn report
al a later meeting.
.Mr. Montgomery, for lhe C. M. &
s. Co., will lence land ut a nominal
icnlali and the committee will inter
iriew him as to a suitable site.
Mr. l.< o Johnson inquiring if the
Loyul Order of Moose could he
identified wilb the movement, was assured  that   assistance  from all  who
CANADIAN LEGION
A meeting of all ex-service men interested in
forming a Post of the CANADIAN LEGION will
be held in the gymnasium of the
RECREATION   CLUB   ON
Friday, July 16th, at 8.30 p.m.
Every Ex-Service Man in
determined effort to
The ri^ht to criticize is by
ami becomln
the district  should make ■
attend this   meeting,
payng the membership fees
a member.
All Ex-Service Men will be heartily welcomed
*******4**************************
had   thc
would be
It is p
ling pot
quipm
Mr.
eisali
ecent
kiddie
welco
nt.
•ror said I
with    Mr.
it  to Kimberl
Palu
possible that ao me assislnn
obtained from ihe gover
clearing the  bind.  etc.
The worthy scheme \
much in the way of volun
hut there is im doubt thn
be forthcoming. The projti
the active support of even
n.
•hi- will
od citi-
Ncw Auto RmJ Cmamp
An interesting development ia being curried on about a mile south of
Windermere, where tha main road
crosses the creek, and where an up-
to date auto camp is being established. Thc property belongs to Byron
Harmon, well known Banff photog-
raphqr and druggist, and he has his
brother, G. Harmon, in charge of
development work there. Full facilities for tourists are being put in,
and there will be a good-sited open
air dancing pavilion, among other
thing.-. The place hu a good deal
of natural beauty to start with, and
everything possible is being done to
make the place really attractive to
the passing tourists and other visit-
to Fnirmont Sunday last*
*  » # *
C. A. Foote and Carl White mo
tored to Radium Sunday.
Mrs. Boyd Caldwell has as her
guest her sister, Miss Reid, of Toronto, and they are spending a vacation
at   Premier Lake.
The Odd Fellows' picnic Sunday
was a very enjoyable day spent at
Wusn Luke. Bathing was the chief
attraction of thc day, and the refreshments were  all  thnt could be
I desired.
*>***)
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Barr spent a
few  days   at   Kitchener  last  week.
Mr. and Mrs. Gus Sjolund took In
the circus in Crnnbrook Saturday.
.-i    Mr.
>|Sundt
and Mrs. J. S.
v  at  Wasa.
Fisher spent!
Mrs. C. A. Foote and son, Chris,
are spending a week at Radium Hot
, Spring*.
    MeCnyby and  daughter ar-
■ived in town to join Mr. MeCayby,
Mrs.
£--&£S
PANTS FOR NOTHING        PANTS FOR NOTHING
PANTS FOR NOTHING
We have been appointed sole representatives in
lhe Cranbrook Dislricl lor the
J, I TAYLOR CLOTHING CO., of Montreal,
and in order to advertise this High Grade Clothing
in this locality we have been authorized by them
to give ABSOLUTELY FRKE one pair of Pants
with each suit sold during the month of July.
-To anyone who can prove that this is not a
genuine offer of PANTS FOR NOTHING, or
that our prices were marked specially for this
occasion, they can have the Suit and Pants
free of charge.
Cleaning find Prewing a Specialty
Bring Your Work To Practiced Tailor*
MUIRHEAD & GUTHRIE
j PHONE 19 HANSON BLOCK ^
and will muke their home here in the |
future.
Mn.   C.   A.   Foote   entertained
few friends Friday evening in honor
of Mrs.  S.  Fvnns, of Anyox.
Mrs. K. O. Montgomtry and Miss
Kileen are spending the week at
Fairmont.
Dr. nnd Mrs. Hanington motored
to Radium Sunday, also Master Normun Burdett. Mrs. Hanington and
Ida remained over for the week ut
the  Springs.
Musters Tom nnd Lome Summers,
Roul Morton and Soderholm are
spending a week at Fairmont and
the   Windermere.
| Mrs. N. W. Burdett entertained a
, number of friends at tea Saturday
in honor of Mrs. Kvans, \vhti ha* heen
the guest of Mrs. f\ Fortier for a
wapl(|
Mr*. Cnvanagh entertained a num-
bor of little ones on Thursday last,
birthday. The children had a great
the occasdun being young Jackie's
time.
Mrs. R, K. Juckson entertained at
tea ou Friduy afternoon laat. A
mosl  enjoyable time was spent.
Mr. ant| Mrs. Win. l.indsuy were
Crunbrook visitors Thursday.
Mr. und Mrs. Phil Johnson and
party were among those who regiH-
itered  at   Fairmont   Sunday.
• •  •  t
John McDonald is taking a week's
rest at Radium Springs.
• • • •
A number from town took in the
circus at Cranbrook Saturday lut.
RESOLUTIONS TO HASTEN
NEW KIMBERLEY ROAD
PASSES ASSOC. BOARDS!
•U a meeting of the Kimberley
bomd of trade last w-eek, R. E. Crt
rar, the president, outlined briefly bia
visit to the convention of Associated
Boards of East Kootenay, as representative of the Kimberley Board.
Having in mind the Importance of
Kimberley as a producer of revenue
for the province (the C. M. & S. Co.
alone paying a large proportion of
the taxes) Mr. Crerar introduced the
following resolution:
"WlwrtM the t.wn tt Kinbertey
The Biggest and Best
Community Effort
Ever Attempted
Cranbrook B.P.O.E.
Kidd
Day
CMNNU
Thurs.-FrU Sat.
July -29 -30-31
Proceeds In Aid of
KIDDIES FLAG DAY PICNIC p a o n six
**************************
I    ROOSVILLE NOTES    !
♦♦♦•♦*♦•»•♦♦♦********«•*«•*****
Mr. Robert Roid motored I" Gras
mere on Monday.
THB  CRANBROOK   HERALD
Thursday, July 15th, 1926
=:
Creeks,   which   is   about   six
south-east of Mlchol, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE tlmt Tlu' Consoli-
tlnleil Mining & Smelting Company
of Canndu, Ltd., of Klmborloy, B.C.,
bv occupation .-i Mining and Smelting
by tholr duly authorized
m McKechnle, of
u'ompany
miles situate on thc wrst side of Alexander
Creek about six miles north of the
confluence of Alrxumtt-r and Michel
('rocks, whicli is about six milee
south-eust of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE lhat The Consoli-
dated Mining & -Smelting Company
of Cunada, Ltd., uf Kimberley, B.C
Province of Briti.lt Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section r>   (.1).)
Haying is now m lull .wing
throughout the district.
Messrs Colin, James ami Richard
Sinclair and Miss E. Sinclair motored
to Feruiu on Monday.
Messrs,!. A. Sinclair and R. J- Hunter, of Flagstone, are spending ■. few
days nt Roosvllle.
Mrs. Campbell motored to Eureka,
where she spent 11 few hours v
where she spent u few hou
Mr. and Mrs. B. Hyde n
tor trip to Eurekaj-ecentl
Jus Sinclair und tlie M ■
Swanson und Mary McDon
ed to Spokane after spent
days here.
The Misses Margaret
McGuire, of Grasmore,
Roosvllle on Wednesday i
Mr. li. liciil motored ti
on Thursday morning.
Mr. Hill Sinclair was i
Eureka on Wednesday.
ugent, Donalu ...
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation u by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Mining Engineer, intends to upply j Company by their duly authorized
for a prospecting licence under the agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
"Phosphate-Mining   Act"   over   the Kimberley,   B.C.,   by   occupation
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed nt tlu- S.W. corner of the
claim about one mile south of tlie
S.W. coiner of S.T.L. 013; thence|
north SO chuins
th- in*
.Mining Engineer, intends  to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate   Mining   Act"  over  the
following described lands:—
Commencing at  a stake or post
thence   oust   801 placed  at the N.E.   corner of  the
ntli   SO   chains; j claim about three miles north of the
Bel
ug.
thu
*eti
a
rn-
111
to
ii'.'
ere
thence west 80 chains, and containing S.W. corner of S.T.L. 613; thence
'640 acres, mure or less. south   80 chains;   thence   west   80
"""*   chuins;    thence    north    80    chains;
thence east 80 chains, and containing
I 040 acres, more or less.
j     Dated the 17th day of June, 1926
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
(1.11    18-24
acres, mure or less,
ttted the ITth dav uf June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
l 8-2*1
Province  uf  British   Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section   5   (3).)
Of    Intention   To   Apply    For
ProM pec ting   Licence.
Eobt. McDonald
days al his home.
s ipendh
Messrs ('has.
Sinclair, and tin
Rose McQuire I
Sunday.
McG
Mlssf
Mr.
mere <
Phillips i
Saturday.
Messrs. J. A. Sinclair a
ten motortd to Grnsmere
day ever, ng
Miss 1 ilv Fuller, whu ape
week ut Glut Lake return
stone un Mt nday evening.
»,l II. Ti
it tie.
(I to
Province  of  British   Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  6   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply    Fo
Prosper tiiiR   Licence,
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on thu west side of Alexander
Creek about two miles nurlh of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is six miles south-east
of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their dulv authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKechnle, of
Kimberley, U.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, Intends to apply
■ for. a proipecting licence under the
' "Phosphate-Mining Act" uver the
following described lunds:—
Commencing nt a stake o
placed at the N.K. corner of tin
one mile south of the S.E. col
S.T.L. 018; thence south Si) i
thence west 80 ehains; thoncc
80 chains; theme east SO chnii
containing 640 ucres, more <
Dated the  I Tth dnv of June
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or ugent
12:i    18-24
post
claim
er of
tains
north
1, and
1 less,
1926
In Fori Steele .Mining Division, and
Bituate on the west side of Alexander
Creek about four miles north of the
confluence of Alexunder und Michel
neks which is about six miles
iouth-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE Notice that The Consolidated Mining & Smelling Company
Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
\.k occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie. of
Kimlierley,    B.C.,    by    occupation
.Mining   Engineer,   intends   to   upply
for =1  prospecting licence  under the
'•Phosphate-Mining   Act"   over   the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the N.E. corner of the
claim about one mile north of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 613; thence
south SO ehains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east SO ehains, and containing 640
acres, more 01 less.
Dated the ITlli dav of June, 11)26.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
127    18-24
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Proipecting   Licence.
thence north 80 chains; thence west
SO chains, and containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or ugent.
1-10     18-24
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the east side of Alexander
Creek near the confluence of Alexander und Michel Creeks, which is
about six miles south-east of Michel,
B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation u Mining uud Smelting
Con pany by their duly authorized
agent. Donald Cowan McKeehnie, ol
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lunds:—
Commencing ut a stuke or post
placed at the N.W. corner of thc
claim, ubout three miles south of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 613; thence
south 80 chains; thunce east 80
hains; thence north SO chains;
thence west 80 chuins, and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th dny of June,  1020.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
I.'I6     18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
of British  Columbia
Province  of   British   Colmnbiii
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACI
(Section  5   (.'{).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting   Licence.
In Fort Steele .Mining Division, and
situate on the easl side of Alexander
Creek about two miles north of the
confluence of Alexander nnd Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli-
dated Mining & Smelt ing Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by Occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKechnte, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation n
Mining Engineer, Intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing nt u stuke or post
placed ut the N.W. corner of the
claim one mile south of the S.E.
corner of S.T.L. 018; thence south
80 chains; thence oast SO chains;
thence north 80 chuins; thence west
80 chains, and containing 610 aires,
more or less.
Dated the 17th dnv of June, 1026.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
124     18-24
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section, Ii   (3),)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply    For
Prospecting   Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, und
Bituate on the enst. side of Alexander
Creek about, four miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
('it ek?, which is about six miles
south-east   of   Michel,   B.C.
TAKE NOTICK that The Consoli-
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining und Smelting
Company.by their duly authorized,
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kiiulierley, B.C.. by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the N.W. corner of the
chum about one mile north of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 018; thence
south 80 chains; thence, east 80
chuins; thence north 80 chuins;
thence iveBl SO chnins, nnd containing 040 acres, more or less.
Dated the 1 Tlh dav of June, 1026.
D. ('. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
125    18-24
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6   (3).)
Notice  Of   Intention   To   Apply   Fn
Prospecting   Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Diviiion, and
Bltuato on the west side of Alexander
Creek about three miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Mlchol
Creeks, which li aboul mx miles
south-east of Michel. II. C.
TAKE  NOTICE  that   The  Consoli
dated Mining A Smelling Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Klmberloy, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKechnle, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
claim about one mile south of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L 013; thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains; thence south so chains;
thence east 80 chains, and containing 640 acres,  mora or less.
Doted the 17th dnv of June, 1026.
'     D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
126    18-24
Province of British   Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section   f   13).)
Province of Britiih  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  0   (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the eust side of Alexander
Creek ubout six miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli-
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, H.t!., by occupation
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at   a stake or post
placed at the N.W. corner of  the
claim, about three miles north of the    -    ,    ,        ,
S.W. corner of S.T.L.  613; thence Kimberley,   B.C.,   by   occupation   a
south   80   chains;   thence   east   80 Mining  Engineer,  intends  to  apply
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Proipecting   Licence.
Notice  Of   Intention  To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate one mile north of the Forks
of Alexander Creek on the west sid>
the main creek about nine miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
md .Michel Creeks which is nbout
;ix miles ninth-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
hy occupation u Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorize*)
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, Intends to apply
for u prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lunds:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E. corner of tlm
claim about one mile north of the
N.E. corner of L8B18; thence north
SO chuins; thence west 8(1 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east
SO chains, and containing 640 acres,
more or less,
Dated tin- 17th day of June,  1026.
D. C, McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
Ml     18-24
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence- under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing al a stake or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
claim, about three miles north of the
N.E. corner of L8518; thence north
60 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 60 chains; thence east
80 chains, and containing 480 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE. -
Signature of applicant or agent.
145    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section fi  (8).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   Foi
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, und
situate on the west side of Alexander
('reek ubout one mile north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is ubout six miles
south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE thut The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Cunada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation u Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
chains;   thence   north   80   chains;
thence went 80 chains and containing
640 acres, more or leas.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
132    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  fi  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   Fur
Proipecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the west side of Alexander
Creek about seven miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
south-east of Michel. B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining £ Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Ci mpuny by their duly authorized
ugent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
fur a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
luini about three miles north of the
Province  of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section   5   (3).)
lice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
claim, about three miles south of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 613; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, und containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1026.
D. C. McKECHNIE,
Signature of applicant or agent.
1.17    18-24
Province of Britiih  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  fi   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Proipecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, ami
situate on the eust side of Alexander
Creek about one miles north of thc
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
south-east  of  Michel,  B.C.
TAKE NOTICE thut The Corsoli-
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation u Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehn
S.W. Corner of S.T.L. 613; thence! Kiniberley,   B.C..   by   occupation
north 80 dhatns; thence west 80
chuins; thence south 80 chains;
thence eust 80 chain*, and containing
t! lo acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1026.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
183    18-24
In F(
itlllite
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  To  Apply   For
Proipecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
i situate on the east side of Alexander
rt Steele Mining Division, and
on the west side of Alexander
Creek about five miles north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolf-
dnted  Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C., HilUiiU. U11 lfl
by occupation a Mining and Smelting Creek about geven mileH north of the
( ompany  by their duy authorized !confiuence of Alexander and Michel
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of Gteekl   which   ia  about 8ix  miie8
Kimberley,   B.C.,   by  occupation  a 'outran 0f Michel (B.O.
Mining   Engineer,  intends  to  apply      TAKE N0TICE that The Consoli-
for a projecting licence under the, dated Min|      & Smelting Company
•I hoapnatc-Minng   Act"   over   thc of Canad    ftd   of fta/fa. B.c:,
following described lunds:— by.occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorised
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
M ining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands
Commencing at a stuke or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
claim about one mile north of thc
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 613; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chnins; thence
east 80 chuins, aud containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June, 1026
I). C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or ugent.
121)    18-24
Province of Britiih Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
• lice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting   Licence.
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section fi  (8).)
In Fori Steele Mining Division, and
situate on ihe eust side of Alexander
Creek nbuut five milei north of the
confluence of Alexander and Michel
Creeks, which is about six miles
HOllth-euil   of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE thnt The Consolidated Mining &. Smelting ('ompany
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimherley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized^
ngont, Donald Cownn McKeehnie. of
Kind 11 rley, B.C., by occupation
.Mining Engineer, intends to upply
for n prospecting licence under the
"Phospnate-Minlng Act" over the
following described lands:—■
Commencing at a stake or post
placed (tt the S.W. corner about one
' mile north of the S.W. corner of
1S.T.L. 613; thence north 80 chains;
thence enst 80 chnins; thence south
so chains; thence west 80 chains und
containing 640 ucres, more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June, 1026.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent,
130     18-24
Province of Britiih  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  fi   (8),)
Nolle*  Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Proipecting   Licence,
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and Notice  Of  Intention To Apply  For
Situate on the enst side of Alexander Prospecting Licence.
Creek ubout three miles north of the 	
confluence of Alexander nnd Michel In Fort Steele Mining Diviiion, and
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing ot a stake or post
placed nt the S.W. corner of the
claim about three miles south of the
S.W. corner of the S.T.L 613; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chuins, und containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1020.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or ugent.
138   -18-24
Province of Britiih Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section ■'•  CJ).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, nnd
situate near the Forks of the Alexander Creek on the west side of the
main creek about eight miles from
the confluence of Alexander and
Michel Creeks, which is about six
miles south-east of Mitchel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C .
,, ,        , , ,iby occupation a Mining and Smelting
Commencing at_a  stake or post c*mpRI£ by their duly authorized
placed  at the  S.W.  corner of the
claim about three miles north of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L.  613; thence
north   80   chains;   thence   east   8f
chains;   thence   south   80   chains,
thence west 80 chains, and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent,
134     18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6  (3).)
Notice  Of  Intention  To  Apply   For
Proipecting Licence,
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate on the west side of Alexander
Creek near the confluence of Alexander and Michel Creeks, which is
about six miles south-east of Michel,
B C
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli-
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd.; of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for u prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands;—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the N.E. corner of the
claim, about three miles south of the
S.W. corner of S.T.L. 613; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, and containing
640 acrea, more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1026.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent,
135    10-24
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie. of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the N.E. coraer of the
claim about one mile north of the
N.E. corner of L 8618; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains
thence north 80 chains; themv east
80 chains, and containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated the 17th duy of June, 1020.
I). 0. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
139    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate neur the Forks of the Alexander Creek un the east side yf tiie
main creek about eight miles north
of the confluence of Alexander and
Michel Creeks which is about six
miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends' to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phospnate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  G   (3).)
Of   Intention  To   Apply   For
Prospecting   Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate three miles north of the Fork:
of Alexander Creek nnd intersected
by the main creek, ubout eleven miles
north of the confluence of Alexiiuderl
und Michel ('reeks which is nbuut six
miles soulb-eust of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining ami Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donuld Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimherley, B.C., hy occupation u
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for u prospecting licenci under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:-—
Commencing ut it stake or post
placed at the S.W. corner of the
claim, ubout three miles north of the
N.E. corner of L8518; thence north
60 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 60 chains; thence west
80 chains, ami containing 480 acres,
more or less.
Dated *the 1 Tth dnv of June,  1026.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
146    18-24
miles north of the cnnflw kc of Alexander and Michel CreekK which is
about six miles south-east of Michel.
B.C.
TAKE NOTICE thut The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Caruidu, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing ut a stuke or post
pluced ut the S.E. corner of the
claim about 1000 feet west of the
N.E. corner of L 8521; thence north
80 chuins; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east '
80 chnins, und containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th dnv of June, 1920.
U. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of npplicant or ugent.
150    18-24
In Fori Steele Mining Division, and
ituate one mile north of the Forks
of Alexander Creek on the east side
of the main creek about nine miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
und Michel Creeks which is nbout
.\  miles  South-east of Michel,  B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd.. of Kimherley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKechnle, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Alining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phospnnte-Minlng Act" over the
following described lunds:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.W. corner of the
claim about one mile north of the
N.E. comer of L8618; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chuins;
thence south 80 chnins; thence west
80 chains, und containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June,  1020.
1). C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
142    18-24
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section   fi   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fori Steele Mining Division, and
situate two miles north .of the Forks
of Alexander Creek on the eust side
of the west brunch ubout ten miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
and Michel Cricks which is about six
miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Mining tic Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation u Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
ugent, Donuld Cowan McKeehnie. of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for u prospecting licence under the
"Phospnate-Minlng   Act'"
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 5  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate four miles north of the Forks
of Alexander Creek one hulf mile
west of the main brunch und nbout
twelve miles north of the confluence
of Alexander und Michel Creeks
which is about six miles south-east
of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli-
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining und Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
ugent, Donuld Cowan McKechnle, oi
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation u
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for u prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stuke or post
placed ut the S.E. corner of the
claim ubout three nnd three-quarter
miles north of the N.E. corner of
L 8fi IS; thence north 80 chuins
thence west. 80 chuins; thence south
80 chuins; thence east 80 chains, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1026.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
147    18-24
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For 1
Prospecting   Licence.
Iu Fort Steele Mining Division, and |
situate two   miles north-west  of the
forks of Alexander Crook on the west
ihle  of  the  west  branch   about   ten |
miles north of tlm confluence of Alexander aud   Michel  Creeks  which  is |
about six miles southeast of Michel,
B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli- '
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kiniberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
ugent, Donald Cownn McKeehnie, of j
Kimberley,   B.C.,   by   occupation   a
Mining   Engineer,   intends  to  upply
for a prospecting licence under the -
'Phosphate-Mining   Act"   over   the '
following described Innds:—
Commencing nt a stake or post !
placrd at the N.E. corner of the J
claim ubout 800 feet south of the ]
N.W. corner of L 6443; thence south j
80 chuins; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east^
80 chains, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June, 1926,
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent,
lfi]    18-24
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  fi   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
ollowing described lands:—
Commencing ul a stuke or post
placed at the N.E. corner of the
claim about three miles north of the
N.E. corner of L 8518; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains.
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, and containing 040 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June, 1926.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent.
143    18-24
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate four miles north of the Forks
of Alexander Creek und intersected
by the main creek, about twelve miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
 _ and  Michel Creeks, which is about
over   trie {six miles south-east of Michel, B.C,
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(S*»tion 5  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting  Licence.
Iu Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate two miles north nf the Forks
of Alexander Creek, and intersected
by the main creek about ten miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
and Michel Creeks which is ubout
six miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli-
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKechnle, of
Kimherley, B.C., by occupation
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phospnate-Minlng Act" over the
following described Innds:—
Commencing at a stuke or post
placed nt the N.W. corner uf the
claim about three miles north of
N.E. corner of L 8fil8; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 ehains;
thonco north KO chains; thence west
80 chains, aud containing 640 ucres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th dav of June, 1020.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of npplicant or ugent.
1-14     18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section fi  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate three miles north of the Forks
of Alexunder creek on the east side
of the west branch nbout eleven miles
north of the confluence of Alexander
und Michel Creeks which is ubout six
miles south-eust of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoll-
__ _, dated Mining & Smelting Company
Commencing at  a stake or  post'of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
placed at the N.W. corner of the by occupation a Mining and Smelting
claim about one mile north of thc Company by their duly authorized
N.E, corner of L 8618; thence south UM'iit, Donald Cowan McKechnle, of
TAKE NOTICE that The Consoli
dated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.
by occupation a Mining und Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donuld Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
ePhosphnte-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.W. corner of the
claim, nbout three and three-quarter
miles north of the N.E, corner of
L 8518; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains, and
containing 640 ucres more or less,
Dated the 17th duy of June, 1920
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or ugent
148    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section fi  <3).)
Nolle*  Of  Intention  To  Apply   For
Prospecting Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, nud
situate neur the Forks of Alexunder
Creek, one-half mile west of the west
branch, about eight miles north of
the confluence of Alexander ami
Michel Creeks, which Is about six
miles south-eust nf Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICK that Tbe Consoli
dated Mining & Smelting Company
uf Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, II.C
by occupation a Mining nud Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation n
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over tin
following described lunds:—
Commencing at a stake or post
pluced ut the N.E. corner of the
claim about 1000 feet west of the
N.E. corner of L 8521; theme south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north HO chains; thence east
80 chains, und containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th duy of June, 1026.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent
140    18-24
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section 6  (3).)
Notice Of Intention To Apply  For
Prospecting Licence,
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate one mile north-west of the
forks of Alexander Creek on the wi
chains;  thence east 80  chains; Kimberley,   B.C., 'by   occupation  a aUo of ttt west branch about also
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  fi  (3).)
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section fi  (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   F01J
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and]
situate three miles north-west of the I
forks'of Alexunder Creek on the west I
side of the west brunch ubout eleven!
miles north of the confluence of 1
Alexander and Michel Creeks which]
is about six miles south-eust of I
Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE thnt The Consoli-<
duted Mining & Smelting Company!
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,|
by occupation a Mining and Smelting!
Company by their duly authorized I
agent, Donald Cowan McKeehnie, of J
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a]
Mining Engineer, intends to apply I
for a prospecting licence under the|
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the]
following described lunds:—
Commencing nt a stake or post]
placed at the S.E. corner of tho]
claim ubout 800 feet south of thel
N. \\. corner of I, 6443; thence north I
60 chuins; thence west 80 chains;!
thinee south 60 chnins; thence east I
80 chains, and containing 480 acres,]
more or less. r
Dated the 17th dny of June, 1020. j
D. C. McKECHNIE.    '
Signature of applicant or ugent.1
152    18-24 '
Province of British  Columbia
PHOSPHATE-MINING ACT
(Section  5   (3).)
Notice   Of   Intention   To   Apply   Fori
Prospecting  Licence.
In Fort Steele Mining Division, and 1
situate at the head of the first south I
fork of Crave Creek and near the |
head of the west brunch of Alexander Creek, about twelve miles north j
of the confluence of Alexander and j
Michel Creeks which is about six ]
miles south-east of Michel, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE thnt The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company '
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C., I
by occupation a Mining and Smelting
Company  by their duly authorized
ogent, Donald Cownn McKechnle, of j
Kimherley,   B.C.,   by   occupation   a
Mining Engineer,  intends to  apply
for n prospecting licence under the 1
"Phosphate-Mining   Act"   over   the [
following described lands:—
Commencing ut n slake or post '
placed at the N.E. coiner of the
claim nbout 2000 feet S.E. of the
N.W. corner of L 6781; thence south
47 chains; thence west 80 chains; I
thence north 47 chains; thence i-Hst
80 chains, and containing 376 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1026.
1). 0. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or agent
IBS    1824
Province of British Columbia
PHOSPHATE MINING ACT
(Section fi (3).i
Notire
Of   Intention   To   Apply   lo
Prospecting  Licence.
in Fort Steele Mining Division, and
situate one-half mile south of Grave
Creek, and Interaected by the first
south folk of the above creek, and
about five miles oust of the confluence of Grave Creek and the Elk
River.
TAKE NOTICE thut The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company
of Canada, Ltd., of Kimberley, B.C.,
by occupation u Mining and Smelting
Company by their duly authorized
agent, Donuld Cowan McKeehnie, of
Kimberley, B.C., by occupation a
Mining Engineer, intends to apply
for a prospecting licence under the
"Phosphate-Mining Act" over the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a stake or post
placed at the S.E. corner of the
claim about 2000 feet P.E. of the
N.W. corner of I. 0781; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chnins, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated the 17th day of June, 1920.
D. C. McKECHNIE.
Signature of applicant or amnt
164   18-14 ^ PAOB SEVEN
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
Thursday, July 15th, 1921
A LIBRARY OF
CANADIAN AUTHORS
NOW BEING ISSUED
Series of Twenty-Five Volumes Will Embody Cream
oi National Literature
(By B. G. Hamilton, lnvermere)
A re-print of the last and revised
edition of Reverend Professor George
M. Grant's "Ocean to Ocean" has
recently been published by the Radis-
son Society of Canada, Limited, Toronto, of which John W. Garvin, B.A.,
is president and editor. This is volume number thirteen of a series, of
twenty-five, entitled "Master Works
of Canadian Authors," which series
that society is publishing. The particular specimen to hand is one of
the cheapest of the four they ure publishing, and is known aa the Library
edition, one hundred dollars being
the price for the complete set
The letterpress qf this volume
and ita generul make-up say u lot for
the character of it and the more expensive editions. The paper used is
good and the type both large and
clear.
Recalling tho Early Days
The purpose of the society is to
reproduce some of the outstanding
works of Canadian writers which
deal with early days in what are now
the eastern and western provinces of
Canada, and of some of the works of
those who have written poetry.
Many of these works are books from
which one often hears—quotations-
yet they are now too rare and costly
for the average book lover to obtain
for his reference shelves. Amongst
the better known of those to be reprinted are the travels of Henry
Alexander MaeKenzie, Paul Kane's
"Wanderings of an Artist Amongst
the Indians of North America" and
Grant's "Ocean to Ocean."
This latter work was first published in 1873, after Grant, while still a
young outstanding Presbyterian minister at Halifax, had, in company
as a friend and secretary of Sanford
Fleming, chief engineer for the
trans-continental railway, which afterwards became the Canadian Pacific, made the wonderful trip from the
maritime city on the Atlantic to a
port of call on the Pacific Ocean.
It is an intimate and personal .diary
of the summer of 1872 beautifully
and coincisely written by one who
waa able and could weigh well the
art of portraying in the words of the
English language.
A  Tran»contincrrtaI  Trip
Thc trip really begun at Colling-
wood. Ontario, then the entry port
for the great little-known west, und
took ils way through Prince Arthur's
Landing, followed the old Dawson
route to the Luke of the Woods und
on to Fort (lurry; ihence over the
plains to Fort Carlton to Fort Edmonton, pust Tete Jeuno Cache, down
the Thompson River to Fort Kamloops, thence nlong the Fraser River
to the Pacific Ocean. In addition to
briefly relating the writer's experiences, it expresses his thoughts in regard to the future possibilities of the
great West. Covering such un extent of territory us he did, it gnve an
observant man like Grant a wonderful opportunity to portray the country and its future possibilities. This
lie did with great vigor. Coming
from the press when the Dominion of
Canada was just in the first stages
of its fusion, at a time when there
was but little cohesion between the
older provinces and the far distant
ono of British Columbia, the book's
Irculation must have hud a strong
influence on the electorate, uml
through them on the government of
llio Dominion, in placing before them
the great possibilities of this terra
incognita, ll also must have bad an
influence iu strengthening the hands
of   those   who   were   holding   up   the
weak baby which afterwards became
the   C.P.R.
An Introduction to the present edition of the book bus been written
by the author's onlv surviving child,
William L. Grant, M.A., L.L.D.. who,
in it, rightly dwells on thc forensic
powers of bis notable futher.
An Able Work
To one who hus reud such books
of western Canadian travel as Milton and Cheadle's "North West Passage by Land" and Sir Frederic Butler's "Greal Lone Land," "Ocean to
Ocean" presents a delightful and refreshing review, nnd aptly bridges a
period between the times they cover
and the publications of n later period.
It covers thut time which is rarely
dealt with, between Wolsley's expedition of 1869 and the march of the
veterans to the front in 1885, but
goes west of thut again.
To those who belong to a generation of thirty yenrs curlier than the
present, the book will huve -i most
abiding interest. Great credit is due
to the society who have gone to the
expense of publishing it, and the
hope is felt that it may prove a financial success us well us reviving
one of the features which worked
for confederation.
To the dwellers around Port Ar
thur it will bring to vision a vivid
picture of how the place looked in
1872, then a hamlet known as Prince
Arthur's  Landing.
To the dwellers in the town of
ColltngWOod) the earlier chapters will
especially uppeul, for a graphic description is given of the embarking
on the S. S. Frances Smith, later
known us the S. S. Baltic, and how a
well known townsman, Captain Alex
Clarke, bravely plunged into the harbor and saved from drowning a stevedore who had tumbled off the wharf.
Captain Clarke earns a good mead of
praise, not only for his rescue, but
also for his modesty. A mention is
made of the Blue Mountains in the
distunce. The whole book teems with
admiration of Sanford Fleming, who
was afterwards knighted. He, of
course, is of especial interest to Cob
lingwood, for one of his brothers
lived there und one not far away, at
Cruigleith. Later, into the book is
introduced Mr. Walter Moberly, the
Greut Western engineer in charge of
construction of the railwuy, who incidentally hud three brothers nt different periods important as citizens
of Collittgwood. Then, too, on the
journey from Prince Arthur's Landing, westward through the chains of
lukes  in   the   hinterland,   mention  is
fide of the ii.m- of boats to cross the
lakes, which, if memory does not fail,
were in earlier years made at Col-
lingwood hy the late Patrick Dougherty and William Watts, names still
well  known.
One  Thing Lacking
The book is u large one, and for
thut reason many may think nothing
more should be placed within its covers, but it would seem if its interest
might have been increased and its
utility broadened, its outstanding
characters made more real, if the
editors of this edition had made footnotes identifying more of the persons mentioned and the places described. This personal touch is a
feature which the older Grant strenuously avoided. Take for instance his
constant reference to "the botanist"
who accompanied the party. A casual
reader would never identify this
young person us being none other
than John Macoun (later Professor),
who early in middle life became
known throughout the world ns one
of the greatest authorities on plant
life in Canada.
To thc dwellers in East Kootenay
one number, XIV,. will be of abiding
interest, being none other than "Te-
cumseh, a Drama, and Other Poems"
by the veteran poet, author and ra-
cantouer, Charles Mair, who for
marly years has at intervals made
Fort Steele and other parts of British Columbia his home.
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CRANBROOK   .   B.C.
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PHONE 88
CRANBROOK,  B.C.
Wf*f.\f.fffffffff
We have told you about Concrete — now we want to
ray SHINOl.ES, and as it looks like rain this morning we
thought a word about shingles would be icnnd advice.
Although there are two kinds of people who won't take
advice, we know them both. If interested ask us. We have
jusl unloaded a car of XXX B.C. SHINGLES, and arc ready
to supply your orders on short notice — so put out your
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PHONE 101
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,   Luke.
to Cranbrook nn Saturday to attend i 	
tlie circus. Reports as to-the fluent ] Mr. J. Barrard, barn boss for the
of the circus wore mainly thnt the c. n. p. Lumber Company, left on
various acta were poor, with the ex- Saturday evening for Sinclair Hot
cept'on of the animals, whlcn were |.|ng8| wh,,ri. |„. wiu s|„,„(i th„ „ext
sold to tie much better tiuui the usual   ,W(( woe){B<
line, anil splendidly  trained. 	
— I    Barry*and Sam Thompson and Miss
Mr. and Mrs.  11.  W.   Birch   and GraCe faylor motored to Radium and
daughter MOry  returned  on  Sundny   Sinclair Hot Springs on Sunday, ae-
,,„u a!"-"*8 use'
*kad m
bu<PaC' ^
U'
CREAMfRV
_ BUTTER
A - MT - A   - tim«    /    f*S   - RCPUIREO
niMiininiiiiiiuni
♦*++e*********************
WARDNER    I
NOTES j
*******
The big diy helJ by :he Farmers'
Institute of iatfray j.roved very attractive to a milliner of Warlno:i'i?»,
who motored down for the p. mih-
and dance whien eu minated the affair, rite Institute hold a vory successful affair, with a good line of j
races and other sports. It was staged
at a very pleasant place, the "Forks,"
where Big and Little Sand Creeks
meet. Boo'hs were very conveniently
placed anl manned hy witling sfttu-
people, iH helping towards the enjoyment of thc occasion. Following
the sports a-i.l picne tie large numher present adjourned *o the new hall
at Jaffray, whore .■ dance was soon in I
progress, .he muidc being furnwtied
by Messrs. OsC'tr -icinun, sr. Mid]
Geo. Umrean, of Wardner, and Cist
Johnson, t-f .f affray. Among thoee
motoring dow 1 from rt'nrdner for lhe
dny were Mr? and M'.a. Cust J. John-
n mid family. Vi\ and Mrs. Tory
Rosicky and family, '«!■:« Sophie Mader, Miss Astrid Job .on. Miss Dfigi.e
Nordmark, Me.*.,.'j Jnck Dow, Ft n
Kmbree, Wm. KI15, Chu, Barnes, j; .
Geo. Umrean and Otcar Helman, v.
A new trade ii' local cars to.'k
place on Sunday, whi n Chas. Barnes,
Jr., traded otf b;s (old touring car
to F. Creelman, in exchange for the
latter's Ford "I ug. loth participants at-.' reported to be quite satisfied over the ileal, although Charlie
and the "bug" are said to be rather
a tight fit.
1. Martinos spent the week-end on
fishing trip to  Premier Lake,  returning with a good catch.
Mr. nnd Mrs. Ben Daye and family,
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Daye, Rollie and
George Thompson spent Sunday on a
picnic and fishing trip at Mi Bain's
I.nie.
Mr. Bob Harrison has been on the
sick list during the past week, motoring tp Crnnbrook on Saturday even*
ing to obtain medical advice.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Wynn and
daughters left on Thurj lay for Saskatoon, where they will spend the
next two weeks visiting relatives
Mr. and Mrs. Chas Howell, of the
Valley, spent Sunday iu town visiting
friends.
The membeis of the Wardner Athletic Club began a new tournament
on Monday evening, playing thc old-
fashioned hut ever popular "horseshoes." Shoes have been prepared
Bnd the spikes placed, hy thc church,
by the club official-i, and a hug- number turned out fa1 the games on Monday.
The government bridge crew is at
work this week, nailing d iwn again
the loose planks on the bridge, which
huve been bothering motorists during
the pust couple of months, nails
sticking up a couple of inches above
the boards spelling ruin to tires.
Miss Margaret Leard was admitted
to the St. Eugene Hospital, Cranbrook on Saturday evening. On Monday Miss Leard underwent an operation for appendicitis.
Mrs. Wm. Holton and daughter
Maurine, left on Saturday* evening
for Waldo, where they will spend
the next week at the camp of Mrs.
Helton's sister, Mrs. Harry Nash,
along the Klk River.
Mrs. Carl Lovick, of Llbby, Mont,
nnd Miss Mabel Embree, of Creston,
both of whom are making prolonged
visits with friends in Wardner, returned on Saturday last, after spend-
iiitr the past few days in Bull River
as the guests of Mrs. Howard Haney.
Mr. and Mrs. Clark MacKenxte and
family, Arthur Welsford. Mr. and
Mn. Wm. Creep and family autwrnl
evening from a two weeks motot
tour through the Salmon Arm district.
On the return journey they were ac
cciipanied by Miss Ireno Birch, who
has been attending school in Salmon
Arm.
Kost Babick, of Waldo, motored to
town un Sundny to spend the day
here visiting his brother.
Mrs. Tony Thompson and children
left on Tuesday evening for Waldo,
where they will join a party of friend*
on a couple of weeks camping trip
along thc Klk River.
George Killam is a patient in she
St. Eugene Hospital, Crunbrook, having been admitted to thut institution
on   Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Wynn** nud
daughters Phyllis und Gwi-nneth, l< fl
on Thurday evening's train for Saskatoon, wliere they will visit friends
and relatives for u few weeks.
Mr. and Mrs. Chns llumrin and Mi
nnd Mrs. K. Thompson motored lo
McBain's Luke on Thursday evening
for a few hours' visit at the Peppier
cottage,
Fred Babick was u business visitor
in * Crnnbrook between trains on
Thursdny last.
Juck Dow left on Tuesday last for
Lumberton where he has taken work
at the sawmill.
The first alfalfa crop of the season
it, being cut this week at the Haney
ranch. Mr. Haney reports nn exceptionally heavy crop and of a quality far superior to that of former
years. It is expected that two' crops
will be taken during the summer.
Several big fish have been tnlttn
out of Lund's Lake tbis week by local
anglers, J. Martinos had a seven
and three-quarter pound salmon to h's
credit on Wednesday even in?, ffiliHe
Olaf Wold caught one weighing six
and three-quarter pounds on Thurs
day. Mr. Martinos also took a couple .
on Thursdny evening which weighed '
heavy.
The busketball Teams of the ladies*
club have changed their hours of
practice on Thursday evening to
sevtn thirty p.m., it having been decided that the evening being much
cooler at that hour, the weekly practices may be carried nn through the
summer. Several membe's of the"
teams being absent on vacation, fow
turned out for practice Thursday
evening last, but as these ladies will
mostly return this week tnd, it is
hoped that everyone will he on lhe
field for next Thursday. Incidental
ly the Wardner Indies' teum are out
to receive challenges from any other
basketball team in the district,
Harry and Sam Thompson motored
to Cranbrook on Wednesday evening,
to allow a few minor repairs to he
made on their car at the Hanson garage.
We are told that Wardner wos
quite honored on Thur«dn> night, hy
the passing through of the fastest express in Canada, the Transcontinental
Limited. Perhaps we would have
felt this honor keener if the express
had tnken US along on its journey to
the Coast, when it was obliged to pass
over this section owing to a big slldfl
on the main  line at Revelstoke.
George Killam returned to Ward
ner Sunduy evening, after being u
patient at the St. Eugene Hospital
for several dnys, owing to sickness
brought on by the extreme bent of
the last two weeks.
Ole Helman returned home on Sunday evening, after spending the past
two weeks camping with n pnrty of
Waldo friends at McBnins Lake.
Gun. Umrean is staging a dance at
the outdoor pavilion ut Peckham's
Lake on Wednesday evening next, 1
July 14th. Mr. Umrean plans on j
leaving at tbe end of the week for
Calgary, where he has a position ir.
one of the theatre orchestras, playing
violin.
Miss Thoru Muir, of Waldo, is
spending a few weeks in Wardner,
visiting Miss  Vera Renstrom.
Mr. nnd Mrs. Rossean, of Fernie,
motored to Wnrdner on Sunday to
spend the dny visiting the'- daughter,   Mrs.   Hermu'i   Renstrom.
companying
friends.
party    of   Cranbrook
Mr, and Mrs. Gust. J. Johnson and
Jamfly motored to Bull River on
Monday evening for a few hours visit.
Ben Hargreaves is suffering a
Bprained ankle this week, the result
of a mis-step, in which he twisted his
ankle. The sprain is fortunately
not of serious proportions.
NEW TOURIST CAMP
BEING OPENED SOUTH
OF WINDERMERE
(Special to The Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., July 10th—Windermere is ngain this yeur enjoying
t he heyday of prosperity. Mr.
Lloyd Tegart is erecting a new residence neur his garage. The Dominion
Government Experimental Station
Is Increasing Its activities, and much
ground that has not been turned up
for years is again under crop.
PoBslbly though the more important work in thc development of the
tourist industry, is being curried on
for Mr Byron Harmon, the great
business man of Banff. Severul yeurs
ago Mr. Harmon acquired a most attractive piece of property overlooking the lake and contiguous to the
mouth of Windermere Creek. He
has been perfecting his pluns for developing this and in 11120 started in.
He has a number of workmen on the
property under the direction of his
brother and they are mnking it into
a beauty spot with entrancing walks,
cool retreats, shady bowers, summer
bungalows, dancing and ice cream
pavilion, service station and a delightful summer residence for the
host. All these will be surrounded
before the hour of opening with the
attractions which go to add to the
liistie   and   comfort  of   a   summer
When ijsingX
WILSONS  \
FLY PADS
>jK,  RCAD   DIRECTIONS
, ^Sf *      CAPEfUUY  AND/
. '--,.  FOLLOW THEM/,
There is
only one
I way to kill
ill the Flies
This 18 it—Darken the room as macb *a passible, close th*
windows, raise one of the bt%nds where the sun shines in, about
eight inches, place as many Wilson's Fly Pads as possible on
plates (properly wetted with water but not Booted) on tbe
window ledge where the light is strong, leave the room closed
for two or three hours, then sweep up tbe flies and burn them.
See illustration below.
Put the plates away out ot tht reach of children until required in another room.
The right
way to use
Wilsons
Fly Pads
hns   to   belgard to the land
of   the   immense   even   were  their
W. R. WILSON RESIGNS
AS GENERAL MANAGER
OF C.N.P. COAL CO.
Ai thc amy ml meeting of the
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., held in
Pernie last Friday, Mr. W. It. Wilson,
fuv many years general manager of
(he company, resigned, ami his son,
H. P, Wilson, was appointed to the
position.
Mr. W, K. Wilson, who was again
elected to tbe presidency of the com
settlement, not a'the
for a farm can \ u
land. pr,
bo-
laiul
ivould hi
price in
Uie Inv
paralyj
•is completed,
be sold at an
i- to return a
**********-******************* ************ * ***********
LAND SETTLEMENT IN EAST KOOTENAY
++ty+*****M+**.****************************j,****4**i*
Enquiries are being made for land the accumulation of taxes and costs
on which British born settlers may be of maintenance, have now brought
placed   in   Knst   Kootenay;   but  the about the unfortunate position in re-
humiliating   confession   has   to   began! to the  lunds in question, that
made  that  in  spit
acreage   open   for
ingle site suitabl
be found on puhli
In the Interests of thoso wh
lieve that there is an urgent need for in that.'
increasing our population, it [fl well cised, u
to examine the question in de- existing
tail. Outwardly no more Inviting solution
lands could be imagined than the be accoi
park-like   benches of the  Kootenay terprise,
und Columbia Valleys. Tha clearing; whether public funds can be suitably
Inquired is slight, the climate perfect, devoted to this purpose. Failure of
means of transportation in all ways such enterprises as those described
ximity of towns, above, entail such legal complications
und camps offers good mar- and hardships to those wbo have set-
f employment and,tied on a project, involving the titles
tnal- and water rights, that it
difficulty arises
he water rights if not exer-
lay be cancelled under the
laws. It i- evident that no
of the difficulty is likely to
nplished through private en-
The question arises as to
efficient, and the
mines
kets and sourc
financial returns not available to the
prairie farmer. But the number of lis plainly in tbe public interest that
persons engaged in agriculture Is main canals should be government
negligible; for Instance, from Wasa owned. If anything is to be done
to Canal Flats, almost 50 miles, they through government agency it must
take an active inter- can 1,e "umbered on the fingwa ofjbe effective and carry with it the
one hand. The principal reason for'germs of success. Agriculture, in
thi.s lack of development is the dry- j common with other forms of indus-
nfiss of the climate. Irrigation is(try, has developed on the lines of
essential. Considering the vast sup-. mass production,
plies of wuter released by snow in
the mountains, und carried by
streams at altitudes well above the
lunds thnt require to be irrigated, it
would nt first sight appear an easy
The  coal mined during the year | matter t(( d,vert water for thf
pany. will still
est in the affairs of the company,
ind it Is understood it is still his Intention to make Fernie his home.
Mr, Hartley Wilson, who has been
connected with the company for a
long time as engineer und acting
manager, is to be congratulated upon
his appointment.
amounted to 879,951 tons 1415
pounds, us against 275,329 tons 500
pounds in 1924, and the coko produced wus 84,207 tons 1700 pounds, as
against 30.G15 tons in 1924.
LIQUOR BUSINESS
IN B.C. SHOWS NO
SIGN OF DECLINE
purpose. Whereas a river will flow with
a strong current on a grade of a
few inches to the mile, small ditches
Victoria,—Figures   issued  by  the
turns from the north.
For the Kootenay settler to have
a chance of success he must deal in
the commercial unit of the car-load
lot. Isolated farms and slovenly
hand to mouth methods of cultivation
are passing into limbo. Co-operation
is therefore essential to success.
An irrigation scheme on progres-
require a fall of several yards. The Live lines would have advantages over
flatness of the  terrain, and the  dis- L • „, ■    .        ,      ,
, .. .,,       1 private projects.    In  tne matter of
tance separating the streams, will not j .
give the grade required, and neces-; MCarin* "-tiers, the government can
sitnte thut water be diverted on a|sPeak with authority and can give
fairly large scale. A further difficul--the needful assurances. The price of
ty arises if more than an isolated plot [land could be very moderate, because
is  to   be served,   the  space   occupied! ,u„ „    ,    / • __.     . , .,
...  ,h    a, u .i. .    the cwt f,i >rng»ting any of the sev-
by  the  ditches as they  converge   to
erg*
.the common intake, must cause un-
finance department show the British U|nk,ble damage and confusion.
('(iliiinliia liquor business is growing
fast. The year ending March .11, | Before the war, Irrigation projects
last, showed a profit of 11,780,668. *»" "'""'''I »• different points.
At the same rate, the year ending Fruit growing was then the most at-
Soptember, next, will show profits,tractive form of agriculture. A high
of $600,000 more than any year yet. j I"'"' for ■ smal1 »en»»ge was region-
, ...        ably to be expected from each set-
Figures showing the total   iquor U       E    rien(,e hal show„ th„ ,,,„
'"""""' ' "'" no1 ""no""™', bu'ltrue destiny of East Kootenay lies in
mixed farming.    For this latter purpose, a larger uren must he allotted
Without   considering   the   United'to the settler, while the less intensive
States tourists, the people of British j nature of the crop precludes other
heing asked
on liquor. jfor the land.    The dearth of settlers,
Mr. und Mrs. Fred Harris, Mr. and
S31 SS! Xe'&\^a^c' - ■•■ >» ««*""""»"."'»" ■ '•■■■"■ ■•
spent Sunday picnicing at Peckham,
ral available areas would not exceed $30 an acre. This low price
would appeal to that class of settler
who cannot contemplate the high-
priced land offered in other government irrigated tracts. And this is
the class of rettler who is the most
likely to be of value to the country
in   the long run.
It [| by no means an impossible
contingency that in the end agriculture may prove a greater source of
wealth than all the other natural
resource." of F.oni Kootenay. PAQE E1QH1
THE  CRANBROOK  HERALD
Thursday, July 15th, 1926
Place your watch
in trusted hands
THERE is only one right way to clean a
watch—bathe, dry, polish and oil each
part separately. This involves taking the
movement completely   apart,   reassembling it, and regulating it accurately uver a period of days.   Ic takes an expert to do it.
Place your watch only in hands that you
ean trust. Our Gruen emblem assures you of
competent watch service nt our store.
EARLE LEIGH - THE GIFT SHOP
Watchmakor   and   Jeweler
•9
I7
MAR
LOCAL
The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. have staked 24 phosphate
claims on the Lizard range immediately west of Morrissey Junction.
Archie Farquharson, whose property
lies in that vicinity, is wearing a real
smile, as he suys he has all kinds of
phosphate on his ranch.—Fernie Free
Press.
The local Rotary Club expect to
visit the Cranbrook Club on Wednesday next. Alf. Cummings, delegate to tho International Convention
at Denver, will give bis report ot the
luncheon. The local club would like
to have all the members attend if
possible. Jim Whitehouse's orchestra
and quartette expect to go down with
the boys.—Fernie Free Press.
Mr. and Mrs. D. T. Diplock, of
Montreal, who have been visiting ut
the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. Potter,
left on Monday for Calgary and
Banff, where they intend visiting for
a short time before returning to the
east. At the United Church un Sunday evening, Mr. Diplock favored
with a sacred solo "The Lord Ib My
Light," which waa much appreciated I
by those present.
A letter to a friend in Kimberley
from Mrs. E. Marsden states that af-
Ur a delightful trip, enlivened by the
passing of several icebergs, she is in
England, where they ure having Kimberley July 1st weather—rain and
more of it—not very welcome in
June, the month of sports over there.
The attendance at a Handel festival
at the Crystal Palace recently was
among the pleasures enjoyed since
her arrival.
E. L. Semmens, of Vancouver, assistant industrial agent for the C.P.
R., with offices at Vnncouver, was in
the city on Thursday last for a short
time, in the course of one of his
tours through the territory his work
covers. He is much interested in
the development of this part of the
country, and keeps in close touch
with all undertakings from which or
to which there is likely to be freight
traffic growth in the future. He
keeps in close touch with boards of
trade and other bodies interested In
the development of particular localities, and thrjugii hia department
there is issued n hrtlc booklet periodically listing the bv>nt» opportunities that OCCUr :r. towns served by
the C.P.R. in western Canada.
Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Philp,
of Hamilton, Ontario, are spending
the summer months at Baynes Lake
with thoir son-in-law nnd daughter,
Mr. und Mrs. Fred W. Adolph. Dr.
Philp is tho chaplain of three Hamilton hospitals for the United Church
of Canada, Ho supplied the Presbyterian pulpit in Cranbrook for three
months in the winter of 1920 to 1921,
Preparations are now going ahead
for the big Kiks' Carnival, to take
place the last three days of this
month, July 29, U0 und 81. This is
being held in aid of the Elks' Community Flag Duy picnic for the kiddies of Cranbrook nnd district, which
will take pluce on August 4th, as
usual. For this carnival the Elks
huve arranged some unique events,
and undoubtedly it will be one of the
events of the summer.
A McLaughlin runabout went off
the rood between Wasa and Fort
Steele on Sundny lust, tin- edge of
tho road seeming to give way while
unother cur was passing. Attempts
to pull the car back on the road resulted in it going farther over the
soft bank, and finally the way was
cleared for it to go down eight or
ten feet on to firmer ground, from
whence it wos able to get up to the
road following an old track for some
distance.
According to the notice published
in this issue, the wuter users in the
eity ore urged to be moderate in the
use of water at the present time, particularly as regards the lawn services. The long dry spell has had
its effect upon the supplies in Gold
Creek and St. Joseph Creek, and the
reservoir level has dropped considerably in the past few days, so that
there is no water at present going
over the spill-way. Cranbrook is
fortunate in this respect, us compared
with other places, close restrictions
having already been imposed in some
cities and towns.
CONSERVATIVE MEETING
A meeting of the Cranbrook, Men's
Conservative Association will be held
In the K.P. Hall, Cranbrook, B.C.,
on Monday, July 19th, at 8 p.m., to
elect delegates to the Conservative
convention. All Conservatives are
requested to be in attendance.       25
Insure with Beale k ElwelL        *
J. Hollinger, of Yahk, was in the
city on   Tuesday.
Mr. W. A. Wilson, who for some
time has been in Winnipeg, returned
to the city on Tuesday.
Mr. T. Cox, of Vancouver, is at
present replacing Mr. J. Mann, C.P.R,
constable here.
Mrs. Wilbur Hill and child left
on Wednesday to spend a short vacation  in  Vancouver.
Miss Connie Spence returned this
week from Fernie, where she had
a very enjoyable time visiting old
friends in that city.
For first class automobile repairs
sea Ratcliffe A Stewart. 33tf
Mrs. Hector McKenzie nd Mrs, J.
Stobo, sister of Mr. G. T. Moir, both
of Nelson, were in Cranbrook from
Sunday to Tuesday, coming over to
visit   Mrs.   Moir.
Mra. Hector McKenzie and Mrs. J.
pleasure of a visit from her sister,
Miss N. Millington, of Spokane, who
is spending her summer holidays in
the city,
THEODORE    PADBERG,    piano I
tuner,  player  expert.    Phone  602. [
31-tf.
The fall fair business is getting 1
well under way, and it is anticipated
that the next meetings will be busy)
ones in preparation for the big event, which takes place^ on the 16th
and 17th of September. *•$$
B. A. Moorhouse returned to the]
city the end of last week, and is undertaking some surveyiri!p»fn this vi-1
cinity for some weeks. Mr. and Mrs. I
Moorhouse are now residents at Vic- j
toria,
For prompt repairs and satisfao-j
tlon go to Ratcliffe *% Stewart's garage. 20tf I
Miss Norine Boyce, now of Spo-j!
kane, but formerly of Cranbrook,
arrived on Tuesday evening to spend
her vacation with her aunt, Mrs. E.
Williams. Miss Boyce is in attendance at a business college in the |
hub city.
After a protracted illness at thel
St. Eugene Hospital, Mrs. G. T. Moir
returned to her home on Wednesday
afternoon very much improved in
health. The many friends of Mrs.
Moir und her family will be pleased j
to learn of this good news.
For the latest magazines and pa- j
pers csll at the Rex Cafe, near depot, i
at
Bob Dixon haa in course of erec-1
tion an attractive bungalow on Edwards Street, next to the residence
of Mr. Art. Ham. Mr. Dixon is I
building it for sale, and doubtless,
from its location and design, he will
have no difficulty in disposing of it.
Special prices on new Batteries at
Service Garage.   Phone 34 ltf |
Another automobile case, arising jj
out of an accident at Ta-Ta Creek
was heard in the court here last
week-end, when Dr, L. H. Myers, of!
Seattle, was charged with driving to
the common danger, the Information
being laid by Mr. Jensen, of Ta-Ta
Creek. The evidence in the case was
conflicting, the prosecution bringing
evidence to the effect that the Jensen
car was standing still, while the defence witnesses testified that both
cars were in motion when the accident happened. After a trial of considerable length, the case was dis-|
missed.
Mrs. Peter Farreli and family are
spending n holiday at Mr. Fur roll's
camp between Wasa and Skookumchuck.
Dr. L. Montgomery, of Montreal,
brother of E. G. Montgomery, was
a visitor to Kimberley last week, on
his return from the caoast, where he
was in attendance at the medeicul
convention at Vancouver.
Ask
Cream
cream.
for   Big   Butte   Dairy
— Cranbrook's    velvet
Ice
lGtf,
G. W. Russell, of the Dominion
Express Company staff, is at present
at Nelson, whero he is assisting in
the fruit transportation there. H. M.
Kirkland, of this city, is taking his
place  on  the  rounds.
The annual picnic cf the Baptist
Sunday School look place on Wednesday afternoon of this week at
Green Bay, when it perfect dny favored the outing, which was attended Ask
by a Inrgo crowd of those connected ('ream
with the Sundny School, and friends. I creuiu.
Martin  Broi. Pay for Allies.      tf.
Mr, und Mrs. Archibald F. Muntor,
of Seattle, were visitors in the city
over the week-end,
Mr. Jnck McDonald and family,
who have been for some time in
Detroit, returned to Cranbrook this
week.
Constable Sharp, recently of Yahk,
has been transferred to Elko, and
Constable Davidson is now acting at
Yahk.
James Ewen und Robt. Ewen, employees of the Consolidated Mining
Co., were up before Magistrate Cope
on Monday nud Tuesday charged with
an infraction of the Forestry Act in
connection with the big bush fire of
a couple of weeks ago. Seven witnesses for the prosecution were
heard, and the case adjourned until
next  Monday.—Fernie Free Press.
for    Big    Butte
Cranbrook's
Dairy   Ice
velvet    Ice
LOtf.
Specials for Friday and Saturday
PHONES   93   &   173
SOAP, Palm Olive,
15 burs for .... $1.00
Crushed    Pineapple,
Del    Monte,    small
size tin   ISc
JAM,   1926  Puck,
K.C.   Strawberry
A Ib tin 75c
Baking Powder,
Blue Ribbon
12 oz. tin  20c
CATSUP,
Heinz  Brand
Per bottle   35c
Dill Pickles, Libby's
Brand: 2% lb tins,
2 for   5Bc
Refugee Beans, packed like Afipar-
gus, size 2 tins: 2 tins 45c
Manning's Perfection Coffee,
fresh ground: per lb 	
Princess Soap Flakes: pkt	
Certo, for preserving: bottle.
25c
35r
MacLaren's
Pimento
Cheese,  just   in
tr ('renin: pkt. .
Campbell's Soups - Tomato, Vcge-
ublc,  Bean, Asparagus, Celery,
Consomme) 2 tins 35c
For Preserving —
Raspberries, crate    $3.38
Bin;; Cherries, crate ....    3.35
Black Currants, crate ..   3.35
Loganberries, crate ....    3.60
Apricots are expected on the
22ml,   price  around   $2.25 par
Crnle.    Owing to extreme heat
have your orders  early to secure the best fruit.
Yellow Transparent Applet,
2 lbs. for    :.... 25c
Rnrtlrtl Eating Pears, 2 lbs 35c
Pouches, 2 lbs.   35c
Cantaloupes, euch        25c
Apricots, basket - 75c
I'luim.   basket        $1.00
MANNING'S  LIMITED
.»********************>******************************
REFRIGERATORS
Of all Models of the best standard make refrigerators
on the market today arc offered at prices which will
interest all at this season o( the year. A kitchen is
incomplete without an economical ice-saving refrigerator.
—   10 Per Cent. Off All Sizes   —
DELANY & SINCLAIR
| PHONE 84 P. 0. BOX 49»
****************************************************•*'
WANT ADS.
BOOK-KEEPER-TYPIST — desires
position; experienced thoroughly
in general office routine. Phone
No. 383, or Box I.JJerald, Cranbrook. 19 tf. I
BIG   SALE   OF   WALL  PAPER-
Great   bargains.     Mist   be   sold!
quickly.   John Gard's Wall Paper
Store, Hanson Avenue. 211
CLEAN ROOMS TO RENT—by day I
or month.    Apply Mrs. C. Howard, |
Herald Building.
18tf.
RESTAURANT BUSINESS— Fori
Sale in Cranbrook, Good location.
For further particulars apply Box
'   W, Herald Offlce, 20-21*
FOR SALE—Piano, as good as new.
Mason and Risen. $360 cash. Enquire Box L, Cranbrook Heraldl
office. 2ltf
SEALERS
TOILET   SETS,   DRESSERS   AND
WASH  STANDS,   BUFFETS AND
DININC ROOM SUITES, SEWING
MACHINES,    WASHING    MACH
INES,   TABLES,   CHAIRS,  BROS,
BEDDING,    OIL    STOVES.    ELU
COOKER,   OIL   AND   GASOLINE
LAMPS.
Com* la aad look than e-rar,
WILLIAM THOMPSON
76 P.O. Boa IM
SeaeM Head Daalsr
awic
■RHMHIF** SALE
At the end of a season there are always odds and ends of
lines left over and which we are anxious to clear out before the arrival
of new goods.    This sale is for that purpose and we believe that every
person desirous of effecting savings on dependable goods will take advantage of it.
Just 2 Days - FRIDAY & SATUR., JULY18-17
We expect to do a week's business in those two days, if prices
and a desire to save are good partners - we are sure those two days
will be humdingers. Every department will contribute some specials
to this sale.
A large reduction lias been
made especially for this sale, in
WOMEN'S COATS, DRESSES
and KNITTED SUITS, but on account of our long established
policy of buying only one of a
style, we haven't space to itemize
every garment and you would prefer seeing the styles and exceptional bargains that are being offered. If you are here early you
will be able to select a garment
lhat will please you in style and
price.
WOMEN'S  DEPARTMENT
36 in. Galatea, blue, red and black stripe, 3 yards for .... $1.00
30 in. Rayon Silk, all new shades in stripes and plain,
3 yards for $1.25
3d in. Marqisette and Nels, white nnd cream,   S yards .... $1.95
36 In. Wash-well Chamhra. and Gingham, stripes, checks,
at per yard   45c
36 in. Heavy-weiglil Cotton Crepes, all shades, 4 yards .    75c
36 in. Cotton Georgette, all shades, worth reg. to $2.25,
at   Half Price
36 in. Fancy Crepes and Rayons, reg. $1.25, $2.00 and $2.25
at  95c, $1.65 and $1.85
36 in. Striped Broadcloth, reg. 75c,   at  55c
54 in. Plain, Striped and Checked Flannel, reg. $2.25. for   $1.65
36 in. Dress Linen, all shades 65c yard
One Lot Rayon aud Sateen Bloomers, reg. tn $1.75, at     $1.15
Voile Gowns, reg. $2.00, for   $1.45
One Lot Needle Work, at Half Price
One Lot Silk Hose, reg. lo $2.00 pair 2 pairs for $1.25
Ont Lot Lisle Hose, reg. lo $1.00   2 pairs 95c
Kiddles' Silk and Lisle Sox, reg. 35c 2 pair for 45c
reg. 65c and 75c for 45c pair
Children's Black, White and Brown
ribbed Stockings, 3 pair for $1.00
Women's and Children's White Canvas shoes   50c pair
One   Lot   Women's   Silk   Scarves,
nt   $1.95 each
One Lot Children's Straw and Cloth
Huts    35c each
Waists   and    Sweaters,
SPECIAL    SPECIAL    SPECIAL
See the Remnant Table
MEN'S   DEPARTMENT
also Is offering some specials worth ynur while seeing.
White Canvas Oxfords, reg. $3.50, at  $2.50
White Canvas Shoes, reg. 3.50, at $2.50
Brown Canvas Shoes, reg. $3.50, at   $2.65
Brown Canvas Shoes, Leather Trim, reg. $4.25. at $3.15
Basketball Shoes, reg. $3.75, ot $2.90
White and Brown Sneakers, reg. $2.00, at          $1.75
White Sneaker Oxfords, reg. $2.00. at    $1.65
One Table Black and Brown Leather Shoes — a real bargain
at   $3.65
Pull-over Sweaters—pure wool, light weight—just the thing
for summer use.    Very special $1.95
One Lot Men's Snappy Brim Hats, fancy bands,
reg. $4.50,   for $3.25
(>ne Rack Block and Brown Socks, reg. 50c and 75c,
at 3 pairs for      $1.00
ONE-THIRD OFF
ALL   STRAW   HATS
Men and Boys this is
the time to get a
thoroughly reliable suit
at a big reduction, no
special sale stuff, but
our    regular    stock.
Women's
al
Women's    and    Children's     Khaki
Blouses and lireeks, at half price
One Table Women's Shoes, odd lines,
at   half price
One Lot White and Colored Towels,
at   $1.00 pair
One Lot Women's Gloves at $1.00 pr.
One Loi Women's Corsets at $2 pr.    quarter off.
one.quarter off mos,ly Society P.rand.
Take your pick of any
man's or boy's suil al
one-fourth off.
All Men's and Boy's
Odd   Pants   at   one-
Now Is the opportune time to procure your requirements
in CROCKERY. One-fourth off everything in the CROCK-
FRY DEPARTMENT, such as DINNER SETS, TEA SETS,
BERRY SETS, CUPS and SAUCERS, BON-BONS, WATER
SETS, TEA POTS, SALT and PEPPER SHAKERS.
15 Per Cen. Discount on nny article in thc FURNITURE PEPARTMENT — excepting those specially priced.
Authorised
Agent,  for th*
famous   Hoover
Sweeper.
Plea.e the bride
-with a
HOOVER
CHARGES
PAID ON ALL
POSTAL
MAIL
ORDERS
Wa Buy. Sell ami Bictmi
No Refunds or Exchanges Allowed
 =■=
on Sale Goods.

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