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The Prospector Nov 4, 1911

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 . ..„ ri •*.•*•*■•■ Awen.
•
Get in touch with
Wilson if you want good
Diamond Values
WILSON
THE JEWELER
1 ,-The' 'feeding 'Newspaper
\\ in the-, ,
"Prospector"
$1.50 Yearly
VOL. 17
CKANBROOK, B.C , SATURDAY MORNING. NOVEMBER 4th 1911
No 44
The Strike Proposition as
It Stands Now
Several Differences  Will Be  Adjusted Before  Pinal
Action Is Taken—Operations To Be Resumed
In a Few Days—Coal Famine Averted
In reference to the various interviews I have had with your committee retarding the settlement ol the
dispute eilstlng in the coal llelds ol
Eastern British Columbia and Alberta, my understanding ol tlie basis ot
agreement arrived at Is as lollows :
"That an agreement ls to be
drawn up taking the Cordon Award
of the Conciliation Board as a basis.
"In this It is understood that an
open-shop Is conceded to the operators and a non-discrimination clause
Inserted In tlie same similar to lbs
one now on file with the Department
oi labor nt Ottawa.
"That a uniform day wage scale of
wages shall apply, applicable to all
mines in the Association; said scale
to be the scale ol the Western Coal
Operators' Association ol '.he lust
agreement with the increased percentage provided by Dr. Gordon added,
"Contract rates to be the same us
provided ln the last agreements with
the following exceptions.
1.   An increase of three per cent In
contract rates at Lethbridgo.
i.   A dlBerentlal ol Ave cents     to
•even cents per ton oh. rll pillars presently  without n difler-
•ntial, the application to      be
made by mutual consent.
I.   An   adjustment of the on tract
rates at Lille Mines so as     to
make the rate proportionate to
the thickness ol the seams.
"The Operators agree to make   deductions Irom Union Members' wages
for union dues for sucb amounts aB
they have given definite orders  from
the Individuals, with specified    sum
as limit ol deduction.
"The management nl the mine is
to be fully vested in the various
companies.
"All employes connected with tbe
management of the mine are not to
be under the jurisdiction of the union
or members thereof.
"The term of the agreement to be
for three and a half years, expiring
31st March,   1915.
"In the matter of the settling of
the prices on new work, which were
not determined at the expiration of ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
the lut agreement and of the differ- j gether again after a long wait lol-
entlal on pillars wblch was to be lowing the Macleod conlerence with
determined by mutunl consent, lt ie the boards ot trade convention,
understood that the committee for The task of arranging a new scale
each side appointed to complete this! should not be a lengthy one since
agreement determine these prices   at all details have been gone over    so
would be resumed is given ln the
letter signed by Mr. ltogers and
acknowledged as correct and duly
signed by
W. B.  Powell, President,
C. Stubbs, Vice-President,
A. J. Carter, Secretary-Treasurer
Representing District   18, U.M.
W.A.
Chas. Garner,
K. Wallace,
Representing   the International
U.M.W.A.
Lewis Stockett,
0. B. Whiteside,
Representing Western Coal   Operators' Association.
The three first mentioned members
ot the Executive ol tho Mineworkers
meet the operators at Lethbridge today (Priday) for tho purpose of discussing all tbo details of the proposod agreement.
Ae there are many matters of de
tail to be considered those will occupy the attention ol the parties in
terestod so that thoy may bo drafted
out clearly for presentation to the
members of the organization to
whom they muBt be submitted s<
that a referendum vote may be tak
en.
We may add that It ls understood
tbat the mon will be given the same
working places as they bad prior to
April lst, provided, of course, thnt
application is mnde within a time to
be specified later.
Fernie, B.C.—Chief Justice Cordon
Hunter is hero today to preside at
the fall assizeB ol the assise court.
But one cose Is upon tbe docket for
trial, that of A. J. Carter against
W. G. Barclay, in which the latter
ls charged wltb making damaging
statements ref-ardlr.; Mr.. Carter'*
action in the matter of securing relief supplies for the miners. 8. S.
Taylor Is appearing for Mr. Barclay
and L. P. Evkstein for Mr. Carter.
The scales committee of the operators and miners are meeting at
Frank today, to take up the arrangement of a new scale of wages in accordance with tho outline laid down
at Lothbrldgo last week, wben Hon.
Robert Rogers succeeded in bringing
the two sldeB to the controversy to*
once. II they fall to agree, an independent chairman shall be called
tn to do so. II the committee tail
to agree on a chairman, the Minister
of the Interior shall be asked to appoint one immediately.
Yours truly,
R. ROGKRB.
During the current week all sorts
of rumors have been ln circulation
regarding the possibilities of nn ear-
ly settlement of the strike, these no
doubt were 'the wish the father to
the thought.'
The arrival In Lethbridge ot the
Hon. Robert Rogers, Minister of the
Interior, recently appointed to thnt
position In the Borden Cabinet, who
came at the reqti'st ol Minister of
Labor Crothers to offer his services
In the pending controversy between
the mine workers and the conl operators, gave rise, as Is natural to
considerable speculation.
He had notified the representatives
of District U II.M.W. of A., and also of the Western Coal Operators'
Association that he would bs pleased
to confer with them, and as a result
a copy of his understanding ol the
situation   upon   which   negotiations
many times, and tbe basis arrived at
being clear and well defined. If this
work ls accomplished within a few
days, the' vo'e upon tho proposition
can be taken In one dny all over the
district and the mines can be opened within the next week,
A few men have already gone to
work at Coal Creek, cleaning up,
preparatory to active operations.
Lethbridge, Altn.—No action wns
taken by the executive ol the minora'
union of district 18 and the operators yestcrdny to put the flnlahlng
touches to the Crow's Nest strike
that wns eettled in this city on Wcdnesdny through a conlerence with
Hon. Robert Rogers, minister ol the
interior. It was given ont, however, by hoth sides tbat nn adjustment won'il take place nt Frank and
a session would he rnllcd there tor
Tuesday, October   31st.
In the nienntlme action will he
taken towards getting things In
shape lor tho resumption ol work In
the different cnal mlneB ol Alberta
and British Columbia.
ln speaking ol tho matter yesterday, President W. B. Powell of    the
Birthday Anniversary
miners' union hod the lollowing    to
say :
The sessions will be continued at
Frank beginning next Tuesday. We
may be in session there a day or a
week, there is no telling, hut I sincerely hope that the matter vill be
settled just as quickly as possible so
that we can get back to work in
the mines.
"At the conclusion ol the conference the matter will be put UJ to
the men for a referendum vote, but
that will only take a day or two
and I expect with good luck ta will
be ready to go to work not lalor
than the end of next week."
Winnipeg.—General satisfaction prevailed throughout the west when the
news ol the settlement ol the coal
strike waa published. An indefinite
coal famine would have ensued lf the
settlement had not been so timely.
Now that the mines are again in operation the danger of a fuel famine
ls averted, this affecting both producer and consumer to a very great
extent. It will also have the effect
of keeping the price of coal down to
normal.
Ottawa.—The following messages
were exchanged between the minister
of the interior and the minister of
labor relating to the western coal
strike.
From Hon. Robert Rogers, minister ot interior, Lethbridge, Alta,,
October 26, 1911, "Have succeeded
ln getting full and complete settlement ol strike signed by hoth parties."
To Hon. Robert RogerB, Irom F.
A. Acland, deputy minister of labor:
"I am directed by the minister ol
labor to convey to you bis utmost
cordial congratulations on tbe splendid success resulting Irom your el-
forts ln the cause of Industrial peace
thus bringing to a close the prolonged dispute in western coal mines. I
am also to request you will kindly
convey the minister's best wishes on
behalf of-tbe parties and the expression of his desire that the settlement effected may bring a eoason of
extended prosperity and good feelings."
Winnipeg.—A civic reception was
extended to Hon. Robert Rogers on
his return to Winnipeg, an address
ot welcome being read by City Clerk
Brown, to which Mr. ""CTj-a janUf, a
suitable reply.
ALL SEATS GO CONSERVATIVE
Calgary.—Three Consorvatlvo gains
and the return of a Conservative
member to replace R. B. Bennett,
the Conservative member for Calgary, who was elected to the Dominion House, was the net rcsultot the
provincial by-elections, which took
place ln Alberta today, three ot the
elections were' necessitated by the
election just passed of the Bitting
member of the provincial house into
thc Dominion house, while the Glei-
chen election was occasioned by the
death of A. J. McArthur, the former
member.
Tbe main Issue of the campaign
was the policy of the Sifton cabinet
with regard to the Alberta and
Great Waterways situation. Though
full returns are not yet available
from Glelchen, nine polls bolng unheard from, the election of the Conservative candidate there la conceded.
LARGE MAJORITY IN LETH-
BRIDGB
Lethbridge, Alta.—Polling day opened here accompanied by a slight
snow fall, although tbe weather was
not nt all cold. The rivalry between the Liberals and Conservatives was brought to a lever heat during the day, and it was conceded
that the light would be a close one.
Both candidates Shepherd and Steward, Liberal and Tory, respectively,
are very popular here, Public houses closed till seven o'clock. The vote
was very small. Lethbridge did
not seem to exhibit much enthusiasm
The result ot the by-election gives
nu.NM, Hoiiservntlve. a large majority.
CONBBRVATIVK .MAJORlTli-S
Calgary, Alta.—Full returns tn
Calgary by-election: - Tweedle, Conservative, 2,708; Skinner, Liberal,
1,(99.
In Qlelchen, Riley, Conservative,
Is elected by about three hundred,
Glelchen Ib a Conservative gain.
TROUBLE AT FERNIE
MAYOR BLEASDELL READS THE
RIOT ACT
Large Numbers of Miners Gather
on Streets-Will Not Affect
Referendum Vote
(Special to Prospector)
Fernie, Nov, 3.—Thore was some
trouble at Fernie on Thursday evening upon the arrival ol the train
Irom Coal Creek. From reports re*
rived on Friday morning it would
seem that a number ol men who have
been working at the mine previoiu
to the signing up ol the agreement,
who bave been receiving the regular
benefttfi from the union were met by
a number ot workers, and as the
men trom Coal Creek proceeded along
Victoria Avenue, they were greeted
by boots, remarks, and other demonstrations ot disgust at their
conduct.
As tbey proceed' along Victoria
Avenue tbe crowd increased to between four and five hundred, and tbe
excitement was < vehement, and
trouble seemed imminent. At thiB
time Mayor Bleardell appeared o
the scene and read the "Riot Act
advising the men to return to tbeir
homes and await the action of ibelr
committee wblch was still in session
st Frank agreeing to and regu'atlng
the details of the conference which
will be submitted at the referendum
some time during next week.
Thore wns no bloodshed, nothing
done except a few personal lights, no
windows broken, and nothing porio' s
resulted from the demons'/ration.
From private sources it is learned
that serious objections have been
taken at the action of a number ol
tbe men who have been employed
several days previous to the signing
ol thc agreement. These men were
receiving the same bcnefltB Irom the
union aa were other union men, but
expecting some extra favors from the
operators, went to work, the balance
of tbe men, still ont on strike, yet
"waiting for iho referendum, submitt:
ed tbc explnnation that all men returning to work, provided the referendum was carried, should be treated alike.
It is expected that this trivial demonstration will not effect the vote
that will be taken next week, nnd
that the strike Is practically settled
and that the men will be at work
as soon as tbe mine Is in condition
to resume taking out coal.
How I Swam Across
the English Channel
T. VV. Burgess Tells of His Success After Many Failures—He
Receives an Ovation on
Landing In France
Selkirk Division No. 473 Grand International Auxiliary
and Moyie Division No. 563 B. of L. E. At
Home to Many Friends
A feature of the past week was the
observance of the second anniversary
of Selkirk Division No. 478, Q.I,A.,
and the eleventh anniversary of Moyle Division No,   (68 B. of L.K.
Thii event took place In Carmen's
Hall on Monday evening. A large
number of members and Invited
guests were present; a special Invitation having been sent to the Brotherhood ol Locomotive Flreimn. Tbe
ball was prettily decorated with purple, red, white and blue bunting,
carnations ud Oregon grape vines.
Excellent music was furnished    by
dancing and was thoroughly enjoyed
by those In attendance.
A special feature was the birthday
cake surrounded with thirteen candles. Bro. Chlol Johnson In bis usu
al happy manner said "that the two
pink candles represented two bright
and happy yoars lor tho O.I.A., and
the balance of the number cloven
yenrs for the B. of L.E.
Dancing was continued until the
"Wee sma' oorV, Tho committee
consisting ol Mosdnmos Margatrold,
Johnson and Baldwin; Messrs. Bar-
vis, Harris and Gush are to be congratulated   on   the   success   of   the
the Edison theatre   Orchestra     for birthday party ol the G.I.A.
"Madame Sherry" the most phen
omenal musical success of the day,
with tts wonderful music, irresistible comedy, superb cast and perfect
production from tbe New Amsterdam
Theatre, New York, Is coming to
the Auditorium shortly for an engagement limited to one night, Nov.
6th. Not ln many years has any
theatrical production so thoroughly
captured ths playgoers as this musical comedy Biiccese now belng'oflered
by Woods, Franco and Lederer, nnd
local theatre patrons may consider
themselves very fortunate ln being
offered an opportunity to enjoy it
nt the very height ol Its popularity.
The beaver season opened on Wednesday and a large number ol Kootenay Indians sre en route to Beaver
ponds. Many wblte trappers nre also taking advantage ol the open Benson and are now In the valleys
south nnd west after the beaver,
which are said to be plentiful.
The Channel has been swum tor
tbe second time tn the world's history.
Mr. T. W. Burgess, after many
failures, yesterday succeeded in
achieving the feat which many people
had regarded aa impossible owing to
changed conditions since Captain
Webb's great swim.
The news of his success came at a
moment when tbe gravest fears were
entertained as to his safety. Nothing had been heard ol him for hours,
and his friends were feeling the keenest anxiety.
Then, in a moment, all was changed. A brief message was flashed
through that he had succeeded where
so many bad tailed, and had achieved
what was almost his life's ambition
As a feat of endurance, of dogged
pluck in tbe face of dilticulties, thero
Is probably no athletic accomplishment to equal his. Marathon races,
twenty-four hours' cycle contests, record runs—all are practically small
things compared to this great swim,
lasting from 11.IS a.m. on Tuesday
to   9.60 yesterday morning.
For bere there was a man battling
for twenty-lour bours all but twenty
minutes in a strange element, at tbe
mercy of waves plucked aside by currents, with no cheering crowd tospur
him to new efforts—only a low men
In a small motor-hoat accompanied
him—and with tho knowledge ever
at tho buck ol his mind thnt great
swimmers ol all nations had tried
tinio after time and, save iu that
far-off caso of Captain Webb, bad
failed.
Tempted himself to believe that no
swimmer could cross that twenty-one
mtleB ol water, torn by evop-chnnging
currents and strange tldOB; knowing
that he had tailed hiniBcll more than
onco In sight ol the goal, this dogg
ed YorkBhlreman struggled on until
be lelt the beach beneath hiB leet nnd
realised that hla forlorn hope had
succeeded.
His succeBS Is very appropriate,lor,
English   by   birth,     he   married   a
| Frenchwoman and Is ln business    ln
Paris. He haB, therefore, been called the "entente coruiaie ' swimmer.
Burgess received a great o,auuu
when he lauued at Heal lasi uignc
from the motor-boat which huu accompanied bim ou his swim, ne al
lectionately embraced tus motuer,
who had been waiting (or bours to !
receive him.
tie said that he owed his success I
largely to the guidance of tbe wa-in- j
er boatmen who accompanied bim.
His message to his wtie was cuar-
acteristtc ol the man. He scribbled
it on the beach on landing, H was
simply, "Arrived,     it's done." j
Ileal.—"when I started the swim
yesterday 1 had made up my mind 1
was going through with it to tbe
end."
Thus at his mother's lodgings,
Lome Cottage, Deal, burgess, tired
but triumphant, openod his owu
story ol the great swim.
"I had a most extraordinary experience wltb tbe tides, however, and
it took all my determination to keep
going when I got a set back of several miles when I got into mid-
Channel.
"My course was a most erratic one
and worked out like a badly written
capital M with a loop on the tlrst
down stroke.
"Starting Irom near the Bouth
Foreland at 11.15, I was carried
away by the tide to three miles
northeast ol the South Goodwill
lightship. Then thoro was a very
long run of the ebb tide, on which
progress across was very hard to
moke, and I was carried along past
the Varne Sandbank about three mllea at a distance of a mile or so off
the banks.
"The position was not bad at tbat
time, but the' most disappointing
thing followed, and I had to exercise
all my determination to keep going,
for with the turn of the tide I was
carried right over the Varne sands,
and waB set back towards England
at a rapid rate, swim as hard aB I
might.
"The drive of the tide was to the
northeast, and I made practically no
progress lor hours.
"I had a good deal ol trouble with
my goggles alter some hours' swimming," he added, "aud the sea punished my eyes greatly, but Jack
Weldman, your Dover Channel swimmer, kli.dly lent me his, and they
proved very effective.
" I was also troubled with seasickness for three hours of the swim,
which was very unpleasant. I suppose I bad got the idea Into my
bead that I was going to bo sick,
and so It happened I bad never
been sick on any of my swims before.
"Mr. Wauchope Watson looked after me assiduously, however, an I pulled me round with tea, which took off
the effects of the sickness, snd then
some beef- ten essence, wblch bucked
me up.
"Well, to continue the story ol the
swim, I was about ten miles off
Calais wben the flood tide finished.
The next tide was kinder and we
made a good course towards Cape
Grisnes, doing very well till seven
o'clock this morning, when we were
about a mile off Cape Grisnes.
"Then lt wan a fight tor the next
three hours nearly.
"It was a tremendous task to
finish tho swim, but I waB encouraged hy tho party In my accompanying boats and by the sight ol the
people on tbe shore awaiting my
landing.
"I was shot past Grlsnez point by
the tide at a distance ol lour hundred yards Irom the shoro. I made a
race to get ln on the west ol the
point, where there is a sandy spit,
but was caught by nn offsetting current and carried around tho point
again only ono hundred or so yards
away.
"I was feeling very queer during
this time; my heart seemed an If It
had stopped beating, and I knew I
was near tbe end of my resources.
To oaso tho strain nn the heart I
had been swimming back stroke lor
some little time, nnd 1 got better
"II I had not been an uul band at
iho erne I would have gone under,
it wns touch and go. As I waa
swept ronnd tbe point to tbc eastward Again 1 realized that I must
make my blggeflt effort. Ho I mnde
a sprint lor a spit sand just under
the little village near OrlBiicz Point,
and luck doclded that I should succeed.
"Jack Weldman, like tho good
sport he Is, had been swimming with
ine tho last three hoitrn, and whon
we landed and he shook hand nnd
congratulated me I was so overcome
that 1 cried. I was unite delirious
at the thought of my success.
"Mother is responsible for the success of this swim," added |i«rgwn,
looking across to his mother, who
wns presont, with a cherry smllo.
"She mnde all tho arrangements and
thought nut things lor thin swim,
and everything went like clockwork."
Unidentified    Man   Foully
Murdered
Duck Creek the Scene of  Gruesome Deed, Probably
Committed in the Summer—Discovery
Made by Section Men
Cret.ii, B.C.—A gruesome discover waB made near Duck Creek by
some section men this morning. Ono
ot tbo section hands was out cutting
fire wood when he was attracted by
au unpleasant smell. Investigating
be found tbe body of a man lying
under two logs and covered wltb
blankets. Ho immediately notified
i'aul liageu ol Duck Creek who hastened to Creston to notify Provincial
Constable Guun wbo at ouce hurried
to the scene. Your correspondent
also was quickly on the spot and
witnessed the examination and the
conclusion arrived at by those present waB that a foul murder had been
committed
Rose read a briel funeral sermon over the body.     It is evident tbat the
murdered man is an Italian.
KNIFE MAY  GIVE CLUE
On hia return last nlgbt Dr. W. 0.
Dose, coroner, said "It is clearly a
case of foul murder." He mentioned that the body bad been lying under the two logs lor about eight
months. Tbere was no writing or
pi.pers on the body. The knile, Dr.
Hose believed, was of Italian make
and he thought lt might lead to
8, une clue to the Identity ol the deceased. Fishing tackle was also
lound near the body.
The underclothing was oi the Stan-
Held make and ot thick, unshrinkable
quality.    Nearby was a bag    which
It is evident that the man had been ! had contained other clothing ol the
dead Ior some time as decomposition i same quality which had apparently
bad sot in in its worst lorm. One j belonged to tbe dead man and had
of the leet was missing and it ap- j ■»"* ransacked by Bomeone, wbo
poarcd as If an animal had chewed i had taken the host of it.
lt off. There were a number of dis- The club with which the deed had
carded clothing in the bush a Jew **** committed was-found under the
yards away Indicating that tbe mur- j hody. The dead man was about
dorer bad mado a change of clothing. | years ot ago nnd about
The deceased was about 6 leet, 8
luchos tall, bald headed and well
dressed. He was covered wltb a
grey blanket while his head was covered with a sheepskin coat. Two
logs about ten feet long were piled
upon him. The trail where the tragedy occurred Is an unused one
about one hundred and titty feet from
the C.P.R. right ot way.    Close   to
 ID
______       5 '"*'   6
Inches   ln   height.     He    bad   dark
brown hair, almost black, and appeared to bo ot Italian nationality.
"The deceased, an unknown man,
whose body was Iound about a quarter of a mile west of Duck Creek
siding and one hundred and fifty feet
north of the C.P.R. railway track,
came to his death at the hands of
some person or persons unknown and
tbe body a portion ol the Manitoba' *» recommend   to the attorney-gen-
Free Press was lound wblch contained dispatches dated September 1.
Constable Dunn wired lor the coroner at Nelson to come to Duck Creek
and he is expected tomorrow.
Creston, B.C.—That a foul murder
had been committed was the unanimous decision- of thc jury empanelled
to enquire Into the death ol an unknown man whose body was discovered near Duck Creek on Monday
morning. Tho .verdict arrived at
was that tbe unknown man came to
his death at the hands ol some party
or parties unknown and the jury recommends to the attorney-general
that a detective he sent to enquire
Into the case.
Coroner Rose arrived tbis morning
from Nelson and immediately proceeded to view tbe hody tbat had
been lelt untouched by the local police. The body was in an advanced
Btate ol decomposition. It was conclusively proven to the satisfaction
of the jury that the deceased had
met his death by violence. A tamarack club lour feet long and two
and a balf inches thick was tbe weapon that was admitted by the Jury
to have caused the tragedy. The
skull was stove In and the jaw bone
broken. The tamarack limb .that
did the deed was broken ofl near the
end and there were strains ot congeal
ed blood upon it. There was proof
of robbery aB nothing was found upon the remains that would lead to
Identification with tbe exception of
a cheap metal watch, a clasp knife
of Italian manufacture and a tew
matches. To the jurymen lt appeared that the murderer or murderers
bad gone carefully through the effects of the deceased.
The youth who found tbe body testified that he was a water bay for
tbe eitra gang and he wan gathering
Are wood wben be noticed a portion
of a blanket protr.illng from two
logs wblch had been plied upon tbc
body. He saw a man's loot and a
stump of a leg. After tbe jury had
viewed tbc scene ol the tragedy, the
above verdict was rendered.
Before Dr. Robo left for Nelson the
cnrpiie was interred under his direction within a lew leet ol tbe spot
where   the tragedy   occurred.      Dr.
eral that a detective be sent to And
out more particulars concerning the
death ol the deceased," was the verdict of the Jury, which consisted of
J. W. Dow, Creston, foreman; J, J.
Atherton ot Creston; C. J. Carlson,
ot Nelson, and A. J. Street, August
Cozen and Thomas Rutherford, of
.Duck .Greet	
KING'S PRINTER
Victoria, B.C.-W. H. Cullln, since
last March chief clerk in the government printing office, has been appointed King's printer in succession
to the late Col. Wolfenden. He waa
for twelve years a member of the
Colonist's mechanical department,
during the greater period as superintendent of the composing room. Hia
latest appointment comes In tbe direct line of promotion. A past mooter in the cralt, a man ol wide Information and an excellent organiser
he has numberless friends In tbe province, Hs ls succeeded In the position of chief clerk by William Rich-
dale.
A very pretty and elaborate wedding was solemnised at Revelstoke
Wednesday, October 15, when
Miss Eleanor, daughter ot C. B. Paget, Esq., was united In Hymen's
silken bonds to W. R. Grubbe, manager ot the Imperial Bank ol Canada
at Wilmer, B.C. The officiating
clergyman was Dean Paget, uncle ol
tbe bride. Tbe bride and groom are
very popular young people, and their
nuptials was the occasion of their
being remembered by their many
friends, wbo presented them with
many costly presents. The bride le
well known ln Wllmer having visited
here. As manager of the Imperial
Bank here Mr. Grubbe bu made
hosts ol friends, who respect bim,
not only for his business probity bt*
for his many other manly qualities
as well. Previous to coming to
Wllmer be was employed ln the
'bank's agency at Cranbrook,
The happy couple wlll spend their
honeymoon touring the south, and
will visit Los Angeles, Bon Francisco and other points. They will arrive in Wllmer at the end ol November.
There wbb n large gathering ot
Kootenay Indians at Bt. Kugene
Mission Wednesday afternoon, the occasion being the laying of the corner
stono ol the new Industrial nchnol.
Father neck performed the ceremony
II. L. T. Oalbralth, Indian Agent,
wns present and adilressed tho Indians.
Brooks Comet Now Visible
Now Seen In the Evening Sky—Later in the Month
Will Appear Both Morning and Evening
Then Disappear For Ever
An interesting visitor Irom outer
space known as "Brooks Comet" Is
now visible Tbe comet apparently
belongs to a tramp fraternity and
wlll never be sera again.
It ts not oa brilliant now as It
will be later In the month. The
moon Is too bright at present but
with a new moon on the 2'2nd it
should tben become an interesting
object In the more darkened sky.
«.t Is   now   visible in the   evening
poos between the pole ond tbe sun
ond for a lew days will be visible lo
both evening and morning, low la
the north west alter dark, and low
In the north enn before dawn. Tbe
perihelion passage occurs near the
end of tbe month at a distance of
some   forty miles Irom tbe sun.
At the time of perihelion, It wlll
he In Vlgro, rising more than two
hours belore the sun, and ehouid be
fairly   conspicuous   after new moon
Bky north weet and anyone wltb a I when the morning skies ore dork.
good field gloss should have no I Tbe comet was discovered a month
lruuble in locating IU large diffused logo ond Is colled after the dleeo»et-
bead.    Later ln the month It     will  er. THE PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK, HRITISH COLUMBIA
School Report for October
Av. Per.
Dlv. Teacher         Enrolled Att. Att
1 Miss  Dick    40   37.07 92.67
2 Miss   Close    48   39.52 82.33
3 Miss L. Close    41   34.88 85.07
4 Mibs Suttaby   57   50.21 88.C9
5 Miss   Hiscocks    58   54.19 93.43
6 Miss Cartwright....  54   49.00 91.71
7 MIsb   Gaston   41   36.38 88.73
8 Miss Thompson    54   48.07 89.01
9 L.   J.   Cranston....   14   12.86 91.84
Totals 407 362.18   89.20
Division V, (Miss His.ocks) wins
'Nelson Shield' for highest percentage of attendance.
The percentage obtained by High
School students in October examinations were :
Advance Course—
Sarah Palmer,   88 per cent.
Sybil White.   86 per cent.
Tom Pennefather,   85 per cent.
Edith Uren,   81 per cent.
Jessie Kennedy,   81 per cent.
Marshal Barton,   08 per cent.
Sydney Elmer,   52 per cent.
Preliminary Course-
Ruth Stevens,   83 per cent.
.Edith Caslake,   78 per cent.
Wilfred Dallas,   72 per cent,
JeBsle McDonald,   57 per cent.
Helen Davis,   6S per cent.
Arthur Atkinson,   42 per cent.
Bernlce Fraser,   38 per cent.
PERFECT ATTENDANCE
Division I,—
Frank Bamford
Nathan Barnhardt
Percy Bardgett
Martha Bennett
Meltord Carson
Lavina Doris'
Frances Drummond
Louise Elmer
Vincent Fink
Wanda Fink
Carl Sill
Gladys Hickinbothani
Grace Higgins
Dorothy Mackey
Robert Pye
Laura Richards
Hazel Taylor
Bertram Murgatroid
Harold Bridges
Frances Noble
Irving Leask
Division II.—
Grace Bardgett
Samuel Bennett
Alice Browne
Roy Brown
Irene Elmer
Enid Gill
Josephine Hollander
Willie Leaman
Charlotte Leask
Rainsford Parks
Russell Rt. Eloi
Noel Wallinger
Division III.—
Willie Daniels
Harry Doris
B(*rnn.l**tte Doyle
Milo Drummond
Charlie Elmer
Nellie Mnrcellais
Orma McNabb
Norma Moser
Agnes Reekie
David Homerville
Margaret St. Klni
Gordon Taylor
Merle Taylor
Division IV.-
Muriel Baxter
Melville Dallas
Dan Daniels
Ruby Dencon
Ruby Finley
Janette  Jones
Allan Lacey
Da re ley McNeil
May Smith
Clifford St. Elol
CrosBley Taylor
John Turner
Edward Turner
Violet Simpson
Lily Lancaster
Harold Bernard
Frank Bridges
Division  V.—
Donna Argue
Andrew Braidt
Mathilda Brault
lreue Bernard
Merle Bathie
Mah Bing
Eddie Brown
Frank Biron
John Brake
Austin Chapman
Charles Clapp
Christine Carson
John Cayo
Jennie Hopkins
Hattie Hollander
Therza Johnson
Violet Jones
Harold Kummer
Wilfrid Kennedy
Willie Lum
Maty Lacey
Wiima McNabb
Evelyn Moore
Teresa Perry
Joseph Patterson
David Reekie
Hugh Simpson
Winona Stinson
Viola Sarvis
Doris Laiusbury
Garfield Taylor
Claude Williams
Irma Ward
Vern Woodman
Samuel Whit taker
Robert Hop Yuen
Delphlne  Bennett
Edith Lewis
Division VI —
Edward Barnhardt
Marie Bartlam
Robert Beaton
Nina Belanger
Kathleen  Brown
Mary Carson
Edith Couldwell
Marion Drummond
Mabel Finlay
Herman Hollander
Gertrude Hopkins
Ida Johnstone
Roderick Kennedy
Margaret Lacey
Sadie Lacey
Russell Leask
Eric McKinnon
Pearl Pratt
Mah Quong Kim
Flossie Robinson
Palmer Rutledge
Ray Scott
Samuel Speers
Norman Wasson
Everett Williamson
Bessie Woodman
Division VII.-
Malcolm Belanger
Raymond Brault
Norvnl Caslake
Oliver Cayo
Elizabeth Chapman
Margaret Can-
Mortimer De Rlemer
Arthur Gill
Albert Hop Yuen
Alfred Jolille
May Lancaster
Gertie Pnrnaby
Thomas Reekie
Ruth Simpson
Arthur Stanley
Hope Taylor
Gordon Woodman
Division VIII.-
Norman  Beech
Orner Bernard
Dorothy Bnssett
Vera  Baxter
Ivan Druch
Freddie Brfgga
Richard Jones
John Lancaster
Howard Brogan
Thresa Lacey
Donald Morrison
Peggy McLaren
Marion McKinnon
Michael Moore
Willie Noyce
Mah Ping
■lack Wlirrt
Upper Columbian Tells of
His Success
One ol the old timers in the Wind
ermere diatrict ib the genial "Jim"
McKay—aman whose winning personality lias won tor him hosts ot
(riends wherever he iH known. Like
many another ol Ilritish Columbia'*
successful anil prosperous business
men Mr. McKay is n Bon ol the
Maritime Provinces having tieen born
In Prince Kdward Island—the gem of
the North Atlantic In 18C7. thc year
of Confederation. He came to the
Upper Oolumbla Valley in the spring
of '86, the year the C.P.P.. mado
connections from eaBt to west at a
place called Oralgloohle, Mr. Mr
Kay Btarted ranching first at Hin
elair. In JM4 he purchased from
tbe C.P.K. (AO acres of second class
land—purchasing tho same on the
instalment plan of five years. His
success on thin ranch may best be
judged from his own wordH In a letter addressed to .1. H. Iiennln, He»|.,
of Calgary, written some years ago.
"T piirchnued from your company
r,40 acres of second-class land In
November, 11)114, on tho Instalment
plan ol five years.
"I have raised successfully wheat,
oats, barley, rye, corn and all kinds
ol vegetables. 1 have a small or
chard and the trees are loaded ovory
year with apples, plums, cherries and
all kinds ol small fruits. 1 have
never had a failure. In nny crop.
This year was anything bill  n gooil
hay reason n« we practically had no
rain. I had 120 acres of timothy
mul clover, and cut 2C0 tons ol hay
the llrat crop. I have taken aii
much OB (M bushels ol potatoes o"
one acre.
"I have 500 head ol cattle, Hu
horBes. and a bunch ol sheep and
hogs and have built a new residence
which cost 11,000. All my farming
land Is between Sinclair Creek and
Vermillion Creek, in the Windermere
district. I wlll be pleased to give
further information to anyone wish
ing to come to this part of Dritish
Columbia,
A few yeara ago Mr. McKay sold
out his Interests for the large
amount of 1420,000. He sold out
to a wealthy syndicate The Columbia Valley Orchards company, who
wlll, wo understand, start in devel
oping the land to the amount of
112.1,000 thin present fall. Dr. Oed-
deB ol Irrigation repute will superintend the operations of The Columbia
Valley Orrlinrds Company.
Mr. McKay |H tho owner of the
Athnlmor townsite. He hns lately
Installed an electric lighting system
for the town nnd Is connected with
other Improvements, fn (not. Mr.
McKay Is „„ optimist of optimists
and a pushing energetic citizen bent
on making bis town a progressive
and up-to-date one. Hln career In
tbe vnlley spells success anil is one
that redounds to hla credit.
Edmonton Express In
Head-on Smash
Runs Into Open Switch - Fireman Killed, Engineer Burned
Passengers Shaken Up
When it ran into an open switch at
Weesex, live mites north of Civsstleld,
this morning about   2.30 o'clock, the
express    that   left   here at miduight
for Edmonton collided with a south- |
bound   freight,    and   Fireman   Tom
Ourrle, of the   passenger, was killed, j
while Engineer J. Houston, of      the,
same engine,    was   severely  Hcalded,
and J- Carson, baggageman,  and    al
brakeman  named  Parsons were      tn- \
jured.     None of the passengers   were j
Injured, although some oi them   bus- ,
taiued a shaking up.
The northbound night express tor
Edmonton was scheduled to pass the •
southbound freight at Wessex this j
morning. The passingOT was runn- |
ing well on time, and when the sid. ,
ing was reached the freight was there:
side-tracked, waiting to proceed alt-j
er the passenger ha.l gone north.
Expecting that all was set in
readiness for his train, the engineer'
of thc passenger was steaming right
ahead, but when a few yards from
the entrance to the siding he noticed that the switch was open. Applying the emergency brakes he stuck to
his post and made every effort to
stop his tram. It was too late,
however, and taking the siding, the
passenger crashed into the freight.
Thomas Currle, residing tit 1115A
Third Street Kast. Calgary, the fireman on the passenger was caught m
the wreck of his engine and his hie
crushed out almost Instantaneously
The engineer, J. Houston, of $87
Twelfth avenue east, city, who was
pinned down when the crash came,
was terribly scalded by escaping
■••team. His condition is serious but
he is expected to recover
The baggage car was wrecked and
Baggageman J. Carson had a narrow escape. As it was he sustained ■
a bad shaking up. Brakeman Pars-';
ons. who was riding forward anl
was also shaken up. Neither men '
were seriously  injured.
The Canadian Pacific Railway company's officials this morning were not'.
prepared to make a statement re-1
garding. the blame for the switch be- [
ing left open, but are holding an investigation today.
Most of the passengers on the night
train north were occupying berths in '
the sleepers and thus escaped the i
shaking up they might otherwise
have received. N'one of the paeseng-;
er coaches were badly wrecked.
A Washington man inadvertently
overheard some tender exchanges between a recently bethrothed couple, ]
who, it chanced, attended some soci-
al function at the national Capitol
to which the aforesaid Washington-
Ian was also asked.
It was on the stairs that the
happy pair chose to talk the matter
over, and it was from the recesses of
an alcove, whither he had gone to
get his hat, that the Washington-
Ian proved to be the accidental recipient of the couple's confidence.
"Just think, dear heart !" exclaimed the young woman. "Yon
proposed to ms but twenty-four
hours ago !"
"Yes, sweetheart," came in thrilling toneB from the fortunate man,
"nnd it seems as though it were but
yesterday !"—Lipplncotfs.      '
Auditorium Theatre
Monday, Nov. 6th
'./0OD5,FRAZEE SiL.EPERER
      ,      PRESENT
The World's Biggest
Musical'Senxiffan
M
5*
a
LSheri
Eve i;v Lit I le Moveiiicut-
trui a Meaning All ItsDwn
Ik NcwAinslei dams. Nov Yoii;
Greatest Success.*
LARGE
BEAUTY
CHORUS
Special Augmented Orchestra
Carried by the Company
Seats on Sale Saturday, November 4th,
at Beattie-Murphy Drug Store
First Row, $2.   Next Six Rows
$1.50, Balance Lower Floor $1.
1 Year in London-New York-Paris-Berlin
Thursday, Nov. 9th
Geo. M. Cohan's Greatest  Musical [Comedy
"45 Minutes
from
Broadway"
With a Star Cast and
The Famous Blue Ribbon
Chorus
More Song Hits and Catchy Music than
any other Musical Comedy ever Written
SONG NUMBERS - "45 Minutes", "So Long
Mary", "Whats the Use?" "A Popular Millionaire",
"Retiring from the Stage", "Mary's a Grand Old
Name", "Stand Up and Fight Like Hell."
COMPLETE SCENIC PRODUCTION
Prices:- First Seven Rows, $1.50; Next
Ten Rows, $1.00. Balcony:- First Two
Rows, $1.50; Next Rows, $1.00. General
Admission, 5oc.
The haunting strains ol "Ev'ry
Little Movement has a Meaning All
Its Own," which forms the musical
theme ol "Madame Sherry" will no
longer remain merely tt laBCinating,
tantalizing melody to the people
who attend the Auditorium on Monday, November 6th, lor on that
date this phenomenally successful
musical production will appear at
this playhouse, and local theatregoers will have an opportunity to enjoy the perfection production which
has captivated Paris, London anil
Vienna, and which Is now packing
the New Amsterdam Theatrp, New
York, to overflowing at every performance.
Tuesday last October 31, wan Halloween, the night when ghostB anil
fairies arc supposed to be abroad In
the land. In Scotland that eve was
very generally observed anil "Bobby"
HurnH has celebrated it in verse. A
custom obtaining in the Highlands Is
the holding of the "(uracil" least.
The "furach" is a mliture nf oatmeal and cream. A huge bnRin Is
provided into which this palatable
mliture Is poured. A ring is then
dropped Into the dish, nnd laughing
lads and lasses, being provided with
spoons set to work In real earnest
In an effort to lind thc ring. The
lucky finder Is the first to be wed, of
course.
One of the best-known and ablest
ol Kngllsh Judges Is not given to the
use ol superfluous words, and his
fondness for brevity is such that he
embraces every possible opportunity
Ol leading others to seek It nlso.
During the hearing of a certain cnBO
which came beforo this Judge, a learned king's counselor pruned nway nt
what seemiil likely to be nn Inlor-
minabla length, until hla lordship,
becoming utterly weary ol the proceeding, suddenly looked towards the
speaker, and gently Inquired what
day it was. The question was so
unexpected thnt tba barrister looked
a while, In sheer amazement, at the
questioner, "Tuesdny, me lud," he
replied, whm he hnd psrtly recovered
from hlfl surprise. "Ab, ycH, quite
so," responded the judge, In his ona-
veat. tones. "Ynu see, I only Just
wanted to mention that I shall not
be Bitting after neit Saturday."
BETTER TERMS FOR PROVINCE
j Victoria, B.C.—Premier McBride
I and W. J. Bowser, attorney general.
i leave on Wednesday uext lor Ottawa,
where they will be Joined by Hon. W.
R. Ross, provincial minister ol
landB. The mission of the Prime
minister and his two colleagues ls
to submit to Premier Borden thc
question of better terms for British
Columbia. Hon. Mr. Borden has
placed himself on record as in hearty
accord with the proposal that British Columbia's claims sball be left
for full and Impartial consider* ;ion
by a competent board of arbitrators
and Premier McBride and his ministers have every reason to {eel confident that so soon as the federal
authorities are able to deal with this
weighty question, the pledge will be
fully redeemed.
"In this connection," says Premier
McBride, "lt is only right to say
tbat there are so many various
phaseB incident and pertaining to
tho solution of the better terms
question as to make it almost Impossible to cover In an Interview the
entire comprehensive subject, but
the people ot British Columbia bnve
a right to expect that, with Ilie new
conditions obtaining at Ottawa, the
local government will not be slow
to move In pressing the legitimate
claims ol their province.
"I fully realize the tremendous
burden that Mr. Borden is obliged
to take at this juncture in Canadian
affairs and how his heavy nnd yet
dolicate responsibilities Just now nre
multiplied by various special clrium-
SUuk'tiB anil ciiii *|tinns.
"ln addition tn tne genpMl <iui«s-
tlon nl better terms which rtili I.
taken up, numcrmn departmental
matters must necessarily be presented while wc are at Ottawa, All
these are of very considerable monV
ent and it would not be fair to
provincial Interests were any to be
overlooked or neglected. Among
others there are thc matters of oil-
fisheries, rights ol Indian roser.-es, of
railway landr. of wharves and similar public workB, of river nnd harbor
Improvements, and Inst, but not
least, the quefltlnnii of Asiatic immigration and the neeenHnry regulation
of Immigration generally for the
protection of our own workers nnd
the building up of a white Canada
au a strong and essentially British
nation within and part of the empire.
"Wc also propose taking up with
the minister nf the Interior the advisability of the inauguration by the
lederal authorities ol more effective
meamires for promoting advantageous publicity (nr British Columbia."
The defeat of reciprocity Is credited
with bringing n now Industry to
Vancouver. V). ''. Atklnn, vice-president of lho A Ik inn Raw Mnnufac-
Inry of Indianapolis today signing a
lease for property fur a local branch.
Offers $1,000 for Best Wheat!   what a Boy Thinks of Pigs
Sir Thomas Bhaughnessy, president
of the Canadian Pacific Railway company, has offered $1000 as a cash
prize for the best one hundred pounds
of hard red wheat to be exhibited
at the American Land and Irrigation
eiposition in New York city.
This announcement was received by
Thomas J. Wall, general agent of
the Canadian Pacific, yesterday. It
lurther sets forth tbat Canadian
farmers are preparing exhibits for
the competition ln which they are
allowed to compete, while the prizes
offered in tbe United States are for
grains grown in the United   States.
KOOTENAY CENTRAL RAILWAY
Construction work iB progressing
ou the Kootenay Central Railway,
and Indications at present point towards the completion of the road
some time next year.
The road is now graded, on the
southern end to Wasn. Two large
camps established here nre working
and other camps will soon be made
on tho west side ol the Kootenay
river on the south ol Skooken-chuck
Creek.
On the northern end of tbe line the
road Is built south aome forty miles
to Splllamachlne. A larger force ol
men are employed at this point.
People all along the line are very
optimistic and predict a large immigration to the Upper Columbia and
Kootenay Valleys noxt year.
Customs In Contrast
The Kngllsh coronation ls said to
have had a marked eflect upon the
populace of China, an effect salutary
enough in principle, but disquieting
at abort range. The Chinaman ls
asking himself how it cornea tbat a
monarch is thus able to show himself wltbout danger or loss of dignity
to dense masses' of people, whereas In
China he must live In a "forbidden
city" nnd make his appeal to the
people inthor as a   aort of religious
myth or pious atiaLiu    '<.n aM a
human being and wltb common at
tributes. If the King nt l.nglnnd
can drive through crowded streets
nnd wllh somo appearance of imllnl
and Intimate relationships wh;.' must
tho streets In China be cleared ns
soon as the emperor approaches as
though It. woro a sacrilege to look
upon Ills flurrod person ? In 'act,
is he really sn sacred ? It Is a serious matter to challenge Ilie winr
tlty nf nn Oriental potentate, but
such thlngfl will happen. Tbat they
nro happening In China should be a ,
hint to the emperor to pnvo nls
divinity In some more tangiM" wny,
Mr. Orr nf Glasgow, Scotland, has
nccepted n position with the C. C. B.
| Teachers in Bury have recently been
{asking their scholars to write essays
on animals in view of the Royal Lancashire Agricultural Show which has
been held, and the county ts chuckling over the following description of
the pig, which emanates from a secondary school :—
"A dirty, grovelling mass of flesh,
grunting and wallowing in the mud
with which its sty is copiously supplied. That is the subject ot my
essay. Who would Imagine that
useful articles could be made from
tbat dirty skin, and tbat the flesh
beneath it could yield the most delicious flavours ? In life the pig ls of
very little use, and ls often the cause
of a great deal of mischief. But for
the pig to die is to be horn again
into a sphere of much greater utility
In life tie is often an object ot contempt, in death he gains greatly In
Importance.
"In a few words I will endeavor to
show how the dead animal can enter
into one day of our life. We rise in
the morning and utilize Ills bristles
to brush our hair and our clothes.
Kor breakfast we have a crisp, savory piece of bacon. We take out our
wallet at school and Hnd that It Ib
made of pig skin. Then the tender
pork chop for dinner send ua back to
our work with an Increased capacity
for study. When we return home, to
find heautllully-ilono pork sausages
frizzling In the pan, we are In the
seventh heaven of delight. But our
sleep Ib disturbed hy a laBt meal of
cold pork sausages for supper, and
aa we He comfortably In our beds we
drowsily murmur, 'Bacon, sausages,
and pork chops.' And the cause of
all this Is the pig."
The Ten Commandments of the
Present Day
1. Thou shnlt not wait lor something to turn up, but thou shalt pull
off thy coat and go to work that
thon mayest prosper In thy affairs,
and make the word "failure" Bpcll
"success."
3. Thou shall not be content to
go about thy business looking like
a loafer, for thnn shoiildst know thnt
thy personal appearance ts hctter
than a letter of recommendation.
3, Tliou shall not try to make is-
cuBcs, nnr shult thou sny to those
who chide then, "1 didn't think."
.. Thou shall not Wfl.lt to bo told
what thou shalt do, nnr in what
manner thnn shall do It, fnr thus
may thy days be long In tho Job
which fortune bath given time.
S, Thou shall not fall tn maintain
thlno own Integrity, nor shalt thou
bo guilty of anything that will lessen
thy good respect for thyself.
0. Thou shnlt not envet the other
fellow's Job, nor his salary, nor tbe
position that he hath   -ained by bis
own hard labor.
7. Thou shalt not fall to live
within thy income, nor shalt thou
contract any debts when thou canst
not see thy way clear to pay them.
8. Thou shalt uot he afraid to
blow thine own born; for he who
tallest to blow his own horn at tbe
i proper occasion tindest nobody standing ready to blow it for him.
9. Thou shalt not hesitate to say
"No" when thou meaneth "No," nor
ehalt thou fail to remember that
there arc times wben it ls unsafe to
bind thyself by a hasty judgment.
10. Thou shalt give every man a
square deal. This ls the las', and
great commandment, and there is no
other like unto lt. Upon this commandment hang all tbo law and profits of the business world.
Many people have always bad a
great dead of crossing tbe ocean, but
| according to tbo following facts
found in an exchange, one iB safer
when crossing the Atlantic than at
any other time. According to figures carefully collected by a German
atatlatlclan, the most dangerous occupation in the world ls that of a
farmer. In contrast to this a trans-
Atlantic ateamcr is ahout the safast
placo ono can find: These Investigations show that forty-five per cent,
of nil Industrial accidents happen to
farmora. Last year more than a
million passengers were carried
across the Atlantic without a single
catastrophe. Kven among thoie cm-
ployed In tlie building trades, the
dangor of the accident Is only a.'iillt
one-quarter that of the farmer, Willie
In mining, which is commonly supposed to bo very dangerous the chance of mlahap la even less. More
poople are killed by falling from open
windows than tn crossing the Atlantic, so that ths deck of a modern
line, Is actually aafer than one's own
home.
While tho train was waiting on a
side track down in Qeorgia, one of
the passengers walked over to a
cabin near the track, In front ot
which sat a cracker dog, bowling
liko tho horn on Pire-Chlef-ol-New*
York Croker's automobile. The passenger asked a native why the dog
waa howling.
"Hookworm," aald the native.
"He's lazy."
"But," said the stranger, "I was
not aware that tho hookworm Is
painful."
"Taln't," responded ths garrulous
native.
"Why, then," the stranger queried,
"should tho dog howl ?'.'
"Lasy."
"But why does laziness make him
howl ?"
"Wai," said the Georgian, "tbat
hlame tool dawg Is slttln' on a sand-
bur, an' he's too tarnation laiy to
git off, so he jest sits thar an' howls
'cause it hurts." ?£***
■
THE PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK,  BRITISH COU MBIA
*xjm ~i*--nra* n±x^££ j vti*,;-?:srjm*t.wtta*Bm
J*'! •3"**J*-    F?l».-i    S*s£a
« K&".     .V * '■■•'. ,4>"£l
Messrs. Beale & E
Have just placed this Subdivision on the market.
The property joins the City of Cranbrook. Lots
are 50 x 122.    All cleared, magnificent, cultivated
soil.
Terms:  $10  cash and $5.  per
month.   8 per cent Interest.
Several of these lots are already sold
Hurry up - If you want one.
TirrgS'ZTAT.-.'.iffiZES&x
SSFOTIBS euHHM
Chatter _and Chaff
Earnest and Facetious
(BY PAUL SPYGLASS)
it Is really astonishing bow easily
an astute counsel, can get the average person "rattled" whilst on the
stand. Tlie lollowing is a case in
point:
Stern Lawyer (examining witness)
—Where waB your maid at the time ?
Excited Lady—Why, in my boudoir,
arranging my hair.
Stern Lawyer—Tell mc quickly,
wore you there also ?
Excited Lady (flushed and indignant)—SIR.
Jack Johnson, heavy-weight champion of the world, has boen saying
somo vory complimentary (?) things
about the clergy of Great Britain.
Referring to tlle preachers in England (after describing himself as a
sober man) he makes tho startling
and outrageously libellous assertion,
"I am told tlie great majority are
boosters." The big black fellow may
Interest a certain class ol people on j
the ethics ol pugilistic limits generally and prize lights especially; hut
when a conceited illiterate vulgarian
has the unmitigated effrontery to
scandalise tho ministry wc are neither interested, elevated nor amused—
merely disgusted.
Several men wore talking about
how they happened to marry. "I
married my wife," said one, after the
others had all had their say, " because she was different to any woman I ever met." "How was
that ?" chorused the others. "She
was the only woman I ever met who
would have me," and thoro was a
burst of applanac from thc crowd.
Many good-natured jokes have heen
passed anont tho feminine proclivity
for having resource to artiilclal
moans In the matter of beautifying
her person. Miss Flora Brand of
Hlgglnsvllle has good reason to
thank hor lucky stars that Bhe waB
wearing false hair recently when a
locomotive of tho Missouri Pacific,
struck her motor , car—sho owoa her
life directly to thla cauae. As It, was
her "switch" became entangled In
thc cnglne'n driving rod and was
pulled off her head.
Oratltudo   Is   an   awfully   scarce
article.     We bave often noticed, lor
example, that the most honest women who borrow a quart of milk
from their neighbours alwayB make
a "P'INT" of returning it.
The latest figure-reducing society
craze of "picking apples" is all the
vogue among the Upper Ten In
Great Britain. The social leaders
of the fashionable world are agog
witb excitement and "apple-pickers"
clubs are springing up in all parts
of the old country. Although a few
very effeminate men have Joined tbe
ranks; thc fair sex constitute thc
great majority of Its members. Those
estimable aristocratic ladies do not
really pick applcB in tlie ordinary
acceptation of the term. Of course.
such an occupation would bo altogether infra dig and totally incompatible with their cxnltod station in
life. Such menial work is naturally
relegated to their poorer sisters—the
plebian children ol the noil. This
apple-picking business is absolutely
metaphorical and the name tins been
selectod as singulurly appropriate because thc stretctitng mo,'emeuts (not
mctaphortc in this InBtninn) ivsi-.'iiblfi
picking apples Irom the brail'lies of
a tree. The fact is ijltlto i, iiinnur
of blue-blooded English worni'i have
realized ttiat thoy are potting too
plump—due to Indolence and t'tv-lro-
nomfcal indiscretions—and are extremely anxious to roduco their girth j
and avoirdupois as -veil ns incidentally Improve their beauty.
The athletic achievements of th ise
pscudo "applc-plckers" conduce to n
supplo symmetrical tlgure and gt'i.eo-
ful carriage. The fair dcoi'Ma of
this new cult (?) agree to stand on
tip-toe beside a wall and reach up ns
high as possible in an endeav.r to
pick an imaginary apple trom tlie
wall papor—u delightful and novel
form of physical culture forsooth.
The poor tired'shop girl In a departmental store does nnt need to tnke
exercise ol this Bort. She, be It, understood, enjoys tlio prlvllogo of
picking boxes ol merchandise frornl
high shelves for her broad and butter. In this connection It Is worthy
of note thnt tho movements aro nl-
moBt Identical; the only difference being that tho rich lady picks nn Imaginary apple Irom an Imaginary tree
two or three tlmoB per day aa a recreation whilst the poor lady (I beg
the wealthy woman's pardon for designating the ordinary shop girl
"lady") PICKS A REAL BOX
FROM A REAL SHELF FOR A
LIVING.
There wore three little maidens from
school.
Who   determined    tn   set   up Home
Rule,
But another one said,
"Then you'll never get wed,"
Which shows thnt this maid was no
fool.
Said a small   young   lish to his old
mam-ma,
"There's a man up there on the bank
not far
From me.
He's   a   splendid,   brand new, long,
Bilk line,
And a jointed rod, and his turnout's
fine,
You Bee.
And he's heaps nnd heaps of tempting flies
That   he'll   dash   before my simple
eyes .
For fun.
He'll catch mc, mother dear, he will;
8o, mother, shall limit keop still
Or run?
Tho old tisli said, in tones so mild,
"Don't bother now, at all. my child
For him:
nut—
If you sec a little boy with a little
bent pin,
And a dozen little   worms In a dirty
old tin-
Then swim:"
A man on a rainy day saw a gin
tlcman ahead of bim with a handsome silk umbrella. Thinking be
recognized him as a friend, he rushed
up, clapped a hand on his shoulder,
nnd shouted by wny of a Joke: "I'll
tako that umbrella, II you please."
The individual addressed looked
round and disclosed an entire stranger, but before tlie othcr could apologize, he said hurriedly : "Oh, it's
yours, Ib It? Well, I didn't know
that.     Here, you can have It."
And he walked off hurriedly leaving his umbrella In the other man's
hand.
It is difnorit for the young man
who arrives home in thc "Wee snia'
hours" tn rcnll'/.o that the majestic
stern-fneed feinnle who towers above
lilm nt tbe head of the stairs is tbo
same timid little smiling girl who
onco fainted in his arms at. the stghl
of a tiny mniiso,
A woman who was noted for her
conjugal affection, wont Into nn apothecary's shop last week with two
prescriptions—one for her husband,
and the other for her cow. Sho enquired what was tbe pries of tbem
and the assistant replied it was so
much for the man and so much for
the beast. The woman finding that
she had not money enough, reflected :
for a moment and said "give me, at
all events, the medicine for the cow,
I can send for me husband's tomorrow."
Some   of   the   color which we Bee
[rom time to time in ladies   dresses
are fearful and wonderful to behold.
There is oftimes a sad lack of taste
displayed    in   the choice ol suitable
costumes.   Incongruity   may be   frequently observed ln the adoption   of
colors without reference to their   accordance with the complexion of tho |
wearer.     How much more agreeable I
would be the impression of the spectator if girls would make a point of
paying attention to   the desirability
of more harmony.      We continually
see a wretchodly light blue hat    and
gloves surrounding a sallow countenance, or a ['Ink opposed to one of a
glowing red; a pale complexion associated with a staring canary yellow.
Hnw frequently again do we Bee the
large dimensions of a very tall   and
embonpoint   figure   magnified to al-1
most Brobdignagian proportions    by j
a white dress, or a small woman re- i
duced to an absurdly Llliputian size
by a black dross.     Girls, for good-;
ness sake, stop tills sort nf thing at
onco.
Night ls upon tbe earth. Darkness '
is in the valley and upon tho hill
top, But tho moon rising and clearing away the clouds, dispels the i
gloom. As slio rolls upward the
stars gather around her, Come with
me and look upon a sccno of intensely exciting interest. Enter tliis
chamber softly—It is the Banctuary
of lnnoccnce—ttie abode of love and
peace.
Bending beside a table behold     u
maiden—a blooming girl oi seventeen
—on   her   knees.     Her   cherry   lips j
move, her graceful form Is anxiously
swaying to niul fro.     She is laboring under on excitement     Tho   cool!
air gushes in upon her through    the
lattice.     She Is strengthened. Could]
wo view a more Interesting picture ?
"Ah;"
WaB that a word or a long-drAWri
sigh ?     List.
"Ah:"
Can she be unconscious ol our presence ? Her hnnd gropos upon thc
lloor. Has she lost a jewel '! Her
■dark eye in wild frenzy Uindice. The
swuct smile bus vanished from hor
features. But, lo: ii returns In
triumph,     Hlic speaks,
"Mary: I've got that Ilea at Inst."
Rlghtncss expresses of actions,
what atrnlghtncas docs of Unci; nud
there can no more be t.wo kinds of
right action thnn there can bo two
kinds of straight, linen.-Herbert
Spencer. |
Man the Maker of Things
In point of Importance., thc production of things conic tirst.
Hecon.i .:i importance comos thoir
transportation.
Man makes thlngB, thm ■ ■-■ transports them.
Also, he transports himself.
Hobert Fulton sent the "Oler
mont"'mi her trial trip up thc Hud-
sou in Eighteen Hundred .Seven.
Tlie flrst steamship to cross tiie
Atlantic wns thc "Savannah." Thia
was in Klghtee-n Hundred Nineteen.
And while an lion. Kent, in the
House uf Commons wna making a
speech to the eilcct that no ship
would carry enough fuel to feed her
boilers on a t'rans-atlantlo trip, the
whistle of the "Savannah" was
heard in the offing. She was ah-
swenng ills logic.
Later, the argument was put forth
that the carrying of this awful p.ass
of fire in the hold of a boat was
flying in tho face of Providence, and
disaster was sure to come to every
Bhlp that incurred thc risk.
But ttie ship has come to stay und
still plows the waters.
About Seventeen Hundred Ninety
came the discovery tiiat a wagon
moving on n rail, instead of on thc
dirt, could carry double the load.
The discovery by Watt of the ex*
pansive rjitalfty of wnter when subjected to boat gave the cue for the
locomotive, which John Husk in prophesied would ruin Kuglnud. He declared that people would quit work
to go tnpesing up ami down the land
in search of thrill.*.. And personally, Ruskin moved to Ooniflton, a
plnce where the "screech of the iron
horse would never be heard."
But the railroad had come to stay.
Morse with his dot nnd daoh came
In Eighteen Hundred Forty Mint; an
an added security - a necessity—In
the running of trains in opposite
directions on a single trnck.
In Eighteen Hundred Boyonty*Blx,
Oraham Boll, u canny Scot, gave us
the telephone, in response to tho universal desire for n fjulot meant, of
saying tilings to people out of sight.
It was only a coup d'etat thut
gave Brondwny a horse railroad and
banished tho 'bus.
Then came the cnblc-cnr, m an ai
tempt to sldestop the Socioty for
tho Prevention ol CrUilty to Animals,    our hearts hied lor the   poor
ter of course, for wheu people want
n thing tiny get it. Wo reach up
in the all or dig down In tho ground
and !o ! we find it, for everything is
everywhere.
Natural gas was discovered nnd
piped for light, heat and fuel when
it was needed, and thus are the
lords of electricity kept civil.
in an attompl to render kerosene
oil non explosive—so mnny servant,
girls going to the Other Side by the
Kerosene Route- gasoline was removed from Illuminating-oil by chemical process. Many good people
preferred caudles, nnd called l;cro- ;
scno a fad, nud dangerous. Kerosene wns worth twenty cents n gallon, and gasoline two cents. Gasoline
was a glut on tlie market.
To utilize th s dangerous by-product, the explosive engine was invented.
From   a   plaything of   one to Ave
horse power, the gas engine grow in
power.
The horseless carriage fs In one
sense a scheme for utilizing a byproduct—-just as art is lovn's by-product.
And behold ! Kerosene Is now
cheaper, aud better quality, than it
has ever been In tho history of commerce. Kerosene Is now the by-product, and thus does the proletariat
wax glad ond the farmer rejoice. It
gasoline over soars as it has in
France, we will use dcnnturednlcohol
made from mangel roots and turnips
—Hubbard.
"Forty-five Minutes From Bread-
way" with its catchy uuhi • and It's
wealth of bright, snappy dialogue,
will be the attraction at the Auditorium, on Friday, November 10th.
The production this season iJ paid
to be more elaborate than the first
presentation. Several new and nuve1
features have been introd'icM, including thc famous "Hlie PuVon
Ponies."
old i trcel.-nir
hon
c, Railed,
limping,
Panting, that
IV l
might     II)
through
HPliiT at    the
rnt
•   Of   IliV   1
lies    nn
hour.
All 11     lover
of
the horsi
ami     a
breeder ol ho
lies,
1 Imii the
niitotiio-
bile witb i'lin
ncc
aim.     Hi
ini'i nov
er cohimnndci
si.
big ii nrii
■ as thoy
do today: nnd nil tho time tho    do-
tumid   Is   lor   a higher gratia horso.
Thus does thn Inrmor thrlvo.
The electric car arrived as a nint-
SOBNB FROM MADAME SHERRY
MONDAY
AUDITORIUM,    nUNDIlOOK,  ON
NOVISMBI5H   ii. THE PROSPECTOR. CRANBROOK, BRITISH COLUMBIA
G. H   THOMPSON.
Barrister, Solictor, and
Notary Public
Office-Reid Building*,
B. C.
CRANBROOK,
McVITTIE & PARKER
P.LS. _ CE.
CRANBROOK, B. 0
W. F. GURD,
Barrister.  Solicitor, etc.,
CRANBROOK, B. C.
HARVEY,   McCARTER,
and   MACDONALD,
Barristers, aud Solicitors,
CRANBROOK, B. C.
Oranbrook Lodgi No It   AF. * A.M.
I-A Regular meeting. '">
SX. the  third Thursday
**r\ri'i'tiK*T   "' BVory m""1'1'
iv^yfA Visiting brethren
f \_/   .      ureloome,
A. C.  BHANKLAND,   W. M.
a. W. CONNOLLY. Sscrstary
,www.vvw-.w..w-^
Rocky Mountain Chapter I
no. i». R. A- M.
Regular meetings:—2nd Tuei
day In eaoh month at eight
o'olook.
Sojourning Companion! are
cordially invited.
B.    H. SHORT. Scribe B
7 Roomed House
For Sale
Centrally Located
Three minutes from Qovernment
buildings
Terms  to   suit   buyer,  no
reasonable offer refused
Por further particulars apply at tlie
Prospector Office
VV.  R.   BEATTY
Undertaker*
Kmbalmer,
FimtM'fti Director,
CRANBROOK.  B.C.
i
j        Box 262        CHANBRUOK, B.C     |
\mmtrmm*mmrWn*h*rm*Hrrm#
ANCIENT ORDER ? FORESTER
Ueeti In Carmen's Hall *at sat «h
Thursday of each month at I p.m.
•harp.
A. McCowao, Chief   Reaftr
C. A. Abbott, Secretary.
Vliltlnc Brethren made welcome.
COURT ORANBROOK. 1941
Knights of Pythias
Cranbrook. B.C.
Crescent   Lodge,   No.   jj
Meets   every   Tuesday
at 8  p.m.  at
Fraternity Hall
T. G. Jones, 0. O.
J. M. Boyce,
K. of R. _ S.
Visiting   brethren cordially   invited    to attend.
J. W. RUTLEDGE,
M.M.V.. V.t.,
Graduate of Ontario Veterinary
college, Toronto lo UM. Gradate and medalist of McKlillp
Veterinary college, Chicago, III.
ID 1100. Registered member ol
British Columbia association.
ALL OALLS NIQHT A DAV PROMPTLY ATTANDIO TO
OFFICE   AT   MCKIN8TRV8   LIVERY  DARN
CRANBROOK, B. 0
J. T. LAIDLAW,
Mining Engineer ami
B.C. Land Surveyor,
H.O  Box 238. Phone TU.
CRANBROOK,
B. 0,
D.J.JOHNSON
CARPENTER   AND
BUILDER
CONTRACTS SOLICITED.
HOUSES
for   Sals or Rest »t Reasonable
Prleee.
Lumsden and Lewis St.
Phone No. 918.
• *********************
WENTWORTH
HOTEL g™»b™ok-
Is a large and attractive hotel of superior
elegance in all its appointments, with a
cuisine of superior excellence. Railway
men, Lumbermen and Miners  all  go  to
i The   Wentworth ii
COOPERAGE PRODUCTION
The amount ol cooperage produced
ln Canada during 1910 has been compiled by the Dominion Forestry
Branch at Ottawa. Reports were
received from one hundred and thirty-three firms of which ninety-four
were in Ontario showing that ...url.
and tight cooperage wns produced in
Canada to tho value of one million
seven hundred nnd forty thousand
dollars. As the hardwood forests of
Canada aro already greatly depleted,
and a» the Canadian products trims
ported in bnrrels are chiefly Hour and
apples, remulrtttg only slack cooperage, the tight cooperage stock manufactured In 1910 amounts to only
one tlfth of the total value. Uarrels
made from tight stock as used as
containers of oils, akoboUo liquors
nnd othor liquids, and as Canada
has practically no wood of suillcient-
, , , ■    ly clear quality for such stock,    thc
U       J,   McTAVISH       •      K*rOprletOi*       <>   most of It has   to bo    Imported    as
' ' x   staves or stavo bolts from tho lli.lt.-
; ed  Btates.  Of  the  total  slack   cooperage    made    up    ono    million three
; hundred and ntnoty-tlve thousand dollars, which is two hundred thousand
i dollars    less    than    tne   l'Jn-3 vnluo.
; Notwithstanding     the      decrease    In
. value   of   slack cooperage for   191G,
; tho number of pieces produced    was
I tive hundred thousand moro thnn    in
I 1909.     Practically  no cooperago     ls
i manufactured   in Canada tor oxport,
I and whatever quantity la shipped out
! is the cooperage loft on the manufacturers  hands     after      the    domestic
market has been satisfied.     In     the
middle of the last decade tho export
trade was quite an important branch
of the cooperage Industry, but       In
1910, exports of staves, heading   and
barrels   amounted to only one hundred and fifteen thousand dollars.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•I
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
t >
i I
Found!
******
On Baker sti eet, one door west
ol Messrs. Hill & Co., the only
place in town that can make
life worth living.
Cosmopolitan Hotel
E. H. SMALL,   Manager.
**********************
King George's New Crown
The Work Is Being Rushed and It Will be Ready for
The Royal Durbar at Delhi-Estimated
Cost is About $325,000
Calcutta.—Orders have been given
for the construction of a special
crown for tbe king when he attends
the Dunbar, uud thnt the value is
estimated to lie about 1825.000. The
design was prepared by a leading
firm of London jewellers, who at preseut hnve tlio execution of the order
in 'hand,
Whether the King will decide to
woar the Koh-in-Noor in his crown
at Delhi remains to he seen.
All India knows the legend. "He
who holds the Koh-i-Noor, holds India." Since the annexation of the
I'uuJhuIj the Koh-i-Noor has been one
of the chief Jewels of tho Knglish
crown, hut Queen Victoria never
visited India, and King Kdward's
coronation Durbar waa held by Lord
Curzon. India has thus never yet
behold the Koh-l-Noor on the head
of an Kngllsh emperor,
At the coronation the great Indian
diamond was the chiet jewel in the
crown of the queen, the great star
of Africa being the central ornament
of tho king's crown.
FKHPARATIONS    BEING  RUSHED
London.—The preparations for the
Durbar in Delhi are now being rapidly completed, and when the King returns to London, tbe last details
will be arranged.
For Sale.
Four Room House- -New.
Neat and Well-built. Cheap
and on Easy Terms. Apply
Owner, rare of Prospector.
Women's character mny he likened
to a postage stamp—one Hack mark
rains it. Man's character may be
likened to a greenback-no matter
how many stains it still passes at
par. This is certainly not a lust
stantlanl yet it has been established
hy Hociety tho world over.
We Are Waiting
For You
to make your first meat purchase at
this market. The longer you keep
from making it, the more pleasure oi
eating prime meats you will miss.
How ahout some chops o1 a steal
for tomorrow's breakfast ' Just come
and see how tempting they aro. Anl
they'll taste even better than tbey
look.
P.   BURNS   &  CO.
F. M. MacPherson
UNDERTAKER
Norbury Avenue Next to City Hall
Open Day and Nigbt Phone 131
Phone 1*
P. O. Boi I
»VWVVVVV*»*'^»»**^«*«#**A**'<**<**£
" Century Restaurant
K. Y. Oyematsu, Prop.
THE   BEST   PLACE IN
THE   OITY   POR   A
GOOD   HEAL.
BOARD AND ROOMS
Opposite O. P. R. Depot.
Phone 119   P. O. Boi 104
VyWWW^*/MAMr*^r>rV
At present there ts no tenancy In
otlicial quarters to contemplate the
postponement of thc Dun ar, or of
tho absence of tlie King from it on
account of the war between Italy
and Turkey, hut it ia recognised that
any serious development of the situation affecting European peace might
causo a rocoiiBiiloration of the present plans, according to which the
King and Queen will sail from Portsmouth In the Medina on November
9th.
Hundreds of the most eminent persons in Kngland have already booked
their passages and secured accommodation in Delhi. The otlicial camps
in which accommodation is provided
for English visitors who apply to
the India olllco. will have about 400
inhabitants, and other camps, privately arranged, 200 or 30C more.
It ia eipectod that between 700 and
800 visitors will go ont specially for
the Durbar. Some have already
started. The latest date for sailing
from Marseilles, in order to be on
time for the ceremony at Delhi, is
Novemher   14.
There is said to be still a small
amount of accommodation to dispose of in ofnclal "Two-gulnea-a-
day" oamp, but It ls probable that
"house-full" will be declared within
a few days.
Y. M. C. A. Notes
The social ovening at the Y.M.C.
A., held last Friday was a splendid
success.
Over ono hundred members and
guests enjoyed the entertainment
given.
During the evening the guests listened to an nddress hy A. S. McAllister of Kenora, and to various vocal
selections by well known local talent
After the program refreshments
were served to about one hundred
guests and a numher took part in
the games on the bowling alleyB and
pool tables.
The program was arranged for by
the Literary and Debating Society,
and other evenings will be devoted
to similar amusements.
This society meets again on Wednesday evening next and invite any
and every man to come to these
meetings and to take part ln the
various programs and discussions.
On Sunday afternoon the men's
meeting was well attended, and     all
who were present enjoyed the address
given by Mr. A. 8. McAllister of
Kenora.
Kenora Y.M.C.A. ls as anxious as
the Cranbrook Y.M.C.A. to secure
the addition of more rooms, a swimming tank and a gymnasium, and
prospects are bright for these additions soon at both places.
Request for the appropriation goes
In soon for the Oranbrook addition,
and with the rapidly increasing
membership of the local branch and
the need of more rooms will undoubtedly help in securing this much talked of and much needed addition.
The young couple had -been married only a few weeks and had mov-
jd out in the country for the summer. One night they Invited the village minister to dinner. When the
linger bowl was placed in front ol
the rustic parson he looked inquiringly at it, tben at his host and hostess
and stammered :
"A-ah yes ! Is there-Is there a
•hild to be chrlstoned Y"-Yonkers
Statesman.
Provincial Elections' Act
Cranbrook Electoral District
TAKE NOTICK that I have received objections In writing to the retention of the following names on the Register of Voters for the Cranbrook Klectoral District on the groundB as stated below .
AND take notice that at a Court of Revision to be held on the 6th
day of November, 1911, at the Court House in Cranbrook at ten o'clock
lu the foronoon, I shall hear and determine the said objections, and unless such named persons, or Borne other Provincial Voter on their behalf,
BatiBtleB me that such objections are not well founded, I shall strike such
names off the said Register. „        ^ ^ ^.^
Acting Registrar of Voters.
Dated this   Uth day of Octoher,   1911.
The following persons are reported absent from the district:
DKS. KING & GREEN
Physicians and Surgeons
Offles at Residence, Armstrong Ave.
OFFICE HOURS
Forenoons - - - - 9.00 to 10.00
Afternoans - - - - 1.00 to 4.00
Evenings - - - -   7.10 te   1.10
Sundays 1.10 to   4.10
IRANBROOK :     : ». 0.
Dancing, Deportment and
Calisthenics
MISS MARION R1TMSEY
(Seven YearB Training under Madame
Ollvlerl, F.ngllBh Court
Teacher)
Classen held at   the   Masonic Hall.
Skirt Dancing, Qavottes,  l.e Minuet,
de la Cour, Reels, National, uld English and Classical Dances, etc.
A special feature made ot Physical
dances, Indian Clubs, Dumb Bells,
Balls, Spanish Arm Movements, Swedish Drill and Skipping, thereby giving Pupils tbe double advantage of
Physical Exercises with Dancing.
For further  particulars address :—
POST OFFICE,   CRANBROOK,   B.C.
86-4t
****************
i
W. Cline
~n—
01 Ibt Aid MamMiiI-a Itirhur
Htt'ipoftt- now na foilti-1 In thi
MANITOBA HOTEL
First OlMS Work In
all  branot.es of tha
JTonsorial   Art;
***************
No.
2B
UB
12
14
3KB
13
47
63
71
71C
74C
75
79
81
81
92
97
104
1C7
138B
142
168
173
175B
183
183
206B
212
225B
227B
233
235
241
243B
249
252
258
262
26311
26811
279
281
288B
290
291R
293
80S
307B
Name
Place
Abbott, Robert   Cranbrook
Aikins,  James Andrew   Cranhrook
AlklnB, Hobert Samuel '.  Cranbrook
Alexander,  Robert Scott    Cranbrook
Ansell, Charles James   Cranbrook
Arrnitagc, Clark    Mayook
Armstrong, James   Cranbrook
Atkinson,  John   Cranbrook
Babbitt. Charles Samuel   Cranbrook
Bagan, Patrick   Cranbrook
Baird. William   Cranhrook
Uaker, Delmer Washburn  Cranhrook
Bakoi, Peter   Oranbrook
Ballard, lHanc  .'.  Cranhrook
Barclay.   Hugh   Cranbrook
Harnet,  Peter lmirle   Cranbrook
Barr, John Edward   North Star
Hartley, George Henry   Oranbrook
Barton, Michael Edgar    Cranbrook
Bibeault.  Arthur   Oranbrook
Blnkley, Daniel Franklin   Cranbrook
Blondln, OsiaB  Cranbrook
Boss, Arthur J  Oranbrook
Bougie,  Edouard   Oranbrook
Bradford. William Henry   Marysville
Branch, Henry   Cranbrook
Urlstow, Hllver   Crnnbrook
Mrookn, Claude Ernest   Wardner
Brown, Herbert George   ?ranI"""0l!
Brown, Roheit 	
Brownlee, James   (?Bn!,r"°!!
Brynns, Frederick  	
Bugler, Herbert Stanley Dare
Bunting,  Auhrey 	
Bums, John 	
Burns, Robert
336    Chapman, Charles Alexander   rmt steel,
872    Clemmer, Austin   Cranbrook
376B Clubb, Joseph Prssley    Mo-,1J
892    Connolly, Edward Worthlngton  Oranbrook
Connolly, Hobart Elliott  Cranbrook
Conover, Clarence Frederick Marysville
Oorrlson, Francis Edward   Cranbrook
Dischaw, James Louis  • Cranbrook
Dormer, Robert  Wardner
Fllleul, Thomas  Cranbrook
612B Flanders, Frank  Cranbrook
656    Fuller, Archie  Oranbrook
Fuller, Henry Edward  Oranbrook
Oagne, Oeorge   Oranbrook
Gasklll, Charles Aaron  Cranbrook
Gillespie, Malcolm   Oranbrook
Oodin, JoBeph  Oranbrook
Gordon, William Angus   Cranbrook
893
894
411
COO
512
597
657
663
678
702
716
724
Cranbrook
Cranlirook
Cranbrook
Cranhr.iok
Crnnbrook
Cranbrook
Cranbrook
Burton, Alfred Burgess   Cranbrook
Burton, William Thomas  Crnnbrook
Hun-riers, John   Cranbrook
Call. John Oonlon   Yahk
Cameron,  James William   Cranhrook
Cameron, John Alexander   Oranbrook
Camphell, Dennle  Oranbrook
Camphell, Frank  Oranbrook
Campbell, James  Cranbrook
Campbell, John Alexander   Oranbrook
Carllon, Oncer  Yahk
Carmlcbael, Norman   Oranbrook
729B Graham, Herbert Robert   Kingsgate
732 Grant, Alexander Mcintosh   Cranbrook
737 Grant, William   Cranbrook
739 Gray,  Joseph   Oranbrook
800 Haslora, William   Oranbrook
849 Hodnett, Herbert   Cranbrook
851 Hogarth, Roland Douglas  , Cranbrook
866 Houle, Encllde   Wattsburg
881 HugheB, Robert  ,.  Oranbrook
884 Hume, Allan    Moyle
885 Hume, Allen   Oranbrook
893 Ibhotson, William A  Cranhrook
930 Johnston, Erastus Borland   Oranbrook
1048 Leclare, Kugene   Oranbrook
1072B Llmond, William   Oranbrook
1C85B Long, Francis Granville    Moyie
1089 Lougheed, Johnston   Oranbrook
1097 Lye, Frank    Wycllfle
1102 Madlgan, Patrick Frank   Oranbrook
1106B Mllhot, Leo   Oranbrook
1137 Manson, Octave  <-.  Cranbrook
1143B Maynard, Napoleon   Cranbrook
1154B Mercure, Clarisas   Oranbrook
1172 Miller, John Wesley   Moyie
1173 Miller, Lyman Kennedy   Oranbrook
1209 Morln, Alpbonse Simon   Oranbrook
1218B Morton, Leslie   Oranbrook
1245 McAfee, John   Cranbrook
1247 McAlplne, Percy Jacob   Oranbrook
1250 McArthur, William Albert  Oranbrook
1251 Macauley, Robert William   Oranbrook
1268 McOormlck, Patrick   Oranbrook
1273 McCullougli, Allen   Oranbrook
1310 McDonald, Wm. Maclay   Oranbrook
1317A McDougall, Alexander   Oranbrook
1328 McEachcrn, John Stewart    Moy's
1829B McKlroy, Angus   Wattsburg
1331 McEwan, Duncan   Oranbrook
1832 McFadden, John Oeorge   Oranbrook
1333 MacFarlane, Alexander   Oranbrook
1349 Mclnnis, Hugh   Oranbrook
1361 McKay, Murdock  .t„... Oranbrook
1371 Mackenzie, Thomas Chisholm   Oranbrook
1374 McKlllop, Donald Alex  Oranbrook
1375 McKlnna, David   Oranbrook
1880 McKnlght, Alonso  Oranbrook
1402 McLellnn, Peter Finlay   Oranbrook
1421 McNeill, James Alexander   Oranbrook
1425 McPeak, William Francis   Oranbrook
1440 McVlttle, Harry Hamilton   Oranbrook
1451D Newman, John O  Oranbrook
1477 Oxendale, John   Cranhrook
1484 O'Neil, Freeman   Cranhrook
1485 O'Neill, Mark Andrew   Oranbrook
1487 Page. Percy   Cranbrook
1538 Peterson, Frank James   Cranbrook
1604 Pruden, Jacob  I  Cranhrook
1578 Rae, Thomas Robert   Craubrook
1574 Ralson, Sidney Gsorgs   Oranbrook
IHO Read, Frank   Oranbrook
1585    Reeves, Frederick William   Cranbrook
1590    Reid, Charles   Wattsburg
1696    Renton, Sydney Charles   Cranbrook
1604 Rlne, Frank Henry   Cranbrook
1605 Rloux, William   Cranbrook
1626    Robinson, Hugh Miller   Cranbrook
1687 Rollins, Victor Albert   Cranbrook
1647 Rowan, William H  Cranbrook
1648 Rowe, John   Cranbrook
1650A Rupert, Beague Herbert   Cranbrook
1651    Russell, Edward Samuel  ,  Cranbrook
1654 Rutherford,  Samuel   Cranbrook
1655 Rutledge, Alexander   Cranbrook
1657    Rutledge, Lessie Nixon   Cranbrook
1660    Ryan, Edward   Oranbrook
1669    Bait, Henry    Moyie
1676    Santoni, Lewis   Oranbrook
1688 Scott, Walter   Cranbrook
1706    Shorpe, James   Cranbrook
1734    Smith, CharleB   Crsnbrook
1737    Smith, Eugene   Cranbrook
1746    Smith, Lewis Mitchell  .' Oranbrook
1763*   Smyth, George Gordon   Cranbrook
1764    Snaddon, William   Cranbrook
1757    Sneddon, John   Cranbrook
1761 Sorenson, Gilbert    Baker
1762 Sorge, William   Oranbrook
1778    Stalker, Nlcl Sinclair  Oranbrook
1795    Steward, Horace   Cranbrook
1807 Stewart, Richard   Cranbrook
1808 Stewart, Royal Alexander   Cranbrook
1814    Stone, Edward Charles  Cranbrook
1814B Stone, William Bdwardi  Cranbrook
1817    Stouflcr, Fred  Oranbrook
1831    Sumption, William Richard   Cranbrook
1»11    Symes, Harry Hayward   Oranbrook
1861    Thenkcr, John  ,  Oranbrook
1868    Thlffault, William   Cranbrook
1865B Thomas, Oeorge W  Cranhrook
1868    Thompson, John  Oranbrook
1870 Thompson, Louis   Cranbrook
1871 Thomson, Andrew   Baker
1883    Tisdnle, David Price   Cranbrook
1890    Tnrphy,  Michael    Crnnhrook
189111 Townscnd, Sydney   Oranbrook
1894 Travis, John Church   Cranbrook
1895 Trevelyan, Henry Berrington   Cranbrook
1907    Vaughan, Chnrles William   Cranbrook
1909    Verfaille, Camilla   Cranbrook
1917    Walker, Daniel   Oranbrook
1939    Ward, Frederick George   Oranbrook
1977B Whipple, Henry   Oranbrook
1995    Williams, Augustus Arnold   Oranbrook
2013 Wilson, Harry S  Oranbrook
2014 Wilson, John William   Oranbrook
2015 Wilson, Robert  Moyle
2046    Workman, John   Oranbrook
2042    Worsley, Francis ,  Oranbrook
2064    Young, William   Oranbrook
The tollowing persons are reported as deceased :
155    Birtch, William John   North Star
174R Bottomloy, Allen   Oranbrook
382,11 Coghlll, Robert Galr    Yahk
482    Dcsnulnler, Odlllon    Moyle
632    Forrest, Timothy    Moylt
838    Higgins, Patrick   Crnnbrook
979    Kerr, Henry Augustus   Cranbrook
U92B Montgomery, Daniel   Oranbrook
1608    Hobeits, Edward   Cranbrook
1668    Ryckman, William Syrian   Crnnbrook
1776    Stack, Frank    Fort Steele
1789    Btocven, Isaac   Cranbrook
The following persons are rsported as not qualified whon placed on tht
Hat:	
Ui    Johason, Mark  Oraabrook THE PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK, BRITISH COLUMBIA
OF  PERSON  ASSESSED
DELINQUENT  TAXES
DELINQUENT TAXES
SHORT DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY
Si**   -S1-
3 tr.
. A„ ft Schatt, J	
Montague s	
ers, 1).  W	
ers, T. T	
W. B	
. H	
>	
Mrs. Ada 	
n, O	
Georgo  	
, Mike 	
enneth	
ii, Joseph 	
tt	
John 	
t, Nicholas 	
Bros.	
. Tony 	
ta, 0, Farcona, E	
Frank 	
,  Al	
, James 	
l.eopoldo	
Mike 	
ne,  John	
, Wm	
M	
Is, Morgan 	
, Frank 	
,  Tony 	
o, Fllomena 	
i, Rosina 	
John 	
Hector 	
Miko 	
o,  Mike	
o,  Joe	
Thomas 	
M. S	
Mary Ann	
H	
.Annie R	
l.eopoldo 	
a, Felice 	
Wir.	
i, Honry 1	
Mrs. H. A	
, Cnrollno  	
i,  Robert 	
>,  John  	
■zyek, Frank 	
Carlo  	
Ceorge 	
a, Felice	
, Sam 	
Gutsappc	
ook,  John  N	
y, Hcrhert 	
n, Thos	
, Louie	
o, Phillip  .'	
ezyn, John 	
y.  Charley  	
n,  Arthur 	
n,  Archibald 	
icll, E. H	
, 0	
Alexander 	
3Uth, John J	
jera, John	
, J. W	
twn	
js, B.  K	
tn, J. A	
i,  Evan 	
■d, Wm	
l, Walter 	
ing, Mrs. S	
, Malcolm 	
r, Archibald 	
ion, Henry J	
, George 	
Andrew 	
or, Wm. 8	
ta, Alexander ,	
egor, Murdoch  ,	
, Urbain 	
mond & Mcintosh 	
nln, F	
kor,  John 	
i, H	
las,  Wm	
nas,  D.  R	
y, Mrs. M., Crawford, Mrs. M. A
ard,  Walton 	
ids, Mrs.  Dollcsanka 	
tell, Mary  Ann 	
tt, Sydney  	
cr, Peter	
i,  Felice  	
uico, Carlo 	
lay, W. (1	
h,  Mrs.  Sarah 	
Bow Boo 	
i,  Stephen 	
intone, 0. H., Hkeail, B. A	
ins, Patrick 	
ties, Patrick 	
a, Paul, Cameron, A	
hlo,  Joseph 	
sella, Philip 	
in, Anton  • • ••
:ka, Mrs. Paraaka 	
s, IJrbaln 	
, Miss TobIiI 	
nome, lliski 	
e, 0. F., Brown, Pearl 	
and, Harry 	
lay, W. 0	
, Mrs. Kate 	
onald, Mrs. I). R	
onald, John A	
tier, A. L	
la, Paul 	
inski, Jacob ...,	
, Mike ..;	
Peter, Wm	
yn, Frank  	
aytla, William 	
MORRISSEY     MINES     TOWNSITE,     REGISTERED     PLAN     NO.     743
Lot Number Block Number
35   ft   36     20   Morrissey Mines  8 5.85
3   &   7      21 Morrissey Mines   16.21
5        21 Morrissey Mines    8,10
6        21 Morrissey Mines     8.10
31       21 Morrissey Mines     5.80
22     21 Morrissey Mines     5.80
35       21 Morrissey Mines      5.80
1        22 Morrissey Mines     6.25
2        22 Morrissey Mines  ,.. 10.90
3        S2 Morrissey Mines     B.lu
FERNIE    ANNEX,    REGISTERED    PLAN    NO.    734A
Lot Number Block Number
South Half Lot   4     42  Fernio  Alilex     4.20
North Half   4     42 Fernie Annex     4.80
r.        42 Fernio  Annox    3.00
il      42  Fernie  Annex   7.20
1      13 Fernie Annex   3.0(1
2      43 Fernie Annex   3,00
South Half   4   43 Fernie Annex   5.40
North Half   4   43 Fornie Annex   5.10
South Half   .I   43 Fernie Annex   6,00
South Half   7   43 Fernie Annex   5.4C
North Halt   8   43 Fernie Annex   3.60
South Halt   8   43 Fernie Annex   3.60
North Half   9   43 Fornie Annei   4.20
South Halt   9   43 Fernie Annei   3.60
10   48 Fernie Annex   4.80
11     83  Fernie Annex   2.10
12   83 Fernio Annex   5.4C
2      84 Fernio Annex   1.20
6  84 Fernie Annex  -2.35
10   84 Ferule Annex   2.70
13   101 Fernio Annex  I SO
14   101 Fernie Annex   8.40
15   101 Fernie Annex   2.40
16 ft   17   101 Fernie Annex   4.80
19   _   20   UU Fernie Annex   '' 90
1   ft   2   102 Fernie Annex   7.20
4   ft   5   102 Fernie Annex   12-00
6      102 Fernie Annex   2.40
7      102 Fernie Annex   2-40
8      102 Fernie Annex   2.40
9      102 Fernie Annex   2.40
13   ft   14   102 Pernio Annex   7.20
15   102 Fernie Annex   8.40
extension,  Registered  plan  no.
Block Number
    85 Fernie Annex Extension ..
5        91 Fernie Annex Extension
fi        91 Fernie Annex Extension ..
8        91 Fernie Annex Extension .
9        91 Fernie Annex Extension ..
10      91 Fernie  Annex Extension .
1        92 Fernie Annex Extension .
2     ••   92 Fetnio Annex Extension .
3        95 Fernie Annex Extension .
FERNIE    ANNEX
Lot Number
10  	
902
A    6 .
95 Fernie Annex Extension .
96 Fernie Annex Extension
96 Fernie Annex Extension
96 Fernie Annex Extension
9ij Fernio Annex Extension
107 Fernie Annex Extension
116 Fernie Annex Extonsiun
4   116 Fernie Annex Extension .
5   116 Fernie Annex Extension .
6   116 Fernie Annex Extension .
8   117 Fernie- Annex Extension .
9   117 Fornie Annex Extension .
7 AV   8  ■  125 Fernie Annex Extension .
6 ft   7   126 Pernio Annex Extension .
S   126 Fernie Annex Extension .
9 A  10   126 Fernie Annex Extension ,
WEST    FERNIE,    REGISTERED    PLAN    NO.    735
1.35
1.35
1.20
1 .I'.i
1.05
1 35
I 05
1.C5
2.70
1.36
1.20
1.05
1.05
1.20
4.20
1.05
1.20
.90
.60
.75
.90
1.50
.60
1.50
Lot Number
Sub-divlsibn 0 of Lot   4
Block Number
Sub-division   A of lot  6
9     	
9     	
South Hall   2 	
North Eaet   i of Lot   3     3
North West   i of Lot   3     3
South West   J of Lot  3     3
8outh East   t ot Lot, 4     3
South WeBt   i of Lot   4     4
East Half   11     3
Sub-division A ft B, Lot   7...   4
Sub-divisions C ft D, Lot 7..   4
II     4
Sub-dlvlslons A ft B, Lot  6..   5
Sub-divlslon   4, Lot   26     5
Sub-dlvlslons   1,   2,   4,  5,   A
6,   l.ot   27     5
HOSMER   TOWNSITE,
Lot Number
3    	
West Fernie  ..v.-.    2.40
West Fernie   15.00
West Fernie   12.30
West Fernie     9.30
West Fertile   16.20
West Fernio     6.16
West Fernie     2-10
West Fernie     1.50
West Ferule     2-40
West Fernie     3-90
West Fernie     2.40
West Fernie     9.00
West Fernie  ,   5.40
WeBt Fernie   22.70
West Fernie     6.30
West Fernio      1.20
West Fernie     1.65
  5   West Fernie   9.60
REGISTERED    PLAN    NO.    772
Block Number
  1 Hosmer   5.00
  1 Hosmor   3.00
  I Hosmer  '.  1.80
  2 Hosmer   7.08
  2 Hosmer   7.20
  2 Hosmer   4.95
  2 Hosmer   5,30
  2 HoBiner   *-ee
  2 Hosmer   4.50
11   2 Hosmer   L65
12   2 Hosmer   4.65
IH  ,.  2 Hosmer   5.22
20    2 Hosmor   L65
17
4
6
8
13
1
4
14
18
19
7
9
16
17
19
13
14
15
9
10
11
8
A    18
8V   20
ft   20
  9,90
  8.60
  12.00
  1.80
  13.50
  6.00
  5.25
  6.00
„',  23.65
  11.70
  10.80
  3,00
  3.15
6 Hosmer     9.27
6 Hosmer     2.55
6 Hosmor   79.20
7 Hosmor
7 Hosmor
7 Hosmer
io Hosmer
3 Hosmor
4 Hosmer
4 HoBiner
4 Hosmor
4 HoBiner
5 Hosmor
5 Hosmer
5 Hosmer
5 Hosmer
6 Hosmor
5 Hosmor
6 Hosmer
i\ Hosmor
&   6
     2.40
     2.10
 1,0
  18.00
10 Hosmer  18.0H
10 Hosmer    l*,00
11 Hosmer   21.00
12 Hosmer  11-10
7       12 Hosmor   -n.on
11      12 Hosmer   a'-*-**
3       14 Hosmer     ''•■'■
5        14 Hosmer      ■ ■»**
7        14  Hosmor      I-'*
H    14 Hosmer     s''0
12     14 Hosmor     ''-'n
13     11 Hosmor     2-*-'
14     II Hosmor     8.40
15       14  Hosmer         8.06
2.28
2.60
1.63
3.90
.56
1.63
2.93
2.93
3.25
2.91"
1.95
1.95
2.28
1.96
.80
1.14
2.18
.65
1.17
1.47
2.60
3.30
1.30
2.60
3.74
3.90
4.70
1.30
1.30
1.30
1.30
3.90
4.90
.45
.45
.40
.35
.35
.45
.45
.35
.40
.90
.45
.40
.35
.35
.40
1.40
.35
.28
.30
.20
.60
5.27
1.94
1.12
7.28
4.80
5.16
2.13
1.03
2.81
1,03
2,95
4.17
1.03
6,79
1.13
11.05
1.13
1,75
8,76
16.04
6,56
9,85
1.98
2,03
5.14
.85
1.55
1.55
.38
11.63
11.63
11.63
13.66
20.63
1.55
6,52
7.50
1.94
.38
2.46
8 1.87
5.41
2.71
2.71
1.86
1.86
1.86
1.91
3.33
2.71
.56
.62
.39
.93
.40
.40
.70
.70
.78
.70
.47
.47
.49
.47
.42
.27
.55
.16
.36
.38
.62
.73
.31
.64
1.21
.93
1.36
.31
.31
.31
.31
.93
1.12
.09
.09
.08
.06
.06
.09
.09
.06
.08
.18
.14
.08
.06
.06
.08
.28
.06
.06
.06
.05
.05
.06
.11
.05
.10
.12
.75
.62
.63
1.60
.89
.11
.08
.18
.34
.18
1.17
.45
1.96
.66
.06
.12
1.52
1.14
.40
.15
.86
.58
1.23
.43
.13
.37
.13
1.05
1.27
.14
1.35
.45
2.15
.14
2.19
.48
.87
.48
3.93
.91
2.87
.39
.16
1.46
.39
8.23
.32
.32
.05
2.38
2.38
2.38
3.89
1.53
1.60
4.19
.32
.09
1.05
2.08
.77
.47
.67
.73
NAME OK  I'EKSON  ASSESSED
SHORT DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY
■-- Sf
SB =
82.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.0C
2.0C
2.0C
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.0C
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2,00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.0C
2.00
2.00
iM
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.C0
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.0C
2,00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2,00
2.0C
2.00
2.00
2,00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
8 9.72
23.61
12.81
12.81
9.66
9.66
9.66
10.16
16.23
12.81
9.04
10.02
7.02
14.03
5.90
7.03
11.03
11.03
12.03
11.03
8.02
8.02
8.97
8.02
8.02
5.51
10.13
4.01
5.88
6.55
10.02
14.43
6.01
10.04
13.85
14.03
20.06
6.01
6.01
6.01
6.01
14.03
16.42
3.89
3.89
3.68
3.46
3.46
3.89
3.89
3.46
3.53
5.78
3.94
3.68
3.46
3.46
3.68
7.88
3.46
3.26
3.26
2.85
3.05
3.26
4.19
2.85
4.10
4.52
17.75
14.92
11.93
19.80
9.04
4.21
3.58
4.58
6.24
4.58
12.17
7.85
26.66
8.96
3.86
3.77
13.12
13.41
7.34
5.07
17.22
14.28
13.34
7.86
4.81
9.68
4,81
10.65
12.66
4.82
20.04
7.18
27.20
5.07
17.69
8.48
9.87
12.23
45.52
21.17
26.52
7.32
7.64
17.87
5.79
89.43
6.27
6,27
3.03
34.01
34.01
34.01
40.54
14.63
24.69
5B.17
6,27
3.69
13,37
19.98
9,81
6.70
11.07
8.26
HOSMER     TOWNSITE.      REGISTERED     Pl.AN     NO.     772
Stetmock, Antoa 	
Gauthier, Joseph 	
Morneau, Elzier 	
Maasell, L. M	
Stitt A Baker	
Norvicki,   Justin  	
Kasaluki, Alex	
Burgess, J. K	
Mitchell, Mrs. M. A	
Tyldesley, T. H	
Buckley, Mrs. M.  A	
Quasi, Mike 	
Smith, F. M	
Pillion,  Joseph 	
Roberts, Isaac	
Cnpik,   John  	
Bolsaites, Joseph 	
Ont—chill, James 	
Sorrento, Tomaso 	
Cole, R. J	
Tarnowicki, Martin 	
McGregor, Murdoch 	
7.tto, Vlncenzo 	
Pasta, Paul 	
Folsoy,  T	
White.  Mra. Annie 	
Lowlckl, JuBtln 	
Shehadey. Said Kouri A.
t.apeter,  William 	
Wildman, Albert	
Harding, E. Q	
Hainan, Andrew 	
Gabrain, J	
Harding, E. G	
Cltnolini, Luigi 	
Estabrook, H.  W	
Estabrook, H. W	
Estabrook, Ernest C	
Mast, Wm. J	
Marsh, John 	
Svic, A	
Bastion,   J	
Cleaves, George 	
Tutlls, John 	
Karoly, 8. Szabo 	
Horvat,  M. O	
Majeskl, John	
Krus. A	
Boyd, Margaret A	
McFarlane, M	
Medve,  Albert 	
Papp, Joseph 	
DaviB, W	
Passalacqua,  D	
Pomnhac, F	
March, Mary 	
Mottle, Joseph 	
Hoza, Frank	
Padar, A	
Whitney, H. O	
Melntyre A Blackstone 	
Ferguson, Arthur E	
Heinz, Ernest	
Cribbs & Company 	
McCool, A. J	
Douglas,  J	
Douglas ft Stodman 	
Crow's Nest Pass Hardware Company
McCulloch, J. 8	
Deepen,  H.  A. ',	
Glendinning, .lames	
Cambrian Mining Co., Ltd	
Ransomc & Campbell	
Shea ft DaviB 	
Oldland, Harry 	
Letcher, Thomas 	
Davis, F. L	
Richards, Edward 	
Ingram ft Mitchell 	
Richards, S	
Oldland, Harry 	
ThomaB, Stephen 	
Thomas, Stephen 	
Mason, J	
Richards, Sam	
Douglas, F. 0., A Chapman, O. A	
Ireton, Wm. H.
Carrie, H.
Pugh ft Livingstone ft The Columbia
ft Kootenay Railway ft Navigation Company  ■••
Evnns, G. I.
Carrie, 11. ...
Carrie, H	
Pugh ft Livingstone 	
;pugh ft Livingstone 	
Pugh ft Livingstone 	
(McOonaell, P	
Hoclzel, Frank  	
Sanburn, I. B	
Miller, A. K	
Jamlssoti, George A	
'Campbell, Wm	
Douglas, (I	
Douglas, tl	
Bore, Louis 	
Douglas, F. C	
Douglan, F. ('	
Ferguson, J. A ...
Murray, a. c	
iMyors, R. 0„ ft Myers, J. A.
Myers, It. ('., ft Myers, J. A.
.MyerB, R, 0„ ft MyerB, J. A.
IMyors, R, 0, ...
O'Reilly,  Jan.
(Howard, A. F.
it'ar-ent, B. M.
Kent,  John G.
Lot Number
2 	
3 	
4     	
6    	
9   ft   10 	
12 	
13 	
14 	
15 	
Block Number
15 Hosmer   8
15 Hosmer 	
7
17
2
3
12
1
2
4
R
7
3
S
10
11
1
C
t
  15 Hosmer
  15 Hosmer
  15 Hosmer
  15 Hosmer
  15  Hosmer
  15 Hosmer
  15 Hosmer
  16  Hosmer
  16 Hosmer  .
  16 Hosmer .
  16 Hosmer .
  16 Hosmer
  18  Hosmer
  18 Hosmer .
  18 Hosmer
  19 Hosmer
  19 Hosmer .
  Ill Hosmer
  19 Ilonincr
  19 Hosmer
&   4 .'.  20 HoBiner
ft  6   20 Hosmer
  20 Hosmer
ft   12
20 Hosmer
34 Hosmer
31 Hosmer
34 Hosmer
31 Hosmer .
4.02
I    .85
i    .48
S2.00
J 7.35
t,„
4.18
.99
2.00
11.lit
2.'.0
.'JO
.33
2.00
5.93
8.U0
1.88
.15
2.00
7.03
6.0J
.88
.52
2.00
9.40
2 1.0
13.12
3.13
2.00
30.85
1,»0
1.88
.44
2.00
6.12
.10
.03
2.00
2.63
.75
.47
.06
2.00
3.28
1.20
.75
.10
2.00
4.05
1.35
.85
.11
2.00
4.31
2.70
4.23
.78
2.00
9.71
1.35
.85
.11
2.00
4.31
7.20
4.55
.71
2.00
14.46
.90
.:t;
.07
2.011
3.53
1,65
.97
.21
2.00
4.83
1.01
.97
.18
2.00
4.65
3.60
3.75
.89
2.U0
10.24
1.80
1.16
.28
2.00
5.24
2.40
.19
2.00
4.59
2.40
1.55
.32
2.00
6.27
2.40
1.55
.12
2.00
6.27
1.50
.94
.10
2.00
4.54
1.50
.94
.10
2.00
4.54
.75
.97
.11
2.00
3.83
1.65
1.03
.13
2.00
4.81
1.20
.78
.16
2.00
4.14
4.50
2.81
.36
2.00
9.67
1.80
1.13
.15
2.00
5.08
6.00
3.75
.48
2.00
12.23
MICHEL   TOWNSITE.    REGISTERED   Pl.AN    NO.   792
Lot Number
12 	
4 	
3 	
7 	
12 	
13 	
14 	
15 	
2 	
4 	
Block Number
C
3
.8
9
11
12
17
7
1
2
3
6
13
15
16
17
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
Michel
MlChsl
Michel
Michel
Michel
8 Michel
8 Michel
8 Michel
8 Michel
8 Michel
8. Michel
8 Michel
8 Michel ...
8 Miohel ...
8 Michel ...
6      10 Michel
7 '„,„'„,„  10  Michel
8 „  10 Michel
2      11 Michel
7      13 Michel
2 &   3   15 Michel
9 ft   10   15  Michel
11   ft   12   17 Michel
5      18 Michel
7     18 Michel
3   	
6    	
'i.'i'j
1.80
2.70
I.SO
3.00
4.20
5.10
2.*5
4.80
6.00
5.10
4.80
.60
1.20
.60
1.65
3.1.11
2.40
3.60
1.40
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.80
3.60
1.20
1.35
1.35
2.40
1.20
1.20
1.50
3.60
2.10
56.20
. 36.00
2.55
6.00
2.55
Moyle
    5 Moyie	
5 ft   6   1 Lake Shoro Addition, Moyic
2   ft   3   ;t I„ke Shore Addition. Moyln
2i   33 Wardner 	
8,   11,   12,   13,   16    II Elko 	
Lot   3054 Group One  Kootcnay  District  	
I      95 Fernio Annex Extension  ...
II      3 Hosmer 	
7        4 Hosmer 	
6 ft   7 •■•■•   5 Hosmer 	
1   ft   2     13 Hosmer 	
5        4 Michel 	
4 Michel 	
7 Michel 	
IB Michel 	
Oroup One,  Kootcnay DiBtrict
240 a"ie> 	
Oroup One,   Kootenny District
160 acres 	
Sub-division, 3 ft 4 ot Lot 357 oroup One,  Kootenay DiBtrict
32.0 acreB 	
1    	
Sub-division   13 oi Lot  4590,
Sub-divlslon    19 of Lot   4590,
16.00
9.40
38.46
Hub-division   16 bt l.ot   301, Group One, Kootenny District
160 acres    20.80
Sub-dlvlslou   16 ol Lot   327, oroup one,  Kootenay District
140  acres     7-60
8,   9,    10, ft
16, Lot  356, oroup One, Kootenay District
960  acrea  	
Suh-illvlBlolis   '
15   A
..115.2.1
Sub-dlvlBlons
2,   3,   9,   ft
10 Lot   369. Group One,  Kootcnay DiBtrict
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Sub-divlslon
6398,
6399,
6410,
6197,
7785,
3039,
6541,
9796,
3671,
5806,
800 acres ...
Group One, Kootenny District, 152 acres
Croup One, KootenRy DiBtrict, 84 acres ...
Group One, Koot;nay District, 44 acres ....
Group On;, ICootenay District, 276 acres ,
Group One, Rootc,,,^ District, 820 acres .
Group Ono, Koote,1By District, 50 acreB ....
Oroup On". Kennedy District, 131 aires
Oroup Onl, Kootenay District, 80 acres ...
Group on*, Koot.cluly District, 320 a<-re.
Group One, Kootenny District.
7018, Group ( ne, Kootenay District
nt Lot  314,   ciro u    inr
li,
160 arres 	
165 acr,s 	
KooUnay District
acres   	
320 a't'os 	
40   ncres 	
,..,   ,     ... „„,  District.   110 acres 	
North Half ol Lot  413*>, Group Ono, Kootenay District,   159
arres    ."■
6, l.ot 34(i,    Group'   Ono, Kootcnay District,   480 acres 	
■I. A   4, l.ot    341,    Group   One, Kootenny   DiBtrict,   640 ncrfB
Lot 3W8, Oroup One, Kootonay District
l.ot 4825, Group One, I.c0_n&y District
Lot   2320,  Group One, Kocitenay
Sub-divisions 'I.
Snh-dlvlslonii   I
euny     l/minci,    i,.u n'-r-i.,.
Sub divisions 7 ft 8,  Lot   341, Group One,  Kootenny  District
320  acres  	
lllock
Lot   7326, Oro
Part Lot   1I0I1S
27   ft    28.
Lot Number
Lot   3069, Group On
Huh-llvlnlon   9 ot I.i
One,  Kootenay  Dislrir
Groip
Huh-dlvlslon   14 ol l.ot
,...,    ,   360 a*ien 	
On',   Kootenay    District, being 1Mb
'.', Entmori' Addition,    Kimberley 	
lllock Numher
Ko.t'nny District,    86.6 acres 	
336,     Oroltp One,  Koot'nay  District
11,11 ncrnp  	
335,   Group one. Koofnny District
1(10 acres 	
12.80
.23
2.00
4.48
1.35
.16
2.00
5.31
6.53
.71
2.00
11.94
.20
2.00
4.00
.15
2.00
5.15
5.08
.92
2.00
12.20
6.56
1.04
2.00
15.00
7.13
.99
2.00
12.97
5.80
.91
2.00
13.51
4.50
.52
2.0(1
13.02
6.03
.91
2.00
14.07
5.80
.91
2.00
13.61
.45
.05
2.00
3.10
1.31
.14
2.00
4.15
1.20
.13
2.00
3.93
1.65
.87
2.00
6.67
4.35
.69
2.00
10.64
2.62
.39
2.00
7.41
2.70
.32
2.00
8.62
1.81
.26
2.00
5.47
1.45
.16
2.00
4.81
1.45
.16
2.00
4.81
1.45
.22
2.00
4.87
1.35
.16
2.00
5.31
.18
2.00
5.78
1.12
.12
2.00
4.44
1.56
.25
2.00
.5.16
1.56
.25
2.00
5.16
2.35
.34
2.00
7.09
.90
.11
2.00
4.21
.90
.11
2.00
4.21
.90
.11
2.00
4.21
5.10
1.02
2.C0
11.72
1.58
.11
2.00
5.79
4.03
2.00
61.23
43.50
8.01
2.00
89.51
1.91
.17
2.00
6.63
4.50
.52
2.00
18.01
1.91
.18
2.00
6.64
6.40
.27
2.00
7.67
2.40
.12
2.00
5.42
1.80
.09
2.00
3.89
9.00
.45
2.00
11.45
.47
.08
2.00
2.55
1.50
.08
2.00
3.58
10.66
1.51
2.00
14.22
1.50
.08
2.00
3.58
1.23
.07
2.00
3.30
3.75
.20
2.00
6.96
1.68
.08
2.00
3.76
6.42
.64
2.00
9.06
1.80
.09
2.00
3.89
1.35
.06
2.00
3.41
.56
.03
2.00
2.59
2.70
.13
2.00
-1.83
.80
2.00
18.80
.47
2.00
11.87
1.92
2.00
42.32
The Leading Newspaper
in the Kootenays
"The Prospector"
Subscribe
Now
1.04
.57
5.76
2.00
2.00
2.00
96.00
4.80
2.00
8.10
.59
2.00
4.50
.35
2.00
2.40
.20
2.00
15.00
.75
2.00
9.60
.48
2.00
3.00
3.00
.30
2.00
15.00
.75
2.00
8.00
.40
2.00
34.68
3.23
2.00
9.60
.77
2.00
8.40
.65
2.00
3.60
1.15
.24
2.00
12.00
.60
2.00
1.50
.08
2.00
10.00
.50
2.00
4.60
.22
2.00
15.00
10.50
1.27
2.00
18.00
11.25
1.60
2.00
9.00
18.87
2.47
2.00
32.00
3.00
1.76
2.00
.60
1.60
.38
2.00
7.00
.36
2.00
16.00
.80
2.00 THE PROSPECTOR, CRANRROOK. BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE PEOPLE'S PULPIT
Etermon  by
CHARLES  T.   KU8SELL,
Pastor Brooklyn Tabernacle
BLASPHEMY    COMMON
Million, of Christians Unwittingly
Profane the Creator in Misrepresenting What His Holy Name
Represents.
Denver, June 18.—Pastor Russell
ftve twu publio addn-sses here to-day,
one o( which we report. Many of Deu
ver'a prominent religious people we«
conspicuous iu tin; U.rge audieuce
Prolound impress! na were undoubted'
ly made. breaking from tho text,
''Holy, holy, holy Lord Uod Almighty,
the whole earth shall be rilled with
Thy glory" (Revelation iv, 6). the
speaker said:
Shakespeare tells ol some "damned
by Unit praise!" Wt* grasp hia statu-
meat as implying that a taint praise
is more injurious thau silence. But
as we look to ourselves and the remainder ot Uie reputed l-.ur hundred
millions uf Christendom and theii
united tribute ol praise to the Almighty Creator we are forced tu admit
that with many He is given "laiiu
praise," while the vast major.ty positively blaspheme the Holy Name by
most atrocious misrepresentations ol
the Divine e..aracter, wh.c.i they e aim
to be His own revelation ol a detnonia
cal plot for the eternal torture in one
way or another, of the thousands oi
millions brought into existence by Hu
power and without tiieir own consent.
There may be *s:d to be three different theories prevalent in Christendom on the subject. They ail nav*.
■ealous, earnest, honest advocates.
Each contradicts the others, Bach
claims to love God and to seek to S-*rvj
and honor Him. Evidently, two at
least of the tnree are wrong, lt is our
conviction that ull three are in error
We believe that all three of them have
fragments of the truth around which
have crystallized distorting, slanderous, blasphemous errors. Ine uphold
ers ol these theories are so blinded and
bewildered that they fail to discern
that their praise and worship toward
the Creator are defiled and Converted
inti slanders and ealummes aud blasphemies by their incrustations uf
falsehood.
All three of these views declare that
the Almighty, with full power to haw
done otherwise, so created humanity
that a child once born into the world
can never die—he must live somewhere unceaeingly—either in pain or
in pleasure. By what authority auy
make these declarations we have never
ascertained.
Surely it is a gross slander upon a
God of infinite Justice, Wisdom, Love
and Power to cla.m that He ever entrusted to poor, fallen, human parents the power to bring into existence
sin-blighted and sin-disposed human
creatures such as we see our race to
be, and theu made the happiness of
their eternity dependent upon a superhuman resistance of the A* ils ol their
environment and of their depraved
constitutions! This blasphemy against
the Holy Name is common to nearly
every creed of Christendom.
Our Catholic friends tell ua that hy
Divine arrangement terrible purgatorial experiences await practically
every member of our race, in the hope
that, if rightly exercised thereby, alter
centuries of torture, au eternity of
bliss will be gained, ls not this also
a blasphemy against the Holy Name?
Who can deny it? Who would not
shdUder to have such an awful crime
of evil design charged against himself
or against his earthly parents? Who
that is begotten of the Holy Spirit is
ii*it pained even to think of such a
eharge being made against his Heavenly Father, "the Uod of all grace"?
Surely such a theory ii blasphemous,
horrible.
Hut we huve grown so accustomed
to this blasphemy thnt it fails to prick
the majority to the heart a.t it should.
With wl <of our development of human
sympathy and cure for the sick and
even lor our wounded enemies on the
battlefield, and with our precautions
of modern times uguist criminal negligence which might lead to the destruction of human life by t'utiHagra-
tion—with all of our tire apparatus
and benevolent laws for the protection uf the very humblest of our race,
we have calmly and without protest
charged against our gr 'at Creator, and
indorsed it us our belief, either publicly or tacitly, that He would look
Upon a holueau.it of millions with no
Art} brigade for their relief, Is not
this blasphemy of the Holy Name?
Is it uny wonder that in early life
our childish hearts were filled with
fear rather thun with love toward our
Creator and toward His Revelation,
the Bible? Is it auy wonder tbut It
required all kinds id fighting with
our -ommou sense to believe, ai we
were taught we should, that Cod lovingly predestinated that all the families of earth should suffer eternally
except a saintly huudlul—because He
was pleased to have it so! because He
foreordained that it must be so! because He mude n great place called
bell before He mude the .-art.., and
made it large enough to hold the entire human family' because He created tire-proof demons lo inflict tur
ture upon th* poor unfortunate* whu
were born in sin, shapen Ui Iniquity,
iu sin conceived by their mothers, and
many uf ihem left without un opportunity ul hearing ul the "only nuiio-
whereby they must be saved" - and
that He wisely and with devilish in
tention laid up fuel enough to last to
all eternity lur the luture uf HU
helpless creatures!
And are uot such evil thoughts and
peseutat'.ons respecting uur great
Creator blasphemy? If not, pray tel.
me what would b* blasphemy! Most
assuredly I can think ol nothing lhat
could possibly enter the human m.rid
or pass the human lips more bin,.-
pheuious thun thin doctrine. Arid yet
those who bow down before this creed
number some of the ablest and moit
intelligent, most enlightened and most
benevolent of our depraved, fallen
fact*. How is thia? How comes it tha'
Ve have been so blinded us respttct**
mmj own conduct uud misbeliefp The
Scriptures answer thut Satan hns de.
ceived us; he has put light for dark
ness and darkness lor tight.
A considerable portion ol thinking
anl Christian people will Join with u-
In snying, Ah I surely Brother Calvin
grevlously erred uud arlevouslv mil*
repr nted the Odd of Love when ha
taught thfl doctrine ol thfl predestination of the wicked to eternal torture-
Ahl say these Christian friends, tfir
hearts rebel agaltial that theory of
Divine predestination, We ''luim that
tin* Almighty Is Love Itself (hat He 'i
Sympathetic with Ills creatures and Is
Using every effort to avert Hie great
calHinlty oi eternal torture.
Ah* my friends, is not this still an
othei form of blasphemyP If some of
us blasphemed thu Holy Name lu representing our Heavenly Father as
u.erc'less, loveless, have Wfl not In an*
nthftf wnv hUsiibtmi'-l thst same Hnlw
Name in declaring that He lucka the
power und the wisdom to do the good
which His loving heart would prompt?
Do we worship a stupid ami impotent
God, one who blund-'rcd in the creation ot our   race,  and  who, tor ail
thousand  years, hi* been  striving to
rectify   that   error   and   all   the   wh.l*
has been allowing thousands of mil
lions of His creatures whom He lover*
to go dowu to an eternity of torture!
Alas! it would b? nearly as easy to
I worship an all-powerful and loveless
| God as to worship an all-loving but
[ unwise and impotent God who foolish-
I ly, sinfully, brought thousands ol rail-
I lions of intelligent beings into exist
! ence only to cause them to suffer an
eternity of agony through His mcotii-
petence,
t     Thank   God!  dear  friends,  tor  the
j glorious day in which we are living.
j with its electric light and other evi-
I deuces that we are in the dawning of
| a New Age.   Thank God! that in this
j day the electric lamp of truth is show*
| ing   up   the   mistake   of   these   bias
j phemous errors which huve so defiled
all tne precious truth* of God's Hook
j lor years, fur centuries.    Thank God
; ttiat' our Bible is   becoming   a   new
Book  to those  whose eyes of  under
standing are opening to the  length*-
und breadths and heights and depth-
ol the love of God which it declares
Now we ar.- seeing itiut "the wages
■jf sin is death"—nut eternal torment
nor  Purgatory.    Sow  we are seeiu*
■.hat Jesu= met tins death penally as
tne Redeemer ol "Ut  race from  thc
power ui the tomb.   Now  we ure seeing tiiat  Lie su-.vution that  God  ha*
; promised will be brought to us at the
I second coming of Jesus and  the establishment of  his  mediatorial  king
doui for tiie  blessing ol all the t a mi-
lie* of the eartn !    Now we are seeing
that tlie saUatiou provided is a resurrection of tiie deai — not merely an
awakening lroui tne tomb, but a com
pleie uplift out oi sin aud degradation
! io the full perfection of human na-
' ture  In  tne  earthly   likeness  oi   the
Creator.
Now  we  are seeing that this great
blessing haa been set apart by the Al-
. mighty as me wurk of the great Sab-
■ batn Day of a thousand years, lu
which "tne last enemy to be destroy*
_d is death." Now we are seeing that
thi whole eartn is to be reclaimed
irum tne cur_e aud made to blossom
I a? Eden—tnat the place of Jehovah's
feet, ills footstool, will be made glorious and in every way happy tying to
all tne willing and obedient, whom the
great Mess a.i shall recover fully from
sin anu deatn. Now we _re seeing
that the Intelligent rejectors of Divine
Grace will not ue tormented cut, as it
[is written, "All tne wicked will G ■_
destroy."
Now we see lhat the free %r-dc* and
glorious opportunity to human restitution will be ushered tn with tne Kingdom, but ihat preceding that glorious
> Kpocn Uod is making a selection of a
saintly class to be tne Bride ot Christ
—"the Lamb's Wife."   This explains
why  the darkness lias been so  long
p rmitted—because Gud would test the
"elect" by obliging them to walk by
faitii and nc! by sight—He would test
I them by ubl.ging to em to endure hardness as goou soldiers—He would test
them by requiring mat tney shall sutler for  righteousness' sake and  thus
manifest tnelr lose ot righteousness tu
a temarkabie   degree.    .Sew    we   see
that the faithful of these are to ex*
i perieuce   a  change   Irom   earthly   to
; neuvenly conditions, in the First Res
1 ur rection, aud tliul thi*-. change has its
: beginning iu the Divine begetting of
the   Holy   Spirit.    Now   we  see  that
■ these, with tne Redeemer, will consti*
1 tute thu Kingdom class which, in-
j visi Isle to men, will bind Satan lor a
! thousand years and supplant his reign
I of darkness und sin by a reign of light
[ and righteousness, helpful and uplift-
! iug to mankind.
We come  uow  to our text:  It de-
j clares that the time is coming when
the whole earth shall be full of God's
| glory.   Ah ! glorious Duy I    Then the
j shadows of  Ignarance, superstitution,
misunderstanding and  misrepresenta*
, tion iu respect to ttie Divine character
I will  all  flee   before  the  light uf  the
I knowledge  ot   the  gl»ry  of  God—the
! appreciation of the Divine Flan for human salvation!   LV-uld this Scripture
ever be fulfilled,   could   the   Divine
character ever be appreciated by intelligent,   honest,    just   and   loving
hearts, if in uuy corner uf the Universe there were such orgies and tortures of  His creatures as the creeds
of  the   Darker   Ages  huve  set  furth?
Surely not!   Un tne contrary, in this
glorious   Day    will    be    fulfilled  the
Scriptural prediction: "All in heaven
and   in   earth   and   under   the   earth
(everywhere) heard  1 saying, praise,
glory, honor, dominion and might be
unto Him that iltteth upon the throne,
and unto tlie Lamb forever!"
Aa we emerge from the darkness
and praise the Lord in thought and
word and act, we thus "show forth
ihe praises ot Him who has called us
out of darkness into His marvelous
'.ght."
The Apostle Paul (Human* viii. 21)
declares that the groaning creation
thull be delivered from its bondage to corruption into the liberty of
the Sons uf God. The meaning of this
fa clear. The corruption came upon
ull ihr-ugh Adam, the deliverance
Irom that corruption is to come lo ull
through the second Adam All are to
he delivered from such bondage, luw-
-ver they  mav use tba deliverance
and  the  privilege-  of  liberty    Those
who use them rightly will come into
harmony pith lhe Redeemer and with
the   Heavenly   Kingdom   and   will   b«
blessed   eventually   with   the   eternal
l.ft    Those wtio reject these liberties
after ihey come to understand tolly,
tnd   compreiieud   thell   lengths   anl
ireadths,  will  thus  be  ehopung t<"
bemse ves the Second Death,
The liberty of the Sons of (iod. their
freedom   Irom  corruption,  denth.   I-
iere distinctly shown, lhe angels ar*
mt subject to, nol bound by, such '-or
uption, such dying conditions. 'Ihey,
,s suns 'il  Und   are free from corrup
•ion. from death.    Adam In nil ungual perfection wu« a son ol Uod, as
ii- Scriptures declare tl.uke 111, Urn.
out he lost his sonshlpfnr liimseli and
.or  all  of  hi-  race und  received  instead degradation and boiidiige lo corruption.   The hope tot Adam and I »r
.i.s race.  then,  in Christ, is deliver
.nice (mm the power of iin and death
into  the  liberty  proper  to  ihem  as
ions   of   God,    Ine   ent.r«   reign   ut
Christ on the earth, a* the Bcnpturei
. -how us, will be devoted to lh Is work
I of setting tree the human family Irum
I tlie   various   bondages  nf   lunurance
f superstttl   wouknoss, hereditj   and
j bringing back all who will by reattlu
I tion pn.ce.i-.e-* to thc original  Image
i and likeness nl Ood, and making tti.-m
ygniu human **"ns of Ood like uni*
hither Adam before lie sm I, plus a
large ami valuable experience gaim-d
during the 0,000 year- of lhe full, ami
also through the !.'«» years ol t *»•
rnl-mih up- the Restitution Age. tb-
Resumption Age (Acts Uo I0-WJ
How glud wo are lhat in this dawn
lng time ol the New Dispensationi the
light is shining upon the Divine W.rd
as well as throughout the realm ol
nature!   How glud Wfl are that we uo
longer must think of the Church alone
as the subject ul salvation and the
world as a whole the subject of condemnation und eternal torturel How
just, how reasonable, how loving are
the Divine arrangements! To seu
these things dr..w our hearts neur to
the Lord in appreciative love, uud we
should worship with the greater devotion One whom we thus see worthy of
praise and adoration.
We are not. however, to expect the
world to be able to realize these
things; it is not the Divine intention
that thev should grasp the Plan, as
the Muster suid to the faithful disetpl-
of old aud still says to us—"To you
It is given to know the mystery ol
th* Kingdom of God, hut to outsiders
all these things ure spoken in parables
un.' dark sayings, that hearing they
night hear and not understand. 1'liey
wil: both hear and understand in due
time, but now is the time for the calling out of Me elect, the perfecting ot
he suiuis," etc.
le* us whose ears and eyes have
bten blessed of the Lord respond with
all gratitude and humility, not merely
wllhoutward praises of our lips, but
also with our hearts let us confess
His loving kindness and lender mercy.
■ and let this appreciation more and
, more sanctify ->ur hearts and separate
us from the world, its alms, .ts lelttsn* ,
, ness. and let us Bant a g.-ud tight
against sin. especially in our own
mortal bodies, because even though
: the Imperfections of the flesh be not
counted against thi* New Creation, begotten of the Spirit, nevertheless, the
I fact that we possess the Spirit of the
Lord should lead us more and more t.i
desire that perteetion winch is most
pleasing and acceptable t.* Him, uud
to   strive,   therefore,   to   lhe   extent   of
our ability, not trusting to the attain*
I men of  that  perfection,  but  leljing
upon the merit of that great atone*
' ment Baoilflee.
All glory to Jesus be given,
That lite and salvation are free.
; And all mav be washed and forgiven;
Yes. Jesus has saved even me.
From the darkness of sin and despair.
Out into the light of His love,
He has brought me and mnde me au
heir
T*> kingdoms and mansions above.
Silver   Hall-Marks.
Bv examining '.he hall-mark on
any" silver arl.c.e made in Britain,
the name of the city where it wus
manufactured  can   be   ascertained.
At  the   present   time  th-*  following
Cities   have    halls    at    which    silver
plate   is  a-say*-d   and   marked    London.   Birmingham.   Chester.    Dublin.
1 Edinburgh.   Glasgow,   and   Sheffield.
London is represented by a leopard s head within a shield, and has
been in use with slight variations
since 1300 The mark of Birmingham
is an anchor; of Chester, three
wheaUheaves und a damer; Dublin,
is represented by the figure of Hi-
bernia, and Edlnbutfh bv a custle;
Glasgow, a tree. fish, und bell, while
the murk uf Sheffield  is a crown.
A dute-niHrk is also given by mean* ,
o|  a  letter,  which   is  changed every
year.    These   letters   sometimes  run j
■ through the whole alphabet, omitting
. J, and thus cover a period of twenty*
: five years.     London,   however,   uses
; only twenty letters, j, V, W, X, Y, Z i
'■ heing omitted. To distinguish ths
i different periods the fcrm of the let-
i ter is varied in euch cycle of twenty .
I years, and the thape of thl shield
1 in which the letter is enclosed is
I also  varied   at  euch  period.
ANOTHER TO 60 WEST
AUGUSTUS   POWER   OF   OTTAWA
LEAVING FOR COAST.
Chlel Clerk of tht Department of Jut-
tice Since 1879 Has Retired From
Public Service and Will Make His
Horn* o.i the Pacific Slope — Has
Been One of the Most Valuable ol
the Government Staff.
Augustus Power. K.C, one of the
most prominent civil servants of the
capita] who bus been chief clerk ot
tlu* I epurtment of Justice --ince 1879,
has if tired froiu the Dominion public
service und In future will reside on
I the   I'acilic coast.   H»; is the second
U. eo, Dr. Rutherford, chief veterinary
' burgeon, having announced his retire*
i meut some weeks ago.
Mr.   Power  was  born  in  Quebec  in
;   1*547   und   is   a  son  of   the   late   Hon.
PICKED THE RICH PLACE.
Harry Lauder a Miner.
Mr. Harry Lauder has recently published a letter on behalf of tlie pit
ponies, and thereby serves to record
his humble origin and hard up-bringing. For years he worked us u miner,
and afterwards eked out a precarious
livelihood by appearing at small lo-
c ' concerts, sing-songs, and the like
in his native Scotland. His first five-
slplliug night was, he has confessed.
a big event, and it was yeurs again
after this before hs talents attracted
the notice of a larger public—first in
Liverpool und -eventually iu London,
He mude his first appearance there
aubut ten years ago as au "extra turn"
at Gatti's, in the Westminster Bridge
road. Between now and then, with a
! rapidity hardly equalled, Lauder has
\ made himself a name to conjure with
in the music-hall world. With two or
three performances every night, not
to speak of royalties on his enormously popular songs, he now makes an
income which a prosperous barrister
might envy; but, 'so far as I am concerned," he once declared, "I find that
money makes no difference whatever,
save that when I want a thing I cau
walk into a shop and get it. It's a
pleasant difference, I grant you; but
'a man's a man for a' thut'."
A Whist  Expert,
Lord Sherborne hos kept hit eigh-
tleth birthday. He has been one t.t
the be«t whist players in London,
and has never forsaken it tor bridge.
His country place is Sherborne
House, situate ubout half-way between Oxford and Cheltenham, It
'takes it-i name from thfl stream
, culled Sherborne, meaning "clear
water," which is famous for trout
fishing. A remarkable feature of
Sherborne House is thut the Parish
Churoh  forms  part of  it.
Lord Sherborne, Ihe fourth baron,
wus bom ut Rlbury, in Gloucester*
shire, and married in intu Mis*.
Emily de Stern, daughter of the late
RHfnn de Stern. Ludy Sherborne
died in IU0A.
Flight of the Gray Wagtail.
The gray wagtail is a striking example of the undeviutiutr flight of
certain bird sptolaa. This bird
pastes its winters ln the heart of
Africa, and in summer it is seen
everywhere In Kurope, iu Asia und
even in Greenland. It has never
been known to travel to North Amer-
i*'u from Greenland, It goes fo
Groenland by   wuy of   Kngland,   the
| Faroe   islands   nnd   I col and,    The
' bird does not kuow and will not
kuow    any    itinerary   Hint   has   not
: been   laid  out   hy  thu   birds of   its
j species in the past.
AUGUSTUS POWKB,  K.C.
Justice Power und Suaanne Albert de
Gaspe. He was educated at St. Mary's
College and McGill University and
was u brilliant student. He subsequently studied law aud wus called
to thi Quebec liar in 1869 and practiced with marked success tor some
time in Montreal, ln l_7*i he entered
the Dominion Department of Justice
and was employed for a considerable
time on the revision of the Dominion
statutes und In 1887 he was appointed
a commUaoner for the revision of the
federal statutes. As chief clerk of the
Justice Department since 1879 he has
handled many of the most important criminal cases that huve come
from the higher courts of the Dominion
und his reputation a^ a lawyer and a
mun of exceedingly keen intellect is
very high. He hus many warm friend*-
iu the capital and his departure from
Ottawa will b» regretted by a large
circle of friends and hia retirement
will be a distinct loss lo the Justice
Department  of  Canada.
A Brilliant Woman.
The David fiytne Research Prize for
1911 hus been uwarded by the University of Melbourne to Dr. Georgina
Sweet for her researches on Parasites
of Australian Stock und Native Fauna.
'I*.is is the tirst time the honor has
been conferred ou a woman. Dr.
Sweet is a graduate of the Melbourne
University. Shu graduated as Master of Science in 1808. fn 1904 Dr.
Sweet presented a thesis on the Marsupial Mole of Central Australia, for
which work ghe gained the degree ot
Doctor of Science, being the first woman in Australia to obtain the degree. Dr. Sweet was in 1908 a Government Research Scholar at the University, investigating the subject for which
the Byrne prize has been now awarded.
In 1909 she was appointed acting lecturer and demonstrator in biology and
lecturer and demonstrator in biology
and lecturer in Parasitology at the
Veterinary School of the University,
and is now a full-time lecturer aud
demonstator in the university and a
member of the Faculty of Science.
K.C. and Dramatist.
Into the forty years of his life Mr.
E. G. Hemmerde, K.C, who, in collaboration with Mr. Francis Nellson,
M.P., has written "A Butterfly on
the Wheel," produced at the Globe
Theatre, London, has crowded many
experiences. At Oxford he gained a
brilliant record as an athlete and
oarsman, graduated with honors, and
aftes being culled tn the Bur quickly
made a name for himself as a lawyer
and politician. In 1909 he was appointed Recorder of Liverpool. As a
speaker, Mr. Hemmerde is known for
his wit. During a meeting some time
ago a member of tne audience shouted, "Even if yuu were tlie Archangel
Gabriel I would not give you a vote."
Quick as lightning Mr. Hemmerdft
replied, "If I were the Archangel
Gabriel you wouldn't be on tho register."
Vancouver Man Forecasted ths Wealth
of ths Canadian Yukon.
Belief has been general that the discovery of gold in the Yukon district
of Canada was the result of an accident, a- in the case in most great
finds in mineral.
The story of John MeDcUffall. of
Vancoover. shows that the finding of
sold at Dawson wn* the outcome of
observation, following a workinz onl
of gold location thenrie* In the Cariboo district of British Columhla
Circumstances deemed Important at
the time prevented bim from makinu
the tjip into tim Yukon Hud he cur
tied out his original intention h«i
tntght not only have nuule the d'n-
(v.very, but much money besides. Mr
MoDougall hu* resided on the Pae!fl<
coast thirty year*, nnd Is a success*
ful contractor in Vancouver
The early 00's on the Pacific coast
were verv dull. In the Inter month*
of hu MoDougnll, finding thnt litt'.<
wus doing, decided to venture into
the northern territory, from which
tales of cold finds cume from Ilm» M
lime. On the hont were Dan Hurl
aud John Outs**, with whom he form
ed  a   partner-bin.
(nt the same boat fffti Willinm 8.
Lansing, a prospoetnr Irom Montana,
who hud gone north iu mr> and had
struck    indd    up   the   St.-wart   River
Lansing told him of the working nl
French Canadians at tha head ■ *
Sixty Mile an.I ut the bend nf Forty
Mile, these two creek* coming al
most together at their wurces.
When he was told by Lansing thnt
the working on the Stewart wera
two hundred miles in a amith-<»nster
ly direction from the head of thn
Forty Mile, he became interested a\
once. Remamherlng hi* other observation in Cariboo, thnt the be*t
ground lay ju-t north of the highest
elevation, he Inquired if there was
any height of land on tlie line between these two points. Lansing replied there was a place known
throughout the country n** the "Moo«o
Pasture," locutod approximately hall
way.
MoDougall wa« more Ir.*ere?tel
thau ever. He a.t Lansing to draw
on the billiard table in the Occident.
ul Hotel at Juneau n romrh map ot
•he Yukon River, with it- tributaries
the Stewart, the Forty Mile, and the
Sixty Mile. This showed the Monsi
Pasture e'nse to what wns then
known e? Reind»»r Creek, and almost
on the Yukon River.
"When we go in." MoDougall said
to his Partners, "we will prospeot
there," drawing a s°mielHe on the
north side of the Moose Pasture. Tt
is a remarkable fact thnt this semicircle Included the be«l payinu
gm-nd of the Inte Yukon discoveries.
The trip nver the mountnins and
down the Yukon River was tedious
in thos*- days, and because of the delay McDotnrnll concluded that h*»
wou'd have to irlve it up, as he had
contracts to look after in Autnist.
and he could not get nut again bv
that tim-?. So he sold his Interest
to his two partners. Hurt and Guise,
and left the map with th«m. extracting the nrom'se that thev would
prosoect the  ground  marked.
Hart and Guise made th» trip down
the Yukon. They passed MoW Pasture and went on to For'v Mile to
replenish their supplies. Here Guise
was offered work nt _ond w«ffes and
accented the certainty. Hnrt got
another nnrtner nn»ned Hanson.
Hart and Hanson pers-sted till they
got gold at Forty Mile. Then the
rush hegan.
MoDougall visited Dawson in 1900
ft would he difficult to analyse the
feelings of a man who practically
picked the ground for prosneeting
where Mich rich gravel was found.
!       THE POPULAR DANCES.
Countries  From   Which  Thty  Come
and Origin at Na-nss.
The position taken up by the danc-
! ers gave the name of the "quadrille."
| which is literally French for "a little
I square"; while "country dance" ha?
1 no connection with rustic gymnastics.
I but is simply a corruption of the
French centre dance, whic'.i has reference to the position of the couples
opposite to each other during the
d nice.
The "lancers" derived its name
from tbe fact that this variation of
the quadrille wus originally improvised by a company of lancers fur their
own amusement while seated in their
saddles. The "polku" is a Polish
dunce, and its name comes from the
Bohemian word "putka," meaning
hulf. und refers to the half-step which
occurs iu the lively measure, uf which
the more graceful "schottische" is a
variation; both names, like that of the
national dance of Poland, the "ma
suurka," being native terms.
The short steps peculiar to the old-
lime favorite—the minuet"—gave the
dance ils iiume, the Latin for 'small"
being "minimis.' The "waits," again,
owes its name to its characteristic
movement, tlu* German "waltzeu"—
meaning to revolve—expressing the
Circling motion of the dancers.
The "Sir Roger de Coverley" is named after its originator, while the less
familiar dance known as the "tarantella." is so called because its vigorous
movement were supposed to be a certain antidote to the poison of a noxious spider at Turunto, in Italy, where
the dunce is highly  popular.
The evolutions of the dancers sufficiently explain the term "reel." "Jig"
is from the French "gigue," aud
"breakdown" is a term from across
thu Atlantic, and refers to the final
rout before the break-up of a free-
and-easy dancing party.
Every >.*_r dancing takes place in
the parish church of Musgrave, in
Westmoreland, in connection with the
ancient rite of rushbearing. On May
Duy twelve young maidens of Brough.
approved by the vicar, assemble at
10 o'clock in the morning at the foot
of (trough Bridge decorated with flow-
e.i and fresh garlands on their heads
Accompanied by a bund they proceed
through the fields to Musgrave, the
bund playing aud the rushbearers
dancing.
The girls a. j led up the uorth aisle
of the church and hang their garlands
at the side, there to remain until the
following year. The Gospel is read hy
the vicar, prayers are offered, and
palms sung, after which the clerk and
vicar retire. A space is then cleared
near the altar, and a fiddle produced.
Dancing now commences, and continues until tlie afternoon.
Dancing is frequently seen in Continental churches. During the Corpus"
Christi octave a bullet is performed
every evening before the high altar of
Seville Cathedral by boys wearing
plummed huts and the dress of pages
of the time of Philip III.—Globe.
Winnipeg's  Population.
The board of assessors' report just
issued shows that the population of
I Winnipeg increased last year   19,238.
I a gain over the previous year of 15
I per cent., and, as compiled from the
| assessment rolls   a total   population
I of 16l,9o8.   This i" a record year ex-
! cept that of 1906 when the percentage of gain showed an incretute of 39
f»er cent.   The report also shows an
ncreuse in assessment values of 115,-
069,030.    Tha  exempted  property   Is
this year valued at 127,611,350, which
added to the rateable   realty   valuation for   the   City  of   Winnipeg  of
$-00,188,000.
Oldtst Weathercock.
1 Probably the oldest weathercock
In England la that now standing oo
the tower of St. Sid wells, Exeter; It
, dates back to 1484.
The Flight From Scotland.
From to-day's papers it annears
that no fewer than 4.40ft emigrants
left the CIvde on Patnrdnv hy various liners for the United 8tat»s and
Cannda, and for London, on the way
to Queensland. Of th<-«». a thou«nnd
were navvies. I-a^t Snturdav nlone
Great Britain lost as manv Scotsmen
as would suffW to people a eood-
ai_e_ town. The Boer war cost us
20.000 lives. Four weeks of similar
emigration will cnuse to Scotland
alone a loss almost ns Inrre as that
which was caused to the British Em-
Eire during the three year*- of war. A
iberal writer has attributed the
fearful emigration from Scotland to
the grouse kept by the landowners.
This argument is erroneous, because
the bulk of the Scottish emigrants
comes from the towns, and they are
driven from the town& by the low-
ness of free trade wages.—London
Outlook.
Bolted for "Safety."
Apropos of Mr. Irving's interest in
crime and criminals, i.n amusimi
story is told. One day he was on a
country walk wit' a friend, a very
nervous mun. At a particularly
desolate spot Mr. Irving stopped
with thc abrupt exclamation:
"Wouldn't this be an ideal place for
murder!" His companion made
some inarticulate noise that might
be taken as dissent.
"Oh, but suppose I were to murder you now," Mr. Irving wentton,
quite charmed with the idea, "it
would be almost impossible to trace
the crime back to me." Calmly
ignoring the other's obvious objections, he went on very earnestly to
elaborate his wicked plans. He explained exactly how he would commit the crime, pointed out where he
would conceal the body, and finished
up by showing 1 w easy it would
be for him to escape detection.
"Don't you agree with me?" he
asked, turning again to his companion. To his surprise he discovered
that he was alone. The other man
was disappearing over the far horizon aa fast as hia legs could carry
him!
BIG MAN IN A BIG JOB
G. M. BOSWOI TH 13 A   -ILLAR OF
TKE C.P.R.
Th; Man Who ••■■» Charge of Freight
_nd Passenger Business on Land
and ' i For the Great Corporation
Started as a Clerk at S2S Per Month
and Cheer Ability and Hard Work
Have Put Him on Top.
Those who know' the mun and the
system suy tbat the letters G. M. attached to the front of Bosworth's
name will t - Mitually be moved around
to tlie rear aud be capitalized and enlarged into General Manager, However, that is in the future. At present the letters stund for George Morris, and ure the front appendages ot
the name George Morris Bosworth,
vice-president of the Canadian Pacific
Railway Co. *
A while buck G. M. Bo-worth was
fourtn vice-president of the C.P.R,,
but a year ugo the numerals wero
abolished, aud he is now known as
vii .-president, in charge of the passenger und freight business and ocean
steamship lines. At first sight that
looks like a big man's job, as it includes pretty nearly everything the
ordinury laymun connects with a
transportation system. However, the
C.P.R. is a big concern, and there are
still a few odd jobs which are attended to by others than G. M. Bosworth.
Still, he fills a big place among the
seventy-five thousand odd employes;
and, if rumors cun be'trusted, he is
destined to fill a still bigger place;
but more of that anon. Bosworth
came to but for the C.P.R. in 1882,
and has been knocking out home runs
and three-baggers ever since. He is
nut a follower of sport, and would not
know au out-curve from an in-shoot.
He  just  naturally  developed   into  a
tobsttr Fishery.
From Can so, N. S., we learn that
with warmer weather lobster fisher*
men are having better luck than was
their lot in th. early season. With
such a continuation of rough weather
as has prevailed since the opening of
the season some were inclined to prophesy a p mr season. Indications point j
to a smaller catch than last year, but
prices are so high that fishermen will
realise equally as good returns on
tlie whole season. The live lobster
shipments to Boston this season have
not been up to the average, the canneries have handled almost thu total
catch.
Cod fishermen are doing well, and
have no reason to complain.
Bank fishertm-'n continue to report
fairly good fishing on the banks. Bait
is plentiful at Magdaluns and a great
many vessels have baited more than
twice there during the last two weeks.
A Grand Old Man.
Sir Walter Gilbey, who recently celebrated his eightieth birthday, has
probably done greater service to practical farming in England than any
other individual, a fact duly recogniz*
ed when he was appointed president
of the Royal Agricultural Society of
England in 1896. Small holdings, the
rural housing question, fruit-growing,
flower culture, live stock breeding,
particularly in regard to horses, are a
U'W of the questions ou which Sir
Walter is an authority. He is an all-
round sportsman, and iu his early
days devoted bis leisure time to mountain-climbing. On one occasion he
was about to make an ascent iu Switzerland, when he thought he might
as well make some inquiries about
his guide. "Is he a thoroughly skillful
cliuiueri'" he asked his botelkeepcr.
"I should suy so," wus the reply. "He
has lost two parties of tourists down
the mountain-side, aud each time has
come off without so much as a scratch
on himself."
Trade  With   Now  Zealand.
Arcoidlnp lo « report received from
the Cn nadian Trade Commissioner in
New Z.'mIiiihI, Canadian exports |._
tbnt colony for the fiscal year which
closed on'March 31, totalled $1,404.-
f».'l_. an increase of $404,02ft, as compared with the previous yeur. Thn
principal Increases were: Chassis
for motor vehicle* $7ft,000, and newspnper Ift-VOOO Practically all lucre..-e» were In the manufacture I
products ot Eastern Cnnnda. Tho
report indicate* thut Cumidinn makers of automobiles ure commencing
to get a petty good grip on the
New Zealand mnrket. Ity the end of
June one Cnnndinn firm will buve
sold li'-ii cars. There promises to be
a continued demand In New Zealand
for good serviceable motor cars,
which ara uot too high in pi lea,
Has MSI. Bound.
Min Braddoii baa  all tha   manu-
>ta ol ber novel* bound In rod
nr.
de
Certain Cur.
ijiinck dootor (writing lo I'ut,
wllom he Imi indllOGvl tu purl, witli it
liiiir.rrnwii Inr ii Hiini euro fur riiou*
mntium) "Hunt n I'nmmon hotlBQ (Ii.i
intu ii cornor whttyra It otmnot ponnibly
OHonpc, tickle, Un rilm witli n olothtiB
1 pull' iiii Ihr team run iluwn it*, oliecki,
I Catch tin' tears in » cup ii» llicy full,
' anil  thru   ruli  llll' HftVctcil  Purt witli
! the team, iiiiiI  1  will I'lllirntitee tlmt
the mogl Hlubborn ouio nf rticuiniitiHiu
will ilhnpi r like ninglo.
The bachelor xhiiultl he arrested lor
contempt nl courtship.- I.lle.
Might Bt Went.
Hurrillcd Mother—1 Ju.t this minute
•aw Mr. Nieelellnw'a arm around y iur
waist.   U'a perlectly awful.
Itepentaut Daughter—Y-e-s, mother,
but it would be a great deal more awful tu see his arm around some other
girl's wuist.
Words ef Comfort.
"My doctor Bays I must sleep out of
doors." suid the man who It not
strong.
"Well," replied the friend, "If, all
right so lung ss yuur landlord doesn't
•ay il."
Selling   Polk.  Cloth.t.
Much money is mudr out nl cust-oft
Kiilice uniforms. (Inutilities are nought
y African truders and exported to
various parts of the "Dark Continent,"
where tney are exchanged tor palm-
oil, Ivory, skins, and othor iiierchuii-
dine, lt is by no means an uncommon sight tu see a swurtliy suvugu
dressed in the uniform ol a London
puliceinan, and wearing the regulation
helmet ol the force.
Knur yeur old Murgitret unit it lurge
bulldog were lllembera of nn uiilonio-
liile pnrty, The dog wuh hei,I on his
mistress' hip nml n great ileal ul at-1
tention wuh paid to him. Murgitret,!
desiring In he held hy Iier limit, Haiil,
to her pleadingly, "I'leuse let me lie)
your puppy, Aunt Mnry." i
Homing Plgtont.
Homing pigeons are uut only endowed with murvelnus speed, hut witli
great endurance, Some years ago a
bird belonging tu the late King Hit-
ward, whu was a great (.igeuu enthusiast, made u record for jin miles
ut a velocity nf 1,307 yard' a minute.
Give a Quaranttt,
As a means uf retrieving tiieir reputation, Australian "wnter-diviners"
now undertake to sink wells and provide the nml er.al necessary lor the
purpose ou coudiliou ol "uo wuter. un
May."
~~Hlt Nervt
Assistunt—Mr.   (Iriiuihley     writes:
"I don't see how you can huve nerve
to sell your worthless remedy for fiO i
cents It hottle."
Manager   Well,   strike   out   "have i
nerve to" and "worthless," nntl put
the letter in our tdtlmoninls.—Christ*
inn Intelligencer,
"They Huy bIio'k iiii enthusiastic motorist." "Hhe in. Hhe's acquninted
witli four gentlemen who own six*
cylinder cum."—Detroit Frco Press.
When yuu give temptation a chance
to tulk it uver, he'a gut you I
"Happiness," declared the philosopher, "is the pursuit of something,
not the catching of It."
"Have you ever," Interrupted the
plain eitisen, "chased the owl onr on
u rainy night*"—Toledo Blade,
Mil. O.  M.   IIOSWOIiTH.
batter. In other words, he is a worker, and his success must be attributed
to long hours and steady application.
He was born iu Ogdensburg iu the
year 1858, and is therefore another example uf our free trade policy with the
United States in the matter of exchanging railroad men. We have received from the States such men as
Van Home, Lnaughnessy, Hays, and
Bosworth, and have given them J. J.
H.-i and a few uthers of lesser calibre.
Bosworth'< first job in the railroad
business netted $_ per month. That
was away back iu 1875. when he was
o. i boy with the Ogdensburg _
Lake Chninplain Railroad. He moved
to Chicago as traffic freight agent of
the National Despatch Line, and came
to the C.P.R. in 1882 as assistant general freight agent of the Ontario and
Quebec Tines of tlie compnny. Two
years later he was appointed general
freight agent uf lines east of Fort
William. Then he became assistant
freight traffic manager, and in 1896
freight traffic manager ot the whole
system. In 1901 he waB appointed
fourth vice-president of the company,
and in 1910 he became vice-president.
Mr. Bosworth has done almost everything around a railroad except run an
engine, and could probably do that it
occasion demanded it. He has been
un the pay-roll of a railroad for over
thirty-six years, and knows exactly
how it feelB to hear the 7 o'clock whis*
tie blow. He has been office boy,
clerk, passenger agent, freight agent
and assistant to fifty-seven varieties
ol busses, but always kept moving up
nearer those initials of hit. No doubt
lie lelt that those letters, O. M., in
front of his name looked lonesomo
there, and decided early in his career
that he wuuld have a more symmetrical name il it read (J. M. Bosworth,
U.M. if his motives could have beeu.
analyzed there would have been found
au innate desire to put those initials
where they belonged. It has been a
big job, but unless his batting eye
lulls blm he Is apt to get there. Hit
long training, especially with the
C.P.R., has been invaluable to him.
The C.P.K. Is not only a transcontinental ruad, but it is also a transoceanic steamship cninpany, and Mr,
Buswurth has to keep his eye ou the
Atlantic steamship boats, the passenger and freight business irom Halifax
to Vancouver, tnd take alt occasional
look at the I'acilic. Certainly a man
whose field runs from Liverpool to
Hong Kong lias to hnve a long arm
and a clear vision, and can't take all
day to decide a point. It't certainly a
big man's Job, and one that Ib apt
to keep the ordinary man awake at
nights gathering up the loose endt
and teeing that the system doesn't,
sag in the middle. However, O. II.
Busworth Is used to work, and takes
to tt like the proverbial duck to water, tnd that reminds one that when
Mr. Bosworth finds things beginning
to pall on him he takes to the water.
Apart from his work, and the fun hi
gets from it, "flshin' " is the orA* rt*
ereation he ever takes. He hu no
other hobblet. He it not interettei
ln sport of any kind, it not In any
tenia a club man, nor it he a slave to
(ads ol any description,
The Cautious Tongue
Singing Teacher—"Now, children,
give us 'Little Drops of Witter' uud
put some spirit iu it."
Principal (whispering) — "Careful
sir. Tliis i» a leiiiperiincc school. Say
'put somo ginger ill It.' "—Wouldn't
Home Companion.
Indignant Hlrnnger (mistaking visitor for proprietor of InnV'Hcre! coming through your garden, I've been
stung hy one uf your confounded
beeH "
Visilor—"Which one? ,lust you
point it out, Hir, and I'll deal with it
Immediately."- Punch, THE PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Thirteenth
Floor
A Cat* When tke Number Thirteen
Nakee Good lit Repulstien
By CLARISSA MACKIE
Copyright by American Preaa Aaao*
cletlon. 1S1L
At tbe uttJee door closed behind the
retreating form or Homer Dickson tbe
•tout stenographer sighed rellevedly
t.fh drew it magazine frum ber desk
"1 thought be'd uever go," sbe said.
The dup|ier bookkee|ier took a silver
quarter from bis pocket and dipped It
toward lbe offlce boy. "Peanuts.'' be
aald suei-tuetly as be spread the moro
lng pu|ier over his ledger aud turned
to the market report.
"1 taw Homer beattn' It for tho fir
ry," remarked Jimmy when he returned wltb tbe peunuta and Ibey bod
been divided Into three portions. "I
guess be't good for tbe day."
"Bo be inld," agreed tbe bookkeeper,
tracking shells and tossing tbem over
hit shoulder Into tbe waste paptr tits
ket with admirable deiierliy. "If ynu
want tbe afternoon off. Mitt Porter
you can bavo It," ba said, wltb t
•mile.
Tb* stenographer smiled lastly as
•he reached for another peanut 'This
•uitt me," tbe murmured, turning tbe
pages of ber magazine.
Suddenly tbe outer door opened and
preclpltutcd confusion upon the trio
A tall man. middle aged, with •
•trong, clean cut face and piercing
dark eyea glanced from on* to tbe
•ther.
-Mr. Dickson Inr he asked eharply
"Out." sold the bookkeeper curtly,
thrusting the newspaper Into a draw
cr and dipping |ien Into tbe Ink well.
"When will he return?" asked the
•tranger quietly.
"Be didn't say. t think he's gone
(er tbe day." replied the clerk ungra
clously as be bent atiove hit ledger.
"I'll wait awhile." remarked tbt Tit-
Itor, (eating himself In ■ chair ind
opening a uotehuok.
Bray, the bookkeeper, shrugged his
narrow shoulders and applied himself
to hla neglected wurk. Miss Porter
laid aside ber magazine and thumped
noisily upou the typewriter, while
Jimmy swept up tbe accumulation of
peanut shells aud Bled letters wltb
brisk attention
The (tranger sat absorbed tn bla note
book, making calculation! wltb • Hub
by lead pencil.
"Nice weather for cropa." remarked
Bray, wltb a alight wink toward tha
Monographer.
—Its Porter ruffled her Baien pomps
dour and giggled.
"We got our bay all In," iald Jimmy
nasally, as be scuttled past tbe •tranter on business Intent
"Tou re'cllect our old black henr
went on Bray facetiously. "Waal, by
gum, Bhe laid a egg yesterday moat at
big m t grapefruit I reckon on tend
tag It to the county fair."
"Did Mr Dickson mention having
■n appointment wltb Mr. Penwortb
this morning?" asked tbe rustic.
A leaden silence settled on the offlce.
Bray broke It at lust
"Penwortb!" be gasped, with t sickly amlle.   "J   Augustus I'eiiwortbr
The stranger nodded Impatiently and
glanced at bit watch. "Did Mr. Dick-
■on mention having an engagement
with me?"
"No. tlr," returned the bookkeeper
respectfully. "I think be mutt be de
ttlned somewhere. I'll try to trace
blm by phone. Jimmy, give Mr. Pen
worth ■ seut In Mr Dickson's offlce."
Bray dlsupiwiired wltblu the telephone
booth wltb agitated countenance.
"Tell that Idiot to keep away from
the telephone. I'll wait till Mr, Dickson cornea lu,'* growled the vitltor ao
aavsgely tbat Jimmy skipped to obey.
Tke brutal message, conveyed verba
Un, Mr. Bray emerged from the booth
with a very red face and returned to
bll ledger, while Mr. Penworth accepted • comfortable Turkish rocker
In the private offlce and lighted • long
black cigar.
"J. Augustus Penworth, Multimillionaire and King of Finance." So the
•peclal article tn Bray's Sunday newt-
paper had capitalised blm. His nam*
wu •• well known ua that of the pres
Ident of tb* republic, and tb* entire
•file* fore* hnd laughed openly it blm.
Bray writhed on bis blgb stool as b*
looked tl the hark of Ihe millionaire's
gray head, nnd he ,-ursed bis own bad
manuere In ridiculing tbe atranger.
Bray wns nuihlilous. and I'rnwnrth
Wll known to It* especially Interested
In young men anil If be knew Ihem lo
be capable and willing tn work could
• Iwaya And plners for ihem In his an
mcrous Industrial plaint. The book
keeper hid mid the irtlcl* In the Run
lay paper, aud bla Imagination bnd
been Ured wllb th* possibilities that
wonld open onl If be ahould ever cross
Ihe pith of the great man
Ilere ke was-J. Augustus Penworth
ind Bray had rltlleiilnl hlin! It wna
too much to h*nr calmly, y*t th* book
k*eper solaced himself with th*
thought thnt perhaps th* millionaire
had heen too nut. h absorbed in hla
notebook to heed tb* Idle chattering
of the offle* fore* Brny'i usual tl*rt
manner and hla courteous, almoat
servile demeanor toward his employ-
It's customers would ordinarily at
tract th* attention of I business man.
Be welcomed • sudden acceleration
tf buslnesa now He transacted Irl'lal
natters wllh a erlnpnesa and ronrteiy
that made Miss Porter and Jimmy
men tbeir innocent eyes He darted
Irom  telephone  tv lodger  and  fron
ledger to vault ind spok* with in tlr
of authority. Altogether be thowed
himself to be ■ man of considerable
affaire All Ibe time he wu pleasantly aware that tbe great financier had
wheeled hla chair about and wu
watching wllb curious Intentness.
After awhile when business hod
quieted down tbe financier beckoned
tht bookkeeper Into the private office,
and ns the giuillled Bray paused before him Penwortb asked:
"How long have you been with Mr.
Dickson?" •
"Ten years," ttimmered Bray •!•
cited!-.
"And I suppose you ire satisfied
witb your position?"
'-Well—not exactly, air. You see,
there ts no chance for advancement"
"H'm—I can Imagine not—bere!"
"How tuueb Is Dickson paylug yon
oow?" demanded J. Augustus I'eu-
worth
"Fifteen hundred, tlr."
"I'll give you three thousand." snap
ped out Penwortb "1 like your looks,
and you're Just tbe aort of chap I'd
like to bave around—young, active aud
businesslike.   Wbut do yuu toy?"
ltra.v gasped "Why. yes, sir- thank
you. sir! I shall bo delighted"- be
stuttered.
"Can you come to me tomorrow?"
asked Penworth.
The bookkeeper besltuted a brief Instant, tben: "Yea. Bir. I wtll come tomorrow Uf course Mr Dickson could
uot es|iect me to refuse sueh an ea-
celleut offer." be said reflectively
"Of course not—eveu tf you bavt
beeu with hlin ten years." rejulued
Penwortb grtmly.   "Now. Mr.-er"-
"Bray-llurry Itroy. sir."
"Mr Ilray suppose you sit right
dowu and peu a letter of resignation
to Mr. Hlekson. I like lo bave these
matters cleared up as I go along, other
wise I'm apt tu forget ihem Ir you
resign now I Can put' you right lute
our uiulii office bere lu Ull un Important vacancy. Tbere ure writing materials bere on  this small table"
'lbe bookkeeper sut dowu aud nervously Indited a brief epistle to his employer. In whlcb he formally resigned
his position, a'atlng his reasons toi
doing so und generously waiving all
sulury due him lu lieu of louger notice
This be closed In su euvelope which lis
sealed aud addressed Mr 1'eoworib
held out bis bund for It and regarded
the euvelope wltb n thoughtful smile.
"Now that's settled." be said. "I
suppose you'll want to settle up youi
books. Mr Bray. I'm rather Impressed
with tbe rapidity wltb whlcb tbut
youug woman out there operates bei
machine. Now, I'm In ueed of Just
such an espert stenographer, and whili
1 suppose It doesn't look exactly
squire to take Dickson's belp away
from bltu-it's all lu the business and
I pay my people well. Seud her lo me,
will you?"
Mist Porter was flattered and charmed to accept a position In the Intuit-
onsly appointed offices of Penwortb 4
Co at double ber preseut salary. Sooner or later ability will meet with Its
proper reward, she told herself, whlit
she was writing her letter of lustaut
resignation al Penwurlb's dictation.
He held tbe two letters III bis baud
aud regarded them thoughtfully.
Jimmy drooped forlornly wben he
heurd the whispered conttileni-es of lbe
other. He bad not read "From Offlce
Boy to Millionaire" for nothing, and
here waa his chance to rise. J. Augustus Penworth wns pushing people
along on tbe upward path Why could
not honest Jimmy I.e* be among tbe
risers?
Tbat was how It happened thnt he
approached the great man and respect*
fully asked for a Job as offlce boy, and
he got it Twice the salary be had
been receiving caused his eyes to sparkle Joyously. Mr. Penwortb bad lust
told him lhal b* could write a letter
of resignation when there was Ihe
sound of rapid footsteps In tb* corridor outside.
Instantly the millionaire leaped te
hla feet, and Bray and Miss Porter,
who were In tbe line of vision, saw
him drop their leilers of reslgtuiilua
through the letter sloi Into Dickson's
closed and Its-ketl desk, and they exchanged glances of satisfaction
The outer door opened, and there
wns the sound of fooifulls. J. Augustus Peuworth thni't aside the startled
Jimmy and diirte-l behind the lull
desk, when* be crouched as If In tear.
"J. Augustus I Va worth 7 Let's hnve
• look al film." suld n gruff voice, and
two dtlrk forms tilled III* doorway of
tbe yirhnie ottlce ts'tore ihey discovered the millionaire and pounced u|sin
blm Just In time to wrest a revolver
from hla hand.
"No, yon don't, Mr. Mike Hennee-
•ey, alia* The fanner, wanted for
forgery and so forth! W* tracked ynu
to this building, nnd we've ritk.-d every offlce wllh a Sue toothed eonih till
we come lo th* thirteenth floor Suy,
Mike, this number thirteen '• on unlucky number for you all right"
jThe detectives laughed aa they handcuffed their prisoner, and the oilier
asked, wllh a humorous wink: "J Au
gustus Penworth. are you moving In
high financial circles, eh? Whut kind
of bushiest you been transacting
here?"
The prisoner stored Impudently tf
fhe horrified faces of the honkkeeper
and tbe stenographer antl winked toward the locki-d desk where their reo-
d-nnltnns waited Homer Dickson's return
"I been stndvlng hiiuinn nnttti*
tome tnd playing tehiNilteaeher ty
learning these folks some lessons," he
•aid. with an affected nasal drawl.
Then ihev led him away
ll was Jimmy, the offle* boy, wta
brok* th* ghastly silence that fat-
lowed his withdrawal
"1 guess I heller dust up Mr Dli-k-
tun's nnV»." he aald virtuously. "He'll
re pretty busy the neat few days, and
lotuebody • fot to be oa to ">e Job,"
HIS VIEW OF TIME.
Judge Bacon Made t Difference For
the Benefit of a Lawyer.
Hi. Honor Judge Bacon, who for a
few weeks is discharging the duties
of Judge in the Cornwall district, had
the unique experience of holding au
appointment before his father, for the
.on was a revising barrister while his
garent wa- a leader at the Chancery
ar. Judge Bacon is now the senior
judge, and in his seventy-seventh
year, but for activity he surpasses
many a man twenty years younger.
He is one of the finest linguists in
tile country, having an acquaintance
with nearly every continental language.
His honor has a wide knowledge ol
the law and of the world He hna-
also earned the reputation nf knowing
everything, while his scathing com
inents of women suitors have at time,
created much amusement. His remark ttiat "No woman's hat shoul I
cost more than 7b. Ud.," 6ome time
ago, led to a "silly-season" correspondence.
Judge Hucon Is a stickler tor l.ng-
lisli as it sliould he spoken. Not long
ago he luid down tlie dictum thut
there are no such tilings as tuiloressea
and manageresses; the proper terms
being female tailors and female man-
igers.
But Judge Bacon is equally as
scathing in his remarks to counsel us
lie is to witnesses. There is a good
-tory told of how a young barrister,
drifting along iu a particularly prosy
si.l vague manner, suddenly detected
ids honor giving vent to a very suggestive yawn.
"1 sincerely trust," he broke ofl,
"that 1 am not unduly trespassing on
the time of this court."
"There is some difference," retorted
the judge, "between trespassing on
time and encroaching on eternity."
"What do you work all" Judge
Bacon asked a well-dressed women at
vYhltechapel County Court on one oc
j casion. Witness: "I am married."
Judge Bacon: "Then you spend your
husband's money?" "I keep his children."
"And dress like that?** pursued his
honor, with emphasis.
"Well," retorted the woman, "I
couldn't go out undressed, could 1?"
Has Faced ths Enemy.
Col. Frederick Hacket-Thwmpson,
C.B., is taking over the command of
No. 7 District (Counties of Warwick.
Gloucester, Worcester, Oxford, Bucks,
and Berks), iu succession to Col.
G. W. H. Pain, C.B. Col. Bucket-
Thompson, of Bilhruugh Hall, Yorks.
was born in 1858. and joined the
army when 21 years of age, becoming
a captain in the Cameron Highlanders
in 1884.
He was at the battle of Tel-el-Kebit;
for which he has the clasp and bronze
star: was with the Soudan expedition
of 1885-1880. and the Nile campaign
of 1895, when he took part in the
battles of Atbara and Khartoum, being mentioned in despatches, and receiving the medal and othcr decorations.
Col. Hacket-Thompson was also in
the last South African campaign, for
which lie has the Queen's medal, with
five clasps. He commanded the Isl
Battalion Cameron Highlanders from
1901 to 1005, and the Mounted Infantry School at Lougmoor from March,
1906, to February, 1910. The C.B. was
conferred upon him tor his good work
in South Africa, where for nearly si*
months he commanded a mobile ool-
umn.
Ghost In a Coach.
Tt may not be generally known
thnt there was a reputed ghost in the
family ot the Right Hon. J. W. Lowther, who has been Speaker ol the
House of Commons since 1005. It
was the disembodied spirit of Jemmy
Lowther. called Iiy the country folks,
"the had Eurl Lonsdale," who died
at Lowther Hall, in Westmorland, in
1802. According to a biographer,
"Jemmy was more detested than
any man alive, as a shameless political -harper, a domestic bashaw, and
an Intolerable tyrant over his tenants
snd dependents."
His ghost was said to career all
over the estate in a coach and six.
To quote a chronicler, "The hall became almost uninhabitable on account of the dead man's pranks, and
out of doors was, for a long time,
almost equally dreaded, as there was
constant danger ot encountering the
miscieant ghost." The bad earl';
kinsman and successor, the first
Karl ol Lonsdale ol the present creation, lost no time in pulling down
tlie hall, ghost or no ghost. On the
site he buiit'I/lwthcr Castle, which
was finished in 1809.
Strange Middle Name*.
Taking the writers at husard. w*
Hnd Doyle wltb Conan and Chesterton
wtth Keith ns a second name. Itnero
Ins the unusual Wing, and tbe D. of
W D. Howlund stands for Dean. Behind W. W. Jacobs lurks tbe second
name Wymork. wblch Is strange, and
J. K. Jerome never mentions the
strange "Klnpku" that Is Indicated by
his second Initial. Rider Haggard la
frank with bis curious name, and pot-
slbly Mr. Pell Ridge Is tbe frankest In
using both his names, whlcb are his
owu and also belong to a hilltop at the
southwest corner of Eugland.-Landon
Chronicle.	
An Army ef Wild Ponies.
Tbe wild horses living ou lbe sand
banks of the Nortb Carolina lagoons
art? tho descendants of horses left behind by 8lr Walter Raleigh's colonist!
when they abandoned Roanoke Island.
On these bsuks sea oats wltb luxuriant
beads grow quite profusely, and thest
are an article of food green or ripe.
Ne one knowt exactly the number of
tbeet ponies, but there are said to be
more tban 3,000 of tbem now oa tba
The Hew Agriculture,
"I calc'late my boy Seth is goln' ter
come back to the old farm after all
when he gits through up there to college," said Granger Timothy Seeds as
he leaned on the top rail of the acre
lot Ience and conversed with neighbor Joel Haycock in his buckboard in
the road.
"Sho'I You don't say?" said Joel.
"I thought the boy was goln' ter quit
the Iarm."
"Well, it did look like that ler a
spell, but I guess he's thought better
on lt, ler he sent his ma and me home
a newspaper piece which stys that he
'plowed up the field for many yards
and his team never nulled better together.' Gosh, he'd never touch a
plow it home hero I"
It. Paler.Durg Here nosing.
The prefect ot Ml. Petersburg bat forbidden prisctlgliilng uud boxing In
every shs|ie aud form, and not even
tbe mildest of exhibitions are to be tolerated. Tbe law on the subject Is very
explicit. It rests on t rescript by tbe
("impress Catherine II., wbo bused It
ou ibe simple isilitt of good manners,
faixohuiigltig blows, especially In public, was uncivilised and must be prohibited, aud so the "noble art of aelf
defense" Is doomed to extinction In tbe
Russian capltiil.-Kicliuiige.
A Seng Bird's Mete.
Mme. Bembrlcb Is the wife of Hen
Eteugel, who used to be a plnno teacher at tbe conservatory at l.emberg.
He Is • bright eyed uud gray bearded
little man, who speaks sotuiwhnt broken English, but who. like hla wife, Is
able to carry on a conversation U
almost a doceu languages, gninewbat
ber senior In yeara, he hns s|s-ut bis
life traveling with the singer, and they
bave ofteu been pointed out as one of
tbe mott devoted couples In public Ufa
Late Honors e'er a Japanese.
By bis majesty's special grace the
Junior grade uf the third mnk hns been
Isjslbumously conferred on Oono Yuan
luaro for bis distinguished services In
writing the Ko>ui, tbe moat am loot
history of Japan. The Kojlkl waa Brat
hubllabad l-ISOO yean ago.- Japan Mali.
Self
Conquest
How Love ind Bravery Saved
a Man From Himself
By CHRISTOPHER BARKLEY
Copyright by American Preaa Areo-
elation. ISIL
Not fur rrotu Kort —, In what was
then called the fur west, wus ouce a
much house* In those days the Amer
leuu Indian was not kept tu coutluued
subjection, and lhe rancher built bis
bouse near euougb to the tori to go
there wltb those of bis household for
protection In cuse of uecesslty. Tbe
fort, uow that the Indian bas been
eliminated, bus sunk to ootblnguess ln
Importance, aud tbe ranch bouse la
bu.' a charred spot, having beeu burned by tbe redskins yeurt ago.
Not au hour before Ils destruction a
couple, i young othcer from the fort
ind a girl, tbe rancher's daughter.
were Billing on tbe broad veraadu lu
tke light ot a full moon. Allen Kim
ball bad enlisted In tbe United States
army because he could neither be controlled tor control himself. He bad
given In to almost every kind of dis
tlpttlon, and at the end ot a spree,
not baring the hardihood to meet bis
father and being out of money, In a
Bt of desperation be hud enrolled blm
self In • cavalry regiment, cbooslug
that arm of the service since It would
•end him fart beat from bis borne.
He bad not been long at bis station
wben trouble wltb tbe Indiana came
on, and Kimball showed himself so
bran that be wai rapidly promoted
through the noncommissioned grades
and before tbe righting was over was
made a IteutenauL Tblt gnve blm
heart, and be determined to redeem
himself wltb his family. Rut u pas
tlon for gambling stood In bis way
At those remote posts there was little
or nothing for tbe meo to do except
drink and gamble, aud Lieutenant
Kimball found the temptation to gam
ble too strong for him. Once be bad
begun to play ill caution deserted bim.
•nd be bet wildly. Tbe result was
tbat be became Indebted to bla broth
er oflicers tn large amounts One or
two of bla creditors In order to get
what they oontldered to he tbeir Just
dues formed a clique against blm, and
be found blmeelf a "cut" man, wblcb
It the army expression for one whose
brother officers wlll not apeak to mm,
though some dissented trom the rest
on tbe ground that Kimball did not de
•erve what wai Inflicted upon nlm.
Kimball bad formed the acquaint
•nc* of Winifred Armour, tbe ranch
man's daughter, at tbe height of the
reputation he bad made for bravery
•nd efBcieucy. He loved ber, and bit
loved wis returned. He confessed his
previous life to ber and announced bla
Inteutiou thereafter to be a credit In
•lead of a disgrace to bis family. Sbe
•ympathlzed with him deeply and
promised blm tbat lf he adhered to
bla resolution for a given time etae
would marry him.
"But," ahe aald. "I will confess that
there Is In tbe east a man of sterling
worth wbo bas asked me to be bla
wife. He lt much older than I, aud
thua far I respect blm only. Uy love
ts yours. If you relapse Into your
former condition when I return to tbe
east I sball accept bla proposition."
Doubtless she put tbe matter thus to
furnish an Incentive to blm to conquer
himself.
He had ridden over to tbe ranch
house on this moonlight nlgbt to bid
ber goodby. He bad failed to conquer
himself and bad lost ber. Tbe Inter
view was painful to both.
"Well," be said, "In one thing I re-
Jolce-you In time will be happy. Thank
heaven, I am not to drag you down
with mel You wlll be a member of a
ftmily, while l-l am every day •>
pectlng an Invitation to resign."
Winifred made no reply. Wbat could
•be «ay» Bbe could not Bud It lu ber j
heart to upbraid blm. Aod tbere waa
nothing ibe could aay to relieve tbe
mental torture both suffered Bhe tim
ply put out ber band In a mute fare
well.
They were both recalled from tbe
mebucholy ttntus existing between
tbem by bearing distant sounds of a
galloping borse, evidently coming at
full speed Buth listened The anl
mat waa out coming from th* direction of the fort, but toward It Kim
ball knew tbnt the Indiana on tbe
nearby rearrvatluu bad been unruly,
•ud something told blm the coiner
was a messeuger bringing a warn
Ing. His fear was realised A bora*
man, reaching a point lu Ihe road op
posit* tbe ranch gate, pulled bis burse
bark on his haunches snd cried out:
"The ludlana are comlugl They're
right on ua!"
Wltbout • word Kimball ran for the
•table near th* Onus* and In • few
minutes returned, leading Winifred's
mare. Middled and bridled Her faiher
was away from the ranch, and there
waa no one In Ihe house but employees snd servants. Tbey, too, prepared
fur flight. Kimball put bis companion
on hrr horse, mounted himself, and
tbey tore through ihr open gate end
sway toward the furt. Tbey had
scarcely stall.") when behind thoni
enme llun terrlliie whoop which oaly
un Indliiii cnn give.
The fori wus six miles from the
ranch nol a. long dlstnnce for sn or
illllll ry ride, hut too great to enable
■ be fugitives lo reach safety wllb a
Horde of yelling savages In their war
I'he horses knew tbnt yell and put
forth nil iheir strength
Scarcely  a  mile  bud  heen covered
when the gallop of • single horse waa
heurd that hud evidently distanced tht
rest Kimball knew that he wus gaining upon Ihem.
"I'm going to slow up and Ore." ht
uld. "You go on; don't low auy
time-   I'll overtake you."
He pulled bis horse back on hit
haunches and turned him as quickly
•• possible, bul not loo quick, for uu
Indian was right on blm Net/lug a
repeutlng rifle that he curried hooked
to bis saddle, he fired wben th* man
was not • hundred yards from htm
and dropped him. Then, turning, he
followed Winifred.   She bad preferred
to reduce her pace, and he consequently soon caught up wltb her.
"Why did you not go on when 1
drew rein?" he asked. "1 am doing
this for ynu. not for myself. You
know thut deutb la my only refuge."
"I shall draw rein every time you
do," was the reply.
"You are demented. Tbose men wbo
are following us are savagee. Wben
1 bait again go on. lf you fall Into
their bands you wlll add • thousandfold to my anguish."
"Do you suppose 1 can tide to safety
leaving you behind to be tortured and
tben  murdered?"
"You are a woman. 1 tblnk of tbe
agony you wtll occasion me, the aad'
nesa for your loss that will oe for
others."
There was no reply to tbis.
On tbe two galloped, maintaining
the distance between themselves and
those behind, wbo were delayed on
coming to tbe body of tbe buck who
had been shot Here tbey divided, a
part remaining with tbe dying Indian,
tbe othera continuing Ibe pursuit
Half tbe distance between tbe ranch
bouse und the fort bud been passed
wben suddenly u red glare was added
to the pale light of the moon. Kimball aald uothing He knew that tbt
glure came from tbe burning of tbe
ranch house Ou. uu tbey aped, the
glare adding to tbeir terror of tbl
whooping suvuges behind them.
Again tbe footfalls of the pursuing
burses, by tbeir varying distinctness,
Indicated thnt the Indiana were separating lu accordance wltb the speed ot
their poulea. Then Kimball saw thst
be might save tbe girl by sacrificing
bimselt.
"There's • rise In the ground ahead,"
he said. "I'm going to stop tbere snd
take them as tbey come on. Hurry to
the fort Wltb what delay to the aav
•ges I csuse you can certainly reach
It"
"Nol No!" cried Winifred, who
knew very well what this meant
"Keep on Wc shall booh meet • fores
from the garrison "
"Klther we or Ihnt red light wlll bs
the flrst newt they wlll get that the
Indiana nre on the warpath."
"I will remain with you."
"Oo!" be cried. They hnd reached
the crest and, reining In bla horse, he
dismounted. Seeing thut she, too, bad
•topped, be said, "My only chance Is to
hold them et bay llll you can tend as
■.stance."
Sbe hesitated a moment; tben, thinking thut he might be right she gave
ber borse a cut and dashed onward
Kimball, who bad trained his horse
for Indian fighting, forced him to Ile
down on the crest, and. placing himself
on bit stomach behind him. waited
for Ibe first Indian lo come within
range. Rut a few moments pnssed before, on a rise lu tbe ground, a hun
dred yards away against tbe glare of
tbe burning ranch house, appeared tbe
silhouette of an Indian. Tbe man waa
coming swiftly, advancing straight
toward Kimball. Kor tbe tew seconds
tbe savage was oo Ibe crest he seemed
to be standing still. Tbe officer used
these few seconds to draw a bead on
tha man's breast and Bred. The In
dlan rode duwu on to Ihe lower ground,
his arms thrown up above his hesd,
then fell backward, nut fifty feet trom
hla enemy,
Kimball aaw that In the burning
building he hud a great advantage.
But tbere wus no time to consider.
Before tbe Indian he had shot hnd
fallen another apiieared oa the crest
At tbe momeut one of thoae bursts of
flume tbnt shoot up uow and again
from burning buildings added intensity
to the light, and tbe body of tbe savage
was pictured with Inky blackness
Kimball took a sure aim at his bead
aod pierced bis brain.
At tbat momeut many silhouettes of
Indians appeared on th* crest Kl.ii
hall felt lhat bla time bad come, but
be welcomed ll Life to hlni had lost
all charm: Indeed, lt was his wish lu
leave a world tor whlcb he hud proved
himself untitled Nor did he wish to
remain to know that lbe girl be worshiped was In possession of another
He began a rapid Ure at tbe advancing
Indiana
Thla Is all tbat Is known of that re
markable battle In wblcb a tingle man
killed live redskins and wounded four
more. His owu account and the In
dluna he put out of lhe tight are all
tbere wus to tell tbe story, and he re
members ootblng more tbun baa been
giveu bere. A troop of cavalry from
tbe fori met a party of Indiana and
put tbem lo flight In lbe road where
lb* meeting took pluce. unconscious
and badly wounded, the soldiers found
Lieutenant Kimball Wben he came to
himself he was being carried on a
siroit ber In the tnisinllght, and beside
him walked Winifred Armour Beud
iug down, she whispered lo him:
"My life Is your* to belp you."
A wild Joy triumphed over all else
but he roiiiii repl) only by a preasure
nf tbe hand
In the urmy bravery overtops almost
sny offense. Kliuliall remained In It.
respected and admired His wlfes
luve wns sit tbnt wns needed tn en
able him to keep himself In subjection
• nd. supplying •• sh* did. support fol
his weaknesses, nt conquered.
GRIM PARTNERS.
The   Graft   8ch*ma   "Death   and   Iha
i Davit" Triad to Work.
; An extraordinary cuse of official
rugutfrj- in reported iu the Havar.au
! pres**-. A peasant wouiun named Kroll,
j living at Wagsellye, received a uutifi
I cation from a local bank thut her bus-.
} bund, whu was io America, had re*
! mitit*(l her 12-jG, says tbe Loudon
j Sketch. She wa* requi sted to bring
[ evidence of identification.
Krau Kroll applied to tbe local magistrate, wbo snld thut his -wrsonal cer-
titviiie would Iw enough and advised
ber tu tell uo one about tbe remittance.
Tbe  same  uight  Into   I'rnn   Kroll's
cottage cume two  frightfully  got  up
monsters,   who Introduced  themselves
as    the    "Devil"    and    bis    brother
•'Death"  The "Devil" explained that
Berr Kroll bad come by the £250 dis
honestly aud tbat unless It was giveu
to him be wuuld band over Krau Kroll
i to tbe teuder mercies of "Death."
Next morning Frau Krull applied for
the money nt tbe hank.   Sbe Informed
the clerk thut she Intended to pay the
| ii-oiiey to the "Devil."   The clerk paid
i uui  tbe ui'Miey. hut secretly Informed
tn- genduriuery.
A  few hours later the "Devil" aud
"Death" duly arrived at the cottage.
I Krau   Krull   begged  tu be allowed  to
keep 00 uf the mouey. but tbe "Devil"
, wus Inexorable, aud the pair made off
with the il!.**.)
I lln idly bad ihey left tbe cottage
j when Ibey were --ouueed on by the
! gendarmes and arrested. The "Devil"
1 proved tu be the magistrate aod
■ "Death" a local re-idem whom be bud
Coohcry
points
chosen as accouipin-e.
Shoee With Teee.
A novelty In shoes Introduced In
German; baa partitions to separate
the wearer's Iocs. Tbe Interior of
these shoes terminates In sott pad!
presslnit against the foot, so that the
thrust lu walking Is taken ul the base
of lhe Iocs Instend of lbe point. Jamming of the toes Is thus prevented. II
Is claimed thut the deforming of lhe
fee'., now so common, wlll he avoided
af fills arrangement and Hint walking
wlll Is. mude more comfortable.
The French Immortete.
The French Academy of Immortal*
has added four new mimes to lis incin-
bershlp. They nre those of M. de He-
filler, who writes i*>ems; (lenernl I.nn-
rlols. who wields n pen is well ss a
sword; Henri Itoujon, oi-dlrortor of
the Itenus Arte, ind Denis Cochin, a
man uf loiters. The academy Is now
ro lo lis foil strength of fort* aud for
Ibe Urst time In several jean.
Grimly Named.
Oniuliral boasts of • grimly named
•Ireet, Ku* Huns Tetcs, ao called be-
cause all Ita luhabltinta were beheaded during the rerolutlon.
A PALACE INJHE AIR.
The Splendid Attor Villa That Overlooks th* Bar of Naples,
William Waldorf Astor's splendid
villa at Sorrento -Mauds on a gray rock
150 feet above she sea In a garden of
orange trees, ll formerly helouged to
Barutie Roechlgllero l-nbouln. from
whose heirs Mr Amur bought It some
years agu. lie villi.rged the domain by
the purchase ot the old convent of St.
lieorge and other estates.
The bouse Is a three atory one. paint*
ed In light colors It Is reached by a
little ruad on the old walla of Sor-
reutu which passe*, before tbe Hotel
Tasso. where (he poet, Turquato
lasso, waa horn ln 1574. For the
splendor uf Its view the spot where
the Villa Astor la built cannot be
equaled. Tbe gulf uf Naples Ilea before
lt, wllb smoky Vesuvius lu front. Be
low tbe Villa Asiur can still be seen
In the lea the remains of the Itoman
temples to Neptune. Venus Aoadyo-
ttetie and Saturn
Id old Roman times Sorrento was a
health resort, and great patricians bad
Villas there. Collin Aslnlo bud one
with a hui.dr.--d rooms at Ihe Capo
Santa Fort mm in. and Caesar. Nero
■nd Antonlus were other villa owners.
—Argonaut *.
Apple Cooking.
Some people. know only two ways
of preparhij; apples—to stew or bake
tbem. Try some of these oltj ways of
presenting "the kin,- of fruit.*.:"
Kor Clout apple make a nice apple
butter or puree from tart fruit, sweet-
eued to taate aud flavored with the
grated rt in] of one lemon und vluua*
mon or uut meg I'm the puree ou.
the Ire to become very cold, then
beat the whites of two egga to a stiff
froth, adding Hits io the fruit, wblcb
should now ite In ihe serving dish.
When It comes io the taMe cover the
top with a cupful uf rirli creum.
To muke fried apples wash and
wl|te dry some tart cooking u pries,
PUI Ihem lu slices a quarter uf un Inch
thick and fry them In butter until
teuder nnd brown. Dredge with powdered Kit uur and serve plplug hot ou
warm plates.
Caramel apples muy be made ns follows: luto a skillet put one cupful of
light brown sugar and one-half cupful
of hot water. Let hull for three or
four minutes, then drop in fire nl •
cooking apples which huve been peeled, cured and halved. Let these slew
In the sirup until ihey are lender and
fluffy'; then drain Ihem out Into a
glass dish, lu another saucepan have
ready one tublea|>onnful of butter
melted with one teuspoonftil of Hour,
anil over this pour nm-balf .cupful of
cream When hot add to the hutting
sirup, stirring briskly for several min*
utex, then pnur over the apples and
serve either hot or cold.
Culinary  Hinti.
All fruit salads arc Improved by marinating In French dressing, thoucb
later nerved with mayonnaise,
Instead of the Individual pate tt ls
more popular now to puss one nr iwo
large pates, each guest serving herself.
Fill with mushrooms, oysters or creamed sweetbreads.
Biscuits or French rolls for formal
use are more diminutive tban ever.
The former should he the size of a
fifty cent piece and a quarter of so
inch thick.
A delicious salad Is made from dlf*
ferent uuts. white grapes, a little
1 shredded grapefruit, pineapple cut
! into cubes und shredded celery. Mask
J lu mayonnaise or serve with a cream
i dressing. x
When a boiled egg Is the usual
; breakfast dish vary It by breaking it
, raw Into the egg cup and cooking lu
; but wuter to the desired consistency.
The flavor Is quite different than wben
■ cooked lu the shell.
PERIL CF THE MAHDI.
A New Fanatical Leader Who May
Spread Terror In Africa.
Tbe word "iiiiiliill" Is a title. According lo lbe Mobnniinedun creed.
Ibe prophet wum bul the forerunner uf
auoibcr prophet greuter thun blmself
und wbo would Ih* known as Hie mail
dl. literally the "mini led by Allah."
Naturally, considering how vague the
definition of tbe promised lender Is.
there bare been scores of preteuders
wltblu tbe post few hundred years,
nmbltlous nieii whu thought thut by
pltiytng on tbe fnuatlcal passions of
the Arubs they would rise to power.
Tbey were sud are generally successful for a certain period, and It hns
'teen Ihe policy of governments to put
linvrn the unruly rebels whenever Ibey
ould. Thus In lbe Sudun, for In-
*tan''e. hiirdly a year passes without
<ts  nuidhl   In "IMng  the  dervlihes  to
Irlve lhe Christians luto lb*, seo. As
long lis Hie rising Is only local It cun
lie ileali wllh rapidly and with energy.
Were It to spread there would be an
Immediate coiitliii.'mllon. As It happens, there eilsis at tbe present lime
In tbe heart of Africa a inn h.l I who Is
the recognised leader of 8.(100.000 followers, colled Ilie Senoussl. The most
Inaccessible oases of tbe Sahara desert form the core of tbis vast empire,
but Ibe miilull's subjects, armed to tbe
teeth, nre scnitered throughout lhe
greater port of north Africa and Arabia ond are by all accounts lucreiislng
rapidly In numbers.-Wlde World Mug
•slue,
Curious AntieipstiQns.
tinny ow-miar anticipations hare
been cited agalost patent applications.
At one time a congressman took tbe
potent ottlce a lock invented by one of
his rural constituents The lock was
an Mint copy ut • lock figured In
Trice on l-isks." showing tbe lock
used nn a gale ot ancient Thebee, thousands of year, la-fore Christ The congressman, after eiiiinliilng the Illustration wiih b wn. shown nlm by oue ot
ibe officers, en-tanned Hint be dldu't
rare wbo that fellow in Thebes win—
b* certainly stole it from bis constituent. Uu annttiei occasion an application for a patent wns tiled tor a flower
nasket whose const rurttuu correspond-
ejl In detail wllb the Scriptural description ul the ark lu whlcb Moses was
placed In Hie tnilriishcs. which we are
loiil In tbe second chapter of Kaodus
was an nrk ul bulrushes daubed wllh
slime and wuh pitch This la also
probably tbe lirsl recorded instance of
a re-eutorced concrete structure.- Met
entitle American
Dandeliona.
The  suburban   housewife  can   find
plenty of young shouts uf dnndetlous
at this Reason to use on ber table If
sbe possesses a good sized lawn.   For
! salads sud pot  herbs ot this seasou
gather tbe delicate young leaves early
! In  Ihe uiorulng.  as  tbe  but  sun  of
midday seems to toughen tbem.
Tbe dandelion Is such a bluer little
herb tbat a salad made entirely of It
Is not to tie advised.   The leave* combine well with lettuce or unions and
' may   lie   used   with   new   beets   or
' deviled  eggs.    An   excellent   French
. cook adds a bit of bncou cut In dice
I to   a   eulad   of   bleached   daudellou
lea vea.
Macaroni and Bacon.
I To couk macaroni and bacon take a
quarter of o imund uf mscarunl, a
quarter of a pound of rashers of ba-
' con. four tomatoes or sis If small,
, grated cheese, bolter, pepper and salt
I Boll the macaroni lu salted water till
I tender, tben drain and cut Intu short
| lengths. Fill a buttered baklug dish
I with layers uf macaroni and tomatoes,
i flavoring eacb layer wltb pepper, salt
' and grated cheese and putting some
j •null bits of butter between. Cover
| the top wllh breadcrumbs and bake
I for half an hour In a moderate oven.
i Serve wllh nicely fried rubers of ta-
' con on ton.
Coffee Cske.
To mnke coffee i.euin cake tsk* on*
; snd a half cups of sugur, two of flour,
', two eggs, two nnd s hulf teaaponnfuls
! of baking  powder,  a   pinch  of  salt,
about three-quarters or a teaspoonful
of lemon, a quarter of a cup of butter
snd a tablespoon fill of cocounut   Melt
' tbe butter, break lu the eggs wltbout
I beating and pour In an eighth of a cup
of milk and half a cup of cold coffee.
Make In three layers.
For filling use a pint of milk, half a
cup of flour, two eggs (beaten), salt, es-
' seuce and • cup of sugar.   Bull Ingredients lu duiible boiler.
Tarragon Sauce.
To Dike tarragon sauce, which Is •
suitable accoiupnnliuent to verloaa
kinds of fish, vegetables and dressed
eggs, bent up the yolk nf an egg with
• teaspiKiufiil of tarriguu vinegar aud
■tlr ll Intu half a pint of bulling melted butter after taking tne sanrepsn
from the stove. Continue to stir for •
few minutes to prevent the sauce from
. curdlliig, then add a large teaspoouful
of finely chopped fresh tarragun and It
Is ready fur use.
Books snd Beeches.
At • sole lu New York a bibliophile
•old:
"Book Is • word lhat come* from tbe
Herman buche, ur beech. But what
connecilon hns a book got wltb •
beech?  I'll show you."
The bibliophile led Ibe way lo • sn
perb Casion thai had Jusl been sold
for Kl,mu
"Tbl» volume, you seo." he said, "Is
bound In bourda noi pasteboards-real
boards, beech boards. That Is bow all
books were bound when printing began Yes, wben printing began In tier-
mnny. eucb Inciinniiuluiu, or early
book, was hound In buche In beech
bonrds half sn Inch thick, covered perhaps wltb leather lipped and clasped
wltb brass and studded with precious
or a-uul urecloua atuueav1*
Whin Th.y Perled.
Meyerbeer snd Roaslul. In spite of all
Ibelr rivalries, were the warmest of
friends.
Rnsslsl on'"* said. "Meyerbeer and I
can nevei agree." When some one In
surprise osk.il why he replied, "Meyerbeer likes sauerkraui better thau ha
does macaroni."
One Method.
"Do you always keep a smiling
j about your dally duties)"
"New; I look grouchy. Then I slut
i ssked la do no extra work.'-Wsah-
I Ington Herald.
Monaco.
j The tiny principality of Mon«eo
comprises elnlii sipiure miles of lerrt*
lory, In which Iwo oiher towns he-
•Ides Monte Carlo manage to squeete
themselves.    The population approta*
aut« 14,000. THE PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK,  HRITISH COLUMBIA
DELINQUENT   TAXES
NAME OF PERSON  ASSESSED
SHORT DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY
Sale of Lands   for  unpaid  Delinquent Taxes  in the  Fort
Assessment District, Province of British Columbia.
Cf|pp|p|',uknown
Kill. % iCunitnown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
I hereby give notice that on Thursday, the   16tb day of November.   A.D.,   1911, at the hour of ten o'clock in the forenoon. &t thfl Oourt-hoUse Unknown
Cranbrook, B.C.. 1 shall offer lor sale at public auction the lands in the   list  hereinafter set out, of the persons in the said Ust hereinafter net out, Unknown
Ior delinquent taxes unpaid hy the said persons on the   31st December,  A.D.,   1910, and for interest, costs, anil   expenses,   Including  the coat  of  ad  Unknown
vertiaing saiil sale, if not sooner paid. Unknown
Unknown
THK LIST -4B0VB MKNT10NK1) Unknown
. (Unknown
MOYELLE
l.ut Number
9
10
I
I
3
4
3
9
in
REGISTERED   PLAN   No.
lllock Number
    :l     Moyelle   .*.....
    2 Moyelle 	
    3  Moyelle 	
    ti Moyelle 	
    M    Moyelle 	
Moyelle 	
Moyelle  	
Moyelle 	
Moyelle 	
Moycllo  	
Moyelle 	
Moyelle 	
Moyolle 	
Moyelle	
14
lt
14
14
15
IS
15
15
15
2    6   r*
a
I 1.05
1.05
1.05
1.05
1.05
1.05
1.05
1.05
1.05
1.05
1.05
1.05
.80
.50
DELINQUENT TAXES
NAME OF PERSON ASSESSED
SHOUT DESCRIPTION OK
PROPERTY
FORT STEELE TOWNSITE, RBGI8TERED I'l.AN NO. 624.
*• 2
5 3-5
?  rt  9
Kallspell Furniture Co
Lot Numher
IS  	
Ulock Number
4,   Fort   Steole
..$   no     *   .5!)     t    vi     Stan     t 2 :is
Chum.  Jack 	
Smith, Miss K	
Woo, Charlie 	
Wise,  Adam, Kelly, J. N.
Dewai, Robert 	
Guenley, AL, estate o[ 	
WESTPORT    TOWNSITE,    REGI8T     ERKP   PLAN   No.   668.
Lot Number lllock Number
3      2 being sub-division Lot   290,
Group   l.   Westport..   4.50
2      9 being sub-division l.ot   2%.
Group   i.   Westport..   1.80
1 ij      9 being sub-division Lot   896,
Oroup    I.    Weatport.     7 34
1        1  being sub-division Lot   42s,
Oroup   1.   Westport..     .90
9      1  being subdivision  Lot    42s
Group   1.    Westport..    2.2(1
10     3 being sub-dlvlston Lot   42s.
Qroup    1.    Westport..    1 BO
Finch. C.
Tilsen, K,
Simpson,
Chlnette,
Belangee,
E., JoneB, F.  A.
F.  E., Hutchison. John
A. I'	
tirant  	
MARYSVILLE     TOWNSITE,
Lot Number
lu,    11,    12 	
10   	
1   	
1   	
REGI STERED    PLAN    No.    Tii.
Block Number
    I    Marysville   43.(10
    .'■    Marysville  1.50
     .*  M&rysvtlle       1.20
     to  Marysville   3.00
    17  MarvsMUe   Via
Dowser, Mrs. H	
Fort Steele Development  Syndicate,   Ltd.
Gates,  John L	
Pollard, H	
Wade, Miss Marcia 	
Gayette, Alexander	
Carroll, James M	
Fort Steele Development Syndicate,   Ltd.
Reddy, J. F	
Schmidt,  Joseph  	
Fort Steele Development Syndiratc,   Ltd.
Finch,  O.  E.,  Jones,  F.   A	
Fort Steele Development Syndicate,  Ltd.
Reddy, J. F	
Fort Steele Development Syndicate,   Ltd.
Reddy, J. F	
Fort Steele Development Syndicate,   Ltd.
Fort Steele Development Syndicate,  Ltd.
Reddy,  .1. F	
Howard, Mrs. II	
Finch, 0.  E.,  Jones, F. A	
Fort Steele Development   Syndicate,   Ltd.
Whltmore, W. A	
Carroll, James M	
Fort Steele Development   Syndicate,   Ltd.
Gregg A McMillan 	
Doyle,   J.   11	
Marsh, Richard 	
Redmond, Patrick 	
Fort Steele  Development Syndicate,   Ltd.
Fort Steele Development Syndicate,  Ltd.
Reddy,  J.  F	
Fort Steele Development   Syndicate,   Ltd.
Reddy, J. F	
McNailght, T. T.. estate of 	
Fort Stoele Developnunt. Syndicate,   Ltd.
Leonard. MIhh M., estnte of 	
Sullivan, Mms D	
Fort Steele Development Syndicate,   Ltd.
Reddy. J. F	
Fori Steele Doveloptnent Syndicate,  Ltd.
Reddy,  J.   F	
Fort Steele Development Syndicate,   Ltd.
Benle,  M.  A	
Fort  Steele Development  Syndicate,   Ltd.
Reddy, J. F	
Fort Steele Developmenl Syndicate,  Ltd.
Mills,  Mis.   \tinn 	
Kinsey. R.  E., estjile uf 	
Galder, H	
Fitch. J. W	
Fraeer,   John  	
Clark, A. T	
Pollord. II	
Ferguson,  James 	
Ryan,   John	
Myers. George 	
McNailght, T. T.. estate of .
Jewell, Wm	
Pringle.  Fred.   S	
Ito, Jennie	
McDonald.  Archibald 	
Peddle.  Donnld   	
Frar.ee.  Mr*.  A.  M	
Barber.   A	
KIMBERLEY    TOWNSITE,
Lot Number
19   	
2fi    to   23 	
REGISTERED    I'l.AN
Block Number
NO.     60S.
10
12
19
to  I
20  	
25   to
to   12
23   to   2
A    4  	
16. IH
41 17 .
to   19,
14 to   17,   19 to 21,
15
14
15
1   ft 5  ...
13,    15   t
I lo   4,
', A    12 	
II   	
13   	
6,   7,   9.    13
20  	
14,    16
lo    16.    IK
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
!
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
Kimberley
10 Kimberley
to 7, 8, Ill lo 16, 19 to   23...
8      Ill Kimberley
10 Kimberley
11 Kimberley
II Kimberley
11  Kimberley
11 Kimberley
12 Kimberley
12 Kimberley
12
2 I
24
35
26
7
8   I
i;
ii
ii, .
7
11
B I
17
19
6 I
20
10,    16   to   19 .
to    17 	
8 to 10. 13 to 16,'17 to 20
lo   10,    Hi      13  Kimberley
13 Kimberley
14 Kimberley
14 Kimberley
14 Kimberley
15 Kimberley
15 Kimberley
15 Kimberley
18 Kimberley
18 Kimberley
19 Kimberley
20 Kimberley
2C Kimberley
20
19 .
to   211 	
A    7  	
to    16   	
to   20     20 Kimberley
to   9.    11    to   17     20 Kimberley
A   IS   to   20     22 Kimberley
to   9     23 Kimberley
.30
3.20
4.00
2.90
1.20
5.00
59.60
14.50
5.75
1.50
14.19
20.00
4.00
5.80
4.60
4.SO
5.59
.    9.49
5.05
.    4.50
. 13.20
.    6.43
. 11.60
.    9.10
14.04
12.20
7.00
.60
.   2.90
5.90
4.64
9.46
8.69
1.75
1.50
6.19
1.05
2.50
8.95
1.75
.    9.80
.   2.90
5.25
4.50
.    8.95
.    5.10
5.55
MOY11E     TOWNSITE,     REGISTERED    PLAN
Lot Number Block Number
I    A   2     1  Moyie 	
3      2 Moyie 	
NO.    647.
&   8
Moyie ...
3 Moyie ...
4 Moyie  ..
4 Moyie ...
5 Moyie ...
I, Moyie ..
I,  Moyie  ..
6 Moyie ...
6 Moyie ...
9 Moylo ...
2     :i Moyic ...
5    9 Moyie ...
12      9  Movie  ...
4     io   Moyle
2     11    Moyie
4        12    M'.yie
16
17 .
.    7.20
.    3.00
.   8.00
. 25.10
.      .90
.      .60
. 10.00
.    1.80
.    3.00
.    5.00
.    7.50
.    3.00
1.20
.    3.60
32.00
3.00
.45
.45
Coneer,  Stein 	
Cameron, W	
Hartigan.  I'atriek
Reid,  Oeorge 	
Oill,   M.   J	
Pollard,   H	
Richardson.   A	
MOYIE,    GOVERNMENT
Lot Number
8   	
6    	
7    	
8   	
14   	
I    A    5   	
ADDI 'ION    REGISTERED   PLAN   NO. 8-1TA
Block Number
     I  Government Addition  Moyle    3.
    2 Government Addition Moyle   4.
    2 Government Addition
    2 Qovernment Addition
    2 Government Addition
    3 Government Addition
6    ■    3 Government Addition
Taylor A Bonner 	
Bonner,   Mike  	
Orchard, Mrs. Annie
Mackay. Oharles A.  ,
Jensen, Paul 	
Day, John 	
Dimock,  H,   H	
Unknown  	
Potter, Samuel 	
Weaver. Fred	
perrler, Arthur 	
Morris. Patrick 	
MOYIE.    LAKE    SHORE
Lot Number
3  	
ADDITION,    REGISTERED    I'I,A
Block Number
    3  Lake Shore
     '.',  Lake Shore
    3  Lake  Shore
7   .
II
3    *
9   .
4
9   .
El
I   .
4   .
Lake Shore
Lake  Shore
Lake Shore
Lake Shore
Lake Shore
Lake Shore Addition
Lake Shore Addition
Lake   Shore   Addition
Lake  Bhnrc  Addition
Addition.
Addition
Addition
Addition
Addition
Addition
Addition
Addition
Moyle
Moyle
Moyle
Moyle
Moyie
Moyle 3
Moyle
N    NO.
Moyie
Moyle
Moyln
Moyln
Moyle
Moyie
Moyle
Moyle
Moyle
Moyle
Moyle
Moyle
1.1.9
1.09
Lus
.36
.36
37.15
1.65
.60
3.15
3.15
1.60
1.20
3.15
31.50
16.60
3.15
1.60
14.15
15.40
4.60
3.20
5.55
2.40
5.55
7.90
2.40
7.90
9.45
6.35
6.30
5.75
11.85
6.30
5.50
.60
1.60
5.50
4,75
6.50
7.90
.80
1.50
7,90
.80
1.60
11.05
.80
11.80
1.60
7.10
3.15
8.65
4.05
5.50
2.40
4.76
1.80
.90
.60
1.8C
2.86
4.58
7.14
3.00
1.20
4.13
29.00
3.00
.46
.45
3.00
2.40
.75
3.00
3.63
.90.
2.40
,'1.00
2.42
7.25
3.60
1.29
2.10
1.81)
.91
88
2.06
.05
.63
.70
12.30
.31
.23
.Sl
.15
.02
1.52
1.56
1.01
.41
1.96
24.19
7.18
2.31
.61
6.58
10.93
1.88
2.39
2.20
1.81
2.49
4.29
2.08
2.33
5.02
2.98
4.69
5.30
6.62
4.71
2.C9
.05
1.12
2.67
2.20
3.77
3.83
.61
'     .57
3.11
,33
.98
4.42
.61
4.79
1.14
3.78
1.78
4.14
2.20
2.73
1.05
.97
.49
3.00
.09
.00
2.54
-.18
.75
1.81
2.22
.30
.12
.64
11.78
.30
.05
.30
.38
.44
.08
.30
11.48
2.06
.46
.09
.24
2.46
2.12
2.06
.36
.26
.44
.26
.36
.47
2.00
2.110
2.00
2.00
2.00
2 0U
2.00
2.00
a.oc
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.60
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.60
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2,00
2.00
8 50
5 i;
12.1,9
2.95
5.111
5.56
94.15
4.11
3.88
2.00
2.32
2.00
9.87
2.00
10.71
2.1,0
7.51
2.00
1.81
2.00
12.11
2.U0
117.29
2.00
40.24
2.00
13.21
2.06
5.71
2.00
36.92
2.0C
48.33
2.011
12.48
2.00
13.39
2.00
14.35
2.00
11.01
2.00
15.63
2.00
23.68
2.00
11.53
2.00
16.73
2.00
29.67
2.00
17.76
2.00
24.59
2.00
22.15
2.00
34.51
2.00
25.21
2.00
17.19
2.00
3.25
2.00
7.62
2.00
16.07
2.00
13.59
2.00
2C.72
2.00
22.42
2.00
5.16
2.00
5.57
2.00
19.20
2.00
4.18
2.00
7.08
2.00
26.42
2.00
5.16
2.00
28.39
2.00
. 7.64
2.00
18.08
2.00
11.43
2.00
23.74
2.00
13.35
2.00
15.78
12.65
10.73
12.29
30.70
3.89
3.26
14.54
6.78
8.61
13.39
19.16
8.30
4.52
10.37
74.78
8.30
2.'15
2.95
2.00
8.10
2,00
7.18
2.00
8.74
2.00
3,58
2.00
8.30
2.00
61.58
2.00
13.04
11.45
1.83
7.01
21.20
18.12
16.71
9.66
4.75
8.74
6,01
7.15
0,011
lloi-la, T. J.
WARDNER    TOWNSITB,
   Block   149 outside Corporate Limits
Cranhrook    14.40
REGISTERED    PLAN    NO.    639
Rutherford A llnigienves
Dempsle,   V.	
WuMsohn,   .lohnna   	
Gorton A  Kelly 	
Blodell, J   ll	
0,uuiii «   Kelly  	
llHtmeru. Ohns	
Stephens,  Miss Mabel  	
WultBohn,   Joliann    ,
lloruni ,ll Kelly ,.,
Jennings « Mills 	
Sunburn, Mrs. I. B	
.Jennings   A    Mills 	
Wulfsiilin,  Johann 	
Simpson A Brown 	
Fitzsiitimons A Turner 	
Simpson A Eckstrom 	
Unknown  ,	
'llitnock.  II.  H	
Hrtinisli.  Hans 	
iHigbye,  Mrs.   Ada 	
Schmidt.   Joseph  	
IWullsolin,  Johann  	
jWilson, Irving H	
[Hughes. Richard 	
'Peterson, Louis 	
illol'tiu A Kelly ....
IJennings &  Mills
Rice, John T	
Wolfsohn,  Johann 	
Blodell, J. H	
McLennan.  Christine
Curtis, G. T	
Schmidt.  Joseph  	
Doak, W. E	
Hlndle,  J. A	
Berg, L. J. D	
Doak, W. E	
Leete,  Wm.  M	
Blodell. J. H	
Speaker, Fred	
Rickworth, F. H	
Lot Number Block Number
6    8 Wardner     4.80
17   10 Wardner  60
8     9 Wardner     2.50
13    11 Wardner     2.90
20   ll Wardner     2.90
13   12 Wardner     2.90
1    A   2   20 Wardner     1.20
I     23 Wardner     2.90
lo   A   11   24 Wardner     5.00
23     24 Wardner     2.90
19,   20' ft   21   25 Wardnor     1.20
1    26 Wardner  60
7   &   8   26 Wnrdner     1.20
10    26 Wardner     2.50
1.   2. Part ol   3   27 Wardner     6.80
U     27 Wardner     3.70
17   27 Wardner   11.60
20     27 Wardner     4.80
21  27 Wnrdner   13.60
24    27 Wnrdner   10.50
2     28 Wardner      3.35
1  29 Wardner     1-50
2   29 Wardner     2.00
6   29 Wardner  90
21   4   22   29 Wnrdner     3.80
3     30 Wardner     1.60
14   30 Wnrdner     2.70
16,   17,   18   30 Wardnor     1.20
20   30 WBrdner     2.90
1   ft   2   31 Wardner      5.00
12   31 Wardner     2.90
13 ft   14   31 Wardner     6.80
14   32 Wardner  30
15     32 Wardner     1.50
17   32 Wardner     2.00
19   32 Wardner  30
16    33 Wnrdner  6C
23     33 Wnrdner     180
1   ft   2   41 Wardnor     4.55
19  43 Wardnor     2.00
15 ft SJ    16   47 Wnrdner     1.20
5      23 Wnrdner     3.00
ELKO    TOWNSITE,    REGISTERED   PLAN    NO.    666
McKee, John 	
Hutchison, Wm	
Jones, H	
Perry, J. L	
McArthur ft Co'y D.
Barton, H. A	
Shinoni, Michlso 	
Kagawa,  James 	
Moulton, Miss Flo ...
Lot Number
9   ft   10 	
19   ft   20 ....
1    	
5    	
9   ft
9   ft
10
10
Block Number
2 Elko 	
3 Elko 	
4 Elko 	
4    Elko 	
6    Elko  	
2.40
1.35
1.50
1.20
4.00
Geddes, A. F	
Drake, G	
Kanouse, H. A	
Johnston, Andrsw, et al
Paquin, Agnes 	
Leask, Geo. R	
Itter A ABkew 	
Hyde, R. 0	
Miller, Anna 	
Sliger, Miss Clara 	
Rogers, R. W	
McCatie, Frank 	
Carruthers, J. T	
Patmore. J. 0	
Greer,  Jas	
Hyde, R. O	
Hyde, R. C	
Bannett, B	
Highye, Mra. Ada 	
Walter, Eugiine 	
Plant, John 	
Moultan, MIbs Flo 	
Bevington, MIbb Cora 	
Stewart, W. M	
     13  Elko      2.95
6          16  Elko   60
6         19  Elko       2.50
7        19  Elko   90
MORRISSEY     TOWNSITE,     REGISTERED    PLAN    NO.    736
Lot Number                                Block Number
3   ft   4     3    Morrissey     12-00
6
8
18
4     	
7    ft    19
ft   9  ...
ft   19
17 .
18 .
1 .
1 .
2 .
4 .
6 .
10   ft
11 .
1 .
3
7
9
17
19
ft    4
Unknown	
Chong Wing 	
Maudsley, M	
Lotobre, Set	
Ohoy, Joaeph 	
Ilobins ft Broley 	
Cuthbcrt, W. V., eatate ol .
Uanong, W. 11	
Icnsen, Paul 	
I'hong Wing 	
I'nsky, J	
'4enry, Margaret 	
Hoikjhton, Rev. 0, W	
Johnson, Andrew 	
I'aiiiiln, Agnon 	
Proctor, W. S	
Rngors, R. W	
Rose, E. 0	
Harper, Mrs. M. J	
Ohoy, Joseph 	
Knltt, Mike 	
Dotmonlco, Isaac	
Oozsa, Gaspero 	
Mllleatis,  A	
Atria,  Samuel  	
Miller. Anna 	
Under, Thomas 	
Mnchleiise, Frank 	
Rose, E. 0	
Newmnn, S. G	
Ohoy, Joaeph  '••
Goiirlay, Robert	
Hasaard, Wm	
Ilm Fno ft Wong ,1nck 	
Ohlnnette, A. P	
Carruthers, Geo	
Wntson ft  Llphnrdt 	
Cole, R.  .1	
Gorman, JnmeH	
Kctonry  Bros	
Morrissey      6.00
3    Morrissey    43.60
3 Morrissey    12.70
4 Morrissey       6.00
4    Morrissey   11.10
4    Morrissey      6.00
4    Morrissey     6.00
4    Morrissey  90
13 Morrissey      3.30
14 Morrissey      5.30
14  MorrteBey      6.30
14 Morrissey      6.00
14 Morrissey   90
14  Morrissey    14.30
14 Morrissey      6.00
15 MorrisBey       6.70
18  MorrisBey    12.00
18 MorriBsey       2.25
IB Morrissey      2-80
18 Morrissey      2.40
18 Morrissey      6.00
  Block   24 MorrisBey      6.00
1,    2,   3    27   Morrissey       3-60
MORRISSEY   MINES   TOWNSITB,    REGISTERED    PLAN    NO.    743
Lot Number                                Block Number
10,   20   ft   25     5   MorriBsey Mines   10.50
27     5   MorriBsey MineB     3.16
8        10 MorrlBUey Mines      1.50
26     13 Morl'lHsoy MineB     4.20
20      15 MorrlKsry Mines     6.80
22     15 Morrissey Mines     6.80
23        15 Morrissey  Mineii      5.80
24 ft   27      15 Morrissey Mines   10-45
28      15 Morrissey Minos   11-60
29     15 Morrissey Mines     6-*0
23       16 Morrissey Mines  30
16      17 Morrissey Mines     7-80
17     17 MorrisBey Mines    L80
18     17 MorrisBey Mines     5.80
21    17 MorriBsuy Mines     8.25
22     17 Morrissey Mines     9.65
23     17 Morrissey MlneH     7.06
24      17 Mnri'iHHcy Minos     8.10
27      17 Morrissey Mines     1-80
1        18 Morrissey Mines  60
9        18 Morrissey Mines     *.15
14     18 Morrissey Mlnon  60
16     18 Morrlniicy Mines     3.15
18      18 Morrissey Mines     6.96
20     18 Morrissey MinoH     4.65
2        19 Morrissey Mincn     2.70
6 ft   6     19 Morrlusoy Mines   13.50
7    19 Mol'i'ifiBoy MlneH  35.20
8        19 Morrissey Mines     6.80
9        19 Morrlusoy Mines     6-80
11    19 Moriisiioy MlneH     L80
12 ft   13     19 Morriflflcy Mines   10.46
14 ,    19 Morrissey Mines     5.80
|fl   ,    Ill MorrlsHey Mines    5.80
. 20      19 Morrissey Mines     6.20
5        20 Morrissey Minns     7.70
e      20 Morrlssoy Minis   8.10
10     20 Morrissey Minns     2.40
11       20 Morrlssny  Minns     5.80
12    20 Morrissey Minns    5.811
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1.30
.21
.32
.47
.47
.47
.23
.47
.96
.47
.43
.32
.43
.47
.96
.47
1.90
2.33
2.34
.47
.47
.47
.47
.21
.66
.47
.47
.43
.47
.96
.47
.96
.11
.47
.47
.11
.21
.47
.85
.47
.45
.911
.72
.90
1.13
.40
1.88
1.29
.40
.94
.09
a. *•*
.16
.16
.16
.16
.16
.16
.16
.16
.16
.16
.16
.16
.13
.13
1.03
.79
.06
.66
.85
.85
.85
.12
.85
1.40
.85
.13
.05
.13
.70
1.73
1.26
3.43
1.00
4.57
3.86
1.10
.21
.60
.10
1.02
.21
.71
.13
.85
1.63
.85
1.70
.21
.06
.63
1.32
.75
.08
.07
.40
.11
.21
.12
1.20
.89
.05
.80
.19
4.08
2.04
15.04
4.35
2.05
3.99
2.05
2.05
.10
.52
1.66
2.17
2.05
.10
4.92
2.01
2.14
4.08
.61
.71
.50
2.01
2.01
.39
3.03
.79
-?6
1.15
1.75
1.75
1.75
3.32
3.67
1.92
1.21
.34
1.66
2.30
3.01
2.30
2.71
.33
.06
1.24
.05
.82
2.28
1.43
.35
1.49
11.54
1.86
1.80
.14
3.27
1.86
1.86
1.96
2.31
2.71
.19
1.86
1.86
4 S
ai —
O   M
u a
12.00
2.00
2.110
2.00
2.110
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
3.00
2.00
2.0(1
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
100
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.110
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.C0
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.011
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.CO
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.C0
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.C0
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.60
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2,00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.011
2.00
2.00
2.110
2.00
2.00
2,00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.CO
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.0C
2.00
2.00 THb, PKOSPECTOft. CRANBROOK, BRITISH COLUMBIA
CRANBROOK LAND DISTRICT
Diatrict ol South-Bast KooUnay
TAKE NOTICE that Edith Ieckuj,
ol Vancouver, B.C., intends to apply
Ior a license to prospect ior coal and
petroleum un the fol.owing de-C.ibed
landa :•—Oommonc n„' at a post planted on fie North Boundary of Lot
7123, Group I, Kootenay District,
near the lank ol Sure Creak, tlience
oast 80 chains; tlience north 80
chnlns; thence west 80 ih",ius; iho.ice
noiiili 80 chaina to point of commencement,
Dated August   29th,   1911.
EDITH LECKIE,
Locator.
David Jenkins, Agent. 37-9t
MINBRAL ACT
(Form   V.)
Certificate ol Improvements
NOTIOB
Mammoth Mining Claim, situate lo
ths Fort Steels Mining Division of
But Kootenay District.
When located :—Hall way between
Woll and Lewii Creeks.
TAKB NOTICB that I, Thos. T.
McVlttle, agent lor B. Lundin, Free
Miner'* Certificate No. J74J7B, Intend, slity daya Irom date hereol, to
apply to th* Mining Recorder lor a
Certificate ol Improvements, tor tha
purpose ol obtaining a Crown Grant
ol the above claim.
And lurther take notice ih„t action
under section 87, muat be commenced belore the issuance of such Certi
Scat* ol Improvements,
Dated this llth day ol September,
A.D.,   1911.
THOS. T. McVITTIB.
»7-9t
MINBRAL ACT
(Form F.)
Certificate of improvements
NOTICB
Waaa Mineral Claim, situate in- the
Fort Steele Mining Division of Bast
Kootenay Diatrict,
When located :—Halt way between
Woll and Lewis Creeks.
TAKB NOTICB that I, Thos. T.
McVlttle, agsnt tor B. Lundin, Free
Miner's Certificate No. 37437B, Intend, alxty daya Irom date hereol, to
apply to the, Mining Recorder for a
Certificate of Improvements, for the
purpose ot obtaining a Crown Grant
ol the above claim.
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, must be commenced baton the issuance of suih Certi
ficate ol Improvements.
Dated thii llth day of September,
A.D.,   1911.
THOS. T. McVITTIB.
!7-9t
CRANUROOK LAND DISTRICT
Diatrict of South-Hast Kooteuuv
TAKE NOTICE that Florence M.
Burroughs o! Vahcbuve'r, B.C*, -spin
•ter intends to apply for a license
to proB.;ect for coal und petroleum
on the following described lands :—
Coniuirucing at a Post pla.ited o
the South Bast corner of lot 7282,
Kootenay diatrict, thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chaina; thence wsst 80 chains; thence south 80
chains, to point ol commencement,
(aave and axcept thereout that pait
coaered by Lot 7330,) being surveyed Lot 7283, Oroup 1, Kootenay
District.
Dated August  29,   1911.
FLORBNOB M. BURROUGHS,
David JenklM, Ageat. J7-9t
Locator.
ORANBROOK LAND DISTRICT
Diatrict ot South-Bait Kootenay
TAKB NOTICB that Guy H. Klrk-
patrick ot Vancouver, B.C., broker,
intend* to apply tor a license to proapect tor coal and petroleum on the
following described lands; — Commencing at a poat planted on Nortb
Wait Corner ot Lot 7284, Kootcnay
Diatrict, thence west 80 ch Ins;
thanes south 80 rhalna; thence east
10 chains; tbenci north 80 ch.in* to
point ol commencement, heing surveyed lot 7285, Group 1, Kootenay
Diatrict,
Dated Auguat 90,  1911.
QUY H. KIBKPATRIOK,
Locator.
David Jenkins, Agent. !7-9t
WATBR NOTIOB
I, William Thomaa Levy, ot Qalloway, B.C., by occupation a larmer,
give notice that I intend, on the 8th
day ot December next, at 2 o'clock
in the alternoon, to apply to the
Water Commissioner at his olllce,
Cranhrook, B.C., for a licensa to
take and use one-quarter cubic toot
of water per second from Spring riling near centre of Sub-lot 7 ot lot
4590, Group 1, Kootenay Diatrict,
and which sinks on same Lot.
The water will be used oaapart ol
Sub-lot 4 ol Sub-lot 7, ol lot
4590, Group 1, Kootenay Diatrict being live (5) acres owned by ths applicant, and the point ol diversion Ib
where aaid Spring rims.
(Signature)
WILLIAM THOMAS LBVY.
Dated this 20th day ol October,
1911. 43-St
CRANBROOK  LAND  DISTRICT
District ot South Bast Kootenay
TAKB NOTICH that J. Edwards
Leckle ot Cobalt, Ontario, intends to
apply lor a license to proapect tor
coal and petroleum on the following
described landa, Oommencing at a
Post planted on tha South Baat corner ot lot 7286 on tha dividing line
of lot 7286 and 7187 cloae to a witneaa poat marked W.P, 11.60, thence
aouth 80 chains, thence weat 80
chains; thence aorth 10 chains;
thence east 80 chaina to point of
commencement.
Dated August  90th,   1911.
DAVID JENKINS,
43-St Locator.
CRANBROOK LAND DISTRICT
District ol South But Kootenay
TAKE NOTICB that Margaret Gillies, of Vancouver, intends to apply
for a license to prospect tor coal and
petroleum on the tollowing described
lands, Commencing at a post planted
on the south east corner of lot 7217
thence east 80 chains; thence soutb
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated August  80th,   1911.
DAVID JENKINS,
43-St Locator.
ORANBROOK LAND  DISTRICT
District of South Bait Kootenay
TAKE NOTICE that B. D. Gillies,
ot Vancouver, B.C., Intend! to aPPly
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum on the following described
lands, Commencing at a Post planted
on the north east corner of lot 7217
thence east 80 chains, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains to point of
commencement.
Dated August  80th,   1911.,
DAVID JENKINS,
43-5t Locator
CRANBROOK LAND  DISTRICT
District of South Eaat Kootenay
TAKE NOTICE that David Jenkins
of Vancouver, B.C., intends to apply
for a license to prosuect for coal and
netroleum on the following described
lands, Commencing at a Post planted
on south east corner ot lot 7284,
thence east 80 chains, thence north
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence south 80 chaini to point of
commencement.
Dated August   80th,   1911.
DAVID JENKINS,
43-St Locator.
LIQUOR  ACT,  1910.
(Section 42)
NOTICB is hereby given that, on
the first day of December next, ap-
nl (ration will be mads to the Superintendent of Provincial Police lor renewal ot the hotel licensa to sell
liquor by ntall in the hotel known
as ths North Star Hotel, aituate at
Kimberley, In ths Province ol British Oolumbla.
Dated this 28th day ot October,
1911.
H. W. DREW,
43-4t Applicant.
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province ot British Columbia.
NOTIOB Is hereby given that all
public highway! in unorganised diatrict*, and all Main Trunk Rond*
ln organised Districts, an sixty-six
flit wide, and have a width ol thirty-three teet on each side ot the mean
•tralght centre Um of the travailed
road.
THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works,
Department of Public Worka,
Victoria, B. O., July 7, 1911.
M-ttt
LIQUOR   ACT,  1910.
(Section 42)
NOTICE Is hereby given that, on
thl first, day of December next, application wlll he matin to the Superintendent ol Provincial Pollco tor renewal ol tbc hotel license to sell
liquor hy retail In the hotel known
as (he Imperial Hotel, sttrayte at
Fort Hteele, ln the province of British Columhla.
Dated this 28th day ol October,
UU,
B W. WBRDBN.
4Mt Applicant.
LTQIIOR  ACT,  1910.
(Section 42)
NOTTCE 1= hereby given that, on
the f't-si dnv of December next, application wi'l be made to the Buper-
In'oni'cnt of Provincial Police tor renewal ot thn hotel license to sell
liquor by re'nl' In tbe hotel known
ns the Central Hotel, situate at
Marysville, In tha Province ot Britlah Columbia,
Dated this 28th day ot October,
1911.
PAUL HANDLBY.
43-4t Applicant.
LIQUOR  ACT,  1910.
(Section 42)
NOTICB Is herehy given that, on
the flrst day of December next, application will be made to the Buper-
m'endent of Provincial Police for renewal ol the hotel license to sell
liquor by retail In the hotel known
as the Wycllfle Hotel, situate at
Wycllfle, In the Province ol British
Columbia.
Dated this 28th day ol Octobtr,
1911.
HARRY BDWARDS.
43-4t Applicant.
LIQUOR AOT.  1910.
(Section  42)
NOTIOB la hereby given that, on
the lint day ol December next, ap-
plication will be made to the Superintendent of Provincial Police tor renewal of the hotel license to sell I
liquor by retail in the botel known '
aa the Royal Hotel, situate at
Marysville, in the province of British
Columbia.
Dated   thia   28th   day of October,
1911.
H. L. SAWYER.
43-4t Applicant.
LIQUOR  ACT,  1910.
(Section 42)
NOTICB ls hereby given that, on
th* drat day of December next, application will be made to the Superintendent ot Provincial Police for renewal ol the hotel license to sell
liquor by ntall ln the hotel known
liquor by retail in the hotel known
aa the Wasa Hotel, situate at Wasa,
in the province of British Columbia.
Dated this 28th day ol Octohor,
1911. N. HANSON,
43-4t Applicant.
LIQUOR  AOT,  1910.
(Section 42)
NOTIOB Is hereby given that ou
th* Drat day ot December next, application will ba mad* to th* Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell
liquor by ntall ln the hotel stiown
aa tha International hotel, situate
at Kingsgate, In the Province ol British Oolumbla.
Dated this 28th day ol October,
1911.
A. MUTZ.
43-4t Applicant.
LIQUOR ACT, 1910.
(Section 42)
NOTIOB la hereby given that on
the flrst day of December next, application will be made to the Superintendent of Provincial Police tor renewal of the hotel llcenae to sell
liquor by retail ln the hotel known
aa the Yahk Hotel, situate, at Yahk,
lo th* Province of British Columbia.
Dated thiB 28th day of October,
1911.
BENJAMIN J. RILEY,
43-4t Applicant.
LIQUOR  ACT,  1910.
(Section 42)
NOTIOB ia hereby given thnt, on
... rtrs. *iay 0- December next, application »'i„ -the Superintendent of Provincial Ponce re
newal of bhe hotel license to sell
liquor by retail ln the hotel known
as the International hotel, situate at
Moyi*, in the Frown,.-.
Columbia.
Dated   this    28th -tober,
1911.
MICHAEL J. BONNER,
43-4t Applicant.
LIQUOR  ACT,  1910.
(Section 42)
NOTICB ia hereby given that, on
the lint day ot December next, application will be made to the Superintendent ol Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to ull
liquor by retail in the hotel known
a* th* Moyi* Hotel, aituate nt Moyie
In th* Province ot British Joljmbia.
Dated this 28th day ol October,
1911.
PHILIP F. JOHNSTON,
43-4t Applicant.
LIQUOR  AOT,  1910.
(Section 42)
NOTICB ia hereby given that, on
th* tnt day ot December next, application will be mad* to the Superintendent ot Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell
liquor by retail in the hotel known
as tha Wardner Hotel, aituate at
Wardner, ln the Province ol British
Oolumbla.
Dated this 28th day ol October,
1911.
R. H. BOHART,
43-4t Applicant.
Strayed or Stolen.
Dnrk brown gelding, weight
-iboiit 1400 lbs, white stockings, white face, white spots
on eves, eight years old. Reward for return of same to
Kimberley.
The Taylor Lumber Co.
LIQUOR  AOT,  1910.
(Section 42)
NOTIOB ls hereby given that, on
the lint day ot December next, application will be made to tbe Superintendent ol Provincial Police tor renewal ol the hotel license to sell
liquor by retail in the hotel known
as ths Parry Creek Hotel, sltua'e at
Perry Creek, ln the Province ot British Oolumbla.
Dated this 28th day ot October,
1911.
ARTHUR SURGE.
43-4t Applicant.
LIQUOR   ACT,   1910.
(Section 42)
NOTICB la hereby given that, on
the first day of December next, application will be made to the Superintendent ot Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell
liquor by retail iu the hotel known
as the Falls View Hotel, situato at
Marysville, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated thiB 28th day ol October,
1911.
E. T. CROWLEY
43-4t Applicant.
LIQUOR   ACT,   1910.
(Section 42)
NPTICE ia hereby given that, on
the flrst day of December next, application will be made to the Superintendent ol Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell
liquor by retail ln the hotel known
as the Windsor Hotel, situate at
Fort Steele, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 28th day of October,
1911.
H. S. MATHER.
43-4t Applicant.
LIQUOR LICENSE ACT,   1910
(Section 19)
NOTICE ls hereby given that on
the first day ot December next, application will be made to the superintendent ot Provincial Police for the
renewal of the license to sell liquor
by wholesale in and n>on the premises known as the Moyie Brewery,
situated at Moyie in the Province ol
British Columhla.
Dated October  16th,   1911.
MUELLER & HESS,
43-4t applicants
,t„|.l„|„l„>„t„|„l„|„1,,H„,„|..t„t.,H„|„|.
:Mrs. VV. Edmondson::
WATT AVENUE
Ja Gra ttute   of
T London  OoUi'ire  of   Music";
Receives Pupils for >'<
Pianof .rt.
Org-.** and Vocal    J
Instruction
tlui) N .ii.e:> Academy
and Normal School
For Young Women
Under the direction of ths Sisters
ol the Holy Names ot Jesus and
Mary- First class boarding and day
school primary and grammar gredes.
State accredited high sen ol. Advanced normal cour.-e of two years accredited by the Btate of Washington.
State diplomas conferred. Music
and art studio.
Write to Sister   Sirpeilor for Year
Book, Spokane, Wash.
Frank Dezall
.KNERAL BLACKSMITH
and
WOODWORKER
Rubber Tin* Applied
To Buggy Wheals
.OBNTS   FOR   CANADIAN OYOLB
AND MOTORCrvS  BICYCLB8
KepaiiinH a Specialty.
Phone 11(1      •   •   •      P. O. Box 1)8
We Deal in Everything From
1 Needle to a Locomotive
Joseph H. McLean
D  ALEU IN
.11 Itinds of Second Hnnd Goods
Fu   nui-.. „ s  EOIAI.TY
BLYEK OF  FURS
LIQUOR   ACT,   1910.
(Ssction 42)
NOTICB ia hareby given that, on
tbe first day of December next, application will bs made to the Superintendent ot Provincial Police tor renewal of the hotel license to sell
liquor by retail in the hotel known
a* the Kootenay Hotel, situate at
the Town ol Moyle, in the Province
ol British Columbia.
Dated this 28th day ol October,
1911.
A, D. CAMERON,
43-4t Applicant.
."..lift* - Olil   Siiind,  Hiiiisoii Av>
Phon* Ul.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦«>«>♦♦♦«>♦♦♦«>♦
!! A. WALLER
MASONRY
sieHiii  uolli I',   Kiii'iih-'i .
nnd So 1 ilio Tank work
n 8|>f-ci»ltv
.    Uoal uml hIouIi  enliniitUw.    .
]   ftirtiihh.'d on application    ]',
'  "    ''
1 11
>    Address I P. O. Boi 14*, Cranbrook     1 >
LIQUOR  AOT,  1910.
(Section 42)
NOTIOB Is hereby given that, on
the Drat day ol December next, application will bt made to tha Superintendent ol Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell
liquor by retail ln tha hotel known
a* th* Cantral Hotel, aituate at
Moyle, B.C., In th* Province ol British Columbia.
Dated this 21th day ol Ootober,
1911.
V. DBSAULNIBRS.
48 4t Applicant.
Wardmotes    iFor the Safety of Royalty
Mr. Adney left last   week to spend
a few days in Michel.
Mr. and Mrs. R. Morrow left    tor '
Port Steele on Monday
Lou Manning went to Fernie tor
a short visit on Saturday.
Mr. A. Johnson was a Cranbrook
visitor on ThankBgiving day.
Constable Eggleshaw was absent iu
Nelaon laBt week on business.
Mr. H. Pearson of Fort Steele, was
in Wardner on Thursday last.
Messrs. Datnstrom and Fumoau ot
Jaflray, were In town on Tuesday.
Mr. Fred Burgess came in from
Lundbreck on Tuesday to attend tho
dance.
Precautions Necessary for the  Protection  of Those
Upon Whose Shoulders Rests the  Responsibility of Government
Mr. Graham Donahoe visited Crnn
brook on Thursday last and took In
the show.
Mr. Lund returned on Sundny from
Spokane where he has been visiting
friends.
Willie Tully ot Fernie, has been
visiting for several days with Lou
and Harry Manning.
Mr. Wm. Barclay traveller tor the
C.N.P. Lumber Co., haB beon spending a week In town.
Mr. Roy Anderson came up on
Saturday trom Hanbury to spend
Sunday with friends in town.
Mr. Arthur Lund returned homo on
Frldny Irom Barons, Alberta, where
he has been spending the summer,
Mr. Henry Bohart returned on Saturday from Fernie hospital, and ls
reported much improved in health.
Mrs. Stinson, a trained nurse from
Cranbrook who haa been in attendance on MrB. F. W. Speaker for several
days, left for home on Sunday.
A young man named Tom Gallaway
who ls well known In town, had hli
leg broken on Monday at Camp A
a log rolling on him from the tor
of a load. He was at once remove'
'o Cranbrook hosnltal.
Thanksgiving day was very quletl-
observed in town, the stores an
lumber company's office were close*'
but the planer mill was running ar
usual. A number of the "boys wen
absent on htintimr excursions.
Mr. and Mrs. Goodwin nnd famil.
leave on Wednesday for Fernie when
they will take up their residence
Mr. Goodwin has heen organizer an"
leader of the Wardner hand durlnr
the summer and Mb departure 1:
mveh regretted.
A card party was given at the re
sidence* of Mr. and Mrs. Lund or
Saturday as a farewell to Mr. au,
Mrs. Morrow. A very pleasant sur
prise party was given In honor of
Mr. W. Anderson on the occasion of
his birthday. His friends met first
at his home and afterwards spent thr
evening ln the hall in games and
dancing. They then repaired to thr-
home ol Mr. and Mra. Andersor
where an appetizing lunch was serv-
ed.
The masquerade ball glvon or
Halloween at the Library Hall wnr
quite successful, nnd a large crowi*
turned out to witness the gay an-1
merry scene. Quite a number avail
ed themselves of the privilege o'
masking, and the costumes were
varlouB and beautiful, and ranged
from the picturesque and graceful to
all stages of the ridiculous. Tho
music waB excellent and a most enjoyable time was participated in by
all present. The prize for the best
dressed lady was presented to MIbs
Edith Lund, who represented an Indian Princess, and Mr. BurgeBs received the prize as the best dressed
gentleman, representing a Turkish
Prince.
DAWSON CONSERVATIVE WINS
Dawson, Y.T., Oct. 23.—Dr. Alfred
Thompson, Conservative candidate,
wns elected today by a majority of
four hundred over F. T. Congdon hip
liberal opponent for the federal
house, Thompson polled 1120,
while Congdon polled 7.16 votes.
Congdon, who wbb a member of the
last parliament, carried only Grand
Forks and Bear. Nine small polls
unreturned are expected to Increase
tbe majority for Thompson.
The safety ot Royal personages Is
guarded with a watchtitlncsB tha
would render their lives a burden t.
them were it not for the tact tlia
they are accustomed to bom*; guar,,
ed from their very earliest years, s,
that later on In life tlie knowledg
that they aro practically never ou
of the aight of those whose duty i
is to watch over their salety doe
not specially trouble them.
A detective who is charged wit.
the duty of guarding the safety of 1
crowned head must, however, tak,
care to cause his Royal charge a.
little inconvenience as possible, an.
the various plans and arrangement,
that a Royal detective may lind ll
necessary to make In the course o.
his work must be as unubatrusive in
character as thoy are etlective in at
tending their object.
King George, for example, is at al
times guarded wllh the greatest car.
It is doubtful, indeed, if his Majesty
except when he iB actually in IiIb bed,
is ever out of Right of at least 0ni
ot tho personal detective staff at
Buckingham Palace, yet en necretl)
and unobstruBively is tbe work of th,
detective department carried out tha
nobody, even in the immediate en
courage of Royalty, would have thi
slightest reason to auspoct that anj
special arrangements for safeguarding the King existed, did they not
know that such was tho case.
When King George dines at the
houae of a personal friend, a memhei
ot the Buckingham Palace detective
staff is present in the house from tht
moment the King enters it until hii
Majesty leaves; but he Ib never ob
served. Frequently he is dlsgulBet
In the livery of one of the Royal ser
.ants, two of whom are usually ii
ittendance in any private house a
which the King may dine.
When the King stays at the hous
of a friend, tho chief ot the dotectlvi
staff, with one of his assistants, ac
companies his Majesty, and alwayi
occupies a room immediately adjoin,
ing the Royal apartments; bul
throughout the visit the presence 0
he detective is no more noticeabli
than is the presence of any othei
nemher of the Royal suite, and I'
would bo Impossible for anyone pre
icnt getting to know, unless he wer
told, that there were two detective
n tho house engaged night and da'
n watching over thc personal Bafet.
if the Royal guest.
So secretly and nnobstrusivoly di
letectives on the stafl of Buckingham
''alace perform their work that, wit'
tho exception of the chief detective
-nost of them are unknown even tr
'ting George.
The chief detective has intervlewr
trom time to time with the Ktnr
when lt may be necessary to make
special arrangements tor safeguard
his Majesty; but normally the chie'
detective's plans arc known only to
thc King's private secretary.
A detective who has charge of thr
safety ot an important Royal person
age has to receive a special tralninc
He must be thoroughly well verBecl
In the ways, doings, and methods of
those Innumerable secret societies
with which Kurope Ib honeycomb-mi,
tho members ot which are eternally
plotting against tho Uvea of Roya'
personages. The detective who
guards the safety of the German Emperor was for two years a member
of one of the most dangerouB societ
ies in Kurope, known as the Third
.nion, and he acquired during that
-eriod a most intimate knowledge ot
.he methods of tbe class of criminal
.vhich men in his position have to
;eep a watchful eye on—greater, perhaps, than any other Hoyal detec-
-ive living.
During those two years the detec-
.ive lived with his life in his hand*.
.lad the faintest suspicion been a-
,oused among the members ot th*
Third Union that tho detective was
a spy, he would, without the slightest doubt, have paid for his daring
■vith hiB life.
A Royal detective must also be a
.-ood linguist, tor be is constantly
irought Into contact with foreigners.
The chief of the detective depart*
nent at Buckingham Palace 1* a
'ood linguist, and can speak French
and German quite as fluently as English; hut In this respect the detectives at foreign Courts are distinctly
ihead of their brethren at the English Court.
The chief detective at the court ol
be Taar is probably one of the moet
remarknhlo linguists living. He can
actually speak nine languages as
luently and easily aB his own.
No lady detectives are attached to
the detective stall at the Kngllsh
Court, hut thore are several at the
Courts ol fr,ii'ien inonarchs.
In the entourage ot tbe Queen ol
Spain iB frequently seen a richly
dressed lady whose name, however,
nover appoars in the papers or in the
Court circular. She Ib supposed by
some to be a wealthy American, who
is a maid of her Majesty; but in reality she is the chief of the lady detective stafl at the Spanish Court,
and is always In attendance when her
Majesty travels.
The German Empress, the Tsarina,
ind the Queen of the Hellene* ar*
also continually guarded by lady detectives.
A Royal detective's life ls one of
ceaseless care and anxiety. He 1*
alwaya fighting what might be termed an unseen foe. It ls true he is
able, as a rule, to keep himself well
informed aa to the enemy's doings,
and as long as his information ts
trustworthy and reliable, be can outmanoeuvre him; but he never can be
quite certain that his information
is reliable. In making his plans, hs
has to uae his own judgment as to
how tar he can rely on the truth ot
the Information gleaned from hundreds ot different quarters. It he
makes a mistake, the chance* ara,
especially in the case ol a foreign
monarch, that an attempt will be
made on* the monarch's life, and even
If It completely falls, the detective'*
reputation is rulnad.
A Royal detective seldom continues to hold his position after fifty;
ind, lt he has fulfilled his duties successfully, he can retire comfortably
then.
A detective engaged in guarding a
monarch Is not paid an especially
high salary, not more than five hundred a year, certainly, hut his "perquisites" are considerable. Royalties
always are very generous ln their rewards to the chief of the detective
itafl at the Courts they visit, and It
Is quite a common thing after a
Royal visit for a detective to be several hundred pounds the richer.
It Is safe to say that the chief detective at the Court of any import*
tint monarch makeB at least £1,000
per annum ln this way, and, of
course, Is well pensioned on retiring.
Survey Road to Canal Flats
Golden, B.C.—H. G. Parsons, M.P.
P., for Columhla riding, has been
instrumental in inducing Hon, Thos.
Taylor, minister ot public works, to
order the survey of a road from the
survey of a road from the proposed
Banff Windermere highway to Canal
Flats. Mr. Hnffner, who Is In charge
ol the survey of the proposed road,
received instructions this morning to
make a survey of the proposed
branch road through the Upper Kootenay valley Immediately after the
completion of the survey of the Banff
Windermere road. The land through
which the latest addition ot the network ot good roads will pas* is all
under reserve for the settler, and
thousands ot acres of agricultural
land will be opened up.
Ore Shipments
The following are the ore shipments from mines In the Cranbrook
district for tbe past week aad year
to date :
Sullivan 156-15,715
St. Eugene  126— 6,117
Total 	
 2-1-21,141
MIWlllPlnini«lnl«l«l»l«l«l«l»l«l»nnilBIitflMIWinil.lalnlaWlilinMI.1
i*»>>VVSrVV**'*A*>A^*>*VS'*-Vi
Picture
Framing
At our flstahlishini'iit
is dnn<! right, and prices
suit nil pockets.    .    .
Every Frame made is
Guaranteed
W. KILBY
O.K. BarberShop, Armstrong Ave
Box 802      •      •       'Phono 271
r**********^*************^^^^^^
Cranbrook Plumbing, Tinsmithing
and Heating Company
VV.   F.   JOHNSON   &   SON,   Props.
Business is now being carried on in our old store
on   Edward   Street,   (Crossing French Avenue)
REPAIRS   A  SPECIALITY
Everything in  Tin and Iron Made  to order.      Blower system, Mine
Ventilation   Expert
Hot air furnace, Hot water and Steam boilei s
ESTIMATES  GIVEN
I'hone   340
P.O.   Box   904 THE PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK.  BRITISH COLUMBIA
i
ESTABLISHED   1896
Publishod Every Saturday   Morning at Cranbrook, B.C.
F. M. Christian, Manager.
A. B. Grace,    Editor.
Subscription rate, if paid in advance,   $1.50.
Subscription rate,  if charged on books,   $2.00.
Postage to American, European and   other foreign countries,   r.fl cents   a
year  extra.
ADVERTISEMENTS—Advertising   rates furnished on application.     No
advertisements but those of a reputable character will  be accepted    for
publication.
ADVERTISERS AND SUBSCRIBERS-L'uless notice to the contrary
is given to local manager advertisements and subscriptions will be kept
running and charged up a 'must their account.
ranbrook    wus    taken   about three
years ago wlthoul  uuy artificial   Inflation by   the   police   fores,   which
gave us  2,400.    This like the    pres
ent census, was confined to the  people   resident   within   the   corporate
limits of the city.     Like tho   city ofl
Nelson, there   is n Urge   population
living   within   one   mile of lhe post.
office which should he counted      nud |
credited to Cranbrook.    if this was
| done Crnnhrook would huve a popu-
! lation of not less than   8,000, Every-j
'one who tins noted the hundreds    of *
I new   houses   which   have been built
during   the   past few years, all     of
| which are occupied, Lhat there is not i
j an empty house in the city,    knows
that    the    population of Cranbrook,)
with its suburban population, is not!
! less thnn   5,000.
order to make u good show ,.f pro
gresa kppt gt*?Ihg oui inflated claims
OS tn lhe population. In his last
budget speech Hon. Mr, Fielding who
should Imve hnd sclontlAo tint a t"
draw upon estimates Canada's popu
lation at 7,775,000. For Borne ren
son the government kept un    count
of emigration Irom C da.      Thej
exorcised no s',u /v*nance over bonua-
ed immigrants t.> ascortaln whother
they remained in   Canada or merely
ed States, according tn this report
was ns follows : United Suites citizens, 22,832; Canadian citUena, M,-
828; other aliens, 87,386; making u
total nf 94,496, if these stdtlstlcB
are correct, the balance* ol Lntmlgra
tlon Into Oanada from the United
states over tin' emigration ol Can-I
ada to the United States wns ;> lit- ,
tie less thnn   22.0(111, whichrcsn't      li
ono tlmi
1
CRANBROOK, B.C..  NOVEMBER 4, 1911.
Premier Mcliride has advised the
Cannery Companies to get rid uf
oriental labor.
Halloween, the one glorious nlgbt
of all the year, especially dear to the
boys and girls, was celebrated \u
Cranbrook on Tuesday. There Was j
no occasion for reprimands, though i
there was lots of fun, there were no
malicious destruction of property.
The Italian-T.'riti) war drags on,
• wiih but little change. One day thej
Italians are in front, the nest day
thc Turks seem to he getting the
best of it. The main question at
issue i.s will the Bulgarian, Servian
or Roumanian soldiers attack thc
Turkish troops, anrl precipitate a
general European war.
should   her   population  decrease
would still be entitled to retain
members. In Prince Edward island,
New Brunswick and Nova Scotia this
redistribution works up &nd down
according to population. It Ls (or
tiie purpose of adjusting the redistribution so that ever) province shall
have its present membership even Ll
its population has decreased, The
claims of these provinces will depend
The result of  the census just   made
public although n disappointment to
she  the mass of the people did noi greal
six | ly surprise  the  present  government.
| un the willingness
the other province*
.>( the Premiers'ol
Monday wns Thnnksgiving day. lt
is not intended that all the gratitude
and thankfulness of a man's heart
should be poured out upon his Maker
in one day. The idea Is, rather, to
commemorate the season of Thanksgiving which naturally follows harvest. Iin Canada, speaking generally, the past season has been a   good
one.
•   •   •   •
For six long months the t,ihern!
government, apparently endeavored
to settle the coal strike in the Crows
Nest Pass, hut failed in every attempt, possibly thiR was because
neither operator or miner hod no
faith in the minister of labor or his
party. The entire west give vent to
their approbation of the success of
the Hon. R. Rogers, minister of the
Interior, who succeeded in making a
settlement that appears most satisfactory to all concerned in the very
short session  of tlie operators    and
miners.
•   *   *   *
A conference of Provincial Premiers i
will probably be called in the near
future to consider the result of the
census recently taken. Dritish Columbia has the right to get an increase every ten years according to
her population, but, on the contrary
During the past session Hon. It. 1.
Borden and his followers repoatodly
protested agalnsl the wny lu which
the census was being taken. The
enumerators were practically, appoint
ed by Liberal   members and Liberal
politicians   With  Tiie result   Mint     onio
political ad v eut ago was Bought rath
er than a propsi enumi ration of tbe
people, in Borao cases the • n imsi n
tors were directed to reporl to the
Liberal organiser ol tho Province or
suppose it is altogether Likely dtatrict and it is n well known fact
m the ne.u honor list Issued W*^, ,„ gome partg ,.- ,,., C0Untrj
London, the name ol Mr, Bor-|the enumerators spent more tune in
preaching reciprocity than tn takini
the census. Kruin all ope thi
try complaints poured In re pectini
tlii* way In which the work was car
ried oo. in Montreal, Toronto and
other cities whole Btreots were miss-
ed and In one city an entire ward
was omitted, The fact that Hon,
H. Li. Borden was not enumerated until he complained from his place in
tlie House indicates how carelessly
the work must have been done.
Hon, Sydney Fishei met all these
complaints and objections with the
cynical remark that thc enumerators
be.ng paid per capita would be mote
likely to etnggernte than to tinder
estimate the number of people. it
appears, however, that a large part
of their compensation depended upon
their list og al parcels of Lind of
one acre or less    in theii    respective
We
that
from ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
den   will be included.      indeed
will be somewhat of a surprise if he
is not knighted and made a      Privy
Councillor of the Putted Kingdom ai
an early day.
Wealth is determined hy the natural resources of the country. If the
people fail to develops a count- y
filled with such resources as are
found in Southeast Blouteaay they
are found to remain poor. Cran
brook district, the Kootenay valley,
has the largest area of undevelop* 1
agricultural and fruit lands in the
Province of British Columbia. The
class of people here are not as energetic as they are in other portions of
the province—they seem to tack con
iidenre in the future of this portion
of British -Columbia, and in couseqt.
ence are slow to advertise the possibilities which in a few years re
turn to them an increase Buch at
they hnve never dreamed of, Then-
are thousands of immigrants going
to Alberta and Saskatchewan every
year, that would come to Oranbrook
if they knew of the wonderful resources nf this district.
*   *   *   *
A number of cities in the Province
of British Columbia are now satisfied
with the result of the census. The
figures for Crnnhrook has not been
announced at thin writing but are
believed to he in the neighborhood of
three    thousand.       The     census   of
I
at lefl.-*t thi-* nterferred with tbe cen
sua proper.     According to La Presse
the Liberal organ at Montreal, some
(200,000 of public money was waste.!
in this way and thnt paper pronoun
res the census a veritable scandal
nnd worthy of Investigation hy tbe
new government.
But, however carelessly the census
may have been taken the fact is apparent that tbe people of the country were misled as to the true growth of the country by the Laurier
government.   That Government       in
passed through hen1 on their wny to |
the United Stales. Sesblon nfter
session the attention ol tho govern
ment was directed to these matters
by Mon. It. L. Borden, Hon. George
BJ, Foster, Hon Y. D. Monk, Mr.
Uriah Wilson, os M.P., Mr. Andrew
Border, M.I*. and other gontlomeu
in the oppositl n Even ns late as
May 1st, 1911, tho present Brim.'
MlnlBter, then Leader of ihe Opposition, brought the matter up as one
ol urgent impoi taneo upon tho mo
tlon to go Into Committee ol Ways
and Means. i Bs remarks at that
time are recalled with Intorosl iu
-. lew of the (ad that Cans in bus
less than 7,100,000 people nstoad ol
nearly 8,000,000. Mr, Boraon upou
th it o< i ^ ion sal I "Mr. Speaker, i
.*. I to at nln aire.( tho attention nl
the government to the suojeot »l
- ■■ 11 ii i.in from Canada to the Un
ited States to whloh I alluded    last
year.      At     pag<       58 'I    of 'Hansard'
of lasl var, I set [orth a statement
' hlch appeared lu the annual report
il the Commissioner Gonoral ol Km
migration tor tho United state-- H
appeared from thai reporl thai the
total immigration luto the United
States from Canada luring the fiscal
year ending Jvue 30, 1909, was 96,-
530, and that, after eltm natlTtg certain port Wins ol that immigration
which could not be properly classed
as actual immigration from Canada
to the I'nited States, there was
found to be a total immigration into the United States from Canada of
61,038, according to the returns made
to the Commissioner General of Dilation of the United States and
tu embodied by him In thai report.
I also called attention to certain
rather important statements in his
report of that yoar, in which he gave
reasons why the immigration' into
j the United States from Canada had
! increased in so marked a degree dur-
| ing the twelve months covered by
phis   report.
I have now the report of the Commissioner General of Immigration
for the United States, which gives
thc returns up to June* 30, 1910.
According to these returns the emigration from tiie United Stntes to
Canada during the twelve months
mentioned amounted to 11G.877. The
report classified that emigration as
follows: United Stntes citizens, 78,-
ii'.)7; Canadian citizens, 1.1,203; other
aliens, 22,477; making a total of
110,377. During the same period tho
emigration from Canada to the Unit-
thai
Well,
way
thon
if ob
and
not
this
am bound In sn ^^^^^^^^^^
would hardly have expoctod. 1 do
not know whether the Honorable the
minister of the Interior has any oh
servatious to make on there stntis-
tics 1 do not, know whether they are
accepted by the government as arm
rate. There does uol appear to be
any official information available In
this country us to tho number of
persona leaving Canada for perman
ent   residence   in   tiie     Bailed   Slates.
tn other words, although wo     imve
very full, and I believe very complete
scati -to*   of immigration into    this
COUntrj   to  lh" Tinted Slates of elSO
Whoro,      Am   I   correct   i
gunt "
Mi   Oliver   Yes.
Mi     Borden,    Halifax
may  he dtfllcultlos in  thl
talning and preserving such statistics
of  which  I am not  aware,  but  olhcr-
wIbo i would ti.* vory much Inclined
t,, Hunt, thai we might follow thr
example ol tho Putted States
compile   und   publish   statistics
only of the Immigration into
country, but of tho (migration from
Hit:; country. That is done in the
I'm led states in a vory complete
way. Not only do tbey keep statia
tics of nil the persons leaving that
country, but they classify them as
I'nited States Cttlzons, Cuuadinn
citizens, ami other aliens, so far as
those statistics relate to emigration
from Canadn. to the United States
in three classes—United States citizens, Canadian citizens and other
aliens. I am bound to sny that 1
think ft would be greatly to tbe advantage of tbc country if we. knew at
tbe present time, as we do not seem
to know, from what provinces of Canada, and in what proportion from
those provinces, this very large cmi
gration of nearly 95,000 persons has
gone during the.fiscal year ended the
SOth of June, 1910, if the figures of
the United Stntes Immigration De
partment are to be accepted as accu
rate. Wc know that at one time
there was a very considerable emigration from Canada to the United
States, especially from certain of
thc eastern provinces. We had been
lead to believe that that emigration
bad wholly censed; but if these figures nre even approximately correct,
it is evident tbat our belief on that
regard was not based on a very sure
foundation, because it is rather
tonitiblng to find that in a single
year no less than 94,41(0 persons
have left Canada for permanent residence in the United States, and
that    these    figures comprise    44,52,3
Canadian citizens in addition to 23,-
832 United States citizens, and 27.- j
336 aliens not being cili/.ens ..( Canada.
Mr. Pi* ■■ *■- -Huw do their figures
oi emigration from the Unitpd Stntes
to Oanada compare with our figures?
Mr. Borden, Halifax.-lt is a little
difficult to compare them on account
of the difference in the fiscal year.
Tbey give tbeir figures for the year!
ending tbe 80th Juno, wllllo our
figures are givon for the year ondlng!
the --1st of Mnrch. In tho i'nited
StfttOB returns they are given iiy
months.     I   tin   not   know whether
ours oro or   not.   However, II   tilOlight
the mailer worthy of some attention
from the government, and, therefore,
I have brought it to tho notice of
the house. I would he very glad
ii tho Minister ,»[ lhe Interior would
give ns niiy obBOrvntions which would
Ind lea to whether uv nol these figures
are to bo accepted as substantially
accurate, and, further whether there
are iu his opinion nny serious tlilH-
oultloB In the way of Inaugurating a
system by which statistics ol emigration as well au immigration may
bo compiled in tills country in the
future, for tbe information of par-
lla...0llt  and the people."
Hon. Prank OllVOr then minister of
tiie interior, made tin satisfactory
reply to Mr, Bor dou, but contented
himself with saying there always luul
been a reciprocity in Immigration
between Canada and the United States and that, there always would be.
No steps were taken by him to meet
tho views repeatedly advanced iby
tho present Prime Minister and his
followers. The government's immigration bookkeeping contained entries only on one side nnd tbe people
were invited to cheer over phenomenal results which had in fact not been
achieved. Tt is a startling fact that
our gain in population for the do-
c'ado onding May Hist, 1911, did not
exceed the actual number of immigrants received here during tlmt time
Unless there wos some great exodus
during the decade or unless the immigration figures were shamefully
padded we nre forced to conclude
that only enough children, werc born
in Canada between 1901 and 1911 to
supply tbe losses in population caused by deaths.
TO PRESERVE FREEDOM OF SEA
Melbourne, Australia, Oct. 25,—
Hon. Andrew Fisher, thc premier, in
a speech yesterday said that Australia ought to co-operate with tiie
motherland in preserving the freedom
of the sen.
Co-operating perhaps with the United States England might be able
to say to those who would break the
peace of the world, "You shall not
do it witb impunity."
Never Too Old To Wed
The hells nf the little village of
Keevil, in Wiltshire, rung out the
other day for two old nge pensioners who were lovers fifty years ago,
aud were married after being married twice before. The old man bad
gone to tbo village post oflice for'his
old-age pension, but could not sign
Ills order, and an old lady who was
also in the oilier come to his assistance. His name wns familiar to
iier, and when the next pension day
come round the two old couple compared notes, and discovered that
they had been lovers fifty years ngo.
Bach had mnrricit twice since then,
nnd now they are married again for
the third time—to each other.
A remarkable scene took place at
tbe Wesleynn Central Hall, Rochester, some little time ago, when Win.
Heiimin, who has the distinction of
being the oldest post boy in Kngland
led Fanny WadhaVna to tho altar.
Mr. Hennaii looked ipiltc sprightly,
in spite of his ninety-four years. Indeed, be may be snid to Imve looked
no older than bis bride, though she
had tlie advantage Of fourteen yenrs
over him, being Just turned eighty.
Perhaps tlie most remarkable    instance ol youth and age joining    in
matrimony occurred quite lately    at
Brighton.    This   bracing   town Iibb
tbo honor   of   sheltering many very
old people, and among others is Mr.
.Tamer Doughty,  the oldest clown in
England.     He is still fond of   surprising his friends, for, though he is
ninety-three years of n^e, nnd    lost
his first wife n short time since,   he
! has married bis housekeeper, a young
| lady of   no more   than twenty-four
i years.
The papers lately recorded tlie mar-
j riago of a certain vicnr, whom thoy
i described    as    nearer     ninety    than
I eigiity years of age.     He had vacat-
! ed  his    incumbency    over two years
t ago owing to his advancing age, but
he did not find himself too old   for
wedlock.       The     marriage    register
gave the age of the bride ns thirty-
five and that of the bridegroom   as
'"full."
When December    mates    with May,
: ono naturally expects the month    of
snow to be represented by the bridegroom and the month of blossoms by
the bride.     But thnt tbe roles    are
occasionally reversed was proved    a
short time ago, when n marriage, in
whicli a lndy of sixty-eight summers
had made n husband of a young man
of twenty-two, wat-s dissolved in   the
Divorce Court.     But the records   of
Cupid contain even  more remarkable
unions than this.     As long ago   as
1709 we read of "a woman of Roth-
erhithe, age;l seventy,  marrying     a
man of twenty-three," and of a widow of sixty-four lending to the altar
j a   youth   of   eighteen,    whose fickle
i heart she had wrested from her own
I daughter.
Our Clubbing Announcement!
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Grocery line therefore we absolutely guarantee every
article that leaves our store.
We will thank our customers to advise us if at any
time goods are received that are not No. i quality.
CAM PBELL & MANNING I
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Wholesale
Wine and Spirit Merchant
Mt.nult.ou.ror ol nil kinds
ol       Aerlated       waters
Agent for
Anheuser Busch Budweiser and
Fernie Beers.
Melcher's Red Cross Gin   and
P. Dawson Scotch Whisky.
Importer ot all kinds ol Foreign and Domestic
Wines and Spirits
Baker St.
Cranbrook, B. C.
I
NORTH    STAR    HOTEL
KIMBERLEY.  B.O.
f
m. w. D*aw, -*iwr**u*or.
*M-H»I l-l-trl-a H l-HHUM »444*H*M**H 11 III IIIII H
|   LAKE   VIEW   HOTEL   \
St.   Mary's   Lake,   B. C.
P, Handley, Prop.
the most attractive Outing Resort in East Kootenay
Good Hunting, Pishing, and Hunting
Boats to Let, Horses lor Hire
For further information apply te
P. Handley, Central   Hotel
Marysville, B. C.
ni hi ii in in 111 n 11 "i I lilli 441 ii i ii nn I i*i'
HIIIII111111III H 11II 11 III IH III111IIII11 Ij.
Attention
Conservatives!
A meeting of the Cranbrook District Conservative Association will be held in the Edison
Theatre instead of the Secretary's Office, on Tuesday evening, November 14th, 1911, at 8: p.m.
T, T. McVittie, Pres,
P. DeVere Hunt, Secy.
IKII I'M 111IHWHI4 W1HI ■!■ I III llll I'l III l"
II HII 111111 III IIU l*H* llllllll I IIU 11..... H
Central Meat Market
I    NORBURY AVENUE A. JOLIFFE, Proprietor    |
Dealer in Fresh and Cured Meats
j j    All Kinds of Game and Fish in Season    j
Cab   Coin   Young Pigs, Fresh Killed    rt
!    I Ul   WHO   Beef and Pork.
■HI M M111111IIIII111 IN MM III II H I MI #11 **
Earl Orejr ss governor-general ol
Canada hu mads many fine speeches,
all showing a lull appreciation ot
Canada's natural resources, sympathy with the national aspirations ol
Canadians and confidence in the future greatness ol the Dominion among
the nations ol the British Empire.
His great speech at the farewell
gathering in his honor in the city ol
Montreal was, perhaps, the best ol
all.
After paying a tribute to the enterprise and energy of Canadians In
developing the vast Dominion, and
expressing hla opinion that nothing
could prevent Canada Irom becoming
some day tbe controlling part ol
the British Empire, he dwelt at some
length on the noble and lovable qualities of French-Canadians, or, as he
prefers to call them, Canadians of
French descent. He said that if
any ol them believed that they could
ever establish a racial ascendancy
on this eide of tho Atlantic it was
a vain and futile dream, hut an a
part ol the Canadian people they
would leaven the character ol the nation with their graces, their culture
their charm and their art. He referred to the deeds ol prowess in the
old regime which illumined the pages
ol Canadian history, and described
two couriers des bols with whom he
happened to become acquainted In
the wilds of Northern Quebec last
summer, "two ol the bravest and
moat delightful companions whom it
le possible lor any man to meet," he
aald.
He gave instances to show that
the general disposition of the Cana-
8THBL BULL AND BEAUTY CHORUS, SINQINQ, "BVRY LITTLE MOVEMENT HAS A MKANINQ ALU ITH OWN,'
AT THB AUDITORIUM, MONDAY, NOVEMBER   CTH.
WITH MADAME SHBRRY   COMPANY
Earl Grey's  Great Speech
Really modern couples are Just as
apt to be truly mated as the old-
tashioned sort ot which we read a-
bout ln the romances. A young Ole-
velander who ls often described as  a
'men about town" became engaged
not long ago, and he spoke as fol-
lowa to the lady who had honored
him: "I don't want to bave anything
tbat I muat hide after we are married, dear. So I may as well tell you
that I played poker, I smoke cigarettes, I drink, I stay out late, and I
bet on the races." "I'm glad to
bear you aay so," said the up-to-
date girl, brightly, "I was so afraid
that you and I wouldn't be perfect
companions I"
Geo. W.Wilson
OBNBRAL   TAXIDERMIST
Taildermletry   Treated   ln   All   Its
Branches.
Cams Heads and   Rug Work a
Specialty
STANDARD METHODS
SATISFACTION    GUARANTEED
Our Terms  are  tha   Beat, write for
Pries   List
CRANBROOK,  -  B.C.
dlans ol French descent was loyal to
the Empire and the King, and Anally
appealed to the French-Canadians
present on behalf ol the British navy.
A distinguished prelate had said to
him that any change in the condition
ol Canada would be a disaster; the
only way to prevent a disastroiii
change was to maintain the supremacy ot Britain on the seas. "It
would thm appear," said Earl Grey,
"that the problem on which your
prosperity and the continuance ol
your liberties depend ls how la that
supremacy to be maintained ? Do
the people ol Quebec think it can be
maintained by doing nothing'! Will
lt satisfy their self-respect to float
Idly on the tide while every other
part of the empire ls at work? Will
such an attitude inspire a feeling of
affection tor tbem ln the other portions of the Empire. What is the
ambition or ideal of the various self
governing units, whose aggregate
strength makes up the strength of
the British Empire on the maintenance ol which the continuance ol
your contentment depends? Is it to
be a parasite on the Trunk of Empire, or is it to ba the sustaining Influence nourishing and strengthening
witb its invigorating sap, the Tree
of Empire, whose branches cast a
beneficent shade over the whole
earth ?"
We believe if our politicians would
appeal to the loyalty and courage of
the French-CanadlanB as Earl Qrey
does there would be no difficulty in
securing their support for a Canadian navy that would co-operate with
the British navy in peace and in war.
FELLOWSHIP
When a man ain't got a cent an' he's
feeling kind of blue,
An' the clouds hang dark an' heavy
an'   won't   let    the   sunshine
through,
It's a great thing, 0,  my  brethren,
for a feller Just to lay
His hand upon your shoulder   in    a
friendly sort of way.
It makes a man feel (iueerish, it fakes the tear drops start,
An' you sort 0' feel a flutter in the
region of your heart,
You can't look up and meet his eyes
—you don't know what to say-
When   his band is on your shoulder
in a friendly sort of way.
0, the world's a curious compound,
with its honey and its gall,
With   its   care   and bitter crosses—
but a good world after all—
An' a good Qod must have made tt
—leastways that Is what *. say
When a band is on my ahoulder in a
friendly sort ol way,
—James Wbltcomb l.'lry
In an Illinois town tbat you can't
find on the map, the fire department
haa an unexcelled record for conscientiousness and devotion to duty. One
night the church bell clanged out an
alarm with the code taps that indicated "fire north ol square."
In instant response the tire department) jumped on hla horse and galloped to the rescue. He bad not gone
lar when a second alarm announced
a second Sre, this time to the soutb.
An anxlovu citizen speeding toward
his aouthslde property called out to
tho passing marshal:
"HI, Jake, you're headed the wrong
way. Thore's a big blaze to Greenings,"
Tho fireman was no shirk. "Keep
lt a-going Edl" ho shouted. "I'll he
over ln lesa 'en ten minutes I"
When Mark Twain In his early
days was editor of a Missouri pnper,
a BuperBtltlous subscriber wrote to
him saying that ho had found a spider In his paper nml asking lf it was
a sign of good or had luck. The
humorist wroto his answer and printed It. "Old subscriber—fln.llng a
spider In your paper Is neither good
nor bad luck. Tho Bplder was mcro-
ly looking over your paper to see
which merchant is not advertising,
so he will know where the othcr
spiders have got their webs up."
Christ Church
Rector,  Rev.  E. F. Flewellen.
21st Sunday Alter Trinity
Matins at 11 o'clock.
Children's service,   3 o'clock.
Evensong,  7.30 o'clock.
There will be no celebration ol
Holy Communion on Sunday next.
Services will be conducted by Rev.
Mr. Colquhou... B.A. (late vicar of
Windermere).
Offerings for "The Diocesan Pension
Fund."
Salvation Army
Sunday Services. Oapt. Frsd.
Stride and Lieutenant W. Lewis in
charge.
Holiness meeting at 11 a. m.
Free and easy at 3 p. m.
Salvation meeting at 8 p. m.
Thursday—Salvation      meeting   at
8 p. m.
everybody welcome.
Knox Presbyterian Church
Morning service at   11 o'clock.
Bunday School and Bible Class at  3
p.m.
Evonlng service at  7.30 o'clock.
Prayer meeting on Tvcsday at 8 p.m.
Methodist Church
Rev. W. Eleon Dunham, Pastor
Sunday Services—The pastor will
preach at   11 a.m. and  7.30 p.m.
Morning 8ub]ect-"The Tongue-
It's TrlumphB and Tragedies."
Evening Subject—"The Social
Awakening of Youth."
A five minute object Bermon will
be delivered at tbe morning sorvico.
Subject—"The Groatest Pump in
the World."
Special music will be provldod by
the choir at the evening eervice.
Baptist Church
Rev. H. C. Speller—Pastor.
Resldsnce Norbury Ave.
Services—11 a.m.,   7.30 p.m.
Morning Subject—"A Hard Proposition."
Evening Subject—"Despised, Re
jected," Why?
Bible school at 3 p.m. Lesj-on-
The story of Esther.
The editor is always glad to receive an item ol news however small
it may seem, over the phone. Our
numher is 145. When you have a
visitor, or are yourself going away
on a trip ring us up and tell us a-
bout It.
Catholic Church
Parish Priest—Father I'lnniondon.
Sundays—Low Mass at 8.30 a. m.
High    Mass,   10.30   a. in.      Sunday
.chool from 2 to 2 p. in.   Kosary and
Benediction at 7.80 p. tn.
Mondays and holy days ol obligation—Mass at 8 a. tn.
Week days—Mass at 6 a. m. at ths
hospital.
George A. l.abcau, nn employee at
the Canadian Hotel, tiled nt Spokane
on Sunday last. Th* body wos
brought to Cranbrook for Interment.
The funeral took place on TueBday
from the Catholic Church and waa
largely attended. "Joo" Lnhrau, aa
be was familiarly known, was an old
timer In the district having come
In during tho early dayfl of construction ol the Crow's NeHt brnnrh. Mr.
Lahenu was well llkntl and very popular with those who know him.
A Intly who owned a tortoise shell
rat called her grocor up ono morning nnd gave her usual economical
order—an order for dried beans,
hominy, yesterday's bread, nnd so
forth—and bhe concluded with n request for one cents' worth ol cat's
meat. Tho grocer sighed, for this
order would havo to ho delivered
three miles away, hut ns he wns entering the Items in his order hook
the lady called him up attain, "Mr.
Hands," she said, "oh, Mr. Hands I"
"Yes, madam 7" "Mr. Hands, I want
to cancel that order lor cat's meat.
The cat's Juat caught a MM."
Treason Saps Italian Army
Hundreds of  Anarchists Enlist As Italian Soldiers-
Five Thousand Killed at Tripoli—Peace
Negotiations at an End
Rome.—A sudden outbreak of treason in the Italian army has caused
great excitement throughout Italy.
Augusto Mazettt a reservist at Bolivia yesterday shot his commander.
Lieut.-Col. Qulseppe Stropps, In the
left ahoulder, Inflicting a severe
wound and the Investigation started
today bas revealed other acta of
treason. It is said hundreds of anarchists have enlisted in the Italian
tinny* and are now spreading their:
propaganda among tbe troops. The]
prese today demanda that any anarchists caught be executed.
Some drastic measures of suppression and punishment were adopted by
the Italian military authorities but
isolated attempts at mutiny and
treachery among the supposed friendly tribesmen continue.
The reports from Tripoli tbat the
Italians mercilessly massacred 'unarmed Arab women and children
were officially denied today. It was
suggested that it bad become necessary to shoot some Arabs wbo were
found with arms.
TURKS TELL OF VICTORY
Constantinople.—The chamber ot
deputies today loudly cheered the
reading ot a telegram from the deputy from Tripoli, Slueiman El
Baruni. Tbe telegram was dated
October  28 and said :
"I reached the coast accompanied
by tbe volunteers October 26 and
delivered a lormidabie assault upon
tho enemy who were driven.Irom
their entrenchments.    Today I    am
marching on Tripoli. Thanks
Divine assistance I shall eater
town."
to
the
PEACE   NEGOTIATIONS OFF
Constantinople.—The government
today notified the foreign ambassadors of all four powers looking to
mediation between Turkey and Italy
that negotiations had been broken
oil.
Two batteries of field artillery
started today for the Bulgarian frontier. The district of Adrlanople Is
now completely fortified, strangers
being execluded.
FIVE THOUSAND ITALIANS
SLAIN
Constantinople.—Beyond admitting
that the war office bad received the
report that 5,000 Italians had been
nlain in the fighting ln the suburb*
of Tripoli and that practically all
the rest of the garrison of 20,000
had been taken prisoners hy tbs
Turkish army and Arabs, the department refused any statement, Ther*
was an air of gladness about tb*
office, however, which indicated that
the victory was unexpected.
WAR COSTS HUGE SUM
i    Rome.—Admiral Aubrey, the   eom*
l mander of the Italian naval forces at
. Tripoli, arrived here today to    bold
a   conlerence   with   the government.
It ls reported that the Italians bav*
! occupied Rhodes, the capital of    th*
Island   of   the   same name ln Asia
Minor, and   Mltylene   in the Aegean
sea.    The coat of   the war to Italy
during the two months hss been  estimated at about   1100,000,000.
Boxing for Sport or Trade
"Why," asked tbe Intelligent foreigner, "Why is it that ln your England they are raising so much protest against this arranged boxing
match between Johnson and Wells ?
Ib not England the home ol boxing ?
Are you not all patrons ot what you
call 'the ring' ? Why, then do ao
many of you wish to prevent this
great light from taking place? You
call boxing 'the noble art,' yet you
all seem to want to prevent thiB
great feat of sport."
The average Englishman shook his
head. "It Is because it ls not sport"
he said.
"Not sport," said the intelligent
foreigner in surprised tones. "But Is
not boxing always sport ?"
"No," Bald the average Englishman
"not when it's purely business."
So the Intelligent foreigner went
his way wondering, and the average
Englishman his deploring the depths
to which "the noble art" could sink
Hie mind went back to the stories
ho had rond of the palmy days ot
the ring whon mon practised this
noble art for the joy ot It, and went
Into tho ring with hare fists to
fight a sporting battle, with no oth
er thought than to prove which was
tho better man.
"They were real eportsmen," mus'
od tbe average Englishman. '
strength aga.nst strength, „klll
gainst   skill,    In   those    days,
caa by using all you- skill and keeping all the rules of fighting. You
don't care about anything else hut
your skill against his and Uu glory
ot the great game you are playing,
lor it's only a game alter all.
"You know the rules of the game,
and you want to be the best man at
that game uecause you love tn*
game and you regard the honor of
being ita finest player as one ot tb*
greatest ln the world. Now, that'*
sport.
"But if you play that same gam*
not for the glory of proving yourself tbe best man at it, but just to
please a crowd of people whom you
don't know and who pay money to
come and see you fight, you can't
help feeling that if you don't win
the)' won't pay you nearly so much
money next time you fight. Bo you
try to please them instead ot trying
to play the game for the eake ot
the game. And then you know that
all these people don't come to watch
you fight because they like boxing;
most of them don't know anything
at all ahout it; they don't appreciate
your skill a bit, they only want excitement, so you are really only ant-
ployed hy * crowd ol people to giv*
them excitement, and you ar* afraid
to finish the game soon even il you
can for fear of disappointing tb*
It wn« peoplo who pay you money. Bo you
have to pretend to keep tbe gam* (0-
uii,l,; lng longer tban you need so      tkat
biack'or^h'lU 'it made no d'ideienoe: the people   shall   bav. their money's
Hey-ho    lor   tho   days   belore men
mado n prlw> light n radol combat I
worth of excitement, and tbe   otber
people who have paid you money  to
But "the intelligent foreigner    had | tot them take moving pictures of you
returned to break Into these tim-iings
Ho    looked    pivwlcd.    "Tell   mo
pray
light
fighting    shnll get a lot ol picture*.
Now, when yon fight like that   It
ho nsked, "why cannot tills I Isn't sport; it's business, isn't lithe snort and business loo?, And th. intelligent foreigner nod-
What .fl" th,.Pstrang. idea o, sport you ded his head "I see the differenc*.
English regard so highly 7 I du | now" he said. "When t » sport it.
not understand It." 1 "<">'• »« ****™*- h,,t whe» "J?
The average Englishman locked j eomes a trade It Is mean and deceit*
P^zed too. "It is hard tn explain,"'"•"• ***** •»«»■•" *■* tr"ta
ho said, "fit It's like this. '.iib, must harm the reputation ol your
hoilnv, for Instance, you fight a ; K«at sport."
man or tb. love ot lighting :..m and | "It does' said the aver.g. I.|-
to try to boat him a* aoon    as youi llebman, bltUrly. THE PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK, BRITISH COLUMBIA
UIIII 1111-iH 11 11 IH I H-H-iH-l l-l-H l-l 11 III1 HI
<?
The above is a good
photo of our advert isi ng
man after he had eaten
Thanksgiving Turkey
cooked in the oven of a
Canada »'B" Range.
F. Parks & Co.
Hardware, Stoves,
House Furnishing Goods
CRANBROOK,        -       British Columbia
♦•M--MH*-l-*-HH-+-M-l~M*^+4-+ •M''f''H''H"H"l"H"H".''M'.
ToyB.     0, C. 8.
J. il. Belyea, of Calgary, was   ' in
town Tuesday.
F. E. Watson of Calgary, wuh     ia
town Tuesday
H. R. Mather, ol Fort Steele, was
in towu Tuesday. .
W. Uaybutt ol Marysville, was   In
towu Tuesday.
(J. 8. Corsan of Toronto, waa     In
town Tuesday.
j. tkott, ol Montreal, was at   the
Cranbrook Tuesday.
li.  II.  Small was    at Fort sUcele.
Tuesday  on business.
A. Wardrobe ol Toronto, *«*     *t
the Cranbrook Tuesday.
11.   M.   Johnson al  London,   »hs nl
the Crauliiook Tuesday.
SIGNET
RINGS
Wry (Htpulai* iniifi'il is ilu* Big*
net Ring fur Ladles or Gentlemen's
wear. We am showing an exceptional Una fOll'-i-iiim low in price,
bul high in quality. oncuT these
I {/.ill's may Ito jusi .vital you mv
looking for to give i<> your trlund,
Stone sot i) ynu ffUU.
Opals,   Rubies,   AuicLiiystf*,   Coral,
Topax, Bloodstone Jade aod Agate,
Also in Plain ami Gold and Caned
Shapes. Prices m Gold $2.00 to $20
Stone sol 53.OO to $25,
Raworth Bros
JEWELERS
Hothouse     Lsttuoo
Campbell *\ Manning
slsry.
Furniture maki-h
'. 0. 8,
id     XlllBH     gilt*-*
V, Do Baldnter
town Monday
tl  Moyle
a.   Ohandler,   0' Seattle, was
guett at tho Oraabrook Tuesday.
T. Hunter ot    Spokane, wait re
tered at the Oranbrook Tuesday
K.   Mallandaino left Cranbrook on
Tueaday foe the Windermere country.
0,  A   Vest, and  J,  IS,  Hush   were
guests at the Cosmopolitan Tuesday
:    J. Peltoo, of   London,   out., was
registered at the Cranbrook Tuesday
.     Just unloaded a car ol winter   ap '
: pies.     Order your winter supply uow
i prices will be higher.     Campbell    &
Manning.
W. a Binning of Medicine Hat,
. I was visiting hla son K. Binning thu»
' I week.
; Mr. and Mrs. H. Granger, of Canal
I Flats, were Cranbrook visitors Tues-
! day.
W.   I).   Hill
own Monday
J. A
Sunday
.'one
last.
11   Jacl
Cranbroi
il Vancouvor   was   in
on ol Bpi
MlMldll>
I    W. Barrio of York ton, waa in town
i Monday.
N. Willis of Wuiuipe.;   was iu town .
| Thursday.
; N*.  Broday of Kernie, was in      town
Sunday last.
H.  Host, of    Michel, was tn     town
! Sunday last.
Dan   Howe of Marysville, wan    in
town Tuesday.
Q   (j. Jewell of Jaffray, wus     u
town Thursday.
J,  Y.   iteiiuett  of Ottawa( was      111
tlio elty  Monday
A.  L>  Moore of Crow's NeHt,   was
111 town Wednesday.
1:   H. Traobo of Lothbrldgo,   was
in  (own Wednesday.
J.  Wultehouso of Nels'-n, was     In
town Wednesday.
W.   V   White of Bpokane.  was      in
the eity Monday
Mr.    and   Mrs.    J.   liiii.lv   left on
Thursday for Wllmer.
A. K. Hmgess of Toronto, was   In
I the elty Wednesday.
J     Stnnnart   of Wasa, spent Sun
day last   m town.
Floyd   Hannan   ol  Colon,   wuh a
guest u' tho Cosmopolitan.
P, l.und of Wardner, was I rami.", t-
blUlnoss in town ThursiUy.
t ■t,al,.l,.l,rl1it    «    «    »    '        *******    *    *  r|.,|,J,,|    |    |    ■ -*■  *    ■->-■■- ■
11TTITI Tr* TT TJHTTTTTI T*Tr*r*l TUTTTtTT
On Sale!
Two Ladies Persian Lamb (.oats to
go  CHEAP.
Several second - hand Clothes and Suits for
Imili Ladies and Gentleiuens requirements
To Be Obtained At
"My Valets"
Nl BLOCK & BARKER
I'hone 370
They make a Specialty of
Cleaning,' Pressing and Alterations.
Wu arc A^enls for tho 'Whito Bowing
Maohlno" which is the boat mi (he market to-duy,    Wo invito you to will  anil Ionic
our slock over.    It will surprize you.
Secondhand Sowing Machines bought and sold
Have you seen our New Electric Cleaner?
Especially    installed   for   Ladies  Work.
.|.+.*.+ -*4*-,-M-'-*+'."M-*+^^
11
8, Reynolds ol Calgary
Iba
,-ity  Sun,lily lust
u.
J   Watt, ol Oalgary, *<ii
ilay
lust in Uranbrook.
McVittie.    P.L.S.,   uf
wun (n town Thursday,
H-   K.   -Ste
vens    of
Wardnei,    was
transacting
business
at Cranbrook
Tuesday.
One New, Malleable Steel
Stump Puller
For Sale At a Bargain
The Cranbrook Trading Co., Ltd.
CRANBROOK, - B.   C.
4,,|,».1,,|,|.,|.,|-,|.,|.,|^^^^,1..H^^^+^I'»I"|.'I-I'I
Gtit-is
I Rifles   Revolvers
Ammunition
We wish to draw your attention
to the followinn
Specials
Savage  303   Featherweight
Remington 30-30 Rimless
Mauser 7 m 7
Mauser  Pistols
Everything  in   Shells,   Cartridges   and
Loaded   Shells
E. A. Busby, of Creelman, and N.
B, broley of Vancouver, were regis*
tered at the Cranbrook Tuesday.
Our Toys  will be displayed
week.     C. 0. S.
nen
Mr. H. E. Birtch.left on Wednesday
morning for Calgary. He wi'l make
the trip In his sixty-horse powei
auto.
J. W. Whiteley, grand organizer ol
the L.O.L. will be here Monday ol
hit-i annual visit. Local lodges wil!
entertain him.
Construction work on the new-
Campbell & Manning building on
Hansen Avenue is progressing. Wher
completed this will be one ot thi
best store buildings in the city.
Y. Weltor ol st. John, N.B., .-.a*.
:it the Cranbrook Monday.
\V. Atwyt'd of Kimberley, waa .it
h-   Cosmopolitan Monday.
C, llantian of Kimberley, was nt
the Cosmopolitan  Sunday last.
Or. de Van's Female Pills
A rel.abla French rtgulator; never fails. Them
pills *.'■ exceedingly powerful in regulating tim
i*-'.ural ive portion of tho It-male system. Kelus*.
nil cheap Iniititlooi. Dr. da TM't are sold at
*-. a boi, or three for $10. Mailed to any tddreia,
Tha toahall Vrt*g Co., St. Cfcthnrlnw, Ont
J. a. Gtlllsple, of Vancouver, was
j, guest at the Oranbrook Monday.
Ot, A. Mclntire of Vancouver, waV
In the city Thursday.
Mrs. C. Loasly of Sirdar, was o
'rnnbrook visitor Thursday.
N. A. Jones of Windermere was at
che Cosmopolitan Thursday.
0. H. McDougal, of Moyic, wa-
"ransacting husiness at Cranbrook
Monday.
P. R. Lyons ol Wardner, and K. G.
Stahl, of Gateway, were guests al
the Cosmopolitan Wednesday.
Respectable woman
cleaning by day or
"B.A." Prospector.
wishes house
hour.     Apply
43-1H*
WANTED-A   situation   as   house
keeper.    For further information ap
Mrs. Montgomery at W. J.
residence,   or at Prospector
ply to
Setby's
Offlce.
G. H. Scott of Nelson, arrived in
Cranbrook Tuesday. Mr. Scott It
a mining man, and is on his way ti
Blairmore to look over some coa'
property in which he is interested.
Electric Restorer for Men
Phosphonol ******** «my nerve lo thi bodj
"     .       *.? Its proper teniion j reito-«
! Hunting Knives
Cartridge Belts
;J. D. McBride
Wholesale Hardware Retail
Phone 5 B°* *9S
f+++M-++-M-M*
vim aod vitality. Premature decay and all lexuil
ttialcQiu averted at mm. Fhoaphoool wil!
malci you ■ new mm.  Price 181 boi. or two foi
&  Hailed to any addrm.   The SooUll Druf
.,it.Calh»rlnai,Ool. ^
The annual meeting of the Oran
brook Farmers' Institute will bi
held on Tuesday, November 7th, it
the committee room of the Cran
brook hotel for the purpose of elect
lng officers for the ensuing year.
"Bill" Earley, who for the pas'
year has been under the guidance o!
Wcs. Cline, president of the Fishinj
Club, went to Robinson and McKen
zle's pond, with a view to catchlnt
a few trout. When he arrived a'
the mill-pnnd he found it covere.
with ice and a number of "brav
Scottish laddieft" curling.
Price. Quality and Prompt Servic
is our constant duty to our Patroim
East Kootenay Produce and
Provision Houm-
Frederick    Brett     was   up   beforr
Judge   Ryan   Tuesday charged   witli
forging several   cheques.     A   ohe'qur
for  *20 payable to Chas. Day,     Im
porting to he signed by Campbell  &
Manning, was cashed by P. MatheBon
Beveral other cheques were found   in
I his possession.     He was sent up for
I speedy   trial   before    Judge Wilson,
i who gave him two yearn In the pen!
! tentiary.
Local playgoers usually have     to
I wait n year or more after a hi* New
York theatrical success before ft it<
offered to their view.    That is   why
, they may consider themselves parttc
ularly privileged   at the opportunity
: to see "Madame Sherry" the big mu
I steal comedy    sensation whlcb maker
an epoch in    theatricals enrnn dlrecl
from the    New    Amsterdam Theatre,
N<*w York, to the Auditorium,      fnr
' an engagement limited to one night,
i Monday,    November     flth.       In    Its
| mlliic, comedy, cast, chorus and pro-
, duction,   "Madame   Sherry"   stands
i form a- *bii one big perfect   musical
I production nf the decade.
R. E, Brown and H. J. Murphy ol
Calgary, were guests at the Cran
tirook  Wednesday.
The C. C. S. has added three eitra
hands to their stafl this week,
Itotiln Hood It.dbtl Out,] In 5 It).
lackages, very line. Campbell &
Manning.
Mr. and Mrs. 1). Bird of Marysville
■/ere guests nt the Hoyal Tuesday.
W. Hodman, of Baynes t.ake, waa
i guest at the Cosmopolitan Mo df-y
A man's got to he very old or very
forgetful who is Bore because the
kidB tore things up a little on TueB
day night.
The Empire Heater or Range is i
Heal Bargain at the Pjices we quote.
Jail and see our stock and prices.
East Kootenay Produce and
Provision House
Mr. and Mrs. George James, Mrs.
E. Biddle, and Mrs. B. White oi
Marysville, were Cranbrook visitor*
Thursday.
Frank Dickinson of Jaffray, was in
the city Tuesday. Mr. Dickinson se
cured a water right on Sand Creek,
for irrigation purposes.
The small boy was much in eviden
ce Tuesday night. Curfew made ni
difference to him as it was his odi
night in the year mischief.
Tokay, Malaga and Concord Grapes.    Campbell & Manning.
MesBrs. Potter and Jones were at
Munroe Lake Monday lishing. The
only thing they caught was a seven
cold.
Major F. Morris of tho Salvation
Army, who hns charge of the army
work in British Columbia. Alaska
and the Yukon, will be paying n
viBit to Crnnbrook on Thursday,
9th. This special meeting will t>e n
farewell to thc Major who has lab
ored faithfully for tbe past four
years in the north and west he hah
received orders for llelds afar. Wi
Hbould like to Invite thc friends and
those who take an interest In thc
army work to a farewell cup of ten
with the Major. 0n November 9th at
7.30 o'clock. After which an nt
tractive program will be rendered.
The fact that the better claBS ot
musical comedy has been amply evidenced by the continued success ol
George M. Cohan's clever musical offering, "Forty-live Minutes From
Broadway, which comes to the Auditorium on Friday, November   10th.
Thin is the tiflh season that this
piece has been on the road, yet the
demand has been sn great with the
limited number nf companies playing
It, that there Ih a vast, territory
that    has   not    heen   covered before
tlllH    Hl'MII'lIl.
j The mimical numbers have been
i sung In every lown and country and
j every one Is familiar with the captivating strains of "So Long Mary"
"I Want to be a Popular Millionaire," H4fi Minuted From Broadway.'
"Mary's    a     Grand     Old    Name,"
"Btand Up   nnd Fight Like H ",
and half a score others.
Mr.
do, w
day.
and Mrs. W. Robertson of Wal-
ere Oranbrook visitors Wednes
Mr. and Mrs. Allan Moore of Wilmer, were Cranbrook visitors Thursday.
T. H. Wright of Stillwater, Minn,,
was a guest at the Cosmopolitan cn
Monday.
J. A. Fabert of Wasa, and F. M.
Young of Fort Steele, were in town
Thursday.
A* G. Henderson of Jaffrav, vae
registered at the Cosmopolitan, on
Monday.
A. B. Hayland and J. K. Porritte
of Kaslo, were at the Crnnbrook on
Wednesday.
O. Winstead and W, Dunlop of
Kaslo, were guests at the Cranbrook
Thursday.
K. Small, G. Hoggarth, Al.
*nd M. Robertson motored to
Steele Friday.
Mut'
Fort
Thos. Summers and P. W. Spence
of Kimberley, were at the Cosmopolitan Thursday.
The Twins, "Tommy and Jerry,"
are due to arrive in Cranbrook some
time this month.
Ostrich feathers cleaned and curled
by experienced curler. Orders can
be left at Nlhlock and Barker's.
Armstrong Avenue, or MrB. C. R.
Sheppard, back of St. Eugene hospital. 43-4t
Mr. and Mrs. Watson Hall returned Monday from their honeymoon
trip to tbe coast.
Mrs. h. Doolan of Sirdar, who hae
been viBltlng at Cranbrook returned
home on Monday.
J. Vineberg, and A. H, Skelton ol
Montreal, were registered at the
Cranbrook Wednesday.
"Forty-five Minutes From Broadway" will be the attraction nt the
Auditorium on Friday, NjVomber 10.
Al,. Mutz, manager of the Fernie-
Fort Steele Brewing Co,, was transacting business at Crnnbrook Thurs
day.
WANTED—Girl for general housework. Apply to Mrs. I. R. Manning,
Garden Avenue.
Otis Staples, President of thc Otlf
Staples Lumber Co., at Wycllffe, wa?
registered at the Cranbrook Thursday.
G. G. Jewell, President of the
Jewell Lumber Co., at Jaffray, was
transacting business at Cranbrook
Thursday,
The Edison Orchestra will ,;Ue n
dance in the Masonic Hall on Friday
evening, November 17th, Tic-tot*
for the dance including -mppnr.   ♦1.00
It is announced that tho Women's
institute will bold a meeting next
Tuesday at 3 p.m. in the Carmen's
Hall, at which MrH. Murgatrold will
give a demonstration on making tea.
Mrs. I. Manning and Mrs. G.
Powell will entertain thc friends of
the Ladies' Aid of the Methodist
Church on Thursday afternoon, Nov.
9th, af. Mrs. Powell's residence.
Tho next dance of tho wlntor series
will be given at tho Auditorium on
Wednesday, Novemhor 8th. Admission 7fi cents. Invitations cnn he
secured at the theatre.
Scobell's Liquor, Tobacco
and Drujc Cure SffBttdt
Atf.iil.ol, Tobacco ind Drugs. It counterncli tha
efficii alnitit Itnuantly-removei all cravings.
Altf t taking the treatment there wlll never ba any
near) ti*Jiliik Intoxicant! or uie drugs r.j*iiiii. Cm
be given secretly. We hnvt yet to hear of one
failure. Mailed under unirnte cover tn iinT atl*
dress. Price lo.OO liux. or fl Ixmm hit 110 TO, Tha
Bacball Drug Co.. St. OMbarluai, Oat,
R, G. Btracban, o. A. Rosa, and
G. P, Mahcy of Vancouver, were registered   at the Oranbrook Monday.
Mr. ami Mrs. T. T. McVittie and
Mrs. Fenwiek of Fort Steole, \ ere
Oranbrook visitors Monday.
AppU*s! Apples! Before buying
/our winter supply, see our stock.
•Ve huve secured some of the finest
Jeritii'H Grown.
Eaat Kootuuay Produce and
Provision House
N. Hanson, G. ffirlckson, A. Brick-
son, and (J. Cooper left on Friday
for a trip to tha Windermere district.
The musical scores for the Country
Girl have arrived, and rehearsals foi
this popular musical comedy will be
gin at onco. This musical event
will be produced by the Cranbrook
operatic Society.
The C. C. S. has received a large
consignment of Xmas crockery and
Chinaware. Thc crockery department
is being remodelled, so that in future
tbis branch of their trade can be
handled conveniently.
There will be a masquerade ball at
:hc Auditorium theatre on Tuesday,
November ?lst. Prizes will be
awarded for best fancy and comic
costumes. A midnight luncheon will
be served, and a good time is assured. Invitations can be secured at
the theatre box office.
The character of Kid Burns in Geo.
M. Cohan's merry musical comedy
"Forty-five Minutes From Broadway," was written for the popular
pugilist, Kid McCoy, but the Kid
?ot stage fright at tbe first rehearsal and a rush order was sent out for
an actor who could look like an
athlete. The part fell to Victor
Moore, then in vaudeville. Moore
made a hit—scored a knock-out, and
llayed the part for two years.
J. Roy Claire will be the Kid
Burns of this season's production. He
Is a trained athlete and an actor of
uncommon ability.
P. Burns Helps in Settlement
It has developed that Patrick
Burns, the cattle king, was instrumental in clearing the way for tlu
settlement of the coal strike finally
effected by Hon, Robert Rogers. It
Is stated that Mr. Burns had worked
for some weekB to get the two parties together and that his efforts in
that direction proved of the utmost
valio.
Tennis Dance.
The Cranbrook Tennis Club gave a
very enjoyable dance in the Masonic
Hall on Monday evening. There was
a large attendance. Iflvorybody was
pleased, and the ladies' committee
are to ho congratulated on tbe success wblch resulted from tbeir efforts, The music furnished by the
Geurrard Orchestra was pronounced
excellent.
Italian Fleet off for Turkey
Malta, Nov. a.—It Is reported
that tho whole Italian fleet has left
Tripoli for Turkish waters,
Frankfort, Nov. 2,--A despatch to
the Frankfurter Zeltung from Tripoli under date of October   31, says,
"The American and Austrian consulates have heen removed to the interior of tbo city because of the
danger of exposure to sheila, At
least 3,000 natives wero executed by
tho Italian*.."
Licenses Bring Great Revenue
Victoria, Nov. 2.—October's contribution to provincial revenue from
tho timber branch of the lands department amounted in tho aggregate
to $115,3.12.80, tbe various details
and heads of receipts being given as
follows : Four hundred nnd forty
nine timber licenses im-mod for lands
west of tho Cascades, $(.7,320; 424
licenses for lands eaBt of thu Cascades, 53,1.4R.80; timber licinse transfer fees, $868; penalties, U.lfiO; 108
coal prospecting licenses, $19,550;
conl prospecting licence transfer fees,
$10: Rnd miscellaneous,   $3,389.
Bank Loot Recovered.
Vancouver, Nov. 2.—About $25,000
of the money recently stolen from the
Bank of Montreal at New Westminster, was discovered by George Mc-
Cleary, foreman for the Bowers Construction company, which has the
contract for laying the new sidewalk
along Fourth street.
The men engaged on tbe work had
torn up thc old board whin they
came upon the money, $4*4R0 of
which was In gold in a sack stolen
from the bank, and * $20,000 in new
$5 and $10 bills. McCleary at once
notified the police and the money
was removed to the Bank of Montreal. More Important develop-
clients are expected.
A Beautiful Picture.
"Home Again," Ib the title of one
of the most beautiful pictures ever
seen in this country. It la an inspiration of love and aflection—a picture'that witl be like a member of
the family. This delightful picture,
size 22x29 inches, all ready for
framing, is given absolutely free to
all who subscribe to the Family
Herald and Weekly Star ot Montreal
this season. The year's subscription
Including the picture, is only one
dollar. The picture alone could not
be bought for the money and every
one knows what a magnificent paper
thc Family Herald and Weekly Star
Is. All Canada ia proud of that
great weekly. The publishers deserve tbc immense circulation the
paper enjoys.
Farewell Banquet.
K. Mallandaino wbo for a number
of years has been chief timber ranger for the C.P.R. land department in
tbis district bas been promoted to
the position of general manager ot
the Columbia Vnlley Irrigated Frill*
I.rfnds Company.
Mr, Mallandaine was tendered a
farewell banquet on Saturday night
by hiB associates in the"land department, and a number of his friends in
this city.
Mr. R. S. Bodkin was chairman
and toast master.
At tbe conclusion of tbe banquet
Mr. Mallandnine was presented with
a gold watch by Mr. B. St. Clalr,
on behalf of the staff, nndMr, Mallandaine wns also presented with, a
silver card rase for MrB. MaHnudame
bv Mr. F. W. Mcl.ea.1.
Mr. Mallnndaine will .tpcti.1 Ihe
winter in touring tho Old Country
and on his return will reside i.t
Windermere, where tho head olllce ot
the company will he located,
Constable Joseph Walsh of Fort
Steele, was in town Wednesday on
business,
DBFKNBS CONTRABAND
Washington, Nov. 2.—Tho vessel
whose enrgoes nro made up, either In
bulk or weight, ot one balf contra-
hand of war will be confiscated by
tho Turkish government, according
to a despatch (rom Ambassador
Kockhill at Constantinople. The
Turkish government defines a o/ntra-
hnnd of war as all material which
can be need without further preparation in promoting warfare.
Lord CharleB Beresford, popularly
known as "Condor Charlie" who returned to Kngland a few days ago
after an extended visit to Canada
has this to say ot Canada. Interviewed by a reporter just previous to
his sailing for Kngland he nald :■-
"Best country in thc world," he declared, "splondid people. ' "Ci.n't
stop to tell you why," he inswered,
"thla Ib tho country for investments
I came to get a closer ac.iuaintance
with tho country nnd the people and
also to see Into financial projects,
and do as a result of my visit? I
am going to scrapo up every penny
I own and sent lt over here for in*
vestment. I've been all over tbs
country this time from Montreal to
Vancouver, and I say again Its ths
bent country in the world."

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