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Cranbrook Herald Nov 12, 1925

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Array THE CRANBROOK HERALD
\S
VOLUME    2i
CRANBROOK, B.C., THURS DAY, NOVEA1BER 12th, 1925
NUMBER
-3 8
8
STAR
THEATRE
THURS., FRL, SAT.
NOVEMBER
19, 20, 21.
"TKF TEN COMMANDMENTS
-THE PICTURE THAT SIMPLY DEFIES DESCRIPTION-
— YOU MUST SEE IT —
• *) TIME OF SHOWS
Thun. and Fri.   - - - 8.15
Saturday  2.30, •  7 , 9.30
PRICES
Evenings  65c and 30c
Matinee 45c and 15c
Appreciation
of Peace
United Service Sunday Lait
Commemoratei Armistice
and Thanksgiving
A STIRRING ADDRESS
Gathering togethor to da honor to
the memory of thoso who in tlie service of thoir country had fallen in
the terrible conflict lhat engulfed
Europe and which terminated successfully for tho allied armies seven
years ago, tho public of Crauhrook
met at the Auditorium on Sunday
evening last for a united memorial
service. Thc meeting was part of
the program of the members of tho
Great War Veterans of* Cranbrook
to mark the termination of the Great
War.
The meeting convened immediately
following the evening services in the
city churches—the veterans taking
the front scats in the hall. The meeting was opened with the singing of
the National Anthem, followed by a
prayer of invocation by Rev. B,
C. Freeman. All joined in the singing of the hymn "Father in heaven,
who lovest all." Capt. R. H. Mason
then read Psalm 46, and Rev. M, S.
Blackburn led in prayer, Mrs. F.
M. MacPherson and Mrs. J. Norgrove
rendered a very pleasing duet
"Some Time We'll Understand." The
next scripture lesson wns read by
Rev. F. V. Harrison, after which Mrs.
Hinton, Mrs. Kuhnert and Messrs.
Hinton and Palmer sang "Ivory Palaces" in a manner which was most
sympathetic. "Where the flag of
Britain flies" wns the next hymn
joined in by nil.
The speaker of the evening was
Rev. W. T. Tapscott, whose address was listened to attentively and
much appreciated hy tho large audience. After expressing his appreciation of thc honor of being asked by thc war veterans to address
them on this, the Tth anniversary of
thc day which, following four years
of conflict, saw the Hun leader approaching the Allied lines and in submission, saying, "The day is yours."
It was hot necessary, he claimed, to
remind them of the enthusiasm that
marked the conclusion of the conflict.
"We are lure tonight to comment-
moratc tlie memory of those who
gave their lives for us, nnd nlso to
express our thanks to those who
served and ore with us again." Also
to remember the heroism of the
mothers, wives and sisters who did
their bit over here so that the
war could bo carried on, also to
express gratitude U> 'hi' divine providence for peace and victory. Our
lives should be so lived that they will
roflect tho fidelity of thoso who gave
Iheir Uvea for U:"'
The chief reason for recalling that
memorable occasion is that wc might
SIXTH TEACHER WILL
BE ENGAGED FOR THE
HIGH SCHOOL HERE
The regular meeting of the school
board was held on Wednesday of this
week, being adjourned from Friday
night last week. All the trustees
wore present except W. D. Gilroy.
The minutes of thc previous meeting
were read and approved.
Miss Winnie Lippett, teacher of
thc Kootenay Orchards school was
granted a short leave of absence, to
take a visit to Calgary and her
school will bc closed for a few days.
Miss M. C. Bannerman wrote
'thanking thc school board for permission to use some rooms in the
new uddition of the Central school,
still vacant, for the badminton club
which has been organized among the
teachers.
Miss Florence Paul applied to the
school board for permission to enter
into the teachers' exchange scheme
through the Empire Teachers'
League. By this organization,*|
teachers overseas may exchange with
British teachers for a year and Miss
Paul was accordingly granted one
year's leave of absence if necessary.
A. E. Jones, contractor, was authorized to make some small repairs
to the new wing of the Central
School, apparently necessitated by
the shrinking of some timbers used
in its construction.
The school board decided, in view
of the large number of spare periods
at the High School, which under the
present schedule could not be avoided, to engage an additional teacher
as soon ns possible. This will make
a staff of six teachers for the six
classes. No appointment has yet
been made.
Accounts totalling $5198.41, including teachers salaries and usual
accounts, were passed for payment
b.%
.* JYED BOYS OF
CRANBROOK ORGANIZE
INTO BROTHERHOOD
UNITED CHURCH
ASSUMES PROPORTION
OF BUDGET OUTLINED
SUM FOR NEW ROAD TO
KIMBERLEY INCLUDED
IN CURRENT ESTIMATES
The rumor recently heard that it
was intended to commence work immediately on thc new bridge at Wycliffe, preparatory to the construction of the new road planned between Kimberley and Cranbrook,
proves unfounded on investigation.
The department of public works are
at present having the bridge replank-
cd, which will make it serviceable for
two or three yenrs more, during
which time it is expected that the
new road will be under construction.
On the completion of the new road
the bridge necessary will be built in
tbe new location. The cost of the
estimates which nre now in the hands
undertaking has been included in the
of the government, and which will
be dealt with during the present session of thc legislature. Work is also
being carried out at present on the
two mile stretch through Blarchmont
Park, Kimberley, surfacing the road
again calcb ihe spirit tbat Actuate*
those men who fought and fell. The
speaker claimed that there is a difference between those who live only
for self aud those wbo give life for
n worthy principle. Wc immortalize
our patriot! and count tho conservation of duty greater than the conservation of OUT Own lives. The speaker
thought that the hero's crown was
Sometimes misplaced. To him, a
horo was a man in the highest sense,
one who would sacrifice self for some
worthy principle—one who would put
under subjection thc baser for the
sake of the higher. One who would
do right In face of odds, and who
showed faithfulness at all times and
unswerving fidelity to duty. The fidelity of one brigade won the battle
of Waterloo.   The story of thfl Light
I j and preparing it for use, but the
mattes of the crossing at the Kimberley end of this road ig still unsettled, no decision yet having been
made on the matter,
For some years there has been a
growing desire among workers with
boys in Canada and the U.S.A. to do
constructive work with the employed
boy. Approximately there are 4,-
000,000 working boys in the U.S.A.
and Canada calling for this sympathetic guidance, friendship and Christian consideration on the part of
those who care.
As labor will play an important
part in re-construction of our country, it is our duty to develop every
employed boy along lines of true Canadian citizenship, in order that he
may grasp the significance of social
an economic problems. Too often he
is unprepared for the crises into
which he is thrust,
The employed boys like to obtain
some identity in the community.
They know about organizations of
business men, high school boys,
Scouts, labor unions, etc., but employed boys do not have an opportunity to join anything of the kind.
The world calls mere loudly than
ever for skilled workers and pays
them in proportion to their efficiency.
Emerson said: "A boy is better unborn than untaught."
AU over the country the Y.M.C.A.
Is getting behind the employed boy
|fand assisting him to his rightful place
In society with marvelous results.
Sec'y Clark of the local "Y" felt that
|"ithe time was pow ripe to organize
the employed boys of Cranbrook into
a brotherhood, and calling a number
of the boys together presented the
aims and objects of such a club. The
boys present were enthusiastic over
the idea, believing that it would fill
a long felt need in Cranbrook, and
decided to call another meeting and
invite some more fellows to discuss
further the scheme. At this meeting
several committees were appointed,
to consider constitution, to draw up
program, to arrange for election of
officers, etc.
Monday night of last week it was
finally decided to organize and the
following boys were elected to office:
President, Hurray McFarlane; Vice-
Pres., Bennic Murgatroyd; Sec'y-
Treas., Art Finley; Directors, Henry
Godderis, Merril Dixon, Ernie Laurie.
The name of the local club is "The
Crembo Club." The boys draw up
their own programs under the following seven objectives: Physical
fitness, Religion, Recreation, Vocation, Inter-Group Brotherhood, Community and Home, and Education.
These are guide posts, but no program will be followed slavishly.
The boys are greatly interested in
[the club, and will be heard from when
more perfectly organized.
Very soon those employed boys
will be voters. They will also have
assumed family and citizenship responsibilities. The Y.M.C.A. is assisting them in carrying these responsibilities through these clubs, by
teaching that the matter of supreme
•importance is to be right toward God
and one's fellow man.
On Wednesday evening, despite
many other attractions, a largo number of the members nnd adherents
church to hear the report of Da T.
J. Ferguson, of Calgary, on the recent conference   at   Vancouver,   as
BIG GAME HUNTERS
SECURE SPECIMENS
FOR CHICAGO MUSEUM
That the reputation of the Cranbrook district as the home  of big
game has spread far and wide was
„.,,.,,„      , ,      .   , shown this week when two represent-
of the United Church met in  tho atlvm -of the PleU Mu,eum of Ngtor.
al History of Chicago, returned from
a month's successful search among
the hills for specimens for the big
well a8 to receive information as to I um -n fJie ^ *t The ^
the budget of the church, and >ts ap- Lr.ct visited wa8 whjtc R.yer flnd
portionment to the local churches. Sheep Crefik _ The party referred
Dr. Ferguson, after referring to to were J. Friesser, taxidermist of
Thanksgiving and Armistice Pays, the Museum and H. C. Hollings, of
quoted R. D. Babson's recent remark the natural history staff. The par-
that there is a health, vigor and free-. ticular object of their quest was to
dom in connection fcvith living in . secure a close-up of mountain goat,
Canada which is probably unequalled, and in this they were very suceess-
in any other part of thc world. He! ful, securing as they did an old billy
briefly sketched the process by which and an old nanny, a young billy and
the uniting churches had given up u young nanny, and two kids. The
wasteful competition and resolved to (task of securing such a group natur-
proceed towards organized union. He ally differs from the ordinary hunt-
described the wonderful concord and ing expedition of taking what you
kindliness which had marked the pro- ] can get. The party which was con-
ceeding of the general council last ducted by Mr. P. V. Stevens of Skoo-
June, and how this spirit had been ' cumchuck, consisted of Mr, Stevens,
present in the organization meetings Mr. Crooks and Messrs Friesser and
of the eight presbyteries with which Hollings, and 20 pack horses were
he had heen associated, and of the | taken in. Besides the goats referred
conferences of British Columbia and te, two Elk were also secured, and
Alberta, as well as in the united will be taken to the museum, ln
congregations in which he had taken |conversation with Mr. Stevens, a
part in the inducting of ministers and Herald representative learned that
the ordaining of elders. The whole the party were eminently satisfied
church was now called upon to en- Svitli their trip and that arrangements
gage in careful study of her re-.'for another trip next ^ear will
sources and responsibilities. In this doubtless bc made, as all kinds of
connection it had been found that to ' gome were to be seen. To have
make good certain deficits and to specimens of game from the East
enable the church to carry on her Kootenay district in a museum such
missionary, educational, and benevo-1 as the Field Museum and so marked
lent enterprises on a nominal basis is of much value. Mr. Stevens is
the members and adherents were be- 'no novice in the conducting of parties
ing asked to contribute by March for collection purposes, he having
,31st, 1920, $4,000,000. Much of been engaged for the last three years
this was already in the hands of,as guide for representatives of the
treasurers, but further efforts would. Smithsonian Institute, and the United
be made to obtain thc whole. Large | States Government. Mr. Stevens
gifts of from |2B,000 to $5000 were holds an open permit for this pur-
being made by individuals. The con- pose. Of much interest to the local
gregations of the Conference of B.C. I hunters are a number of view8 of
were asked to raise $175,000. Those {big gome from all parts of the world
of the Presbytery of Kootenay were, which Mr. Friesser had among his
asked to raise as their shore $9500. j collection. The Field museum to
The United Church of Cranbrook j which the specimens will go is one
was being asked to assume $1000 as of the leading museums of the world.
its portion. It would be disastrous It was first started In 1893 and has
if the church should be hampered in since been maintained by money set
her operations by failure at this aside by the late Marshall Field for
juncture to attain the required sum. this purpose. The building covers a
■ ■ space 720 feet by 300 feet and has
on its staff over 200 assistants in
various branches. Mr. Friesser and
Mr. Holling left Wednesday for
their home in Chicago.
VETERANS DECORATE
GRAVES OF DECEASED
COMRADES ON SUNDAY
Following thc gun-carriage, draped
with the Union Jack, tbe boys of the
(Old Brigade, 30 strong, marched
from the Veterans' Hall to the cemetery on Sunday afternoon last
for the purpose of decorating
the graves of their comrades who had
passed away since their return to
Canada from the last "big push." In
turning out ns they did, the boys
showed that they were not wanting
when it came to reverently honoring
the memory of their fallen comrades,
even if they had rejoiced at the recollection of victory but the night
Before.
On the arrival at tho cemetery the
men formed In single line, and led
by Capt. Welsford and Rev. B. C.
Freeman, the boys visited the graves
of every one of their deceased comrades and deposited on each a wreath
which they carried In their hands.
Following this a short service was
held, in which Kev. H. C. Freeman
and Rev. M. S. Blackburn both spoke,
offering some very appropriate
thoughts.
While a number of citizens were
in attendance nt the graveside, the
feeling has been expressed thnt
it would be more to our credit if
many more joined with the boys of
the G.W.V.A. in this decoration service.
Following aro tho names of the deceased members of the G.W.V.A.
buried in Cranbrook cemetery, whose
graves were decorated on Sunday:
G. Atkinson, L. Clark, K. Cryderman,
H. Deacon, F. Foster, A. i>. Gill, E.
Handley, H. Handley. W. Hogan, H.
Lindon, D. McCarthy, K. McDonald,
W. McKay, Pete McKenzie, Jas. McLaren, F. D. Patton, John Scanlon,
S. Watson.
Labor the Great
Coming Force
Mrs.    Rote   Henderson   is
Speaker at Meeting on
Sunday Afternoon
ANNUAL MEETING OF
AMATEUR ATHLETIC
ASSN. LAST THURSDAY
CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR
OLD COUNTRY SHOULD
BE MAILED EARLIER
Bearing in mind the convenience
of the public, W. M. Harris, postmaster hns called attention to
an Associated Press despatch from
London which explains itself and
which reads as follows:
"The Hritish Post Office has issued
a warning that id I persons who desire to send Christmas presents to
the Old Country should mail them
Brigade had become the synonym for I \anfr \n advance of the holiday. The
bravery in nil  ages, nud the story
of the captain of Cape Haltiras lighthouse, who in response l<> lho suggestion from his men that if they wont
out to the wreck they could never get
back, said "We do not have to come
back."   This was but one of the many
stories told hy thc speaker in illustration   of   one's   fidelity   to   duty.
Fidelity to country, home nnd God
were essential.    The latter was the
inspiration of all noble deeds.   Similarly the speaker could sec that it was
also   tho   inspiration of thc apostle
Paul, who saw his duty.    No tears
or prayers of his friends could break
his resolve to do his duty in the eyes
of his master.    We could attain to
that sublimity of character by doing
our simple duty day by day.   Sacrificing our rights for thc right and
will was heroism.    A true hero did
not lord it over his fellows, but was
also willing to serve.   Do your honest
•duty day by day, conducting your
business with spotless integrity.   "Be
true to yourself, end you will not be
warning is for the purpose of avoiding delay to packages similar to that
which occurred last year owing to
the great congestion in the mail."
false to any man." Some people look
upon the church a3 a life insurance
policy, whose premium is so high that
they let the policy lapse. The Church
is God's agency for bringing about
heavenly conditions in earthly relations. The speaker concluded hit remarks with several illustrations aa to
what in his mind constituted a hero.
The army that stands is the army,
who, bock of the arms, has a love of
country. The Christian man is ont
who shows heroism in all departments
of life. If we do the duties of lift,
we can fight its battles with greater
fortitude.
Mrs. J. Warren favored with a
vocal selection "There Is No Death,"
which was much appreciated.
Tho singing of "O God of hosts,"
followed by the Benediction, concluded the service.
Thursday evening last, the annual
meeting of the Cranbrook Amateur
Athletic Association took place at
the Y.M.C.A. when the reports of
the officers for the post year were
deceived. The financial report of
Sec. G. T. Moir was interesting,
showing as it did, a very successful
year's operation and, as was the consensus of opinion of the meeting,
It reflected much credit on the energy
and active interest displayed by Mr.
Moir.
There was a large number
who were In favor of Sunday
games. To do this is wot essential
to have the use at the city Ball Park
which at present Ig under the control
of the Cranbrook Amateur Athletic
Association. Knowing that the
former executives were opposed to
the using of the park on Sunday, a
representative of the Sunday Ball
advocates stated that if the members of the executive would concede
the Sunday playing point that he
would vote for their re-election,
otherwise not
When it came to the election of officers a somewhat stormy time ensued, llr. Molr, who with others,
hu consistently opposed Sunday ball
playing, stated that in his opinion it
Dr. Ferguson had been present at
presbytery meetings at which thc !
members insisted on trying to raise
larger amounts than had been asked
for. Of the total sum about 75%
was needed to maintain the great
home mission and social service
■work in the Dominion and its extensive foreign mission work among
thirty millions of people in Japan,
China, India, West Africa, Korea and
Trinidad. Colleges and religious
education called for $275,000, the
benevolent funds for $325,000,
church union and emergency expenses for a like amount, and expenses of General Council for $170,-
000. It was not expected that so
much would be needed next year, but
in years to come, as in the past, thc
work would be expanding inevitably.
Following thc address of Dr. Ferguson Rev. B. C. Fereman gave some
further facts in support of the allotment to the Cranbrook congregation. He also gave his impressions of
the recent conference in Vancouver,
and apparently like all who were present, he was enthused with the spirit
which animated the conference.
A resolution from this meeting accepting the allotment as satisfactory
and within their means was passed.
Following the meeting the congregation adjourned to the school room
whero the ladies served refreshments
which were indeed appreciated.
Dr. Ferguson waa a visitor to Kimberley on Monday and left on
/Thursday evening for Calgary.
SMOKER ON SATURDAY
NIGHT AT VETERANS
MOST SUCCESSFUL
ARMISTICE BALL
PROVES ONE OF YEAR'S
BIG SOCIAL EVENTS
The committee of the war veterans
under the chairmanship and efficient
and active leadership of Major Hicks
have set a mark which will be difficult for other dance committees
staging military or other dances lu
Cranbrook to reach. This was the
opinion of aB who attended the Ar-
mistice Bali on Wednesday evening.
On entering the hall, the guests were
immediately taken with tht beauty
of the decorations. The pleasing
lighting effect obtained by the covering of the many electric globes
was at once thoroughly appreciated,
and with the wall decorations of banners and hanging baskets of flowers
and the festoons of red, white and
By far the best Bmoker ever held 1 blue radiating from the suspended
at the G.W.V.A. was the verdict of Union Jack in the centre of the half,
those who have attended the many made a setting that was brilliant to
functions of this kind held at the'say the least. Pennants and flag
Vice-Pres J. M. Clark
Sec-Trees  H. Laker
It is now stated, however, that
there is some likelihood of some of
the above who are elected not agreeing to act.
The balance of the executive consists of representatives from various
athletic and other bodies connected
with the Amateur. Athletic Association. We regret that time prevents
publishing a fuller report of the
meeting in this Issue. The meeting
did much to clear the atmosphere as
to the question of Sabbath ball play-
«u not In th. be.t intere.ts of the |'-* b°'h »Wra M™ outrken w!th
regard to same.   It remains now for
city, and he wot prepared to stand
or fall at one opposed to it. Much
discussion ensued. Some of the
former officers declined to act again,
and officers were finally elected as
follows:
Bon. Pres Dr, F. W. Green
B. K. Sang
tho public   to   indicate   what   they
want.
Thc financial statement, which will
be published in full next week showed receipts from all sources of
$2818.18, with $091 remaining in
hand.
local hall. This referred to the
opening function on Saturday evening in the program of events arranged by the veterans in a celebration of the seventh annual anniversary of the Armistice, and that It
went over with a bang reflects much
credit upon those who had been arranging the event. With songs,
readings, stories and music, an abundance to eat and drink, it was not
difficult for the returned men and
their friends to thoroughly enjoy
themselves. The time passed very
quickly and when the closing number came, everyone left feeling that
this w&s the best event of its kind
yet held. Major H. B. Hicks occupied the chair and gave an address
that was most interesting, dealing
principally with the coming unity
convention at Port Arthur or Winnipeg on Nov. 25th. The convention
is being called to consider and will
most likely decide to amalgamate the
various military and naval veteran
organizations under one head, the
name of which is to be decided at
this convention. Of the names suggested one is "British Legion" followed by the name "Ctnada" or
whatever the colony may be. Tbe
various locals in East Kootenay arc
choosing a delegate. Whether one
from each of the Kootenays will be
chosen or one from both East and
West combined is not yet decided.
Major Hicks is at present in com*
munication with Nelson on this point.
A meeUng is called for Wednesday
next at the G.W.V.A. Hall at which
all interested arc asked to attend.
Those contributing to the program
on Saturday last were as follows:
Bill Derbyshire, Bob Morrison, J. Vigors, L. Carson, T. M. Stewart, Harry
Collier, B. Bell, *1, Sims and Charlie
Beatty.
During the evening, Bill Johns, the
popular Stewart of tht Vets., came
in for a congratulatory ovation, la
a abort talk to the boyi, be reminded
which were inscribed the names of
the more important engagements
during the war were to be seen on
the walls and a large motto "-Lest we
forget" was also in evidence. To
the accompaniment of the music furnished by the Robinson's five-piece
orchestra, the dancers entered into
the spirit of the evening and to all
appearances thoroughly enjoyed
themselves. The music was full of
pep, the company the best, with the
result that when thc announced time
of closing arrived it was necessary
for the orchestra to consent to stay
another hour. The refreshments
served by thc committee of ladie*
was in keeping with the general excellence of the other features of the
evening. Friends from Kimberley,
Wardner, Yahk, and practically all
nearby points were in evidence.
Club Cafe Cloaei
The Club Cafe, which has been
operated by Alfred Seto for some
time past, closed its doors this wvek.
a notice for the distraint of throe
month's rent adorning the door, while
the said Alfred Seto departed for
parts unknown on Sunday last. It
is understood that tho liabilities, nut-
side of thc claim for rent are not
heavy, and there arc no very large
losers.
NEED FOR EDUCATION
Sunday afternoon a mooting under the auspices of the Federated
Labor Party of Canada was held in
the K.P. Hall, when Mrs. Rose Henderson, of Montreal, and recently n
labor candidate in New Westminster
in the federal elections, spoke to an
appreciative audience, which doubtless, on account of other events, wns
not as lnrge as it otherwise would
have been been.
The chair was taken by James
Simms, of Athalmer, who in a few
introductory remarks pointed out the
necessity of the labor party getting
busy if they fdt that they should
have as their representatives men who
wore more in tunc with thoir line of
thought. Tho labor party in Canada
recognized the eternal order of
things was one of chango, and were
preparing themselves to enlighten
their people on tho changes that WiU
arise. The labor movement was
built up on co-operative philosophy
in opposition to the system of the
other parties. T]iis co-oporntive
philosophy was the backbone of the
movement. The speaker predicted
the rise of the labor party in the
Old Country and Australia and that
labor would carry the day in the
federal elections there next week.
He felt that it was the duty of labor
not to tie up with any other party,
but despite the advice of leader
Green of the American federated labor body, they were going to go
ahead with iheir own party, and not
be dependent on third parties. From
now on it would be their mission to
implant in the minds of the workers
the necessity of having labor candidates in the field.
In introducing Mrs. Rose Henderson the chairman referred to the useful work that she had been engaged
in previous to taking up the work
in the interests of labor, and of her
good run in the recent election contest in New Westminster where she
polled nearly 4000 votes.
Launching at once into her subject Mrs. Henderson said her mission
was to go into all places preaching
the political gospel. There was no
use of doing this in the heat of on
election contest. It was her hope to
develop in the worker a new conscience. They at the present time
possessed an economic conscience and
a social conscience as well, but
were devoid of a political conscience.
It waa their duty to develop this side
and in asking them to link up with
the great labor movement she offered no appologies as it was thc
greatest movement in the world today and one that was experiencing
th<: largest growth.
The speaker paid tribute to some
of the  daily  Press  for  telling the
facts as they exist.    She referred to
the slashing indictment of both political parties as contained in McLean's
Magazine of Sept. 15th, also to the
Vancouver Province's criticism of the
slapstick method of both parties in
the election, that neither party was
touching the great questions of thc
day.    The  labor party she  claimed
was tht only growing movement.   In
nine months of the McDonald regime
in the OW Country over one and a
quarter million voters had joined up
with  labor.    There,  aH  one  of  the
leaders  had   pointed  out,   labor  in
England could take over the  reins
of office any   time   it   liked.    The
ipeaki-r claimed  that her   acquaintance with the worker was such that
he could see the effect of the present   system   was   that   it   was   so
brutalizing, that men were ashamed
to say that they belonged  to  that
class; ashamed to say they belonged
to the class with thc greatest idealistic outlook of any in the world today, a class that was coming up by
leaps  and  bounds.    She would  not
take to task too severely those who
had in the past voted Liberal or Conservative, feeling that they had done
them of their duty as veterans in
connection    with    the    celebration.,
There would be plenty of opportunity s0 th>nkin(f that they could do some
for them to enjoy themselves but at *°od-    Thia shc 8ai(J was a t*l\*cy,
thc same time ho reminded them 0flnoinlinK to the brcad  linc8  in tho
their duty to thoir fallen comrades
and urged a large attendance at the
decoration at the cemetery upon the
following day. The boys showed in
no unmistakable manner that they
were prepared to do their bit along
these linos as well as in others.
Robinson's Orchestra were most
generous with their music, a fact
which was thoroughly appreciated by
thote who enjoyed the festivities.
cities, filled with men of ability who
voted for one or the other of the
parties, and were now themselves the
product of thc system which they
voted for. It was not up to them
to decry the capitalistic class, they
were getting luxury and everything
they wanted.
The speaker ilealt with the corruption that was practiced In trying
(Continued on Page Four) PAQE TWO
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
Thuri-day, November 12, WS
SALE
STARTS
SATURDAY,
NOV. 14th,
AT
9 a.m.
P
LOOK FOR
THE STORE
WITH BLUE
AND WHITE
SIGNS.
MUST BE RAISED OUT OF THIS $18,000 STOCK OF HIGH GRADE MERCHANDISE, made by the World's best makers
if it takes every Article in the Store to do it. All we have is 13 days. In order to raise this large amount of money in such a short space of
time means Miss M. McLeod of Cranbrook can not take into consideration what these goods cost. Along with the shortage of money we realize
we must give the people of Cranbrook and surrounding District Bargains unheard of before in this or any other Country. The Type that
prints this notice cannot express in reality the Hundreds of Bargains that await you at the Store. The people that receive this circular
will come for many miles and the Shrewd Buyers will be carrying this High Grade merchandise away in armfuls.   Sale Starts
SATURDAY, NOV. 14*
Ladies'
PRINCESS SLIPS
Sale Price     \
11.*» i
WOOL SCARF
Sale Price
$i»
Baby    i
RUBBER
BLOOMERS
Sale Price
35c
Children's
PLUSH HATS
Sale Price
49c
Ladies'
HOUSE DRESSES
Sale Price
89 c
Ladies'
GLOVES
Suede 1 Strap
Sale Price
98 c
I
Ladies'
Fancy Silk
VESTS
Sale Price
.
Ladies'
CREPE KIMONAS
Sale Price
98c
Ladies'     \
FANCY BELTS
Sale Price
25c
1
Beautiful
SILK SCARFS
Sale Price
98c
Pure Wool
TOQUES
Sale Price
49c
Ladies'
GLOVES
BRUSHED WOOL
Sale Price
79c
RUBBER APRONS
Sale Price
69c
One Only
LADIES' RUSSIAN
RAT COAT
Sale Price
$182"
Ladies'
WINTER COATS
Sale Price
IB*
Ladies'
SILK HOSE
Sale Price
59c
Ladies' Silk & Wool
SWEATERS
Sale Price
$3-79
Ladies'
HATS
Sale Price
Flannel
DRESSES
Sale Price
$7-98
A   Ladies'
FLANNEL SKIRTS
Sale Price
$4«
Ladies' Brassiers
extra large sizes
Sale Price
79c
Children's
WINTER COATS
Sale Price
**
Ladies'Dresses
English Poiret Twill
and Tricotine
Sale Price
$15"
French FLANNEL
DRESSES
New York Styles
Sale Price
$7-79
Girls'
GOLF HOSE
all wool
Sale Price
69c  i
Beautiful Silk
KIMONAS
Sale Price
S5-98
LADIES' COATS
Fur Collar
Sale Price
$14'5
Ladies'
STREET SKIRTS
Sale Price
S4-*
Ladies' Fur Collar
and Cuff Coats
Sale Price
$24"
Ladies'
BLOOMERS
Sale Price
49c
Drop everything, be sure and be there, asyou can rest assured that you will not be disappointed, as we wiU make all catalogue prices
look sick.    Everything Truthfully and Honestly sold as advertised.    THE MONEY IS NOT OURS UNTIL YOU ARE SATISFIED.
MISS M.  McLEOD
EVERYDAY FEATURED WITH
/   SPECIAL BARGAINS
COME OR YOU WILL BE SORRY
CRANBROOK
13 DAYS AND THIS SALE IS NO MORE
COST ALOKG WITH PROFIT
FORGOTTEH Thursday, November 12,1925
td caumaeei naiu
PAQE
WRIGLEYS
AFTER
EVERY
Probably one
reason for the
popularity of
WRIGLEY'S is that It lasts
so long and returns such
great dividends for so small
an outlay. * It keeps teeth
clean, breath eWcet, appetite
keen, digestion good.
Fresh  and  full'flavored
always la Id wax-wrapped
package.
-♦—»-♦-♦-♦- ♦-♦- »■■■■♦  ♦ -* ♦-■♦-
G-W-G
BOYS'
CORD KNICKERS
—They Wear Longer—
Price, age 6 to 7, $2.00
age 8, 2.25
age 9 to 10,   250
age 12, 2.75
C. EMSLIE
Armstrong Ave.
•GENTS' FURNISHINGS
BOOTS, SHOES,-Etc.
NISBET & GRAHAM  \
Barrister!, Solicitors, &c
Offices: Imperial Bank Bldg.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
OFFICES at KIMBERLEY
IN K. of P. HALL
Open Every Thursday from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
****V************i
ISKOOKUMCHUCKI
I NOTES
****************
Mr. Adolph Solemn, from Washington, was a Skookumchuck visitor
last week, making a double return
trip from Cranbrook to Skookumchuck ami taking the Misses Maud
and Alice West there and back again.
There was a dance at the old Blake
home here recently. There was a full
house, and some to spare. The dance
was given to raise funds for an Xmas
tree for tlie children of this district
ami was a great success, and we sincerely thank the camp 2 boys and
others who so generously helped us
hy buying the hand made stockings
ami mills anil other arte ilea, as well
as surprise packages. The children
tdso enjoyed the Hallowe'en play.
The teacher, Miss Knott, had an
Xmas cake raffle, the cake being won
hy Mr, \V. S. Cameron. Then the
first article was put up for auction
and brought .p.UO more. The other
lU'tlclos auctioned brought $46.30,
making $00,80 in all for our Xmas
tree, so wc all feel like saying "three
cheers for those who did so much,"
especially the camp 2 bunch.
Mr. Shira, of ('anal Flats, ia a visitor hero tho last two days, on business. Air. McKinley, ulso of Canal
Flats, is another visitor, rounding up
horsGg in these parts,
Mr. Shaw Parker returned today
from his business trip to Fort Steele
and Cranbrook.
Mr. J. W, Crowe is hauling props
for Mr. It. Chcnuz, louding the car
hero at tho siding,
Mrs. Welsh, Mrs. Cumberland and
Miss Maud West were Cranbrook
visitors on Tuesday. On their way
home they had a slow leak in their
rear tyre and had to stop for repairs,
making a successful job of it before
help came along.
Mr. and Mrs. Pete Jensen were
Cranbrook visitors on Tuesday.
Mrs. John Crowe, of Torrent, was
a Skookumchuck visitor on Tuesday,
Mrs. Baker, of Larchwood, drove
the tote team of W. S. Camerone'
camp down last Monday for groceries.
—     si '-rang
Mr. Robert West has finished his
car of props and has started his new
house,
Mr. Ray MillerTof Ta-Ta Creek,
was a Skookumchuck visitor Wednesday.
Mr. F. Canning and Mr. E. Pomier
were city visitors today.
Mr. P. Bull was a visitor yesterday.
Miss Flo returned to her sister,
Mrs. John Crowe, of Torrent, yesterday, ou horseback. Her sister, Miss
Alice, accompanied her, bringing
back the ponies.
■        i m
Htia Maud West is proud possesor
of a fine large brown mare, bought
off Mr. McKinley, of Canal flats.
Mr. Cameron, an old Alaskan prospector, is here looking around. Let's
nope he finds something rich, we
need it
Mrs. Welsh, on her return from
camp last Sunday night, saw a deer
and fired eight or nine shots at it,
but never touched an hair.
Mr. McKinley, of Canal Flats, has
sold to Mr. Blake at the water tank
a fine gelding.
Mrs. Clorace motored to Cranbrook Tuesday to the doctor with her
baby. Florence and Alice West accompanied.
Mr. Shira, Bob West and Louie La
Blond were Cranbrook visitors from
here today.
Mr. McNair walked to Skookumchuck from hiB mine today.
Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Cameron and
baby, Velma, with Miss Knott, the
Larchwood teacher, started by motor
for Erickson today.
Mr. A. H. McKinley started for his
home at Canal Flats this morning.
-   i     »♦* ■
October Report
Central School
■alaklleke* INI        IfttM Ul
Geo. R. Leask
mnn Mnun
U>   OORTBiOMl
OaktaetWerk.  Metal*
ui meets m met
oa-Mi c«iwt stettuj itmu
Genuine Aspirin
Proved Safe
Take without Fear as Told
in "Bayer" Package
A
[&AYERJ
thur
Unless you see the "Bayer Cross'
on package or on tablets you are not
getting the genuine Bayer Tablets of
Aspirin proved safe by millions and
prourlbod by physicians over twenty-five years for
Colds Headache
Neuritis Lumbago
Toothache Rheumatism
Neuralgia Pain, Pain
Each unbroken "Bayer" package
contains   proven   directions,    Handy
boxes   of   twelve   tablets   cost   few
cent    Druggists also sell bottles of
24 and 100.
WATER NOTICE
Use and Storage
TAKE NOTICE that the East Kootenay Power Co., Ltd., whose address is Fernie, B.C., will apply for
a license to take and use 160 cubic
feet per second and to store 60,000
acre feet of water out of Fording
River, which flows southerly and
drains into Elk River,   in Lot 7989.
The storage dam will be located
at about two miles east of the north
east corner of Lot 8965. The capacity of tbe reservoir to be created is about 50,000 acre feet, and it
will flood about 1,000 acres of land.
The water will be diverted from the
stream at a point about 2 miles north*
easl of N K. Corner Lot 8965, and
will be used for power purposes up-
pen thc undertaking Lot 4588, described oa East Kootenay Power Co.,
Ltd,
This notice was posted on the
ground on the 13th day of October,
1096. A copy of this notice and an
application pursuant thereto and to
the "Water Act, 1914," will be filed
in thc office of the Water Recorder
at Fernio and Cranbrook,
Objections to the application may
be filed with the said Water Recorder or with the Comptroller of Water
Right*) parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C., within thirty days after
the first appearance of this notice
in n local newspaper.
Description of the territory within
which  its powers  in respect of the
undertaking are to be exercised — aa
filed with the Water Board by East
Kootenay Power Co., Ltd.      Power
will be supplied within the Kootenay
District, B.C., and if permitted by
lawful authority within Alberta. The
petition for thc approval of the undertaking will be heard in the office
of the Hoard of Investigation, Vic-
torin, B.C., at a date to be fixed by
thc Comptroller, nnd any interested
person mny file an objection thereto in thc ofllce of thc Comptroller*, or
of the  Water Recorders at Fernie,
B.C., and nt Cranbrook, B.C.
EAST KOOTEAY POWER Co., Ltd.
By E. F. Sanborn,
Gen. Mgr., Agent
Tho date of the first publication
of this notice is October 22, 1925.
86-88
Consolidated Nining h Smelting Co.
of Canada, Limited.
OFFICES, SMELTING AND REFINING DEPARTMENT
TRAIL,  BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS AND REFINERS
Porch-tiers ol Oold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Orel
Producer, of Oold, Silver, Copper, Pig Lead and Zlae
"TADANACBRAND
Shield ia held by Division I for
miking the highest percentage of attendance.
DIVISION I
Percentage of Attendance, 98.6.
Irene Mclnnis 81.4, Margaret Henderson 80.8, Sophie McGregor 80.4,
George Euta 79.7, Nellie Sakaguchi
78.9, Mae Gooderham 78.4, Hazel
Simpson 76.3, Jean Warren 74.5, Elsie Woods 74.8, Isabel Frame 73.8,
Kathleen Detail 72.4, May Cox 71.0,
Sheila Paterson 70.3, Leslie Laith-
waite 69.8, Winnifred McQuaid 69.6,
Dorothy Bridges 69.6, Jessie Brain
"".5, Mary Robertson 69,2, Mary
Macdonald   08.3,   Harold   Holdener
68.8, Ruth Bond 68.1, William Harrison 67.9, Barbara Beale 67.8, Donald Macdonald 67.4, John Mackay
66.6, Clifford Haynes 65.6, Walter
Fining 65.5, Marlon Gill 63.3, Roy
Linnell 61.9.
Absent—Catherine Martin.
A. WOODLAND
DIVISION  II
Percentage of Attendance, 98.06.
Jack Farreli 71.2, Kathleen McFarlane   70.8,   Helen   Campbell   67.7,
Grace Flett 67.4, Annie Harbinson
66.7, Leslie Kuhnert 66.1, Molly
Johnston 66.0, Wilfred Pocock 66.0,
Susan Randall 64.2, Annie Moore
63.5, Lorna Barber 62.6, Florence
Pattinson 62.0, Eva Bartle 62.0, May
Strachan 61.9, Bud Parker 61.4, Eileen Grey 60.9, Charles Robertson
60.4, Mary Genest 60.3, Elsie Parker 69.1, Charles Allen 59.0, Enid
Shankland 58.8, Douglas Patton 68.6,
Alex Dalziel 68.1, Leslie Philips t>8.0,
Elma Campbell 57.5, Beulah Hill
67.0, Lucille Rosling 56.8, James
Huchcroft 56.9, Fred Large 55.6,
Harry Fanning 64.6, Grace Pritchard
64.2, Helen McGill 54.1, Ida Lancaster 62.9, Jim Drew 50.1.
Absent—Gilbert Vicary, Jack Eassie, Gladys Stone.
M. GRACE JOHNSTON
DIVISION III
Percentage of Attendance, 97.56.
Olive Norgrove 90.1, Dorothy
Brown 89.6, Sidney Weston 85.2,
Kathleen Edmondson 84.3, Jessie
South 84.2, Rosaline Weston 83.6,
Rusk Randall 83.5, Betty Lunn 80.6,
William Cox 80.6, Marshall Russell
80.2, Robert Muirhead 80.0, Vera
Sadler 78.8, Mary Fyfe 78.6, Mary
Roberts 78.6, Mary Richmond 78.1,
May   Russell   78.0,   Gordon   Dezall
77.9, Jean Macdonald 77.6, Lillian
Webster 76.8, Albina Haddad 76.7,
Marie Collins 76.2, Edwin Hilcy 76.1,
Walter Barrett 76.5, Robina Miller
73.9, Helen Gilroy 73.4, Winnifred
Pelkey 73.4, Evelyn Eley 73.1, James
Brookes 72.7, Tresa De Luca 72.2,
Garnet Blaine 71.1, Alex Laldlaw
70.2, Doble Macdonald 69.7, George
Pelton 69.6, Ruth Fanning 68.8, Lillian Dale 68.6, Beverley Collier 67.8,
Alfred Calhoun 62.2, Yvonne Williams 61.1.
RUBY M. GLASER
DIVISION  IV
Enrollment, 36; Percentage of Attendance, 88.60.
Pat Harrison 67.0, Eddie Leonard
-66.0, Vincent Lundquist 63.7, Margaret Farreli 68.8, Pauline Bowness
61.0, Ellsworth Ryan 00.7, Dorothy
Flett 60.1, Malcolm McPhee 69.4,
Joe Genest 59.1, Jean Niblock 59.0,
Mary D'hondt 68.4, Eugene Kennedy
68.2, Ruth McKowan 67.8, Florence
Johnston 66.6, Donald McGinnie 56.1,
Edna Taylor 56.0, Berta Jones 56.8,
Cyfll   Harrison   65.8,  June  Collins
66.1, Alee Williams 64.8, Jimmy Dixon 64.6, Vivian Kemp 54.4, Nancy
McCrindle 54.S, Gladys Brain 63.6,
Helmer Erickson 52.0, Bertram
McLean 61.0.
Abeent — Lloyd Burgess, Mike
Frost, Norman Galbraith, Margaret
Johnston, Ruth Nicholson, Bob Rei-
chardt, Dorothy Worthington, Helen
Wade, Marjorle Wade, Angus Rector.
S. D. WHITE
DIVISION   V
Percentage of Attendance, 89.33.
Grade 6—Harry Christian 74, Edna Baxter 66, Jean Rutledge 66, Hazel Clapp 64, John Belanger 59, Mae
Melly 68, Andrew D'Hondt 58, Reginald Shaw 67, Betty Genest 54, Hilda
Robinson 68 (missed exam), Gene
Ingham 48, Gladys Burton 68 (missed * exams), WIU McCoy (mined
Grade 7—Kathleen Nisbet 75, Willie Stevely 71, Joe Walkley 69, Stanley Porter 68, Edna Collier 08, Bert
Pelton CC, Elva Turner 00, Jessie
Cassidy G4, Jim Atchison 01, Winnie
Stewart Cl, Maurice Godderis 00,
Jack Parker 60, Wright Speers 60,
Dorothy Stewart 69.
Missed Exams—On Young, Richard Ban Quan.
E.  WRIGHT
DIVISION   VI.—Cr.de 6
Percentage of Attendance, 83.20.
Buaye Futa 81.0, Norah Simpson
79.5, Hazel Bowley 79.2. James Halcrow 77.5, Ira MacNaughton 75.8,
Jane Nisbet 75.4, Pearl Kriewalt "4.0,
Francis Curie 74.2, John Magro 73.8,
Evelyn Holdener 73.5,   Sadie   Gibbs
73.3, Mary Small 73.2, Lillian Russell 72.4, Mike Kolisnek 71.8. Norman Blaine 71.1, Rose Magro 70.1,
Elliot Harris 70.0, Murray Rombough
68.2, Marshall MePherson 05.5, Clarence  Johnson   64.2,   Clara   Gordon
03.4, Eva Kilby 63.3, Hilda Gillis
00.4, Elizabeth Godderis 58.0, Leona
Small 58.2, Gordon Calhoun 57.3.
Unranked—Eunice Moore, Herbert
Potter, Billie Whiting, Ranka Thor-
leifson.
M. McCASLIN
DIVISION   VII.—Grade 6
Percentage   of   Attendance,   93.8.
Owen Haley 82.5, Mary Andrews
82, Neil Campbell 81, Marion Richmond 78, Theo Laurie 78, Jessie McKay 76, Harvey Birce 75, Mary Pritchard 75, Gordon Speers 74, Christine Williams 73, Allen Patmore 71,
Harry Walkley 70, Jack Pattinson 70,
Elizabeth Stewart 69, Frank McClure
68, Kathleen Neilly 67, Edgar Offin
67, James Lunn 67, Margaret Rutledge 66, Robert Stevely 05, Dorothy
McDonald 65, George Haddad 04, Edna Shaw 62, Florence Steward 02,
Edith Walker 54, Robert McGregor
53, Allan Downey 62, Josie Blefare
49, Harvey Moir 38.
M. C. BANNERMAN
DIVISION   Vlll
No. Enrolled, 46; Percentage of
Attendance, 76.34.
Eileen Moore 83.88, Edith Faulkner 83.16, Roberta Collins 82.16,
Percy Weston 80.66, Angelo Provenzano 80.5, Billy Saunders
79.16, Norman Hall 79.10, Joo
Birkin 78.16, George Storrar 78.0,
Edythe Wells 77.83, Georgina Haddad 77.33, Kenneth Haynes 77.16,
Dolly Johns 77.0, Stanley Heise
76.66, Albert Nicholson 70.33, Grant
Macgregor 76.16, Percy North 70.00,
Carl Brennan 75.66, Edith Sullivan
75.0, Barbara Worthington 73.10,
Doris Haley 72.33, Peggy Reid 71.83,
Rudie Kozack 71.83, Joe Ward 71.33,
Billy Burton 70.66, Thoma*, Miller
70.5, Edward Romanik 69.60, Muriel
Worthington 69.0, Ada Gammon
68.83, Emilia Desautels 68.00, Kathleen Haynes 68.5,  Esther  Leonard
66.6, Margaret Walkley 65.5, Hannes
Poho 63.81, Hilda Smith 63.06, Mimi
Blefare 63.5, Harold George 59.16,
Clarence Barrett 68.81, Jack Roberts
68.5, Donald Emond 54.5.
Absent   from   Exams — Donalda
Walker, Genevieve Saunders, Callum
Mackenzie, Jack Parkin, Kichi Maigawa.
M. L. BAXTER
DIVISION IX.—Grade 4, 2nd T.rm.
Percentage of Attendance, 80.04.
Doris Eley 88, Dick Slye 82, Barry
Hill 81, Fred Kolisnik and Elliot Dale
80, Olive Sadler, Stanley Weston and
Stanley Williams 79, Hubert Linnell
76, Gladys Ratcliffe and Betty Brown
74, George Carpenter and Victoria
Pascuzzo 73, Barbara Patton, Sheila
Hennessy and Mary Lee 72, Albin
Erickson 71, Margaret Dalziel, Steve
Romanik, Helen Haddad and Carrie
Spence 70, Allan MacPherson 68,
Cyril Robertson 67, Leonard Porter
GO, Faith Ryan, John Pascuzzo and
Cecil Morrison 65, Georgina Cox 03,
Bub Sullivan 02, Nooch Tito, John
Niblock and Irma Taylor 57, Ethel
Lewis and William' White 56, Clyde
Williams 55.
Absent from Exams — Eleanor
Green, Elliot Taylor, Donald Gill,
Joe Ban Quan, Mabel Atkinson, Violet Miller.
P. M. G. C. MACDONALD
DIVISION   X._Cr.d. 4,  l.t Term.
Percentage  of Attendance,  82.0.
Agnes Gray 88.2, Ralph Manning
87.2, Sherman Evans 87.0, Donald
Vance and Douglas Paterson 80.2,
John Richmond 84.4, Edna Johns
83.4, Louise Bridges 82.8, Sam McCreery 82.6, Margaret Carpenter 82.6, Barbara Muirhead 81.8,
Dorothy Coleman 81.0, Muriel Little
80.8, Albert Robberecht 80.3, Franklin Wood 76.6, Patricia Parker 75.8,
Raymond Burgess 75.4, James Adams
75.2, Mary Romanik and Annie Frost
72.8, Ivor Barrett 71.4, Jessie Magnet 71.2, Cameron MacDonald 70.0,
Grace Christie 09.4, Archie Roberta
07.0, Pearl Walkley 66.8, Amanda
Desautcl 65.2, Harold Porter 57.0.
FLORENCE PAUL
DIVISION   XI.—Grid. 4.
Percentage of Attendance, 83.63.
Harold Curie 87, Isabel fanner 86,
Leighton Warren 86, Eddie Irwin 86,
John Mackenzie 85, Albert Russell
84, Bernard Pelkey 82, Jack Reynolds 80, Gladys Campbell 80, Edward
Walsh 78, Graham Palton 76, Jeannette L'Abbe' 74, Annie' Birkin 73,
Jolanda Magro 73, Frances Slye 72,
Rosie Blefare 71, Sybjl Norgrove 70,
Ronnie Coleman 09, Cyril George
69, Tony Naso 67, Hunter McClure
66, Pearl Steward 65, Byron Kemp
62, Ralph Case 68, Stanley Whlttaker 56.   Oscar Asplund. -
Absent from Exams—Mary Cameron, Ina Colledge, Clyde Colledge,
Henry McMurren, Julia Mohs, Marguerite Morro, Ina Poho, Lilly White.
FLORENCE E. BEST
DIVISION   XII
No. Enrolled, 36; Percentage of
Attendance 76.61.
Gertrude South, George Wilson,
Gwen John, Earl Whiting, Queenie
Chow, Bertil Erickson, Ruth Briggs,
Enid Home, Sheila Stewart, Harold
Coutts, Eddy Frost, Herbert Conroy,
Phyllis MacDonald, Dermot Moore,
Stewart Flett, Dorothy Russell, Ber
nice Coleman, Glen Bownosa, Ella
Biggatlni, Hazel Reid, Myles Beale,
Evelyn Whlttor, Lee Gammon, Gladys
de Wolf, Phyllis Ward, Leslie Sail-
Ier, Walker Willis, Toddy Smith, Merrick Owen, AdolphUg Burton, Kred
Pattinson, Frank Jones, Gladys
Milne.
IL FREEMAN
DIVISION    XIII Grade   3.
No. Enrolled, !iii; Percentage of
Attendance, 77.3",.
Arthur Hinton, Frank Harrison,
Douglas Johns. Lillian Saddler, Eugenie McGruder, Stephen La Fleur,
Phyllis Wilson, Jack De Wolf, George
Faulkner, Esther Weston, Edna McPhee, Helen .Sutherland, Charles McQuaid, Betty Russell, Hedley Baxter,
David Brown, Beatrice Calhoun, David Miller, Marguerite Pelkey, Gordon Russell, Phyllis Ryan, Bernard
Niblock, Millicent Pelkey, Charles
Wormington, Margaret Smith, Margaret O'Meurn, Bob Pattinson, Charles Dickinson, Ivy Sissons, Harry Collier, Fred Harbinson.
Absent from Exams—Lawrence
Gillis, Amy Offin, Harry Wnde.
BESSIE X. WOODMAN
DIVISION   XIV— Grade 2.
Percentage of Attendance,   72.30.
2nd Term—Frances Parks, Christine Patterson, Edward Flower, Esther Gibbs, Grace McCreery, Solma
Lundquist, Kathleen Harbinson, Nel-
lie Burton, Florence Strachan. Pauline MacDonald, Margaret McCrindle,
Barbara Rutledge, .Margaret Leon-
-ord, Sandy Halcrow. Fred Lancaster,
Betty Birkin, Theodore Johnson,
Claire Disautelle, Harold Milne,
Yvonne Edmond.
First Term—Victor Haddad, Rosie
Nnso, Gilbert Parker, Bobbie Collins.
Annie Lee, Agnes Stew-art, Billy Sissons, Dougnld Steveley, Jack Neily,
Eleanor Collins, Ellen Asplund. Patricia Rankins, Aulder Conroy. James
Niblock, James Wheaton, Edward
Brehmer.
Absent from Exams—Bertha Ban
Quan, Phyllis Brend, Barbara Fink,
George McMurren, Hazel Sinclair.
Dick Wallace.
BESSIE ROBERTSON
•DIVISION XV.—Cr.de 1, 2nd Term.
No. Enrolled, 3.".; Percentage of
Attendance, 73.5.
Honor Roll—Dorothy Barber. Dora
McNaughton, Alex Lamont, Edgar
Home, Susan Gould, Elgin Hill.
Perfect Attendance—Dorothy Barber, Charles Bell, Edwin Erickson.
Wilfred Faulkner, Susan Gould, El-
]gin Hill, Alex Lamont. Wilson Lee,
Dora McNaughton, Dominic Naso,
Herbert Offin.
E. B. PATERSON
DIVISION   XVI
Percentage of Attendance, 70.9;
Perfect Attendance, 9.
Mary Frost, Dorothy Gammon,
Gladys Haynes, Doreen Kuhnert,
Frank Lamont, Leona Richardson,
Hazel Steward, George Ward, Bernard Weston.
L. C. HENDERSON
The  constant
curling and waving demanded by,
modern   style   inn
hnir dress, slowly burns the col- *■
or,   lustre   and *  .
very   life   from
the hair, leaving       \_^/      \
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brittle, streaked with gray; then the
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Try this for one week! While
combing and dressing your hair,
moisten your hair brush with n little
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For Sore Throat
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KOOTENAY ORCHARD
SCHOOL REPORT
FOR OCTOBER
Grade 7.—Bddk Gart&Idej "2.
Grade 6,—Jim Stone, B5, Frank
Iltrn, 64.
Grade 5,—Rose Noyce, 07; George
Noyce, 62; Hypollite  Ruault, 58.
Grade 4.—May Stone, 68.
Grade 3, (1st Term)— Bertha
Gartside, £5; Mabel Sakata. 81.5;
Jack Langin, 7l>, Evelyn Hern, 66.
Grade 2B-—Dorothy Thompson,
Ernest Ruault. Alice Noyce, Arthur
Hern, Agnes Noyce.
Grade   IB.—Roy   Sakata,
Average of Attendance, '.'1.7.
WINNIFRED LIPPITT.
Shopper; "If thi= rut: U all wool,
why is it labeled 'cotton'?''
Clerk: "That, madam, is to fool
the moths."
The furniture and rug ad in this
issue makes good reading, and take
it from us you'll not be deceived in
quality, nor disappointed in the
prices.
Jhe Greatest Dramatic Spectacle of all Ike Ages- PAf    PAQE  FOUR
THB CRANBROOK HERALD
Thursday, November 12,1925
ftU Cranbrook Kerala
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
F. A. WILLIAMS
R. POTTER, B. Sc.
lubscrtptlon Price  U.00 Per Tew
To United State,  IWO Per Tear
Advertising Rate, on Application,   Chanfee ot Copy
lor Advertising should be handed ln not later than Wed-
Madav noon to eecnra attention.
CLINGING  TO  OFFICE
NOW that the country is,getting its breath after
thc gasp of astonishment that Premier Mackenzie Kiti£ will attempt to curry on for another session, after finding himself a minority group in the
house of commons, ami himself and nine of liis cabinet without the right to sit in tlie chamber to meet
the elected represenatives of the people, it is noticeable that many of liis own followers realize the futility of such a course, and how it is merely deferring
the time when lu- will la- swept out of office hy a
wave of indignation.    Were Premier King to resign
now, putting up tlu- problem of forming a government to Mr. Meighen, the Liberals would have had
a chance of going back stronger than ever, if the
Conservatives had found it impossible to carry on.
But despite his fervid pre-election statement, that if
his parly were not given a clear majority, he would
go back to the country again, it is evident that the
sweets of office an- too big a lure, and thc premier
apparently prefers to meet defeat ignominiously in
thc   house—because   it   is   inevitable—rather  than
step down when the election indicates that tlie feeling in the country is opposed to his policy.
To appreciate the real state of affairs, it is
necessary to bear in mind that there was much jockeying and quiet arrangement in some seat where
it was possible, between the Liberals and the Progressives, so tlie wherever feasible the Conscr
vatlve candidate was opposed by some sort of a com
bination between the other two parties. In some
cases the Conservative could not surmount such a
pact, as in Lethbridge, hut in oilier cases, notably
in West Kootenay, tin- Conservative won out clear
over all, and without a suspicion of any political rap-
proachements that lead to embarrassing situations
later.
On the prairies, in the course of the campaign,
thc premier emphasized that he did not believe the
position of thc Progressives  was  one  that  could
work benefit to the country as a whole.     He openly
repudiated any suggestion of an understanding between the Progressive leader and himself, and the
Progressive leader reciprocated.     Hut all the time,,
behind their backs as il were, schemes were being
worked out by tlieir lieutenants to combine forces
where it was thought lhat liy so doing they could
keep a Conservative out of a seat.     Ur. King was
even announced to appear on the Progressive-Uar-
mer-Labor platform, but apparently thought better
of it, and did uot do so.
Now the premier i.s forced to go down on his
knees to this remnant of thc third party and beg
their support in the house, lie must do so, because
if even a part of this group of twenty-three Progressives show any inclination to go against the
government, the Liberals will bc defeated. There
cannot be defection on thc part of any of them, so
that whatever tliey may choose to ask must be given
them, or the government has to go out of office.
What sort of government will this lead to?
What possible chance is there of the Liberal party
tackling with vigor lhe problems that need attacking with decision and energy? The prime minister
himself has to meet the commons by proxy, and
there can he nothing but government by collusion,
with a minority group of about two dozen really in
control of affairs.
Such a course upsets all the political precedents known, ami is a travesty on the British principle of governmenl by majority. It cannot last
long, fortunately, and thc electors will express their
opinion of it in no undecided voice when they arc
finally given the chance.
*****
NOW IN SESSION
portance other recent sessions.     The government
realizes that it cannot face the people again without
having made some attempt to solve thc P.G.E. cptcs-
tion, and so expert advice has been sought—the public has heard that before—to see what can be done
with the line.    The government appears to have no
policy in regard to it beyond keeping it in such
shape that it can continually be pointed at as a monument to the folly of the Conservative rule, which it
in no sense is.    The voluminous report of the survey on the educational system has to be dealt with,
if courage can be screwed up to the pitch necessary
to make the reforms it hints at so broadly.   There
are the huge over-expenditures in connection with
the university to be explained away, with the chance
to brand anyone who attempts to criticize the unconstitutional methods of making these unauthoriz-,
cd payments as no friend of the university.
Then there is the responsibility of the government for the blindfolding of justice in connection
with the Janet Smith case, and its ramifications.
In one of the trials in connection with this case,
thc counsel for the defence made the direct charge
that the Attorney-General connived at thc abduction
of the Chinese, who has been the central figure iu
this celebrated case, and yet in the house it is stated
that thc premier knows of nothing worth making a
statement on in the case.     The Attorney-General
was a witness in these cases, and the impression has
gained ground in the public mind that there is something bcing hidden, and probably someone being protected.     The peeuliar practice of the government
stepping in and appointing a special commissioner
to look into the case, thus taking it out of the regular police channels, and the charges and countercharges that have developed, have made an atmosphere of distrust that the government cannot escape responsibility for, even if it attempts to.
STRONG CRITICISM OF GOVERNMENT IN i
FIRST DAYS OF LEGISLATURE SESSION |
Victoria Conservative member, pre-
gation. It is apparent from Premier documents tabled here yesterday by
Oliver's callous admission that this the Minister of Public WorKs. They
million dollar blunder was an error  diture or how much was raised by
•   *
DOING THE CITY CREDIT
IN these times when there is so much to distract
thc attention of those who ought to be interested
in such matters, possibly the achievements of thc
high school boys who went to Nelson recently, to
compete against other athletes from West Kootenay schools, has not received sufficient prominence.
Thc cultivation of these inter-school events is difficult in these parts, where distance is such a consideration, but there is nothing like it to keep in a
healthy state that intangible but vital attribute of
youth known as "the school spirit."    Youth is at
its best when put on its mettle, and there is nothing
like sport for testing mettle.    The boy that plays
thc game right is most likely to be the man that
carries the same spirit into later years.     But in
such endeavors the high school pupils need the support and assistance of their elders, and it is only
reasonable that they should have it.    There is no
lack of criticism heard when the enthusiasm of youth
sometimes finds expression in directions that are not
considered the sanest or most uplifting, but there
would be less need for criticism if more support
could be given them in the undertakings that tend
to do credit not only to the contestants, and the
whole school in general, but result in some very
creditable advertising for the city as well.
*****
(Special to The Herald)
Victoria, Nov. 12.*—Early Government predictions of a short session
were  quickly swallowed  before  the
end of the first week's debate in the
Legislature when the seriousness of
the   indictments   presented   against
the   Oliver  administration  not  only
from   the   Conservative   opposition,
but from its own ranks, was realized.
Not thc least serious situation wos
created  by the arraingment of the
Government's "shilly-shallying" with
I with the Pacific Great Eastern problem presented by II. G. Perry, Liberal member for Fort George. Failure
of the Government to  formulnto a
definite policy of dealing with this
railway  he  said  was mere  drifting
and an admission by the Government
that it wus not competent to deal
with   n  business  problem.    A   bono
fide capital expenditure of $28,000,-
000 had now become a total debt of
(49,000,000 through accrued interest which is still mounting at the rote
of  $2,600,000 a year with nothing
being done by the Government to relieve the taxpayers of this appalling
burden.
No oppositionist could havo pointed a more awful picture of tho
and it was significant that the Government staggering under the blows
[it had received during the week, immediately adjourned the  house  for
five days.
• • • •
The addresses of the two Liberal
members who moved and seconded
the address in reply to the speech
from the throne were mere recitations of statistics taken holus bolus
from departmental reports. Following their remarks R. H. Pooley, opposition, leader in a dignified and
calm review of just two or three
phases of the Government's record
brought Premier Oliver to his feet
with a lengthy and typically violent
reply described by his own members
as the most pitiful exhibition he has
ever given in thc house.
sented a series of arraingments of
the government which it will be exceedingly difficult for the ministers
to answer. The miscarriage of justice in the Yamamoto case, where a
Japanese was tried and condemned
to death while the Attoney'General's
department had in its possession a
report from itg own mental expert
thnt the man waa hopelessly insane,
and the terrible bungling in the
Janet Smith cuse, were declared by
Mr. Pooley to have rocked the very
foundation of government, the confidence of the people in British justice.
Further references to election
mnlpractises wero contained in Mr,
Pooley's speech. He denounced the
burning of thc North Vancouver absentees ballots by the provincial
secretary's department before tho
trial of the North Vancouver election
ond said that the Attorney-General
hud not done his duty when he refused to assist the electors of North
Vancouver    in    investigating    that
scandal.
• • « •
Mr. Pooley, and H. Despard Twigg,
Seldom has there   been   such
glaring admission of   governmental
incompetence as the revelation of the
million and a quarter over-expenditure on the University construction,
admitted by Premier Oliver to have
taken place.   With only three million dollars authorized by the Legislature the public works department
plunged ahead and contracted $4,-
200,000 for the balance   of   which
they calmly ask the Legislature at
the present session.   The Minister of
'ublic Works tabled a bulky file of
documents at the   opening  of   the
house which he said would explain
the  whole thing, but a search of
those papers fails to reveal one word
about the extent of the over-expenditure or how the situation haa been
financed    in   the    meantime.   Mr.
Pooley pointed out this coarse attempt to cover up the trail and demanded a full and complete investi-
that he is relying upon his faithful
majority to exonerate him from all
blame.
• * « •
"The financial situation in British
Columbia is serious enough, but
when thc very rock on which the
British Empire is founded, justice
and liberty of the subject, is threat
ened then is our plight serious indeed," declared R. H. Pooley, opposition leader, in a scathing arraingment of the Oliver Government on
the third day of thc session of the
legislature when speaking to the address in reply to the speech from tbe
throne.
Mr. Pooley attacked the govern
ment on several counts, maladministration of justice as evidenced in the
Yamamoto and Janet Smith cases,
questionable election practises us
evidenced in the North Vancouver,
Kamloops, Nelson and Grand Forks
contests, unconstitutional over-commitment in thc University construction being among tbe chief grounds
of his criticism.
.'he administration of justice has
been drugged iu the mud during the
past year," he said, "in the Yamamoto and Janet Smith cases, Such
incidents tend to tear down the faith
of the people in good old British
liberty  and justice."
Dealing with the bill to provide
additional money for the University
Mr. Pooley said that over-commitments were no new thing with the
Oliver government but it was a nov
ipecial warrants.
"I understood the government is
committed to $1,300,000 for which
there is no authority and that special
warrants for $500,000 have been obtained from His Honor. We want all
the cards on the table."
The whole proceeding wos absolutely unconstitutional he said and
the members on the opposition side
intended to probe to the very bottom
and insisted upon having everybody
connected with the transaction before the committee on public accounts even to the highest officials
in the government.
+ + +
Mr. Pooley took the Premier and
several of his ministers to task for
plumping tbe country during the
Dominion election campaign speaking in behalf of the Australian
treaty.
"The Premier was disloyal to the
farmers of this country," he said.
"Tha farmers are strangled by the
heavy taxes of this greatest taxmas-
ter in the British Empire, harried by
American competition and now he
lifts his voice in favoring of opening
the door to Australian products free
of duty in many cuses or practically
so in others. There will be 1,001)
cases of Australian eggs landed here
in a few weeks at 48 cents a dozen,
thus breaking down thc B.C. market
for our own producers, whoso price
is nbout 68 cents just now. The
farmers look for relief from this
government, but all they see in the
Uliver goveruineoi ou. ,. «••--, » ■■--     <*-   . -
elty for them to make a clean breast speech from the throne is promises
of it as they had in this case,
"Why has this move been mude?")
he asked. "Is it to head off an in-
vestigalion? If so I warn the government that they are mistukui.
There will be a full and complete investigation of that transaction and
1 do not want it circumscribed by
the extent of the hand-picked filed
tell us nothing about the over-expen-
of moro debt and more taxes.'
Mr. Pooley said he favored a short
session but would not neglect the
interests of the people to make it
short* and warned the government
tbat the vote in British Columbia
ut the general election was a reflex
of the sentiment against the Liberal
party aroused by the maladministration of the Oliver government.
AT Victoria, with the attention of tbe province
temporarily distracted by other developments
in the federal political arena, the legislature has
started what bids fair lo surpass in interest and im-
A LIBERAL TRIBUTE TO MEIGHEN
Mr. Meighen'* achievement in four yeara Is remarkable,  ln 1921 hia chief rapport came from Ontario,
New Brunswick and British Columbia.   Nova Scotia was
..jlidly Liberal then; today Mr. Meighen haa eleven supporters from that province.   He waa short ot any supporters In six province* after the 1921 election; today he
appear* to have aecured members from every province,
and overwhelmingly »o in New Brunswick, Ontario, Nova
Scotia and British Columbia.   Th* Maritime provinces
also   turned   over,   but   thla   waa   anticipated   and
can be understood.   Depression haa been ao great there
that governments had to tak* tha Ham*, whether they
were responsible or not.   Enn th* supposedly low tariff
provinces    joined    In    ft*    Meighen    high    tariff
procession.   It ia difficult, nevertheless, to diagnose the
situation.   It may be that th* Ugh tariff policy of the
Conservative party waa responsible.   Or waa it the blue
ruin talk that undermined th* Liberals!    Possibly the
insidious suggestions and backyard gossip cut considerable figure in th* Ontario result.
Mr. Meighen la not Premier yet, and he wtll not
be if the Liberal* and Progressives can reach an understanding.     Even that la difficult—Lethbridge Herald.
LABOR THI- (iREAT
COMINO FORCE
(Continued from l*age One)
to win this or that seat. In tho St.
LawTence St. George district of Montreal she claimed that it took $150,-
000 to win that sent last year. It
was here that an old Liberal worker
told her that labor could not win, as
they hud set enough money aside
that they would be able to pay for
every vote. She described the ward
heeler—how with his smile, clasp of
thc hund, he tried to get the votes.
If they were willing to pay $150,000
for these votes, it was some indication of thc value of the vote. It
was a sacred thing, and should not be
used until they realized such sacred-
ness. Having had two uncles who
had practically given their lives for
the bnllot she claimed that it was
easy for her to see the sacrcdness
of it.
With regard to the present political situation the speaker said that
she had forsccn and prophesied thc
present politieal stalemate, nnd with
regard to the future she foresaw the
. er would but use his ballot in his own
passing of both parties, if the work-
interest. She could hoc a form of
labor government within thc next ten
yenrs. She referred U> th« enormous debt of Cunada und the addi
tion that is bcing made to it yearly.
It was unfortunate that even thla
large investment of money condition!
in Canada wag such that our children had to leave the country to secure   employment   in   the   United
States.   Thc    politician    of    today
could Invite you to the smokerfi and
the beer parlor, but waa doing nothing to remedy these conditions. 400,-
OOOmore men could be employed if
tho $700,000,000 of   imports   wero
shut out.   Slave labor of China and
Germany was in  competition with
that of the workers of this country.
As the miners had been forced to
come to termB of the capitalist ao
would the rallwaymen.   In thla connection the speaker said that ah* had
a conversation with * prominent official of the C.P.R., who told her
be  against the railway employee*,
that the next smashing process will
There will be 20 men for every job,
"we are out for dividends and not
for our health" was his way of looking ot It, by bringing first claaa men
ah* hoped that the day would soon
com* when th* railwayman would
have th* mm* to send hia representative to parliament. Hearty applause wai given th* speaker.
Chairman Slma, who complimented
th* speaker sn her helpful address,
told of th* work that Mrs. Henderson waa doing In the district
With respect to the corruption
money that Iln. Henderson had
spoken of, Mr. Sims stated that he
could recall a representation made
to him that If they contested the
■•at Mr*,, that it would mean the
election of Dr, Xing. Judging from
the result, it would appear that the
district had a finger In ths pie, and
had accepted Its share of the doles
that were handed out.
The only nsw feature to the Imperial Bank robbery waa ths finding
lata last wash of a Luger automatic
| revolver oa ths Palfrsyman place,
near ths spot where Ward was taken.
Ing at It, by bringing first class men Th, m,,,,!,,, 0f the revolver was
from England. She claimed that it nmmg kut tWt WM found on Ward
was to furtlier this end that the mat- wh,n hl m M1Mhed the day of
ter of colonisation hod been propos- hii capture-.—Creston Review.
ed, to be turned over to the railways. - , ,
In conclusion she made a strong plea Constable Ted Davis has resigned
for the workers to "pool their Intelll- jib position on ths city force. We
genco" and vote together. Th* undsrstand ha will taks a position on
farmers wero leading th, way, and ■%**** f«"-Pwn,e Fre«
****************************************
! FAIRMONT I
****************************************
Flow, babbling brook, O tumbling stream,
As down from Radium's lofty height
Fairmont, some say—a choice of names—
So then, call it which you will.
Ceaseless you run, in music sweet,
Till winter frost in part, or all,
Doles bind you in it's grasp, and chain
Your freedom, and your flowing life
Till warming spring comes on and cries
"Release, your iron hand unclasp,
Let it dissolve, and move again
Down to the vale, the broad expanse,
On to Columbia's lovely lalge."
Last night I stayed, and camping there
Close by the rippling, romping rill,
Quiet was the night, and damply sweet,
1 laid to rest, and thoughts went up,
To hilly slope, where I had seen
The grayish cone, of verdure bare
But founting out, in varied plaee
And different heat, a sulphur stream
And lower, larger, streaming flow,
Supplying nil, full, free and more,
To drop in clefts ot steep descent
And sink into the rock again.
There on the height, where people came
To breathe the winey, mountain air,
And plunge and play in water warm,
Encircled there by lovely lawns,
And flowers and trees, and beauty rare
Viewing from pool, the lofty mount
And shining lake, source of a stream
That flowing on, to north and west,
And bending south and west again,
Through our fair province, onward thence
To our neighbors to tho south.
A benefit wher'er it goes
And past the towns and cities great
Between two gileat Pacific states,
Near thousand long, and mileage wide
To the great ocean sumcly named.
Thinking as this, I went to sleep,
Soothed by the music, ceasing not,
And woke at the breaking of the morn
To merging sound of rising wind
Mingled with tinkling of the stream „ „
Brushing loud and soft again,
Cadence of life, of murmuring trees.
Render forgive, if need there is,
To ask forgiveness, here to add,
Fineness of parallel of thought,
A happy lesson for ub all
Who visit this great nature spot.
The crystal flow, the healing warm,
Thc glorious view and ozone air,
And flowing to the ocean far
The evergreening of the pines,
All speak—An unmistaking voice—
For evergreen, and flowing stream,
Mean glorious, everlasting life;
Such that no frost can ever bind
Or any detrimental power confine;
Life, love and happiness shnll rule,
True knowledge fill the whole wide world
Full—puna and unrestrained flow.
Entering a sea so vast
Without a limit to It's space,
The ocean of a perfect love,
Love that—casting out all fear—
Breathes a perfect confidence;
The greatest thing in all the world,
Such will obtain In God's due time
Redemption of the human race,
J. E. SIMESTER, Victoria, B.C.
Radium,
Fairmont Hot Springs,
Oct. 24th, 1925.
(Right* reserved)
on a
Canadian Pacific
FROM
Montreal—Nov.   18,   S.S.  Minnedosa
Montr»>,—Nov. 19, S.S. Marburn
Montreal—Nov. 20, S.S. Montclare
Quebec..—Nov.   25,   S.S.   Montnairn
From
DEC.   S, S.S. MONTROSE
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DEC. 16. S.S. MONTCLAIRE
DEC. 23, S.S. MONTNAIRN
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NOV. 26—Empress ol Scol-
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CHINA OATS, per package     4Sc
ALUMINUM OATS, per package     48c
QUICK OATS, per package     35c
LIPTON'S TEA, RED LABEL     80c
aiNOER SNAPS, per pound     25c
SPRATTS DOG BISCUITS, per sack    85c
FRESH APPLE CIDER, per gallon $1J»
HEINZ TOMATO SOUP, J tins for $1.00
CANNED CORN, choice quality — 2 tins for    35c
FRESH TOFFEE, per pound    50c
COMB HONEY, per comb     35c
PEROXIDE SOAP, 2 bars for    25c
PALM-OLIVE SOAP, 3 bars for    25c
FINEST FRESH UROUND COFFEE, per pound    60c
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P.0.Bexl4,NeIwn,B.C.    -   -   -  -   Plione 603. j Thursday, November 12,1925
THB CRANBROOK HERALD
PAQE   FIVE
Kimberley and Wycliffe
Notes
ftlf ttTttt-ft* *
I   KIMBERLEY   |
I NEWS NOTES J
*************************
Thu tea lust Friday, which wns to
have beon ot Mrs. A. A. Word's, in
uiil of tlie Hii-jlisll Church, was held
nt the homo ot Mrs. Pontus Johnson.
Miss Flossie Harris entertained a
numbor ol CrlondB at cards on Wod-
m-Hilay ovoiilng, ol ibo homo of Mrs.
E., Marsdon, A very pleasant time
was spont '>y "11 prosdnt.
0, A. Pooto and family spent
Thanksgiving Hay at Cranbrook,
Last wook a "kitchen Bhower" wns
given for Air. ami Mrs. Chlsholm at
lho Concentrator by a numbor of
Rossland frlonds, iiu- brlda being woll
and favorably known In thnt town.
tVffffffffff*Vffffffffffff
When In
KIMBERLEY
Stop at the
OLYMPIA
FOR THE BEST
CAFE, CONFECTIONERY and ROOMS
Our Cafe Is Noted for Its
First Class Cooking
A No. 1 Colfee
Excellent Cooking]
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GOOD
PROPOSITION
For Rent
DEPOT ROOMS AND
TEAPARLOR
This   Building,    Recently
Constructed, is Situated in a
Good Rooming District ..in
Cranbrook
Tea Parlor may be used
for Store
For Terms, Etc, Apply
H. C. LONG
VAN HORNE STREET
A daughter was born to Mr. and
Mrs. McKenzie last Thursday at Mo
Dougall Heights.
Miss Marcella McKay spent the
holiday at Moyie, the guest of Mr.
and Mrs. Roy Burch.
The Catholic ladies' whist drive
and dance, which wus held Monday
(evening in Handley's Hall, was certainly a success in every way. The
hall was packed, and there waa not
a dull moment tho whole evening.
Several fine prizes wore captured by
tho whist players. The grand drawing Tor cash prizes cuused considerable excitement, thc ?50.00 prixe being won hy Mr. Holt, jnr. The ladies
iu charge certainly deserve great
praise for the success of the evening.
Tlio Caledonian Society met Wednesday evening in tho K.P. Hall.
On Saturday evening last Dr. and
Mrs. Hanington entertained the
young folks ut a delightful party at
their home. Dancing was the chief
amusement. Delicious refreshments
were served, after which the young
folks returned home, having spent a
very pleasant evening,
Tuesday night the Retail Merchants met at the school house.
Next Monday the Board of Trade
will again meet, and the public are
invited to attend to discuss matters
of importance.
Thursdny evening laBt Dr. and Mrs.
Hanington entertained a large number of their friends at their home
on Howard Street, Dancing and
cords were the chief attractions for
the evening. Mubjc was supplied by
a local 4 piece orchestra, which was
thoroughly  enjoyed.      During   the
FOR RELIABLE
Shoe Repairing
Take Your Shoei to the
— O.K. SHOE SHOP-
Norbury Ave.     -     Crnnbrook
For Quality & Value In
Men'a Dress & Work Shoe*
SEE US   —   W. Niclioi, Prop.
FOR SALE
Wateroui iMitcr
Kcfusc Conveyor Chain
and drive
II.ml up chain and gear
Steam loaders
Slashers, live rolls and
other saw mill equipment
Six sets heavy IokkIiik
ilelghi
<) lumber buggies
2 dump carts
Qunntity wire cable
Shading, pulleys, steam
and water fittings
Power drill
LOVBRINO LUMBER CO.
Ltd., Wasa, B.C.
«CUNARD
% MCNOMOMLISQI
$  Back Home for
I CHRISTMAS
>       "ATHENIA"       <K
3k   From Hilllu tt Lee.te.lnrr St.
23 •!>' 01..I.W, Miiim Dm. ll- fl
5       "ASCANIA"
Vy From   tUlifftx   to   Plymouth.
g£ Cherbourg and Londo*. S-hcUI
fl! txcurtioa,  ptr-MMlIf   ssemrUi
1ft \m. D'ck        Whllt"™*   S*UU|*
j£C Pull Information trom *(*■!•,
~T or Company's o-fficM, S2S Haa<
}U ~tlnC■ St. W.. Vucmmi.
m\mvM**&**t
evening about fifty guests sat down
.to a delicious supper. This was certainly one of the events of the season and all who attended certainly
had a very enjoyable evening.
The Thanksgiving supper and entertainment given at the Union
Church Monday night, was a huge
success and was largely attended.
Those in charge of the affair are to
be highly congratulated. A nice sum
was realized, which will go toward
the church funds.
The Armistice service held at the
Union church Sunday night was
largely attended. Rev. Jos. Evans
gave a very interesting address. The
choir, also, rendered some very pleas-
ing numbers.
The funeral of the late August
Sjoberg, which was held Sunday from
the Union church, was well attended.
Burial took place at the Kimberley
cemetery.
The new cement sidewalks are still
underway, the work going on in very
favorable weather.
Dr. Tiffin now has his office in thc
Staples' block.
The Mark Creek store is having
some improvements done on thc outside of the building.
There are a number of cases of
chicken pox and measles in town.
The new telephone building is almost completed and the men are busy
putting in the new lines.
Jack Holland is sporting a new
Dodge car.
Tom Caldwell is confined to his
bed through illness this week.
11 WYCLIFFE NOTES jj
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
I
Montana Restaurant
Mcali at All Hoan
Cltan, ClfanttM ft TobaccM
Cranbrooit  St    .
Opp. Buk af Coi
Ml
THERE'S  JOT
in dining at n Restaurant where
things are kept immaculate, tha
service prompt and the food -exceptionally tasty and wholesome. That's why you'll enjoy
dining here. Our dally menu
always includes many delightful dishes.
VICTORIA CAFE
ff*Vffffffffffffffffffffff
when'in moyie"eat at—
THE MOYIE CAFE
First  Cl...   M..I.   Sn.ei at
All Hoan
Good clean  Rooms la connection
Roily Bird was a visitor here this
last week-end.
Mr. Boyd Caldwell, of Kimberley,
left early on Thursday morning with
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Crowe by automobile for Vancouver, to attend the
meeting there of the Amateur Athletic Association, which they were
chosen at a meeting at Kimberley on
Tuesday, to represent East Kootenay.
The roads that way should soon be
quite famllar to Lloyd, as he has
made the same trip during this last
summer. They are expected home
again somewhere about the middle of
the week.
Mr. and Mrs. Avery, of Lumber-
ton, were visiting with Mr. and Mrs.
A. Butler on Monday evening of last
week.
Mr. and Mrs. G. Bigelow, of Lum
berton, were registered at the hotel
for the week-end, leaving for Kimherley on Sunday evening.
Miss Geneva King, of Ainsworth,
who is teaching at the Flagstone
school, was the guest of Mrs. F. V.
Chelmiek on Monday, on her way
back to Flagstone after spending the
week-end with Mrs. Skead, of Kimberley.
The government bridge across the
river here is, we understand, to be
replaced right away. This was he-
ginning to need doing pretty badly,
as the large amount of traffic over it
was cutting it up quite a lot
The Entertainment Club met for
the first time in the Hall last Wednesday night. Ten tables were made
up for court whist The hosts of Uie
evening were the bachelors, and they
certainly were right on the job and
left nothing to be desired in the way
of refreshments, etc. Several were
feeling rather quaky, we heard,
dreading there would not be enough
eats to go round, as a much larger
crowd had turned out than they expected. However, their fears were
evidently groundless, as there was
plenty, and then some, to spare. It
was certainly a good beginning and
looks well for the success of our social winter evenings, and we hope the
members of the club will keep up
their good start and turn out each
week whenever possible. Thc meeting is held on Tuesday this week on
account of the dance in Cranbrook,
and a committee of married ladies
were choaen to be hostesses for this
week.     The prizewinners last week
Z'n Hi"; S- G' CUrk' 1,die»' «r-st;
Mr. Waiter Johnson, gentlemen's
first; Mra. A. Frederickson, ladies'
booby, and Mr. Val. Anderson, gentlemen s booby. Mr. Anderson passed
nis prise of smokes around, and we
hope Al Frederickson will get all his
of th"* d" now With the bool>y 8p°o1
ee.
The school attendance gets smaller
and smaller owing to the measles epidemic which is going the rounds
among the children.
. *•• Fred[ Wlllia. of Kimberley, was
visiting in Wycliffe Sunday and Mon-
day.
GEORGE  J. SPREULL
BARRISTER    ■    SOLICITOR
NOTARY
CRANBROOK - B.C.
tVfffftrVf*Vf*Vffffffffffff.
SEE US FOR—
YOUR NEXT SUIT
Latest style, -ft fabrtes MO-fCO
H. C. LONQ, Van Horne St
Item Ira TUrt ef
— Call Op —
BEALE & ELWELL
Cranbrook k Klmberloy
Stmts kt IMaritr
NOTES s
Soon after the mill hands had started work last Wednesday morning a
•teal shaft broke In one of the conveyors, necessitating the mill closing
down for the remainder of the day
whilst repairs were made.
The government telephone gang is
at present residing at Yahk whilst
they complete the stringing of the
new metallic telephone line from
Creston to Yahk. They expect to
finish there work about the end of
uie present week, and there is no
doubt that thla new line wtll greatly
Improve the phone service between
Yahk and Creston,
Last Friday Mr. Bateman and his
son, Cllve, were visitors to Yahk.
Mrs. C. 0. Peterson and Mra. Spar-
man, of Yahk, are spending a few
daya visiting Mr. and Mrs. Hammer
at Nelson. Mr. and Mrs. Hammer
.war* at aw Uum well-known resi
dents of Ynhk.
Many homos were brightened up
this week-end by the return of young
people from various high schools at
Nelson, Kaslo. etc., amongst whom
wore Annie McCartney, Sylvia Bilker, Joe Brogan.
On Thursday last Mr. Flett, C.P.R.
superintendent at Cranbrook, was a
visitor to Yahk.
The travelling Operatic Company
from Vancouver, B.C., which visited
Yahk on Saturday of last week, gave
a splendid show here. The first item
was a ballot dance by Madam Valda,
which was a beautiful exhibition of
toe dancing; next followed a demonstration of the famous Charleston
dance, also by Madam Valda; then a
three act play, entitled "The Mollusc," in which Miss Tommy Clancy
held the lending role. This playlet
was very clean and cleverly acted,
and greatly appreciated by the audience. As a result of several people
arriving late, the company then put
on a London Cockney sketch, which
wos very amusing. This completed
the program, and the remainder of
the evening was spent in dancing,
with Miss Lena Brogan at the piano,
Miss Brogan being releived occasionally by Miss Carter, of Eastport. Mr.
F, Fredricks, of Eastport, assisted
Miss Carter at the piano by whistling
as she pluyed. It was quite a novel
form of dance music, but, nevertheless, was greatly appreciated by the
dancers, who insisted on encores.
There would appeor to be a great
deal of talent among the Kingsgate
and Eastport people, both musical
and sporting.
Mr. and Mrs. Sawyer, of Kings-
gate, took their car to Spokane last
week, in preparation for using same
on the winter trip to California.
The wrestling fans at Yahk, Kings-
gate und Eastport are having numerous arguments as to who will be the
winner in the coming ju-jjtsu match,
to be held in the Yahk Mill HaU on
next Saturday evening, Nov. 14th.
As the bout is on a "winner take all"
basis, the fans who see this match
will no doubt see some real action,
and not only that, it will be come-
thing new, as a match of this sort
has never before been held in Yahk.
Tha general opinion seems to be that
the local wrestler, Nels Jepson, will
have the hardest match of his career,
as his opponent, Tom Grant, of Otis
Orchards, Wash., is a big powerful
man, of about 190 odd pounds in
weight, and is alleged to be an ex-
pert in the ju-jitsu style of wrestling.
Prizes are also being put up for the
preliminary bouts, which will take
place before the main event. The
fact of prizes being put up will no
doubt make the preliminary men do
their utmost to win.
Mr. Paul Nordgren and Mr. S.
Nordgren motored down to Spokane
on Monday last. They report the road
as being in pretty fair shape, which
they must have been, as they made
the return trip from Spokane to the
boundary line in the short time of
four hours and ten minutes.
Miss Ora Gulman returned to her
home in Yahk lost week, having spent
the past month or so in Spokane.
ty for membership were freely dis-
I cussed, und plans laid for u dance
| to be held to commemorate St. Andrew's Day, after which the meeting
resolved itself into un informal
social gathering, made doubly pleasant by the appearance of scones,
oat cakes, and other "jammy pieces"
for which "Auld Scotia" ia famous.
Several of the audience rendered
musical selections, and after singing
Auld Lang Syne, the meeting adjourned.
Further gatherings are to be held
fortnightly.
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
LAKE
WINDERMERE
NOTES
thc opening assisted by Rov, C. E.
Turner, of Rossland, Rural Dean of
Nelson, nnd doubtless goud congregations will greet them.
Members and adherents of the
Chureh of England in Kimberley aro
delighted with the progress nmde and
are setting out with renewed vigor
to liquidate the debt necessarily incurred in thc undertaking.
Rev. W. J. Crick wus in Cranbrook
on Sunday last and preached at the
morning service, the offering going
in aid of the new church he has just
built.
BOARD OF TRADE ACTIVITIES REVIEWED AT
BROTHERH'D MEETING
WINDERMERE HOSPITAL
BAZAAR RECEIVES FINE
FINANCIAL RESPONSE
(Special to the Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., Nov. 11.—The
success of the bazaar of the Ladies'
Aid of the Windermere District Hospital Association was quite up to the
standard which usually crowns the
success of this devoted, energetic
body of workers. Under the direction
of Miss E. M. Kittlt, the president,
Mrs. E. M. Sandilands, the-secretary,
and the other members of the executive, the funds of the aid were increased by a net gain of over $430,
realized in the short space of two
hours. But thi8 does not by any
means recompense for the individual
and collective work of organization
which has been going on amongst
the members for months past.
The entertainment was held in the
basement of the newly constructed
consolidated school house, and was
attended by all and sundry. In addition to the sale of work and of
light refreshments, there took place
the drawing for a number of raffles.
Of these the well-made and beautifully appointed doll's bed, made by
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander J, Dobbie,
was won by Mrs. Arthur Ashworth;
the ten dollar order for goods, as
generously donated by Mrs. Arthur
Taylor, went to Mrs. Harry Peters;
Mr. W. H. Tompkins won the live
turkey in a weight guessing contest,
and Mr. R. J. Williams the rooster.
The handsome little powder puff
boxes fell to Mrs. W. W. Taynton
and Mrs. H. B. Gore.
Those in charge of the various
sales stalls were Mesdames F. E. Coy,
Ed. E. Tunnacliffe and Harry B.
Gore for the fancy work; Mrs. William W, Taynton for parcel post;
Mrs. W. Sinclair Taynton, Miss MacKinnon and Miss Francis had charge
of the Bale of candy, while Mrs. T.
M. Frater presided over the afternoon teas. The home cooking table
wag under the care of Mesdames J.
C. Pitts and A. M. Chlsholm.
KIMBERLEY FORMS
CALEDONIAN SOCIETY;
MEETING LAST WEEK
Enthusiasm and a good turn-out
were the features of a matting
held In Kimberley last week
for the purpose of forming a branch
of the Caledonian Society there,
berley.
Mr. Charles Morrison kindly put
the room in the rear of his new
furniture store at the disposal of tha
meeting, and it was no time before
the business of the evening was well
under way.
Mr. E. Beckinghnm waa elected
President   by acclamation,
1st Vice-President, Mr. Dave
Clark.
2nd Vice-President, Mr. Charles
Morrison.
Scc'y.-Trens., Dr. Harrington.
Executive Committee—Mra. Brem-
ncr, Mrs. Harrington, Mra. H. Pat-
WWWVWMMWVWWVnAAIWUV
(Special to the Herald)
lnvermere, B.C., Nov. 11.—Mrs,
Arthur H. Tegart, of Windermere,
has returned home after a visit of
some length to relatives at Vancou*
ver.
Miss Mary Williams, of Cranbrook,
is here on a visit of some length at
the home ot her father.
Mrs. N. Hogarth, Mr. E. Hogarth,
Mr. and Mrs. McCreery, of Cranbrook, and Mr. H. W. Supple, of Cab
gary, were amongst those arriving by
automobile who spent the Thanksgiving holidays in this part.
Lieut-Commander Powles, R.N.,
has added two pedigree goats to his
foundation flock on Britannia ranch.
He proposes to further extend his
operations by carrying. on a heaver
and muskrat farm, and has arranged
for the delivery next fall of more
than two pair of silver foxes.
OCTOBER REPORT
FOR   SOUTH
WARD   SCHOOL
DIVISION I
Attendance 84.7.
Perfect Attendance: Edwin Ber.
rington, Frank Blefare, James Haley,
Billy McNeil, Eileen Pantling, Freddie Shaw, Harry Solecki, Paul Solecki, Angelina Blefare, LUa Campbell, Walter Cox, Josie GarfTa, Agnes
Moore, Philip Rombough, Catherine
Rosling, Tom Barrett, Herbert Berrington, Margaret Russell, Stanley
Saunders, Eddie Woods.
Rank:
Grade. Ilia—Catherine Rosling,
Harry Solecki, Edwin Berrington,
Margaret Caasels, Paul Solecki, Eileen Pantllng, Billy McNeil, James
Haley, Ellen Saunders, Freddie Shaw,
Frank Blefare. Unranked owing to
illness, -Seville Rosevear, Nina Gordon, Wilfred Griffin.
Grade Illb—Connie Worthington,
Walter Cox, Angelina Blefare, Jack
Bateman, Philip Rombough, Rose
Yadernuek, Lila Campbell, Stanley
Saunders, Tiny Sullivan, Steve Yadernuek, Agnes Moore. Unranked
owing to illness, Gertie Daliiel, Muriel Miller, Mabel Griffin.
Grade Ha—Velda Coleman, Eddie
Woods, Camilla Romano, Tom Barrett, Herbert Berrington, Jon Thor-
leifson, Margaret Russell. Unranked
owing to illness, Joyce Bond, Leslie
College, Lloyd ' College, George
Strood. .
S. W. HODGSON
DIVISION II
Attendance 77.8.
Perfect Attendance: Jack Berrington, Alex Blefare, Donald Campbell, Malcolm Campbell, Franklin
Eley, Angelina Frislni, Maurice Haley, Frankie Roiling, Jimmy Shaw,
Milton Solecki, Billie Yadernuek,
John Yadernuek.
Rank:
Grade lib—Franklin Eley, Irene
Curie, Violet Partridge, Frank Romano, Dorothy Thompson, Donald
Campbell, Alex Blefare, Maurice Haley, Malcolm Sanderson, Milton Solecki, Jimmy Shaw.
Grade Ia—Bruce Cameron, Gerald
Walsh, Freddie, Steeves, Mike Tito,
Reggie Bevis, Alex Larsen, Charlie
Colk, Jack Berrington, Billie Yadernuek, Margaret Thompson, Betty
Daliiel.
Grade Ib—Phyllis Griffin, Billy
Worthington, Lloyd Cameron, Delia
Colledge, Frank Rosling, Florence
Johnson, Charlotte Quaife, Albert
Partridge, Josie Romano, Peter Thor.
leifson, Malcolm Campbell, John Yadernuek, Angelina Frislni.
MARY J. RICE (Teacher)
FLORA C. DOW (Substitute)
NEW ANGLICAN CHURCH
OPENS IN KIMBERLEY
ON SUNDAY NEXT
It is but a short time since
the inception of tht Anglican Church
in Kimberley, but during that time
much progress hu been made and
it is gratifying to announce that the
new building on Walllnger Avenue is
so near completion that arrangements
have been definitely made for the
formal opening on Sunday, November 15th.
Rev. W. J. Crick arrived aa priest
in charge about the end of June and
since that time, while discharging the
ordinary duties of his offlce, he has
been assiduously promoting the erection of the building now happily to
be opened for use of the Anglican
community in this place. In the work
he has been assisted by a committee
who have also been aealous in the
difficult task which wu before them.
tcrson, Mrs. Leo Johnston, Mr. W. I    Archdeacon  Graham,  of  Nelson,
Young, Mrs. John Morrison,  Mrs. who will be remembered for his elo-
Holt, Mrs. E. Park. quest appeal oa behalf of the build-
The question of due. mm! eligiUU- tag tm*\ le opttU* U efleUW al
(Held over from Last Week)
Wednesday evening a meeting of
the Cranbrouk Brotherhood was held
in the school room of the United
Church, it being the regular monthly
meeting of that organization. Following the luncheon, President Wilson took the chair, and after several
matters of business were attended to,
he favored the members with a resume of the activities of the Board
of Trade for the past year. As the
mover of the vote of thanks said, the
address contained a number of matters of which he was ignorant and
doubtless there were others in the
same position. After enumerating
the various avenues along which the
activities of the Board ran, Mr. Wilson gave a report as to the result obtained in each line.
With respect to agriculture,
through the efforts of the board, the
matter of the feasability of irrigating
the St. Mary's Prairie was thoroughly
gone into, government engineers having come into the district to make investigation. The report was that it
was not feasable.
In the interests of mining the mineral display cabinet at the post office
was one of their accomplishments.
Seventy specimens were already being shown, and more space wm required.
Aids of various types were given
to the lumbering, transportation and
motor traffic interests. An estimate
of the value of the tourist traffic was
given. In connection therewith certain figures were interesting. The
government had collected in this district $7,300 from the 3 cents tax on
gasoline, and in motor licences $29,-
213; the amount spent in the district
had been $57,000.
Other matters ouched upon were
the annual meeting of the Board? of
Trade which was held here, the endeavor to secure additional assistance
at Kingsgate, the swimming pool for
the Y.M.C.A., and the tourist park,
which showed a balance of over
$500.
A hearty vote of thanks was
dered Mr. Wilson on tlie cond
of his address.
POTATO EXHIBITION
AND SEED FAIR AT
NEW WESTMINSTER
In view of the increasing importance of the potato and seed industry to this Privince it is hoped that
all those interested in the agricultural industry will endeavor to visit
this Exhibition which 13 being held in
the Armouries.New Westminster, November 25th to 28th.
No other section of the North
American continent is so well adapted for the production of such a wide
variety of seeds as is the province
of British Columbia. British Columbia i3 importing large quantities of
various kinds of seeds annually the
majority of which can be successfully produced right at home. Some of
the seeds now imported are alfalfa, red clover, timothy, root and various kinds of vegetable seeds. As a
result thousands of dollars are leaving this province annually for ths
purchase of seed.
Potatoes are the most valuable
field crop produced in British Columbia; anything which can be done
to standardize tho varieties reduce
disease and improve the grnde is of
the greatest benefit.
Seed potatoes produced in northern sections ar^ always superior to
those grown in the south. It would
seem logical, therefore, to expect
that British Columbia should be exporting large quantities of seed potatoes annually.
The British Columbia Potato Show
and Seed Exhibit is an opportunity
for producer and consumer to come
together to discuss matters of mutual
niterest. It is also an opportunity
for the farmer to acquaint himself
with the varieties most suitable for
the market and to learn the importance of good seed.
Attention is also directed to the
special session for peed growers
which has been arranged for Satur-
morning, November 28th. It Is
hoped to secure a number of goud
speakers to give addresses on seed
production.
New Type Engine for Loggrri
Diesel engines will be brought into use in the logging camps of the
Pacific coast next year, if recommendations before tbe Pacific Logging congress, held recently in
Seattle, are adopted. The increasing
remoteness of the timber regions and
the prohibitive cost of wood and
gasoline make it necessary, it is
said, to find some other form of
power.
WWWWWWVWWWVrVWrWrfVWvW^^^
REMOVED
C. JOE BROS., TAILORS.
We are pleased to announce that we have removed to more commodious quarters in the Bowness
Building on Baker Ave., opposite Cameron & Sangs
and are now prepared to cater to the needs of those
who want good clothes at a big saving. We have a
varied assortment of suitings and patterns.
If a saving of $15.00 to $20.00 per rait is a
consideration, sec ns.
Ladies' and Gents' Suits Made to Order
CLEANING and PRESSING
C. JOE BROS.
Baker Street, Opposite Cameron & Sang.
St********************************************!*Ml**
COAL
As Coal Dealers—
We dot our i's and cross our t's, — we pay
strict attention to details.
That's why we have no trouble writing
QUALITY AND SATISFACTION
into all transactions with our Customers
:   LETHBRIDGE DIAMOND COAL FOR QUALITY   %
The CRANBROOK CARTAGE & TRANSFER CO.
PHONE 63
fff
PATRONIZE  HOME  INDUSTRY
 By Using	
CRYSTAL CREAMERY
BUTTER
CRYSTAL DAIRY, LIMITED
- phone aa — PACE   III
THE CRANBROOK  HERALD
Thursday, November 12,1928
THE UNITED CHURCH
REV. B. C. FREEMAN
Pastor
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15th.
II a.m.—Subject, "HOLDING THE LINE".
U.1S — SUNDAY SCHOOL AND ADULT BIBLE CLASS
7.30 p.m. — Subject "THY LIFE   FOR   HIS   LIFE;
PEOPLE FOR HIS PEOPLE."
THY
RESOLUTIONS LAID BEFORE RECENT
FARMERS' INSTITUTE CONVENTION HERE ! i
— YOU WILL RECEIVE A CORDIAL WELCOME —
PROFESSIONAL CABD8
W.   A .   F E R 0 I E
DENTIST
Campbell-Manning  Block
Phone 97        Office Hours
9 lo 12; 1 to 5 p.m. Sat. 9 to 1
Drs.   Oreen   &   MacKinnon
Physician,   -ft   Surgeon.
Offlce at Residence, Armstrong
Avenue
OFFICE      HOURS
Afternoons  2 to 4
Evenings   7.30 to 8.30
Sundays  2-00 to 4.00
CRANBROOK,   B.C.
DR.   F.   B.   MILES
DENTIST
OFFICE HOURS
9 to 12 a.m.       1 to 5 p.m.
Hanion  Blk.,  Cranbrook,  B.C.
Baptist C&urcft
Rev. W.T. TAPSCOTT
213 Norbnrjr An. • Phone 2M
SUNDAY, NOV. ISth.
11 a.m.—Rev. M. S. Black
burn, Preacher
12 o'clock — Sunday School
7.30 p.m. —"THE LAW OF
THE HARVEST."
lOtl
ABE COBDMIAI
DtTITBD.
Resolution No. I Bajrnoi Lako
Whereas on two recent occasions
when a veterinary inspector has been
sent down to the Baynes district to
test the local cattle for tuberculosis,
tbe  work  has  been  only  partially
done and many cases have been overlooked and not tested; be it hereby
resolved that, the Chief Veterinary
'inspector be requested to give at
least a fortnight and preferably one
month's notice to the District affected  (through the  Secretary of the
local Institute or if no Institute is in
existence some well-known farmer in
the district before sending the Inspector; and that the Inspector shall
be instructed to call on. the   said
farmer  or  Secretary   of Institute,
who, on bia part, shall have a list
ready of all owners of cattle who
wish to have their cows tested.
Reaolntion  No.  2 — Baynes  Lake
Whereas, in the control of the unenclosed range and the apprehension
of male animals belonging to the Indians, Illegally at large a great deal
of confusion exists aa to how much
control tbe provincial authorities can
exercise  In  this  matter  and how
stockmen can protect themselves in
this matter.   Therefore be it resolved that the Advisory Board be asked
to procure a conference with the
Grazing Commissioner and the Indian Superintendent for B.C. and a
definite understanding be arrived at
in this matter and the Institutes and
stockmen advised of the result.
Resolution  No.   3. —Cranbrook   In-
etltaU
Whereas in certain sections con*
F. M. MacPHERSON
Undertaker
Phone 350
Norbury Ave., Next City Hall
W. Herchmer
BARRISTER
and
SOLICITOR
CRANBROOK   -   B.C.
— PHONE 61 —
I'fffffffffffJ
JOHN CARD
PAINTER &
PAPERHANdER
fill Llic tf Wall refer
to Stock.
-Store, Hauoa Areaae
vmmett *t HI ku
OUBBMM    .    .    .    ML
CRANBROOK
CLEANERS & DYERS
Every Garment sent to us to
be Cleaned or Dyed la given
Our Utmost Care
Our knowledge of the business
is your assurance of satisfaction here.     Phone and we will
call, or bring us your work
W« Clean * Ore EnrylUef
PHONE   157
siderable damage is being done by
beavers and in cases where permits
are issued and beavers trapped it is
compulsory to turn the hides in to
the Government and considering the
cost of trapping this Institute re*-
quests that at least half of the value
of the hide be given to the trapper.
Discussion on this was to the effect that this impression waa wrong
as to not get ing any part of value
of hide as you turn in your hides to
the government and when they sell
these, they return to you half of the
sale price.
Resolution No. 4, — Baynes Lake
Whereaa a groat deal of loss is
sustained by stockmen from injury
and death of their stock by reason
of derelict buildings on abandoned
farms, open wells on tho same and
barb-wire fences in disrepnir, therefore bc it resolved that we request
tho Advisory Board to take up this
question and give us full information
how to handle this trouble on lands
abandoned and reverted to the
Crown, second, on lands abandoned
but still held in the title of absentee
owners,
Briico Institute
Brisco asked support of Central
Institute to secure loading platform
and shed to store freight in at Bris-
,co in view of increased shipping from
that point nnd it was moved and seconded by Mr. Jones that the proper
action is for Brisco to take this matter up with the District Suprintend-
ent of C.P.R. cither by petition or
take up with Board or Railway Commissioners.
Save Money!
Make your own hard
or soft soap by using
waste fats and ~
GILLETTS
PURE |VE
FLAKE LT C
It costs less to make ,
soap than to buy It!
FULL DIRECTIONS
WITH EVERY CAN
eSS?
fOfc
VISE.      .
;Tstft)
li
•nt
member to get what action he can
on it
Mr. T. H. Flett was present to
answer Brisco's request for platform
and building for freight etc., and
Mr. Flett promised to go into this
matter fully, if Brisco would send
particulars. The matter of railway
fences being repaired etc. was
brought up and Mr. Flett said that
if matter was small that it should be
taken up with section man, but if
large should be taken up through his
office.
Resolution  No.   12,—Jaffray   Institute
Whereas property is held as security for school taxes and consequently it should not be necessary
to penalise thc owner by depriving
i him of his vote, therefore be it resolved that rate-payers havo a vote
ut school meetings,   whether   their
tuxes ure paid or not, providing they
nre bonu fide property owners.
Moved by Mr. Crowo seconded by
Mr. Uilmour that some concessions
be made to make it easier to get a
little more expeditious action on this
matter of fumigation.
Resolution No. 13—Cranbrook
That we support tho Cranbrook
Farm-on1 Institute in requesting thut
thc rights of tho City of Cranbrook
in selling water records from the
overflow below their reservoir on the
combined waters of Joseph Creek
and Gold Creek bc defined and
better understanding of the present
confused status of water rights on
these two creeks be obtained.
Resolved that a letter of appreciation of the services of the District
courage them to stay on the land,
therefore be it resolved that the De-
partment of Agriculture make provision to provide free a short agricultural course for one student from
each Institute district each year, and
further that the nomination of such
student be left in the hands of thc
Executive of the Central Institute of
each District, who shall be guided in
their choice by the standing of such
student in any field, judging and
stock competition carried on in the
district.   Moved by Mr. Crowe, seconded by Mr. Smith.    Carried.
Resolution  No.   19.
Whereas thc East Kootenay Stock
Breeders' Association has requested
assistance in ridding the   range   of
worthless and unbrunded horses and
whereas   this   Institute   is   of   the
opinion that this problem is so large
ns to be beyond the means of any
local   organization   to   handlo   anil
whereas in view of the fact thnt it
is estimated thut there are 1000 of
those on thc St. Mary's and adjacent
ranges which are robbing the duiry
and beef  men  of  the  grazing  on
these lands, be ib resolved that this
Central Institution go on record as
strongly supporting this resolution,
and instruct their delegute   to   the
Advisory Board to press this matter
at tho Board meeting and with the
Department   of   Lands.   Moved   by
Mr. Worden seconded by Mr. Letcher.
Resolution  No.  20.
Whereas there seems to be a lack
of appreciation on the part of the
Comptroller of Water Rights and his
head officials of the difficulties aris-
^1°1"m"   ml' *' "iW'^*?"*7  ' •A**™"'"*'. Mr. A. L. Hay, be sent ling from uncertainties as to authori-
.?°iIr-„ TnTl L J^SfE '™n> this convention to the Hon. the'ty of water branch engineer, and
the Grazing Commissioner   of   the
/Province be asked to make more or
less periodic visits to Uie district of '££!£££ J™ Jta district!
East Kootenay, annually, in order to    ReJO|utj0   n0
become personally familiar with ex- j
L. D. CAFE
(Littb Davenport)
When yon wish sam-alMaf food
lo oat, go ta Ik* L.D.
"asyLessons in *
AUCTION
BRIDGE
New Series by WYNNE FERGUSON
cAuihor tflFerguson on cAwHonThi4$
CwrtBitt IMS k, lUrk. jr.
isting conditions and that beforte do-
Whereas,
15, — Baynei
some   farmers
complained that they are unable to
ing so he notify the local organisa- a ^ ,0 8hoot  vermjn
bona well In advance. ,ganle whe„ ft fa   dcstroying   ^
Resolution   No.   6, — Windermere
That Mr. Tice, the potato special-
crops) on their own holdings without paying for the same; be it here-
ARTICLE No. 6
nted out la these
eanii
i of the best ways to
lodam a» soonms
-    It has often been
articles that one
team auction le to study examples of
"What not to do," either in the bidding
or play. The other night the writer waa
playing at oae of the well-known New
York card dubs, supposedly with high-
' grade players, and yet observed some
very fine examples of "What not to
do.   For example:
Hearts — K.7,6 	
Clubs —K, J. 9,8,4        i     Y
Diamonds—K, 10,«, 6,1 lA      B:
Spades — none :     Z      :
wom-ps nsTiTUTi
Mm* b I
I. ef r. I
************************t
TASTY FOODS
Carefully selected — prepar-
11 ed by Cooks who know how
— and served to you in an
appetizing and appalling
;; way — is what you get when
you dine with us.      Vantpt
and courtoufl serves.
i CLUB~CAFE
I'hone 155
. ************************
President!
fee^TraatNri
GEORGE SMITH
Sn.   Flalajtoa
I. O. O. P.
KEY CITY LODGE No. «
Mteta every
.Monday night at
 'The Auditorium
Sojourning Oddfellow* art cordially invited
N.G.    -    . F. A. WILLIAMS
Bee. See. E. O. Dingley, P.O.
■jtg*±
C. P. R.
Qeneral Change in
TRAIN
SERVICE
UcanadianI
Imcific/
No score, first game. Z dealt and bid
one no trump. A passed, Y bid two
spades and B -and Z passed. Here's
where A started to give a fine eshibition
of "What not to do." He didn't stop to
. figure that his hand waa worth probably
three tricks it apatite were trumps, so
that if his partner could take only one
trick, they would save the game. He
gaily bid three dub* which Y doubled.
B and Z passed and A now decided to
try three diamonds. This also was
..doubled and the contract was set for
-Mu points. Study this hand, the bidding
and the score, and learn "what not to
do" under similar circumstances.
Here's another hand where a fairly
good player fell down:
and compare notes with analysis thai
will be given in the next article.
The same player had a somewhat
similar problem a few hands later. Hi
also fell down on this hand so let's sei
what our readers will do. It is a fiai
example of "What not to do."
Hearts —S
Clubs —9,8,6,3
Diamonds — 7, 6, 2
Spades — A, K, 8,7, «
         Hearts— K,«, 1
1     Y      I       Clubs— K, ft J, 4
lA       B:        Diamonds—K, 8
I     Z     :       Spades —ft 10,4,2
Effective, Sun., Sept. 27th, I92S
Time for Trains ut Cranbrook
Will Be
Weitb'nd — Tne. Time — Enstb'nd
No. C7   Daily   No. 08
ar 12 noon nr. 4:10 p.m.
Iv. 12:20 p.m lv. 4:20 p.m.
Cranbrook.Lake Windermere
No. 822 ar. 3:30 p.m. Wednesday A
Saturday.    No.  821  lv.  0:00  a.m.
Monday and Thursday.
To Kimberley
No. 823 Iv. 12:25 p.m.; No. 8:25 lv.
4:30 p.m.
From Kimberley
Ne. 824 ar. 11:30 a.m.; No. 823 ar.
3:66 p.m.
Trull-Canada Limited has been withdrawn.
Nos. 823 and 824 connect at Cranbrook with Westbound No. 67.
Nos. 826 and 820 connect at Cranbrook with Eastbound No. 68.
For further particulars apply to any
ticket agent.
J. E. PROCTOR, D.P.A. Calgary
DEVIL'S
FOOD
THAT'S
LOVELY
Cream scant half cup batter—add 2 cups brown sn-
gar—add 2 egg yolki and
J. i cup cocoa made into a
thick paste wifli a little
boiling water. Sli.- in
three-quarters ol a cup ol
milk (one-quarter Pacific
Milk), balance water) In
which Is dissolved 1 teaspoon soda. Add one and
a half cups flour and one
half teaspoon baking powder. Then fold in beaten
white of one egg (save
other white for Icing).
PACIFIC  MILK
Haai    Oflcei    Vnium
Factorial al Laimar a\ AbWttfarJ
Heart* —6
Cluba—K,Q,9,8
Diamond! — 7
Spade*-A, Q.J, 9, 7, 6, 2
Ko acore. rubber game. Z dealt and bid
lour spade* (a fine preemptive bid, by
the way). A doubled, Y passed and B
bid live heart*. Z and A now passed
and V doubled. When all patuted, what
should Z have opened? Think this over
No score, rubber game. Z dealt and bid
four heart*. A bid five diamonds and
1. V opened the king of spade*
and B'a hand, the dummy's In this instance, was placed on the table. Z
played the three of apades and A the
live. What should V now play and why?
Reason this out and try not to do what
Ydid.
In the following hand the most inexcusable mistake of the evening wu
made:
t Y i
lA B:
t     Z
ist of the province, be asked through  .    j*   ,:, . ...    „ .    . .
sa.    a j • «     j-      a      i.     £    °y resolved that all provincial con-
the Advisory Board, as to when he
is going to make his visit to the district of East Kootenay- and that advice of his intention be sent well, in
advance.
Resolution No. 7, — Windermere
Heart*
CM* --
Heart*—K, 0,9,8,4
Club* —A, 4
Diamonds — J, 7,6, 2
Spades — 9,5
No score, first game. Z dealt and bid
one heart, A and Y passed and B bid
one spade. Z and A passed and Y bid
two hearts. Tlie final bid was four
spades due to the fact that Y raised the
heart bid twice more. He also doubted
four spadi.. What should Z open/ Before you dv.i'Je, think it over carefully
nnd don't in ike thc mistake that Z did.
Ilis opcniitg wis a fine example of
"What not to du."
,   «. 4
^r
— ur ie
Pktwwl" — 5,3
fcades —K.ll,2
I
V
.
lA
I
Z
1
IT* ..v. •
Cnl - -
DUnxw
lil-*.**. *
fs —6, 4
Hearts —8,4
Club* —Q,M,2
Dismond* — K, 2
Sjm6*j — none
Cw\ww% ■fttmwwaadZUin the lead.
flow cu YZ wUlve mi the eight tricks
eay<M*a*e?
rt* Problem No. 4
Z*fcoOd*»dtWlouro(heartsandYwin
the trick wtUthe ace. Y should then lead
tWdauccofspade* which Z should trump
wkh th* deuce ot dub*. Z should then
■ h*-lttaUaioldUmoiKU*ndfollowwltS
the deimef diamond*, which trick A
murt wta. Whatever A nqw leads YZ
oust wta two trump tricks. If A leads
■ mmm or • Made Z trump* and
lead* the eight ol hearts. His queen of
dub* aaaM iow mah*. If A should lead
ft trump. Z *t**swt still win two trump
trick*. Played te thi* way, YZ must
via Ira of th* right trict* wainst any
defense, lt should be noted that the
lead of the km* of diamonds by 7. at
trick one and the lend of the deuce of
diamonds nt trick two is a loser. A
should lead the nine of hearts which Y
must win. Thc lead by Y of a heart or a
spade is a loser. Tlayctl in this way, Y7
must lose four tricks. It should also b<
noted that Z may first play the king o.
diamonds and then lead the four of
hearts and let Y lead the done of
spades. When he trump* the spade 7
should then lead the deuce of jli.uiumJ..,
obtaining 1 lie name result as iu the correct solution given* It is a tricky problem and should be carefully not.il. KI
ot the variations given should be played
out.
time we have no Colorado Potato
Beetle in the Windermere district
and whereas these beetles are on the
increase in the districts to the south
of here, therefore we would request
the Department of Agriculture that
it continue and increase the aid for'
their destruction.
Resolution  No.  8, — Brisco
Whereas there are annually winter excursion three-month rates from
Alberta to eastern Canada and
whereag a resident of B.C. desiring
to take advantage of such rate mu»t
pay the regular rate to some point
in Alberta and then at great inconvenience obtain an excursion rate
ticket and whereas we feel that B.C.
citizens should have a corresponding
concession in this regard, therefore
be it resolved that we request the
Advisory Board to take up this
question with a view to having such
concession extended to B.C.
Resolution No. 9, — Newgate
Whereas in certain districts in
close proximity to Indian reserves
considerable trouble arises each year
due to the fact that there are male
animals belonging to the Indians on
the open ranges, this Institute requests the Minister of Lands to give
a definite ruling a* to what can be
done in handling this question and
how far the authority of the Lands
Department extends in the control
of the unenclosed Indian lands.
Resolution No. 10, — Newgate
That the freight rates on the Great
Northern from Newgate to Fernie
and intermediate depots be investigated.
Moved by Mr. Tompkins seconded
by Mr. Crowe that matter be referred to the Advisory Board member
to take what action he seee fit and
find out rate*.
Resolution No. II, — Baynes Lake
Whereas at present there is no
road to the G.N, depot at Dorr and a
dangerous situation ia created whenever it is necessary to take produce
in vehicles to be loaded at the depot;
to it hereby resolved that the Department be requested to take the
necessary steps to oblige the G.N.
to provide a road to the depot, as
the road necessary would be on their
right of way; and to provide a second road ao that carloads may be
loaded at the siding, without driving
between the tracks.
Moved by Mr. Jones, seconded by
Mr. Cobb that this resolution be left!
i—   (k>   liBHila   ttt     Ailuiuni-v    TtnnrH '
Premier, the Hon. the Minister of' provincial     constables    in     water
Agriculture and each member of the troubles, and a chronic disinclination
on the part of these latter officials
Lake    to take summary action which is the
having only action of value in such matters,
and in the past instances of summary
action by the local engineers have
been unsupported by his superiors
to the lowering of his authority and
the lessening of his  energy  in  his
duty, therefore be it  resolved that
we ask that   greater   attention   be
'given to the fact that quick action
is the only action effective in irrigation matters.
Resolution No. 21
Whereas many of our agricultural
districts are isolated and a long way
from medical and other facilities, and
cannot get into quick communication
with markets and other utilities,
therefore be it resolved that the Dominion Department of Public Works
through the Minister be asked to investigate such conditions and where
possible extend the Rural Telephone
system to make the life of the agriculturist more enjoyable and more
profitable.
stables be instructed to issue such
licenses without payment immediately on application by any farmer of
his district
Farmer can obtain this free license
That whereas up to the present  g"^™^ *f*""* *"*'" "
ima    lira    Vm-irn     tin      PnlnraHn       P-ntntn <* *
- Resolution No.  16, — Cranbrook
Whereas in certain districts the
coyote is becoming a greater menace
to the sheep industry and poultry industry each year and many sheep
men are being compelled to quit the
sheep industry due to the ravages of
the coyotes, be it resolved that this
Institute strongly advise that the
bounty be very substantially increased ap. that the bounty in the summer
months be double that of the winter
months and that no reduction be
made in the bounty for pup*.
Resolution No. 17, — Moberly
That bears should be allowed to
be killed at any time and no limit to
the number killed by any person.
Brought up in connection with obtaining licenses to kill bears which
are a menace to school children and
people and the meeting was inforncd
that a license can be obtained at any
time to get rid of bears or nny other
animal. that is a menace to people
or crops.
Resolution No. 18.
Whereas it is desirable that every
opportunity be given to our young
people to secure the   best   possible
training to enable them to carry on
as successful farmers, and to en-
Upset Stomach,
Gas, Indigestion
Take 'Diapepsin
The moment you eat a tablet of
"Pape's Diapepsin" your indigestion
is gone. No more distress from a
sour, acid, upset stomach. No flatulence, heartburn, palpitation, or
misery-making gases. Correst your
digestion for a few cento. Each
package guaranteed by druggist to
overcome stomach trouble.
Hair Grown
or No Money
NMtot tht Vaa Ba tadbl* rabtar emwt* cap oa th*
bottle. Yoo rub tba bottle onr yoar head sad tbe rubber
nipples feed the hair (raring medicine lato lhe scalp.
One minute a da, hi jroor on home with Van Eat
Liquid Scalp Massifs meena an abundance of new hair
and Ihe gloeeandlueter that come with perfect hair health.
— For Sale by —
Stores Department, B. C. Spruce Mills,
Lumberton, B.C.
in tha hands of   Advisory   Board'
Bruce Robinson
Phone 295       Teacher ef Xaale P.O. Box 7(1
STUDIO — ARMSTRONO AVENUE
Third House from Presbyterian Church
flflBIISOIS ORCHESTRI-DIIGESIRBII6ED FOR
DOW DuttO
They-Driv-*
Him Nut*
s,
"Rub." CoUbot
IN rw HAZY   l—s
U6UT OP
ftffcOACHIMG  busk,
TTHe uiiib-eireb
MIMM), WITH f\
riCMblSH CHUCKCe
Of TftlOMPH, CfcEM-
<aLou>Ly--iDuoAKbs
TH* T-eRftofc-ATRlCWEN
WMOR6-W1TH   A
SHRieK OT HOR(5oE-
CoMTIM-JEb  OA)
■PA.C5-S
"SHe CLOSED H€ft
evei as -rvte
.SWAf-rrHY ARMS
Op THE BROTe
cLoseb ABounr
H6R LIKE   THE
TeMTACLeS of sons
HORRiaL-E 3EA-MOMSIERL
just TrteM Trte t>ooft
CPEWEfc. AMd   JAClc
L6friMQ"teLL- CoMrii-JUEt*.
■■as
' ' ^
"rOSH-Eq   IM  AMb 1
LAlk TH* FIENb FLAT
OM MS BACK UJtTH
A weLL-Amefc*. BlOlA).
OM THE JAUJ-  He
GATKeReti -thg u'hr
ffeRM Of THE B-SAUTIFUI.
QIRL 1(0 HIS FouueBFUL.
arms AMti pper-A-aet*
To FL-S: UJ1TH HER TO
THE AMERICAM   COM-.
SOt AT6 - BUT JUST THEN
-THS COftTAIlOS PARTek
ANts SIKT6-S7-J   BLACK
C6MOMS. COMTIMOEb on
wee ijs." Thursday, November 12,1925
THE   CRANBROOK   HERALD
PAOn SEVEN
HAY
Timothy and Upland
Ready far Immediate
Shipment
We Specialize in all kinds of
Farm Produce
TIMOTHY SEED
3-1 Purity and No. 3
Prices on Application
Wire, Phone or Write to
PINCHER CREEK
CO-OPERATIVE    ASSOC.
Pincher   Creek,   Alta.
PHONE 27 tf
DR.   LARGE
Dentist
C.P.R. Telegraph Buildin,
Next to Y. II. C. A.
Office Hours
0 to 12—1 to 5        Phono 204
Milk and Cream
DIRECT FROM
Big Butte Dairy Farm
mora u
♦■WtfttttfT ♦♦♦♦tt * ttftffft
For Good Value In
GOOD   EATS
Go to The
ZENITH   CAFE
Cor. BAKER A VAN HORNE
iliiliitrrfcJiit..i.it.itiiftitiiti-J. A A J. A J. A-/i A A .*. A i
tTTtTTTTTtTtTTTTTtTttttT
**************************
See Us For Your
I School
Suppliesf
Watch for arrival of our new
(FALL   GOODS
Paul Nordgren Store
On Kain Road, near bridge
Cor A Cold
o/fSmenihw?
The po«arTiil UMlMtlM
finrmicitlal fuma* iHsa *lt
by Papt bring qvkk nl*.
Papa tootM Un tmajaw
thront tnd ■Ir-MMi **aa
kill cold-MMM, iHu aara-
non ■ndTntlaiMMtlN, Mi
Kwir.lv am* Hull iii* I
couch* and aaSaX TMr
strrnalhan tha thMt ll •
wonderful way.
PEPS
Sk ttowOt-Sim
WHY OPERATE?
for Appendicitis, GdllftooM,
Stomach nnd Liver Troablaa,
when HEPATOLA docs the
v.Mti*. without pain and OO
risk- of vour lifo nor lass cl
time.
Cnnt-uitiK tin potion.   nTotuldbydngflhto.
Mrs. Geo. S. Alnt
MUK MANUVACTUBM
330 Fourth Avu. S. PhoM MN
SASKATOON
PrircSiV-Ml-I'nrcelpoatUeatn-
STRIP TICKETS
With and Without Coupons
For General
Admission Purposei
For Sale at
THE
CRANBROOK HERALD
OFFICE
J. F. SCOTT
Cranbrook Drug & Book Co.
SYNOPSIS precedented   action,   clumped   Bub's
Bob, a young tramp,   saved   thc mind.    He reached out und plucked
Limited when it was about to crash   the purse from the startled conduc-
into a boulder on a trestle, and now (tor's hand,
is in the mail car on the way to Crat-
HURRY'S WHITE LUNCH
IS THE PLACE TO EAT.
White Help Only Ie Eaploje-i.
Vou Trill find this Cafe a Homr
Place to Enjoy Too Heale
ALEX. HURRY   ■   Prop.
******* I
THE
NEW HOTEL
Yahk, B.C.
J. MARKLUND, Proprietor
SIM
When In Yahk make your home at
TIIE NEW HOTEL.
This Hotel li new from bottom to top.    Twenty-five nicely furnished roomi. All are clean
aad comfortable.
RESTAURANT IN CONNECTION.
THIS WINTER
Canadian Pacific
RAIL      ■    -      STEAMSHIP
TO THE OLD COUNTRY
XMAS SAILINGS
ONTROSE, Liverpool
ELITA, Cherb'gSouthampton-Antwerp
ETAGAMA,Orecnock (Glasgow) L'pooi
ONTCLARE, Liverpool
| ONTNAIRN,(ireenock (Glasgow) L'pooi
Dec
•5M
tt
10 It
tt
11 11
tt
16 II
1»
23 A|
SPECIAL TRAIN to SHIP'S SIDE at W. ST. JOHN
From Winnipeg 10.00 a.m„ Dec. 8 and 13, connecting with
S.S. Metagama and S.S. Montclare.
THROUGH SLBEPBRS POR OTHER SAILINQS
Early Booking Inmrei Choice Accommodation      |
for full Information and reservations ask nny agent of the
CANADIAN PACIFIC
er City helping Jim Fowler, the clerk,
to reasaort letters which had been
disarranged when the train came to
its sudden stop. He finds a letter addressed to himself at the Salt Lake
City hotel where he had made his decision to cast loose. It is in "her"
writing, but he resists the temptation
to open it and it is cast into the
"Dead Letter" compartment.
CHAPTER II—Continued
"Just past midnight," said Jim
presently, consulting hia watch for
perhaps the fortieth time within four
minutes, an increase of his nervousness betrayed by his bungling aim.
"Today is the fifth anniversary of
our marriage." His eyes, veiled with
the ardent mist of utter worship,
gleamed brightly in the compressed
light of the lurching mail car as he
gazed steadfastly upon his wife's picture. More to air hi8 own inward
ecstasies than to enlighten his companion, Jim continued to talk with
engaging freedom to Bob as they
worked.
"Five years—each one sweeter
than the last—" He choked, then
recovered a letter from a wrong
■ack.
Bob felt awkwardly out of place
and socially weak in the presence of
such devotion. Nevertheless, he experienced a vague feeling of emotional kinship for Jim; reminiscent,
though wholly dissimilar, chords were
struck in him, stirring up haunting
memories that echoed with sweet
hollowness in his thoughts, like stray
notes fluttering down at evening
from high steeple bells.
"Don't care so much for myself,"
Jim was saying, "not that I don't like
babies well enough—but My Dearest
means more to me than any baby
possibly could. Still, it will make
her happiness complete. She wanted
a baby. So I'm glad, for her sake—
only I—wish it were over—"
Bob had not the least idea of what
to say in answer; so he compromised
with a sympathetic nod, and was relieved a moment later when the Limited slithered to a stop in the Crater
City station. Jim slid the door open
for the relieving clerk and guard,
who jumped in cheerily, but stopped
in alarm when they saw the odd assortment of hoboes. While the incoming clerk wa« signing his release
order and the registered mail turnover, Jim satisfied him with a hasty
explanation. Meantime, Bob and his
pals dropped to the wet platform,
closely followed by the marine, who,
glad that his vigil waa over, disappeared efficiently into the night.
Bob had forgotten the conductor's
declaration that the passengers intended to make up a purse. But not
so hia differently-moulded pals, who
nudged one another with excited,
smacking whispers when they saw
Smogs approaching.
The fat conductor was leading gingerly under the meagre shelter of the
open-sided train shed a committee of
the passengers made up of a saturnine paint drummer, an itinerant parson, and a tourist—no less!—in golf
stockings* knickers and cap.
In the uncertain light of one of
the shed's overhead oil lamps the
committee paused and beckoned to
Bob. Spike and Potts hastened to
them, grinning, bowing. Bob, who
had watched tbe advent of the committee with uninterested contempt,
remained where he was—just under
tho mail car door. He intended to
wish good-bye and good hick to Jim
before slouching off into oblivion
once more. Smogs, drawing away
distastefully from the two orthodox
hoboes, called to Bob to come forward.
Bob paid no attention; so the committee, virtuously determined not to
be cheated out of the satisfaction of
appearing magnanimous, after dubiously hesitant glances amongst themselves made the concession of moving
to him,
"Young man," said Smogs, "the
kind passengers have taken up a collection—ln which, ahem, I felt constrained to join—to reward you—"
Bob looked idly up into the mail
car for Jim—
"—and to furnish you with a
means of reforming and—"here with
a sour look upon Spike, who was edging up and scratching his nose avariciously with hia steel claw, and upon
Potts, who smirked with ingratiating
humility, "—of breaking away from
bad companions."
"Bad companions are the cause of
many downfalls—" intoned the paint
drummer virtuously with an approval-seeking look at the parson, who
merely yawned and giggled, however,
because at that moment a drop of
rain drip bounced on his neck and
trickled intimately down inside his
mall order union suit.
Smogs proffered the money, only
to meet with a curt refusal from
Bob. This was a new one in the experience of Smogs and the committee
On second thought—" he grinned
apologetically, then tossed the puree
to Potts. Spike, quick as a famished
malamute at a musing team's feeding
time, caught the money and darted
off into the gloom.    Putts and Bob
'Young man," said
kind patsengera have
collection."
Smogs,
taken
tore after him, leaving a thoroughly
bewildered committee to disperse at
will.   ■
Overtaking Spike at a far corner
of the station building, Bob forced
him to relinquish the money to Potts.
When Bob's attention was distracted
by the arrival of Jim on the scene,
Spike, adopting new tactics, went off
arm in arm with Potts in a most
friendly manner—but rather too hurried to be sincere.
I heard the presentation ceremon-,
ies," Jim chuckled. "Glad you took
Smogs down a peg. Say Wilson, hy
the way, you haven't any particular
place to spend the night, havo you?
Then why not come home with aie?
I'd be very glad to huve you—treats
are on me tonight, you know!"
* Bob declined; it was no time for
Jim, he felt, to be dragging a stray
tramp into his house. But Jim insisted so good-naturedly that he finally talked down Bob's scruples, and
the two strode away from the station
up the deserted and storm-swept
street of the sleeping town.
Jim set a swift pace, occasionally
breaking into a run, in his eagerness to reach the happiness he anticipated at home; und he babbled
eagerly in the teeth of the wind.
"Great luck to muke a new friend.
I'm a bit superstitious, you know
'—and the luckiest omens have been
happening all duy. First train we
passed was a string of coal empties
—greatest luck in the world, any
brakie will tell you—found a new
penny, too."
He stopped short as he kicked an
heavy object that clattered on the
cobblestone?, then stooped and picked it up,
"Holy Hannah!" he cried jovially,
"a horseshoe!"
He fairly raced now, and Bob was
hard put to keep pace with him, for
their way led uphill and Jim's cottage was a good half-mile from the
depot. Jim ascended the four steps
of his porch at a single bound and
dashed in, calling for Bob to follow.
Oppressed by a strong sense that
he was an intruder, Bob hesitated at
the open doorway. Finally he overcame his scruples and stepped
through after Jim. He found himself in a little parlor that was furnished in the stodgy and sparse manner typical of the mountainous west,
observing a curious tableau.
Jim, with the rapt expression of
i astronomical explorer discovering a new world, was on tiptoe, smiling into a wriggling bundle in the
broad arms of a nurse. Fussing over
his medicine cuse at thc table was
a grave faced doctor who hnd been
summoned early that night to attend
to Jim's wife.
(To bc continued)
Dorothy Bryant, of Fernie, journeyed
(.'ranbrook on Friday.
The meeting of the Wardner Soil  and  Recreation  Club  scheduled
take place in the hall on Tuesday
enlng to discuss its reorganization,
has been postponed until Friday evening  of  this week,  owing   t0    the
meeting being held in the church on
the same evening.
J. Martinos and Jack Cumberland
motored to Fernie on Sunday last.
Jack is finding the distance to Fernie
short enough to cover often these
week-ends.
Mlsa Hoggam, of Wasa, spent the
week-end in Wardner visiting friends,
returning Monday evening.
Bill Mader returned home on Saturday from St. Eugene Hospital,
Cranbrook, where he has been confined for the past week with a severe
attack of quinsy".
Chas, Simpson, logging supt. for
the C.N.P. Lbr. Co., spent the week-
end in Wardner.
m**
Mrs. A. Olsen suffered rather a
nasty accident on Saturday evening,
when she slipped on the loose gravel
mi the corner by the public bridge
and broke her ankle. Mrs. Olsen was
immediately taken to the St. Eugene
Hospital, Cranbrook, by Mr. 0. E.
Holmes, where an X-ray was taken to
determine thc damage done to the
injured member. It is expected that
Mrs. Olsen will be confined to the
hospital for a long period, as, being
an elderly lady, the ankle will no
doubt take a long time before it is
fully healed.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Renick and
Herb Headdon motored to Cranbrook
on Saturday evening. They were accompanied home by the lattei's fiancee, Miss Hoggam, of Waaa, who
spent the holiday here.
C. M. Pennock returned on Sunday
from Vancouver and other points on
the Coast, where he has been spending thc past ten days on business for
the C.N.P. Lbr. Co.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Peppier spent the
week-end nt their cottage at Mc*
Baines Lake, where "Pep" put in ft
couple of busy days putting away his
boat and making things ship-shape,
preparatory to closing the cottage for
the winter. Ah everyone knows, it
n't much fun breaking the ice for
morning swim or yet to catch a
breakfast, _
Manning Melntyre, of Lumberton,
i.s spending a few weeks' holiday in
Wardner, visiting his sister, Mrs.
Tony Thompson and family.
Jack Shclborn, of Erickson, Man.,
arrived in town this week, joining his
sister, Miss Alice Shelbom, who came
here a couple of weeks ago to work
in Martinos' store.
Mr. Peppier, of the company store,
this week received a large shipment
of small cakes from Shelly's, including fruit cakes and cup cakes, etc.
Needless to say, they were quickly
sold, most of the town's housewives
finding them a welcome change from
their own cooking.
Under the supervision of Mrs. G.
W. Donahoe, Misses Louise Lawson
and Sudrin Johnson were around
bright and early on Monday morning
(Armistice Day) selling poppies. The
girls made good little saleswomen
and collected a large sum for their
efforts.
A number of the young people motored out to Mayook on Friday evening to attend the basket social. A
fine time was enjoyed by all and the
sale of baskets netted the goodly sum
of sixty-five dollars, showing the
liberul bidding of those present.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Hamrin were hosts
on Monday evening at a Thanksgiving dinner to Mr. and Mrs. Howard
Haney and family, of Bull River.
The frosty nights of the past week
served to good advantage when the
ice was discovered to be safe on Sunday. As a consequence, skates were
overhauled and put to good use for
the entire day by young and old. It
is said that there is some good hockey material to be found among the
boys this year.
The young folks of the town plan
to put on a novelty dance in the club
hall on Thursday evening, Nov. 19th.
The music will be furnished by the
Fernie Orchestra and a good time is
assured to all.
THE WEATHER BULLETIN
Official
Oct
22
23
24
25'
Tb.naom.lar
Cr.abro.ll
Max.
  61
Al
27
28
46
46
38
34
25
28
Min.
25
28
35
29
24
17
12
A big cup of steaming hot
FRY'S Cocoa—so warminc
and delicious—is the best of
all foods for a growing
child. Use it every day—
for true economy. But of
course remember, "nothing
will do but FRY'S."
j. i. ray a sons ic.e.o.-
MONTREAL
WESTERN PARKS IN
ROCKIES ARE GEMS
SAYS TORONTO WRITER
Glories of the Canadian mountains are not half appreciated by
those who have not aeon them, Bays
Bystander at the Office Window, in a
recent issue  uf the Toronto  Globe.
That is one of the fruits of living
in such a country of magnificent distances. Fortunately, access to much
of the beautiful area has been made
easy by the creation of national
parks, of which there are five in the
Canadian Rockies. These are Jasper
Park, Rocky Mountains Park, Kootenay Park, Mount Robson Park, and
Waterton Lakes Park, which are visited by many thousands of motorists
every year.
Rocky Mountains Park, in which
Banff and Lake Louise are situated,
is the oldest of the group. Immediately to its west is Kootenay Park;
but the two are practically one, because technically divided, because the
former is in Alberta, and subject to
its laws, while the latter is in British
Columbia. The Banff-Windermere
Highway runs through both parte,
and from a point called Castle a
branch road runs to Lake Louise. A
continuation of this road is being
constructed to Field and the Yoho
Valley, both of which will be open to
motorists next spring. This is a region of beautiful scenery, and already passengers often leave the
C.P.R. train at Hector, the old station, and walk seven or eight miles
to Field, rather than miss the wondrous beauty. This part of the line
was abandoned when the great spiral
tunnel was built, but for some distance through the mountains the
highway will use the old C.P.R. right
of way, and thus keep in sight the
vistas lost to view by the railway in
the interests of lower grades, Next
spring motorists will be able to reach
Takakkaw Falls, Emerald Lake, the
National Bridge, and all other famous
spots in the Yoho Valley.
Jasper Park lies west of Edmonton, and has Mount Edith Cavell as
orte of its attractions, while Mount
Robson is the highest Canadian peak.
From one elevation in Mount Robson
Park, it is said, sixty-three lakes can
be seen. On the way up to Berg
Lake the visitor passes forty waterfalls.
These four parks are all on the
Canadian Circle Tour, recently described in this column, and this reminds us that Mr. John Simpson has
written to say that his former figures of thirteen hundred miles aa the
length of this tour should have been
sixteen hundred. The mileage he
now gives as follow?: Calgary to
Windermere, 1ST. miles; Windermere
to Nelson, 221; Nelson :.. Spence's
Bridge, 875; Spence's Bridi ■ I i Ashcroft, 25; Ashcroft t.i Barkerville,
20:1; Barkerville to McBride, n di-
vlsional point on the Princi Rupert
line of the C.N.K.. 70; McBride to
Edmonton, 343; Edmonton to Calgary, 194—making a total of more
than 1,000 miles.
AFTEL
There's m
To Eq%
Sainsbury & Ryan
BUILDERS AM)
CONTRACTORS
(Ht« and Work
QiaimK—d
VelepbeiM US aa< M
CRA5BR00E      -      B.C.
Apply Minard's every day and
rub it in well wiih the finger
tips.   It penetrates and heals.
Removes inflammation.
A remedy for every pain,
i
*♦*♦+*♦♦♦♦
WARDNER
NOTES
»*+*+*$
A special Thanksgiving Service
was held in thc Church on Sunday
evening last, thc Rev. Mr. Dingle officiating. Vocal solos, ducts, children's singing and recitations were
the feature of thc evening, and the
Thanksgiving service was ulso combined with the service of Armistice
Day, during which the singing of "In
Flanders Fields" hy Mrs. l'aul Storey
was very well received. There wns
a large congregation present, and the
change from thc usual routine service was much enjoyed.
A. J. Churchcr spent the week-end
in the Valley, visiting Mr. und Mrs*
Charlie Howell ut their runch.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Wynne and fu-
mily motored to Cranbrook for a few
hours' shopping on Saturduy ofter-
—a hobo refusing money.     But a
glanco at Potto' face, which had be-' noon
'-"«•«' mem •» **'» »»-l    lira. Frank Thompson
und   MisH
MllIIIIlIIXIllllIimiXIXimim^LO^
hester
inci
CIGARETTES
20/r
72!
25«
xxx
ANEW
STANDARD
OF  EXCELLENCE"
tt99119Ytfwtf<t¥lkii .
PAQE EIOHT
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
Thursday, November 12, 1925
DIAMONDS
— THE GIFT SUPREME —
WH HAVE SOME VERY SPECIAL VALUES IN
D 1 A Al O N D R I N G S OF THE LATEST HAND-
WROUGHT AlOUNTINGS. - AT $18.50, $25.00, $35.00,
$50.00 AND UP. .     ,     ,. .   ,
Dainty Bar Pins, set with genuine blue white diamond at
$2.00 and up.
Diamond Tie Pins at $11.50, $16.00 and up.
SEE OUR WINDOW
The Gift Shop
Mortar, A».nu.    A.  EARLE  LEIGH Watchmaker * J.w.l.r
...     A Small Deposit Will Hold Any Article Until Xmas
WWWWWVWVWVWWlM^WWWWWWraMMfWWWWNW
LOCAL
Aappemngs
The quarterly open meeting of the
Baptist Women's Mission Circle will
be held In Baptist Church, on Thursday, Nov. LOfch, at S o'clock. The
program will be contributed by
members of C.G.I.T. and Mission
Band.
We cany a full Ua« of Man's Women's and Mtsiw' Shoes.
W. F. DORAN,
Our Low Prices win every time
The Rotary Minstrels, the best
show of the year, are again to be on
the boardK some time in January.
Rehersnls are already being held, and
any vocal disturbances that may be
noted in the vicinity of Kink's store
need not bo put down to any untoward happenings, but simply mean
that the Rotarians are getting their
vocal chords broken in again.
Christ Church Bazaar, Saturday,
Nov. 28th. Will those ladies who
havo jrifts of needlework, fancy work,
etc., for the Bazaar, please send them
or bring them to the Parish Hall on
Wednesday afternoon, Nov. 18th.
88-40
Cranbrook taxidermiit
BORN—At the St. Eugene Hospital on Monday, November 9th, to Mr.
and Mrs. Patrick Smith of Lumber-
Framed pictures, Picture framing, developing, printing and enlarging—at Photocrafts Studio.        38
Harry Bywald, employed by the
C.P.R. at Yahk, was brought in to
the hospitul early on Wednesday
morning, having met with an accident in which a tree fell on his left
leg, crushing it considerably.
For prompt repair* and satisfaction go to Ratcliffe k Stewart's garage, 20tf
The new Ford models now on display ut the Hanson Garage are attracting much attention. The sedan
and the coupe have each a distinctive
design and color and for the price
that is being asked, will undoubtedly
meet with a ready sale.
Red edged, blue edged, gilt edged
and plate sunk cards in stock, suitable for invitations, or may be used
for Christmas greetings, when a
special wording is requrled. In
various sizes. See samples at the
Herald   Office. 38
Arrangements are well in hand for
lhe dance to be given by the; Bluebird Girls' Hockey Team, to take
place at the K. P. Hall on Friday
eveniiifc next, November 20th, when
the girls are going to see to it that The case of A. McFettridge vs. C.
everyone attending has an especially p.R, which came np last week before
good time.    It is getting near hockey Jut]ge  McDonald was concluded  on
time, and this dance is intended to Friday when the jury found in favor
get the club away to a good start 0f    the    plaintiff.    Damages    were
financially for the new season. awarded in the amount of $2000.00.
Special price, 7n new Baterie. JW„R' iTr^"l?**«*" "" "^
Service Garage.   Phone 34           ltf ""• wh,le G' J- Spreu11 "P™"™*"1
J. Lamont, of the Standard Ranch,
is making arrangements to remove
his dairy ranch to the former Hanson
place, near Pattern's Lake. He is
having a well dug, and is making
other arrangements for the transfer
of his dairy plant to its new location
shortly.
the C.P.R.
LEIGH the jeweler has some
special silverware bargains on his
$1.00 table. 38
BOYS' SUITS, five to seven years
$5.00. Boys' Two Pants Suits,
eight to sixteen years, $10.00. Our
low pices win every time. W. F.
Doran,  Cranbrook  Exchange,
John Ward, bandit, who pleaded
guilty to the charge of robbing the
Imperial Bank of Canada at Creston
before Judge Forin a week ago, was
this week sentenced to eight years
in the penitentiary, and 20 lashes.
Ward, caught on the afternoon of
the robbery on October 20, with
If $2700 from the bank in his possession, at first elected for trial by jury,
It is expected that the sale of work but later reelected for speedy trial,
held last Saturday by the United' and came up before Judge Forin at
Church Ladies' Aid will net the mem- j Nelson, pleading guilty last week.
bers of that organization something At that time his honor reserved judg-
betweon five and six hundred dol- ment. In sentencing the prisoner,
1 iirs. It was well attended, and the Judge Forin drew his attention to
tables were all well patronized, most the fact that he was liable to imprl-
of the goods displayed representing sonment for life for the offence with
many and varied lines of women's' which he was charged, that of
handicraft, being disposed of. | robbery  with violence.
PATEY BROS.
"THE MUSIC HOUSE"
TJ 1 l\I/\   Get '" ■t"ut'h »'"h what •> going on In (II
your home -
parts of the States and Canada by installing
one of our Radios — Free demonstration In
No obligations.
PIANOS
Of all makes sold on terms which on be
suitably arranged.
J. Gormley of Bull River is a
patient in the St. Eugene hospital
at present. ' -
See window of Photocrafts Studio
for result of opening day competition. 38
BORN—On Friday, November 6th,
at the St. Eugene Hospital, to Mr.
and Mra. E. Hulberts, a son.
THEODORE    PADBERG,    piano
tuner; player expert.    Phone  502.
31-tf.
H. E. Hancock, - immigration onl*
cer at Kingsgate -is confined to the
hospital this week us a result of un
accident by which he sustained some
broken bones in his foot.
For sales and service Nash and Star
can.  Saa Ratcliffe * Stewart.   83tf
J. P. Scott, vice-president of the
B.C. Board of Retail Merchants Association, R.M.A., received a telegram today from Secretary Ing
Vancouver which stated that the
government will announce today the
abolition of the personal property
tax, putting in its place a turn-over
tax on groBS sales.
Highest prices paid for old sacks,
at H. C. Long, Chinese merchant,
Van Hours Street. 36tf
A very enjoyable dance was held
on Wednesday evening at Patton's
Lake, which was attended by everyone in that vicinity, and a number
also went out from town, everybody
reporting a thoroughly good time.
SPECIALi—Tungsten   lamps,  10,
25, 40, 50 and 60 watts; 20c each.
75 anl 100 Nitrogen for 50c.
W. F. DORAN
Oar lew prices win every time.
Sunday morning the congregation
of the United Church had the pleasure of listening to an able address
by Dr. Williams of Formosa. Those
present very keen in their appreciation of the story told by the able representative of the church in this
noted mission field.
The Girls' Bluebird Hockey Team
will hold a dance on Friday, November 20th, at the K.P. Hall. Dancing
10 to 2. Good music and refreshment*. Admission, gentlemen 76c,
ladies, 50c. 37
Dr. and Mrs. Green and family,
who for the last six weeks or so have
been residing in Victoria, were expected home to-day, Thursday. The
Doctor has been greatly benefitted by
his sojourn in Victoria and we understand he is returning with renewed
vigor and strength.
If you want up-to-date pictures,
coupled with moderate prices, go to
Photocrafts Studio. 38
A number of members of Durham
Encampment, No. 12, went to Kimberley on Friday evening last, and
paid an official visit to Sullivan
Lodge, I.O.O.F. They were entertained at the close of the meeting to
a social time.
Oysters in any style at the Victoria Cafe.   Try some on the shell.
35tf
The Doukhobor Colony from
Grand Forks have rented the former
C. C. S. building on Norbury Avenue,
and have put into storage there several cars of apples from their own
orchards, which they are distributing from here, conducting their
own selling. It is stated that at
least one local store tried to negotiate to handle their fruit for them
in this city, but not being able to
reach amicable terms the Doukhobors decided to institute their own
selling. The title under which they
do business is the Christian Community of Universal Brotherhood.
BOTiN—At St. Eugene Hospital
on Wednesday, November llth, to
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Cunning, of
Sheep Creek, a son.
Salvution    Army   Home    League
Sale of Work and Cooking will be
held   in   the   Presbyterian   Sunday
School room on November 21st, 1926.
35-39
The death took place on Tuesduy
of this week, ut the St. Eugene Hospitul of Mr. Peter Esbrook, of Creston. He hud been ill for many
months unci confined to his bed since
last Mny. Deceused wus u nutive
of Holland und wus sixty-eight yeurs
of age.
For first class automobile repairs
see Ratcliffe & Stewart. 33tf
A fox farm on n lurge scnle is be
ing established nt Murysville, the
foundation stoek having been
brought in from Alberta, it is stated,
and n large piece of lnnd is being
wired off for use as pens.
LEIGH the jeweler has n wonderful assortment of Xmas curds.     38
Skating commenced lust Sunduy in
eurnest, McKenzie's pond, where thc
'ice wus found to bc quite sefe, being
a popular spot, and many young
people, und some not so young
donned thoir skates for the first time
this seuson.      *
A Curd Pnrty and Dance will b«
given at the Auditorium, Friday,
December 4th by the Odd Fellows.
Whist und Bridge, 8 to 10. Prizes
for cuch. Duncing 10 to 2. Refreshments. Presentation and program during evening. 38-40
R. II. Rogers, representing the
Playford Soles Co., is in the city arranging for a sale at the store of
Miss M. McLeod, which opens on
Saturday of this week, us announced in this issue. Mr. Rogers has
been in the city before, und the mercantile events of this kind thut he
hus been connected with arc pronounced by the buying public as being snles thnt are genuine in every
respect.
ffffffffffffffffffffffffff
WILLARD W. WARREN
, Jhe death took pluce on Thursduy
morning nt 6 o'clock of Mr. Willard
J. Warren, of this city. He hud not
been in very good health for some
time, though he hud improved considerably, it wus thought, since coming here three yeurs ago.
He is survived by a widow and two
children, Jean, aged twelve, and
Leighton, aged nine, as well ns a
sister, Mrs. J. M. Clark, und a brother, J. E. Warren, all of whom reside here. Thc late Mr. Wurren
wus born in Prince Edwnrd Islund,
und was forty-three years of age.
since coming here, he had been en-
guged principally at the fox farm,
which hus grown to an undertaking
of considerable proportions under his
direction.
The funeral arrangements have
not as yet been announced .
WANT ADS.
WANTED—Girl for general house-
work.   Apply Box W, Herald office
.        38tf
There has been much activity during the last week at thc City Bowling Alley, all the alleys and shooting
gallery being well patronized. The
competition for the geese has created lot of fun. X. Holdener has locked horns with Joe Walkley over the
geese which he purchased from
Walkley. These were advertised as
geese of the garden variety, grain
fed and gentle. As proof of their
gentleness, X. Holdener is showing a
lump on the side of his neck like a
goitre, the result of an encounter
with one of Joe's ganders. Holdener
suys they may have been fed on
grain but he is afraid it must have
been wild oats.
"Are You a Mollusc?" This was
the question thc show ut thc Auditorium Monday and Tuesduy evenings wus designed to answer, but apparently it did not interest many
people to find out whether they cnme
under that classification or not, for
one night thero were about twenty-
two people present, and the next
night three or four less. The company cume into town four or five
duys ahead of their schedule, but on
uccount of the short notice were not
uble to repnir their fortunes here,
though it was the kind of show thut
hud it been properly advertised
might have done fairly well, and certainly on their merits deserved better
than the poor reception they got.
The students of the High School
are holding a Tea and Sale of home
cooking on Saturday, November 14th,
from three to six p.m., in the Parish
Hall. 30-37
The Hon. Dr. J. H. King and Mrs.
King visited Fernie lust Saturduy
evening und were given u public reception by the Fernie citizens under
the auspices of the Fernie Ladies Liberal Association, in Victoria Hall.
Mrs. Robt. Duthie, President of the
Associution, in opening the reception,
reud un address of welcome and presented Mrs. King with a lovely bouquet of carnations. Dr. King responded to the address on behalf of
himself and Mrs. King, thanking the
people of Fernie for their splendid
welcome and expressed great pleasure in being able to meet so many
of his constituents. Col. Thompson,
of Ottawa, and Harry Gale, ex-Mayor
of Vancouver, also spoke briefly. A
musical program followed with Mesdames Suddaby and Watson, Misses
Charlebois, Dicken and Miscisco, and
Messrs. Heidman and Wesley Owen
contributing.
A general meeting of thc Cranbrook Ladies' Hockey League will
be held at the Cranbrook Hotel, Monday, November 10th at 8.30 p.m.,
for the purpose of re-organizing for
■their coming seuson. All those interested in Hockey are invited to attend. 38
II. F. Daniels has been in the city
this week as the representative of J.
Walton, a firm of stockbrokers, of
Nelson and Trail. With him are
also Messrs. E. S. Morton und
G. Walker. It is the purpose
to open an office here, and negotiations were completed this week for a
lease on the Beattie building adjoining the liquor store, recently vacated by the forestry branch. It
is assumed that an office will
be opened there right away and
fitted up to do business in this
line. The firm maintains a privute
wire for board listings of stock,
which are bought and sold on margin,
and a general financial business is
also to be conducted by the firm,
which might a little later employ
some five or six on their office staff.
Kimberley would also be given some
attention by the firm, and an office
 C 0 M E. T 0. T H E	
DANCE
— OIVEN BY THE —
Girls' Blue-bird Hockey Team
AT THE K. P. HALL
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20
GOOD MUSIC REFRESHMENTS
Dancing 10 — 2
GENTLEMEN    75c   LADIES   50c
UOOD TIME ASSURED DONT MISS IT
mAAAMWVAAMMVWWUMAAA^MWWWWt-^MWWHAAAAMJ^V.
APPLES
FROM TREE TO CONSUMER
Now is your chance to
Lay in a Supply of Apples — AT REASONABLE PRICES
You htve all kinds to choose from:—
NORTHERN   SPY,  WAGNER,  SPITZENBERG  GREEN-
1NQS, BEN DAVIS; ALEXANDER, NEWTON, BAXTER,
ONTARIO, ROME BEAUTY. AT $2.00 PER BOX
SNOWS OR JONATHAN $1.50 AND $2.00 PR BOX.
DELICIOUS, $1.?5  PER   BOX
See us for Chicken Feed $2.30 per 1001b
We Deliver FREE To Any Part of the City
Christian Community of Universal
Brotherhood
NORBURY AVE. OPPOSITE STAR THEATRE
We dellve r FREE TO ANY PART OF THE CITY
'ffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff*Vffffffffff*VJ
iiiiiiiiiiiMniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiioiiiiiisiiiuiiiiiiiitiiitiiiiiitiiisiuiiiiiiiuiutiH
MAN WANTED—To sell Watkin's
Products in Fernie and Cranbrook.
Address, Geo. Davis, Box 129,
Penticton. 38
Gramaphones and a (ull line of musical instruments always on hand — sheet music and records.
All instruments can be purchased on terms.
PATEY BROS.
ffff*Vff''ffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff*Vfffff
**************************************************,
St. Mary's Church
BAZAAR
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17th, 1925
OPENS AT 3 P. M. IN
THE KNIGHTS OF   PYTHIAS HALL
Bigger and Better Than Ever
SALE OF FANCY WORK,     HOME COOKING,
AFTERNOON TEA.
candy, :;
Evening at 8 — Cards, and awarding af prizes by
Mayor Roberto.
CRANBROOK    DISTRICT
ROD * OUN CLUB
FIRST ANNUAL
BANQUET
K. ol P. HaO, at 7.30 p.m.
MONDAY, NOV. 16th
Fall course dinner of Wild
Game.   All members are in*
vited, alio anyone Interested
In Game.
Ticket! $1.50 each
may be purchased Irom
W. STEWARD
or any member of the executive, or ticket committee.
Cranbrook * District   .
Burnt Club
CHANGE OF MEETING
NIGHT
Meetings are now held the
First   Thursday   of   every
■oath, In the Maple Hall,
at 8 o'clock
AN OPENING occurs for a few live
men to be taught the principles of
stock brokerage. A salary will be
paid during training. Requirements, Age 25 to 35 years; good
education and personality. Selling
experience preferred. References.
Apply, J. Walton, 10 Baker.St.
38tf
Snap.—For Sale.—1925 Ford Sedan, only run 3,000 miles, or will
trade on Ford Touring. Box 488,
Crunbrook. 84tf
FOR SALE—One Lee Enfield Rifle.
Apply B. Weston. 35tt
FOR SALE—Heavy team suitable
for logging. Standard ranch,
Cranbrook. 33tf
FOR SALE—Safe, in good condition.
Inside measurement about 24 in.
square. Any reasonable offer accepted. Particulars at Herald office. 81-tf
MASON * RISCH PIANO
Walnut, In Perfect Condition
used less than a demonstration
Piano,  come and try it over.
Dining    Room   Suites,   Tables,
Chairs, Rockers,. Heaters,  Cook
Stoves, Winnipeg Couches  Sew.
Ing Machines,  Hand and Power
Washing    Machines,    Mackinaw
Coats, Rubbers, Skates, etc., etc.
— AT —
WILLIAM THOMPSON
Phaaa 76 P. O. Boa I3S
Seen* Head DeaUrs
ANNOUNCEMENT
"     J.  WALTON,   Stock   broker   of
Nelson and Trail, is opening an office at
16 BAKER ST.
where orders will be received for stocks
listed on any recognized Canadian or
American Exchange. A private telegraph
wire will be installed at as early a date as
possible to ensure rapid execution.
Our representatives will gladly explain every phase of market trading.
on a smaller scale may be opened little later may extend their opera-
there a little later, which would be tions into the prairie provinces,
operated from Cranbrook. The firm They are connected with thc well
is also contemplating opening offices known firm of R. P. Clark tt Co., of
at other places in the interior, and a | Vancouver.
Announcement
THE NEW FORD CAR IS NOW ON
DISPLAY. NO ADVANCE IN PRICES.
Hanson Garage
Ford Sales and Service

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