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The Prospector Oct 21, 1911

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Array Engagement and Wedding
Rings at
Reasonable Prices
W. H. Wilson
Jeweler & Optician
VOL. 17
ptiUt
rfoe> Leading," Newspaper
/"Ar
X   Jvoo/enays
.<S
07
The
Prospector"
$1.50 Yearly
CKANBUOOK, B.C, SATURDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 31th 1911
No 42
Peace   At   Any  Price
Au Article of Special Interest at this Time of Wars
and Rumors of Wars.
(By Judson C. Wolllver)
Having seldom beon MIM, und
never convicted ol killing anybody
olee, 1 regard myself as a person ol
peace. Wherelore I was pleaded Immensely to road In the public prints
a lew weeks ago that President Tatt
bad concluded negotiation nf a brace
of arbitration treaties, one with
France and the other witb England,
which positively were guaranteed to
put war out of business.
These treaties, we were assure,!, being once ratified, would make it impossible (or ue to have a war with
England or Franco. All that would
then be necessary in order to end
the whole bloody business, would bo
to Induce all tbc other nations tn
make like treaties with oach other.
Thiu, it was averred, would ho comparatively easy, onco the load wero
taken, the example set, by three such
eminent countries.
"Kor," tt was pointed out In one
editorial whoBe author did not seem
to intend it for the humorous department "the united power of these
three countries could easily impose
peace on the world, if need ho, by
show of force."
WHY NOT FIGHT   TO KDBP
PEACE ?
In brief, these three countries could
compel the world to keep the peace.
it they had to fight all tbe time    to
do ltl
This Idea of having poace at any
price teemed rather good to me until
a fortnight later, when France and
Oermany got tangled up over Morocco, and were on the verge of war.
The price of wheat wont up one and
•even-eighths cents ln one day, and
the market reports said the war
•care did it. I had been holding my
wheat for a better price, and this
looked good. Therefore, I set out
to ascertain, if possible, whether
war, as an institution, was likely to
be retired from circulation. If lt
wa«, I wanted to find out whether ll
Would happen belore my wheat was
•old.
Therefore, I hunted up an Eminent
member of tbe Diplomatic Corps. It
wa«, of course, utterly Impossible Ior
htm to have any views on the subject
Census Gives Seven Millions Manchu Dynasty Near its
  Doom
British Columbia's Population More Than Doubled
in Past Ten Years
Province Will Have Twelve Members After Redistribution—Vancouver Shows
Tremendous Increase—Montreal's Splendid Showing
iiu,
because if he shoild got expected of
positive opinions on anything he
couldn't be an Eminent Diplomat.
Thoy'd lire blm. Still o,l Mich ques-
tlons, one must talk to an Eminent
Diplomat, else ono (annul; put over
one's lilufl about special Information
and Insight.
Approaching thc S. D„ 1 asked    iu
a rough-necked, low-Move 1 toue     of |      Ottawa, Oct.   17,-The population of   Canada by the census ot
voice which must havo grated   sadlyjle89 alBtricts not reported, compared with   1901, is:
""'What'sall this"about the mbitra |      Total  *>°P«1»U°<>.   »•*■    '.»»W«i     *«>*.   MTl.Mtj *******»•   '.»«
tlon treaties putting an end to war? '8M-
Are they going to do it beforo   this
year's wheat's sold .'"
E. n. looked the pain lie felt,   and
indicated Inability co Krnsp Ihi
port ol my iniruiry.
"What I want to know," 1 groped,
"is whother,  if theso treaties    ,vitl
pur
Population by provinces :
I    Province— 1911
| Alberta   372,'Jl!)
I British Columbia   362,768
[Manitoba   454,691
| New Brunswick  351,811,
Franco and Eng.and ar. ratified, l^r^^::::;;::::::;::;;;:::::;:;,]^^
there will be an end of all chance of!
fighting with cither ol them '■ Ts i.he
good old world threatened with an
end to war? Isn't thoro going to be
anything for the historians to write
about hereaftor? Are the days of
potential romance positively ended ?
Arc the Ten Dost Sellers to bo perforce, all problem novols and pack
ing house descriptions, merely because war is to become a back number ? Is the race to degenerate Into a lot of mollycoddles, without
chance to be drafted into heroism
and the vice-presidential class ?"
A FEW QUESTIONS ON THE SUB-
JRCT
A vague notion oi my intent seemed to dawn on him. Ho looked exceedingly serious, as a diplomat
must when he is getting ready to
hand one across to you, and said :
Beyond doubt, President Taft has
Initiated a movement which will
write his name high on the roll of
true benefactors or tbe race."
"Yes, sure," I conceded, "but what
I want to know is whether It Is to
the scrap-heap for the dreadnaughts ;
whother tho soldiers are liable to be
looking Ior jobs at harvest-time next
summer; whether thc plowshare market is to be subjected to the bear Influence of a world-wide movement for
the transmogrification of swords;
(Continued on Page  2.)
Prince Edward Island  '....    93,72?
Quebec  2,000,000
Saskatchewan     453,508
Northwest Territory      10,000
Yukon 	
•Decrease.
1901
73,022
178,657
256,211
331,120
469,574
2,182,947
103,259
1,648,898
91,279
20,129
27,219
Increase
299,897
184,111
199,480
20,895
2,273
336,955
9,537
351,799
362,229
Pet.
417
103
78
6
1
15
*»
21
396
Ottawa,    Oct.     17.—Hon.     Martin ijumped in population from   37,022 to
Burrell, minister of agriculture tonight gave out to the press the tirst
official statement oi tbe result ol the
census taking which is now practically complete. The figures show
a population of 7,081,869 for Canada
as compared with 5,371,319 ln 1901,
an Increase of 1,710,554. It was estimated that tho population of Canada would be about 8,000,000 so that
tbe figures will cause not a little disappointment to the people of the
Dominion.
As compared with thc Increase of
population in the 1891-1901 docade
the figures are satisfactory. In the
ten years preceding 1901 Canada's
Population increased by only 538,076.
As compared with this betterment
the increase of 1,710,554 in tho past
ten years Is large but It is not nearly so satisfactory as was expected.
BRITI8H COLUMBIA DOUBLED
Ol the provinces Alberta showed the
372,919 in tbe decade. Saskatchewan
comes second with an increase during
the ten years of from 91,279 to 453,-
508. The province of Quebec shows
an increase in population of 361,799
while Ontnrio has increased by 336,-
955. Urltisb Columbia Increased by
184,109 and Manitoba by 149,480.
Ths provinces down by tbe sea have
all fallen away In population. Nova
Scotia shows a decline of 2,273, New
Brunswick of 20,795 and Prince Edward Island of   10,537.
VANCOUVER
HUNDRED
AND
THOU8-
Montreal shows tbe largeBt Increase
in population of any city in the Dominion and continues to maintain
Ub position as the most metropolitan centre. The total population of
tho city Is 466,197, a: against 267,-
730 ten years ago, an Increase oi 198. in Nova
467. Including Westmount, Matson-
ablo   margin   over   tbe halt million  Cariboo in British    Columbia, which
I growing from 208,048 to 376,240, an
increase of 168,200. Vancouver
Jumped from 27,010 to 100,333 and
Winnipeg from 42,340 to 135,430.
The population of Halifax Is 48,032
an Increase ot   6,249 in the decade
TWELVE MEMBERS FOR B. C.
Tho unit ot representation which is
arrived at by dividing the population
of Quebec into 65 parts, tho representation of Qinboc being definitely
fixed by the British North America
nuuve and Verdon, Montreal has a
Population ot 510,811 or a comfort-
act, ts 30,780. On this basis the representation of British Columbia in
the houBe ol commons will increase
from Beven to twelve members; Al-
borta from seven to twolvo; Saskatchewan from ton to fifteen; Manitoba
from ten to fifteen. On the other
hand tho representation of Ontnrio
will decrease from eighty-six to
eighty two; New Brunswick from
thirteen to eleven; Nova Scotia from
eighteen to sixteen and Prince Edward Island from four to three.
The next parliament will contain
232 members, an increase of eleven as
compared with tbe present house.
That the census Is not complete is
shown by tho following letter which
today addressed by A. Blue,
chief cenBus commissioner, to Hon.
Martin Burrell, minister of agriculture :
Replying to your enquiry of this
dato, I beg to say that tbe census of
Canada recently taken shows a population of about 7,100,000 which will
be slightly Increased when tho full re.
turns have been received. Four electoral districts have not yet made
complete returns, viz., Cumberland,
Scotia, Regina and Battle-
ford   In    Saskatchewan,    and    Yale-
Revolutionists Claim  Many   Provinces Have Fallen —
Dr. Sun Yat Sen Has Two .Million Dollars as
War Fund —Would-Be King Beheaded
largest   ratio    of     Increase   having mark.     Toronto    Is in second place
(Continued on Page   2.)
San Francisco, Cal., October —
With two million dollars in its treasury and an equal amount subscribed,
with twenty-five thousand troops In
tbe field and thirteen thousand reserves ln tlle United States and Canada
and with a constitution adopted anl
administrative officers chosen, tho
proposed Cluing Hwn republic Is do-
clured to lie making u determined ef
fort to overthrow the Manchu dynasty and establish itself in Ohina, Details of the formation of the tenta
tive republic were revealed here today by Hun Fo, son ..f Dr. Sun Ynt
Sell, wbo is to be president if lhe
revolution now in progress is successful.
Today the one hundred ".housand
and more revolutionary Chinese in
the United States and Canada feel
tbat it is but a matter nf dnys until
the Manchu dynasty will succumb,
Cable advices received by the i evolutionists here today Indicate thut the
provinces of Hunan, Ho-nan, Hu-pnp,
Klang-sun-ng. An-whl and Sze-Obueo
have fallen and tbat Quong-toug, thl
province In wblch Canton is situated,
Is about to be captured by the rebels
HANKOW CUT OFF
Peking, Oct. 15.—The Chinese government has placed severe restrictions on tbe telegraph linos, evidently for the purpose of preventing communication between tbe rebels. For
this reason Hankow, where the revolution Is at Its height, iu cut ofl.
Until lately, the revolutionists, having no wires, received little Information concerning the progress of their
plans. Tbe govornment refuses to
reveal the number or the destination
seat
nf tbe troops which aro being
southward.
HEAVY TROOP TRAFFIC
lleglnnlug tomorrow only a stngls
first-class tralu will be run daily between Peking and Tien Tsing Fu.
about seventy miles tn tho southeast
of tho capital. This Is due to the
heavy troop tratllc and for tho purpose of preventing any great number
of rebels from entering PekJng. Pae-
senger and freight traffic bas been
suspended between Peking and Hankow.
Sn fur the government has refused
to penult correspondents to accompany tbe army. Both Bides are
anxious to favor toreigitoi* and it is
believed that tho government will
reconsider this refusal it tho revolutionists meet with initial success.
A dispatch received from Hankow
said the Revolutionists had organized a Red Cross Society and bad touted the co-operation of the Methodist Episcopal missionary. This invitation was accepted provisionally.
WOULD-BE KING BEHEADED
New York. Oct. 16.-A cable from
Peking says ;
Because of the peculiar birthmarks
on bis person, a 15 year old lad of
a family living near Si-nlg-fu, Kanau
province,has been regarded by Ignorant people as possessing tbe externals ol royalty. Whether he conceived the idea himself or whether lt
was put into his head by revolutionists, this lad determined that the
time had come lor him to save China
from the impending partition and
absorption. Declaring himself the
"king who can save the world," he
Issued a proclamation ordering all
foreigners to be killed. A few hundred provincials took the new 'king'
seriously and flocked to his banner
but after ten days the officials raptured him and he was beheaded.
Dr.   Hall,   The   Painless   Dentist
Dental Chambers are over F.  Parks & Company's
Hardware Store  on  Baker Street   --    Phone 290
WAITING   ROOM
OPERATING ROOM
Dr. Hall has the Largest Dental Practice and the Most Elaborately Furnished Office between
Calgary and Vancouver. His Methods are Modern, and together with his wide Experience
in Dentistry, his Skilled Workmanship has brought him to the front and given him a standing
that few dentists ever attain.
The Painless Dentist --- Dr. Hall I'llK rwosi'Kl TDK. CRANBROOK, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Census Gives Seven Millions
L Continued from  Page   li
are   estimated    to give a population
of   70,000.     The   population ol tbe
cities and towns reported to ynu
may be changed slightly un revision,
but I think it may lie accepted as
correct. We have tested it by two
independent compilations,"
Following are the returns for the
cities :
ALBERTA
City                       1911       1901 Inc.
Calgary   43.73G 4,097 3'J,l',a»
Edmonton ... .... 24,882 2,62(1 22.250
Lethbridge      8,048 2,927 5,970
Medicine Hot ...   5,572     1.170 4,002
Strathcona       5,580        550 5,030
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Nanaimo      8,305 6,130 2,275
Nelson      4,476     5,273 -799
N.   Westminster. 13,394     6,499 6,895
Prince Rupert ..   4,775 4,775
Point (Iiey      4,319 1,319
Vancouver   1C0.333 27.010 73,323
N. Vancouver ..   7,781 7,781
S, Vancouver  .. 16.021 16,021
Victoria   31,626 20,816 10,804
MANITOBA
Brandon     15,837     5,620 8,217
Portage      5,885     3,901 1,984
Bt,  Boniface  ....   7,717     2.019 5,698
Winnipeg  135,430 42,240 93.090
NBW    BRUNSWICK
Kredericton   . .,   7,208     7,117 'il
Moncton    11,329     9,026 2,303
St.   Johns    42,363 40.711 l,66B
NOVA SCOTIA
Amherst     4.964
Dartmouth     5,058 4,806 252
Glace Bay    16.561 6,945 9,616
Halifax   40.081 40,336 5,245
North Sydney ..   5,418 4,646 772
Sydney Mines ..   7,464 3,191 4,273
Sydney Town .. 17,617 9,909 7,708
Truro      6,015     5.99C 18
Yarmouth     6,571     6,430 141
ONTARIO
Arnprior      4,395     4,152 243
Barrie      6,428     5,949 479
Belleville      9,850     9.117 773
Berlin    15.192     9,747 5,455
Brantford   23,046 16.619 6,427
Brockville     9,372     8,940 432
Chatham   10,760    9,068 1,692
Cobalt      5,629 5,629
Coburg      5,073     4,239 834
Collingwood     7,077    5,755 1,32a
Cornwall     6,598     6,704 -106
Dllndas       4,297     3,173 1,124
Fort William  ... 16,498     3,633 12,805
Gait    10,299     7,866 2,433
Goderich      4,522     4,158 364
Guelph    15,148 11,496 3,652
Hamilton   81,879 52,634 29,245
Hnwkesbury .. .   4,391     4,150 241
Ingersoll     4,757    4,573 184
Kenora      6,152     5.202 957
Kingston   18,815 17,961 854
Lindsay       6,956     7,003 -473
London   46,177 37,976 8,201
Midland        4,660     3,174 1,486
Niagara Falls ..   9,245     4,244 6,001
North Bay     7,719     2,530 5,188
N. Toronto      5,362     1,852 3,510
Orillla      6,835     4,907 1,928
Oshawa     7,433     4,394 3,639
Ottawa   86,340 59.928 26,151
Owen   Sound  ....  12,555     8.776 3,779
Pembroke       5,624     5,156 468
Petorboro   18,312 11,239 7,073
Port Arthur  11,216    3,216 8,003
Port Hope      5,089     4,188 901
St.  Catherines.. 12,460    9,940 2,514
St. Thomas    14,050 11,186 2,565
Sarnla     9,936     8.176 1,760
S. Ste Mario ... 10,179     7,169 3,010
Smiths Falls ...   6,361     5,155 1,266
Stratford    12,920     9,959 2,970
Sudbury      4,140     2,027 2,113
Toronto    376,240 208,040 168,200
Waterloo       4,360     3,537 825
Wellnnd       5,311      1,863 3,448
Windsor   17,819 12,153 5,666
Woodstock       9,321     8.833 488
PRINCE  KDWARD ISLAND
Charlottotown  . 11.198 12.086 -882
QUEBEC
Chicoutillli     5,880 3,826 2,054
Froserville      6,842 4,569 2,273
Qranby     4,750 3,773 977
Grandmcre    4,783 2,511 2,272
Hull   17,165 13,993 3,592
Joliette       6,346 4,220 2,113
Lachino    10,778 5,561 5,217
Levis       7,448     7,783 -335
Longull        4,016     2,835 1,181
Malsonncuve    1R.674     3,958 14,716
Montreal  466,197 267,730 19H.467
Quebec   78,067 68,840 10,266
8t. Hyacinthe ..    9,797     9,210 587
St.  Jean      5,903     4,030 1,873
Sherbrooke   16,105 U.7G5 4,640
Sorel      9,419     7,057 1,362
Plot to Wreck Taft's
Train Foiled
Banta Barbara, Oal., Oct. 16.—
Wbat is pronounced by Sheriff Nat
Stewart of Santa Barbara county
and by W. K. Wines ol San Francisco, special agent for the Southern
Pacific railroad, to have been a deliberate attempt to dynamite an 800-
foot bridge twenty-five miles north
of here, over which President Taft's
special train passed early today,
was frustrated by tbe vigilance of a
Mexican bridge watchman at 1.30
o'clock this morning.
The bridge which it was planned to
wreck is a fine structure 800 feet
long. About midnight the Mexican
watchman wns passim; over the
bridge on his regular rounds. When
about half way across he noticed thc
dim outline of a man in the gully beneath the bridge. He called to the
man, who Immediately started to
run. Thc Mexican drew his pistol
and fired several shots, but all went,
wild. He than made un Investlga
tlon and finding a package of dynamite nt once notified the sheriff's office by telephone. The sheriff notified the railroad oflicers nnd Wines.
who was on the president's special.
was ordered to get off at Hniitn Barbara and make an Investigation.
FIND 2-1 STICKS OF DYNAMITE
When the officers arrived nt Capital! they were taken Immediately to
Thetford Mines
Three Rivers ..
Vnlleyfteld ... .
Verdun 	
Weatmount ...
3,256
4.006
9,981
4,460
11,055
-1,680
1.898
9,724
3,856
5,462
VAN
1,588
12.266
1.7S5
4,469
2.249
27,961
133
11,889
7,262
14,141
'.r,447
11.012
14,318
SASKATCHEWAN
Moose .Inw   18,828
Prince Albert ...   6,254
ltegiliu    30,210
Saskatoon   12.102
MAIL EMPIRE WANTS INtJl'IRY
Toronto, (let. 19.—The Mail and
Empire, commenting on the census
under the caption "Where is the Missing Million'.'" points out thut, combining the population nt the last
census with the government reports
ol immigration and a natural in-
creoae "f 1,000,000 people, the present population should be over 8,000,-
000. After allowing for ihc departure ol many immigrants whose stay
in Canada was but temporary, the
Mall continues.
"Evidently there is Inaccuracy
somewhere, If tbe census Is approximately correct, thin tlie Immigration figures cannot be right, lu 10
years the government expended 17,-
,-,,,;,, Did tbi ''".ni::. get all
these Immigrants <«i- whom tbe gov
ernmenl made a large outlay? Hither
Canada is paying 'or more Imml
grants than are ever landed on its
roil or it lias been paying for their
passage on to other countries. The
new government might well investigate the matter.
Field Crop   Statistics
Ottawa—a bulletin   of the census
and statistics office issued today
deals wiih tlie Held crops of tbe present year compared with the fig ires ol
the year    1900
The rc-nsii^ area, of field   :
merated m the month of Juue    have
been com] ill thi   provinces
except Quebec and British Columbia,
anl  the   u.,- sties -V crops
are   given    in   thi- '"
with esttmati 1 ol product tnpul
ied from the rejmrrs ol a largi stall
of correspondents at tlie end of Sep-
Canada Envy of the World,
Says Duke
Royal  Party   Welcomed at Quebec—Premier Borden
Present at the Procession—Quebec
in (Jala Dress
Th    -.-' a fig ■'■'-     * Saakat-
lacking (or two districts
S ■. b  Scotia (or     one
the * tala o(   be Domin-
iea :■,   ;' r    the November
1  :[ col iparison o( areas
L901   and    1311
ye
j temher
[ rhewan are
'and those i
(rliwtri* t   but
; Jon   Will    Ih'
Monthly, an
■for  the cene
' will then he n a !>■.
j    For the years   1909,   1910 ami   I'll
Ithe comparative quality of crops nt
the enri o( September was fairly uniform (or wheat oats, bark-y and rye;
but   peas, beans,   buckwheat,      .xcd
'(-nuns nni! flax were lower this yoai
by eight to twelve per cent.    dodder
< crops, including roots and corn, arc
unchanged for tha three years.    The
'condition of potatoes, which is   76.73
lis the same as last year, but 13.60
less than  two years ago.
The comparative condition >f fodder mul root crops for the Dominion
nt the end o( September ranges from
[82 to   *" per cent., of alfalfa   79.66
Jpor cent, and of potatoes 70.78 per
cent, and is generally lower in Ontario thnn eisowhore,     Tho Maritime
: provinces nnd the Northwest provinces give 90 per cent nnd over for
potatoes nnd nearly ns good for oth*
t or field roots.
The census enumeration of held
crops taken In June shows for the
Northwest provinces togothor with
Ontario nnd the Maritime provinces
nn fin-n of 9,990,621 acres wheat, 7,-
661,862 acres oats, 1,291,287 acres of
hurley. 133,053 ncres rye, and 1,090,-
615 acres Max—to which will he added
lhe areas for two districts in Saskatchewan. For the harvest year of
1900 the corresponding figures of the
cenatn >d 1901 were 4,0(38,328 acre-,
wheat,   3,981,370   acres oats,   765,273
ncres barley, 156,352 acres rye, and
21,202 acres  (lax.
The increase in the production of
the principal grains in the decade,
computed for the presont year on the
estimates of correspondents, is shown
to he in round numbers, 148,035,000
bushels wheat. 187,049,Q0G btnhels of
oats,   ai.711,100 bushels barley,   664,-
1000 bushels rye, and 12,36').000 bushels flax. These figures are exclusive
of returns for two districts in Saskatchewan,
the spot by the watchman. Inside a
box-like section of tlie steel pier 21
sticks of dynamite were found. The
explosive was hidden from view except that a fuse 10 feet long hung
out.
In a similar position at the next
pier IS sticks ol dynamite wero
found wtth fuses attached. Hoth of
these piers were about the middle of
the bridge.
Further inspection disclosed two
sticks of dynamite lying to one side
of thc bridge, evidently at the spot
where the man had heen arranging
the dynamite and attaching tho fuses
ENOUGH TO BLOW UP BRIDGE
The officers said the dynamite
would test forty per cent, enough,
they declared, to blow the bridge to
atoms.
Sheriff Stewart and Mr. Wines returned from the scene tonight and
reported the evidence of the plot waa
complete.
Although the suspect ban completely disappeared the officers say they
have certain clues find already have
several mon on the Case.
SECRET BERVICE MEN OAlvLKD
Secret service men have been wim
Quebec, Oct, 13.* 'Glorious weather
greeted the day fixed tor the landing
of their highnesses the Duke and
Duchess of Connaught on Canadian
soil to represent his majesty the
King iu his greatest   Dominion,
The city presents n gain appearance
Not since the tercentenary have the
decorations been so lavish, the whole
capital heing ablaze with red, white
aad blue decorations. Prom the
steeples of Quebec's many churches
rang out the lirst welcome to the
royal party.
The deputation at Kings wharf to
meet th" viceregal party last night
included Lieutenant Governor Lang
Iter, Mayor Drouln, Quebec; Thomas
Mulvey, under secretary ol state;
Col. Sherwood, w, it. Uaker, Capt,
T. Rivers Bulkeley equorry to his
royal highness; A Y. Bladen, CM.
G. niul private secretary, and rt. E.
Worthlngton,   medical   oUcer to the
duke.        These     gentlemen     at     once
went on board tbe Empress and met
their royal highnesses with wh.uu
the-,   later dined.
There was unfortunatel) some hitch
in the proceedings this morning nni
although rtir Francis Laugher, letu
tenant governor ol Quebec, Premier
Uorden, rtn Lomer Gouin, tbe In
spector general ol the naval service
aud civil and military dignitaries
were on hand at Kings wharf (or the
official reception, the guard ol honor
was at least ten minutes late in ap
pearing their royal highnesses being
already ashore when the guard ap-
; eared &gain when the mast for
the royal ston ard was In place ap*
parent!] no one thought to unfurl
the emblem until some tinn altei the
royal party bad come F trther
along the sh re werc the varii is llg
attartee   who bad to welcome
the party.
CHATS  WITH  PREMIER
Neither tht duke or duchess, however showed any eml-arrass:i ent. Be
fore leaving the steamer on the way
in his highnesses halted fur a few
moments for a chat with the military officers on board, including Gen.
Utter After landing his royal
highness chatted with Hon. Mr. Borden and Hon. rt. Hughes until the
guard of honor came. Then tbe royal salute was given. The hand
struck up the National Anthem and
a few moments afterwards their
highnesses entered their carriages for
the   parliament  buildings.      The duke
wore the uniform of a field marshal
of the British army, while the duchess wore a fur coat. Their royal
highnesses, accompanied by Col. H.
0, Lowther, C.M.G., Scots Guards,
military secretary, Lieut. Ramsayi;
Capt. W. Long, D.O.A.D.; Capt.
Worthlngton, medical officer; Capt.
T. Rivers Bulkeley, Scots Guards,
and Miss Pelly, lady in wniting to
her royal  highness.
FARMER'S CART BLOCKS PROCESSION
Thero was much enthusiasm during
the procession, which was accompanied by an escort of dragoons, and
the progress was halted several tim
es by obstructing vehicles and at
the foot of the hill ou St. Peters
street   one   of   the   carriages   was
(docked for « time by a farmer's
cart.
DUKE REPLIES TO ADDRESS
Tbe reply ol the Duke of Connaughl
to the welcome on behalf of the pro
vince of Quebec was as follows
"Mr. Prime Minister aud Gentle
men-—Your province, neb in historic.
al memories,   is   usually the tlrst to
welcome a   new   governor  general  and
to bid him God .-.peed a> the end ol
his tenure of office I thank you
for the hearty and loyal welcome
which in the name of Lbe province of
Quebec, vou hm e sxteuded to the
duchess and  myself.
"Thus the lirst all I lasl impres
sums ol Canada are naught with the
atmosphere ot prosperity and pro
gross whlcb charactei lees your beau
tiful land.
''lu days gone bj it was the fusion
of the French and English races
which made th.- greatuese ot England
Here   again   history   repeats Itself,
aud
it   l!
(he
union
our
own
-leal ii
111,
ll
UlilkOM
Ki
||
ihu
■k
B
llgl
mil
sg
i«r-
lilt
li
I'll
aoil
in
ii
ui;
ra-
blazon    and    Norman
drew  th«- qualities ol
severance ami Btrengtli
hei to hei proud posit
tlons.
CANADA EN\Y OF WORLD
Here under the wise rule of
statesmen, sometimes of British uld
sometime-- of French descent, Oauiua.
has achieved an era ol development
which is the envy ,d the world I aiu
pro id and happy to !ia-?e beon selected b> the king t.i bit the high
offlce ol governor general and to he
thus In a position to follow and to
promote the romarkable progress of
your country. That this progress
may uuder the protection of Divine
Providence he continued and advanced Is my earnest desire. 1 im glad
to have this opportunity of expressing to you my happiness in arriving
among you.
"I thank you* from tbe bottom of
my heart for tbe cordial welcome
you have given me. ln tbe name of
the Duchess of Connaught also 1
thank you for the graceful expressions    with    which you have greeted
] her arrival in Canada. I shall have
great pleasure in transmitting to
the king and  queen  your assurances
' of loyalty and of attachment to the
crown.     Our stay in Quebec is   now
: of necessity a very short one but we
hope to confer with my predecessor
at the citadel of Quebec which will
give us an opportunity of knowing
your beautiful city.
RECALLS  HAPPY  DAYS
\    "Many years have passed since my
j first visit to Canada where long ago
I came as a soldier, almost at the
outset of the military career to
which I devoted my life. It will be
a great pleasure to me to renew associations of my youth. Although
the country and towns may have
changed, T know Canadians' hearts
have not changed and I rejoice to
think that in coming here IT shall
tind amongst you some of the old
comrades of my time as a subaltern
with whom I formerly passed ao
many happy hours."
Forest Monarchs Saved From Fire
Outbreaks
mount [rom
Han Franc
sen and  wll
b0   placed   oi
tho hunt.
It   ih certain
thi*  man   Im
nol   y.'t  lo
i   the moun
tains  and
i   close    w
tch   ih  being
kept on all  I
asses.
And when y
■ii come to
htnk it o'et
Wn none o
us amount
to much;
But few are jerry to tho fact
Except our boss, wife, God
sucb,
With an immense saving of cost to
the province and with a loss of
timber which is almost negligible
compared with former years, thc system of protection of forests from fire
inaugurated in this district last
spring by tbe provincial government
under the supervision of W. H. McGregor, chief supervisor of tire wardens in this division has proved an
unqualified success from a conservation standpoint. No lives were lost
during the year and the only serious
fire in the immense territory in
which tho system was organized by
Mr. McGregor, which extends to the
international boundary line on thc
south, to the Alberta line on tho
east, to Laggon on the nortli, to
Asbcroft on the northwest and
through tbe Nicola Valley on the
west, was at Seymour Arm, where
an outbreak necessitated a considerable amount of work before it was
controlled. Thero was om fire on
the Weat Arm at 9-Mile point which
destroyed some farm building but the
damage, to timber in this case was
small.
Ut is estimated, though all the figures have not, yet been compiled,
that the total cost of lire protection
and fire fighting which the government will be called upon to bear in
Mr. McGregor's district for tho past
season will bo very much less than
the total sum laBt yeai" expended in
the Nelson district alone, when fires
coat about   $fifi,0Wi.
Mr. McGregor came to Hritish Columbia from Ontario where he was regarded as one of tho most efficient
officials in the forestry department
of the provincial government by ape-
clnl arrangement between Hon. W.
H. Rom minister 0f lands for this
provinco and Moll. Frank Cochrane of
thf: Ontario governmenl and during
the pant gummer devoted hiH efforts
to the organization of an off!dent
flrn fighting anl fire prevention service on tho lines of that which hns
provM eminently guccesaftll in the
ens torn province.
Thai it Ih Infinitely hotter from an
economical nnd public standpoint to
prevent the outbreak of fires than u
spend money in fighting them after
they have commenced to destroy the
timber wealth of the province is one
of the cardinal principles of the department which Hon. Mr. Ross organized. Efforts were made to impress not only upon tire wardens and
divisional wardens the necessity of
efficiently patrolling the various districts ho that fires could be discovered and controlled before they gained sufficient headway to cause damage but also to impress upon the
rancher and" the public the tremendous importance of the protection of
British Columbia's forest wealth.
Ono of the most important moves
made during the summer was at a
meeting at Crnnbrook wben a conference was held between Hon, Mr.
Ross, Mr. McGregor and others representing the government, the leading lumbermen of the district and J.
S. Dennis, land commissioner for the
C.P.R., when arrangements were
made whereby the three bodies were
in future to co-operate In thc campaign against forest firos.
During the summer many of the
lumbermen had regular patrolmen at
work on their limits and the railways made arrangements for patrolmen to follow every train on speeders so that nny fires which wers
Btarted along the track might be extinguished immediately,
Thnt this plan of organised prevention of loss of forest wealth by
menus of proper patroling proved effective, in shown by thc fact that during Lho season thore woro approximately 'JM outbreaks or llro in Mr.
McGregor's district, very few of
which reached Hufllcimt, proportions
to cause HorlollB damage before Iki-
Ing discovered and extinguished hy
memborn of tho fire protection aor-
j vice.
| One of Mr. Ross' objects in the Inauguration of lhe modern gyetom in
jthin provinco wan tho Introduction ol
j now foroHt protection legislation at
the next session and before leaving
'for Ontario about the ond of this
i wp(>k Mr. McGregor will make a number of Important, recommendations
un these lines to the inii>t»tari-
NEW  FEATURE   IN   CANADIAN
COINAGE
"What has happened to the grace
of God?" asked one Toronto man of
another. The question Was not irreverent. The questioner was talk
lng about coins. lu bis Irnnd he
bad ono of the new Canadian cents.
The fad is that "Del Gratia"
Hooms to have disappeared from the
Canadian coinage, although tbe new
King Oeorge coins m Kuglnnd re
lain it. Humpies of these show
that there has been no departure
from the long established custom of
putting thc name of (iod on the coinage. Why tho dies sent out to the
Canadian mint nte different remains
to  bo explained
Tbe King Kdward coins bore the
Inscription "Qdwardus VII., Die Gratia. Hex Imperator." The LUI
Oouadlail coins are stamped, "llnor
gins V., Ite\ et Ind,. Imp.,'1 that is
to say. "Oeorge V , King, and 10m-
poror td India." There is no Del
Gratia.    Kven the contracted forma
"Dol Oia.,'* and "IU!.," which
lomethues appears on Hritish coinage are absent
Anglo Baxon countries long pointed
tbe linger of scorn nt France for
omitting the name of Ood from fc her
coinage. A few yeara ago Theodore
Uoosevelt ordered "la God We
Trust" removed from the United
States coins but congress promptly
ordered it back again. The altera
tion in Canadian coins seems to have
occurred without attracting at ten
turn, but is safe to predict au agitation for the replacing of "Del Gratia" on the plecea which are to be
minted  here.
NEW   SENATORS  FOR  BRITISH
COLUMBIA
Peace At Any Price
(Continued  from  Page    li
whother the members uf the military
affairs committees ftre to lose all the
army  posts nud supply  depots       in
their borne districts.     Why,"   I  luu
j vied nii, seeing thai he threatened to
Interrupt me, "do yon realize    what
I a    tragedy    it  would be for Benator
' Warren nf Wyoming If war wore    to
I be put on the bum ?     Por years and
| years,    he's  boen   getting approprla-
i tlons for Port Laramie and Port D.
; A. Russell, in   order   that Wyoming
might be in proper posture of defense
I against an invading Hoot of   French,
iKnglish   or     German     battleshlpB,
; There    wouldn't  be nny    more excuse
for    keeping up tbose    forts if thero
i were not going to he any moro war;
and then what reason  would tha, peo
i pie of  Wyoming   hnve  for   continuing
to ro-oieot Senator   Warren? What's
a senator for,  if    not to get appro-
i prlatlona for the state ?"
He made n nervous gesture of de-
! preciation, but. I was going quite
! some by this time, and declined to
' bo stopped.
"Take    dear    old  Senator Dupont,
chairman   of the committee on Mili
■ tary Affairs, and uncle to the I'owdor
. Trust.     How would be be able     t()
keep up any real, live interest in beluga Honator II there wero not going
; to be any more war, or any market
j for powder ?     And so on down    the
Hat :   who would want to serve    on
the Naval Affairs committee,  if      he
couldn't have a nuvy-yard In his district ?"
The Kmiuont Diplomat at last saw
my drift.
"You are right," ho said, "but also wrong." 1 thought that was a
mighty good bit of diplomacy. "You
need not be concerned about these
treaties   putting   tbo battleship fleet
; oil the rocks, ur necessitating the
According to thc | Cttncellation of all the army and navy
act governing tho provinces of Al- ; comm|8Bions nnd leaving tbe country
berta and Saskatchewan iu 1%5 it j wIthout any rcai aristocracy. Not
was provided that representation of t aUi Theso treaties, my dear boy,
these provinces may be increased to wiIl merely nmku jt |)oshUiiC for the
after the next decennial dipiomatfl to [)roi0ng tbeir conversa-
similar provision was | Uon8 a,)OUl matter8 l)f difference bo-
made for Manitoba. Tho Uorden | twcen nati0ns; and in prolonged con-
government intends to give this in- j Ver8atiun is o(t61l to |)C founrt the
crease to hix senators to the prairie I WftV to peaC0 • •
provinces and also an increase of j Tnat begftn' tn 1(K)k lik(. peace at
three   senators in Dritish Columbia, i ftny ,)Hc(3i  wiLh a vengoanCe; but   it
Ottawa, Oct.   13.-
four    eacb
census   and
thus making a total number of seven
new senators from the west, making
twenty-four, which is the same numher allotted respectively to Ontario,
Quebec, and thc maritime provinces.
The increase will enable the government to reward some of the many
aspirants for favors. Kor British
Columbia tho names of G. H. Cowan
and Hir Charles Hibbert Tupper of
Vancouver, and Hon. Robert Oreen,
of Victoria, have already been proposed. For Alberta the defeated
Conservative candidates Hurron and
Magrath are likely to be taken care
of as well as Lake, of Assinihoia and
Haggart in Winnipeg, the latter being rewarded for giving up his Heat
to Hon. Robert Rogers.
There is nothing thnt makes a man
feel more like making the air look
blue thnn to go home feeling himself
the most abused person on God's
foot stool nnd leady to give his family a curtain lecture and find that
there is company at home. Then
he has to put on a pleasant face and
pretend he is the happiest mnn in the
world. B-r-r-r-r! It's a terrible feeling.
Don't be pessimistic so far as your
home town is concerned. Can't you
Bee that if you go about with a long
face bewailing the miserable fate of
your home town, it only pullB It
down ? Don't say that the town is
dead, that its citizens arc back numbers, that the population is steadily
decreasing and a hundred other evils
that probably exist only in your own
mind. If you can't say anything good
then keep still. Don't let other
people know that you haven't the energy to move away from such a miserable hole as you claim you are
living In. If you are a property
owner don't tell the whole world
that your property Ih worth just half
as much now as it was last year.
It Is very possible tbey may believe
you and some day you may want to
sell that proporty and you will be
able to get just about half its worth
So yon see when you talk against
your home town It only hurts yourself. Your town has as good a
chance as many other towns, of becoming an enterprising city. All lt
needs Is a few good "booBterB". So
put your shoulder to the wheel and
"boost" and thc result will richly
repay you for your trouble.
There is no place in a pretty little
city such as ours for rubbish piles
or "dump" piles as they nre sometimes called. They mar the looks of
a town more than one would Imagine
until one visits a strange town and
duds these piles of rubbish. Tbey are
far more noticeable to us in another
town than in our own for hero.
knowing where they are and accustomed to passing thorn every day, we
soon cease to notice them. Strangers
notice them, however, and that
was no time for    facetious remarks.
Em. Dip. went on :
"There is no way to prevent wars
among nations. Anybody wbo claims
to have discovered a way Is either
very innocent or very guilty. Nations
used to fight. Wars were mighty
frequent in those times, because the
emperors liked the amusement. Later
they foi.t.;ht when their kings could
induce their cabinets to agree to
light. Tbat made wars rather less
frequent, because the cabinets frequently wouldn't agree. Still later,
they fought when kings nnd cabinets
could convince their parliaments that
they otfeht to fight.
WHY  NATIONS  FIGHT TODAY
"Nowadays, speaking generally and
with allowance fot some notable exceptions, nations fight when thc people of one country decide that they
want to light, and when the people of
another country decide that they
rather fancy thc idea, too. That
makes it still more difficult to get
the necessary agreement, because the
people, who do the paying and the
shooting and the being shot at, have
never been so enthusiastic about the
amusement as the emperors and kings
and cabinets used to be.
"Nations fight about three general
sets of questions; those which involve the national honor, those which
involve vital interests and those
which involve substantial advantages
As a rule, questions which cause wars
are of tho third class; but the nations usually claim that they consider that honor or vital interest are
involved.
"A perfect illustration iB found, in
the Russo-Japanese war. Russia
was fighting for mere advantage, but
claimed that her national honor was
at stake. Japan was frankly lighting because her vital interests, hor
very right to national existence, waB
at stake. Russia's eagerness for advantage, for more territory nnd commerce, forced  tlio war.
"lf Germany and France i hould
fight ovor Morocco, Germany's desire
for territory and commercial opportunity would have caused it; but
Franco would fight bnck, not because
her vital interest wan involved, as
was Japan's, but because hor honor,
prestige, solf-respoct ns a nation,
was involved. Franco would not be
vitally aflected if she gave Germany
all Germany asks In Morocco; but
France would lose place and prestige,
and therefore cannot yield.
"In the case of our war with Spain
you may decide for yourself what
caused the conflict. We claimed it
was vital interest- Cuba wns at our
door, involved in revolution and,turmoil whloh menaced ub with pestilen
ce nud turbulence. We claimed that
we intervened in Cuba to end that
danger. Perhaps so; some people
think we intervened because wc
wanted Culm. Anyhow, we assured
the world that it was a matter uf
vital interest. Nations never admit
the meanest motive.
"So, I am trying to explain, you
can't hope to put an end tu war;
yon can provide opportunity ior
'talking past, the danger point In
rriaes.
"We already have arbitration treaties with France and Kngland. These
provide for arbitration of questions
which are properly subject to arbitration. To ho a proper subject for
arbitration. It must be a question
susceptible to determination under
the principles of law or equity. Hut
what quest ions aro SVUCOptible of determination in that way?
FIRST, LET'S TALK IT OVKR
"That's a very difficult thing to
answer. Before two countries can
arbitrate, they must agree to arbitrate. Those proposed treaties with
Franco and Kngland, ln effect, pro-
vido a method by which we can agr»*
whether n difficult question Ib one for
arbitration or not. They provide
ono new chance of reaching a peaceable adjustment of differences.
"Lot me Illustrate. As our rela-
tioas with Franco or England now
stand, in case of disagreement, the
first recourse is to diplomacy; to
talking it over, trying to agree between ourselves. Most disagreements are settled in this wny.
"If this method does not bring
agreement, then comes arbitration.
j This i.s, in effect, submitting the dlf-
j ference to a court, both parties hind-
i ing themselves in advance to accept
Ithe decision. Here, the proceeding
| Is like a lawsuit; hoth sides have
counsel, prepare their cases, submit
testimony, present briefs ond make
arguments.
"But there aro still loft certain
questions which nre not susceptible
to decision in accordance with established rules of law and jurisprudence
It is to provide for this difficult
class of cases that the treaties now
ponding have been drawn, Thoy provide that if there is difficulty in agreeing to arbitrate, then the two countries shall each establish a Joint
High Commission of Inquiry, composed of three cltUons of each country, or otherwise constituted as the
countries shall agree, by exchange of
notes, in a particular cose.
"This Joint High Commission
shall organize, select secretaries,
havo power to issue siOpoenas, administer oaths, etc., nnd the expenses shall be equally borne hy the two
countries. it shall inquire into the
whole matter in disagreement, and if
five of the six commissioners shall,
at the conclusion, agree that the subject Is properly one to be subjected
to arbitration, then there shall be
arbitration."
This delay of a yoar is perhaps tho
most important thing about the
whole procedure. It provides a
means to get postponement, to prevent hasty action under the influence
of excitement or temporary passion,
of the public mind. It is especially
to the advantage of the iTnitcd
States, because in effect it would
give this country a year's time in
which to get ready for trouble, If
it were apparent that there were
going to be trouble. Notoriously,'
we are about lho worst prepared
nation of the first class.
ARBITRATION'S    A    GOOD THING
But the difficulty about it is that
a treaty is not enforceable. It Is
only an agreement. The moment
war is declared nil treaties are
blown to the four winds. Japan
and Russia had plenty of treaties one
day. They didn't abrogate them by
agreement. Japan sent a fleet Into
Port Arthur to start war, and the
gun that started war ended all
treaty arrangements till peace was
restored.
So with this arbitration business.
It iH a good thing because it provides moro things to talk about, to
waste time ovor, to give folks a
chniico to cool oft and to think.
when very angry, count one hundred"
said Jefferson. This plan proposes
that wo shall always have time
enough to count, ono hundred—provided the other fellow doesn't haul
ot! and smash us while we're counting, or provided we don't wallop
him while he's engaged in the praiseworthy mathematical amusement.
Tt's n good thing to talk about In*
ternatlonal pence, to get to believing
in It, to think over how much war
nnd armies and navies nud pensions
cost. It nil helps mnke war less
popular and loss likely to happen.
And in this regard the discussion of
universal arbitration aud world-wide
peaco is an excellent business.—From
Farm and Fireside.
MADAM SHERRY
AS GOOD NOW AS THEY
WERE
EVER
Owing to the condition*, nt present
Is 1 existing In the Crow's Ncsl. Puss the
what we don'l. wnnt.     lt 1, true we |    ,MB   f   ^    ^ a
wish   strangers     to   rememher   our,    ,   ,
town, but on account of Its extreme whlch plnyB thc auditorium onaThure-
ncatness, not on account of Its lllth i day. Ootober Hli, will hn $2.nn for
and neglect. "Dump" piles not only j tn» ,1CBt scnts instead ol thc usiul
mar thc looks of a town but they j Price ol $2.5(1. Tho show is without
render lt unhealthy. If the nation-: doubt tho best musical farce comedy
al government can he said to have that has ever played western Oanada
a "hobby" its present hobby is    to: nnd    included    in the cast nro such
musical comedy oolehritcs aH lOthel
Doll, Wnlter Oatlott, llert Wainwright, Marie Morgan, .lessle Btonor
Ooorgo Pollltnoy, etc., including tho
original Now Amsterdam theatre
beauty chorus. Pull scenic equipment and light effects arc cnrrled, together with a special orchestra nnd
tho thentre patrons of Oranbrook
will have tho opportunity to witness
a performance unexcelled In any of
tbe large ci*i*v
destroy all unsanitary conditions existing In our country, lt would ho
a good thing If our town government
would adopt Uiln same hobby, Wo
should arouse onr health oltlrcrs.
Thoy, poor men, have struggles
against grrnt. od:ls for so long that
they bave almost glvon up the fight.
Abolish rubbish piles and all other
sit:h traps of disease nml you will
find that the sick list ln our town
will greatly diminish.
SirWIIfrid Laurier and bis colleagues, oven the defeated ones, are juat
as gooil men now as they were on
tbo 20th of September, the day before thc election. Anyone who admired them thon should not despise
them now,—Canadian Century.
GOES MILE A MINUTE ON MOTOR
CYCLE
Winnipeg, net. IJ.-Joo Uarbaroau,
a Piencb Canadian motor cyclo rider
clipped two minutes Irom the world'B
ono hundred mlle motor cycio record
lor a dirt track on Haturday, his
time lor the whole distance being
1:40:84. One lap he actually completed In li'J 2-5 seconds. The previous record of 1:42:09 was mado by
Evans at Columbus, Ohio, on Sent.
17,  1911.
■jjjjaTjjaaaafffffi THE PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK, BRITISH COLUMBIA
tf III1 HII l-H'M 1-H-M-H 11' ■
I AN ARBITER II
OF FATE
Qimtllcl SwtJlawa in Ancient
Supcrs.ltion
By CLARISSA  MACKIE
• '  Copyright by American Press Aaso-   ■ '
elation, uui
  ,.lll„tl,._« ... 1
"llere comes Aimi Alvurettu." suld
Elsie Usilessly from her seut In the
bow window. "I wonder what hns
hsppeni'd. She's got her knit hood on
ovor her swooping cup, aud she is run
nlng across, ihe orchard,"
Mrs. Parsons leaned over her daughter's shoulder and peered at the lull
angular figure hurrying through tho
orchard thnl divided the two houses'
"Maybe Quiuullul tins had another lit.
That eut will ho the death of Alvaretta
with his fits aud llulcky ways; she's
worried over him half the time. I'll
open tho door for her." She went to
the side porch uud uwalted her sister's
coming.
Alvurettu come up Ihe narrow pnlh
between Ihc rows of chrysanthemums,
her prunella shod feel Hushing lu uml
out of the deud leaves nud hor faded
face iiulie pink wllh excitement,
"ls It Gomullol?" culled Mrs. Parsons
eagerly us her sister drew uear.
Miss [.ce stopped short und stared.
"Il Whnt tiamullt'lV"
"I thought |verhups thul cut had nn
other fit," relurued Mrs. Parsons sharply; "he's alwuys cutting up some sort
of didoes!'*
"Guiuullel's nil right," assured Alvaretta culinly as she followed ber sister Into thc wnrm silting room, "flow
•re you. Elsie? Haven't you finished
those pillowcases yet?"
"This Is tho lust one," answered Elite, rising to offer her nunt n rocking
chnir. "When we saw you running.
Aunt Alvaretta. we thought something
bad hnppened." She resumed her own
■eat and bent her fair head above the
muslin pillowcase.
"Something unusual did happen."
averred Miss Lee with mysterious
nods of her hood. "I'll hnve to take
off my knit bond; It's bottor'n nil
get out ln this room. Kor the land—if
I haven't got on my sweeping cap!
Well, It's all In tbe story of whnt happened when I wus cleaning the garret
this morning."
"Whnt hnppened?" queried Mrs. Parlous Impatiently ns she picked up hei
needles nnd knitted furiously nt some
white Ince she wns mnking for her
daughter's trousseau.
Miss T.ee removed her sweeping cap
•nd twirled It thoughtfully on one lone
finger, her keen, block eyes wntchinc
Elsie's downenst fnce ns she told her
atory.
"As I wns snying. 1 elenned the gar
ret this morning, or 1 wns Just beginning to when I decided I'd clean out
that little closet under the rnflers.
There was s little hair trunk tbnt be*
longed to Grandmother Lee, nnd It
bad all sorts of truck In lt. I won't
tell you nil tho stuff there wns tucked
•way In thnt trunk. Some rainy day
yon can come, Emellne. nnd we'll look
It over, nut nmong other things there
was n little pnslebonrd bos and Inside
of It wns n little scrap of lace, marked
'Ann Lee's wedding veil.' Thnt wus
your great-grandmother. Elsie! There
was a scrap of the wedding gown nnd
then Bcrewed up In n Hide piece of paper was this bit of grandmother's wedding cake!" Alvaretta triumphantly
held up n twist of yellowed paper,
wblcb she cnrefully unfolded to discover a morsel of dark, fruity cake
with a few Hecks of Icing clinging to
It
"I'm going to give lt to Elsie tc
dream on," snld Miss I.ee slowly.
Elsie's pale fnce flushed hotly and
•be shrank back In her chair with a
protesting gesture of her hands. "Ynu
needn't laugh nt me, Aunt Alvaretta,"
•be said tremulously. "You kuow 1
don't have to dream on wedding enke
■^my fnte's been decided for me." Sbe
■bot a bitter glance at ber mother's
•verted face.
Mrs. Parsons nrose and went to the
plant stund In the window, where she
proceeded to pick the dead leaves from
the geraniums wllh quick, nervous ges
tures that betrayed her Inward per
flirtation.
"I didn't know Elsie hnd decided
•be was going to marry Jerome Bar
clay. I thought she wns sort of teeter
lng between him and Rob Harris,"
blurted Miss Alvaretta, getting upon
her feet. "I've never tnken much stock
ln your notion of having Elsie get her
wedding clothes ready before she'd
mode up her mind."
"I never said 1 wanted to marry Jerome llarelay l-l—can't boar hlin!"
flashed Elsie, wllb unusual spirit
Mrs. Parsons turned n cold face to
ward her daughter "I I bought It was
understood," she said severely, "that
yon was to marry Jerome, lie snld
be wouldn't take 'no' for nn answer,
■nd be soys yuu enn keep hired help
■nd you needn't do n stroke of work
If you don't want to He can afford
to hnve you live like n lady. He lefl
■ di'mond ring for you to wenr, and
he told me to Are abend and get the
Clothes ready. He says be knows you
will be ready I don't want to Influence you. Klslo, but I've hnd to work
lo hard all my life It seems as lf 1
couldn't hnve ynu let sueh a good
chance go by." She looked appealing-
ly at tbe mutinous face of her daughter.
"I wouldn't mind working hard for
■ome folks," half sobbed the girl,
turning tier eyes nway.      '
Mra Parsons sighed und resume)
kit picking of tbo dead leavei fron
uo geraniums. ", itiiin t kuow tnat
Rob bad given you the chance to sny
yes or no," she sold bll ler ly,
"Fiddlesticks!" sullied Miss Alvaretta, with a toss of hor bead, "1 guess
lloh and Elsie know whether ihey
want to murry eacb other without any
hlghfnlnting tulk ulsiut Ii. lloh Harris Is poor, but he's suiart os a whip
•nd bound to muke his murk In tbe
world. He's got moro gluger In his
Utile finger Ihun Jerome Barclay has
In his whole lacy body, 1 don't believe In Interfering with otber folk's
business, and 1 sbnn't Influence Klslo
either way, bnt 1 think It's only fair
•he should bavo ■ chance, and her*
It ls."
Miss Alvaretta held ont lho bit of
wedding cake in Its twist of paper and
dropped It In her niece's outstretched
band "Elsie Pursuits, you tnke that
cake and put lt under your pillow tonight If you dream about Rob Harris you can take lt that It's your fate
to marry him and nobody else. It
you dream of anybody else 1 reckon
It's your duty to marry them whoever
they are. Therel I've got to be going. Gamaliel will be wanting hli
milk."
With a pressure of Elsie's hand and,
a delimit glnnce at tbe thin disapproving back of her sister, Miss Alvaretta marched out of tho room.
When she bad disappeared through
the aisles of leafless trees Mrs. Pur-
sons turned around. "1 hope you're
not going to take any stock In that
foolishness, Elsie."
"Mother, I'm going to have my
chance," she snld quietly, "lil promise lo abide by whatever I dream
nbout tonight If I dream about Jerome Barclay lil toll you the truth."
"I'll do the best I can by you, Elsie,
whichever way you happen to drenm,"
said Mrs. Parsons after a long pause.
"Thank you, mother," sold Elsie,
and then they talked of otber matters
and Elsie's lovers were not mentioned
■gain that afternoon.
After supper there came a scratching
and mewing at Ihe side (Mor. "It's
Gamaliel," said Elsie as she arose to
admit Miss Alvaretta's big black cat
"I suppose he's come over to spend the
nlgbt"
"The most ungrateful critter that
ever lived, remarked Mrs. Parsons a«
■he placed a saucer of milk for the
unexpected guest "Alvaretta wait*
on that cat band and foot and Are
nlgbts out of the week be runs ovet
here to sleep. I shouldn't think you'd
want him sleeping ln your room, Elsie."
While she undressed Elsie thought
of the wedding cake aud of what sbt
might dream while Its magic lay sc
near bor hoad, but she forgot it aftei
all until she was about to stop Into
bed. Tben she groped In the dnrknesi
and found tbe twisted bit of paper oi
the bureau and tucked It under hei
pillow.
She thought persistently of Jeromi
Barclay, while she. tried to banish bin
from her mind, and so Bhe fell asleej
•nd dreamed of him—clear, vivid
dreams of automobile rides around tbt
surrounding country nnd into tbe nd
jacent cities as Jerome Barclay's wife;
dreams tbat were so real that she re
membered every detail of each out
wben she awoko to a realization tbal
ber teat had failed to grant ber heart'!
desire. Not once hnd she even thought
of Rob Hands ln the misty land ol;,
dreams.
Gamaliel   yawned   sleepily   on   bll |
cushion and bounced off lndlgnantl) i
as tbe door  was cautiously pushed
open  and   Mrs.   Parsons'   face   wai
thrust ln.
"Welt, Elsie, wbat did you drenm!"
she asked, with assumed lightness.
Elsie sat up ln bed and swept ths
fair hair back from ber dejected face,
"I dreamed of Jerome Barclay, moth'
er," she said heroically. "So I'll mar
ry him Just as I said I would."
Mra. Parsons advanced Into the room
and picked up a scrap of paper from
the floor. "What's this?" she asked.
"What did you do wtth the cake, Elite?"
Th* girl stared and thon slipped her
band hastily under the pillow and
drew forth ■ screwed Up piece of paper. "Here It ls—no—why, mother, I
made a mistake and put a curl paper
under the pillow Instead of the wedding cake!" Tbe color came Into her
cheeks, and ber eyes danced as tbey
bad not done ln months. Sbe was
getting some of her old time spirit
back. "There Isn't nny charm about
dreaming ou a curl paper, Is there,
mother?" she asked demurely.
"No, there Isn't" said Mrs. Parsons
■bortly. "Elsie, I believe that Gamaliel ate that cake. See, this ls the paper with a few crumbs left tn lt I
found It near hla cushion. Therel
See him eat the rest of It!" She looked resentfully at Gamaliel as he swallowed the remaining crumbs and licked bis lips appreciatively.
"I forgot to soy, Elsie, tbat Rob
Harris ls downstairs waiting to see
you. He soys be enn't go till he does.
I expect your Aunt Alvaretta had
something to do nbout getting him
over here. He looks powerfully worried. Hels got a little automobile to
attend to his business wltb, I've asked Rob to stay to breakfast You better hurry." She opened the door and
stumbled over tbe nctlve Gamaliel.
"Drat that catl Thieving old reprobate!" Bhe scolded, departing. "I'm
glad you dreamed wbat you did,
child," she called back.
Elsie snatched Gamaliel to ber heart
and kissed him rapturously. "You're
the dearest old thing, nnd you shall
wear a white ribbon," she whispered
In his perky ear. Then from below
there came a prolonged and familial
whistle that was echoed In her heart
She crept to the window and answered It happily, tremulously.
From across the orchard Aunt Alvaretta's vole* sounded, calling:
."Gamaliel!  Qum-.'.l!" _     '
Tourists Were Pew.
Ere — Tbere aren't man* peopl*
■round bere.
Adum—No; I don't believe we could
make any money running "seeing
Eden" Wps.-New York Pres*.
As Compared.
Behold tim hustling bootblack
At work wr*l all his powsrl
Ht, Ilka the busy little bee.
Improves each shining bour.
-Chlcaso Naws.
Cheap Communication.
"Do you believe tn telepathy*"
"Certainly not," replied Mr. Dustla
Btax.   "Even lf ths scheme were practical thero Is no money In It"—Wua-
Ington Slur.
Of Course Not!
If you don't eat between your drinks
Nor drink between your meals
You'll not have Ions to worry
Uow anybody feels.
-Louisville Post
He Was Immune,
Howell-Her laugh Is contagious
Powell-Well, 1 wu ln no d»u-
of catching Iti abe wu laughing It ar*.
-New .lot* Pm.
NOT 6000 ENOUGH.
Famous Fol* Who Hava Veen Turned
Oc o.
Mr. John Rail's'1, tho lam mi.snl.1
M I producer of ■ le.n.,uDoa|ers, who
wss st He i-'Ii-t- with tho present
King when thev \v-t-> *,,,tn .chnnlboyi,
greatly aniu-,,1 sn euHienee lhe other
di. by tilling the-u ajme interesting
•torles ol those di.yi respecting King
George, hi -ell, und otlur uow celebrated men.
B1-' o.ie ol the |»I». Mr. Hassell
tells with mn vtusto i" lhat ol how,
after thu. helno ''""I in Germany
lor some years, snd speaking the German lanyimit*- excellency, he was
.oiz.nl wiih military arplratlutil, and.
sti ' a young man, went up as a can.
didate to «n"dhur«t. H iwever. he did
t><' satisfy the examiners. And the
Iwj subject' th. t h '"SS told he had
(ailed ii, were — German aud drawing.
Lord Roberts, hBvIng a predilection
towards a nilllt.rv career even as ■
youth, died in vain to pn*s tho medical meu i Kngland lor that particular
purpoio.
They declared he was so delicate
thut he would probably not live many
years! Accordingly, he went out to
India tu gain health and strength, and,
whilst there, entered tlie Indian army.
Hij progress since theu has uow become proverbial, and his lame has be.
come aecr'id to that ol no living soldier.
1 Is, again, curious to remember
that Prince Kumar Shrl ISsnjlt«luh|i,
herbs", tlie lineal batsman and Holder
this generation haa ever seen, was not
included iu tlie Cambridge eleven uu-
d-r the captaincy ol tho Hon. F, H.
Jackson, becauie "he wjsu't goud
enough."
Many a tim: since then ha. Mr.
Jackson stated what a mystery it hat
always been to him that, after seeing
Rnnji play time alter time, ai he did
at Cambridge, i- - muld have come to
such a conclusion, In the lace ol what
the Indian prince did almost immediate! afterwards iu the realms ol
cricket.
Antther famous instance ol s candidate's being rojected In one ol hla
strongest points is that ol Mr. J. H.
Taylor, the world-celebrated golfing
champion.
Mr. Taylor, as a young man, hod
military inclinations, aud one day hs
determined to enlist. So, iu due
course, he came belore the doctor
with other recruits. This medical man
passed the would-be soldier as regarded his general health, tee.'.i, etc., but
astounded him by declaring that he
could not be accepted because hia
eyesight was certainly seriously defl.
cient.
But perhaps the beat tale ol the
"not-good-enough" kind Is thst ol poor
George Lohmann, one ol the finest all.
rounders English cricket has ever
produced.
George Lohmann, a mere lad ol sev.
enteen, strolled on the Oval to watch
tha practice st the note.
Casually he took up the ball and
began to bowl to the Surrey playere
batting. Time alter time he best and
bowled them. Then Mr. Aleock, the
secretary st that dny, hod hla attention called by ono ol the players te
the lad's bowling, so he came to see
it.
"What club d> you play lor, my
ladP" he asked.
"Wandsworth Second Eleven, sir."
snswerej the boy.
"And why not for thc first elevenP"
asked Mr. Aleock, smiling.
"Because they say I'm not good
enough, sir," replied the lad.
"Oh. they do, do they" Well, would
you like to play lor Surrey next week
—Lohmann, I think your name la—
ehP"
George Lohmnnn could hardly be
Heve Ms ears. He reddened like Ure
as this "it opportunity-Ma heart's
one desire—waa dangled thus belore
him, and, somewhat tearfully, answered:
"I  should Indeed, ilr!'
And tljus tlie boy who wss "nnt
good enough" lor Wandsworth's First
Eleven began a career that dellnhtod
and surprised the world ol cricket-
Answers.
New Mown Hay In a Church.
A custom which hes existed at Old
Weston (Huntinmlnnshlre). England,
from time Immemorial has again
heen observed. The church Is dedicated to St. Swlthin, snd on the Sunday nearest St. Swlthin's day the
edifice Is strewn with new mown hsy.
The tradition !» that an old lady
bequenther n field Ior charitable pur
poses on condition thst the tenant,
provided the hay to lessen the annoyance caused by the iquesk'ng ol
tho new Imnts wrrn by tho villagers'
on Feast Sunday. There are other
explnnntlnns—one that It Is sn nil-ring of the first fruits of-Ihe hny harvest and another that it is a survival
ol the custom nl strewing Ihe church
(when the floor was only beaten
earth) wllb rushes, these heing re.
newed on the festival Sunday.
History ol Polo.
Polo is tlie most ancient of all games
with stick and ball, aud probably
hockey, golf and cricket are but modifications ol it. The earliest records ol
the game are I'er.-iau and date back
to 600 B.C. In India it seems to have
been known for ceuluries belore the
Ilritish occupation, but it rose into
favor only some hall a century agj
wheu the English residents began to
practice it. lhe gome was Introduced
into England by tbe officers ol the
Tenth Hussius abuut IS63, but at that
tii.ie the players used hockey slicks,
and billiard bulls. It was John Watson ol tlie Thirteenth Hussars wbo
drew up the rules and regulations
which changed polo Irom a wild, skill,
lesa game into a scientific   ,iort
Odd Names In Old Tlmsa.
Among tlie g.xid men and true on
a Juiy in Btl'sex iu he seventeenth'
century where Steadfujt-on-lli^b
Strings. Kill Sin Pimple, Uod-
Pewurd Smnit. und Fight-the-Good-l
Flght-ol-Faith White. Hume's Hli-
Ury tnentiens Ml II Christ Hud-Not^
Died-Kor You- You Had Been Uamued
Harehone, whose long name defeated'
its own cbject, being generally
shortened Into Damned llarebont.-
Uuiduj Chrinicle.
No Idle Boast
The Famous Pointer (angrily)—1
hoar, air, that you're boasting that
you studied under me?
The Neur Painter (calmly)—And so
I did, sir, so 1 did. Why, 1 occupied
a room under your studio for nearly
u month!
Regular customer (who has just entered restaurant)—"Strong smell ol
paint here, William!"
Waiter (coughing apologetically nnd
indicating young women about to
leave table)—"Yessir—soon pass oil,
sir—they're just going."—Punch.
IDE STREET PLAYERS
LONDON AT NIGHT TEEMS WITH
FREE VAUDEVILLE SHOWS.
B.dford Place It a Typical Examplo
of the Haunts of the Catchpenny
Acton Who Ranj-e From Acrobats
to Tragedian*—Some Perform for
Charity and Excellent Talent li
to Bt Seen for a Penny.
In the daytime Bedford Place, Lon-
don, tlie home of the well-to-do
•visitors in the city, hus little to recommend it brides its floating population, and they usually float earlv
to the Abbey, St. Paul's »nd the Na-
tional Gallery, After nightfall, how-
evfr, excellent entertainment of tlio
continuous variety order is provided.
The performance begins immediately after dinner, when the stringers
are starting to the theatres uml maids
in nil conditions of slattern!1 ness
rush madly to tlu square to pick un
taxi cabs nnd ride hack in them with
the air of my lady on her way to a
drawing-room.
The big show bes'ni with the magi-
cal irruption of nil sorts of wandering mlnstels. lays a recent writer.
Ma ire mint really work In this nlaln,
matter-of-fact region; you m'ght ha
scanning the miner and lower ends
of this plnoa and reporting, like sister
Anne, that you saw nothing, when
lo! in front of your very door, to right
and left of you, spring itinerant musicians, acrohats, opera singers, acton
—it Is as if the stony pavement had
yawned and yielded them up (or
your diversion.
Beneath the open windows of the
boarding houses, "board residences,"
hotels, apartments, the strange entertainment is now in full swing. We
havo brought out uncomfortable,
backless stools and sit down with
the firm determination to hn amused
at as small an expenditure of pennies
as possible. Our particular villain
is a violinist who plays an "Ave
Maria" as well as it can be played
on four strings. Our neighbors to
right and left have drawn a gayer
lot, a singer of the worn-out stuff
from the 'alls and a tumbler who :s
also a ventriloquist. In a few minutes, however, there will be a shift
and we may get either tumbler or
singer, while the stolid auditors one
side or other will have to put up with
the virtuoso. Across the street there
are other performers and the medley
goes on as such things do in Pande-
nomium; each singer, dancer, musician, pursues his little program
(empties h!s bags of tricks, to be
quite professional) as if he were the
cynosure of the street: It would be
Impossible to recognize the slow,
stupid, ugly Bedford Place of day-
time while this tumultuous variety of
noises fills it from end to end.
Listen! A stentorian voice from
the upper end of the Place dominates
the clashing sounds.
"The first dramatic impersonation
I will give you this evening, ladies
and gentlemen, is the closing act of
'The Only Way,' from the famou*
novel by Charlei Dickens, 'The Tale
of Two Cities.' I will, with youi
kind permission, represent Sydney
Carton."
This was perfunctory politeness,
for without anybody's permission the
shabby Thespian strode into the
middle of the street, dashed his hat
onto the pavement and launched into
the tragedy. The man was by , no
means a bad actor. His voice was
susceptible of great changes; it could
be tender and sweet, it could be
rich and powerful. While he acteJ
the other performers at a little distance went on with their work undisturbed by the tragedian or he hy
them. Only the one-legged man wh?
had a trained dog and the dwarf
tumbler who happened to be nearest
paused in their labors and gave poor
Sydney Carton the tribute of a tear.
As the slow twilight faded out and
the slower stream of bronze dribbled
into their unwashed palms the per*
formers gradually worked their way
out of the Place in the direction of
Ennesley Gardens. The pavement
Irving had passed the hat and * disappeared; the tumbler, the ventriloquist, the comic singer had vanished,
and only the violinist with foui
strings still lingered, ready to play
the "Ave" over again for the smallest
encouragement. But even he mads
haste to dive into the outer shadowi
when, with a show of caparisoned
■teed, mysterious covered cart and
loud staccato note from a hidden
piano, entered the Masked Musicians,
prepared to give their concert.
It was my first sight of this eminently British institution, and I waited with something like a thrill to see
what make their perennial fascination. The black-palled cart halted,
the piano gave out a gentle tinkle,
steps were lowered and two men and
a woman modishly dressed like dinner guests and wearing velvet masks
descended and stood in front of the
cart. Their first selection, given in
the conventional concert style, is
from an ancient florid opera; then
the men step back and lean negligently on the wheels of the cart while
the prima donna shrills the aria of
"Santuzla." A good baritone voice
follows with sentimental song of the
day, his mate "obliges" with a shrieking tenor, th.-re is a final trio, and
the concert is over save for the
penny catching. Baritone, a slim,
elegant figura in a perfectly fitted
dress suit, holds out his shining silk
hat as if conferring a favor; the other
masks stand in attitudes of easy unconcern, not even whispering to each
other—all is carried out with the
most polished decorum; it is like a
gam j, the carrying out of a wag«.
Pence roll in thickly and there is ni
sordid suggestion.
This is the featured act of the Bed-
ford Plnce vaudeville. No sooner
have the mashers faded away as silently as they enme than the minor
oerformers ro-emerge from the iha-
lows to reap but a languid interest
Hpd few pennies. Indeed, it ls eleven
/clock, and Russell Square, economical of gas a- of other material comforts, ia turning it ofl and going to
bed*
A-woman in Paris edits a newspaper, aud nil tho work done on the
paper is performed by women. Recently the editor's mother died, and
she herself pronounced the funeral
oration over the grave.
The love of money Is nlso the root of
much matrimony.
"A political party," said Uncle
Eben, "is lumpin* like de. chu'eh
choir. I)n man dat make de mos*
noise in it ain't alius de one dat is
most      promotions      of harmony."—
Washington Star.
A CHICK FOUNTAIN.
Can Be Mado by Anyb *dy, and tht Little Pttptrt Enjoy It Immoneely.
Here's nu ingeniou ■ little fountain
for keeping a consta.it supply of water for yuuttiful chick as. It ta simple
in tbe extreme to ma it, aud any boy
wbo cao use a saw and drive a nail
can moke one ln an bour. Just take
two pieces of board one sis inches
square and tbe otber "J by V2 and nail
tbem so as to form a right uugle. (let
an old milk bottle ai 1 nail two tbln
FOUNTAIN FOB CBXCKXNS.
strips of tin so tbat the bottle wlll slip
easily In and out and remain support*
ed head down.
Tben null the lid of a tin cao under
the mouth of tbe bottle, and enough
water will escape to keep the little receptacle always full and be handy tor
the chicks to get at wbenerer tbey
want to liquidate tbeir littlo bills. It
goes wltbout saying that tbe contraption should be kept In a cool, ibady
•pot
WANT REAL JWtCELS POST.
Entirely Too Much Energy Waited on
Roada From Town to Country.
Aa to Home products of tbe farm,
there le a dlffercuie of 40 tu CO pet
cent between tbe price tbat the grower
receives and tbe price tbot tbe consumer pays. Tbere are even cases In
wblch this price difference amounts to
800 per cent. Tart of the loss Is due
to a bnd system of retail distribution,
as when a dozen city milk wagons
travel over the same route, eacb delivering one) bottle here and unotbel
bottle there, when one wngou might a,
well make all the deliveries along tbe
route. This aame waste appears even
more markedly between the farm and
the town. How mauy fully loaded
wagons do you pass In driving to
town? Frum a dozen farms a dozen
packages of butter, poultry or vegetables may go to town the same morning, each in a different vehicle. Every
day n dozen piuvols of merchandise
are hauled ont or town ulong tbe sama
road In n dozen different conveyances,
and the time and labor of eleven men
and eleven horses go for nothing. Tbt
rural free delivery mall wugon now
comes to your house with a load tbat
you could put in one or two bushel
baskets, and it goes back to towu wltb
an even smaller load. Under preseut
conditions it looks as If the postofflce
department was not giving the farmer
his money's  worth.—Country  (lentle-
PRECIOUS  DOCUMENTS.
Care ef tht Constitution and Declaration ef Independence.
Open to tbe light ot dny for the first
time In nine years, tin* Declaration ot
Independence aud the constitution of
the United States were reeeutly inspected by Secretary of State Knox
and found to be in as good condition
as wben they were put away lu their
abiding place, a steel safe especially
deslgued for tbeir custody.
Tbe four pages ot tbe constitution
and the pages containing the resolu
tlou submitting the constitution to tbe
states of tbe Union ure In excellent
condition. The ink Is as black as
wben fresh laid to tbe parchment wltb
a quill pen und Is or u quality thnt wlll
outlast auy Ink of modem mnke
Tbe Declaration of Independence,
wltb hardly a signature legible or all
those which ure appended to It by the
great men of the Infant republic, however. Is otherwise losing not lilng of legibility. Its condition is due to the fuct
tbat away back In 181V.!, when there
were uo other means known or getting
a facsimile, a press copy wus tukeu
which atisorbed the Ink from nearly
Bll the signatures and left the script
of lbe body of tbe document Btill read
able, but more ft)lot hy balf tban it
bnd been before.
The declaration hud also been exposed lo strong sun light wlille ou exhibition ut Philadelphia In 1870 and at
lhe Chicago exposition In 1803
Thc document s are kept In a light
steel case lhat Would offer ouly Blight
resistance to beat nnd fire. Kuch page
Is hermetically sou led between two
panes of gluss. whirl, are theu bound
in wooden frames of highly polished
ouk.
Secretary Knox directed that Chief
Clerk McNeil muke estimate for a safe
depository for the documents Mbnt
should bo fire proof, wuter proof, air
proof ond light proof. The two valuable documents were thon closed up
again In tbe safe aud the seal affixed,
f to he opened again only for transfer to
a stronger place of keeping.
Tbe documents will not be open to
public Inspection. The snfe Is kept in
the library of the state department.-
Washington Star.
Points
for
Mothers
Live Stock Notes.
Do you use tbe whip because yon
have It bandy? s
Are you humane In the treatment of
the animals you drive?
A horse's pulse beats from thirty-six
to forty times a minute when be Is In
health.
A muie ls no more prone lu kick than
a borse unless he'ls taught to do so by
bad treatment
Are you one of tbe unthinking who
starts a borse with a blow Instead of
using your voice'/
Do you want a balky borse? Tou
can easily bare one by giving blm
too heavy loads to draw.
If the borse must be kept ln tbe barn
during hot weather keep all the doors
and windowB wide open.
Oats Is the most perfect all -round
feed for horses ut any time of (he
year.   Barley Is a close second.
It ls a good sign to «ee a pall* of
scales In the stable, but you bave to
use them to get uuy good from Ihem.
Carrots musl lie fed sparingly to
working horses. Cut them lu slices.
Tbey are a Nmiine, aud affect tbe
kidneys also.
Lop off the ratlnn of all kinds wben
the horses are doing little or nothing.
They are too much like a man to stand
heavy feed while lying still.
Stuffing the colt with hay or straw
or auy coarse feed will spoil Its looks.
Keep this ration down by tbe use of
some griiiu and less coarse feed.
Watch tbe hired man with your
horses, lf ihey cringe, dodge or show
signs of fear while with lilm. take my
advice and "Ore" lilm. A good horse
is spoiled wben he Is a victim of fear.
Don't make your horse wait till he la
cooled off before you give blm a drink.
Take a couple nf quarts In a pall and
give that. Then wait a while and give
as mu.'li more Hy this you will save
a lot of suffering on the part of yout
borso and he wilt come out all right
Tlie woman who knows bow to
spank a Imliy properly didn't ncqulro
the knowledge, through a correspond*
ence school.
(linger bonbons are readily mado by
taking nlil,mc pieces ol pesorved ginger nml inserting tllOBQ in the hollows
ol line large dates which have been
j stoned.    Draw the date together and
' roll in jmwdcrcd sugar.
I    Kvery time a new barber comes to
j town all the bald men drop in to see
il he can't suggest something that will
| make hair grow.
ENTOMBED IN A GLACIER.
A Reminder of ths Fearful Alplnt
Tragedy of 1870.
A broken alpenstock bearing tbe
carved name "Dr. .1. Bean, Baltimore,"
has. the Loudon Chronicle says, just
been found by u Chnmonix guide lu
the Ice of the tiluclcr des Bossous,
which "flows" down direct from the
summit of Mont Blanc to the valley
of Chnmonix. The find recalls tbe
most terrible accident tn Alpine bis
tory, wben eleven climbers perished
on the summit of the (Jrent White
mountain lu violent suowatormB which
lasted a week. In September, 1ST0,
the Itev. G. McCorkIndole of Glasgow
and two Americans, Dr. J. Benn of
Baltimore and Mr. Itandall, both elderly men wltb little experience of the
Alps, set out from Chnmonix wltb
eight guides nnd safely reached tbe
summit In doubtful weather. Hardly
had tlie descent commenced wheu tbe
snowstorm started, and not one of tbe
eleven climbers was seen again alive.
A strong force of guides some days
later found tbe bodies of five victims.
Including the clergy mnn and Dr.
Benn, but the other six were never
found, having most probably fallen
Into crevasses. It la uow thought,
owing to the discovery of the broken
alpenstock, that the bodies of tbe six
climbers, who bave been buried ln
their tomb of Ice for the Inst forty-
one years, have reached tbe end of
the glacier, which travels at the rate
of about 500 feet a year, and are not
far from the surface of the Ice at tbe
Up of tbe Chnmonix valley. — Bt
James* Gazette.
A Standard of Colors.
Tbe call for International standards
of alt kinds Is becoming every day
more Insistent wllh the progressive
unification of the industries of tbe
world. The latest demand of this
kind Is for an International standard
of colors. Chemists, manufacturers of
dye stuffs and plgineuts and mauy
others would benefit hy sucb a standard. It Is suggested thut wheu once
the desired color scheme bits been de*
elded upon tbe best method of perpetuating tbe standards and rendering
them available for comparison every*
where would be by means of colored
glasses wltb which a tintometer could
be constructed. A tentative Instrument of this kind, based on an arbitrary color scheme, has been mnde.
Warning About Washing Greene.
Wben preparing greens especially of
the wild variety, nothing should be
taken for granted since Invisible worms
ere very difficult to dislodge. After
washing tbem almost leaf by leaf and
through several waters. If you will let
them stund an hour or more In strong
salt water, you muy be surprised to
find thut more worms, stupefied by tht
salt, have dropped to the bottom of the
pan, when, but for this precaution,
tbeir presence would have remained
undiscovered. — Good Housekeeping
Magazine.
Japanet* Consult en European Linos.
The Japanese ate going to take tbeir
next census according to European
methods. A Japanese professor from
the University of Tokyo Is now In
Home wltb a view to studying tbe taking of tbe Italian census. He knows
Italian as perfectly as a native. lie
has already been tn Berlin and Vienna
with a similar object. Tbc Japanese
census Is to be taken nu more exact
lines than has ever been attempted on
previous occasions. — Itume. Cor. Pall
Mall Gazette.
Home women marry for love, hoiih
for a home and a low to spftfl the
other woman.
Dr. Wiloy'a Advioe.
Children under ten years of age
abould not eat at tbe aame time with
the adults.
lf mothers knew tbe enormous ad*
vantage to be derived from such a
procedure they would welcome tha
Idea. Children would then eat food
especially suited to children. Things
would be cooked, uud they would have
before tbem juat what (hey sbould eat,
As it Is tbey see the food before
them thnt ls eaten by the grownup**
and they demand It, cry tor It, coax
for It or cajole by uny other method
that the little one Im heir to. and tbe
foud parent Is too often proue to say,
"Oh, let blm buve It this oure." And
tbere you ure. You know the rest—
the little fevered bryw, the colic pains,
etc.
But If with a bit of extra work the
little ones were permitted (o have only
tbat which Ih recognized as good for
tbem their eyes wuuld uot be bigger
thau tbeir Btumiuhs. to the resulting
good of nil concerned.
Berries are very plentiful and ara
very good food, ouly tbey ought not to
be served to children unless the seeds
are extracted. That Is, they may be
cooked aud tbe pulp uud Juice ouly given to the children. Seeds nre Indigestible, and there ls a possibility that
they may lodge In tbe appendix.
The truth of the mutter Is that all
foods nt this time of the year are nourishing tf prepared properly. The great
mistake mnde Ih Unit we do not take
time to prepare them. Especially Is
this bod for tbe child. Nine out of ten
children, perhaps, do not know how to
chew their food properly. They swallow as soon as possible, and thus
chunks of fresh foud are given to the
digestive organs, wblcb ore unable to
cope wltb tbem. Especially la this tbe
case with uncooked fruits.
I would put a ban on nearly all uncooked fruits for children. Tbey probably cause more trouble than anything else, and all on account of improper mastication. But if fruits ara
cooked It ls nnotber mutter. It Is,
too, an easy mntter, for nature bas
Intended the summer season to be one
of vegetables nnd fruits, aod It should
be taken advantage of.
In regard to lufants I bare ona
tblng to say first, lust and always,
and that Is a strict diet of pure milk,
preferably mother's; If not tbis, then
some healthy animal's.
Milk for tbe bube Is the one great
food principle Intended by nature,
and nothing cun take Its place. But
especially lu the bot weather great
care must be tukeu to guard the cleanly condition under wblcb tbis milk la
finally made reudy for consumption.
Very often there is a great mistake
tn quitting the milk diet for children,
I would suggest that uuder tbe age of
tbree years milk should be tbe child'!
chief form of food.
No Sale
"I non you are smiling at my jokes,"
hii id the waiting contributor hopefully.
"Yes," replied the editor; "that
courtesy in due when one meets old
friends."' - Philadelphia Ledger.
Frightful Mistake
"I never saw a bride looking so
sour.   Whal was the matter?"
"She fuiind out when it was too late
that she was wearing lemon blossoms
instead ol orange."—Chicago Tribune.
Children's Dresses.
Every mother desires to see ber little girl dressed attractively. Sbe can
accomplish this by making, their frocks
herself or wltb the belp of a seamstress. Materials can be bought for
sucb small price now that every young
miss should be provided wltb one or
two new dresses to begin tbe school
year ond to curry ber over to tbe winter season, when cloth frocks are needed.
One pretty little model Is made of
pink dotted lawu trimmed wltb bands
of awlss eyelet Insertion, it Is a ona
piece model, closing at the left side
and having a square neck. The neck
Is finished wltb a band of tbe Insertion, which continues down the side
of tbe front, where tbe dress opens,
and is used for a belt and cuffs.
An embroidered gulmpe with long
sleeves la worn with It If desired. Another frock of blue and green plaid
has a plain blue gingham yoke cut
square and trimmed with rows ot
wblte cotton soutache braid. Cuffs and
a belt are tbe same. The material la
laid In three box plaits In front and
also ln tbe back, wblch fall straight
to the hem. Tbe sleeves are abort
and slightly full, giving plenty of play
for the little arms.
A frock of blue and wblte polka dotted percale bas a shaped bib yoke of
plain blue, wblcb extends over the
shoulders and Is edged about with two
rows of wblte linen braid. Deep shaped cuffs trim tbe long full sleeres. Tbe
hem of tbe skirt Is formed wltb a five
Inch band of plain blue wltb tbe top
edged wltb braid. The bodice Is quite
plainly cut and Joins the box plaited
skirt wltb a narrow belt of braid trimmed blue. A shallow gulmpe having a
high collar ls worn with this dainty
and sensible frock.
From any one of these three models
choose a new dress for your little gtrL
Amusing tho Kiddles.
A mother wbo likes to see her lads
and lassies In tbe house Interested ta
some occupation told tbem the other
day that she would give a quarter to
eacb child who discovered for him or
herself the psalm In whlcb the following birds were mentioned: Tbe dove,
sparrow, swallow, stork, pelican, raven, hawk and eagle. Of course It was
not allowed to use the concordance.
After the birds were "discovered" the
mother told all tbe stories she knew
ahout them, and tte children bad ato-
rles to tell also, and the day, which
was a rainy one. waa uue ul tha bap»
-lest of tbe vacation.
Thr Common Experience
However toilsome bo your lot
And Irksome to endure,
Home one will hint that you have got
A regular sinecure.
—Washington Htar,
Marrying n uian to reform him Is
like trying to make a satisfactory omelette out of a bad egg.
The Hustler's Epitaph
WivcH of married men remind us
We can make our wives sublime
And, departing, leave behind ur
Wealthy widows in their prime. THE PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK. BRITISH COLUMBIA
t%l\e yvaoyectov, ©vmibiooU, -U. (£,*
Published Every Saturday   Morning at Cranbrook. B.C.
F. M. Christian. Manager.
A. U. Grace,    Editor.
Subscription rate, if paid in advance.   $l.r>u.
Subscription rate, if charged on books,   $2.00.
Postage to American. European and   other foreign countries,    50 cents   a
year  extra.
ADVERTISEMENTS—Advertising rates furnished on application, No
advertisements but those ot a reputable character will be accepted for
publication.
ADVERTISERS ANU SUBSCRIBERS—Unfess notice to the contrary
is given to local manager advertisements and subscriptions will be kept
running and charged up against tbeir account.
17th  Year
<STOgjffgCP
CRANUROOK.  B.C.. OCTOBER
No. 42
It
have
looki
her
as   though Italy would j This is going some, holding two sea
turkey    plucked    in good   slons of court on the same day.
time for Thanksgiving.
The new cabinet has many points of
advantage over its predecessor, the
chief one being that it is a Uorden
cabinet.
in
towns that are 100 miles apart.
As there is no railway communication between Wilmer and Cranhrook,
the distance between the two cities
was covered in a motor car.
A partial ceneus ret ini has been
made, an 1 has been u disappointment
throughout Canada. A population
of at least slgbt million whs expected.
The Increase of population Ince
1901 ih about l,710,554, ol ■"tus increase British Columbia, Alberta,
Saskatchewan and Manitoba conrrl-*
Luted 1,048,017. British Columbia
is third id the proportion .if Increase.
Western Canada will make a larger
increase In the next ten years than
| she has in the past.
The population of Southeaat Koote*
I nay shows an increase of about fifty-
five per cent. The increase m p >pu-
The latest and moBt idiotic spasm! lat*on for British Columbia is about
of the defunct Laurier government | >W Per cent-
waa the appointment of a postmaster at Cranbrook at the request ot the
party heelers who were down and
out.
Our war vessel, the Niobe. was
damaged to the extent of MOO,000
when she got herself piled up on the
rocks of! Shell.iirne.
Kor unqualified nerve and unmitigated gall, commend us to the recent action of the political "Ciar"
of Cranhrook on his actions in regard to tho post offlce.
*   •   •   •
R. E. Beattie resigned   on October
5th and   Joe   Jackson  was  appointed
on    October   9th.     This    is another;
example of the sharp practice of the;
retiring Laurier government.
Opening Up of the Upper
Columbian Valley
Editorial Correspondence
There
' timate
1 Cana'lia
There is
toes not seem to be any l*g»-
objection   tu the coming ol
i     Qve-dollar gold   pieces.
little fear of this piece     of
monpy   being  cnn fused   with   the   British sovereign as the latter coin does
circulate in tbe Dominion!     The
Canadian gold    piece   will be always
worth its face value,   which is fourteen cents more than can be secured
for a sovereign. It will not deteriorate from a wearing stan ipoint,   ami
lit will,  partially at  Least, Jj away
I with the paper :: Dnej  habit that has
I heen    acquired,    a    habit which will
Jttjge Wilson closed a sitting      of   not bear much praise from the staml-
the    County Court at   11  a.m.      on | point   of    cleanliness. The   new coin
Saturday, and at five p.m. was hold-   will    be    legal ten ler    In the United
ing a sitting of the court at Wilmer.   States.
It is reported that the Ottawa
house will convene in November, and
that the session will be short, the
only business of importance being
the voting of supplies now past due,
and to pass a measure of redistribution giving to the west its due representation, and a fair re-arrangement
of seats in the provinces, as called '
for by the new population returns.
The Home Circle Column
Pleasant Evening Reveries—A Column Dedicated
to Tired Mothers as  They  Join   the
Home Circle at Evening Tide
Thoughts from the Editorial Pen
There is no place in the universe
for a lazy woman. We will care for
the aick woman, we will tolerate a
cross woman—but what shall we do
to the la/.y woman. Hcc&ubb the
home is the very centre of life, the
homekeeper iniut he active, orderly
and conscientious—these imuliuoutioUH
she must have, and If she can add to
these, thrift, intelligence, and tinder
ness, we find wherever she in, that
most blessed nnd beautiful of all
earthly delights, a happy home.
We hope all who read thla column
will endeavor to keep a few flowers
ia the home. In addition to their
beauty and fragrance, they teach
neatness and order. The wife and
children like to huve a clean room
so tbat the (lower, in its purity and
grace, may not shame them. And
then, too, a poor man likes to feel
that he has an ornament in bis
dwelling similar to that which a
rich man chooses aB the best embellishment ot his drawing-room.
Why should you go out to tea aad
praise your neighbor niufhnB, when
you have forgotten to tell mother
how good hers were'.' Why Bhould
you announce how much Mr. Wilson
over tbe way knows, when father iB
a great deal better informed man,
and It has never entered your little
head to whisper quietly to him how
much you appreciate his wisdom'7
You keep your ability to discover
faults for the home while the eye
that should look for virtues is closed
tightly until you go out.
One child in ft family that gives
away all his playthings with Monte
Crlsto nonchalence and prodigality,
iB often wrongly kissed and praised,
and haloed in the fnmily circle for
his generous soul. He is often held
up as a model to his brother that
nhows an  incipient passion (or corn-
"married considerations", usually
gets what he doservos—Its full equivalent In unhappineHs. A man who
marries for beauty, learns, as no
other man can learn, bow hideous
and loathsome it may become. So,
young man, take love for your guidance in thin matter, remembering
that It demands the best and noblest
in you—that it Ih sacred and holy,
and divine, for it in of God.
No hoy goes out from the home
irele without a sense of loss. For
, time, at least, the motherly presence is aadly missed, the sisterly affection warmly cherished. Then if
the mother's letters reach him often,
filled with all that a mother most
eloquently expresses, love, hopefulness and prayer, he is still surrounded hy a holy influence.
What chance has a young lady a
little out of style, who haa to earn
her own living, to shine in society
hy the aide of one of our fashionable
ladiea whose pap fs a millionaire ?
Hoclally wo are the slaves of gold.
Old-fashioned people look at it In the
old-fashioned way nnd say it is all
wrong. And so it is; but it is a
fact that stares us in the face that
those who are worth the most are
considered as of tbe most worth.
After all, perhapH the wisest man
was right when he said, "The love of
money is the root of all evil."
We always class children, birds and
llowers together. And why 7 Because they should 1-e equally beautl-
nnocent and happy We should
never rob childhood of its ideal
loveliness. Even old
be gay, anil happy
good    to    overcrowd    the    children's
Windermere, Wilmer. Athalmer and
Invermere are all points around the
lower, or northern, end of Lake Windermere. The lake is about a mile
or so in width, it is flanked by
benches reaching hack to the foot
hills, and a resident ol the first named locality told ine that there must
be tifty thousand acres of land
around tbe lake that can be utilized
for agriculture Mien once irrigation
works have been installed.     There  is
abundant water lor tins purpose, flue
mountain streams llowing into the
lake on both sides. Wilmer la not
just on the take, but a little below
it on the west side ol the Columbia,
ami at a moderate altitude above
the river. Athalmer is at tin- foot
ol the lake, Invermere is ,.n the
west Bide, about a mile and a half
from Windermere, and Windermere is
ou the east side, about half way up
the lake, lu point ol business and I Join
population l should say A thai mere
is the most important Just now. Ileitis the steamboat landing (or craft
coming i.v from Ciolden, a voyage of
two 'lays at this season Wllmer is
very picturesquely .sit ua tni and is
certain to be a point Ol increasing
Importance a« the Irrigated area of
which it is tii* centre is enlarged,
invermere a very picturesquely situated on the lake shore.     The hue of
the Kootenay Central, now under ceedingly ptcturesqU>
construction wlll pass through tbe
townsite. My impression Is that
this is the only one ol the present
centres of population tdat will be
on the railway, although this can
hardly he yet said with certainty.
The people ol Windermere on the east
side of the lake say they do uot
want the railway, for they wish their
futu.'e town to be the resort of plea-
seekers and the centre of a fruitgrowing section
The scenery around Lake Windermere is very charming. The valley
Is wide, say from eight to ten miles,
and the mountains on the east   side
Canal Flats takes its name from
the canal connecting the waters of
the Columbia nml the Kootenay, the
former (lowing north and the latter
south. Here is a very interesting
illustration of the geological strur
tare of the Kootenny country. Tos
sthiy I can make it understandable
without the help i>f a map. Colonist
readers are more familiar with the
route of the C.P.R than With the
cotutry further south, and no i will
attempt my description from that
line ns a base, Tho 0 c it. leaves
the Columbia at Qolden nnd asQends
the valley of the Kicking 1 torso,
About half way to tiell there is a
station known as l.rnnchoil, which is
about twelve miles from tlie Colum
hia by a direct route, but is separat
cd from it by a high mountain range
Near Leanchotl the Beaverfoot uver
thc Kicking Horse, coming
from tiie sow h. It lists ni a little
group of lakes lying |usl within the
railway belt ov twenty miles south
east from l.eanrhoil. and iu another
group fi lakes nearby  the Kootenay
rises. Thi- BOUrCQ oi tins uver is
nlmost due south from Stephen on
the O.P.R, and about thirty miles
distant from it, lis courBO is very
nearlv pnrallel to the Columbia, although separated from it by an ex
onntaln range
having an average width of fifteen
miles. lu the latitude of Windermere the Kootenay swings to the
west, and the range narrows to a
single massive alevatlou, which Mr.
Parsons. M.P.P, for the district, says
wilt hereafter bear the name of the
writer of this letter, an honor which
l the more appreciate because on the
mountain wall is a painting of a
battle of unknown antiquity. This
massive rock, which is not conspicuous for its altitude, viewed from the
south is seen to be thc southern terminus of a mountain chain. To the
west of it the broad valley of     the
are exceedingly picturesque. The j Columbia is seen extending as far as
highway south of Winderemere is the eye can reach; to the east of it
mainly through the timber all the j the Kootenay reaches into a region
way ti> Wasa, which Is twenty-four ! of wooded mountains flanked by
miles south of Cranhrook. However i snow-capped peaks.
the landscape    visible from a motor |    The source of the Kootenay is   4,-
t as extensive as in the
valley; but in very many
rivals the latter. L'pper
lake    affords some excep-
tine    views,    notably,  that
car is nc
Columbia
places it
Columbia
tionally
from Thunder Hill ranch, the property of Lord Hindlip, who, by the
way, was expected there the day after we left. Thunder Hill is a very
formidable elevation and the descent
from it down to the Canal Flats is
so steep, so narrow and on the edge
of so precipitous a cliff, that the
most impressive parts of the Malahat
Drive are as nothing in comparison.
I went over this Drive a week hefore
descending Thunder Mountain, and
will confess to have felt better pleased when the car went slowly than
when it kept at about tbe speed limit, but it seemed to us when we got
down to the Flats as if the worst
part of Malhat Drive were like a
boulevarded city street. Considerable money will have to be spent in
widening the roadway down Thunder
Hill, hut I doubt it it can ever be
made less steep
Who finally arrived, und wbo, 1 am
glad to Bay, had no such suggestion
himself to offer, I got to work on
my articles after thc definite plan
spoken of with Mr. Harry in London.
These were written at the Palatine
hotel, tn Newbtiigb. Tbe articles
finished, I returned tii London to
settle certain business matters prior
to my public return to America by
Christmas,
"Imagine my amazed indignation
when, shortly before sailing, the-Cables brought tbu untrue news, 'Dr.
Cook ConfcHHes.' Imagine my hcart-
acbing dismay when, on reaching the
shores of my native country. I found
the muha/.itif which was running my
articles in which 1 hoped to explain
myself, had hluv.oncil tbu sensation
provoking 'I" over its cover—'Dr.
Cook's ConfeHBton.'
"1 had made no confession. 1 had
made tbe admission that 1 wna uncertain ns to having reached the ex-
act mathematical PolO. That same
admission Mr. Peary would have to
make, had he been pinned down. lit*.
did mnke this ndmlsHiou, in fact,
while bts own articles a year before
were being prepared iu tbc I lamp-
ton's olllce.
Although Dr. Cook's representatives arc frank in sayiug that Dr.
Cook's book contains the most scnaa-
liouat material of the entire Polar
controversy, great Hucrery is maintained concerning thu nature of this.
The charges made against-Dr. Cook,
they sny, are not so startling rh tint
revelations id fraudulent methods employed by the campaign to discredit
lum. Dr. Cook's book, It Is said,
cannot hut create a tremendous sensation.
Dr, Cook intimntcs that Peary's
proofs of having renched the Pole
were altogether inadequate and not
nearly so convincing as hia own.
Wardner Notes
Mr. F. Cunningham was in Cranhrook on Saturday and Sunday laat.
Mr, A. Hollis of Galloway, was tn
Wardner on Saturday.
Mr. H. La Pointe was a Fort
Steele visitor on Thursday last.
Mr. John Anderson was in Cranhrook on Wednesday on business.
158 feet above the sea; at tbe Canal
Flats it Is 2,740 feet. In the valley
of the river for ahout twenty .idles
above the Flats there is a considerable area that will be utilized for
farming when the timher has been
cut oil. T would not. like to suggest
how much of it may be so classed,
but that any of it is bo possesses
interest because it shows that there
will one day he fruit farms in the
very heart of the Rocky mountains.
Today I talked with Mr. Farquhar-
son, a timber cruiser who has heen
almost everywhere in thiB part of the
province. With a large map before
us I pointed out one river after another and I asked him as to the
adaptability of their valleys for settlement. There was hardly one of
them which he did not say could be
utilized, although in some of them
tbe water of the Btreams would have
to be used for irrigation. The
Kootenay Valley below the Flats
will be the subject of my next letter.—Victoria Colonist.
C. H. L.
Dr.   Cook,    Arctic    Explorer
Startling  Revelations  are about to be
published in his new book
New York, Sept. 11.—Dr. Frederick
A. Cook, the Arctic explorer, after a
silence of nearly two years, will
shortly make public the proofB upon
which he hnsed his polar claims, and
will make sensational revelations of
bribery and fraud In the rival campaign to discredit him.
Dr. Cook denies emphatically that
ho ever made a "confession" of any
sort, or admitted doubt ahout hav-
ng reached the North Pole.
Declaring that he left America at
the height of thc Polar controversy
because of nervous and physical
breakdown Dr. Cook says that it always was his intention to wait until
people should kit, enemies had exhausted their
and good; too | charges against him and until he had
secured  evidence  exposing  the     con'
      scuitvi     ciini.iii-     •  .i | ■• '.11 ii j;      bus toil     i
horizon wuh angry eyes and lowering , piracy on the part of Mr. Peary and
prows, nor
discord    by
Allow  then;
n their merriment to
continual fault-finding.
all the freedom consist-
ering the toy market by crowding |ent Wlth absolute safety. Let them
out and acquiring the holdings of thei [)lfty ftn'' f p happy but teach thern
weaker dealers in the nursery. Both l8fl,,"contr°L Qod'a *fltiinate of self-
children are wrong. The first has not i control is this "He tbat Is slow
the proper respect, for his duty to!t0 anffRr ls better than the mighty,
others.     The one demands leHB than   ftnd he thftt    •'■••cth    his own spirit
his rights; the other, more.
than he that, taketh a city.1
There ia nothing in the moral,! There is one sin which seems to us
spiritual or physical universe that ' is everywhere and by everybody unmakes marriage respectable but love. j derestimated and quite too much
Without it there can be no marriage,
only a wretched, miserable form,
that rapidly degenerates into a loath
some, demoralizing burden. The
time to marry in when \ovrt demandn
It, and not simply hecauae the kit
chen needs a cook, the dining table
a figure-head in muslin or nilk, or
the cucumber vines somebody to kill
tbe hugs on them. The one to
marry Is the woman you love and
no other one. That, and thnt alone
should decide. Ulches may take
wings and flee away; beauty may
fade; good health Ih an excellent and
desirable thing In man or woman,
but the circuiriHtnnceB of hu hour or
a moment may nun the best of
health.     A   man   who marring nom
erlooked in valuation of character.
It is the sin of fretting, so common
that Unless It rises above its usual
monotone wi< do not deserve It.
Watch any ordinary coming together
of people and sec how many mlnutea
it will he before somebody frets--
that Ib, makes more or Iphb complaining statement of something or
other, which most probably every
one In tho mom, or in the car, or
on the street corner, it may be,
knew before, and which probably no
one can help. Why say anything
ahout it ? It Ib cold, it ih hot,, it
Ih wet, it is dry; somebody has broken an appointment, ii; cooked a
meal; stupidly or bnd faith, somewhere has resulted  in discomfort.
his friends to discredit him before
making his reply, This "evidence"
which is (if an extremely sensational
nature is given in Dr, Cook's book,
which will shortly come from the
press.
Ur. Cook declares that Hampton's
.Magazine misrepresented him and
hurt bis cause irretrievably by advertising bis articles as a "confession" as follows
"Wearied of the whole problem of
undesirable publicity;,disgusted with
I the detestable and slanderous campaign, which, for Mr. Penry, was
forced unremittingly, I decided to
i go away for a year, to rest and recuperate. Thin could not be done
if I took the press Into my confidence; and therefore I quietly departed
from New York to ho Joined by my
! family later. oui, of the public eye
' life for me aasumed a new Interest,
fn the meantime the public agitation
was Bttllod. Time gave a bettor
perspective to 'he casu; Mr. Peary
got for which bis hand hud reached.
Me was made a Hear Admiral, wltb a
pension of   16,000 under retirement.
"While in London 1 received a message from Mr, T. ISverett Harry, of
Hampton's Magazine, concerning   tbc
publication of a series of articles explaining my case. Mr. Harry came to
London nnd talked over pinna for
these. The opportunity for addressing the same public, through the
same medium, as Mr. Peary had in
his serial atory, strongly influenced
me—in fact, so strongly that, while
I had a standing offer of ten thousand dollars, I finally gave my article
to Hampton's for little more than
foif thousand dollars."
"In order that Hampton's magazine mighty benefit by the publicity
attaining to my first statement, and
in response to the editor's request, I
came quietly to the United States
with Mr. Harry, by way of Canada,
to consult with the editor before
making final arrangements.
The articles that eventually appeared in Hampton's with the exception of unauthorized editorial changes and excisions of vitally important
matter concerning Mr. Penry, were
practically the aame as planned in
London.
"Coming down from Quebec, I
stopped in Troy, New York, to await
Mr. Hampton, who was to come
from New York. While there, Mr.
ftay Long, n sub-editor with all a
newspaperman's sensational Instincts
came to see nie. He communicated
It seems, a brilliant scheme for a
Hcrlea of articles. As be outlined It,
I wns to go secretly to New York,
submit myself fto several employed
alienists, who should pronounce mo
inanno, whereupon I wna to write
several articles in which I should
admit having arrived at tho conclusion that I reached the Pole while
mentally unbalanced.
"I said nothing wben the auggoB-
tlon was mnde. At heart, I felt
aohingly hurt. ft folt as If this
newspaper man. not. hesitating at
leceivlni; the public in ordor to get
a sensation, regarded mu as ft scoundrel. I wna learning, too, aa H had
throughout the heart-hitter controversy, the duplicity of human nature.
"After a talk    with Mr. Hampton,
Messrs. F. Speaker and Irving of
Jaffray, were in town on Tuesday.
Mr. Lund returned from Calgary on
Saturday.
Mrs. Fred Speaker visited in Cranbrook on Thursday last.
Mrs. U. W. Pennock was a Cranbrook visitor on Tuesday.
Mr. S. C. Smith left on Tuesday
morning for a husiness trip to Calgary.
Mr. Clarence Kmbree wbb In from
Bull River on Friday evening to attend the dance.
Mr. and Mrs. R. Pieraon and little
son Kenneth were Cranhrook visitors
on Wednesday.
Charlie Webster, now of Creston,
was renewing old acquaintances in
town this week.
Mrs. Green and little daughter
Ethel of Galloway, are visiting in
town the guests of Mrs. J. Anderson
The big saw mill closed down on
Friday for the season, the supply of
logs being exhausted.
Mrs. Limd and Miss Couzens returned on Thursday of last week
from a visit to MaryBVille.
Choir practice was held in the Presbyterian church on Tuesday evening,
Rev. Mr. Stephens taking charge for
the occasion.
Fred Hayward and Vernon Anderson went to Jaffray on Saturday on
a hunting expedition and brought
back some grouse for Sunday dinner.
Lou Manning returned on Friday
from the Fernie hospital, where he
has recently undergone an operation.
He is now looking well.
Mr. and Mrs. Minto Craigie and
children, of Greenwood, were in
town last week visiting with Mr.
Crnigie's sister, Mra. B. Kmbree.
Mr. Ogden, real estate agent, of
Calgary, has beon in town this week,
and has done quite a rustling business in Calgary lots.
Mrs. E. C. Murray who has been
visiting for some time in Michigan
arrived home on Wednesday and ahe
and Mr, Murray have taken up their
residence in their handsome new cottage on Laurence Avenue.
Mr. Chas. Smith met with a painful accident in the planer mill on
Saturday, being struck in the .face by
a piece of belting, which had become
unfastened. It was thought at flrst
that he waa dangerously injured, but
beyond a nasty flesh wound the accident was not Berioua.
The dance given by tho hand boys
on Friday evening last was a pronounced success and everyone present
bad a most enjoyable time. The
music which was furnished by the
Cranhrook orchestra was moat delightful and a good sum was realized
towards the funds of the band.
UNDER THE SPREADING CHESTNUT TREE
The Soiithorn colonel had been per-
suaded Into Hcolng a performance ol
"Othello," hy Bnlvim, nml was press
eil [or his opinion of it..
"Woll," ho sniil Judiciously, as ho
stirred tho sugar, "I am not what
you might call a prejudiced man,
suli, and I don't see, lookln' at tho
thing In a lawge way, but what the
coon did as woll as any ol 'em,
•Uh."
a*********************************!
WENTWORTH
HOTEL gyg:bpook'
Is ii large and attractive hull I > i   uptTi.
elegance in all it^  appointment , >iitl>
cuisine ol superior excellence,    K.nl\\,i\
men. Lumbermen  mil Mirn rs   ill   ",,  i,
The    Wentworth
<     J   McTAVISH    -   Proprietor
■
Found!
Oi i! u<er stieet, one door west
ul Mi- is Hill & Co., the only
place in town that can make
life worth living.
Cosmopolitan Hotel
E. H. SMALL,   Manager.
*******************************************
***************************." ■■■ *************
PHONE ^
Gold Standard \!
Teas and Coffee ;;
Our whole time is devoted to  your  wants  in   the '
Z  Grocery line thereiore we absolutely  guarantee  every '
article that leaves our store.
* We will thank our customers to advise us if at any !
i time goods are received that are not No. i quality.
CAMPBELL & MANNING j
Staple and Fancy Grocers
********■- ■ ********»*-**• ■ *************
NORTH     STAR    HOTEL
KIMBERLEY.   B.C.
m
11
H.    W     DREW,   Proprietor.
We Are Waitii.g
For You
to make your first meat purchase at
this market. The longer you keep
(rom mnking lt, the moro pleasure of
eating prime meats you will ndea.
How aliout some chops or a stcai:
lor tomorrow's breakfast ' JiibI cune
and see how tempting they are. And
they'll taBte even better tliMi they
look.
P.   BURNS   &  CO.
Phone 10
P. O. Boi I
ia»|ii|»l»|ii|»|ii|»|ii|i»l»l«|iilW«l»WI«l.l»l»l BTaTaMil»l»l.lal»l.lMl»|a|ii|,|.1«lllirin^
I A. C. Bowness
Wholesale
Wine  and  Spirit  Merchant
Manufacturer of nil kinds
of        Aoi'iated        wutu
Agent for
Anheuser Busch Budweiser and
Fernie Beers.
Melcher's Red Cross Gin   and
P. Dawson Scotch Whisky.
Importer of all kinds of foreign and Domestic
Wines unci Spirits
Baker St.
Cranbrook, B. C.
	
_ THK PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK,  I'.KITISII COLUMBIA
IK OF PERSON ASSESSED
SHORT DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY
DELINQUENT TAXES
DELINQUENT TAXES
E-fi M
*■-  ~ £
•o E-
u
00
ta w —
;    d   C
acr-
£3 =
■
a.  £
8
O  H
a a
NAME OF  PERSON   ASSESSED
BHORT DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY
c _
Ins, A., 4 Sehatt, J	
s, Montague S	
ithers, II. W	
ithcrs, T. T	
ng, VV, B	
A. H	
i,   D	
ye, Mrs. Ada 	
ijuin, 0, -.	
II	
,s,  Oeorge 	
ski,  Mike 	
Kenneth	
nan, Joseph 	
,  M	
io,  .lohn 	
lift, Nicholas 	
iry  Bros	
Lib, Tony 	
.'ettn, 0. Fnrcona, E	
i, Frank 	
ta,  Al	
a, dames	
lo, Leopold,, 	
,  Mike 	
mme,  John 	
;>n, Wm	
ik,  M	
nds, Morgan 	
E	
re, Frank	
lo.  Tonv	
uso, Fllomena	
do, Roslna	
>, John 	
n, Hector 	
>,  Mike 	
itlo, Mike 	
itio, Joe	
I, Thomns	
. M. S	
s, Mary Ann 	
, H	
cr. Annie It	
lo,  Leopold,, 	
,'ea, Felice 	
, Wm	
■rn,  Henry L	
I, Mrs. H.  A	
•a, Carolino 	
on. Robert 	
no,  John	
arzyek, Frank 	
, Carlo 	
e, tleorge	
■•ea, Felice  .'. ,	
io, Sam	
j, Outseppe	
ironic, John N. 	
>ry,  Herbert 	
ion, Thos	
k,  Louie	
iko,  Phillip  	
•tezyn, John 	
ley. Charley 	
on,  Arthur	
on, Archibald 	
•bell, E. H	
y. c. ;	
Alexander 	
louth,  John J	
ihers, John	
e, J. W	
.own  	
ieB, B. K	
cm, J. A	
is,   Evan	
ird, Wm	
m, Walter :	
wing, MrB. S	
i, Malcolm	
or,' Archibald	
ison, Henry J :	
e, George	
Andrew 	
tor, Wm. 8-.	
ita, Alexander	
regor,  Murdoch 	
s, Orbain 	
imond & Mcintosh 	
;oin, F	
ker,  John 	
j,  H	
nas, Win	
nan, D. R	
:y, Mrs. M., Crawford, Mrs. M. A
■aril,  Walton 	
nde,  Mrs. Delicsaska 	
hell, Mary Ann 	
■tt, Sydney 	
er, Peter ...
a,  Felice	
nico, Carlo 	
lay, W. 0	
th,  Mrs.  Sarah 	
How Soo  ■
l,   Stephen	
•stone, fl. H., Skead, S. A	
lies, Patrick 	
ijeR, Patrick 	
h, Paul, Cameron, A	
hio,  Joseph 	
(sella, Philip 	
,s, Anton	
ika, Mrs. Paraska 	
s, llrhaln 	
, Miss Toshl	
ilome, Riskl :	
e, 0. F., Brown, Pearl 	
»nd, Harry 	
lay, W. O	
, Mrs. Kate 	
onald, Mrs. D. R	
onatd, John A	
,ier, A. L	
.a, Paul 	
nski,  Jacob 	
Mike 	
Peter, Wm	
,u, Frank 	
cytls, William 	
MORRISSEY    MINKS    TOWNSITE.     REGISTERED    PLAN    NO. 743
Lot Number Ulock Number
36   4   311      20    Morrissey  Mines  i 5.85
3   &   7      21 Morrissey Mines   10.21
5        21 Morrissey Mines   8.10
II        21 Morrissey Mines   8,10
31       21 Morrissey MIiicb   5,80
32      21 Morrissey Mines   5,80
35      21 MorrisBey Mines  5.80
1    22 Morrissey Mines   0.25
2        22 Morrissey Mines   10.30
3        2,2 Morrissey Alines   8.10
FERNIE   ANNEX,   REGISTERED   PLAN    No.    734A
Lot Number Block Number
Soutli  Half Lot   4      12  Fernie  Aanex   4.20
North Half   4
42 Fernie Annex     4.80
il    	
South Half
Nortli Half
South Half
South Half
North Half
South Half
North Half
South Halt
10 	
Annex
Annex
Annex
3.00
7.20
3.00
3.00
5.40
5.40
Annex     COO
Annex      5.40
    3.00
    42 Ferule Annex
    42  Fernie   Annex
    43 Fernie  Annex
    43 Fernie
4       43  Fernie
4      43 Fernie
.1     43 Fernie
7      43 Ferule
8      43  Fernie Annex
8     43 Fernie Annex     3.60
9  13 Fornie Annex     4.20
!)      43  Fernie  Annex    3,60
    43 Fernie Annex     4.80
    2.10
     5.41
     1.20
    2 35
     2.70
     I SO
11    83  Fernie  Annex
12   83 Fernie Annex 	
2  84  Fernie  Annex  	
6      84  Fernie  Annex  	
10    81  Fernie  Annex  	
13    101 Fernie Anuex 	
14    101 Fernie Annex   8.40
15    101 Fernie Annex  :... 2.40
16 4   17   101 Fornie Annex   4.80
111   &   20   1<U Fernie Annex  'M
1   &   2   102 Fernie Annex   7.20
4   &   5   1C2 Fernie Annex   12.00
6      102 Fernie Annex   2.40
7     j  102 Fernie Annex   2.40
8  102 Fernie Annex   2.40
9 ....'  102 Fernie Annex   2.40
4   14
13
15  	
FERNIE    ANNEX
Lot Number
10 	
    102 Fernie Annex     7.20
    102 Fernie Annex     8.40
extension,   Registered  plan   no.  902
Block Numher
    85 Fernie Annex Extension
5        91 Fernie Annex  Extension
91  Fernie Annex  Extension
91  Fornie  Annex  Extension
9  91 Fernie Annex Extension
  91 Fernie Annex Extension
  92 Fernie Annex Extension
  92 Fernie Annex Extension
10  	
1    	
2    	
3      95 Fernie  Annex Extension .
5   &   6   95 Fernie Annex Extension .
1      96 Fernie  Annex Extension .
G      96 Fernie Annex  Extension .
8      96 Fernie Anuex Extension .
9      96 Fernie Annex Extension .
4      107 Fernie Annex Extension .
1      116 Fernie Annex Extension .
4      116 Fernie Annex Extension .
5      116 Fernie Annex Extension .
6      116 Fernie Annex Extension .
8  117 Fornie Annex Extension .
9      117 Fernie Annex Extension .
7 &   8   125 Fernie Annex Extension .
6   &   7   126 Fernie Annex Extension .
S      126 Fernie Anuex Extension .
9'4   10   126 Pernio Annex Extension .
WEST    FERNIE,    REGISTERED    PLAN    NO.    735
Lot Number
Sub-division 0 ol Lot
5    	
Sub division   A of lot
9    	
9    	
Block Number
South Half
Nortb Eaet
North West
South West
South East
South West
East Half
1
1
_D
 i
  2
2   3
i ol Lot   3   3
i Of Lot   3    3
I ol Lot   3   3
i of Lot   4   3
I ol Lot   4   4
11 	
1.35
1.35
1.20
l.C'5
1.05
1.35
1 35
105
1.C6
2.70
1.35
1.20
1.05
1.05
1.20
4.20
1.05
1.20
.90
.60
.75
.90
1.50
.60
1.50
10
Sub-division A 4 B, Lot   7.
Subdivisions C 4 I), Lot  7.
11 	
Sub-divisions A 4 B, Lot   6
Sub-division   4, Lot   26 	
Sub-divisions   1,   2,   4,  5,   4
6,   Lot   27     5   West Fernie ....
HOSMER   TOWNSITE,    REGISTERED    PLAN
Lot Number Block Number
3        I Hosmer 	
9        1 Hosmer
13  	
1    	
3    	
4     	
West Fernie 	
WeBt Fernie    15.00
West Fernie   12.30
West Fernie   0.30
West Fernie   16.20
West Fernie   6.15
West Fernie   2.10
West Fernie   1.50
West Ferule   2.40
WeBt Fernie  '.....-..• 3.90
West Fernie   2.40
West Fernie  ,  0.00
West Fernie    5.40
West Fernie.   22.70
West Fernie   6.30
West Fernie   1.20
West Fernie   1.60
NO.    772
9.60
I.IIII
1.00
10
11
12
1 Hosmer   1.80
2 Hosmer   7.08
2 Hosmer  '■■' 7-20
2 Hosmer  ■  4.95
2 Hosmor   3.30
2 HoBiner  1-65
2 Hosmer    4.60
2 Hosmer   1.65
2 Hosmer   4.65
IR    2 Hosmer
5.22
4    18
4   14
4    20
4    20
20
17
4
r,
8
13
1
4
14
15
19
7
!l
16
17
19
13
14
15
9
10
11
8
5   ,
7
11
3
5
7
11
12
13
14
15     14 Hosmer
2 Hosmer      1-05
3 Hosmor    9-90
4 Hosmer     3.611
4 Hosmer   12.00
4 Hosmor     l.M
4 Hosmor   '3.50
5 Hosmer     r>,00
5 Hosmer ■•   5.2B
5 Hosmer     6,00
5 Hosmer   23.55
6 Hosmer   11.70
5 Hosmer   10.80
6 Hosmer     3.00
li Hosmer     3.15
i; Hosmor     9.27
6 Hosmor     2.55
6 HosmiT   79.20
7 Hosinei'     2-40
7 Hosmer      2.40
7 Hosmer 6"
10 Hosmer   I8-110
10 Hosmer   18,00
10 Hosmer   18.00
11 Hosmer   21.00
12 Hosmer   H-M
12 Hosmer   21.00
12 Hosmer   31,35
14 Hosmer     '*W
14 HoBiner       '•»"•
14 Hosmer     4.80
14 Hosmer     8.40
14 Hosmer      'l-'n
14 Hosmer      2.Sli
14 Hosmer     8-40
2.28
2.G0
1.63
3.90
.56
1.63
2.93
2.93
3.26
2.93
1.95
1.95
2.28
1.95
.80
1.14
2.18
.66
1.17
1.47
2.60
3.30
1.30
2.C0
3.74
3.90
4.70
1.30
1.30
1.30
1,30
3.90
4.90
.45
.45
.40
.35
.35
.45
.45
.35
.40
.90
.45
.40
.35
.35
.40
1.40
.35
.25
.30
.20
.50
3.011
5.27
1.94
1.12
7.28
4.50
5.16
2.13
1.03
2.81
1.03
2.95
4.17
1.03
6.79
1.13
11.06
1.13
1.75
3.75
16.04
6.56
9.86
1.93
2.03
5.14
.85
1.55
1.55
.38
11.63
11.63
11.63
13.65
20.63
1.55
5.52
7.50
1.94
.38
2.46
HOSMER     TOWNSITE.      REQISTBRBD     PLAN     NO.     772
I 1.87
5.41
2.71
2.71
1.86
1.86
1.86
1.91
3.33
2.71
.62
.39
.93
.10
.411
.70
.70
.78
.70
.47
.47
.49
.47
.42
.27
.55
.16
.36
.38
.62
.73
.31
.64
1.21
.93
1.36
.31
.31
.31
.31
.93
1.12
.09
.09
.08
.06
.06
.09
.09
.06
.08
.18
.14
.08
.C6
.06
.08
.28
.06
.06
.06
.05
.05
.06
.11
.05
.10
•12
.75
.62
.63
1.60
.89
.11
.08
.18
.34
.18
1.17
.45
1.96
.66
.06
.12
1.52
1.14
.40
.15
.86
.58
1.23
.43
.13
.37
.13
1.05
1.27
.14
1.35
.45
2.15
.14
2.19
.48
.87
.48
3.93
.91
2.87
.39
.46
1.46
.39
8.23
.32
.32
.05
2.38
2.38
2.38
3.89
1.53
1.69
4.19
.32
.09
1.06
2.08
.77
.47
.67
.73
82.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.0C
2.0C
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
3.00
2.00
' 2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.1:0
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
3.00
2.00
2.0C
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.0C
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2,00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.C0
2.00
2.00
3.00
2.0C
2.00
2.00
2,00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.0C
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.0C
2.00
2.00
2.00
2,00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2,00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
* 9.72
23.61
12.81
12.81
9.66
9.66
9.66
10.16
16.23
12.81
9.04
10.02
7.02
14.03
5.911
7.03
11.03
11.03
12.03
11.03
8.02
8.02
8.97
8.02
8.02
5.51
10.13
4.01
5.88
6,55
10.02
' 14.43
6.01
10.04
13.85
14.03
20.06
6.01
6.01
6.01
6.01
14.03
16.42
3.89
3.89
3.68
3.46
3.46
3.89
3.89
3.46
3.53
5.78
3.94
3.68
3.46
3.46
3.68
7.88
3.46
3.26
3.26
2.85
3.05
3.26
4.19
2.85
4.10
4.52
17.75
14.92
11.93
19.80
9.04
4.21
3.58
4.58.
6.24
4.58
12.17
7.85
26.66
8.96
3.26
3.77
13.12
13.41
7.34
5.07
17.22
14.28
13.34
7.86
4.31
9.68
4.81
10.65
12.66
4.82
20.04
7.18
27.20
5.07
17.09
8.48
9.87
12.23
45.52
21,17
25.52
7.32
7.64
17.87
5.79
89.43
6.27
6.27
3.03
34.01
34.01
34.01
40.54
14.63
24.69
58.17
6.27
3.89
13.37
19.98
9.81
5.70
11.07
8.25
Stclmock, Antoi  	
Gauthier, Joseph 	
Morneau,  Klzier 	
Mnisoll, L. M	
Stitt 4 Baker 	
Norvickl,   Justin  	
Kasaluki, Alex	
Burgess,  J.  E	
Mitchell, Mrs. M. A	
Tyldesley, T.   H	
Buckley, MrB. M. A	
Quasi,  Mike 	
.Smith. F.  M	
Filllon, Joseph	
Roberta, tsnac 	
Cupik.  John	
Bolsaltes, Joseph 	
c'hirchill, James 	
Sorrento, Tomaso	
Cole. It. J	
Tamowickl. Martin 	
McGregor, Murdoch 	
Zito, Vincenzo 	
Pasta, Paul	
FolBoy,  T	
White.  Mrs.  Annie 	
Lnwlcki,  Justin 	
Shehadey, Said Kourl A.
t.apcter,   William 	
Wildman,  Albert 	
Harding, E. G	
Hainan, Andrew 	
lOabraiu, J	
Harding, E. G	
Cimollnl, Luigi 	
Estabrook, H. W	
Estabrook,  H.   W	
Estabrook, Ernest O	
Mast, Wm. J	
Marsh, John 	
Svic,  A. 	
Bastieu,   J	
Cleaves, George	
Tutlls, John 	
Karoly, S. Szabo	
Horvat,  M. G	
Majeski,  John	
Krus, A	
Boyd, Margaret A	
McFarlane, M.	
Medvo,  Albert 	
PAPP,  Joseph  	
Davis, W	
Passalacnun, I)	
Pomahac, F	
March, Mary	
Mottle,  Joseph 	
Hoza, Frank	
Padar, A	
Whitney, H. O	
Melntyre 4 Blackstone 	
Ferguson, Arthur E	
Heinz, Ernest	
Cribbs 4 Company 	
McOool, A. J	
Douglas, J	
Douglas 4. Stedman 	
Crow's Nest Pass Hardware Company
McCulloch, J. S	
Doegan, H. A	
Glendinning, James	
Cambrian Mining Co., Ltd	
Ransome 4 Campbell 	
Shea 4 Davia 	
Oldland, Harry 	
Letcher, Thomas 	
Davis, F. I	
Richards, Edward 	
Ingram 4 Mitchell 	
Richards, 8	
Oldland, Harry 	
Thomas, Stephen 	
Thomas, Stephen	
Mnson, J	
Richards, Sam.	
DouglaB, F. O., 4 Chapman, 0. A	
Iroton, Wm. H.
Ciirrle, H.
Pugh 4 Livingstone 4 Tbe Columbia
4 Kootenay Railway 4 Navigation Company  •	
Evnns, G. I.
iCarric, H. ...
Carrie, H •	
Pugh 4 Livingstone 	
Pugh 4 Livingstone 	
iPugh 4 Livingstone 	
iMcConnoll, P	
illoclzcl, Frank 	
'Sunburn, I. B	
Miller, A. K	
jJamleson, George A	
ICampbell, Wm	
'Douglas, G	
Douglas, G	
Dore, Louis 	
Douglas, F. O	
[Douglas, F. O	
Ferguson, J. A	
Murray, A. c	
Myers, R. C, 4 My.rs, J. A.
iMycrs, R. C, 4 Myeis. J. A.
Myers. R. C, 4 Myers, J. A.
iMyors, R. 0	
O'Reilly.  Jas	
Howard,  A. F.
.Pazzant, E. M.
[Kent,  John cl.
Lot Number
lllock Number
2
3
4
6
9  i
12
13
14
15
7
17
2
3
12
1
2
4
5
7
8
6
10
11
1
I
6
3
4   4 ...
4   6  ...
&   12
 (4,01
J    .85
4.18
.90
1.8a
M
13.13
1.88
.47
.85
4.23
.85
4.55
.r,t
.97
8.78
1,16
1,68
1.55
.94
.94
.97
1.03
.78
2.81
1.13
3.76
*    .48
.99
.15
3.1.1
.44
.03
' .06
.10
.11
.78
.11
.71
.117
21
.Is
.89
,28
.19
.32
.10
.10
.11
,18
.16
.36
.15
.48
J2.00
2.00
2.00
2.U0
2.00
2.00
2.UU
2.00
2.UU
2.00
2.00
2.0U
2.00
2.00
2.110
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.0H
2.00
2.U0
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.110
2.00
2.00
2.00
4 7.35
11.19
5.9]
7.03
9.40
   IS iU
3u.85
    HO
6.12
15 Hosmer 	
Iti  Hosmer 	
16 Hoamor 	
u. Hosmer 	
     1.20
  l.as
     2.70
     1.35
2.63
3.28
4.05
4.31
9.71
4.31
Iii Hosmer 	
lh  Hosmer 	
18  Hosmer 	
18 Hosmor 	
19 Hosmer 	
     7.2>l
 90
    i.e.
     1.5)
     8.60
     1.80
14.16
2.53
4.S3
4.6.1
10.24
.',.24
     2.10
4.59
19 Hosmer 	
19  Hosmer  	
    3.40
     2.40
    1.50
0.27
6.27
4 54
    1.60
4.54
 76
3.83
     1.65
4.81
34 Hosmor 	
31  Hosmer 	
31  Hosmer 	
34 Hosmer	
     1.20
     4.50
     1.80
     6.00
4.14
9.67
6.08
12.23
MICHEL    TOWNSITE.    REGISTER ED    PLAN    NO.    792
Lot Number
12 	
4 	
3 	
7 	
12 	
13 	
14 	
15 	
2 	
4 	
5 	
6 	
3 	
8 	
9 	
11 	
12 4    13 ...
17 ft    18 ...
7 	
1 	
2 	
3 	
6 	
lllock Number
13
15
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
.Michel
Michel ...
Ill    8 Michel ...
17  8 Michel ...
8      10   Michel
7 [  10 Michel
8      10  Michel
2      11  Michel
7      13  Michel
3 4   3   15  Michel
9 ft   10   15   Michel
11   ft   12   17  Michel
5      18  Michel
7      18  Michol
2.'A',
1,80
2.70
1,80
3.00
4.2U
5.4C
2.85
4.80
6.00
5.10
4.80
.60
1.20
.60
1.65
3.60
2.40
3.60
1.10
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.80
3.60
1.20
1.35
1.35
2.40
1.20
1.20
1.20
3.60
2.10
55.20
36.0(1
6.00
2.55
3 -.•■■   5  Moyie
    5  Moyle 	
ft   6   I Lake Shore Addition, Moyic
ft   3   3 l.aV.e Shore Addition, Moylo
    33  Wardner	
11,    12,    15,    16     II  Elko  	
6
5
2
21
8,
Lot   3054 Group One  Kootenay  District
I        95 Fertile  Annex  Extension
II     3 Hosmer 	
7        4 Hosmer 	
6  ft   7    5 Hosmer  ■	
1   4   2     13 Hosmer 	
5        4 Michel 	
4 Michel 	
7 Michel 	
18  Michel  	
Group One,  Kootenny District
240  acre,   	
Group One,  Kootenay  District
160  acres  	
Snb-dlvuion, 3 4 4 ol Lot 357 (jrolip One,  Kootenay District
32/1 acres 	
1    	
Sub-division    13 ol Lot   4590.
Sub-division   19 of l.ot   4590,
Sub-division    Hi of l.ot.   361, oroup One,  Kootenny District
Sub-dlvlBlon    16 of Lot   327, ()rc„p
160  acres   	
One,  Kootenny  District
Sub-divisions  7,
15   &
9,   10, 4
Lot   356, ciioup One
Kootenay District
960   acres
16.00
9.40
38.46
20.80
7.50
.115.20
Sub-dlvlslons   1.   2,   3,   9,   &
10 Lot   359, flroup  One,  Kootenay  DiBtrict
800  acres   	
6398, Group One,  Kootenay District.    152 ncres 	
6399, Group One, Kootellay District,   84 acres
6410, Group One, Kootenay District,   44 seres
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
l.ot
Lot
Lot
619'
7785
3039
6541
9796
3571
5806,
701s
Oroup One,  KooteUtty Diatrict,   276 acres
Group One, Koote,lay District, 320 noes
Group Cn,', KooteBay District, 50 ncres ...
Group One. Kootenay District, 151 acres
Group l'ne, Kootcnay District, 80 acres ....
Group One, Kootcnay District, 320 n-rrs .
Group One, Kootenay District, 160 acrea .
Group i ne, Kootenay DiBtrict,   165 acr s
314,   Oro i.l    Cn?. Kootcnay District
127 acies  	
Kootenny District.   320 a'res 	
Kootenay  Districi,    40   ncres 	
KooteImy District.   110 acres 	
4185, Group one, Kootenay District,   159
Sub-division   5 of Lot
Lot 3608, Oroup One,
Lot 4825, Group line,
Lot 2320, Group One
North Hall ol Lot
Lot
Bun-divisions ;i.   5,
Sub-divisions   1.
Sub divisions 7 4 8
Lot   7326,  Group  Cne,
Lot Number
Lot   3069, Croup One,
Buh-dlvliilon   9 of lot
Subdivision    14 of Lit
6, Lot 3I||,     Group
acres
3,  4    4,
Kootenny  District,   480 acres 	
Lot.    341.   Group   One, Kootenny    District,   640 acres..
341, Group  One,   Kootenay  District.
320 acres 	
Lot   7326, Group  l'ne,  Kootenay District,   360 aires 	
Part Lot   306S, Ornip One,   Kootenay    District, being Lots
27   4   28. Block   2, Esimero. Addition.   Kimberley 	
Block Number
Koit'nnv District,   86.5 acres 	
336.    Group One, Kootenay District
li,o actes	
335,   Group One. Kootenay District
160 acres 	
96.00
8.10
4.50
2.40
15.00
9.60
3.00
13.00
6.00
34.68
9.60
8.40
3.60
12.00
1..-.0
10.00
4.50
15.00
18.00
9.00
32.00
.60
7.00
IG.00
12.80
1.35
6.53
5.08
6.Ill,
7.13
6.80
4.50
C03
5.80
.45
1.31
. 1.20
I.G6
4.35
2.62
2.70
1.81
1.45
1.45
1.45
1.35
1.12
1.56
1.56
2.35
.90
.90
.90
5.10
1.58
43.50
1.91
4.50
1.91
6.40
2.40
1.80
9.00
.47
1.60
10.68
1.50
1.23
3.75
1.68
6.42
1.80
1.35
.56
2.70
10.50
11.25
15.87
3.0C
The Leading Newspaper
in the Kootenays
"The Prospector
*>
Subscribe
Now
.23
.16
.71
.20
.16
.92
1.04
.99
.91
.94
.91
.05
.14
.13
.37
.69
.39
.32
.26
.16
.16
.22
.16
.18
.12
.25
.25
.34
.11
.11
.11
1.02
.11
4.03
8.01
.17
.32
.18
.27
.12
.09
.45
.08
.08
1.51
.08
.07
.20
.08
.64
.09
.06
.03
.13
.80
.47
1.92
1.04
.57
5.76
4.80
.59
.35
.20
.75
.48
.30
.75
.40
3.23
.77
.65
.24
.60
.08
.50
.22
1.27
1.50
2.47
1.75
.39
.36
.80
.64
2.00
2,00
2.0U
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.110
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.WI
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2X0
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
3.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2,00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
4.48
5.31
11.94
4.0V
5.15
12.20
15.00
12.97
13.51
l.l.02
14.07
13.51
3.10
4.60
3.93
6.67
10.64
7.41
8.62
5.47
4.81
4.81
4.87
5.31
5.78
4.44
5.16
5.16
7.09
ir.i
4.21
4.21
11.72
5.79
61.23
89.51
6.63
13.C2
6.64
7.67
5.42
3.89
11.45
2.65
3.58
14.22
3.58
3.30
6.96
8.76
9.06
3.89
3.41
2.59
4.83
18.80
11.87
42.32
23.84
1C.07
2.00       123.96
102.80
10.69
6.85
4.60
17.75
12.08
8.30
17.75
10.40
39.91
12.37
11.05
6.99
14.CO
3.58
12.50
6.72
28.77
32.75
29.34
38.75
4.59
9,85
18.80
15.44 THE PROSPECTOft, CRANHROOK, BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE PERFUME
Of IK
LADY IN BLACK
By GASTON LEROUX.
Author al "Tht H.alac. ol Uh Ytll»
Room."
COr 1 RIGHT   1939. BY BRENTANO'S
(Continued.)
CHAPTER. XI11.
"Whc
When My  tether  Wear* a
Win It Will fit."
mT wus literally true tbnt he wns
trhcbleOMl. Anu I wus more
ternUed infMil uiuu words
could express. I nud uever
seen hlui in such :i state ot iiit-uiui inquietude. "I "nol to u«8 you. my boy,
whether youi niothei told yuu iheiwrj
or ihe accident erlih the revolrerr"
"No," he unsnored, "end I asked ber
nothlnf."
"And you swore to see nothing end
hear uoiuiiitf without bei saying anything lo »uu ubout the pistol sbot aud
cry';"
'i'he young man now gazed at me In-
tenlly.
"It was necessary for me lo believe.
For my part, I respected ihe secrets of
the Lady In Black. I had uoililus to
ask ut her when she said to me, 'We
musl lenve each other now, my child,
but nothing can ever separate us
again." "
"Ab, she snld tbnt to you?"
"Tea, and tbere was blood upon her
bands."
We looked at each other In silence
1 was now ut the window und beside
the reporter. Suddenly bts hand touched mine. Theu be pointed to ibe little
taper which wns bun,Inn in the en
trance to the subterrnueuu door which
led to Old Hob's study In the lower
"lt Is dawn," Bind Itouletubllle. "and
Old Bob Is still at work. We wlll go
■nd bare a peep at blm."
A few moments later we di-scendec '
Into the octagon room of lhe Tower o
Charles the Bold. Tbe lump was mini
lng on tbe table, but there was no sign
ot Old Bob.
He picked  up the lamp and examined everything.  We came to [be little
desk table.  There we found tbe skull,
and it was true that It had been spat- j
tered with the red paint of (he wash
drawing which Darzac bud set to dry
upon   thut   part  of  the  desk   which i
faced the window.   I weut from one
window to tbe otber and shook tbe i
bars to assure myself tbat tbey bud
not been tampered with.
"Whut ure you uboutV" asked ltou-
letabille.  "Before thinking ubout how
bo could have got out at the windows I
wouldn't   it   lie   better   to   Und   out
whether he went by the door?"
He set Ihe lamp upon the parapet
aud looked tor truces of footprints.
Then Itouletabille suld:
"Go and knock at tbo door of tbe
siiiiuro tower and usk Bernier whether
Old Bob bus come In. Ask .Maitoul
and Pere Jneques.  Go-quick!"
Five minutes uflcr I weut out 1 was
back wltb tbe Information, No one
had seen Old Bob In uny part of tbo
fortress.   Rouletubllle said:
"lie left this lump burning ln order
to muke people believe that he wua at
work. There Is no sign of a struggle
of any sort, unit In the sand 1 find the
truces of the footprints of only Bunco
und Darzuc. who enme to this room
iluriug the storm Inst night and have
brought on their feet a little earth
from thc Court of the Bold and also of
tho clnyllke soil of the outer court.
There Is no footprint which conld be
Old Bob's. Old Bob reached here be-
fore and perhaps weut out while tho
tempest was raging, but ln uny case j
he has not come In since,"
I-'kc a dash un Idea pierced through ■
my brain. I rushed through the court
till 1 cume to the oubliette. I discovered thnt the Iron bars were still \
fust lf any one had lied by tbat way
or hnd fallen Into the shaft the burs
would have been opened. 1 hurried back.
"Itouletabille! There ls no way thnt
Old Bob could havo got out except In
the stick!"
My friend wns not listening, and 1
was surprised to see him deeply engrossed lu a tusk of which t found It
Impossible to guess the meaning. He
was making drawings with a rule, a
square, a measure und a compass, seated in tbe geologist's eusy chuir, with
Durznc's drawing board before him.
He was quietly milking a plun.
He had pricked Ihe paper with one
of the points of his compass while
the other point traced the circle which
might represent the Tower of the Bold
as we could see It in the design of M.
Iiurzuc. Then, dipping his brush Into
a tiny dish half full of tbe red paint
wblcb M. Darzac had been using, he
carefully spread the palot over tbe entire space occupied by the circle. In
doing this he wus extremely particular, giving the greatest attention to
Beelng thai the paint was of the sume
thickness nt every point His face
took on a look like that of a maniac.
Tben be turned toward me so quickly
that be upset the great easy cbulr tn
which he had been sealed.
"Salnclalr! Snlndutrl Look at tho
red puint!   Look at the red paint!"
I leaned over the drawing, terrified
by his surage tone.
"'I'he reil paint, the red paint!" he
kept groaning, his eyes staring In his
beud ns though be were witnessing
some frightful spectacle,
"But wbut—whnt ls It?" I stammered.
"'What Is ll?* My God, num. enn't
you see? Dun't you know lhat thut ls
blood ?"
No, I did not know It -Indeed. I was
quite sure that It wasn't blood. It
was merely red puint. But I took
cure not to contradict itoiileiubllle. 1
feigned lo be Interested in this Iden of
blood,
"Whoso blond?" 1 Inquired. "Do you
think that It can be Larson's?"
"Oh. oh. oh! Larsan's blood? Who
knows anything aliout Larsan's blood?
Who has ever seen the color of It? To
nee that, it would tie uecesBury to open
my own veins, salnclalr That's the
only way.    My fathei  would uot let
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PILl.s with an Iron-clad guarantee
uf money hark if they fail to give
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will .-tup the |min in tlie haek—relieve the bladder—and cur.* evory
trace uf Kidney Trouble nnd Rheumatism.
GIN Pll.I.S have cured thousands
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regarded aa hopeless,
We don't ask you to buy GIN
PILLS tu tind out what they will do
f»»r you.
Simply write us, mentioning this
paper, and We will send yen a sample
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pn
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■   aud   Chi
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Dept   N 1'.. Tm,
uitu.
■17
>«,.
Tbt
•rtftnal
, Qln Pills mail* hy
| National
Drujand
Chemical Co. ot
Canada
Limited,
Torouta,
• re told
•sir la
tbii be*.
bts Mood be spilled like ttiat.'
He was speaking again wltb that
strange, desperate pride ot Lis father.
"When m> father wears a wig It
will tit. My father would uot let bis
blood be spilled like tbat"
He spoke again:
"My poor mother did not deserve
this, l did uut deserve tt," A t*?ar
rau dowu bla cheek aud tell Into ttie
little (lisb ot paint.
"Ah." tie cried. "It Isn't necessary
to flit Jt any fuller." And ae picked
up tbe tlay cup witb Inuuite care aud
carried It to tbe cabinet.
"Let us go! Let us go!" be said
drearily at last. "Tbe time Is eotne,
Saiuclalr. No matter wbut happens,
wo can uever turn back uow Tbe
Lady lu Black must tell us everything
-everything ubout tbe toon wbo is tn
that sack."
De knocked at thn dour of the square
tower. I asked bim whether be did
not wish me to leave bim alone wltb
bis mother, But, to my great surprise, be begged me not lu abandon
blm "for anything In tbe world—so
tbat the circle Sbould not be closed."
And be added mournfully, "Ferbaps tt
may never be!"
Tlie door of tbe tower ngo la was
opened, and we saw Bender's face appear.
"What do you want? Whnt are you
dolnn here again?" be demanded.
"Speak low, Madame is In Old Bob's
Bitting room, and the old man bas uot
couio In yet."
Itouletabille pushed the door farther
open.
We were In the vestibule of the
tower.
"What In madame doing In Old Rob's
Hitting ruom?" asked the reporter In a
low voice.
"She Is waiting for Dana?, She
lure not re-enter the room until be
-.'(itnes, nor 1 either."
"Well, go back Into your lodge. Bernier."
Ue opened the door of Old Bob's
salon, and we saw the form of tbe
Lady In Black, She never moved at
our entrance, hut ber lips opened, and
u voice that I should uever have recognized as hers murmured:
"Why arc* you come? 1 saw you
crossing the court, Vou have been
there all night. You kuow all, Whut
do you want now?"
She added lu deep misery:
"Vou swore to me that you would
seek to know uothing."
Koulctabille took ber hnnd.
"Come, mother, dearest," be said
tenderly.
She did not resist lu the least But
when he led ber to the door of tbe fatal chamber sbe recoiled. "Not therel"
she moaned.
Itouletabille tried the door. It was
locked. He called Bernier, wbo
opened tbe door and tbeo burrled
away.
Once the door was opened we looked
Into the room. What a spectacle wa
beheld! The chamber was In the most
frightful disorder, and the crimson
dawn wblcb entered through the vast
embrasures rendered the disorder still
more sinister. Wbat an lliumlnatlou
for a chamber of horrors! Blood was
upou the walls and upon tbe floor and
upon the furniture—the blood of thfl
rising sun and the blood of him whom
Toby bad carried off In thu suck, no
oue knew whither, In the potato bag!
The tables, the chairs, the lOfal, were
all overturned, lhe curtains of tbe
bed to which the man tn nls death
agony had tried desperately to cling
were halt turn down, llud one could
distinguish upon une of them the mark
of a bloody hiiiiit.
Mme Derate murmured:
"We are delivered!"
Roulptnbllle hnd fallen upon bis
knees al bei side.
Then she tuld us the i-tnry. Bbe
looked at ihe closed door. Sbe looked
at the overturned furniture and the
blood  sputtered  walls ana  floor and
^ DODD'S ''',
^KIDNEY^
narrated the details or me ingnuu.
s< ene She told us that as soon aa
Darsac bad entered his room be had
drawn (he bolt ami had walked Lo the
little table In lbe ovular ol the room,
the a part meu I was lighted ouly by a
wax caudle.
The silence of the room was suddenly broken by a loud crash tike that of
a piece ot turmfure. lho crash came
from the little panel, and then ull was
silent. Darsac made a movement toward the panel Which was situated at
the baci; ol the room on the rtght hand
side. Ile was nailed to the spol Whore
he stood by a second crash louder
than the Brat, und this time it seemed
to her that she could see Ibe panel
move. But ul that very moment thu
panel swung open before them. A
shadowy form Issued from the panel
DtterUlg B cry of rage. Darsac rushed
upon the tlgure.
"And tbat shadow-that shadow bad
a face that you could see?" Interrupt
ed Itouletabille. "Mamma, why did
you not see the face? i ou have killed
tbe shadow, but bow do we know thai
it was Larsan if you dtu nut see ins
face? Perhaps yon nave not wren
killed Larsan's shadow.'"
"Vh, yes," she replied almost listless
ly. "Ue is dcail,"
Rouletabllle look the l.ady lu Black
Into his arms, curried her tenderly lu
her room BUd said lo tier: "Mamma,
you must leave me now i have work
to do-tor you, lot Uarssc anu toi my*
seit"
"Don't leave me until Hubert comes |
back!" she cried    Some one knocked
at the dour ot tbe corridor    KnuletS
tulle asked who was there, ami the
voice oi Darsac answered
The man wbo entered looked like a
corpse. .Never was human tsce so pal
lid. so bloodless, so devoid ot an setn
bianco ot lire.
lie fell Into the h.ilr trom which
Koulctabille hail |Uf*c raised the t.ady
In Black.   Ue looked op n< net
"iour wish is readied.' he said "it
is where yuu wisheu it lo he '
"Did you set m> tuce? questioned
Rouletabllle excitedly.
"No." answered Uarsar wearily. "I
bave not setn it. Uld yuu thins mat i
was going to open lhe sa< k."
I   thought   thai   KoUieiaOlMe   would
have shown discomfiture at  this au  '
BWer; but. ou the contrary, ue turned :
to Darsac anu said:
"Ah. you dnJ uot see his face  That's
very   good.   Inoecu.      J be   intDoriattl ;
thing uow is tuat we should close the
circle.   Walt a moment."
And almost Joyously be threw bltu- i
self  down  on  all  tuurs ami  crawled '
around among the furniture aud under
the bed.
Suddenly be rose u> bis feet, balding
in his bsnd a revolver whicn he had j
found under tbe panel.
"Vou have found uis revolver!" cried |
Darzuc, "Ue did uot have time to j
use It."
As he spoke Darzac took from his
pocket  his own   re\oirer,   wblcb   bad
saved bis life, aud held it out to tbe
young man.
"This Is a good weapon," be said.
Rouletubllle   examined    It   closely.
Tbeu be compared lhe pistol witb tbat
which had fallen Mum the baud of the
assassin     Tbe latter  bore tbe  mark
of a Lundou gunsmith,    it was Dew,
: every barrel was lilied, and Ilouleta-
< bllle declared that it bad uever been
flred,
"Larsan only avails himself of firearms in the Inst extremity," suid tbe
young mnu. "Ue bates noise of any
. kind. Fie Intended merely to frighten
you with lt or be would have fired immediately."
And Itouletabille returned M. Darzac's revolver tnd put Larsan's In his
pocket.
Rouletubllle    made    a    few    steps
through tbe room and said:
"Wbere Is the body?"
Darzac replied:
"Ask my wife.   I want to forget sli
about lt. I kuow nothing more about
this horrible thing. No uuu suve Mme.
Darzac knows where the body is. Sbe
mny tell you lf she likes."
"1 have forgotten, too," said Matbllde.   "1 was obliged to do so."
"Nevertheless," insisted Rouletabille,
shaking bis head, "you must tell me.
You said that be was lu bis agony.
Are you sure thut he Is dead uow?"
"I am perfectly sure," replied Dap
zac simply.
"Ob, it Is finished:   Is It not entirely
I ended?" pleaded Matbllde.   Sbe arose
I and walked to Ihe window.  See, there
i Is   the  sun:    'This   horrible   night   Is
dead-dead   forever;     livery tblng   Is
over!"
(To be continued.)
COCKSHUTT I BINDERS
The Frost A Wood Light-Draft, Non-Choking, Roller Bearing Maohlne.   See Our Dealer.
Widow Wit
"I suppose," said the timid young
man, "when you recall what a hand-,
some man your tirst husband was,
you wouldn't consider uie for a min-!
tlte."
"Oh, yes, I would." replied the
widow, instantly; "hut I wouldn't [
consider yuu [or a second."
Amazing results have heen achieved,
at   thi'  ulltapuwi rfol  Mare-mi wireless
telegraph station uear Pisa, Corn*!
niunicatlon was established with stations in Ireland and Canada mid Mas.
sow a   in   lhe     Kant    African     Italian',
colony ol Eritrea.
The motor ear goes whissing by,
The acruplane floats through the sky.j
The  man   who  walk-.,  his  cares  tiro
few
He jjots " here lie is going In.
Washington Star
A Grim  Insult
"Pa, what docs it mean when you
say a man was grossly insulted!'"
"Well," replied the father, "a man
(s grossly insulted when the opposing
pitcher passes two men iu order to
get a chance at him."
Townley Threadier seems to be
very foud ol children.
Burl II.' has reason tu be If it
wasn't Ior children lu-. cult.in nulls
wouldn't be paying bun tiny pel eeul
An inoandesccnl electric lamp ol ,vi
candle power lias been designed (or
lighting public places.
Woman the only tax which at
laches mure Importance lo what's oh
it'-, li. ad than to what's in it.
MINARD'S I INIMKNT Is the only
LlnUnent asked fur at my store and
the onlv one we keep fur sale.
All the people use it,
MAK1.1N  ULTON.
Pleasant Hav, 0 B
Globe Trotters  Plus
A number of tourists were recently
looking down the crater of Vesuvius.
Au American gentleman said to his
companion:
"That looks a good deal like the infernal regions."
An English lndy, overhearing the
remark, said to another:
"Good gracious, how these Americans do travel l"—Lippincott's.
FARMER'S WIFE
TELLS HER STORY
FOUND A CURE    FOR    ALL    HER
ILLS IN DODD'S KIDNEY
PILLS
She  was  tired,  wurn nut   and  nervous
nnd     inhered     front     Rhuomiitlsm,
but   two   hum",   ul   Dodd's   Kidnuy
Pills cured her.
Hawthorne, Out. (Special).- Mrs,
T. ti V lex adder, wife ot n Hell kuuwn
I nui"i   living   near   here,    adds    her
testimony tu that uf ihe thousands
ivhu have Icutlicd fmiu their owu
experience that Dodd's Kldnoy Pills
t'Uie Kidney Disease.
"1 Buffered for twelve years," Mrs.
Alexander   says,    "My    buck    ached,
m\ alcop was broken and unrefresh*
ing, I was nervous and tired aud I
was troubled with heart llutteriugs.
It Iiuu tna tiuin developed and added
iu my Buffering.
"1 was iu a very run-down, worn-
out condition when I started to use
Dodd's Kidney Pills, hut I am
thankful to say they gave me relief
almost from the lirst. Two boxes
cured me completely."
| Dodd's Kidney Pills cure the Kidneys.    Cured  Kidneys mean that all
. Impurities are strained out of the
blood,    That means    pu**9   blood all
i over the body and the banishment ol
that  tired,   heavy   feeling   and  those
i pains and aches that impure blood
brings. (
Doctor*—"Everybody is so remarkably healthy iu this village I've nothing to do,"
Gruvedigger—"Same wi' me, sir.   I
tniclit as woll sell my spade.   I have
not buried a living soul a' thia
mouth."
INTERESTING   INFORMATION
Versatile
"Thev tell me your boy Josh is very
versatile."
"He is," replied Farmer Corn-
tossel, patiently. "I never saw any-
body who could do so many fool
things without repeatin' hissell."—
Washington Star.
■Supposing some fool had rocked the
hunt when Washington crossed the
Delaware P
More than halt the fuller's enrth
produced in the United States in 1010
was mined In •Florida,
Lord Miehclham paid $17,000 at auction fur the ring given by the Karl uf
Essex to Queen Elisabeth,
Teacups that have   turned   brown,
I silver that is discolored by egg, can
!"■  brightened  by  rubbing with wet
sail.
The moon adds to the delicacy of
sentiment, but u real inl lamp, before
now hns been as emotionally productive, even when not lighted.
Borne men resent no blow so fiercely
us wiien an idea strikes them.
If ten stains resist the usual boiling water, whisky is aure to take it
out,
A cubic mile (if average rock weighs
12,800,000,000 tuns.
Delightful
"There are many delightful dishes
to he mude from left-over food."
"That's nice," responded the young
bride. "There's a great deal of food
left over since 1 began doing the
cooking."—Kansas City Journal.
Mothers can easily know when their
children are troubled with worms, and
they lose no time in applying the best of
remedies—Mother Graves' Worm Eiterm-
Inator.
Had Dons His Duty
"I wish some time, Mr. Speeder,"
said the doctor, "that you would bear
our hospital in mind, und if it appeals
to you do something for it."
"Great Scott! Squills," retorted
Speeder, "why can't you be satisfied?
That new chauffeur of mine has contributed at least two patients a day
to your old charity, what more do
you want?"
Since, annexation by Japan about
two hundred thousand Koreans hove
cut off and sold their "topknots," materially reducing the price of human
hair in tho far eastern markets. To
evade the duty tho Koreans can cross
the frontier of China before cutting
tiieir topknots.
"A tramp after a day or two in our
hustling, bustling town of Denver,
shook the Denver dust from his boots
with a snarl.
" 'They must be lazy people in this
town. Everywhere you turn they offer you work to do."—Los Angeles
Times.
Very many persons die annually from
cholerii and kindred summer complaints,
who might have heen saved, if proper remedies had been used. If attacked do not
delay in getting u bottle of Ilr. J, I). Kellogg s Dysentery Cordial, tbe medicine
that never fails to effect a cure. Those
who have used it Bay it acts promptly,
and thoroughly subdues the pain and
disease.
Concerning the Dominion  Exposition
at Regina, Saskatchewan, July
31st to August  12th,  1911.
The Dominion Exposition which is
being held in Regina, Saskatchewan
this year  under the auspices of tlie
Reglua  Agricultural    aud    Industrial
Exhibition Association, Limited, will
he tiie largest aud befit fair ever beld
iu Western Canada,
Over $,t,nuo bus been expended on
new buildings fnr the accommodation
of the many varied exhibits, lu thu
Manufacturers' Building will he seen
all tbat is best aud newest in Canadian industry.
Tbe Agricultural sect inn embraces
the must pei feet specimens of products from ('auadu's farms, especial
attention being paid lo the featuring
,d the purebred stuck, attractive prizes villi he awarded as an Incentive to obtaining numerous entries.
The Dog Bhow, Pot Slock and Poultry exhibits will be composed of the
must valuable breeds.
Special Attractions
Tbe  iitst   Regiment    Highlanders
Maud.
The Siege of (iihruller.
Tbe Flying Buuyaids.
McKlnley  Aslicr  Hippodrome Co.
Hue of tlie most novel and pleasing
features -Uiehiird Karsy's (limit my*
riophoiie. This particular feature as
presented by Mr. antl Mrs, Karsy is a
great novelty. The Myriophone is an
enormous instrument designed uud
patented by Mr. Karsy himself. Although beautifully toned and played
with much expression this great instrument can lie heard without dilliculty for two thousand feet.
Captain Webb's Five Performing
seals.
Morris* performing ponies.
Madame A1 tea's trained dogs and
leaping grey hounds.
Steiner Trio, Comic Acrobats.
Zerald'a balance act.
Prince Albert's Pipers Rand. In
addition to these the special attraction before the grand stand every
afternoon and evening should be men-
tinned—James E. Hardy's wonderful
wire act. Mr. Hardy is known
throughout the world as the "High
Wire King."
There are many other acts which
space will not permit mention of.
Landlord—Our rates are $2 up.
We—■
Guest—That's all right; I am an
artist, and	
Landlord—The deuce you are! Then
It's $2 down.
Ask for Minard's and take no other.
Why Not Do It Themselves
Judge  Ben.  P.  Lindsey, in a woman's  suffrage   address,   said  with  a
smile:
"Another type of man accused the
woman voter of grafting. Well, we
nre all prone to accuse others of our
own besetting sin. Like the tramp,
you know.
Frankly Stated
"I suppose you are going to make
some addresses tins summer."
"Yes," replied the stntesmnn. "I'm
going to tell my constituents exactly
what they need."
"And what do they need?"
"Me."
Her   Ides
"It isn't equitable."
"What's the trouble?"
"A divorce costs u great deal more
than u marriage license,"
In Norway, where little fruit ia
raised, un apple costs 11 cents, a pear
15, while peaches are sold ut 20 centfl
a pound.
Wonderful
"I heard that they made car wheels
out of paper. Don't you think that
is wonderful?"
"No. I've heard of stationary engines lots of times."
Maybe tbe icemen won't get a
chance to deliver any ice in the next
world.
Sometimes it is
a man's jukes Hu
lo weep over
r his troubles.
um»&
D'*QrTC5
W. N. U.( No. 850.
BJxly-elghl per cent, of the world's
' publications are printed iu Itlngltsll.
Bread-making makes pretty hands,
bul most girls prefer dope.
j Father—1 never smoked when I
wan your age. Will you bo able to
tell tlmt to your son?
Willie- Not and keep my fnce as
straight us you do, pop.
Little Willie—Say, pa, whut is a
diplomat?
Pa—A diplomat, my son. is a person
who can prove a man a liar without
calling him one.—Chicago News.
Nnggs—What is the. effect of taking
a cold bath every mowing?"
pOggfl- Tim chief one that I've
noticed is nn unconquerable desire to
toll everyhody about it!"
Canada bought $173,784 worth of
toys and dolls from tho United States
ami $,'172,132   worth   from   Germany
during  the  eight  months  ended   November .'Hi. 11M0.
Coffee wns first introduced into the
Netherlands during the second half of
the seventeenth century. In the
Netherlands and still more in other
countries of Europe chicory is used
in the preparation of coffee to make
the drink stronger and to give it a
darker color.
No Air Needed
Sportsman (assisting jockey who
has been knocked out)—Stand back,
please; a little more air, and hurry
up with that brandy I
Faint voice from the patient—Never
mind the air.—Punch.
Deafness Cannot Be Cure./
if lo«l fti-pllcatloni, u lbe? cannot reach thc dl*
Med portion ul the ear.    'lucre U only one way U
CdtatnoM, ana that li by coniiltutioii.il rcnutliM,
fneti la earned by an Inflamed condition ot tba
mucoua lining ut tlie Eumacblan Tube. When thla
lube li inflamed yuu have a rumblUut round or imperfect hcarliif, and when It ll entirely closed, Deaf-
mm 1a the mull, and uuli-M the loflammutloa can be
lakeu out and this tube restored to Ita normal condl*
Uod, hearing will be dralruyrd forever; Dine cuea
Mil ol ten are caused by Catarrh, which U nothing
but an Inflamed condition ot the mucous surfaces.
W* wlll give Quo Hundred Dollara for any ruse of
Ueafnesa (caused by catarrh) that cannot De cured
*T Uail's Catarrh Cure.  Send for circulars, tree.
F. J. CHUNK V k CO., ToleS* <*
Sold by Druifftsts. 75c.
Take uall'a Family Pills tor oeuUpatiflP
An electrical device has been perfected to thaw out frozen water pipes
without opening the ground.
Charitable
Utile \Villie-"Say, pa, what did
ma mean when she suid Mrs. Jones
was queerP"
Pa—"Il means, my son, that your
uui was too charitable to express her
real opinion of Mrs. Jones."—Chicago
News.
FADIKJpIRn
When Woman Should be in
the Prime of Charm £
and Beauty
At thirty to thirty-live q woman
should be in the prime of charm und
beauty, and yet many woman begin
tu fade before then. Wrinkles uppcur
uud the complexion grows sallow.
Dark rings surround the eyes, und
headaches follow, with backaches uud
low spirits. Tin- euuse of this is simply need of blond nourishment. Good,
pure blood is the life of a woman's
beauty und health.   It is good blood
licit   brings tbe glow of licjilth to the
cheek,   brightness    to    the eye, and
elasticity to tbe step, and the general
happiness of good health. When woman feels jaded and worn out her
blood simply needs attention, uud tbe
one unrivalled and sine remedy is Dr.
Williams' Pink Pills, which supply
the rich, red blood that repairs the
waste, dispels disease and restores
the brightness aud charm of womanly
health.
i    Mrs. H. G. Hart, Winnipeg, Man,,
, is oue of the thousands of  sufferers
, who owes her present health to Dr.
Williams1 Pink  Pills.    She  says:  "t
! had    suffered    for a  long  time,  uot
knowing what the trouble was, I had
I doctored  with  several    doctors,    but
1 ouly   seemed   to be growing   worse.
The last doctor  I  had  told  me    the
t trouble was anaemia, that my blood
! wus turned  to water and    thut    my
'condition was serious.    But his treat.
ment, like the rest, did nie no good.
■■ I got ao bnd 'that if I excited myself,
| or went up stairs. I  was completely
out of breath and felt ns if I was go-
i ing to suffocate.   My heart would pui-
J pitate violently,   and at times I would
j suffer with terrible pains from it.    I
'had a yellow complexion, my lips had
j lost their color, and I had no appetite and could not eat.     1    grew so
weak  I  could  hardly    drag    myself
along,  und  my feet seemed to have
weights on them.   I was so completely run down that I thought I wna go-
j ing Into consumption.   At this time a
j friend urged me to take Dr. Williams'
Pink Pills,    After taking a few boxes
j I found my health improving, and af-
I ter taking the Pills for a  couple of
! months I wus entirely well, and have
since enjoyed the best of health, and
' I feel that I can never say enough in
praise of Dr. Williams' Pink Pills."
These Pills are sold by nil dealers
j in medicine or sent   by   mail at 60
cents  a box  or  six  hoxes  for  $2.50
; from Thc Dr. Williams' Medicine Co.,
1 Brockville, Ont.
They Cleanse While They Oure.—The
vegetable compounde ol which Partnelee'e
Vegetable Pillfl are eompoHed, mainly
dandelion and mandrake, ■.■leur the stomach and Inteatlnen of deleterious matter
and restore the deranged organs to
healthful action. Hence tney are the best
remedy for indigestion available to-day.
A trial of them will establish the truth
of thin assertion and do moro to convince
the ailing tban anything that can be
written of these pills.
i China's export of teas in 1909 fell
off by over ten million pounds, principally because of the great supplies
that huve beeu offered by India and
| Ceylon.
Minard's Liniment lumberman's friend
Rotterdam's output of roasted coffee is 16,500,000 pounds a year.
|    He—So Billy has" told you that he
i saved me from a watery grave.
She—H'm.    He   told   me   that   he
saved you from a much worse place
I than that!—M.A.P.
Everywhere
"**i*y*i
CHEAT VEST
CUT PLUG
"Does my steam whistle annoy
you?" inquired the man who had opened the new factory, "1 suppose you
hnve noticed the noise."
"Why, yea, I hove noticed the
noise," responded the neighbor, "but
I'm a Irille deaf, and I .supposed it
was the early robins."
SMOKING TOBACCO THE PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK. BRITISH COLUMBIA
BRAIN WORKERS
who get little exercise,
an occasional dose of
feel better all round for
b^
"NA-DRU-CO" Laxatives
They tone up the liver, move the bowels gently but freely, cleanse the
system and clear the brain. A new, pleasant and reliable laxative, prepared
by a reliable firm, and worthy of the NA-DRU-CO Trade Mark.
25c. a box. If your druggist has not yet stocked them, send 25c. and
we wlll mall them.
^
NATIONAL DRUG 4 CHEMICAL COMPANY
Or CANADA. LIMITED. MONTREAL.  21
A man with a grievance never lucks
a topic uf conversation.
WOMEN   WANTED
To tukc ordora in spare time. No
experience nooossary, our lines
especially used I.y mothers and girl*.
Apply Women's Department, 228
Allj.rt Si„ Ottawa, om.
Bravery
Swatting Hies is not without its
perils. An Indiana invalid fell uut of
bod mill broke his leg while reaching
for a lly. Hut only the weakling una
the coward will ilesist from his stern
iluty on account of danger. Swat till
the lust germed lly expires!
Minard's Liniment used by physician,
"Hear Dubbllegh over there brug-
KiiiK aliout his wife."
"What's he saying?"
"He's telling Brown that all he is
he owes to her."
"Humph! l)o you call thut l>run-
glngP"
Stop
That
limp
*   ll__la» a—   hamraa
Chtkfc that ttwplag, *m**m harm
late • touad, healthy horn, wtll I if
aad taftt to da a f aod dar '• wark,
Daa'l lat a tparla, dark,   %\**\a\,
Bprala, fttagbaa* ar aay athtr t*aaaa*
Daa'l lat a tpavta,
Iprala, fttagbaa* ar ai<.
aeaa tuty yarn*- ham la i
Cura It Vttk
Kendall's
Spavin Cora
n curat without lea-zing a aaar.
Meaiiah or whttt halta-hccauat ll data
■at hlbttt.
Part Kalla, B.G.. Juat llth IM
"Hava beau using roar Malacat far
raan aad flad tt alt lhat jrou rrprcMat.
Mara aat acaa wtthaut It far 10 yeara."
OBOROS 001DON.
91. a bottle-* far |5. ■icelleat far
hanaehotd um. laid ay atl dtali>*a.
Aaa tor free book "A Trtatlaa Oa Tha
Herte " ar writt aa for copy. ||
n. i. j. mnut c». *********. mm, it
Pilli of Atteitod Vnluo-ParmeWM
Vwtulilti l»ilIn nre tin* rt'Hiilt uf .•■ireful
stinlv of tin- iit-opurttei ot certain routs
nml herbs, anil the action of Hin'ti an hciIr-
lives  und  laxatives  un   tho  iligvfltive  up
SuratiiH. The huccphs tho cunipouinlerH
uvo met with atti'HtH the value of their
wurk. Tliene plllri have been reeognited
for miniv yeara as the bent clemiscrs of
the H.vHieiii that ean be got. Their ei-
eellenoe waa reoogntied from the Brut and
they grow mure popular daily.
Doctor—You're vory run down in-
droit. You mustn't tuke uny violent
exorcise of any sort. For Instance,
you mustn't er—er—er whnt ure you?
Patient—An anarchist.
Doctor—Well, you mustn't er—er—
throw nny bombs for a long time —
London Opinion.
For All Tlmt
Mrs. Highup—"The judge decreed
tlmt they should be separated, never
lo see each other again."
Mrs. Blaso—"Are they?"
Mrs. Highup—"Yes; they nre living
next door to eucli other in u New
York apartment house now."
Should Be a Limit
"I snw Peckham today," remarked
Nagget, "und lie wns very drunk.' '
"Well, there's some excuse for
him," replied Mrs. Nagget. "He lost
his wife last week."
"I know, but a man sbould be nble
to celebrate without making a hog of
himself."—Catholic Standard and
Time s.
INTERNATIONAL COLIC REMEDY
SOLD ON JI SPOT CASH GUARANTEE
W. »*tmu4 V.ur Mom- If It Inr Falls.
COLIC MAY KILL YOUR HORSE or Cow within ont
hour unless you have this remedy ready for instant use.
Colic kills more horses than all other diseases combined, and when you need a remedy you must have it
at once, lor if you wait for a veterinary or make a trip
to town you may find the animal dead when you return.
If International Colic Remedy ever fails we will refund
your money. It is the only Colic Remedy ever sold on
such a strong guarantee. Put up in a regular drench<
ing bottle.
• AVID  HI*  FILLY
St. Jovits, Qui, March jrd, 1911.
Intidnatiokal Stock Food Co., Limited.
Gentlkmkn.—I am jrlad to say I u„ed International Colli
Remedy on what seemed to be a hopeless case and saved a
beautiful (illy—ahe was cured in a few minutes.  (Signed)   CHARLES ST, AUBIN,
PRIOI We. AND (1.00 Pill BOTTLI.      POR MU BY DULIII IVIRVWMIM
INTERNATIONAL STOCK FOOD CO.. LimitwJ. TORONTb. CAN.
HOLYaCOD PALACE.
Htttortc Castle  Hat  Been ths Scene
of Stirring Epliodct.
Few regal edit,ees have undergone
more vicissitudes than Holyrood Pal
uce, which ia now being subjected to
several alterutiuns and improvement*
to lil it for the occupation of Kmy
Ueorge and Queen JUary when they
stay there in July. It QCQUplei ihe
pi... oi Holyrood Abbey, founded tn
1183 by King David I., on ihe spul
where he was supposed l > have been
.saved irom an infuriated Stag, Tht
legend goes that the Uiuu waa hunt-
iny in the foreit cl Drum-dech, in the
immediate vicinity of Edinburgh, and
was aa?ailed by an euraged slag,
which unhorsed him, and probably
would have put u very speedy end tc
bis existence had not tliis Scottish
monarch, like the first Christian i*m<
peror, been favored of the -mints.
Aa a reward fur his piety, uud in
consideration uf his great liberality tc
churchmen, a, cross descended froU.
Heaven in the moment of hia danger
with which he stoutly attacked the
beast.    T.ie latter, finding itself over
come, quickly made its way uut ui th.
woods, and left the King und the wos*
masters ut tht* situation. 'J lus tu proVf
his gratitude t j the saints whu haJ
j interceded iu his behalf, he founded
- the Abbey of ltulyruod for thfl canons*
, regular o' tit.  Augustiue.
(    The  canons   were   allowed   man)
l privileges, and succeeding   uiunuieh*
I added   tu   the   gilts   of   the   tuuuder.
i Holyrood  Abbey  becoming   the most
I opulent uf all religious Institutions Ic
Scotland,   lu due time a royal res I
] deuce wus erected close to it, althougl
I it is doubtful how soon it became tin
permanent hume of thu Kings of Scotland.    Certain   it  is,  however,   thut
James IV. lived there,   it waa during
his   residence,  on   account  of   Mas:
having been celebrated in the chapel.
thut  a  revolutionary  mob broke in
and despoiled all the religious orn*
meuts,  leaving only the  bare walls.
The  rioters even profaned the  vuull
which   had   been   used  us  the   royul
sepulchre, broke open the leaden co'
fins, and curried away the lids; but tii
the royal buiiej were uot negotiable
articles, the anti-Papists were forced
to leuve them behind.
But worse misfortunes were still tc
come, and they came with Queer
Mary. Her Majesty's misfortunes com
menced at a very early period. Tht
first Sunday after her arrival a mot
beset the palace for the purpose oi
instructing her In the proper way ol
worshipping God. To such a pitch ol
enthusiasm bad tho spirit of these re
ligious instructors risen t'.iat it wa.1
only with difficulty they were restrained from hanging the prbst who al
that moment waa officiating in the
chapel. Mary locked herself iu hei
apartment with her Mass book and
her father-confessor, while tumultuou.*
zealots assuTW the gates und pro
nounced themselves certain Her Majesty was muking for eternal perdi
tion, and must soon be utterly losl
unless she listened to John Knox and
abjured beuds and images.
Then came the historic night ol
March 9th, 15G0. As Miry and a
small party were having supper, Darn
ley and Ruthven, followed by othei
conspirators, entered for i e purpose
of seizing David Rimo, the accomplished Italian secretary and skilful
musician, who had gained the Queen'?
confidence and roused the jeulousy ol
the Presbyterian lords aud ministers
of the Kirk. Anticipating their purpose, Rizzio thr-.v himself behind the
Queen and clung to her dress; but
was stabbed by George Douglas, leaning over Maiy's shoulders. During
this exciting scene the Queen's husband held her fast in hU«rma, while
another cf thi conspirators held a
pistol at her breast. The room in
which the fetal supper-party took
place is still in existence.
Tough All  Around
The tough customer wus struggling
with u tough steak iu u tough restaurant.
"Say, ynu!" he finally roared at a
waiter, "I ain't used to eaUn1 rhinoceros hill'. Ketch me something o
little more nourishiu' in ;. hurry."
"Aw, fude away, little one!" said
the pugilist waiter witheringly.
"What do you think this joint is—a
diet iitchen."—National Monthly.
"So your Shakespeare club is a
great success!-"
"Yes, We have accumulated
enough fines for non-attendance to
take us all to a musical comedy."—
Washington Herald.
A GRIM SPECTRE.
To Get Poisons
From the Blood
You Have to Depend on the Filtering  Process of the  Liver
and Kidneys
Disease   Is  the   Dread  That   Haunts
Steamboat Captains.
Captain Mend us of ll.Ms, Dominion" realized more than anyoue the
other day that the anxieties of ao
emigrant liner's commander, do net)
end with the safe piloting of hii sb'.J
through undreamt of per:l5 acrcis in-'
Western Ocean.
There are three thine? the ccm-
tr.hi.der ol a passenger liner ha* i
wholesome dread of — fog, tire and
disease, ilu* former cau be dealt wil \
Ly slowing down and a frequent u-1
of the ship's horn, and olh-r precautious to minimise the risk of acid -i \
a  d.-l    c i  .      .. »    u £ 'through  the  demon  fog,  and  on   u i
A Book of Interest to Horse Owners, roftd J- the |eM u ,tfg *0 ^entlMilJ
Kvery   horse  owner  worthy   of  the   met   with   as   making   the  Gull,   u.l
name takes a natural and commend-  straits uf Belle Isle and even in tht
nble  pride  in   keeping  his  horse   in   Gulf itself,
prime condition.   With sensible feed-,     Fiu    is    a   devastating   terrifying
ing. proper cure and    a    reasonable, agent. bL   with a good head of steam ,
amount of work, there is no trouble  pump, amj hose in good working or    Sett-nig* CwetmetlM Csw RmmST&iI
mi iluini- this,     (mi Ar sue i nnntimnni   j ..    i   »..„   ...-ll   .1..11.. 1   -Mr.",    n... •■»■« — •»■—
S552 Buys Everythinj
Needed To Build This
Fine 6 R^om Home
MOT th* portabto
[ " hiad. but w.ll-
,   amtlnicttd. ***rm.
(Mhttantial  tram*
bulldm*,*.. V.-u **'*
arch.tvct'a t%.
1    bu Uer t    l""t    and
i   lumhtr dvaltr'a toil
fr.ltit* by htunl
All *n»,.f,»I.J.t«ct
fron our in.Hi. ||
Other Houses, Bungalow*,
Cottage*, Barn*, School*.
! 2 to 12 Room*—$175 Up
R*ar/tMn| al wkolatala •ott-htaba* tHmm*4. tttvd
anrl itiarhcJ;   roolni.   door*.  winJowa.  gla**.  a'***—
board, intarlo*) trim and I*- .h. Hr'-utt. far, tha aalLa
and ralnt. Aho plan*, blue t-mia and datailad buildlat
laatnictloei-all ao «l«ar lou'll aaad oj UUM tabar.
Book of 60 Home Plant FREE
PftotM, .Ue*. .ncriplloo. .how ..Belt, what cm.lMrf
(,.u... HMkllBa an. i.ll. ...cli, lh.'. ...... w-    "—"
j 3-L.nl   -.me aa. a*, to. HIM Boca N*. ■
in tluillR tliis.    Uinl.r such conditions   fct  all(|  t|u>  well   Jnlk',1  ship's  Iir,'
a sound horso looks   lino   and fools | brigiul,. made compulsory on all pat-
I well—ia always ready lor tervioo und  senger carrying liners nowadays a ttr-
rnese Organs Alone Con  Purify the] brings thu top price when sold. ,t at.u js nut so terrible a Hung a» il
Blood, and They Do Their Work     |   But aocidents will happen, a slight  „adi in cold und sensational  print,
Well when Helped by wrench, n sprain, n cut, or some un-! „,„i nM tnkun place nnd been so el-
known cms,, may result in lameness, (ectively and promptly dealt with that
Spavins, ringbones, curbs or splints the passengers have been In ignorance
conio .sooner or Inter to every stulde. ,,j )t, presence,
Taken promptly und treated properly! ]hPrc |, one tning every commandei
none ol these troubles are serious. ,lf „ vessel, lurt-e or small, hopes and
But il neglected or given lho wrong! inwardly prays will never be hi* lol
treatment, they quiokly decrease a t„ oontend with, and thai is the grim
horses ability lor work as well asLpectre disease, and when ts presence
Ins cash value.   It is most important1 app,arl in si) malignant and h:deou.
in'nrv       liiirci.       nii'n.ir . .1 *■
DR. CHASE'S
KIDNEY-LIVER PILLS
No medical treatment oan possibly
purify the blood except us it sets in
healthy working order the kidneys,
liver and bowels,
To these organs
assigned    the
* therefore, that
duty ul filterfiig from the blood tiie. *1,",u.11' 1,l,v,".     ., ,   ,
the horse, his niliueuts and dist.>asos,
For this reason Dr. Chase's Kidney1, "'" '" "» *s»»Ji»« anu nest_ways, „|n,„.n wilhi„ ,.gh, „[ Quebec-only
Liver Fills aro the most satisfactory  "' f\, P°"™ °» ' "s„l"u,'!,'r   .ls   to forty miles away   and to be held at
treatment you  can  possibly    obtain; "''"*;'"' mua book,   A  I realise on I ior days, posai-ly weuka—is cruel luck
to purify the blood. - }}>«    i»''«»l'   •' \*   Diseasesi,'    pub- ,he «»,., ty  „|  which   is  accentuate I
'•  prompt,  definite! Vs1"'1' *V   l'".,"''-.,11- ■'• ,K""Jnl! Co.. when  it Is   rem
livur   action   Is f»»s„b»'« ** »! V«nw* ,_ The in- throUKh „„ ,„„,,
every   horse   owner I ," j,,,,,, „, ,h   dreaded I  .allpox,  h<
good knowledge ol „,,d ,„,. C0mpany whose ilag the ship
poisonous waste matter which is left; ""•', "?r,e' nis aliments and diseases,   ,.,„„!'.,   •■      ■-■■ m,i  nt d..-,, »,„|
over when   tlie   nutritious   elements and tho remedies to be applied,   He [noere sympathy.
are extracted Irom the food you eat.: s|lu)"1'  k""w  J"st  l,"\v .'"  Ir''"1  «" There are no weapons luhioned to
ill they nre not overcrowded or slow "ralnary ailments, arid just when it gght this insidious loe, tiro* and Isola.
and sluggish   in   action   they keep il„1ec,8!Sy   .   ,     in   ""-'   greater t:0n only can tell to what extent Its
the blood pure and healthy.             '   ski 1 of the veterinary. romlfloations have extended.    Tube
For this renson Dr. Chase's Kidney1, 0ni; of He quiokest and best ways, almi)8t wilhi„ ,.gh, „[ Quebec-only
:    njti-       ,».- ,        ... "Ito   apt.   Itoste.1   nn   11,,.   imitl...     ij     tr, I   . ., ....,.'
up
k
,,   ,   ,.     -    rity ol which is accentuated
Their  efforts   are   prompt,   definite S8lle? tiy Ww„Ut\,a- J' .KenclS1 C?"   when  it is   rem inhered   that   it   .
and certain.      The liver   action   isi ''nosl,"r« **} 8{ Vermont.      lho in-   through no laull ol Captain Meudus
! quickened, the kidneys are   invigor-' ,ormu'!on  wl'lch " e,v':!,  '*•  simple,   or a„y  relaxation  ot tin company'*
ated.  tho   regular  movement  of the a0™™».  «**1  easy  to flnd-tt  valu-, stri„gent  hygienic   rules   ol   health
| bowels is assured.   It is only a mat- "'''  ' '' "' ""' ' '
! tcr of a few hours until you begin
. to feci the benefits of this great modi-
i cine.   Further   use,   as   often   as is
necessary to keep these orgnns nc-
i live, will cleanse and purify tlie
! blood and enable tlie digestive sys-
i tem to properly do its work.
I Backache, headache, and bodily
1 pains will disappear, and the fatigue
which is an accompaniment of poi-
! sons in the system will give way to
I new vigor and energy.     One   pill a
$10
dose, 25 cents a box, nt all dealers,
or Kdmnnson, Bates & Co., Limited,
Toronto.
The world's output of coal for 1909
was estimated ut 1,110,000,000 tons of
2,204.6 pounds each. This was an
increase of eight million tons over
1908.
ablo point in a book of reference.       j thal tl,c ,eri(m, ,nd ,rks,)n„, detention
iJih,,^ ,„C'''.'-      5l,"''frtTrf.C''nrgCi has    been   c»U«ed,   detention,   which
by simply writing the publishers or   howeVpr, |, vi,„|lv  M(.eessary for the
»L?«    rf„„d°I„ ' "l """  dr^  Si°'-'i\ safeguarding of Canada's health from
nn  w ni, 7, '," ^ure ..'a   «n epidemic ol this dread scourge.
sold by almost every druggist in the	
country.
  ) An Editor's Irony.
A MOTHER'S PRAISE OF |     Time nnd time again editors hav,
BABY'S OWN TABLETS' 'aken n fling at the people who seem
  j to think lhat filling an editorial chait
Mrs. Allen Mason, Carleton, N.B., Is u mighty simple, on<y mntter.
writes: "I have used Baby's Own Probably the be«l hit of irony on ths
Tablets ever since I have luul child-! matter is the following by Boh Low-
ren und that is going on fifteen years.! cry. one of the be-lknown newspaper
1 have always found them entirely men in Western Cannda:
satisfactory for all tlie ailments of "Kvery once In a while «ome cheer,
little ones nntl feel thut I cannot j ful individual remarks to us, 'Weli,
praise them too highly," Mrs. now that the paper 's out. I supposr
Mason's praise is just thut of thou-> you cun take ii easy for three or font
sands of mothers who consider Baby's: days.' Ve.-, how delightful it is thai
Own Tablets the only safe and sure; a country editor has nothing to do
remedy to keep in the house for their; between press davs. Business runj
little ones. The Tablets ure sold by: along automatically, When papoi
medicine dealers or by muil at 25 bills come due money drops off the
cents a box from The Dr. Williams' trees with which to pay them. Sub-
Medicine Co., Brockville, Out.
SUITS
OVERCOATS
TO ORDER
Sett tu Fra Sar-fl«i ul lam
hnu.
138 BAY STREET   TORONTO
AGENTS  WANTED
I A study of other agency propositions
convinces us that' none can equal
! ours. You will always regret it if
I you don't apply foi ' particulars to
, Travellers' Department, '."ii Albert
| St., Ottawa, Ont,
\— —
KIT MD HEALTH TO MOTHER WD Will.
i      HkR.WiMtt.oWi BixwHirto tvitip ta«R **n
utd for ovei SIXTY YRARBbv MTXUOMt «
Corns cripple the feet and make walk-
inB a torture, yet mire relief in the shape
of 5f.       y" i8 wltWu rt,uch ?''"*? .tl l,ox frum 'rh,! 'Dr- VVilliums'
Toronto Type Foundry Co., Ltd.
CALGARY WINNIPEG
REGINA
The Largest Printers' Supply Home in Canada
We Carry in StocK Cylinder Presses, Job Presses,
Paper Cutters, Type and Material. Can Fill
Orders for Complete Equipment from our Stock.
We are the Largest Ready Print Publishers in
the West. We Publish Ready Prints from our
Winnipeg, Calgary and Regina Houses.
Order From  Nearest Branch
THIS WILL INTEREST YOU
EDDY'S "Royal George' Matches
the most perfect " Strike Anywhbr* "
matches made, that are Sakr,
Surr,
and Silent,
are sold in boxes, averaging 1000 matches to the box,
for 10 cents a box.
You can't afford to pass this by.
ALWAYS EVERYWHERE IN CANADA, ASK FOR
EDDY'S MATCHES
Factory
•nd OHIca.
HAMILTON,
ONT.
The best equipped factory for producing Counter Check Books
in Canada.
Capacity
50,000 Check Book*
= per Day.
We are supplying the Largest users of Counter Check
Books in Canada with our
, "IMPERIAL BOOKS."
APPLEFORD COUNTER
CHECK BOOK
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Wt wtnl
Alb.rtl
Appleford
Counter
Check
Book
Company,
Limited.
(Not In th« Truit.)
I publhhari" te let » tur •ganti In ail ManlUba, Saik.'chawan,
and Britlah Colurob'i town. Writ, u. Ur eandltlan. and prlca.
Queen Mary'i Dally Life.
Aecnrding to a letter published in
The Yorkshire Post, and written by a
lady holding a hi?h position at court,
the Queen at 0.30 a.m., begins th«'
day's work by going through her large
correspondence (which she has previously opened) witli two secretaries.
Then come interviews with the governess, nurse, housekeeper, and the
heads ol departments in the palace.
Then appointments with turniture
makers and various trades-people till
1.30. In the alternoon Her Majesty
visits an hospital or some charitable
institution, or a picture gallery, or
visits some other interesting places
in or near London, such as the City
churches, the halls of the various
City companies,, etc. Alter tea the
(Juivn again summons her secretaries
lor more correspondence, and gives
one or two interviews. After dinner
she reads till 10.30, and then retires
to rest. Iu the country, expeditions
to historical or other interesting places
in the neighborhood with some of tin
children ure arranged, or some local
charities or institutions are visited.
T
"Will you never give up smoking,
dear Adolphus?"
"No," replied the depraved smoker
nnd punster; "I shall smoke just us
long as I chews."
RY MURINE EYE REiEOV
tm Iti Weak, W«arjr,Wat«7l-.«.ri f
GRANULATED EYELIDS I
MurlneDoean'tSmart-SootheiEyeraln
Murta. Era Sal... ta Am.U. Tajkn. Ma, 1140
■YE BOOKS AND ADVICE FREE BY MAIL
Murine EyeRom«dyCo^CrUc«Bo
WE8TERN  FARMERS
PROFITS IN TEN YEARS
He Payi Only $35 per Year in Duties
on   Implements—What   640
Acres Can Do.
A farmer writing to a Toronto daily
Prison Visitor—To what, do you attribute your downfall, my |>oor man?
Convict—To procrastination.
Prison Visitor—Ah, yes; procrastination is thc thief of time.
Convict—Precisely.   1 stole n watch.
scribers vie with each other to se*
who can pay the farthest in advance.
Advertisers beg for additional space.
And the wav the news hunts up the
editor is also pleasant to contemplate.
"There is sowthinfr. strange annul
the way tbe news items aet.    When
the paper   is out   the editor   simply
Keep Minard's Liniment In the houst I goes lo his d,-k and  lean*  hack  iu
  j his easy chair   and  looks wise   and
If the hotlom cellar step he painted J waits lor next reek's press day. Th-
white it will save many a fall in the day before press day the people lint
dark. „n j„ front of   the office   door   and
 | then they tile past the desk and tell
It Haa Many Qualities.-^The man who; him all the news of the week He
lionesses a bottle ot Ur. Thomas' Eolefr . ,12 .       .       •
trio Oil is armed against many llll    tl ! "'""'s I* UP '" H"°en or ,tt'""'.v """■
ute., takes it back and hangs it on ll
hook The comi>o*itor* take the copy
and shake it over the type eases, say
a few mystic word-, the type Ilie-
into place, and after ll few passes by
the foreman the forms are ready lor
the press again. And the editor goes
down and deposit* some more money
in the bank. It is the greatest snap
in 'he catalogue. Now, il the editoi
could only  do away  with  press day
will cure a cough, break a eold, prevent
sore throat; It will reduce the swelliiiir
from a sprain, cure the most persistent
H«ires and wll! speedily heal cuts and
contusions. It Is a medicine chest In
itself, aad can he But for a quarter of a
dollar,
Prof. Frucd says dreams are lialf-
_ ...,tj   naked  wishes.    Sort of  Dudless De-
paper from Indian Head, Saskutcho-! loslons, as it were,
wan, under thc nom de plume, Sas-1    Mark Twain sniil:
katchewan Farmer, refutes the state-     "A beautiful sunset made Beranger
merit made by many Westerners, thut!" Poet; a mother's kiss made Ilenjn-j ,lls )ob would be complete,
the formers of the   West   have been I n|i" West an artist, and fifteen dol-1
ill-used by the Dominion Government''ara a "oeli makes us a journalist." Slightly Mixed,
which is identified largely with Kast-j   .'. prominent Toronto firm has  re-
em interests.  This Saskatchewan far-1   Trinidad expects to hnve a million ceived  the following   communication
Dangerous to Use "Esquire."
The recovery ol a letter which had
been sent to a little town iu Germany
and never delivered to the person
addressed cured the writer of tit11
custom of adding "Ksquire"to a name
on the superscription of mail matter.
The letter in question would probably
have been promptly delivered bad
tho address read simply, "Mr. John
Brown." But the sender had addressed it, "John Brown, Esquire,"
and the communication rested comfortably in the "E" compartment ol
the [>ost icshinte department, waiting to be culled !tr by "Mr. Ksqulre."
One of the popular guide books warns
agaiu.-t the use cl "Ksq.," saying
that it might ba mi-talcm for a name.
Whole Wheat Bread.
I.ondon doctors interested in the
nutritive value ol foodstuffs have issued a document in which they recommend the use of whole meal in making bread instead of fine white flour.
It is maintained that there are in ths
whole meat two and one-half times
the amount of mineral substances that
nourish the body.
Cannot Expert Feathers.
Plumage, skins or eggs of native
birds cf Australia and New Guinea
uin no longer be exported, this having
oeen prohibited by the Australian
Commonwculth Coverninent.
Switzerland hns lour "official" languages, German being lirst with
2,51)9,149 persons speaking it, French
next with 790,220, Italian 301,323, and
Homauisli 39,912.
"What a cunning Chiffonier I"
"Yes," said the flat-dweller, "isn't
It?    Thut   wos  our   reception   room
and we hud a set of drawers made to
lit it."
According to the Melbourne customs
officials, an enormous trade in bogus
curios and idols made In Germany
flourishes in Australia.
mer gives a typical instance of the  rubber trees In a lew yeurs.
expenditure and  revenue    connected
with a section   of   land,   640   acres,
from the year 1900 to 1910.   He soys:
"I will give you nn idea of what
u section of land, 040 acres, will earn
and how it will increase in value in
the most favored wheat producing!
districts of Saskatchewan under nor-1
mai conditions, from 1900 to 1910, allowing the average price of land to
be $10 per acre for that period. In
so doing it should be borne in mind
thnt 30 per cent, of the land in this
province waa Free Grant.
Capital Expenditure
1900.
Lend, 640 acres at $10 per
acre    $0,400.00
Cultivation, 440 acres at $6
2,640.00
2,000.001
per acre
Dwelling house	
Stable for 12 horses, granary
and implement shed ,. ,.
1910.
12 horses and harness,,   ..
Implements, Duty
3 seed drills $33.00
3 plows    30.50
2 disc harrows  ..   ..   10.00
2 six-section harrows      6.511
3 7-ft. binders   ..   ..   53.00
4 wagons, complete..   72.00
One-sixth  interest in
thresher 125.00
Extras, say    20.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
330.00
210.00
80.00
60.110
465.00
300.00
60A.OOO
4M.n0
l3fio.no $18,000.00
Crop for 10 years from 400
acres at 25 bush,  to the
acre, at 76 cents $76,000.00
Working    expenses
for  ten  years  at
$5  per   acre   .. $32,000.00
Interest on capital
for  ten   years  at
6 per cent    10.800.00
    42,800.00
Itching, burning, bleeding,
scaly and crusted eczemas,
tetters, rashes and other
torturing and disfiguring
Surplus (not taking into account increase in value ol
luml. which mny be figured at $i8,coo)  32,200,00  humors that destroy sleep
-now 12 righ'ttrlt an J and make life a nightmare
farmer work.nR it Hootion ot land un-    of  physical  and men till
fli*r tlii"*.*- condition* wouM    nny   in        n,    . ,.,      » .. .
duty on tin. implement* required to Buffering speedily yield to
earn this largo profit, iissuminn thc j
average liiV of baitio to bo ton years,
comes out nt approximately $.'(5 per
annum. Thin is no exaggerated state-
mont. of profits and increase in value
of land, a» thousands of farmers iu
Saslcalclicwan can tOBtlfy, and hundreds who havo specially applied!
themselves and taken advantage of
the opportunities at hand, have realised far greater profits than ore here
shown. How, then, can the farmers
of tho West cluim that they hove
heen ill-used, or not given a fair
denlT \
(uticureL
Soap aad Ointment
No othff r*-tttf*1ii*n fnr nkln and m-ilp m
fr"***dr "•■•'• •"''iiiKJt'.lral. A Uncle rake ol Ciitl-
fiir-i Hokp nnd box of ttiticuru Ointmrnt at*
Ditrn mifflrlrnt. Hold tl.ruiistmut tbe world
H-nd to Totter Drue k fbfm Corp., ItoHoo,
V H.A, tor an-pute book, an tutborltpoa tmt-
nf nl ot ikln and Ktlp A'ataata.
from a French firm, which is evidently Jt'alinj/ in t-tamps:
*'A great mnny people have postage
stamps who deep in their archives;
in old corre?pondenoP8 or, huve the
easiness to obtain stump*! in theii
relations.
'The MAISON M— solicit oflen
frcjm every person who huve stamps
in their possession, because it is the
Firm who payed the highest the lots,
collections nnd tjrehiveB.
"STAMPS by 100, 1,000. 10,000 ot
more, und ALL TIME CASH.
"When doing offer, please, give
camples and deals. Berlotis correspondents (for addressing Mumps of
flie news i.*-sueg us fust jif their ap*
parition) are wanted from ull countries.
"The MAISON M  apply oneVIf
cf Commission an Exportation, and
put herself on the disposition of her
correspondents for get to them every
goods they COULD WANT ON THE
PLACE OF PARIS." - Canadian
Courier.
Hii WiMLoni Rou-rHir'a tvii'r bM ****%
■■d tor ovei SIXTY VRAHBby MtLUOMIal
I MOTHKKS for tbeir CHILDREN WUIUI
nHTHlNO, with PBftPBCT BLCCB&* 11
IOOTH1I tho CHILD, BOPTANt tbl GO Ml
ALLAYS all rail*. CUKIt WIND COLIC, ed
li tbt bopt remaar tor DURRHOU.   It fa t»
«ittlr kirrattM,   Be lure tad tak far **%%*%
muw i tootfaiBK a-m*" iid uki m «S3
WM.  Twcatrlntaaut battle.
Generous
0 rand pa-—Johnny, I have discovered that yon huve taken more maple
' sugar than I gave you.
| Johnny—Yes, gracious, I've been
I making believe there was another lit-
j tie buy .spending the day with riuv-
I Harper'a Bazaar.
You Ought ,,
To Know
tbnt impure blond with its weak*
ening results, unpleasant breath,
bcailaelns, uurrsHtil nights, poor
appetite, sallow skin, pimples and
depression,comes from constipation
BEEGHAM'S
PILLS
have licen doing good to mtn and
women for many, many yenr« and
their value 1ms been tested and
proved. They remove the enme of
physical troubles. A few small
doses will show tliclr safe tunic -
action on you. Beeeham's Pilli
will surely help you to an active
liver, a good stomach, a sweet
breath, clear head and refreshing sleep.   In young or old tbey will
Relieve
Constipation
Said Everywhere,
In bate. IRa.
Tht Thret Rivals.
March building statistic! (or Winnipeg show n decrease in total*; ot a
million und a half dullur*i compared
witli the suuie month last yeur, say*
The Winnipeg Telegram. Vancouver,
on the other hand, reported an in-
erease of more than a million dollar*.
lor the same |»'nnd. The nun-taxing
] of improvements in the linti-!i Columbia eity is responsible lor this magni*
llceut result. No other e;iu.-e could
have enubled Vancouver to outstrip
Winnipeg. Even ut that the Manitoba
j eity bus done exceedingly well. But
! Calgary—well, her increa.se during the
| month ol March la.it wa- greater tban
thc total rctjorted Ior tin- same month
lart yeur. An increase ol nearly fOOO,
OUO is a handsome exhibit Ior the city
which a lew years ago was a cow tu*u
at tin* fiN't of the Canadian hi I Id.
WATCH AND CDCE
BRACELET rRaCC
Girts, we will give you this hand
40tne gold-plate Extension Bracelet
absolutely FREE, for selling ool*
$4.00 worth of our lovely cardt M
* lor 10c.
A Matlsr al Tasts.
When it comes to tan shoes with s
frock   coat   we   prefer  rugtiUMi  uu   s
pipe organ.
In London 20.000 prrsonH are living
moro thun mx to a room.
Bteol dies now are engraved hy electricity.
"And are you Htill rejoicing in tbat
Bplcndtd cook, Mrs. Malaprcip'*'" in-
quired the caller.
"Well, we are and W0 ain't," aaid
Mrs, Malaprop. "Tbe foot in, Mary
wna so completely procrastinated by
the work of my household thut I've
given ber a three weeks' vacation. 1
wn.-i afraid if I didn't a)ie would he
Invalidated tcrmaganlly?'— Harper'u
Weekly.
Boys, we will glv« you this handsorns
engraved nickel watch, new design.
Just out, open face, stem wind him
set, carefully adjustod movemeni,
lullv guaranteed, for selling only
14.00 worth of our lovely cards at
8 for 10c.
ORDER TODAY; be first In your
vicinity.
FREE- Our beautifully Illustrated
catalogue sent postpaid with every
order. Our cards sell on sight, te
Ihey are the latest designs jn Cana*
dian views, floral and birthday cauls,
all are beautifully 'colored and many
are richly embossed on gold.
TORONTO  PREMIUM  CO.,
Dept. N. Toronto. Oan
VV. N. U., No. IU. THK PROSPECTOR, CRANRROOK, BRITISH COLUMBIA
NAME OF PERSON  ASSESSED.
Sale of Lands  for  unpaid  Delinquent Taxes in the  Fort   Steele!!;;";;;;
Assessment District, Province of British Columbia.
wn
now 11
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
I hereby give notice that on Thursday, the   16th day of November,   A.D..   19U, Ht tbe hour of ten o'clock in the forenoon, »t the OoUrt-hoUeo Unknown
Cranbrook, B.C., I shall ofter tor sale at public auction thu lands in the   list  hereinafter Bet out, ot the persona in the said Hat hereinafter aet out, Unknown
tor delinquent taxeti unpaid by the said persona on the   31st December.  A.1...   1310. and for interest, costn, and   expensea.   including  the cost of ad-.Unknown
Vertteing oa'd sale,  if not sooner paid.
THK LIST ABOVE MENTIONED
DELINQUENT TAXEB
NAME (IF PERSON ASSESSED
SHORT DESCRIPTION OK
PROPERTY
ti  v *
ill
G 2: -r
ia Z
« $
m a
., v
x A
0 H
Kalispel! Furniture Oo
port  steels
Lot Number
it 	
TOWNSITE
RBUI8TBRBD   PLAN    No.    124.
lllock Number
1,   Fort   Steele  	
WESTPORT    TOWNSITE,
Lot Number
('hum,  Jack
Smith,  MIM P.
Woo, Charlie	
Wine,  Adam. Kelly. J.
Be war, Robert 	
Guenlcy. Al., estate ol .
RBOIST     BRBO   I'l.AN   NO.   cos.
Hluck Number
    2 being sutt ihvisiuu Uot   -'Jo.
Qroup   1.   Westport,.
    '.I being sub-division Lot   396,
Qroup   l.   Weatport..
     9   being   subdivision   l.ot     296,
Qroup   l.   Weatport..
    1 being sub-division Lot   42*.
Ue,up   I,   Weatporl
    1   being sub-divlslon Lot   42s.
Oroup   t    Westport
    3 being sun-division Lot   42s.
Oroup   1
B.,
Pinch, C.
TUsen, F	
Simpson, F. E
Chinettc
Jones, F. A	
Hutchison, John
MARY8VILLB    T0WN8ITE
l.ot Number
111,    11,    12  	
Weatport.
NO.     733.
A. P. ..
Belangee. Grant
21
10
1  ..
1  .
Doweer, Mrs. B	
Fort Steele Development Syndicate,
Gates, John 1.	
Pollard, H	
Wade, Miss Marcta 	
Gayette, Alexander 	
Carroll. James M	
Fort Steele Development Syndicate,
Reddy, J. P	
Schmidt,  Joseph  ....
Fort Steele Development  Syndicate,
KIMBERLEY
Lot Number
19   	
20 to   23 ...
19 t
to 22
4   24
30.   35.    36.    3
Ltd.
Ltd.
Ltd,
Ltd.
Ltd,
Ltd.
Ltd.
Pinch, C, E.,  Jones,  P.  A.  ...
Port Steele Development  Syndicate,
Reddy, J. F	
Fort Steele Development Syndicate,
Reddy, J. P	
Port Steele Development Syndicate,
Port Steele  Development S>ndicnte,
Reddy, J. F	
Howard, Mrs.  II	
Finch, ('. E., Jones, F. A	
Fort Steele Development   Syndicate,
Wbitmore, W. A	
Carroll, James M	
Fort Steele Development Syndicate
Gregg ft McMillan	
Doyle, J. H	
Marsh,  Richard  	
Redmond, Patrick	
Fort Steele Development. Syndicate,   Ltd.
Fort Steele Developmenl Syndicate,  Ltd.
Reddy, J. P	
Porl Steele Developmenl, Syndicate,   Ltd.
Reddy,  J.  F	
MeNallght, T. T..  estnte of 	
Fort Steelo Developmenl   Syndicate,   Ltd.
Leonard, Miss M..  estate of 	
Sullivan, Miss D	
Port Steele Developmenl Syndicate,  Ltd.
Reddy, .1. !•'	
Fort Steele Development Syndicate,
Reddy,  J.  P	
Fort Steole Development  Syndicate,
Beale, M. A	
Fort Steelo Developmenl  Syndicate,
Reddy, J. F	
Fort Steele Development Syndicate,  Ltd.
3 A
15,
14
16
1 ft
13,
1    l
ll
13
l>,
4
IC, IS,
ft 17 ...
to   19,   :
15   to
14,    11,   to    20
13   to    It.    IS
2 lo 7, S, III to lli, 111 to   23..
24   	
25   	
. STERED    PLAN
Block Number
1    Marysville       "43,00
5    Marysville            1.50
13  MarySVtllfl ...    1.21'
16  Marysville .         3.00
i: Marysville       1.80
IGISTBRBD    PLAN    NO.    668
Block Number
I    Kimberley    30
1 Kimberley       3.20
2 Kimberley        4.00
2    Ktniberley        2.90
2   Kimberley       1.20
2    Kimberley      a.00
2 Kimberley    59.6U
Kimberley      14.50
3 Kimberley       5.75
4 Kimberley       1.50
J-    I
4 Kimberley    14.19
5 Kimberley   20.CO
5    Kimberley       4.00
5    Kimberley       5.SO
ti    Kimberley     4.60
7   Kimberley  :    4.so
7   Kimberley     5.50
S    Kimberley      9.49
s    Kimberley     5.05
S   Kimberley      4.50
S    Kimberley   13.2(1
10 Kimberley     6.43
111 Kimberley   11.60
10 Kimberley       9.10
11 Kimberley     14.0-1
II   Kimberley    12.20
  11 Kimberley   7.00
26   ft   27   11 Kimberley   60
7    12 Kimberley   2.90
s  to   10,   16   to   19   12 Kimberley   5.90
6   io   in,   is   13 Kimberley   4.64
ll   to   17   13 Kimberley   9.45
II,  «  to 10. 13 to 16, 17 to 20 .. 14 Kimberley    8.69
7     14 Kimberley    1.75
II   ,«   12   14 Kimberley   1.50
6   to   14,    lli   15 Kimberley    6.19
17     15 Kimberley    1.05
111   &
6   to
Ltd.
Ltd.
Ltd.
20   15 Kimberley   2.50
III   18 Kimberley   8.95
  IS Kimberley   1.75
2i:   19 Kimberley   9.80
7   20 Kimberley   2.90
16   20 Kimberley   5.25
20   20 Kimberley   4.50
9,    11   to   17   20 Kimberley   8.95
IS   lo   20   22 Kimberley   5.10
9   23 Kimberley   5.55
MUIb, Mrs.  Anna 	
Kinsey, R. E., estate ol .....
Calder, 11	
Fitch, J.  W	
Fraser,  John 	
Clark, A. T	
Pollard,  H	
Ferguson.  James 	
Ryan,  John 	
Myers, Qeorge	
McNaught, T. T,. estate of
Jewell, Wm	
Pringle. Fred.  S	
Ito, Jennie 	
McDonald, Archibald 	
Peddle. Donald 	
FiVUee, Mrs.  A,  M	
Barber,  A	
MOYIE    TOWNSITB,
Lot Number
1    ft   2  	
3   	
12   	
7    ft    S 	
1   	
13	
15 jS    16  	
4   	
12   	
13   	
16 &    17 	
5   	
1 A    2  	
5   	
12   	
4   	
2   	
4   	
REGISTERED   PLAN    NO.    C47.
Block Number
    1   Moyie     7.20
    2 Moyie     3.00
    2 Moyie     8.00
    3 Moyie   25.10
Moyie
Moyie
Moyie
Moyie
Moyie
Moyie
Moyie
Moyic
Moyie
MOYIK,    GOVERNMENT
Lot Number
Oonaer, Stein 	
Cameron. W	
Hartlgnn,  Patrick
Reid, George 	
Gill, M.  J	
Pollard,  H	
Richardson,   A	
.90
.60
10.00
1.80
3.00
5.00
7.50
3.00
1.20
:)  Movie      3.60
'i Mnyle   32.09
1"    Moyie  ....      3.00
11 Moyie   45
12 Moyie   45
N     REGISTERED   PLAN   NO. 617A
Block Number
1 Oovernmeil   Addition   Moyle
2 Government Addition Moyie
2 i iovcrnment Addition  Moyie
Government Addition Moyle
14       2 'Iovcrnment  Addition  Moyle
3.00
4.80
3.9C
.75
3.00
4    .*
:-: Qovernment Addition Moyle 88,10
6     3 Qovernment Addition Moyie
MOYIK.    LAKE    SHORE
Lot Number
ADDITION,    REQI8TERBD    PLAN    No.
Taylor ft Bonner 	
Bonner, Mike 	
Orchard. MrH. Annie
Mackay, Charles A. .
Jensen, Paul 	
Day, John 	
Dlmock, H. H	
Unknown  	
Potter.  Samuel  	
Weaver. Fred	
Perrler,  Arthur 	
Morris. Patrick 	
4   .
9  .
Bi
1   .
I
Block Nl
3 Lake
3 Lake
3 Lake
I Lake
I Lake
5 Lake
.1 Lake
1 Lake
I   Lake
Shoro Addition, Moyie 9.110
Shore Addition Moyle     .90
Shore Addition Moyle   2.10
Shore Addition Moyie 13.80
Shore Addition Moyie 11.60
Shore Addition Moyie   5.40
Shore Addition Moyle   3.60
Shore Addition Moyie   1.20
flhore Addition Moyle    4.20
Lake Shor
Lake Hhor
Lake sh.,'
Addition Moyi,.
Addition Moyle
Addition  Moyle
4.80
1.50
3.15
3.15
1.60
1.20
3.15
31.50
16.60
3.15
1.60
14.15
15.40
4.60
3.20
5.55
2.40
7.90
2.40
7.90
9.46
6.35
6.30
5.75
11.85
6.30
5.50
.60
1.60
5.50
4.75
5.50
7.90
.80
1.50
7.90
.80
1.60
11.05
.80
11.80
1.60
7.10
3.15
8.65
4.05
5.50
2.40
4.76
1.80
.90
.60
1.86
2.86
4.58
7.14
3.00
1.20
4.13
29.00
3.011
.46
.45
3.00
2.40
.75
3.00
3.63
.90
2.40
3.00
2.42
7.26
3.60
1.29
2.10
1.80
2.12
12 30
.31
.23
.81
15
.02
1.52
1.56
1.01
.41
1.96
24.19
7.IS
2.31
.61
6.5S
10.93
1.88
2.39
2.20
1.81
2.49
4.29
2.C8
2.33
5.02
2.98
4.69
5.30
6.62
4.71
2.69
.05
1.12
2.67
2.20
3.77
3.83
.61
.57
3.11
.33
.98
*.*t
.61
4.79
1.14
3.73
1.78
4*14
2.20
2.73
1.05
.97
.19
3.60
.09
.06
2.54
.1.8
.75
1.81
2.22
.30
.12
.64
11.78
.30
.115
.05
.3(1
.38
.44
.08
.30
11.48
2.06
.45
.09
.24
2.46
2.12
2.06
.36
.26
.41
.26
.36
.47
2.00
2.00
2.06
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.1,0
2.00
2.00
2. CO
2.06
2.00
2.06
2.00
2.06
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
a.oo
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.01)
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.60
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.60
2,00
2.00
2.00
2,00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.110
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.60
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.66
2.00
2.00
2,00
2.00
2.00
2.00
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Dons. T. J,
»     60       *     59       S     19       S2.O0       S 3.SS
94.15
III
1.88
1.46
3.95
2.32
9.S7
10.71
7.51
1.81
12.11
117.29
40.28
13.21
5.71
36.92
48.33
12.48
13.39
14.35
11.01
15.63
23.68
11.53
16.73
29.67
17.76
24.59
22.16
34.51
25.21
17.19
3.25
7.62
16.07
13.59
20.72
22.42
5.16
6.57
19.20
4.18
7.08
26.42
6.16
28.39
7.64
18.08
11.43
23.74
13.35
15.78
12.65
10.73
12.29
30.70
3.89
3.26
14.54
5.78
8.61
13.39
19.16
8.30
4.52
10.87
74.78
H.r.l)
2 95
2.95
8.10
7.18
8.74
3.58
8.30
51.58
13.04
11.45
3. S3
7.01
21.26
18.12
16.71
9.56
4.75
8.74
0,111
7.16
6.09
SHORT DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY
MOYELLE    TOWNSITB,     REGISTERED    PLAN    NO.    684
Lot Number Block Number
8    3     Moyelle  (
9    :i Moyelle 	
10    3  Moyelle 	
1     6  Moyelle 	
1     14    Moyelle  	
3    14    Moyelle 	
4     14    Moyelle 	
5  14    Moyelle  	
6    14    Moyelle 	
1     16    Moyelle 	
2    15    Moyelle 	
3  15    Moyelle 	
9    15    Moyelle 	
10     15    Moyelle  	
DELINQUENT  TAXES
is
3 s
M
Z
X
M
M Q 't.
B M ***
**              H_
S S °
-•* 1
-J **
*i «■
11
0 63
1.06
'    .16
12.00
1.05
.16
2.00
1.05
.16
2.00
1.05
.16
2.00
1.05
.16
2.00
1.06
.16
2.00
1.05
.16
2.00
1.06
.16
2.00
1.05
.16
2.00
1.05
.16
a.QO
1.05
.16
2.00
1.05
.16
2.00
.80
.13
2.00
.80
.13
2.00
Rutherford >n Hargreave
IVmpste,   K	
Wullsohn.   Johatia  	
(Jorum ,1  Kelly 	
Blodell, J   ll	
ilorum A   Kelly  	
Pslinere.  1'has    	
Stephens,  Miss Mabel
Wullsobn,  .lolinnii
QorUIU A!   Kelly 	
Jennings * Mills 	
Sanburn, Mrs,  t. li	
Jennings   ,n   Mills	
Wullsohn, Johann 	
Simpson x-  Brown 	
Pltaslmmona ,*i Turner
Slmpsou A  K.ckstiom ...
Unknown 	
Dmiock,  11.  11	
Branlsh, Hans 	
Hlgbye, Mis. Ada  	
Schmidt,   Joseph  	
Wulfsohu,   Johann  	
Wilson, Irvine, 11	
Hughes, Richard 	
'Peterson.  Louis 	
IGortim * Kelly 	
Jennings A Mills 	
iltice, John T	
Wolfsohn,  Johann 	
Blodell, J. H	
McLennan,  Christine 	
Curtis. G. T	
Schmidt.  Joseph 	
Doak.  W.  E	
iHlndle, J. A	
|Berg, L. J. D	
|Doak, W. E	
JLeete,  Wm. M	
iBlodell,  J. H	
Speaker, Fred	
Rlckworth, P. H	
WARDNER    TOWNS1TI
Lot Number
6   	
17
8
13
20
13
1
I
10
23
,4    11
   lllock   149 outside Corporate Limits
Oranbrook  14.40
REGISTERED   PLAN   NO.   639
lllock Number
    »    Wardner    4.80
    16 Wardner  60
    9    Wardner    2.50
    11 Wardner   2.90
    11  Wardnor   2.90
    12  Wardner    2.90
    20 Wardner   1.20
    23 Wardner   2.90
    24 Wardnor   6.00
    24  Wardner    2.90
 .'...   25  Wardner   1.20
 60
  1.20
  2.50
19.   20   ft   21 	
1    26 Wardner
7   *   8   20 Wnrdner
10     26 Wardner
I,   2, Part ul   3   27 Wardnor     6.80
11     27 Wardner  '.....    3.70
17    27 Wardner   11.60
20    27 Wardner      4.80
21     27 Wardner   13.60
24     27 Wardner   10.50
2    28 Wardner     3.35
1     29 Wardner      1.60
2     29 Wardnor     2.00
6     29 Wardner  90
21   ft   22   29 Wardner     3.80
3   30 Wardnor     1.66
14    30 Wardner     2.70
16,
20  ..
1    ft
12 ..
13
14
15
17
17,    18
ft    14
  30  Wardner     1.20
  30 Wardner     2.90
  31  Wardner      5.00
  31 Wardner     2.90
  31  Wardner  •    5.80
  32 Wardner  30
  32  Wardner      1.60
  32 Wardner     2.00
19   32 Wardnor  30
16   33 Wnrdner  60
23   33 Wardnor     1.80
1   4   2   41 Wardnor     4.55
19   48 Wardner     2.60
15 St 8J   16   47 Wardnor     1.20
5      23  Wardner     3.00
ELKO    TOWNSITB,    REGISTERED    PLAN    NO.    666
Block Number
McKee,  John 	
Hutchison, Wm	
Jones. H	
Perry, J. L	
VcArthur ft Oo'y D.
Barton, H. A	
Mlchlzo 	
James 	
Miss PIo ...
Shlnoni,
Kagawa,
Moulton,
Lot Number
9   ft  10 	
19   ft    20 	
1     	
5    	
9   ft   10 	
9   ft   10 	
6          16  Elko  	
6         19  Elko  	
7         19  Elko  	
MORRISSEY    TOWNSITB,     REGISTERED    PLAN    NO.    736
Elko
Elko
Elko
Blko
Elko
2.40
1.35
1.50
1.20
4.00
13  Elko       2.95
2.50
.90
Gediles,  A.   P	
Drake, G	
Kanouse, H. A	
Johnston. Andrew, et al
Paquln, Agnes 	
Leask, Geo. R	
Itter ft Askew 	
Hyde,  R.  C	
Miller,  Anna 	
Sliger, Miss Clara 	
Rogers, R. W	
McCabe, Frank 	
Carruthers, J. T	
Patmore, J. C	
Greer,  Jas	
Hyde,  R.   0	
Hyde, It.  C	
Bannett.  B	
Higbye,   Mrs.  Ada 	
Walter, Eugune 	
Plant, John 	
Moultan, Miss Flo 	
Bevlngton, Miss Cora 	
Stewart, W. M	
Lot Number
3   ft   4 	
18
4
7
8
17
18
1
1
ft    19
4 ...
6 ...
10   ft
11 ...
1 ...
3 ft
7 ...
9 ...
17 ...
19 ...
Unknown  	
Chong Wing 	
Maudsley, M	
Lofebre, Sef	
Choy, Joseph 	
ItohinB ft Ilrolcy 	
I'llthbert, W. F., estate ol .
anong, W. B	
JeiiBen, Puul 	
Chong Wing 	
'asky,  J	
Icnry, Margaret 	
Houghton, Rev. 0. W	
Johnson, Andrew 	
Fannin, Agnes 	
Proctor, W. S	
Rogers, R. W	
Rose, E. 0	
Harper, Mrs. M. J	
Choy, Joaeph 	
Knltt, Mike 	
Iiolmonlco, Isaac 	
Cozra, Gaspcro 	
Mllleaiii,  A	
Ala-la,  Samuel  	
Miller. Anna	
Hadcr, Thomas 	
Mnchieime, Prank	
Rose,  E.  0	
Newman, S. G.	
hoy, Joseph 	
Gourlay, Robert.	
Hassan!,  Win	
Ilm Foo ft Wong Jack 	
Ohlnnetto, A. p	
Onrruthers, Geo	
WatHon ft Mphnrdt 	
Colo, R.  .1	
Gorman, James	
Kefonry   Bros	
Block Number
3    Morrissey     12.00
3    Morrissey      6.00
3    Morrissey   43.60
3 Morrissey   12.70
4 Morrissey     6.00
4    Morrissey   11-10
4    Morrissey     6.00
4    MorriBsey     6.00
4    Morrissey   90
13 MorriBBey     3.30
14 Morrissey      6.30
1-1 Morrissey     6.30
14  Morrissey  '.    6.00
14  Morrissey   90
14  Morrissey   14.30
14 Morrissey     6.00
15 Morris6ey      6.70
18   Morrissey    12.00
18 Morrissey     2.25
18 Morrissey     2.80
18  Morrissey      2.40
18 Morrissey     6.00
24  MorrisBey      6.00
27  Morrissey       3.60
REGISTERED    PLAN    NO.    743
Block Number
ft   23     5   Morrissey Mines   10.50
    5  Morrissey MineB    3.15
    1.50
     4.20
TOWNSITE,
  Block
1,   2,   3	
MORRISSEY    MINES
Lot Number
10,
27
8        10 Morrissey Mines
26       13 MorrtBBOy Mines
20    15 Morrissey Mines   5.80
22   15 Morrissey Minos   5.80
28    15 Morrissey Mines   5.80
24   ft   27   15 Morrissey Mines   10.45
28    15 Morrissey Mines   11.60
29  15 Morrissey Min3s
23  15 Morrissey Mines ,
16   17 MorrlBKoy Minos
17   17 MoiTlssoy MineB
18  17 Morrissey Minos .
21   17 Morrissey Mines
22   17 Morrissey Mines
23   17 MorrisBey Mines
6.40
.30
7.80
1.80
3.80
8.26
9.66
7.05
24   17 Morrissey Mines   s.io
27    17 Morrissey Minos   L»0
1      18 Morrissey Mines  60
9      18 Morrissey Mince   4.15
14     18 Morrissey Mines  60
16    18 Morrissey Mines   3.16
18   18 Morrissey Mines   6.95
20    18 Morrissey Minos   4.65
2      19 Morrissey Mines   2.70
5   A   6   19 Morrissey Minos   13.50
7      19 Morrissey Mlnea   35.20
8      19 Morrissey Mines   6.80
I      19 Morrissey Min*s   5.80
II   19 Morrissey Minos   1,80
12   ft   13   19 Morrissey Mines   10.45
14   19 Morrissey Mines   6.80
16    19 Morrissey MlnfB   6.80
20    19 Morrissey Mines   6.20
5     ,  20 Morrissey Mines   7.70
6      20 Morrissey Mln*s   8.10
10   20 Morrissey Mlticn   2.40
11     20 Morrissey Mines   5.80
12   20 Morrissey MIiiob   5.80
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2.60
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2.C.0
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.60
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
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2.0C
2.00 THK PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK, BRITISH COLUMBIA
CRANBROOK LAND DISTRICT
District ot Souih-E.ist KooUnay
TAKE NOTIi B that E.litb I.ecMe.
of Vancouver, B.C., intends to apply
for a license to prospeot ior co.il and
petroleum on the tollowing du e:ibed
lands :—Oommenolng nt a post plant
ed on the North Bo.nditry ol Lo.
7123, Group 1, Kootcn.iy DiBtrict,
near tho hank ol Snjie Cree':* tbence
cast 80 chains; thence uorth 80
chains; tbence weBt 80 t li,ins thence
aouth 80 chains to point ol commencement.
Dated August   29th,   1911.
EDITH  1.ECK1E,
Locator.
David Jenkins, Agent. 37-9t
MINERAL ACT
(Form   F.)
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICB
Mammoth Mining Cluim, situate in
the Fort Steelo Mining Division ol
But Kootenay District,
Where located :—Half way between
Wolf and Lewis Creeks.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Thus. T.
McVittie, agent for B. Lundin, Pre a
Miner's Certificate No. 37437B, iutend, Bixty days from date hereot, to
apply to the Mining Recorder tor a
Certificate of Improvements, for the
purpose ot obtaining a Crown Grant
ol the above claim.
And further take notice that action
under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements,
Dated this llth day of September,
A.D.,   1911.
THOS. T. McVITTIB.
S7-9t
MINERAL ACT
(Form F.)
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
Wasa Mineral Claim, situate in the
Fort Steele Mining Division ol East
Kootenay District.
Where located :—Halt way between
Wolf and Lewis Creeks.
TAKB NOTICE that I, Thos. T.
McVittie, agent for B. Lundin, Free
Miner's Certificate No. 37437B, Intend, sixty days from date hereof, to
apply to the Mining Recorder for a
Certificate ol Improvements, for the
purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant
of the above claim.
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of sueh Certi
ficate of Improvements.
Dated this llth day of September,
A.D.,   1911.
THOS. T.  McVITTIB.
37-9t
CRANBROOK LAND DISTRICT
District ol South-East, Kooteuav
TAKE NOTICB that. Florence M.
Burroughs o! Vancouver, B.C., apin-
•ter Intends to apply for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on the following described lands :—
Commencing at a Post planted on
the South EaBt corner of lot 7282,
Kootenay district, thence east 60
chains; thence north 80 chains; then
ce weBt 80 chains; thence soutb 80
chains, to point ot commencement,
(save and except thereout that pait
covered by Lot 7330,) being survey
ed Lot 7283, Group 1, Kootenay
District.
Dated August   29,   1911.
FLORENCE M. BURROUGHS,
David Jenkins, Agent. 37-9t
Locator.
NOTICE
NOTICE ls hereby given that I will
■ell Lots 19, 20 and 21 in Block 93,
Oranbrook Oity, together with the
Improvements thereon nt Public Auction on the 17th day ot October
next at the Government Building, at
11 o'clock in the forenoon local time.
The upset price ot these Lots is
placed at 1800.00 and the improvements on LotB 19 and 20 are appraised at 31000.00, and improvements on Lot 21 at {50,00. The
terms of payment on these lots will
be i cash and the balance in three
euual annual Instalments wtth Interest at six per cent per annum on
deferred payments, but the value ol
the Improvements must be paid In
full at time of sale.
Dated at Cranhrook, this 12th ol
September,   1911.
A. C. NELSON,
Acting Qovernment -Vgen*.
37-5t
WATER NOTICE
We, Dickinson ft McTavish, ot Jaffray, B.C., give notice thnt, on the
31st day of October, 1911, at 2.30
o'clock in the afternoon, we Intond
to apply to the Water Commissioner
at his oflice in Cranbrook for a licence to take and use a one-ball cubic
foot of water per second from a
spring rising on Lot 3543-G-l, in
rear ol the Jaflray hotel In the Cranbrook Watcr District. Tbe water ls
to be taken from the stream about
300 yards nortb of the B.C. Southern Railway track and ia to he iise.1
on Lot No. 3543 tor domestic purposes.
DICKINSON ft McTAVISH,.
U7-.it
NOTICB
NOTICE is hereby given that, on
tlte flrst day of December next, application will he made to the Super-
intendent of Provincial Police for ro-1
ncwal of tho hotel license to soli
li I'.ior by retail in the hotel known
(is the Central Hotel, situate at
Moyie, B.C., in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this    2nd    day   of   October,
1911.
V. DESAULNIBR3.
41-lt Applicant.
NOTICE
NOTIOE is hereby given that 30
days after tho publication ol tbis
notice. I shall apply to the Chief
License Inspector of tho Provinco for
a license to sell intoxicating liquor
at retail on the promises known as
the Wasa Hotel, situate at Wasa,
B.O.
Dated this 2nd day of October,
1911.
N, HANSON,
41-4t Applicant.
CRANBROOK LAND DISTRICT
District of Soiith-Enst Kootenay
TAKE NOTICE that Oily H. Kirli-
tiatriclt ol Vancouver, B.C., bro.or,
intends to apply for a license to product for conl and petroleum on the
lollowing described lands! —Commenting at a lost plnntcd op Nortb
A'est Corner ol Lot 12,4, Kootenay
District, thence west 80 ch. ins;
thenco soutb 80 rhni s; theuce onst
so chains; thence north 80 ch :ns to
point of commencement, b. ing sur
veyed lot 721-5, Group 1, Kootenny
District.
Dated August   311,   lllll.
GUY 11. KIRKPATRICK,
Locator.
David Jenkins, Agent. 37-9t
WATER NOTICE
I, Chnrles Henry Conner, o' Roo -
vllle, by occupation a termer, give
notice thnt I Intend on the lst day
of Novomher next, at eleven o'cloci
In tho forenoon to npply to the
Water Commissioner nt his oflice at
Crnnbrook, B.C., for a license to
take and use one half a cubic toot
of water por second from a spring
10 chains eaBt of tho south eaBt corner of lot 487 on sublot 21 of lot
4589 and n Bprlng on the north east
portion of BUblot 4 of lot   4f89.
The water will he used on sublot 4
of lot   4589 for irrigation purposes,
nnd the point ol diversion is    where
the above springs rise.
(Sgd.)
CHARLES HENRY CONNER.
Dated this Uth day of September.
1911. 37-5t
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given tbat 36
days after the publication of thlfl
notice, ll shall apply to the Chief
License Inspector of the. Province ior
a renewal of my license to sell intoxicating liquor at retail on thd
promises Known hs the Windsor
Hotel, situate nt Port Steele, B.O.
Dated tllis 2nd duy of Ootober,
1911.
H. S. MATHER.
4_L4t  Applicant.
NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereliy given thnt 30
days after tbo publication of Ihls
notice, I shall apply to the Ohiel
License Inspector of the "ro.inco lol
n license to s-11 intoxicating liquor
j at retail on tbe ire isei known as
the North Star HoLel, situate nt
i Kimberley, B.C.
Dated this 2nd day ol Octo; er,
lllll.
H. W. DREW,
ll-lt Applicant.
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that 30
dnys after the publication ol this
notice, I shall apply to the Chief
License Inspector of the Province lor
a renewal of my license to sell Intoxicating liquor at retail on tbe
premises known as the Central
Hotel, situate at Marysville, B.C.
Dated this 2nd day of October,
1911.
PAUL HANDLEY.
ll-4t Applicant.
PUBLIC HIGHWAY8
Province of British Columbia.
NOTICE is hereby given that all
public highways in unorganized districts, and all Main Trunk Roads
in organized Districts, are sixty-six
feet wide, and have a width of thirty-three feet on each side of the mean
straight centre line of the travelled
road.
THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Work*!.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, July 7, 1911.
IMTt
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that 30
days after the publication of this
notlco, I shall apply to the Chlel
License Inspector of the Province for
a renewal ot my license to sell intoxicating liquor at retail on the
premises known as the Wycliffe
Hotel,  situate at Wycllffe, B.C.
Dated this 2nd day of October,
1911.
HARRY EDWARDS.
41-4t Applicant.
NOTICE
NOTICE iB hereby given that 30
days after the publication ol this
notice, I shall apply to the Chief
License Inspector of tho Province for
a renewal of my license to bcII intoxicating liquor at retail on the
premises known aB tho Imperial
Hotel, Bituate at Fort Steele, B.C.
Dated this 2nd day of October,
1911.
B. W. WERDEN.
41-4t Applicant.
NOTICB
NOTICE Is hereby given that on
the tirst day of December next, application will be made to tho Super-
| intendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to soil
liquor by retail in thc hotel known
as tho International hotel, situate
at Kingsgate, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this    2nd    day   of   October,
1911.
A. MtfTZ.
41-4t       . Applicant.
NOTICE
NOTICE is horeby given that, on
the first day of December next, application will be ma'de to the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of tho hotel license to sell
liquor by retail in the hotel known
as the Perry Creek Hotel, situate at
Perry Creek, in tho Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 2nd day of October,
1911.
ARTHUR BURQE.
41-4t Applicant.
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that, on
the first day of December next, application will be made to the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of thc hotel license to sell
liquor by retail in the hotel known
ns the Kootcnay Hotel, situate at
the Town of Moyie, in the Province
of British Columbia.
Dated this 2nd day of October,
1911.
A. D. CAMERON,
4l-4t Applicant.
NOTICB
NOTICB ls hereby .given that 30
days after the publication of this
notice, I shall apply to the Chief
License Inspector of the Province for
a renewal of my license to sell intoxicating liquor at retail on the
premises known as the Falls View
Hotel, situate at Marysville, B.O.
Dated this 2nd day of October,
1911.
E. T. CROWLEY
41-4t Applicant.
NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that on
the first day of December next, application will be made to the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of tbe hotel license to sell
liquor by retail in tbe hotel known
ob tho Yahk Hotel, situato at Yahk,
in the Province of British Columbia.
Datod this 2nd day of October,
1911.
BENJAMIN J. RILEY,
41-4t Applicant.
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that, on
tho first day of December next, application will he mnde to the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal ot the hotel license lo sell
liquor by retail in the hotel known
as tbe Moyle Hotel, situate at Moyle
'n the Province of British   lol.imbla.
Datod this Snd day of October,
1911.
PHILIP P. JOHNSTON,
41-4t Applicant.
NOTICE
i NOTICE Is hereby given that, on
j 'tii- qvst day of December noxt, application wm ne ns,! fo the Superintendent of Provincial Police re
| newal of the hotel licenso to sell
I liquor by rotnll In tbo hotel known
Ins the International hotel, situate at
Moyie, in the province of rj,:r '
Columbia.
Dated   this   lllth   day of   October,
1911,
MICHAEL J. BONNER,
42-4t Applicant.
NOTICB
NOTICE is hereby given that, on
the first dny ot December next, application will be made to tho Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel licenso to sell
liquor by retail in thc hotel known
as the Wardnor Hotel, situate at
Wardner, in the Province of British
Columbia.
Dated this 2nd day of October,
1911.
R. H. BOHART,
41-4t Applicant.
NOTICB
NOTICE Is horeliv given that 30
days after tho publication of this
notico, I shall apply to tho Chief
License Inspector of the Provinco for
a, renewal of my licenso to sell Intoxicating liquor at retail on tho
premises known nB thc Roynl Hotel.
Datod this    2nd    day   of   October,
Bituate at Marysville, B.C.
1911.
H. L. SAWYER.
41-4t. Applicant.
>H-+^i4H-*^.|~H"M".-H-+l--.-
| Mrs. W. Edmondson!
X WATT AVENUE
Graduate   of
'London College of  Music
Receives Pupils for
Pianoforte
Organ and Vocal
Instruction
|,.[,.|. ".■..•..|..!..*..*..]..*..!..*..!."..!. .j..|..j..l.
SCENE FROM MADAME SHERRY,  AUDITORIUM, OCTOBER
Holy Names Academy
and Normal School
For Young Women
Under the direction ot th? Sisters
of the Holy Names of Jesus and
Mary. First class boarding nnd day
school primary and grammar grades.
State accredited high school. Advanced normal course of two yearB accredited by the state of Washington.
State diplomas conferred. Music
and art studio.
Write to Sister   Superior for Year
Book,  Spokane, Wash.
Frank Dezall
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
and
WOODWORKER
Rubber Tires Applied
To Buggy Wheels
tGBNTS FOR CANADIAN CYCLE
AND MOTOR CO'S BICYCLES
Repairing a Specialty.
Phone  60       •••      p. o.   Boi   213
»>-*^»VS^»V>^A*\AA^A*>^*>AA*V>i
Century Restaurant
K.  Y.  Uyematsu, Prop.
THE   BEST   PLACE IN
THE   CITY   POR   A
GOOD   MEAL.
BOARD AND ROOMS
Opposite C. P. R. Depot.
Phone 119   P. O. Box 104
vvvvvvyv*vvvv»»vvvvvvv>»v
We Deal in Everything From
a Needle to a Locomotive
Joseph H. McLean
DEALER IN
All kinds of Second-Hand Goods
Furniture a SPECIALTY
BUYER OF FURS
Sage's Old  Stni d. Hanson Ave
Phone 251.
i*>«VV***»«*V«A'»»>»>'»«*^»*^***'\A
Picture
Framing
At onr   establishment
■  is done right and prices
suit all pockets,    .
Every Frame made is
Guaranteed
W. KILBY
O. K. Barber Shop, Armstrong; Ave
llox HU2     ■     -       'Phono 27"
*^«**«>«A't*«V'«^<***4*>«A'\«W»*M
**********************
i; A.  WALLER :
< > MASONRY
<i
<!  '	
',',   Steam Boilor,   Furnace,
i<      and Se|ilic Tank work
'.', a specialty
'>   Cost and stock estimates
] J   furnished on application.   ) [
< > '	
I >     Aililrus. : P. O. Box 2*A, Crantiruolc
! ',************
F. M. MacPherson
UNDERTAKER
Norbury Avenua Nfixt to City Hall
Open Day anil NIajlit Phono 233
Strayed or Stolen.
D:irk brown gelding, weight
about 1400 lbs. white stockings, white face, white spots
on eyes, eight years old. Reward for return of same to
Kimberley.
The Taylor Lumber Co.
THE SELF DENIAL OF THE SUCCESSFUL ARTIST
(By    Ethel
Bell,    Star
Sherry)
of   Maritime
"I wonder how much thc world
knows of the times of starvation nurtured hy singerB nnd nctots, not
rnly through necessity hut In tin:
persistent following of ths aim of
perfection ? Of course the history cf
ull art is filled with inatnncoii of
adversity, terrible trials and deprivations of not only the .-omforts but
the actual necessities of life. The
studios of Paris echo with tales and
scenes of hardship and sacrifice, Md
it is a familiar occurreacc in nil history of artistic endeavor, thia paeii-
flcc of self to the great goal."
B>it there are severe demands cn
the successful artist as well. What
do you think of the people wh.*, push
from them not only the pasiri-jH und
other seducers of the palate, hut the
real bread and butter essential to
comfort and a normal condition,
merely to preserve a certain tone or
accent? You may believe mo when
I say that many great singers and
more than one great actor, have
fairly starved themselves not only
for a day and a week, but through
a season covering months, in order
to protect certain vocal and physical
degrees thnt would have been menaced by the results of comfortable living. Ab a bit of personal experience,
permit mc to relate thnt at one time
during my. appearance in grenri opera
in Germany nt the outset of my career, there was a certain score that
included difficult passages I could an-
say with ease only when I had te-
nounced all food for nt least a day
or two, and when that opera was in
repertoire, T would literally starve
until it had been sung.
I know one of the finest tenors the
German Bchool ever produced who
became a slave to his stomach, and
he is now singing occasionally in
small concert gardens. Some of
your greatest actors have lived week
after week, and year after year on
what even an ambitious student
would regard a starvation diet-
healthy and robust men who gave
their cumfort and much of tlie enjoyment of life to score for their
art.
Salvation Army
Sunday Services. Capt. Frod.
Stride and Lieutenant W. Lewis ln
charge.
Holiness meeting at 11 a. m,
Free and easy at 3 p. m.
Salvation meeting at 8 p. m.
Thursday—Salvation      meeting   at
8 p. m.
everybody welcome.
Catholic Church
PariBh Priest—Father Plamondon,
Sundays—Low Mass at 8.30 a. m.
High     Mass,   KT.30   a. m.      Sunday
school from 2 to 3 p. m.   Rosary and
Benediction at 7.30 p. tn.
Mondays and holy days of obligation—Mass at 8 a. m.
Week days—Mass at 6 a. in. at tbe
hospital.
Methodist Church
RflV, W.  EQlson Dunham,  Pastor
Sunday service :   The pastor      will
Morning Subject -"The Past Days"
preach at   11 a.m. nnd   7..'.(I p.m.
Five minutes object BQrmon on 'The
Eye, a Telescope," also at tho morning service.
Evening subject—"Gifts Worth Hav
ing."
The program of music for the evening service will include : Duet.
"Watchman What of the Night?",
Mr, and Mrs. George F. Stephenson;
Anthem, Choir.
All are cordially Invited to the
above services.
Baptist Church
Rev. H. C. Speller—Pastor.
Residence Norbury  Ave.
Morning Subject—"Very Early in
the Morning."
Evening Subject—"God's Use of
His Sovereignty.
IJlhle study at 3 p.m. Ezra, chap
3.
Strangers specially welcome.
And for the said consideration, we
do hereby further convey to the said
Nobles of the .Mystic Shrine, the
right, during thc said time, to the
use of tlie streets, alleys nnd ambulances of the said city for thc TENDER handling and care of the NOVICES.
IN WITNESS THEREOF, I bave,
by the power in me vested, subscribed my hand and affix:d the MG
BBAL of the city, at .'llANimoOK,
B.C.
Cranbrook, B.C., (ss)
P. DEVERE HUNT.
[ hereby certify that, before mc, a
notorious republic in and for the
said Province, on the 18th October,
1911, personally appeared tbe witbin
named ,  to    me known,
who in my presence acknowledged the
execution of the within instrument
for the uses and purposes therein
stated.
IN   TESTIMONY     WHEREOF,    I
have hereunto set one of my hands,
and affixed the BIG SEAL this   18th
of October,   1911.
SEAL
O. U. NOVICE,
Notorious Republic.
Knox Presbyterian Church .
Morning service at   11 o'clock,
Sunday School and Bible Class at
3 p.m.
Evening   service   at   7.30   o'clock.
Choir practice at   8,15.
Tuesday evening, Guild prayer
meeting.
All cordially welcome.
RENEWED ACTIVITY IN THE MINER U. WORLD
Christ Church
Rector,  Hov.  E. P.  Flewdlen.
Holy Communion at 8 a. m.
MorninR prayer and Holy Communion at 11 a. m.
Children's Bervice at 3 p. m.
Evening service nt 7.30 p. m.
MAYOR'S WARRANTY DEED
KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE
PRESENTS : Thnt I, P. Devcre
Hunt as mayor of the City of Crnnbrook, Province of British Columbia,
under and by virtue of the authority
in mo vested as sum officer, mil for
and in appreciation of the visit of
the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine to
our said city on October the Twenty-
fifth, and the receipt of which is
earnestly anticipated, do hereby,
SEAL, ASSIGN, TRANSFER AND
CONVEY unto the Nobles of the
Mystic Shrine, and to each of them
severally, all of the real nnd personal property situated in said city, of
every kind and nature whatsoever
upon condition that the said property shall revert to tbe lawful owners
thereof at the eleventh hour of thc
following day, reasonable wear and
tear expected.
And I, the said mayor, for myself
nnd the officials of the city and Inhabitants thereof, undertake and agree
to defend thc said Nobles of the
Mystic Shrine against any lawful or
other interference by police or othcr
officers within the limits of the said
city, between the hours of eight
o'clock a.m. on tbe 25th day of
October, 1911, and the eleventh hour
of the day following, of the said
month.
Reports of renewed activity in
quartz and placer mining and the
installation of (1 number of large
plants have been received tliis   week.
In the early fiO's Perry Creek attracted a good deal of attention as
a plnccr camp, and later in the 90's
a large number of gold quartz claims
were located.
Later in 1003 the Perry Creek
Hydraulic installed a large hydraulic
plant which hns heen in active operation since that time.
The East Kootenay Placer Mining
Co., a local company also commenced
operations in 190.1 and installed a
large steam shovel for lifting the
sluice boxes, later on in 1904 they
installed a new powor washer.
A large amount of developing work
on gold quartz properties located on
Perry Creek has been performed.
During the pnst summer Mr. Geo.
Scott hns hnd a small force working
on a property' that is located above
the falls, and has also located Beveral new claims.
The Badger and Red Mountain
claims were noted in 1890 as being
very promising claims, these claimB
are now owned by Gus Theis. Mr.
j Theis has a number of promising
properties on the east side of Perry
Creek on which a large amount of
developing has been done, and gold
in paying quantities Ib found. It is
reported that American capital will
'operate this property.
i The wagon road up Perry Crd'tk is
in excellent condition. Tbi-re is ft
fine botel at Old Town, and visiters,
miners, prospectors end 'apitaKsts,
(can be assured of finding good accommodation.
I The sportsmen will also find large
and small game, with excellent fishing on Perry Creek.
"Who can give a sentence using the
word pendulum ?" asked the teacher.
Little Rachel's hand shot up. Tbe
teacher nodded encouragingly.
"Lightning was invented by Penju-
lum Franklin."
_ K
Oranbrook Plumbing, Tinsmithing   |
and Heating Company
W.   F.   JOHNSON   &   SON,   Props.
Business is now being carried on in our old store
on   Edward   Street,   (Crossing French Avenue)
REPAIRS   A   SPECIALITY
Everything in   Tin and  Iron  Made  to order.       Blower system, Mine
Ventilation   Expert
Hot air furnace, Hot water and Steam boilei s
ESTIMATES  GIVEN
Phone   340
MlglimTaM»l»l»B1»liliuTMill»1lilgl«l»l»l[«l«lii|»l-f»llB
P.O.   Box   904
iiTimriignn>niiT.iM»i.T«r«iiir«nn»iiBp^il THF. PROSPECTOR. CRANBROOK, BRITISH COLUMTIA
GARDSFORCGRONATtON
INTERESTING  GIFT OF  ANCIENT
LONDON GUILD.
MISSIONS AND EMPIRE.
Two Decks of Playing Cards Were Ihi
Offering ol th? Noble Company of
Cardmakers—They Were DestgnH
by Seymour Lucas and Handsomely
Printed and Enclosed In a Stamped
" Cast.
King George V and Queen Mary
were th.' reeijxents ol a multitude ol
"coronation" gifts. Among them worn
two decks ol pi ay ing cards Irom the
playing cardmakers' guild. Tbe d»"
sign la In fifteenth century style by
Seymour Lucas of ihe Rjyal Academy,
Tlie design on the king's deck ts on a
I'Ci.iON'ATKlN CAKUS.
rr>d ground, while tbuse given to the
queen are In royal blue. The three
galleons are symbolical id tlie king'*
connection with Uie navy.
Each puck wus in a case of rich
morocco, corresp Hiding in color to
the cards and stamped with the royal
ciphers, tlie arms of the company
with Us motto, "Cord.' Recto Elati
Unities," and a border of rose, sham-
rook  and thistle.
Foil Over a  Precipics.
Field Marshal Lord Methuen met
with his most thrilling adventure, nol
on the battlefield, but on the Alps,
when he mid a friend wen: mountain*
. eering. A storm burst on them just
as they had reached the summit oi
Dome des Mischabel,
Fur seventeen hours they fought it
and, though starving and stiff with
cold and fatigue, held their ground
Then a Hash id lightning caused Lur i
Methuen to make a false step, and
fall over the precipice, but the gui'U
to whom he and his friend were fastened was quick enough to plant lii-
fitiifl* in the snow and ''liable hiinsdi
to resist tii" shock of the fall. For »
time Lurd Methuen remained suspended  in   mid-air,    when    any  moment
might have \ n his lust.   He shouted
to ids comrades to cut tho rope and
Bave tin mselv is. But friend and
guide, by a superhuman effort, dragged him back to safety. That wh*1
Lord Methuen's last experience in
mountaineering.
He lias the reputation nf getting
more work out uf Tommy than any
other general; but they say themselves he feeds them "like fighting
cocks." They refer to him affectionately as I'aul "because he persecuted
Ihem,"
Worked For Five Shillings Weekly.
Hir  John   Barker  has  come  fur  »
tour  through   Canada to   Vancouver,
and thenee to Japan, Cililia, and India.
Sir John's career Is'in itself one of
the mod -rn romances of business, He
began life with very little money, and
it is believed that nis llrst job brought
him in live shillings a week. Fur a
long time lie was one of Whiteley'j
young men. und then, with his natural shrewdness, his resolution, his
ambition, and his down-right aptitude
tor business, he set up for himself in
the uow famous shop in High street,
Kensington, London.
He had little money of his own at
the time, and had to borrow capital,
but in a few yearn he was nble to pay
everybody out, though it took a good
deal mure than $600,000 to do it.
Sir John wus appointed an alderman
of the first London County Council,
and in 1006 was sent to Parliament as
Liberal representative for Peurhyn
and 'Falmouth.
Tho Sacred Gangei.
The River Ganges, in India, ia famous fur two tilings-its alleged purifying Influence on all who bathe in
it, and its muddiness, For ages there
lias been a belief among tlie Hindus
that a dip in thtf'Ganges, particularly
at Benures, is a safeguard against the
cholera, typhoid fever, and other infectious disease, A recent analytical
examination of the river water at
Benares lias revealed the interesting
Juct that the Ganges is fairly alive
with bacteria antagonistic to the bacilli nf cholera and typhoid. The
plague-ridden Undo., .vii., plunges into the river to bathe in it, provides
liintaulf witli 11 vast army -if useful ml*
crobes, which will quickly sweep out
of bis system, the deadly microbes ol
disease.
Rice For Australia.
"Imagine thousands, nay, millions
of acres south ,,f the Daly River covered with rice," wrote the Acting
Administrator of the .Northern Territory, Australia, r. ntly to the Acting
Minister of External Affair-. '"I have
gone through miles and miles of such
wild rice in a canoe at the close ol
the wet season." Senator Findley imagined something mor,-. He saw the
territory placed beyond need of financial assistance by the treatment and
sale of this rice, if'- immediately sent
to the Territory for several tons fur
experiments. Great hopes are entertained that the Northern Territory
will prove one oi Australia'!) most fur
Uie urea*.
Tht Gospel Bearers Have Won Lands
For Britain.
It may not be gei.emli.v known, but
it is none the less a fact tlial Itr.t.iiii
owes several of her recent MQuifl*
t o -s of territory to the wurk or influence of missionaries. We give a batch
of illustrations irom the latest recruiting ground, Africa.
The expansloL ol South Africa is
largely the work ot th-' missionaries.
ln B.*chunalai:d ti:e northern route
was for a long time kept open solely
by their iofluance. Some of the ear-
lieat roads were known as "Missionary Roads," aud many place-names
preserve the memory of individuals,
Indirectly the missionaries account
for the Transvaal and Orange River
Provinces, our latest acquisitions
For though we had to pay |I,000,000r
100 for the war of conquest. In contrast to the inexpanslvaness uf mis-
si, nary labor, it was nevertheless ti>
the latter thai the great Boer Trek id
1:UJ was du-, which resulted m the
founding of t ,e republics. Fur lud
not Hr. Philip b.eu so doughty a
champion ol the natives, and su trusted an adviser of the Government, the
U'e-s hou J never have moved ^ut.
vl the gr at achievements of I.iv-
.ngitune it is uun o*-ssary to speuk;
but we must uot forget lhat they
opened the country to successive iu*
cut si j ns of Englishmen, und that
John Mackenzie, the missionary, was
une of ths lirst to f Uow him, It was
linckeniie wno saved the uative states
.ro.u extinction by the Boers, and,
us Deputy Lomuiissiouer ul Beohuan*
aland helped tu fouud thai pruvii.ee.
11 i.as be 'ti said tiiat if his advice
..ad be n taken the Hot War would
have been averted, And a high authority lus added tbut if tbe uiissiotur-
i s ol Christ had preceded those ui
Empire the whole of tiie nine Kuttir
wars might also have been saved.
The Moffat Treaty uf l-itW with the
Matabeles laid the iuu.ui.iLon of Rhodesia for Britain. Yet tlial treaty wus
tilt work of a missionary, the Rev.
J. S. Mofiat, sou of ths iu.inous Ur.
Moffat.
Basutoland, the Switzerland ut
South Africa, we owe to a French mis-
sionary, Coillard uf tht- Zambesi, Mo*
shtsli, the able Basutu chief, governed wiih a Cabinet of French mission*
aries After inflicting a severe de-
(eat cn Britain's forces in Iso-', he
wrote tu tbeir commander a letter
in which he offered peace, saying, "1
am ashamed uf what happened yes-
t*erduy. L:-t it be forgotten. Oh, my
master, 1 am still your man. I um
still the child of the Queen." After
such a politic and Christian epistle
it :s not surprising to find that in
due course Basutoland was received
under our protection on the moot favorable terms. The Basutos are said
by Bryce tu have made greater progress in civilization thun any otner
Kuttir race. Their imports iu lHhi
■were over $1.500,iM).
Barotseland, nUu now known as
Northwest Rhodesia, is due to French
missionaries. Though it is as big as
the tier man empire it did not cost
Greut Britain a single life. Coillard
advised Lewanika, tnc k.ng, to put
himself under the protection of some
European nation, und with great disinterestedness recommended the British. Convinced by past experience of
the good judgment of the missionary,
Lewanika agreed, and iu consequence
his country became a British Protectorate iu 1890.
Northeast Rhodesia, again, we owe
to Stewart of Lovedale. By his ex-
olorution of the Shire country, lie
Supplied Lord Salisbury with the information on which he formed the
British Central Africa Protectorate.
By the founding of Livitigstonia he
did much more still to establish our
authority there. And as it was we
wen only just in time to anticipate
the gnat partition of the continent,
and tu resist the Portuguese claim
to the Nyussu region us well. As Cecil
Rhodes once said, "We owe all Rhodesia to you Scotch missionaries." Or
us Steud more dramatically put it,
"The frontier has advanced on the
stepping-stones of missionary graves."
Lord Avebury'* Pet Wasp,
The wasp is becoming a nuisance,
and there aTe few who would choose
a wasp as a companion. But Lord
Avebury, who was Sir Juhn Lubbock,
is among the few. Some years ago he
captured a wasp in the Pyrenees and
lie kept her for nine months. "I lud
no difficulty." he writes, "in inducing her t« feed on my hand; but at
first she was shy and nervous. She
kept her sting in constant readiness,
and once or twice in the train, when
the  railway officials cannj for tickets
• and I was compelled to hurry her
back   into  her  bottle,  she   stung  me
| slightly.    I   think,  however,   entirely
: from   fright,    Gradually   she   became
j quite used to me, and when I took
her on my hand apparently expected
j to be fed. She even allowed me to
atruke her without any appearance of
feur, u.id for  sume months  I  never
1 -law her sting." The wasp ultimately
succumbed to the r.gor of an English
, February, "and she now occupies, a
place in the British .Museum."—London DuiLy  Chronicle.
Population of Scotland.
In a Parliamentary return issued
showing tho areas, population and
valuation of the counties, burghs und
parishes In Scut.and, tiie total urea,
revised by the Ordnance Survey Department up to December 31, 1910, was
given us io.07u.460 acres, the population at the census of Uie present
year 4.759.445, and the t«ital valuation
£32,836,947. The molt populous county Is Lanark, with 1,447,113, the next
i in order being  Edinburgh  with 507,.
; GU*i  and   Ren'rew   with  -'114.574.    Ths
. highest valuations art- Lanark £9,G92,-
ti44; Edinburgh, £4,765,005; Aberdeen,
1 £1,065,131, and  Renfrew, £1,806,38.8
AFTER THE PICNIC,   .
THE picnic Is over.
Am) homeward we aUrt,
Dusty ami weary,
Willi sunburns thai inurt|
Eyes that are heavy
And (eet that ar* Mr*,
Llttl* ones peevish.
Their hipplnen o'er;
Crying and whining,
Worn out wllh tbeir plty-
Thli Is th* end of
The great plcnlo day.
WhRt'a In th* basket
The weary man lugsT
Uneaten sandwich**,
Huiier and bug*.
Knives and forks greasy,
A slab of plum pl*
That hack must b* take*.
Hut no one knows why;
Jutnmed In with cookie*,
H-nj.ui.iH and cak*>—
Oh, what a mixture
That homeward w* take!
Jura that held salad
Now "oozing with goo;"
A hot IK- ot plcklea,
The Julco leaking through;
a tumbler ot jeiiy
That fell In the sand;
A cupful ut beans,
The variety-canned.
Where will yuu tind
Such a mum*, let ine ask It,
As this wu bring homo
Luto nt tilttht In the basket!
<Kdg.ii  A. Qu*lt lu L'elrolt free Pre**
THE MEANEST CRIME
BLACKMAILING      IS     RAMPANT
THROUGHOUT  LONDON.
Tha Unaxpectad.
in tlio tlrst plan, the mercury was
at 1)8.
lu lbe second place, tho mercury WM
tlilii und Ned} and ttie perspiring miio
ut tba desk viewed hitu wltb manUal
Irritation.
"1 uui Introducing," snld the strunger, "tiu admirable Bafety device
known as the DOUfreezablo water pipe.
Let ine deiiRinstrate It to you "
Wltb an angry roar tbu man ut tba
desk reached for bis paperweight, but
the uiuu wllb tbe admirable device al
ouce proceeded witb tbe demonstration. Dm wing tbe noufrceznble pipe
from Ills side p-ocket be bit tbe oilier
uiuu over the head with It—and then
walked away wllb his wallet aud
watcn.—Cleveland l'lalu Dealer.
Tha Ruttlc Paraon'a Break.
The voting couple had been married
ouly a few weeks aud had moved out
lu tbe couutry for tbe summer. Oue
night ihey Invited tbe village minister
to dinuer. Wheu lhe finger bowl was
placed lu front of tbe rustic parson be
looked Inquiringly at it theu ut bis
host and hostess and stammered:
"A-ah, yes: Is there—is there a child
to be christened?" — lookers Statesman.
No Warning at All.
A reckless golf player had Just hit
one of tbe ladies.
"Why didn't you warn her you were
gulng to shoot?" somebody asked.
"1 did," he protested. "1 cried fore
two or three times.'-
"Fore nothing!" tbe other man exclaimed. "To attract a woman's attention you should have yelled three
ninety -eight. "-St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
His Falling.
Paradoxical as lt may seem,
there Is one thing tbe man who
knows It all can't aeem to learn,
and tbat ls wben to atop talking.
-Philadelphia  Inquirer.
Legislatively Expressed.
"No one can go wrong if be follows
tbe Ten Commandments," said tbe sincere citizen.
"Yes," replied Senator Sorghum; "tbs
only trouble about the Ten Commandments arises (rom tiie amendments
people try to tack on to them."—Washington Star.
Ths End of the Hunting Season.
■»V***S!»i
"Here's   to  the   fragrant  nulseseed
bag.     May   its  shadow   never  grow
less."
Lived on Shellfish.
There died the other day, al the ago
of H2, a hermit named Lewis, who for
tlie laat twenty year., has exihted on
shellfish and lived on his covered
trawler, beached at Lower Fishguard,
He never varied his dietary, except
when rhelltisli were scarce, arid then
lie substituted bread and cheese. To
within two dnys of Ii'.a death he was
iu robust health.
****44&$44>*4^i&*$**f****
<£> Staking Hinors.
I The trouble wllb most men
\ Is that they want to bu ut bat
... all the time und are never will-
7 ing to tlo any Melding.-Chicago
J. Record-Herald
**************************
Nearer the End.
"lf I were younger," mild the rich
old man. "1 believe I might win you
for my wife."
"Yes." replied the cold beauty
dreamily, considering hla sixty-Are
yeara: "or. auy, tlfteeu years older."—
Catholic Standard and Times. |,
Tha evil Profession of tho Man Who
Extorts Hush Monoy Is One That
Kosps an Army of Detectives Busy
and Is the Despair ef tho Official
Police—Hew Scoundrels Get Men
Into Thslr Power.
"This is one ol the worst crimes a
man can commit   ...   By throats
and letters you have made  'a life
a hell upon earth"--Mr. Justice
Lawrence, at ths Old Bailey, London,
England.
One of the most sensational blackmailing cases ot recent years came
to an end a few days ago, when Mr.
Justice Lawrence, In passing sentence, made tlie remark, quoted.
"The greut pity ol it is," said a well-
] known London solicitor, who has
| probably dealt with more cases of
blaokmall than any other member il
the legal prolusion, to a newspaper
uuiii, '"that lor every one ol these
blackmail.lijt scoundrels who nro
brought to book, a hundred escape
loot free Tlieoe human parasite, are
ol all classes. They teed upon the
poor a« well a« the rlah, and it Is
extremely difficult at time, to know
how to deal with Ihem, Why! He-
cause the victim, ure alraid to go to
law Men and women come to me
and tell tne that such and such a
person Is extorting money from them
Iiy threating to expose sonic scandal
connected wllh their lives. Tho extortion mint be slopped, they say.
but It muit bs done quietly, otherwise there is s possibility ol social
ruin lor them
"Thu, thej lie my hands; and if I
roaiiot settle tho mutter amicably with
tho blackmailer, 1 Imve a turn the
tables on him cr her by pulling private detective, on their truck, finding
cut all there is to be discovered about
them, and endeavoring to make things
so warm for them generally thut they
ore glad to conic to tonus."
"But surely it is better to lace the
possibility of social ruin and exposure than to be hounded down and
fleeced by these despicable rogues!"
"Not always. The victim may be
a married man or woman, .with growing children Just making their way in
the world, and whose lives would
probably be ruined by the exposure.
The life happiness of a woman may
depend on hiding some secret sin
Irom her lover or husband, or vice
versa. The blackmailer knows this,
and knows that lie can bleed hla
victim to the uttermost without danger ol being sent to prison."
And here the solicitor mentioned a
case which he described as one ol the
saddest on record.   A young woman,
moving in very good circles, met a
scoundrel at a   seaside   resort   when
she was quite a girl, and he persuad-
', ed her into a secret   marriage.    He
treated   her   abominably  for   a  few
weeks   and   then   disappeared.    For
years the woman   heard   nothing  of
her husband.   She thought  he  must
j be dead, and,   meeting   a man   who
[ really loved her, married   him without disclosing her previous marriage.
Suddenly husband No. 1 turned up,
and proceeded to blackmail the unfortunate woman under the threat of
j disclosing her previous marriage and
j having her arrested lor bigamy.   For
i a year or  two she   kept  nim  quiet
i with all the money she could get; but
It   was  no  good.   He  hounded   her
down until at   last, in   despair, she
committed   suicide.    Afterwards   her
husband got an inkling ol what had
happened, consulted   my   inlormant,
and thus  the  whole  story  came  to
light.
"It sounds like the plot ol a modern novel," Baid the solicitor; "but
I can assure you that it is an authen-
l fl  C&S&
It is an astounding but nevertheless
true lact that there is a restaurant In
the West-end ol London which is
known to be the rendeivous ol these
blackmailers. Here they meet to
discuss their villainous plans during
the day, and In the evening they mix
among the audiences at the music
halls, theatres, hotels, and restaurants, looking lor likely victims.
They are well-dressed, plausible
scoundrels, who quickly worm their
wayMnto the confidence of any per.
son who gets into conversation with
them. As a matter ol lact, at the
beginning of last year, Scotland Yard
was In possession ot certain information which lelt little doubt that a
notorious gang ol blackmailers, com-
Erising no lewer than a couple of
undred men and women ol all stations of Iile. was at work in the City
and West-end and victimising many
people ol high social standing. In
club-land, on the racecourse, and at
all the resorts ol rank and lashion,
the members ol this gang were to be
seen.
Perhaps the most dastardly trick
played by these blackmailers Is that
of using one ol the prettiest members
of the gang as a decoy, getting a
wealthy and prominent man into an
entanglement with her, Bnd then
making him the petitioner in a threatened divorce case, thc girl, of course,
being married to one ol tho member,
ol the blackmailing gang. It is estimated that by this trick blackmailers
have netted, Irom various victims,
no less than 11,000,000. They know
that their victim, rather than lace
divorce proceedings, which would result in social ruin, is willing to pay
practically any price to keep the
matter quiet.
The extent to which blackmailing
is carried on may he gauged Irom the
enormous number ol advertisement!
ol private detectives published fn
the newspapers, in which they em-
phasixe that they make a speciality
ol blackmailing cases.—London Tit-
Bits. •
OLD QUEBEC.
At T.-iblo d'Hote.
If you can't pronounco um imm.
Or tlui entree or llio Joint,
Ah your Fronch is rather lame,
Point I
-l.lpiilncott'o.
Tha Hatpin's Grip.
Teacher -Cau any little girl tell ine
why our bonds nre covered wllh linlr?
Lillle Olrl-To have something In plu
more balr lo,—Life,
Montreal'.   Earthquake.
A.  aerere  earthquake  at   Montreal
Kov. 27, 17112, damaged iuli houses,
"Oh,   zees   lai.gvallchl"   complained
| lhe foreigner.
I    "Wliat'a the mailer wllb It?" asked
I the native.
I    "Vou any, 'I nm down nnd nut; 1
mn  nil  lul'    Oh,  zees  liingvulteui"—
Chicago Record-Herald,
Unaxpectad   Polit.neas.
"f notice," said the young man's
employer, "that yon are always ahout
th-. lirst iu tin- oflice in the morn-
ha, "
"1 hank  ynu, sir.
"Why do you  tliank  mef"
"For  noticing it."
Defined. i'i .
Tommy-Pop. whut la ennui?        '*
Tommy's Pop— Ennui, my eon, Is a
dlsenae Hint attacks people who nre so
lazy that ihey get tired of resting^
CbUadelphla Uncord, . >
Acta ef Kindness.
If every one did nn net of dally
kindness to Ids neighbor ond refused
to du any uuklndueaa half the sorrow
of Ibis world would be lifted and die-
■ppear.-Ian Mariano.
Apples For Sheep.
Apples for sheep have about the
.nine feeding value nn turnips or mangels, if fed in reuaomible quantities In
connection with oilier foods. Ah between sweet and amir varieties, tbe
difference will Ile In the pnlntnblllty
rather thun In uny slight difference In
composition thut muy exist
Big   Figures.
"My dear Miss Moneybags," said
the impecunlus young man, "I love
you more thun I can find words to
tell."
"But I presume you could tell mo
tn figures," rejoined the beautiful
heiress iu icy touca.
"Why Is a demagogue usually ra>
garded nn so dangerous a man?" Inquired lhe lender uf lbe mob.
"Because," replied tbs llrst citizen,
"hla following la largely composed of
people who would rather stand around
listening to speeches tban go to work."
—Washington Star.
"Ever hear Mills Hygee sing? Slue
cnn do It beautifully lo firs Inn-
gunges,"
"Yes, but I like ber sister better.
She cnn refuse firmly In one."—Chicago Tribune
A Oity Pull sf Interest and Information Fer tho Tourist.
Quebec is one of the oldest cities
in America, lt is noted for its ancient
institutions and is one of the most
interesting cities for tourists on the
continent.   A recent writer says:
The ancient seminary and divinity
school, founded in 1003, still is [ull uf
students training lor the Roman
Catholic priesthood; the Laval University, which is the largest and most
important educational institution iu
Canada, is being rebuilt and the books
and historical manuscripts, which are
the most Interesting purl of it, are
packed away with thc pictures, which
probubly are thc most Important in
Oanada, The library has inure thau
100,000 volumes, including the most
couipletu collection in existence oi
works relating to the exploration and
early   settlement  of   tlie   Dominion,
lt was customary lor bolh military
and ecclesiastical explorers to deposit
their journals and other manuscripts
with thu university, which was founded by Mgr. de Laval, llio llrst Komau
Catholic  bishop ol Canada,  and they
me now the source of material as well
as Inspiration tor historians, A publishing house ol Cleveland has print-
ed translations ol much ol the most
important historical material.
ihe university is composed ol four
schools art, law, medicine and the-
ology. There are ;iti prolcssors and un
average of about ,lKi students.
iile old pa t ol the city oil tlle bluff
is Inoloaod within a wall built at the
same lime as Ilie citadel, and the best
iircsei ved ol any ancient city wall that
ever have seen. Sentiment here is
expensive also. As the sergeant 111 thu
clladel said: "It costs a lot ol money
lo keep it up, but it's a heap ul satisfaction."
Beyond the walls is the Provincial
Parliament Building, a large and
stately building of the conventional
French school, lt contains the legislative chamber, the utllces of the governor and his Cabinet, the court rooms
and the state library, and is surrounded by au attractive and well kept
garden. _
Beyond the Parliament Building is
the best residence portion of the city,
with many comfortable mansions,
schools and nunneries. More than
2,000 young women from Cannda and
the United States are being educated
in  these  institutions.
The ancient gates of the wall have
been preserved, and where it has been
hecesary new ones ol monumental
proportions have been erected by the
municipality.
Within the walls, near the principal
hotel, is a plain, old-fashioned building that was occupied ior several years
by the Duke of Kent, lather of Queen
Victoria, when he was in command
ol the garrison here, and one of the
new gates cut through tlie walls was
named after him. His daughter, her
Majesty, the late Queen, contributed
liberally toward the cost ol construction, and his granddaughter, the Princess Louise, wile ol the Marquis ol
Lome, not only laid the foundation
stone, but revised the architectural
plans while her husband was Governor-General oi Canada.
No city in America has so many
nunneries and monasteries as Quebec,
and most ol them are either schools
or homes for the poor and aged. One
of the benevolent Institutions is
unique. It is kept by the Sisters ol
Providence, who receive the children
ol widows and ieed and teach them
for two cents a day. It is a day
nursery also, where working women
can leave their babies to be cared lor
by sweet-laced nuns while they are
earning their living.
The number ot churches and the
site of them is surprising. Nearly all
are of the Roman Catholic laith. A
cathedral ol the Church ol England
occupies a conspicuous place In the
centre of the city and Is interesting
because a number of battle flags aro
hung in the chancel, over the pulpit
and the altar, and in the vestry is a
beautiful communion service presented by the late King Edward. The
sexton will tell you that it cost
110,000.
One ol the oldest churches In
America is the French cathedral or
basilica ol Quebec, which dates back
to 1647. It is one ol the most imposing structures in Canada. It contains
several important pictures. Including
a picture ol the crucifixion painted
by Van Dyck in 1630, which, with several other examples of the old masters,
waa looted Irom the churches ln Paris
by the revolutionists ol 1703 and purchased by Abbe Des Jardins, ol Quebec, who happened to be In the
French capital at that time.
The vestments are superb and the
collection of sacred relies is the largest ln North America, They are kept
In two large vaults in the sacristy said
include, it ls said, skulls or bones ol
more than 40 saints, beside nieces of
the true crors and crown of thorns,
the cradle ol the child Jesus, a piece
of rope witli which the Saviour was
flogged and a fragment ol the veil ol
the holy mother which shows a stain
ol the blood ol her beloved son which
fell upon it as she kneeled belore the
cross. '
world's greyest iRim- CELT GOVERNS MAORIS,
Osnsds Building 112,100,000 Structure
Across the St. Lawronco.
The Canadian Government In erecting the Quebec bridge over the St.
Lawrence River, six miles above Quebec has what promises to be tho
greatest bridge in the world. It Is intended ior the trains ot the Oram!
Trunk Railroad, the cars ol the trolley lines that run up and down both
both banks of the river, the general
vehicle traffic and whatever else may
be concerned. It is Intended tu replace a bridge which fell in 1007 while
iu process of erection by the Phoenix
Bridge Co., ol Pennsylvania, Tin.
was a terrible disaster aud cost tho
lives ol more than HO men—the exact
number being unknown—ol whom 3(1
were Indians of the Caughnawaga
tribe employed as workmen. Thu Ilu-
anciui loss, which fell chiefly upon the
Government, amounted lu about $3,-
0QO.0OO.
The new Qucbeu bridge is a part of
thc grand enterprises now being carried ou by the Dominion Government
tor a continuous line ol railways be*
tweeu the two oceans. Thu section
east of Quebec has beeu under construction by thc Qovernment 'or several years and when finished will bo
leased by the Grand Trunk Railroad,
for Ull years upon a three per cent.
basis. The Government is also building the middle section Irom Quebec to
Winnipeg, which will also bu leased
by thu Grand Trunk Compuny on similar terms, and uu auxiliary company
called thu Grand Trunk Paeitlo Is
building Irom Winnipeg to thu purt of
Prince Rupert ou lhe Pacific and will
couipletu thu line beforu the end ol
next year. When this bridge is completed it will be possible to run a
truiti Irom Moncton, N.B., to Priucs
Rupert, B.C., without change.
At the point at which the bridge ls
being built the hunks ot the St. Lawrence are 200 leet high, precipitous
aud ol sandstone. The depth of tha
river is 200 (eet for a long distance
each side of the centre line, and the
current runs at a rate of about eight
miles an hour. The river here is
2,000 leet wide at low water and 2,800
teet at high water, the tide being about
15 feet. At low tide tlle sites ot the
shore piers are exposed while the
channel piers are in about 10 feet of
water.
The new bridge will surpass in several respects any other ever erected,
even thut by which railway trains
cross the Frith ol Forth, a few miles
north of Edinburgh. It will have a
span ot 1.758 leet, while the span of
the Frith and Forth bridge is 1,710
leet, that ol the Williamsburg bridge
over East River, New York, 1,600 feel;
the Brooklyn bridge, 1,595 leet; the
Lansdowne bridge in India, 820 feet)
the bridge over the Monongahcla at
Pittsburg, 812 feet, and that over tha
Mississippi at Memphis, 700 teet,
These are the largest bridges in the
world at present.
The cost of the substructure is |3,-
350,000 and ol the superstructure 18,-
650,000-a total ol 112,000,000.
JAMES   CARROLL   AN   INTERESTING FIGURE IN NEW ZEALAND.
Although Born ol Irish Parents th*
Minister ol tho Island Government,
For Native Affairs Is a Maori at
Heart and Was Brought Up Among]
*tl. People — Aro a Remarkable,
Race.
The man who is their most dlstin-j
guii-hcd leader ol the New Zealand)
Mauris to-day, though brought uu
among them, and considering himself!
true Maori in thought, is hlmieU born
ol Irish parents. He is the Hon.l
Jam is Carroll. Minister ol His Ma-,
iesty'a Government ol New Zealand!
for Native Affairs. Under his leader-]
ship, Uie Maoris have turned the tide)
of their decreasing population and1
have evolved a modem race pride'
that has set their level for future.
achievement high. With this Irishman at their head, and with the
proofs before them of what grandsons
of cannibals can accomplish in com-
petition with the white man, there io
still a luture fur the Maoris among
she civilized peoples ail the world.    ,
In build, the Maori is notable
among the sous ol man. Erect and
proud, with thc natural dignity ol an
• A Northern Utopia.
Iroquois Falls was laid out lor beauty as well as commerce, and Is being
built with the Idea ol future growth.
The T. 4 N.O. Railway station is in
the centre of 160 acres ol land, the
present limits ol the town. From
here go forth roads in every direo
tion; like a cobweb the streets run to
one centre, and that the Government
railway. These streets have been named alter the royal lamily and Earl
Grey's lamily, excepting one, and that
bears the name of Ontario's Premier.
Playgrounds and parks have been arranged where thc children can spend
happy hours tn play.
Ths Composition of a Rocket.
The ordinary skyrocket is made ol
various compositions packed in tubes
rolled tightly round a cylindrical core.
The match by which the rocket ts
exploded is placed In a cavity at the
bottom. The movement of the rocket
would be irregular if it were not for
the guide stick, which is made very
light, so that it does not retard the
flight ol the rocket when the gases
come out and hit the ground with all
their might and send the rocket up
luto the air lor all that it is worth.
He-Dearest, I am tempted to steal
a kiss.
She—Well, you don't sea a cop any.
where arouud, do you?-Phlludelpbla
Telegraph.
"How can I set this package homer ho
aaked, with huaky coush.
"I wouldn't try," tho clerk replied.   "I'd
(o and sloep It oft"
-Dallas News.
"Jones grumbles that bis wlfs can't
take a Joke."
"Thut's funny, seems to me."
"How so?" '    i
"She took Jones.'-Juds
A Colony Maker.
Mr. Algernon Edward Aspinall, secretary ol the West Indian Committee
in London, who is about to visit Canada, is one of an energetic coterie of
j Englishmen ol affairs who are making
exceptional efforts to improve tno
trade conditions oi the British West
Indian Islands. Mr, Aspinall has
held official position in several of the
West Indian colonies. He Is iu his
fortieth year, and is a man of peculiarly energetio temperament. His favorite recreation ls mountain, climbing
and walking in Switzerland, and he
is not Fatisfied il he cannot break
time records whether in walking or
climbing. When he returned to England irom the West Indies he deliberately set out to work up a West
India advancement party, and he
threw Into the work all the energy
which had made his name famous in
the Alps. He first published a pocket
guide to the West Indies which at
once resulted ln a marked increase in
tourist travel from England, and iu*
fused new life into the organizations
having the welfare ol the British West
Indies at heart. In 1898 he was elect-:
ed secretary to the West India Committee, and shortly afterwards was ap*
polned secretary of the West India
Club. About the same time he was
elected a member ot the council of
the British Cotton Growing Assocla*;
tion. A favorite project ol Mr. Arpl.
nail ls a sort ol commercial union be*
tween the .whole of the British possessions on this side ol the Atlantic In*1
eluding fhe West Indies, British Guiana, British Honduras and Canada,
and it ls believed that his approaching visit has something to do wiin1
this plan, |
*————————>        . ^. i
Looking For Harbor. J
Prol. L, C. Ellis, head oMhe T. oY
N. O. Railway Co.'a exploration par-]
ty, has lust returned to Ottawa and
he will hand his data, etc., over to'
the commission at Toronto, shortly.
The party examined the iron depos*.
its as well as agricultural possibilities
on the Ontario shore of James Bay. ]
So tar, Prol. Ellis has made no
statement, .Imt lt Is understood thai
the prinoipal aim ol tha party wai
to ascertain what possibilities there
are lor an Ontario harbor, on the'
southern shore ol James Bay, They'
examined the country Irom Cochrane
north along the Mattagaml, Ground
Hog and Moose rivers. Tha estuaries
ol the Moose at James Bay,were examined closely lor the purpose of ascertaining silt deposits.
. '
Municipal Ownership.
Western Canada it nothing tt sot
progressiva, and in no field does tha
progressiva spirit (how Itself as In
the realm ol municipal government.
Ihe most conservative taction tn a
western Canadian city would tn tha
older countries be considered radical,
11 not Socialistic ' ■  ..
Nearly all western cities own their
own waterworks systems, tha majority of them their own sleotrlo light
and power systems, aid more than
one city its own telephone system. In
Alberta the telephone system la owned by the province, and so tb* necessity ol ownership of this utility by
Ihe municipalities has bean to all talents aud purposei phvlatloV
"Life Isn't worth living," sighed tht
aad featured man,
"I quite agree with you," said the solemn looking stranger.
"Ah, then you, too, are a pessimist!"
ssld tbe sad featured man.
"No; I'm an undertaker," replied he
of the solemn vlaage.-Cblcago Tribune.
Sl-Thnt new bond yon got must
have been a clerk before he came hers.
Cyrus-Why?
Sl-Whenever ba atopa work he always tries lo put tbe pitchfork behind bla ear-Toledo Blade.
hom. I. raiiiiot.i.. MP.
athlete that Is more Celtic than Scan*
dinavlan, his temperament has mora
than one strain In it that allies him
with the irresistible Celt. His history
is lull ol myth and legend ol rare poe.
tic power. Everything in heaven and
on earth is woven for him with the
strands of fancy and romance.
Outside of the unpopularity ol war
Since peace settled d<*xu on the couutry, the visible side of Maori life is
little changed. In the villages arouud
Rotorua the great Arewa tribe carry
on the same native handicrafts as
they have for centuries, and practice
the same picturesque old rites they
brought over from mythical Hawaiiki
aeven hundred years ago. No European
oan afford to look down on their system of life which has lasted so long,
for in many ways, it was, and is today, the perfect communal state.
Land ls owned in common, but each
man must be his own carpenter, shipbuilder, fisherman, farmer, fire-maker, rigger, and sailmaker. There is
no room for drones in the Maori village. Left naked and destitute on an
uninhabited island, his training would
make him king ot men at home, and
comfortable where many a white Robinson Crusoe would perish.
A Young Hers.
In recognition oi the splendid hero-
Ism of a young miner named Frank
Smith, a monument is to be set up
at Otaga, near Dunedin, New Zealand.
Smith and a fellow miner named
Bates were at work the other day
sinking a hole in a drifting quicksand.
The hole had to be constantly pumped out as it quickly filled with sludge,
Suddenly to the men's horror Bate*
slipped and fell at the mouth ol ths
suction  pipe.   His  toe  entered  ths
fiipe, and his loot was quickly sucked
n, and then his leg was broken. Smith
sprang to his comrade's rescue, and
wrenched open the mouth ol the pipe
so at to relieve him. But the drainage water had been slowly rising
around, and belore t*e men could
escape, oozing slime surrounded their
legs encasing them as in plaster of
Paris moulds. It eventually burled
them. When the relieving shift discovered the flooded hole and pumped
It dry, they lound the young hero
standing erect quite dead, still holding his comrade's hands.
Authoress' Pseudonyms.
The preference of many women writ-
ers lor a male pseudonym is doubtless a survival of the old superstition
that to engage in the task of authorship was "unwomanly." The Bronte
sisters aet the lashion in appearing
as Currer, Acton, and Ellis Bell respectively. Their example was Iul-
lowed by George Eliot. But George Is
a name to which the distressed lady
novelist flies as to a city of refuge.
We have George Egerton, George
Fleming, George Paston, and a host
of others. Theu, too, there have been
John Oliver Hohbes, Ralph Iron,
Frank Hamel, Frank Dauby. On the
other hand, Mr. Oliver Madox Hueffer
shares with the late William Sharp
the distinction ol a feminine disguise,
for he was known to the novel-reading
publie until quite recently aa Jane
Wardle.
New Zealand's Pioneers.
An unusua] sight was witnessed at
Moturoa, New Zealand, recently, at
Uie unveiling ol the obelisk erected
to commemorate thc 70th anniversary
ot the William Brian, the first im-
migrant ship to arrive at New Plymouth. In a buggy near the obelisk
were six ladies and near by another
lady, the combined ages of whom
amounted to 581 yeurs, giving an
average ol 83 years to each. The old-
sat waa Ujt and the youngest».
Trwn Topics.
Hasten tbe fay wben there shall be
nothing shndj ub.-uit Providence except the street-.-Providence llolletln.
The elopement of two nine-year-olds
from I'hllndoiphlii la not surprising.
There are Home towns whlcb even little chl'dren cry to get away from.—
I'lttHbrrg Chronicle-Telegraph,
A Now York official aays criminals
are dilvlng the cabs In that city,
from the prices they charge It Is fair
to eon. tide thnt they ore ex-bank rob-
bora. -Cincinnati Commercial Trlliua*. THF, PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK, RRITISH COLUMBIA
G. H   THOMPSON,
Barrister, Solictor, uni.
Notary fubllo
Olllce - Held Buildings,
ORANBROOK, B, 0,
McVITTIE & PARKER
P.L.S, a, O.B.
ORANBROOK, B. C
W. F. GURD,
Barrister, Solicitor, etc.,
ORANBROOK, B.O.
HARVEY,   McCARTER,
and   MACDONALD,
Barristers and Solicitors,
CKAN BROOK, H. 0,
Oranbrook Lodge No M    A.F.4 A.M.
Regular meeting! on
«»y. the third Thursday
$lff$RL\ *jr   of every month,
<H$*^'t» Visiting brethren
wulcotnu.
A. 0. BHANKLAND,   W.M.
B   W. CONNOLLY, Becrstary
mUrtiiWMmiMmilttiWHWMulij,
Rocky Mountain Chapter I
NO.   126.   R. A. M. |
Regular meotlngs: -2nd i'ues J
day lu euch mouth at otgbt j.
o'clock. V
Sojourning Companions are -'
cordially Invited. «.
B.    H. SHORT, Serllis B,     |
Box  2112       CUANUKOOK, II.0     |
immfmmmrmfimfff.'tmr.>mmm*f
ANCIENT ORDER',: FORESTER.
lieoto ln Carmen'e Hull inl and 4th
Thursday ot eacb month at t p.m.
sharp.
A. McCowan, Chief   Ranger.
C. A. Abbott, Seeretary.
Visiting Brethren mude welcome.
COURT CRANUROOK, 8943
Knights of Pythias
Cranbrook, B.C.
Crescent   Lodge,   No.   33
Meets   every   Tuesday
at 8 p.m.  at
Fraternity Hall
T. G. Jones, 0. 0.
J. M. Boyce,
K. of R. ft 8.
Visiting   brethren cordially   invited   to attend.
J. VV. RUTLEDGE,
M.M.V., V.8..
Graduate ot Ontario Veterinary
college, Toronto ln 1898. Gradate and medalist of McKIUip
Veterinary college, Chicago, 111.
tn 1900. Registered member ol
British Columbia association.
.ll CALLS NIOHT 4 DAY PROMPTLY AITSNDEO TO
OFFICB  AT   McKINSTRY'S   LIVERY BARN
CRANBROOK, B. C.
J. T.  LAIDLAW,
Milling Engineer and
B.C. Lurid Surveyor,
i'.O   Uox 238. i'hone 223.
CRANBKOOK, B. C.
DRS. KING & GREEN
Physicians and Surgeons
OSloe at Residence,   Armstrong Ave.
OFFICE HOURS
Forenoons - - - - 9,00 to 10.00
Afternoans - - - - 2.00 to   4.00
Evenings - - - -   7.80 to   8.10
Sundays 8.80 to   4.10
IRANBROOK : B. O.
Dancing, Deportment and
Calisthenics
MISS MARION RUMSBY
(Seven Years Training under Madame
Ollvlerl, English Court
Teacher)
Classes held at the Masonic Hall.
Skirt Dancing, Gavottes, Le Minuet,
de la Cour, Reels, National, Old English and Classical Dances, etc.
A special feature made ot Physical
dances, Indian Clubs, Dumb Bella,
Balls, Spanish Arm Movements, Swedish Drill and Skipping, thereby giving Pupils the double advantage of
Physical Exercises with Dancing.
For lurther particulars address :—
POST OFFICE,  ORANBROOK, B.O.
se-tt
7 Roomed House
For Sale
Centrally Located
Three minutes from Government
buildings
Terms to  suit   buyer,  no
reasonable offer refused
For further particulars apply at tim
Prospector Office
W.  R,   BEATTY
Undertaker,
.'jnlm. mor.
l-'uiu'i'iil Director,
ORANBROOK,  B.O.
D.J.JOHNSON
CARPENTER   AND
BUILDER
00NTRA0T8 SOLICITED.
HOUSES
For   Sale or Rent at Reasonable
Pricea.
Lumsden and Lewis St.
Phone No. 338.
ADDITIONAL LOCAL
Y. Mnrtley uf Calgary, was in   the
city Saturday.
G, S. Williams of Vancouver,    waa
iu town Saturday.
J.   Miller   uf   Vancouver,   waa In
town  Saturday.
G. W, Senrio, of Seattle, was In
tho city Saturday.
Tho Albert Art studio is being reopened for hiiBineHH, opposite the
Cosmopolitan hotel, Baker utroot.
Furnished rooms on Armstrong
Avenue.     Apply   Box   LIS, 40-2t
W. Hi Drew ot Kimberley, thc genial proprietor ol the North Star
llotol, was transacting buHinonn at
Crnnhronk Saturday.
Mr. Pennington, prenident of thc
Boo*Spokane line, arrived at (Jranbrook Friday In hiB private car No.
'A, attached to a apodal train. He
left for Kootcnay Landing at Rk on
a Hpccinl.
Mrs, w. Doran who haB boon visit-
ing her brother in Montana, returned
home a^nin thin week. Her brother
who ban been flick is ' now, wo are
glad to report, well on tho way to
recovery.
The Central Mont Market had in
commission tbla week a uew delivery
wagon. It Is a dust proof affair,
and tho patrons of tho firm can ho
assured that all meats delivered will
bo clean and free from dust.
ScobeiTs Liquor, Tobacco
and Drug Cure &ttt
Alcohol, Tobacco and Drugs. It count cruets lhe
cllecta olnniHt Instantly— removci nil ctavlnga.
Altei taking the treatment there will never be any
need tuttrinlc intoxicants or use iIiuru again, Can
be given secretly. We have yet to hear ol one
failure. Mailed under Bflpurato cover to any ml-
dress. Price l">.0O box, or 1) boxes for 810 00. Th«
Suobell Drug Co., St. Catharlnei, Out.
A meeting of the Cranbrook-Fernle
Farmer's Institute will be held at
Mighton Hall, on Wednesday, tho
18th day of October, 1911, at 8 p.
m. Business will he brought forward to arrango for Govornment
speakers. Admission free. The
public in general (including ladies')
are cordially Invited to attend.
For Sale.
Four Room House--New,
Neat and Well-built. Cheap
and on Easy Terms. Apply
Owner,  care of Prospector.
Miss Sarah Wilson and Harley
James Davis wore united in marriage
last Saturday evening, Octolier 14th.
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
Leask. Rev. W. R. Dunham of the
Methodist Church, olliciated. About
twenty guests sat down to the wedding supper. The bride and groom
■were supported by Mr. and Mrs, A.
Gardner.
Mr. and    Mrs. Davis    will for the
Woman's character may be likened
to a postage stamp—one black mark j
ruina it. Man's character may he
likened to a greenback—no matter
how many Btains it still passes at,
Par* This is certainly not a Just
standard yet it has been established
by society the world over.
MISS    JANETTE   MATHER
Rceives Pupils for Pianoforte
Instruction.
Apply over B. H. Short's Store.
Armstrong Avenue,
CRANBROOK, B. C.
tlrao-botng make thoir bo...e in Slaterville. Mr. Davis is employed at
the Bast Kootenuy mill.
1<\ S. Lorraine, representing tho
Madame Sherry Company, was in
town  Sntnrdny.
Cabinet photos at $3.60 per dozen
until the 28th inst. Take advantage of tlie low price now ! Albert
Art Photo Studio.
Do you know whnt sphere of life
you cau make a grand success nf because you would bavo very little
competition ? Try minding your own
business and see for yourself.
isn't it strange how much trouhlo
some meu take to "put their schemes through" when nil tbat is neces
sary is to leave tbem alone and thoy
will  "fall through."
The provincial government officials
have ordered tbo cutting down of all
tho trees east of the government
building, which is an improvement.
If tho ontiro block 0u which the
building is erected, was mado Into a
park It would be an attraction whoro
many citizens would spend an evening during summer mouths.
Ono day recently wo were compli-
montod by a stranger upon tho neatness of tho streets and nlleys of our
town. Our town Ib ono of the cleanest in the province yet we want it
to boat tbo record and there Is M;U1
room for improvement. Get busy
people, and clean up any little rubbish that may he around your home.
A rubbish pile grows like a wood unless it is removed, nnd the older it
grows, the moro bothersome to remove Attend to it while il is in
its infancy.
Special   Meeting
City Fathers.
of
I A special meeting ot tlie city council was held on Tuesday evening in
the council chambers. Tbere were
present Mayor   Hunt, and    A1 ter men
■ McNabb,  Johnson, Jackson,  Bowness
'and Campbell.
Mr. Bert McPhee, representing the
Cranbrook Electric Light Co., being
in attendance, was given permission
to address the council re an account
(due his company.
On motion of Aldermen Campbell
and Johnson, it was moved that the
accounts of the Craubrook Electric
Light Co., be referred to the tire
and police committee with power to
act,—Carried.
Communications from George Ashworth, R. B. Benedict, of Crnnbrook;
and j. B. Sutherland, of Oalgary,
applicants for the position of City
Auditor wero rend and tiled.
j   Communications from  Jobu Ohold-
jitch of Cranhrook,  It.   W.   McDonald
of Nelson, and N. S. Harrison,    also
applicants for auditor were read and
on motion filed.
Mr.  John Choldltrh of Cranbrook,
was, on motion, appointed ns auditor
for the ensuing year.
Aldermen Oampbell ami McNabb,
moved that leave be granted to Introduce by-law No. "Ji*. By-law No,
91) wna then rend a !lrnt nml second
time. Tho council theu resolved
into a committed of the whole with
the mayor in the cbnir to discuss
by-law No.   91*.
It was moved by Aldormen Campbell and Bowness, that the council
adjourn.
Because everyone nil over the country is humming, singing or whistling
some numbers of the score of thc big
srnsattonal musical success, "Madame
Sherry," tho impression is current n
somo quarters that the produntiritra
charm is in grentcr part musical, Report says that the mirth qualities of
the play are no less engaging thi i
Its acore. Tho love of a man for a
maid under old circunwtantDS. love
of the soulful, romantic sort, love
tbat blossoms in tlui heart of youth
and flourishes as true love ever does,
when things do not go smoothly, is
tho reigning spell of tho production,
according to report, but this love,
this courtship is so beaut on so mauy
sides, and attended by so many misadventures, that while itself remaining an appealing intern it, alt its accessory situations nrouso amusement.
Some idea of the fun developed may
perhaps be gleamed by i summu/ of
tho character of tho play which be
sides thc lovers include an Italian
house janitor, his Irish wife, a lively fun-loving actress, a New York
man ahout town, an excitable Venezuelan, an amusingly whimsical uncle
of the maid in love, and others, including thc pupils of a dancing
school and thc guests of a yachting
party.
HOUSEHOLDERS MUST REGISTER OR LOSE VOTE
The municipal voters' list is open
and thoBe qualitied may register at
tho city hall or before tt commissioner for taking affidavits, until, Oct.
31. Any person who is a British
subject of the full ago of 21 years,
who has been a resident of the city
since January 1 last and who has
paid the road tax and other taxes up
to date is eligible to bo placed on
the Hat. Everyone, who is not the
assessed owner of property and on
thc assessment roll as such, must register in order to obtain thc (ranch-
JOE JACKSON. POSTMASTER
On Sntnrdny last Mr. Joseph Jackson received hiB appointment as
postmaster of Crnnbrook.    Mr. Jack
I son    was   sworn before Judge J. A.
! Arnold, and assumed his duties as
postmaster on Saturday afternoon.
New Brunswick Cabinet Ministers Sworn In
Frederic ton, N.H-. net, ig.—The
Clemming government war sworn in
this afternoon as follows i Hon. J.
: K. Flemmlng, Hon. w. c. H. Grim*
mer, attorney general, Hon. H. Y.
McLeod, provincial secretary, Hon.
John Morrissey, public work-! commissioner, Mr. Landry, agricultural
commissioner, Hon. Robert Maxwell,
and J. A. Murray without portfolios
The solicitor generalship is not filled,
| Flood Canada With Bad Bills
! Ottawa, Oct. IH. ■ Secret service
Officers of Canada are watching for
i thn source from which the counterfeit $•! bills nre being sent Into Canada from the United States. The
l|4 note Ih nn easy one to counterfeit
I according to tho officers of tho Immigration department, and thoy are
| constantly meeting with bogus ones
, in their work along the border.
Counterfeit bills which are being circulated, are carried into Canada by
I innocent looking peoplo* and are then
| put into circulation.
Will  Survey   Expired  Leases
Mr. T. T. McVittie, P.L.S., bus received instructions from tbe minister
of lands to survey expired timber
leases In the vicinity of Cranbrook,
Marysville, Kimberley and Fort
Htoele, nnd to report on the character of the soil for agricultural purpoB-
es. in having these lauds surveyed,
it is probably the intention of tho
provincial government to open up
these tracts for settlement. When
these lands are thrown open for settlement thero will be a large influx
of settlers who will locate in tbe immediate vicinity of the towns above
mentioned,
Must Admit to Imperial Councils
UP IN THE SKY
A large balloon was sent up from
Cranbrook on Monday afternoon by
Eugene Casserta, The object In
Bending up tbe balloon was In honor
of the victories gained by the Italians over the Turks.
The balloon was 4C feet in diameter and 2G feet in length. In passing over the city the balloon caused
Borne excitement as to who Bent it
up, and their reason for ao doing.
London, Oct. IC.—Tho Karl of Dudley, first governor general of the
Commonwealth of Australia, speaking at Kidderminster said :
"The day has come when the over-
sens dominions must ho admitted as
partners in the councils of tho empire. We must never relax our efforts to bring about closer co-operation. Upon success along such lines
eventually depends Britain's existence ns a first class power."
Gives Manitoba Shock
Winnipeg, Man., Oct. IB—Consternation was coined here today by
an   order   issued   by   the Canadian
. minister of railway.-; at Ottawa stop-
1 ping oil construe lion work on the
National Transcontinental railway.
This is a Dominion government rood.
running from Winnipeg to Moncton,
N.B., to be leased ly tbe Grand
Trunk I'acilic railway when completed. The order also applies to work
OD the $8,000,000 railway shops
building a few miles east of here.
The new government, it is believed,
will at once order nn inquiry into
the expenditures of tbe system.
The October Rod and Gun
On the eve of the opening of the
big game hunting season, Bod and
Cun in Canada, published by W. J.
Taylor, Limited, Publisher, Woodstock, Ont., is to the fore with a
plentiful supply of good game hunting stories, covering Canada from the
Atlantic to the Pacific, The opening
story by Mr. Bonnycastle Dale in
particularly good, consisting of a
line description of the gallant efforts
of a little fawn to escape, its rescuo
by tbe sportsman whoso best instincts were aroused by its bope.ess
struggle, and its capture and revival
by the potting showered upon it. The
whole narrative makes an irresistible
appeal to tbo highest ideals of Hporte
mansbip and proves u capital opening for a number which Includes hunting of many varieties and under
widely different conditions. Mr.
IStarratt's paper on Woodcock
Shooting in Nova Scotia is another
article winch stands out prominently
as one which cannot fail to stir tbe
feelings nnd the memories of all bird
hunters and make them live many of
their experiences over again. Big
game hunting, however, is given tbe
pride of place in tbis number, and it
is a foregone conclusion that in many
a camp throughout this broad Dominion Rod and Cun will prove not
only an acceptable but an Indispensable companion. Many an important article of the outlit would |»o
less missed than tbis number. Those
who have thc arrangements for the
hunting parties and camps so general next month throughout the Canadian woods will please take notice.
A wet day in camp can bo passed
most pleasantly with o copy of the
big game hunting number of Rod and
Gun In Canada.
There is nothing that causes so
much trouble among neighbors as
chickens. Poor chickens I If they are
blamed for all tbo enemies they bavo
made In this world tbey have scores
of black marks against them. It
seems strange tbat people will let
their chickens run. They certainly
aro no improvement to a pretty
lawn. Now is the time when chickens can do the greateHt damage to
flower gardens and vegetable gardens.
Now in hot weather is thc time people lose their temper tho easiest over
trirlea, Keep up your oblckens and
keep the good will of your neighbors.
Provincial Elections' Act
Cranbrook Electoral District
TAKE NOTICE that I have received objections in writing to the retention oi the following names on the Register of Votors for the Cranbrook Electoral District on the grounds as stated below .
AND take notice that nt a Court of Revision to be held on the 6th
day of November, 1911, at the Court House in Cranbrook at ten o'clock
in the forenoon, I shall hear and determine thc said objections, and unless such named persons, or some other Provincial Voter on their behalf.
BatlsfleB me that such objections are not well founded, I shall strike auoh
names off the said Register. ^ q   ^^
Acting Registrar of Voters.
Dated this   13th day ot October,   1911.
The following persons are reported absent trom the district:
No.
Name
Placo
************<
1  W. Cline j
—o-~
OI III* old Mitimii.M Hnrlinr
Shop A-tit tmw he found lu tha
MANITOBA HOTEL
First Class Work In
all   branches of  the
;; Tonsorial   Art;
2B Abbott, Robert   Cranbrook
IIB Aikins, James Andrew   Oranbrook
12    AlklnB, Robert Samuel  Cranbrook
14    Alexander, Robert Scott   Cranbrook
38B Ansell, Charles James  Cranbrook
43    Armitage, Clark    Mayook
47    Armstrong, James  .'  Cranbrook
63    Atkinson, John   Cranbrook
71    Babbitt, Charles Samuel   Cranbrook
710 Bagan, Patrick   Cranbrook
740 Baird, William   Oranbrook
75    Baker, Delmer Washburn  Cranbrook
79    BakoB, Peter   Cranbrook
84    Ballard, Isaac   Cranbrook
86    Barclay, Hugh   Cran'u-ook
92    Barnot, Peter lnilrie   Cranbrook
97    Barr, John Edward   North Star
104    Bartley, Oeorge Henry   Oranbrook
1C7    Barton, Michnol Edgar   Oranbrook
138B Blbeault, Arthur   Oranbrook
142    Blnkley, Unniel Franklin   Oranbrook
168    Blondin, Oslaa   Cranbiviok
173    Boss, Arthur J  Cranhrook
175B Bougie, Edouard   Cranbrook
183    Bradford, William Henry   Marysville
188 ' Brunch, Henry   Crnnbrook
Cranbrook
.. Wnrdner
Cranbrook
Cranbrook
206B Bristow, Oliver	
212    Brooks, Claude Ernest 	
225B Brown, Herbert George	
227B Brown, Robert	
233    Brownlee, James   ?,,n!":00l!
235    Bryans, Frederick 	
241    Bugler, Herbert Stanley Dare..	
243B Bunting, Aubrey	
249    Burns, John 	
252    Hums, Robert   ?anbroo!<
258    Burton, Alfred Burgess 	
262    Burton, William Thomas	
263B BusBlors, John 	
268B Call,  John Gordon 	
279    Cameron,  James William 	
John Alexander   Oranbrook
Dennle  Crnnbrook
Frank  Crnnbrook
JameB   Crnnbrook
John Aloxandor   Cranbrook
 Yahk
  Cranbrook
Cranbrook
Oranbrook
Oranbrook
Crnnbrnok
Crnnbrook
Cranlirook
Crnnbrook
  Yahk
Cranbrook
281 Cameron,
288B Campbell,
29(1 Campbell,
291B Camphell,
29,1    Campbell,
805    Carllon, OBcar 	
307B Carmlchaol, Norman
336    Chapman, Charles Alexander   Fort Steelo
872    Clemmcr, Austin  X.  Cranbrook
376B Clubb, Joseph PreBley    Moyle
392 Connolly, Edward Worthlngton  Cranbrook
393 Connolly, Hobart Elliott  Cranbrook !
394 Conover, Clarence Frederick  Marysville
411    Corrison, Francis Edward   Cranbrook
600    Dischaw, James Louis   Crnnhrook
512    Dormer, Robert   Wardner
597    Fllleul, ThomaB   Cranbrook
612B Flandera, Frank  ■  Cranbrook
C56    Fuller, Archie  Cranbrook
657    Fuller, Henry Edward  Cranbrook
663    Oagne, Oeorge   Cranbrook
678    GaBklll, Charles Aaron   Cranbrook
702    Gillespie, Malcolm  • Cranbrook
716    Godin, Joseph  Cranbrook
724    Gordon, William Angus   Cranbrook
729B Oraham, Herbert Robert   KlngBgatc
732    Grant, Alexander Mcintosh   Cranbrook
737    Grant,  William   Cranhrook
739    Gray,  Joseph  Cranhrook
800    Haslom, William   Cranbrook
849    Hodnett, Herbert   Cranbrook
851    Hogarth, Roland Douglas   Cranbrook
866    Houle, Euclide   Wattsburg
881    Hughes, Robert  Cranbrook
884 Hume, Allan '.   Moyie
885 Hume, Allen   Cranbrook
893    Kbbotson, William A  Cranbrook
930    Johnston, Erastus Dorian!   Cranbrook
1048    Leclare, Eugene   Oranbrook
1072B Llmond, William   Cranhrook
1G85B Long, Francis Granville  ^   Moyie
1089    Lougheed,  Johnston   Oranbrook
1097    Lye, Frank     Wycllfle
1102    Madigan, Patrick Frank  Cranbrook
1106B MUhot, Leo  .,  Cranbrook
1137    MasBon, Octave  Cranbrook
1143B Maynard, Napoleon   Cranbrook
1154B Mercure, Clarissa  Cranhrook
1172 Miller, John Wesley   Moyle
1173 Miller, Lyman Kennedy  ;  Cranlirook
1209    Morln, Alphonso Simon   Cranbrook
1218B Morton, Leslie   Cranbrook
1245    McAfee, John   Cranhrook
1247    McAlpine, Percy Jacob  Cranhrook
1250    McArthur, William Albert   Cranhrook
1261    Macauley, Robert William   Cranbrook
1268    McCormlck, Patrick   Cranlirook
1273    McCullough, Allen   Cranbrook
1310    McDonald, Wm. Maclay   Cranbrook
1317A McDougall, Alexander   Cranlirook
1328    McEachern, John Stewart     Moylo
1329B McElroy, Angus    Wattsburg
1331 McEwan, Duncan   Oranbrook
1332 McFaddcn, John George   Cranhrook
1333 MacFarlane, Alexander   Cranbrook
1349    MclnniB, Hugh   Cranhrook
1361    McKay,  Murdock   Crnnbrook
1371    Mackenzie, ThomaB OhlBholm   Crnnhrook
1374 McKlllop, Donald Alex  Cranbrook
1375 McKlnnn, David   Cranhrook
1380    McKnlglit, Alonzo   Crnnbrook
1402    McLellnn, Pctor Finlay   Oranbrook
1421    McNeill,  James Alexander   Crnnbrook
1425    McPeak, Willinm Francis   Oranbrook
144C    McVlttle, Harry Hamilton   Oranbrook
14511) Newman, John 0  Oranbrook
1477    Oxondalo, John   Oranbrook
1484    O'Neil, Frcemnn   Oranbrook
1486 O'Neill, Murk Andrew   Oranbrook
1487 Pago. Percy  Oranbrook
1533    Peterson, Frank James   Oranbrook
1664    Prudcn,  Jacob   Oranbrook
1573    Rao, Thomas Robert   Oranbrook
1674    Raison, Sidney George   Oranbrook
1680    Road,  Frank    Cranbrook
1585    Reeves, Frederick William  Cranbrook
1590    Reid, Charles    Watteburg
1596    Renton, Sydney Charles   Cranbrook
1604 Rlne, Frank Henry   Cranbrook
1605 Rioux,  William    Cranbrook
10U6    Robinson, Hugh Miller   Cranbrook
1637    Rollins, Victor Albert   Cranbrook
11147    Rowan, William H  Cranbrook
1648    Rowe, John  :  Cranbrook
1650A Rupert, Bcugue Herbert   Cranbrook
1651    Russell, Edward Samuel  Cranbrook
1664    Rutherford,  Samuel    Cranbrook
1655    Rutledge, Alexander  Cranbrook
1657    Rutledge, LesHie Nixon   Cranbrook
1660    Ryan,  Edward    Cranbrook
1669    Sait, Henry    Moy*e
1675    Santonl,  Lewis   Cranbrook
1688    Scott,  Walter   Cranbrook
1705    Shorpe, James   Oranbrook
1734    Smith, Charles   Cranbrook
1737    Smith, Eugene   Cranbrook
1746    Smith, Lewis Mitchell   Cranbrook
1753 Smyth, Oeorgo Cordon   Cranbrook
1754 Sneddon, William  Cranbrook
1757    Sneddon, John  Cranbrook
1761 Sorenson, Gilbert    Baker
1762 Sorge. William   Cranbrook
1778    Stalker, Niel Sinclair  Cranbrook
1795    Steward, Horace   Cranbrook
1807 Stewart, Richard   Cranbrook
1808 Stewart, Royal Alexander   Cranbrook
1814    Stone, Edward Charles  Cranbrook
1814B Stone, William .Edwardi  Cranbrook
1817    Stouffer,  Fred  Cranbrook
1831    Sumption, William Richard   Cranbrook
1911    Symes, Harry Hayward   Cranbrook
1861    Theaker, John   Cranbrook
1863    Tlilffault, William   Cranbrook
1865B Thomas, George W  Cranhrook
1868    Thompson, John   Cranbrook
1870 Thompson, Louis  Cranbrook
1871 Thomson, Andrew    Baker
1883    Tisdale, David Price   Cranbrook
1896    Torphy,  Michael   Cranbrook
1891B Townsend, Sydney   Cranbrook
1894 Travis, John Church   Cranbrook
1895 Trevclyen, Henry Berrington   Cranbrook
1907    Vaughan, Charles William   Cranbrook
1909    Verfaille, Camllle   Cranbrook
1917    Wnlker, Daniel   Cranbrook
1939    Ward,  Frederick George    Cranbrook
1977B Whipple, Henry   Cranbrook
1995    WilllaniB,  Augustue Arnold   Cranbrook
2013 Wilson, Harry S  Cranbrook
2014 Wilson. John William   Cranbrook
2015 Wilson, Robert    Moyie
21)40    Workman, John   Cranbrook
2042    Worsley, Francis   Oranbrook
2064    Young, William   Cranbrook
The following persona are reported aa deceased :
155    Birtch, William John   Nortb Star
17411 Bottomley, Allen   Cranbrook
382.11 Ooghlll, Hobort (lair    Yahk
482    Dcsaulnlcr, Odlllon    M°yl»
632    Forrest, Timothy    Moyle
838    Hlgglnt, Patrick   Crapbrook
979    Kerr, Henry  Augustus   Cranbrook
11921) Montgomery,  Daniel    Cranbrook
1608    Roberta,  Edward   Cranbrook
1668    Ryckman,  William Syrian   Cranbrook
1776    Stark,  Frank     Fort Steole
1789    Sleeves, Isaac   Cranbrook
Tho following persons Bre reported a» not qualified whon placed on the
list :	
924    Johnson, Mark   Oranbrook THK  PROSPKITOR,  CRANHROOK,   HRITISH COLUMBIA
When YOU want a
|| Heating  Stove j
m-H-H-M H+l+m+H-Ht   ********
WE Want to Show
You Our Line,
IT'S HERE
LET IS SHOW YOU A
NEW  MODEL
TEA KKTTLE; IT'S ONE Ol Till:
HANDIEST KITCHEN t'TEXSILS
WE HAVE
LOCAL NEWS.
■ ■ ********************
• i |    Kilhy frames pictures.
W. J, Barttey ol Vancouver,    was
In town Friday.
J, J, Woods ot Fernie, was in town
Friday.
v. K. Roberts of Vancouver,    was
at the Cranbrook Thursday.
J. Roberta, of Winnipeg, waa     In '
town  Thursday.
N. Hanson came In from Wasa    on
| J   Tuesday on  businoBs.
,,     It.  D.  Huggard of MaryavlUe, was
iu town Tuesday.
KOR     SALE—On.    uow    Malleable
T   Steel Stump Puller at a bargain   The
Oraaboook Trading Oo., Ltd,
Harry   Mather  nud  11.   Wenlei       of
Port  Steele,  wern ill town Monday.
,,     Mr   nn,i Mr>. A. li. Fenwiek
.» Oraubrook visitors Monday.
WH+rtlWHI llll H'M
'•
About
:: Aeroplanes ::
We know
Nothing
BUT
lu regard t«> i*a pi i i*» ■ "
Watches and Jewelry we
know tuosttv nil tbut ih vvurtli
kuow lng, Try um with your
ih'xi copal i* |i'i> niul in' fuii-
vtncod,
ENGRAVING
in an> Htyledu " the
IH'emlneM
Raworth Bros.
Jewelers and Opticians
C, i' R  Watoh Inspector*
A. S. Uuudeve, M.I'., pnased
through Crnnbrook Thursday afternoon on his way to Ottnwa.
vere
■■      AUnn   M.   Moore,   oi   Frank
[\   was in town Tuesday.
U.   J.   Jackson, ut
in  the city  Tuesday.
Alta..
B&ndpoint, wa
! F. Parks & Co.
Hardware, Stoves,
House Furnishing Goods
CRANBROOK,        -        Hritish Columbia
Mrs,   H.   It,   Bawyer  Ol   MaryHville.
wu» shoppniK  in Cranbrnok Tnesttay
C. M. IVnnuck, of War.tner. was Id
totiw Tuesday
Mr. and Mra. C, Boucher ot Nelson
were Crauhrook visitors Monday.
Uid yuu get -a pair ot Taylor
Shut?**': Wi* we selling thorn
still at |2.95 Thoy are worth
M 00    C  C. S
T.     B,   Ilradley   ol   SeUon,  a    rom
niemai traveller wHw tranMoUng bu
■inees at Cranbrook Monday
PreedemonstraUouof Cowap'a
dol ion mis uooott, chocolate aud
Icings, tor uiio week ;it Kink's
Pure Pood Grocery Everybody
Invited and will be made wei-
come
Some nice tea eota tor children.
Prices  from   50c.   to    W.00.   Campbell
.*i Klannlng.
K. Q, Manley and C. J, Mor muck
ot Seattle, were registered at the
, Cranbrook Monday.
A. Johnson o( U!thbn..Ke, and 1).
A, Uruce of Calgary, were guests at
the Cranbrook Monday.
Mr. and MrB. G. Broder of Vancouver, were Cranhrook visitors Thursday.
Anything in the Stove line at
Kast Kooteuay Produce and
Provision Mouse.
Mr.  and Mrs.   J.  Taylor,   Mr.   and
Mrs. Y. Coles n( London, were gueats
lat the Cranbrook Thursday.
Mr. nnd Mrs, A. Sinclair, of Blair
■ more, were registered at the ('ran
brook Thursday.
POR 8ALH-A  tloek o( May hatch
I od    white   rock    nud    leghorn fowls.
' Apply at Haptittt Parsonage, Norbury
Avenue
Over $17,00(1 worth ot real property
changed hands in Cranhrook during
ihe past   two weeks,
0, K Jones, P. C, Hill and It. M.
I'ophan of New York, wore reglslwrud
al the Crnnhrook  Wednesday.
Mr. aud Mm. Y M Young, and
Mrs. W H Tendei ot Yovt Steele,
were Cranhrook visitors Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs, T. Thornton ot Van-
ouver, were guest a at  the Crauhrook
W.   Crosaley  ol  Montreal,   wa
town Monday.
One New, Malleable Steel
Stump Puller
For Sale At a Bargain
The Cranbrook Trading Co., Ltd.
CRANBROOK,
WANTBD—This year's Pullets, cash
or trade.      Reply, stating breed   and
Did yon    ever   get in ss the clock - when   hatched   to    "8"    Prospector
struck    one,    and    your  wife  struck   Office.
too? From  Madame Sherry. ,    ,,
  j    Mrs,  L.  Griffiths returned this week
D.    G,    McPhail   of Moyie.  was in ; from a holiday trip to the Old Coun-
town Monday. (try.
H.   Frankman,   of    Bonners  Ferry, j    a closed cab is the kind that     al-
, was in town Monday. : ways  goes    slower.      From   Madame
Sherry.
Orders taken for green or dry wood i 	
;any length.     Campbell & Manning. Did you get ;i   pair  of  Taylor
T.   W.   rlebbard of Creston,  was at  Shoes?       We   are   Selling    them
the Cosmopolitan Monday. .still lit ¥2.95,      They   are   worth
In    every  man    there    is an Ada... |"      ■    *•'■   **■ •   •*5,
Wednesday.
ROOMBRB WANTHD—Oentratly located.     Apply to Phone   180 or P.O.
Box   178.
Harry Y. Behnson, M.P.P., of
Victoria, was a guest at the (.rnnbrook Thursday.
B. 0. Stanley ami M, 0, Meyers of
Toronto, were guests at the Cranbrook Thursday.
Canada has given a royal welcome
to its governor general. The Duke of
Connaught will tind Canada true    to
the Kmpire and British traditions.
Wo employ only competent
workmen to fix up all our stoves
Kast Kooteuay Produce and
Provision House.
To be on tbe safe Bide of matrimony, marry either a bachelor or a
widower.   From Madame Sherry.
Gums
Rifles   Revolvers
Ammunition
We wish to draw your attention
to the following
Specials
Savage   303   Featherweight
Remington 30-30  Rimless
Mauser 7 m 7
Mauser  Pistols
Everything   in   Shells,   Cartridges   and
Loaded   Shells
ii Hunting Knives
Cartridge Belts ii
l J. D. McBride I
Wholesale Hardware Retail
:!    Phone 5
Box  195
who    biteB   at    the   apple
Madame Sherry.
F.   S.    Kesler.
town Monday.
Fro,n j    Mrs. James KoBter left on Monday
! tor Calgary on a visit to her parents
of Moyie, was    in !    The  rM( g<   ""v court
I was heins painted this week.
house
CN. Nelson, jr., of Wycliffe,   was MrB   _,   „   R,      retm.ned this WMk
nt the Cosmopolitan Monday.
J. C. Phillipps, of Toronto, was in |
from an extended eastern visit.
the city Monday.
F. H. Lutz of Montreal, was at
the Cranbrook Monday.
Cleanliness is next to Godliness, we handle both at East
Kootenay Produce and Provision
House.
Fresh fruit and vegetables of all
kinds, daily shipment. Campbell &
Manning.
J. S, Stoddart of Windermere, was
at thc Cosmopolitan Sunday last.
A. 0. Clarke of Moyie, was in town
Monday.
B. C. Hay of Nelson, waB in town
Sunday last.
W. Henderson of Victoria, was in
town Sunday last.
Mrs. J. Woolf of Fort Steele, was
a Cranbrook  visitor Monday.
Many a man labors under a misapprehension who was never known to
labor under any other circumstances.
From Madame Sherry.
F. A. Macfarlane and K. A. Hyde,
of Boston, Mass., were Cranbrook
visitors Tuesday.
Mrs. Fabert and Mrs. Donahoe ol
Wasa, were shopping in Cranbrook
Tuesday.
' * j Mrs. Wells and family left on Tuesday niRht'H dyer for a month's viBit
• ■ I to her sister at Morningside, Alta.
■'!    Mr.  nnd  Mrs.  Percy    Cob  returned
J M Monday from a holiday trip to    the
J Old Country.
PYoe demonstration of Cowan's
delicioufl cocoa, chocolate, and;
icings, for oue week at Pink's
$ I Puna Food t j rocery. Everybody i
Invited nnd   will  bo  made  wel- ■
Homemade candy,   20 centB per It.
Saturday only, The Palm.
Mr.   and    Mrs.    W. S. Bush   were
Cranbrook visitors Wednesday.
B. H. Pnrcell, of Chicago, wan at
the Cranhrook Wednesday.
H.  N.   Jones of Olde,  Alta.,
in town Wednesday.
J.   M.   Everett of Nelson, was   in
the city Wednesday.
G. K. Kllis of Winnipeg, was      in
town Wednesday.
J. A. Voelter of Chicago,  was    at
the Cranbrook Wednesday.
Free demonstration of Cowan's
delicious cocoa, chocolate and
icings, for one week at Fink's
Pure Food Grocery. Everybody
invited and will be made welcome.
J. R. Coggin, of London, was In
town Thursday.
Barrister G. H. Thompson was at
Fernie Thprsday.
0. McNeely of Calgary, was in the
city Thursday.
Stoves, Heaters, Ranges, ut
prices that defy competition.
Kast   Kootcnay    Produce    and
Provision House.
B. H. Harris of Moose Jaw, wns at
the Cranbrook Thursday.
A. L. Cousins of Marysville,      was
in town Thursday.
Orange Maize, a deliciotm breakfast
food.     Campbell & Manning.
L. Graham of Fernie, was in      the
city Thursday.
M. Wilson,    of    Montreal,    was in
town Thursday.
Constable    J.    Walsh Hnd    II.     T. j    H. Price and R.  V.   Johnston      of
J | Richardson  of  Port Steele,  wns    In I Vancouver, werc registered at       the
town Monday. 'Cranbrook Tuesday.
71    j.   i. Alexander government agent,
* ' of Fernie, was registered at the Cos
J. T
;r
•. I mopolltan  Sunday last.
A. Carney of Kaslo. provincial
government timber inspector, was in
town this week.
Mr,  and    Mrs.    P,   Doran  returned
i »   Sunday last from a holiday trfp    to
points in  Nebraska.
HHIHUI11111 III III til 111 IIU I Milt llllll
Dr. de Van's Female Pills
A nlliblt French reguliior; uever telle. TheM
pills ere eiceeditigly powerful In regulating thl
generttlve portion ul llio lemele lyetem.   Refuel
,,,    . .. „.    ...    . ,    nil cheep imlletlone.   Dr. de> ▼•■'• are eold el
E. S.  Wadsworth, (•. T.  Wadsworth , ti* bot'or three for 110.   Milled to enyiddreee.
and  H.  A.  (Milan of Montreal, spent   "»••»•» ***** ©••■ ■!. Cfclh-wiMt, Orel
Sunday  Inst  in  ('rnnbrook,
  R. Gamble and T. Wright of Moyie
+ |    P,   McL.  Fletcher ot  Hosmer,     was   we" *llmUl Ri tne Oanbrook   Tues-
■. | registered  at  the    Cranbrook  Thurs-' "ay'
■ ►   day
■ »   J. Wcvnr, of Montreal! and A.    B.
::! electric Restorer lor Men °l0'^ «' 7"r™t"',m" n****-"*
"   PhtMDhonol •'•>«« ....ri.ar.aii, iha bod, «l **** Crunhrnok Wf«lnP»afty.
, , i .Itn.od vllalllv.  J'r.wetma decay "nti all, eiual        .    ,    .,       .,        ...
,   ..akiu.a a.attwl at anca.   rbo.pbo.ol .ill     Jack VenalileH of Vancouver,     wa»
+ la'kV.°ll^f"n7a°dd,«.c,&WCn,B,i3 town   W^nexlny    nlm.lng hands
ii*..
h.O.lli.rl.u.Oll
with hii many Irlcnda.
"Its an ill wind that blows nobody
any good," said the zephyr that
wafted Joseph Jackson from the C.
F.R. into'the Cranbrook poBt office.
On Wednesday afternoon the ladiea
of the Knox church congregation
took occasion of the anniversary of
tho pastor's marriage to present him
with a purse of gold.
Kilby, practical picture tramer,
Armstrong Avenue. Splendid selection of moulding.
Mat Armstrong who died on the
14th inst., of typhoid fever, is still
being held at Deatty's Parlors
awaiting instructions from his family
who live in Ontario.
Did yuu get a pair of Taylor
Shoes? We are selling them
still at 12.95. They are worth
#4.00.   C. (J. S.
S. B. Hicks, P. R. Laviogton and
P. Stark of Wycliffe, were guests at
the Oranbrook Tuesday.
R. Walmsley, O. Stark, and P.
Black of Creston, were in town Tuesday.
Born—At the Home hospital, Cranbrook, October 10th, to Mr. and Mrs
J. A. McDonald, a son.
citrons.
Preserving   prunes     and
Campbell A Manning.
Born—At the Home hospital, Cranhrook, on Tuesday, October 17th, to
Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Norris, a son.
FOR SALE—One new Malleable
Steel Stump Puller at a barga'n. The
Cranbrook Trading Co., Ltd.
Snacks served  from    10 a.m.
10.30 p.m. The Palm.
to
The sewer contractors installed an
electric-driven contrlfugal pump thts
week, which is expected to keep tbe
wwer trenches free from water.
Or. P. W. Oreen returned Monday
from a hunting trip in Alberta. Thc
doctor reports small game ns being
plentiful.
Hay—How about that picture you
have got in tbe drawer, lt wlll look
better on tho wnll.
Kilby frames pictures.
J. L, Brnilshnw of Winnipeg, A. J.
Smith nnd A. V. White of Toronto,
were registered at the Cranbrook on
Thursday.
Diil yon got a pair of Tuylor
Shoos? We arn soiling them
.lllll iU %'i 65. Thoy are worth
fl U0.   c. c. s.
T. T. McVittie, P.L.8., of Fort
.Steele, was in the city several days
this week making arrangements for
tho Immediate surveying of expired
timber leases in the vicinity of Cranbrook.
Government Agent J. T. Alexander
of Fernie, was In town Saturday
last, and during tho nfternoon left
wltb K. Small on an anto trip tu the
Windermere country.
A woman Is happy whose chlUrm
arc younger than herself. Prom
Madame Sherry.
If you bave any old clothes, etc.,
that nre not In use, will you please
send to Salvation Army quarters on
Hanson Ave., or phone Salvation
Army, 203.
They wlll be given away to deserving cases.
,PRBD. A. 8TRIDB,
OUcer In Charge.
On Sale!
Two Ladies Persian Lamb Coats to
ro  CHEAP.
Several second - hand Clothes and Suits for
hoth Ladies and (ientlemens requirements
To He Obtained At
"My Valets"
NIBLOCK & BARKER
Phone 370
They make a Specialty of
Cleaning, Pressing and Alterations.
Wo aro Agoiils for tho 'Whito Sowing
Machine" whloh is tlio hest on tho market loilay.   Wo invito yon to «a!l and look
our stock ovor.   Il will surprise you.
Secondhand Sowing Machines bought and sold
Have you seen our New Electric Cleaner?
Especially    installed    for   Ladies   Work.
■H..H.,.,H,..,H„H,H,,.,. I ■■...,',■■■  •M-++-M-M
^t-lj^^nilllllllllllHililllllll lllll llll ||.
LAKE   VIEW   HOTEL    ::
St.   Mary's   Lake,   B. C.
P, Hundley, Prop.
Tho most attractive Outing Resort iu East Kootenay
Good Hunting, Fishing, and Hunting
Boats to Lot, Horses for Hire
For furt her information apply to
P.  Handley, Central   Hotel
Marysville,  B. C.
*MHr-l"l"t»l"»-l--l-'t"l*-l"l"|"l"|M|..|,.|,,|^.,|..|..|..|..|.,|..|.,|..I,.t.,l.lt,,|..|.,|,,t..|.l|,,<,.|,,l,.t.
W Ml IM I. I'l I'l 11 IIIH' ♦■M". "t"M "M"H -M*M *H*M*H-i
Attention
Conservatives!
A meeting of  the  Cranbrook  District  Con-
! I      servative  Association  will  be held in the Edison      !!
i, i >
11      Theatre instead of the Secretary's Oflice, on Tues-      !',
i >
||      day evening,  November 14th, 1911, at8:p.m.
T. T. McVittie, Pres.      ;;
P.  DeVeue Hunt, Secy.    ■>
* >
■M"M'»*M"I"MI"I*»*H»+W^
Auditorium   Theatre
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26th,  1911
The World's Famous  Musical Comedy Success
f Jf HlM | ■ iLNifiMl  .   I
I *"    -   '1 **•** *e*.*m aa. >       MU -   few all  Ito    m,
IHE BWWITIjjfl MttOOI WHOSt HAUITW! HMjjg HAW timHAUM THE W0UO
II'. tha Tails. Sot, ol WOODfA nUUt IIDIUI Fi.nom.nal laical.
MAHATE SHERRY
B; OTTO HAOEP.BMHI and KaJL HOfCHN*
THE LAUGHING MUSICAL SENSATION OF TWO CONTINENTS
* CUT IF MUCH COIKI. CEIEUIMI. ItUiiinITbma^IwaKSSSS
.nun. in tou.
The Original New Amsterdam Theatre
Beauty Chorus
Special  Augmented   Orchestra
Carried By The Company
Car Load of Special Scenery
Seats on Sale Monday at Beattie-Murphy's Store
$2.00   $1.50   $1.00
1  Year  in   London .- New York • Paris - Berlin
«■»   -1-*.   «     »_   »     l.-«„t.^_t^l-.«-J<1.|,.|,-J, J,rt,J..|, ala J IrlwtMlllll .lf|-tlirjitl».jjll 11II f 1111 ll II ll J' ■*■ '*■   *
*W*W^rW*W*sf*aY'\rHW*r^ '
Central Meat Market
NORBURY AVENUE A. JOLIFFE, Proprietor
Dealer in Fresh and Cured Meats
:;     All Kinds of Game and Fish in Season    ;;
FftP ^alp Young Higs-Fr
I Ul    QUID   Beef and Pork
esh Killed    •;
IH Willi II M;» t\ 114 ll 1111 ll 11111.111.|. 111 .|.|. |. i.t.t

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