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The Prospector Jun 27, 1914

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Array "n<-in<'!n1   Legislative Assembly
11
Auto Goggles
from
50c. to $2.00
Wilson - Jeweller
V 'Bt^ipttUt
The Leading Newspaper
in the
Kootenays
The
"Prospector".
D$2.00 Per Year
V O L U M N E    20.
ORANBROOK,    B.    0.       SATURDAY       MORNING      JUNE    27,    1914,
No.  26.
Oddfellows Celebrate
On Monday evening Key City lodge,
No, 42, I.O.O.F., held a social session at Fraternity hall, which was
attended by about titty members of
the order. The social was given to
celebrate the jubilee of Oddfellowshlp
in British Columbia and the election
of Mr. H. White to the Grand Mas
tership of the province. Mr. A. H.
Blackeby, ot Toronto, P.O., representative to the Sovereign Grand lodge,
was also a guest of honor lor the
evening. A very sumptuous banquet
was spread and a programme rendered. Messrs. J. Frank Broughton,
Ralph A. Racklyeft, E. Kettertng-
ham and Clifford Rendall were tbe
committee on arrangements.
The following was the programme:
Selection ... R. W. Russell's Orchestra
Chairman's Remarks 	
  J.    Frank   Broughton
Song—The Admiral's Broom 	
  R. 1). Cameron
Speech   W. M. Harriss
Selection       Orchestra
Speech   Scott McDonald
Song—Tbe Plcnnninies Lullaby 	
    R.   W. Russell
Speech   C. R. Ward
Selection   Orchestra
Speech   W.  B. McFarlane
Song—The Veoman'B Wedding 	
  J. Frank Broughton
Speech   J. P. Fink
Speech A. H. Blackeby
Selection   Orchestra
Speech     Grand Master H. White
God Save tbe King
•Shepherdjrfthe Hills'
Harold Bell Wright's most popular
novel, "The Shepherd of the Hills,"
of which a million copies have been
sold, bas been made Into a play by
its author with the assistance or Els-
bery W. Reynolds. The first production of this play in this city will
take place at the Auditorium on
Tuesday, June 30, where lt plays an
engagement of one night.
The play is practically a true narrative of life among the humbl
dwellers of the Ozarka. It touches
all the emotions, and its influence is
wholesome and helpful, notwithstanding several rough characters
that Sgure more or less prominently. Tlfe shepherd of the story is a
cultured and rough stranger who
comes into the hills, glad to escape
from the vanities and conventionalities to which he has been accustomed. There ia a flock needing a shepherd, and he thankfully accepts the
lowly occupation of a sheep tender,
but soon becomes shepherd of a human flock, the big-hearted mountaineers, their families, and all who need
a friend and advisor. Among his
most-devoted followers are Old Mat
and Young Mat, the giants of the
hills; Sammy Lane, glorious in tba
beauty of young womanhood, and
Poor Pete, a deranged lad who understands the voices at nature and
sees what others cannot se\' There
la a mystery of the bills that often
terrifies, but at the last the solution
ls brought about by Pete and the
shepherd, and lt is tbe latter who
is most deeply afflicted and concerned. It ia hardly necessary to add
that a pretty romance Is woven into
the humor, pathos and tragedy, (or
the play throughout is one of human
interest with a conclusion that ia
thoroughly satisfactory to Young
Mat, and of course to the auditor.
Messrs. Gasklll and MacVitty, the
producers, bave given the play a superb scenic mounting and a cast, tlmt
has been carefully selected for Its Illness to each type.
An Appreciation
The Territorial Headquarters Stall,
oa bfchalt of The Salvation Army In
Canada, desire to express, through
the press, their deep and sincere Appreciation lor the numerous messages ol sympathy and condolence
received (rom comrades, friends,
churches, societies and othera. Since
the event ol the sinking of tbe SS.
Empress of Ireland, such messages
have been conveyed by cable, telegram, and letter Irom all parte of
the world, and especially the Dominion of Canada,
It is our desire to let It be known
that, particularly the assurances of
prayer, have strengthened our hearts,
have encouraged our conlldence,
and have stimulated our latth, and,
furthermore, aa the realisation ol
the extent of our loss through this
appalling catastrophe becomes keener day by day, the kind worda ol
cheer and counsel will help us in our
endeavors to carry on the great work
of The Salvation Army In eitendlng
the Kingdom ot Qod upon earth.
Last Rites at Hillcrest!
Hillcrest, June 21.—With dense
white mists shrouding the mountain
blustering west wind blowing sleet
and tops and enclosing the valley
and a snow across the little mining
town, the combined funeral of one
hundred and fifty of the miners killed in the Hillcrest collieries was
held tbis afternoon. All but twenty-
three of tbe bodies have been recovered from the mines, and all of those
tbat have been identified were buried
today. Meanwhile the work of identification goes on and the heartrending scenes when relatives and
friends come face to face witb the
poor distorted corpse are being repeated in thte improvised morgue.
All but one or two of the one hundred and fifty coffins were laid Bide
by side in two long trenches which
had heen dug on the top of a low
hill just at the edge of the Httle village. Services were held by different
denominations and fraternal societies
represented among tbe dead this
morning, and nt three o'clock tbis
afternoon, after the coffins bad bean
laid out in tbe middle of the town,
that relatives and friends might
gather about them and take a last
farewell, the little procession ol
drays, farmers' wagons and delivery
carts which did duty as hearses,
started down the winding road headed by the Bellevue band playing the
dead march.
At the side of the long trench
where the relatives and friends gathered in the driving snow, weighed
down with overwhelming grief, the
women convulsed with an agony almost too deep for tears, the coffins
were unlogded In a long double row
and then lowered one by one Into the
grave. The funeral waa of such a
size that It was Impossible to bury
many of the dead separately. The
great bulk were treated alike, the only division made being that between
religious denominations or fraternal
orders.
Ministers ol the different faiths
from this and all the surrounding
towns conducted the last sad rites,
and the funeral arrangements proper
were in charge of the Hillcrest local
of the United Mine Workers of America. Of the 400 members of the local
193 were swept away In the disaster.
R. B. Campbell, M.P.P., and George
Cruickshanks, of Hillcrest, looked after identification and classification
arrangements, and were kept hard at
work all day at this important and
difficult task. Undertaker T. W. Davis, ot Coleman, had charge of the
burial preparations and was assisted
by undertakers from Fernie, Hosmer,
Macleod and Plncher. One hundred
and fifty coffins were sent in from
outside, a large consignment coming
from Graham ft Thompson, of CaV
gary.
This morning beginning at ten
o'clock services (or the dead were
held In the little town at the foot
of the mountains. At ten Roman
Catholic mass was celebrated ln the
school house by Father Beaton, of
Frank. At the same hour holy communion was held (or the friends and
relative of the Anglican victims at
tbe Anglican church, Rev. Watkins
officiating. At one o'clock a union
service of Anglicans, Methodists,
Presbyterians and Baptists was held
in thy Anglican church, those In
charge being Rev. Watkins Jones, of
Coleman; llev. W. T. Young, of
Prank; Rev. D. Hart, of Hillcrest;
Rov. Cook, Rov. W. T. Murray, of
Golden; Rev. Muncaster, of Blalr-
more; Rev. J. F. Hunter, of Blalr-
mure; Rev. Hurt and Rov. Shire. In
addition to theso, Masonic services
were held in tlio Methodist church, a
large number of tho dead belonging
to the order.
Ottawa, June 22.—The governor-
general here received the following
cablegram from King George sympathising with tbe sufferers In the Hillcrest mine disaster: "I am grieved
to hear through the press of the terrible disaster at tbe Hillcrest coal
mine, hy which It. is feared many
hundreds have lost their lives. Please
eipress my deepest sympathy with
the sufferers, and also wtth the fam-
ili'B of those who have perished.
(Signed)   "GEORGE."
A message has also been received
from Right Hon. Lewis Harcourt,
secretary of state for tho rollnlcs,
expressing the sympathy nf the Imperial government. As coon as a
report la recolved aa to the extent
of the disaster nnd thc need for assistance, a grant will ho mnde hy
the govornmont through the governor
general's wnrrnnt.
Promler Borden hns nlready wired
his sympathy. J. D. McNlven, the
western official of tho depnrtment ol
labor, bas been sent to Hillcrest to
mnke an Investigation. The mounted
pollco have been notified to lend overy assistance.
Business Holiday
an assured fact
All the Stores of Cranbrook will close on Wednesday afternoons
during July and August
What has been attempted so many
times in the city ot Cranbrook has
at last come to pass. It has been
tbe wish ot a good many ot the merchants for years to bave a tml(-day
holiday ln connection with the business life of the city, Petitions have
been circulated time and again until
tbe scheme has been almost given up
as hopeless; another attempt was
made as a last effort by two of our
merchants and success has crowned
tbeir efforts at last. The petition
given below with tbe attendant signatures only calls for Wednesday
half-holiday during the months ol
July and August but it is hoped
tbat tbe beneficial results of these
two months wlll be such that they
will eventually Include tbe whole
year or at least the whole summer
months.
While tbe signatures include every
single merchant In the city, It Is not
out of place to say that the Herald
and the Prospector have enjoyed the
benefit of a half-day holiday for   the I
past eight or nine years, as has also
the Customs department, they taking
Saturday  instead of Wednesday.
The following petition was circulated, and signed as below:
Cranbrook, B. C, June 24.
We, the undersigned merchants of
Cranbrook, agree tu close our places
of business at 12 o'clock noon on
thc following days: Wednesday, July 8th, July 15th, July 22nd, July
29th, August 5th, August 12th, August 19th and August 26th. July
1st being a legal holiday we agree
to close all day, thus constituting u
Wednesday half-holiday during tits
months of July and August:
Halsall ft Co.
P. Burns & Co.
Fink Mercantile Co. Ltd.
E. A. Hill.
Ira R. Manning.
McCreery Bros.
C. C. 8., Ltd.
T. E. South.
Cranbrook Trading Oo.
Sun Grocery Co.
J. D. McBride.
A. G.  Bowness.
R. G. NeUon.
F. Parks _ Co.
M. Macleod.
Geo. Ruddell.
W. H. Wilson.
Raworth  Bros.
R. P. Moflatt.
A. H. Bullock.
Little ft  Atchison.
Patmore Bros.
W. W. Kllby.
W. F. Doran.
C. Emails.
The 41 Market Company.
Stephens' Orocery Store.
Ward ft Harris.
Quain Electric Co. Ltd.
J. Manning.
Cranbrook Meat Market.
A. L. McDermot.
A. R. Webster.
Jas. A. Leask ft Son.
New  City  Water  Works
24 Car Loads of Pipe Ordered
$2,000.00 Bond Against Date of Delivery
The City Council have been busy
this week going over the details in
connection with the new waterworks
and confirming the placing of the order with the Mannesman!! Tube Co.,
Ltd., ot Montreal, through thc firm
of J. B. Turney Co., of Lethbrldge.
W. F. Crooks was the agent acting
for the Turney Company during the
negotiations with the city.
The confirming of the order took
place at a meeting on Monday night
and Mr. Crooks sent away the details on Tuesday. The agreement
drawn up between the city nnd his
firm Is to the effect that tbe pipe
must be delivered tn part In Cranbrook not later than July 23rd, or
must forfeit a bond ot $2000.00.
In conversation with Mr. Crooks
our representative drew his attention
to the short time allowed tor delivery on account of the fact that the
pipe Is shipped trom the Rhlneland,
Germany; Mr. Crooks assured ua
tbat the time did seem small but he
had made deliveries to Calgary ln
much shorter time and he could aee
no reason wby they could not do the
same to Cranbrook.
The   amount   of pipe ordered   for
the   new waterwoi»:s lt shipped   together would fill 24 cars distributed
ln. quantities as follows:
11,000 lln. feet   of 14 ln. lap welded
steel pipe.
1,200 lln.   feet  of  10 ln. lap welded
steel pipe.
4,200 Iin.   feet of 8   in. lap   welded
steel pipe.
21,000 lln. feet of 8   In.   lap   welded
steel pipe.
Huge Fire Rages at
Revelstoke
Revelstoke, B. C, Jun* 25.—A huge
fire which began late last night is
raging here. The buildings of the
Revelstoke Ojwter and Chop House,
Reid ft Barton, photographers; Adams' jewelry store, the London restaurant, the Great West & Peace
River Land company, Hobson's bakery, Hoenlnger Brothers' tobacco
store and Trueman's photograph studio are destroyed.
E .plosions of boilers and gasoline
are adding to the excitement and all
Revelstoke is watching the fire.
The buildings are all frame and the
blaze was of huge dimensions.
It Is believed there Is no loss of
life, there being lire escapes at all
the windows above the business
blotks whew tbere are living rooms.
WOMEN IN NIGHT ATTIRE.
Revolstoke'a main street, MoKcnzie
avenue, is littered wltb household effects hurridly snatched from rooms
that are now in ashes or for a long
time wero ln Imminent peril. Women and children whose homes are
destroyed, in their night clothes and
wrapped ln hlaiftets, are mournfully
regarding the ruins of tbelr homes.
The city, eicept for tbe lurid light
of the blazing buildings, is in dark-
tbe lights having been turned
ofl to avoid the danger of live wires
and half a block in the heart of the
business section of the city is in
ruins.
The fire had heen checked at the
upper end and a roadway and the
Canadian Pacific rnllway tracks at
tbe lower end prevent danger uf the
blaze spreading further.
The splendid water pressure that
Revelstoke enjoys and the able and
heroic efforts of the fire brigade alone
prevented a disaster which at one
time threatened to lay a whole block
on both sides of the street in ruins.
The Revelstoke Oyster ft Chop
house is standing though badly
charred and damaged by water and
smoke.    Adam's jewelry   atore,    the
16,000 lln. feet of 4 In. lap welded
steel pipe.
The above quantities will be delivered ln Cranbrook in the following Vondon chop ,,„„;„_ th; 0reat' ffeat
consignments and on the following U peace River Land company's or-
dates, so that ths work will be able flce Hobson's bakery and grocery
to proceed with all despatch: store, Hoenlnger Bros.' tobacco'store
2500 lln. feet 14 in. not later July 28 land TrUem„n'8 photographic studio
3500 lln. feet 14 in. not later July 30 iare practically gone although tbe fire
5000 lln. teet 14 In. not later July 30 „ ,tH1 blazing in the lower end ot
1200 lln. feet 10 in. not later July 30 tb(!   Wock   and the   fire brigade    ts
2000 lln. feet 8 in. not later July 30
2000 lln. feet 6 in not lgter July 30
2200 lln. feet 8 in. not later Aug. 7
8000 lln. feet 6 in. not later Aug. 7
800 lln. teet 4 in. not later Aug. 7
7500 lln. feet 6 in. not later Aug. 14
450O Iin. teet 4 in. not later Aug. 14
The work on the waterwoi';s will
begin almost aa soon as the pipe Is
delivered.
Death of Mrs. T. T. McVittie
The news of the death of Mrs. T.
T. McVittie of Fort Steele came over the wire Thursday afternoon as a
shock barbed with pain and sorrow
and threw the Httle townsite ot Fort
Steele Into consternation. The more
bo is the sorrow felt tor the bereaved as the last word received was to
the effect that she was progressing
so favorably aftur passing through
her operation so successfully. For a
little ovor two days she seemed to
be making tbo beBt of Improvement,
and thon the relapse and her spirit
lied. Mr. McVittie was at ber bedside when the end came.
Mrs. McVittie was under tbe care
of Dr. Jones of Vancouver during
her sicknesB nnd tbe hest of care and
nurBlng wns hers to tho end. It Is
expected that she will be laid to rest
in Victoria.
Her many friends In this district
wlll bear with Mr. McVittie at this
time and extend to him their deepest sympathy.
Pits Examinations
Nanalmo, B. C, June 24—The mine
managers examination board ou-
nounces tbe results of examinations
held May 19, 211 and 21 nt Nanalmo,
Cumberland, Merritt and Fernie for
first, second and third class certificates.   Of 95 who wrote 5!) passed.
In the seven successful In tbe tlrst
clnss are: George O'Brien, Fomlo;
Dnvid llrown, Corbin, nnd James
Tnuhoy, Michel.
In tho 14 successful In tho second
class aro: William Olarketon, llns-
mor, nnd James (Minn, Corbin.
In tho successful third class nro:
James Taylor, Fernlo; Wllllnm A.
llrown, Fornle; William Walker, Corbin; Andrew Dow, Hosmer; Thomas
James, Michel; Thomas Kind, Coal
Creek.
Born—At tho Cottage hospital on
Wednesday, June 24th, to Mr. and
Mrs. J. W. Foster-, a son.
City Band Concert
The Cranbrook city band will give
their regular weekly open air concert
Sunday evening, June 28th, commencing at 8.45 p. m.
Program.
March—Washington State   Young
Overture—Arcadia   Laurins
Waltz—Dream   of Paradise—Johnston
Selection—Scotch Melodies 	
  Air by Maekie
Intermezzo—The Flower Qlrl 	
  Wenrlck
March-Bonltha     McFall
God Have the King.
James Austin, bandmaster.
Ross & Bowser to visit Kootenays
Victoria, B. C, June 21-Hou. W.
J. Bowser nnd Hon. W. R. Ross will
leave on an extensive tour of tbe
province at the beginning of July
witb a view to ascertaining the requirements to which tbelr departments minister. The Itinerary includes visits to McBride, Fort (leorge
Fort Fraser, Hinltbers, Hazelton and
to various centres In Kootenny and
Boundary,
Change at the Trading Company
Geo. Ladds, who has been connected with the Cranbrook Trading company for a long while, has sold out
his interest therein to Harry Hinton
late of Plncher Creek. Mr. Hinton ls
well versed In tbe business and is
taking an active part ln the welfare
of tbe store, beginning his duties tbis
week.
Mr, Ladds considerably assisted,
by hla courtesy to customers and
conscientious discharge of bis duties,
in advancing the welfare of the firm.
Spokane Men Find Gas
Spokane, June 23.—Developments
wblch the promoters believe may uncover a second Calgary In eastern
Washington have been undertaken by
Clark Bros, and Klein, Spokane
brokers, in connection with the accidental discovery of natural gas while
drilling for artesian water.
The drillers struck a flow of 300
cubic feet of gas in 24 hours In 700
loot well. They have obtained control of 11,000 acres of land and will
At Nelson Mr. Bowser will give i start Immediate exploration work to
special attention to the problem of | determine the extent of gas and pos
the lloukholior settlement. Home mis- nihility of oil.
understanding has arisen In connection with tho enforcement, of the legislation of last session und i the minister hopes to mako It clear to all
concerned that while the government
has no desire to Impose nny bard-.
ships It cannot nllow conditionn to j
exist which amount, to nn evasion of, ,l,lS™ »R°. *'t "• "• Htltser, chemical
the laws of tho country, j engineer (or Hpoknie Falls Gas   Oo.
Tho ministers will   address   public He said:    "Gas was struck    at    a
Tho Hold la about 20 miles trom
Kennewick In Benton County anil
about < .inal distance trom Columblu
rlvor. Gas was discovered hy Dr. G.
H. Allison. Preliminary Investigation ol tho find was completed a lew
meetings nt the points visited, stat'
iug tbe policy of tbo government on
questions bearing upon tho development of the provinco.
Mr. nnd Mrs. Alb. II. Webb leave
today for a trip to the Old Country.
They Intend visiting their old home
In Lincolnshire nnd seeing some ol
their old-time friends before their return to Canada wblch Is oi|>'ctrd to
Ihi somo time lu September.
depth on leaving work drillers cloned
well with nix-Inch wooden plug drlv
en Intn casing,     lu October It   was
burning at lull opening of pipe   and
continued  to burn until rapped   the
Uth   of   thla   month.    The present | Taylor,
quantity o( gas Is equivalent to   10 Harry Muston
tons ot coal per day or If used   In
gas engines would develop in excess lMr household ellects with
of 00 horsepower continuously, siirance.
striving to quench the flames.
BRIGADE REHCIIKD MANY
Above thc stores were numerous living rooms, all of which have been
consumed, although some ot the contents havo bcen rescued and are now
piled on the main street ot tbe city.
It is not believed that any lives
have been lost as the fire brigade
a?arc»;d the rooms and rescued all
who could be lound.
Fortunately tbe night is calm; had
a wind been blowing nothing could
have saved tbe hlock as (ar aB Mol-
son'a bank.
It is Impossible at present to estimate either the extent of,the loss or
the insurance.
Numerous offers ot temporary
homes bave been made to the weeping children and terrified women who
driven from tholr homes, are watching the blaze sweep away the last
vestiges of their residences.
The cause of the fire is unknown.
It started at tbe rear of tho London
chop house.
Some bud narrow escapes. Tbe residents of rooms above Reid ft Barton's climbed through the upper windows and dropped from awnings to
tbe street just before the fism.'s
burst through the upper windows.
FIFTY  THOUSAND  LOBS
Revelstoke, June 2r..—Fifty thousand dollars Ib the loss estimated to
bave been caused by the fire which
Inst night swept away a business
block on the msln street ol the city.
Tbe chief losers are Mrs. J. M. Kel-
lie of Victoria, building, 115,600, Insurance 14,000; J. B. Barber, ReV'l-
stoke, building 12,700, Insurance $500;
McKay nomls, Toronto, building (5,-
t;00, Insurance $1,000; Mrs. Lee, Revelstoke, building (3,00, insurnnre (1,-
500.   All are n   total loss.
McKay Hernia on another building
lost |500, Insurnnre (1,500. Other
losses Include: A. Hobeon, grocer,
loss (5,000, insurance (8,000; G. H.
Adams, jeweler, loss (1,200, insurance
(800.
A. D, Turner, photographer; R.
Krlckson, rale; Held A Barton, photographers; Hopnlnffar Bros., barbers, and Ureal West A I'eare Itlver
Land compnny suffered total Iohmos ot
fixtures and furnishings.
Miss Abbott,    Miss McDonald,   H.
Hunkers,   W. Anderson,   M. Muelnk,
Mr. and    Mrs. lloyl»,  Mr. and   Mrs.
George  Miller,  Mrs.    Miller,
It. Cummins, W.   Al-
Isn,    A.    Matheson, Mrs. Whitehead,
W. Hmlth nnd Mrs. Carlson all lost
no   In-
King Knights Premier
London, June 21.—The King's birth
day honorB, announced today, include
a number ol prominent Canadians.
Chief is the prime minister, Right
Hon. Robert Laird Borden, P. 0„
who becomes Right Hon. Sir Robert
Laird Borden, P. O., G.C.M.G., thus
reaching the rank ol the grand cross
order of Ht. Michael and St. George,
which Is held by Right Hon. Sir Wilfrid  Laurier, P.C, G.C.M.G.
Two other Canadians attained entrance into the order ot St. Michael
und St. George. They were Hon.
George Kulas Foster, who heconieB
Hir Oeorge Elllas Foster, K. ('. M.
II., and Hon. Charles Kugene llouch-
er de BouchervlUo, senator, former
premier of Quebec, and one of the
oldest legislators in the British om
pile, who heroines Hir Charles de
Bouchervllle, K.O.M.G.
In the list of knight bachelors are:
. A. M. Aikins of Winnipeg, member of parliament for Brandon; Hon.
Adam Heck of London, Ont., minister without portfolio In the (intario
cabinet; Dr. Thomas Cl. Roddick, the
e.'lebruted surgeon ol Montreal, umi
Chief Justice W. W. Bulllvan of
Prince Kdward Island.
The minor honors include tbe bestowal of the dignity of commander
of the order of St. Michael and St.
George upon William Kirkpatrick
McNaught, ex-M.P.P. for North Toronto and one of the chief citizens ot
Toronto.
Companionships in the Imperial
service order are conferred upon William HltnBworth, deputy minister of
inland revenue, Henry Turner Mach-
in, assistant treasurer of tbe province of Quebec and Francis Cyrus
Herlcau. CqJ. Walter B. Davidson,
the governor of Newfoundland, is
created a K.C.M.G., and therelore becomes Sir Walter Davidson.
Among the knights bachelor named
is Douglas Mawson, the explorer.
Tbe list Includes a large number
of barons and baronets, but there
are a few notable names In it. Lord
Kitchener of Khartoum, his majes-
ty'B agent and counsel-general in
Kgypt, Ib mado an earl. Sir Herbert Cozens-Hardy, Sir Edward Vincent, Major John Fielden Brocklo-
hurat and Sir Leonard Lyell are
raised to barons.
Among the baronets Is Albert H.
Stanley, manager of the London Underground railways, who ls English
born, hut was raised In tbe United
States. Mr. Stanley came to London (rom Detroit and assumed bis
British citizenship last year. For a
number of years be was connected
with tbe Detroit United Railways
company and public service railways
of New Jersey.
Other baronets named arc Sir
Joseph Beecham, the pill manufacturer and philanthropist; George B.
Henchel, tho composer, and Hir T.
VanBitart Bowater, lord mayor of
London.
Orange Celebration
Every indication ls tbat tho 12th
of July celebration which is thiB year
to be held in Crnnbrook will be the
largest ever held in the district. The
occasion Is the 224th anniversary ol
the Battle of tbe Boyne wben James
was driven out of Ireland by King
William III. and the Protestant religion established.
The lodges which will be represented nre Wilmer, Creston, Ferni1, Hosmer, Cranbrook and tbe Ladies Orange Lodge of Fernle.
CrPBtonltes an 1 tho*e from intermediate pomtB west will arrive by
special train about the noon hour,
and lodges from the east will arrive
at 12.50 noon on the day ol celebration, Monday, July 13th, as the
glorious twelfth (alls on Hunday.
Musir will be furnish'.) by Crsn-
brook nnd Creston Hrnss Bans, six
bagpipers and several life ami drum
hands,
The grand parade will tako placo
about 2.15. Mayor Taylor will wel-
coine tbe visitors and addresses will
follow by Rev. F. L. Carpenter, of
Creston, Revs. Dunham and Thomson of Cranbrook,. Government
Agent Geo, Htalker of Fernle nnd a
past master ol the Wilmer lodge bus
al(0 been asked to speak.
Athletic sports for children and
adults wlll follow and he concluded
by a lacrosse match between Fernlo
sud Oranbrook, In the evening a
dance   will   be held In tbe Audltorl-
C.eii. Nlblock, who has been conducting a cleaning and pressing establishment on Armstrong nvenue,
bus tnken a tense on tbe store In
Norbury avenue recently occupied by
the Chapman Investment Co. Mr.
Nlblock Intends to be In bis now
promises and open for business on
the let of July with all tho accommodation tor doing first class work. THE PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK, B. C.
©he llroapector, (Hvanbtook, §. (ll.
ESTABLISHED    1895
Published Every Saturday Morning at Cranbrook, B.O.
F. M. Christian, general manager ; | j
SUBSCRIPTION  RATES  $2.00 PER YEAR
Postage to American, European (British  Isles excepted)  and other foreign countries, 50 cents a year extra.
ADVERTISEMENTS—Advertising rates furnished on application, No
advertisements but those of a reputable character wtll be accepted for
publication.
ADVERTISERS AND SUBSCRIBERS.—Unless notice to the contrary
Is given to local manager advertisements and subscriptions will be kept
running ami charged up againBt their account.
20th YEAR
CRANBROOK, B.C     June 27
No. 26.
The Mining Industry
Mr. Thomas Taylor, MiniBter of
Public Works, lias returned to Victoria from the Interior with a very
optimistic report as to thc condition
of the. mining industry. His statements hear out what Sir Richard
McBride Baid a year ago we were to
expect. They endorse what Mr.
Goodeve said a few days ago. They
corroborate the Hcores of reports
made by private Individuals. There
I.s not in Kootenay anything bearing
the faintest resemblauce to a mining
boom. What is happening is that a
number of hard-headed business men
are putting their money into mines
and winning handsome profits. You
cannot find a wildcat Ln the whole
of Kootenay. It is all business bo
far as mining is concerned.
Tbere is certainly a very gratifying Btate of things. It not only
means much for the present, but it
meanB very much for the future.
There was a time when even the
most hopeful of ns could not wholly
banish doubts as to the permanency
of the lode-mining industry, but that
has now heen demonstrated. Tbe
new conditions will make it easier
to secure capital for bona-tide mining propositions.
Education
Ross interests India
The Hon. Wm. R. Ross, Minister
of Lands, has received a letter from
the Dominion Creosoting Co., Ltd.,
of Vancouver, who have received an
order for 160,000 creosoted railway
sleepers from the Bengal and North
Western Railway Company of India,
expressing thanks to the Forest
Branch of the Department of Lands,
for their effortB in interesting the Indian Railway company in British
Columbia lumber.
The Indian railways use annually
very large quantities of railway
sleepers, and the habit of the past
has heen to secure a large portion
of this timber from Australia, but as
the timber there is becoming scarcer
the price is slowly advancing.
As a direct result of the efforts of
ths Hon. W. K. Ross who is directing the Forest Branch in a campaign for trade extension in foreign
markets this order for 1GM00 creosoted, ties has heen placed with a
British Oolumbla firm.
Tbe specifications call tor thc best
quality well,seasoned Douglas Fir to
be treated with 12 lbs. of creosote
per cubic foot under specified temperature and pressure conditions.
Arrangements have been made to
have tlic Forest Branch inspect the
ties both before and atter treatment,
ho as to ensure the Bpeclftcatlans being strictly adhered to.
After the excellent qualities of
Douglas Fir bave been tried out in
India, there wilt doubtless be further
large orders coming to British Columbia and the creosoting industry
will be given a   decided impulse.
For llie past two years the Honorable Martin Burrell, Minister of
Agriculture, has had under contemplation the necessity of taking some
step towards the lessening of bovine
tuberculosis. The relation of bovine
tuberculosis to human tuberculosis is
well known, ami the transmission of
the disease through milk from infected cows is uo longer a matter of
serious dispute. A careful perusal of
the writings of those authorities
who have dealt in recent years with
this subject reveals a Btate of things
especially in connection with the
mortality of the cbildreu of the cities, that must arouse deep public
concern.
ATTEMPTING! SOMETHING.
Nearly every civilized country is
attempting at least something iu
the direction of controlling or eradicating tbe disease, which not only
involves a heavy ecouomic loss to
cattle owners, but which is a constant menace to public health. Tbe
problem in Canada, as elsewhere, ia
both a large and complicated one,
nor can a permanent solution come
without co-operation between Federal, Provincial and Municipal authorities, backed by tbe enlightened support of the individual owner.
CONTAGIOUS DISEASES.
The Veterinary Branch of the Federal Department of Agriculture, formerly under the able direction of
Dr. Rutherford, and lately under the
capable present Veterinary Director
General. Dr. F. Torrance, bas largely undertaken the work of stamping
out contagious diseases of animals,
such as glanders and hog cholera.
Jurisdiction, however, is concurrent,
and amongst the provinces British
Columbia has made the most advanced step hy enacting a statute
providing for the slaughter of and
compensation for dairy cattle infected with tuberculosis, and with very
satisfactory results. By a recent
Federal Order-in-Council regulations
have been authorized which will empower the Department of Agriculture
to enter into agreements with cities
for the definite object of eradicating
bovine tuberculosis from all dairy
herds supplying milk to the cities in
question.
INSPECTION OF DAIRIES.
Local sanitary, inspection of dairies
will be required, nnd in the working
out of the scheme it is certain that
Invaluable educational results will
follow on this whole subject. Dr.
Torrance, wbo prepared the new regulations, was a member of the International Commission on the Control of Bovlfla Tuberculosis, and is a
recognized authority on the subject,
und his speclul qualifications in tbis
direction strongly influenced the Honorable Mr. Burrell when he selected
him as Veterinary Director General
a year and a half ago.
tables, and say they could hardly bc
surpassed for quality and Bize on the
Coast.
The land is three miles up Kumao-
lon Inlet from Granville channel, the
course of steamers between Victoria,
Vancouver and Prince Rupert and
northern ports. It is possible to get
into the lake during the flow of the
tide with a bandy launch at nearly
any time, as the overfall caused by
rise of the tide in the narrow entrance seldom exceeds 4 feet. During the ebb, however, it is not safe
to attempt tho passage arter the
tide has turned for more than twenty minutes. The channel is very
rocky and the overfall soon reaches
a height of between 8 and 10 feet.
Bhoveling contest, tug of war •Sullivan vs. World), aud a one-mile race
for amateurs only.
The evening will close with a dance
for which Qrat-clasB music has been
provided.
Givtm a fine day Kimberley will
have a large influx of visitors present. Cranbrook citizens are particularly invited and a good timo Ih ensured to all.
Wins a $10^000 Prize
A play-writing contest conducted
by a New York theatrical producer,
who offered a prize of $10,000 to the
author of the manuscript that met
with the approval of a board of
three competent judges, has been
won by a woman. Her victory is
the moiv creditable to her and her
sex becauBe her drama, "Children Ol
Earth," easily won over 1,646 rivals,
Miss Alice Brown, tbe New England novelist and Bhort-story writer,
may be congratulated for proving
that her Hex is a match (or tbe men
when lt invades the field of dramatic literature.
Highbrow theorists of tbe stage's
duty to art and Hociety, and faddists who are appropriating it for
propaganda, will find food for reflection in Miss Alice Brown's triumph. The play with which ahe has
vanquished all her men and women
competitors has no sociological mission; it is just a human drama of
New England types, laid in the simple BUrrOUndingfl of New England
life.
These are thfl noble women, man's
equal In everything except, physical
strength, to whom tbe franchise, if
they want It, should on demand bo
granted. How different indeed from
the female animals thnt. nre running
riot on the British ihIch, Qiggraolng
their sex nnd every other sex in
their1 mud attempts to compel thfl
parliamentarians to trust Into their
wild and violent, keeping thfl affairs
of a nation.
THE SUMMERR CAMP.
A joyous time In wood and copse,
To wander free from morn till night;
O'er grassy vales and mountain tops,
And  back to camp a welcome sight:
With  the purling brook hard by.
The forest bids with open anus,
To nature seeks one and all;
Partake in .full of all her charms,
So rich in life that ne'er can pall:
And the bubbling brook hard by.
Does not a scene so bright and free,
Bespeak  a meed ot thought  sud rare;
A constant call to you and me,
To breed no devastation there:
With the sparkling brook hard by.
A*careless lire, the smoker's match,
Tbe growth of centuries is doomed;
With Sicken'ng haste tlV: giants catch
Tbe pleasing view's for aye entombed.
And tbe brooklet now is dry.
We have a duty,  sacred trust.
The youne and old,   the smalt   and
great;
For each one may, he can. he must,
Protect our woods from such a fate:
And the babhlins brook hard by.
R. F. 'CHILD,
Victoria,   June  15.   1914.
Lands to_be Opened
KUMEQLON—SKHENA   LAND   RE-
CORDINC DISTRICT
A traet ol logged-ofl timber land
on Kumeolon Inlet, fronting on tbe
tidal lake nt its head, about three
mites Irom Grenville Channel, has
been subdivided Into lots ot 40 acrea,
and will be open to entry by preemption at tbe office ol the Government Agent, Prince Rupert, B. C,
at '3 o'clock in the forenoon on August llth, 1914.
The subdivisions, with one or two
exceptions, are along the lake-shore.
They are well situated, being for the
mclpt pnrt on or near the big flat
around thc month of the larder ol
two croeks which drain to the lake,
a tidal sheet, cif water sheltered from
every wind by the mountains on
nearly every side. Climatic conditions are similar to those at l'rince
Rupert and Port Essington. from
which place tha land lies about. 25
miles to the southward. The land
is thirteen miles from the Htnndanl
Cannery and sixteen miles from
Olaxton. The temperature, even In
winter. Is mild and the rainfall heii-
vy, especially in thc winter months
As most ol the land hnd been well
timbered, It. will take snme time to
remove the (dumps left, after logging
operations; but, In th' opinion of
the surveyors, the land Is well worth
the trouble of clearing, as the soil
is nlluvlnl and very rich. When tbe
land wns being logged a small tract
ol about an acre was cleared and
plnnted. It wan cultivated with excellent results, the produce being disposed of at Port. EDsslngton, The
surveyors    "Red    some   of Ibe  veg.'-
Prisoners vs. Forests
According to a recent report of the
Forestry Department of New South
Wales, good conduct convicts at the
Btate prison, instead of breaking
stone, are now engaged in the more
useful and healthful work of replanting with trees the waste lands of the
state. At one prison alone 25,000
trees, mostly American asb and pines
were planted in 1913, and so successful have these plantations been that
thiB work will be considerably extended in the present year.
A simitar i idea has been worked out
successfully by the city of San Diego in California, which possesses 7,-
000 acres of bare rolling sand land
at a distance of ten miles from the
city. A trained forester was .engaged
to make this land profit-yielding and
under his direction the city's unemployed havo been given work planting this area with trees suitable to
the nature of the country, Other
cities in the United States that have
lound it necessary to purchase and
reforest large areas on the watersheds governing their water-supply
have advantageously used the same
kind of labor. The primary purpose
of such reforestation is not, however, to i furnish work to the unemployed, but to develop a profitable
source of revenue from land which
would otherwise remain unproductive.
City forests ol thiB kind are not,
as yet, in vogue in this country.
Perhaps the only city forest in Canada is that at Guelph, Ont., where a
small area has heen planted sur
rounding the springs which furnish
the city's water-supply. In many of
the counties of eastern Canada, however, are, large areas of waste land,
originally forested, and capable only
of producing forests. Ontario has a
Counties Reforestation Act making
possible tbe acquisition of Buch
waste land for reforestation purposes by municipal council, but up
to the present time only one county
has availed itself of this opportunity. Quebec and the Dominion gov
crnment have also passed legislation
to encourage tree planting, and the
Dominion Forestry Branch in the
last liscal year distributed nearly 4,-
000,000 trees from the nurseries at
Indian Head for woodlot planting in
western Cannda,
The growing of forest trees on
waste land can in mnBt caBes be
mude a profitable undertaking, besides providing labor to a considerable number ol men, yet no extensive reforestation bas as yet been
done ln eastern Canada.
KimberleyCelebrates
Next Wednesday bOlng Dominion
Day, the citizens of Klmhorloy are
arranging to bave a Ilrst cIiihs celebration, nnd onn that will far surpass any tbey have previously held,
Tbo list of events are Interesting,
and should result In some good
sport. Tbo list Includes Btnndlng,
running and high Jumps, marrlotl und
single Indies' races, boys' races, lat
man's rare, tho program calling for
all to bc over 200 lbs. and should
cnuse some sidea to crack with Inngli-
ter;    100   yards   dash,   IC   Ih, shot,
Communication
It is with all duo apologies to Mr.
O'Hara that the writer ventures this
reply to his' communication in the
Herald of June llth last, lu regard
to "Economy" and a retainer fee,—
the latter, according to Mr. O'llnrn,
being beyond all reason of economical practice and convention. Tbe
writer is not nciiuaiutcd witb Mr.
O'Hara aud for that reason can pass
no speeiUc judgment upon IiIb capability or integrity, uud)would not do
so even if It were ever bo mooted as
it would not be conventional busl
iieus, but supposing it the best for
tbe sake of clean unbiased argu
ment. There may be voiced iu this
communication a little Imsto in draw
lug conclusions as to Mr. O'Hara's
situation aud attitude bearing upon
tin isolietue of tbe whole altair; but a
very satisfactory deduction can be
Obtained by tlrst reading "K.eono
my," and then to lind tbe lire [rom
whence came tile smoke,--peruse the
Council proceedings on the front
page of tbe Herald.
Now leave the unimportant feature aside, and coming to the gist
of the affair, is not consultation jus-
titiable in any engineering work,
where there are naturally always
complicated economic questions to
be settled'.' The advisability of consultation or the calliug in of a consulting engineer to supervise a spe-
ial venture, and as an assistance to
a city in meeting the unforeseen
problems, has been long established
as a necessary, precautionary and
economic measure iu city enterprises;
and the calling in ol other or outside engineers is nover taken' and
should not be taken as an index of
incapability, or as a reflection upon
tbe integrity or character of an acting city engineer. As a general rule
the average layman is not always
cognizant of the abort procedure and
of the usual fee for such consultation service; and in justice to those
tbe alleviation of mal constructed
directly concerned, and to assist in
opinions, tbe writer quotes the following data, which is the adopted
practice of the American Institute of
Consulting Engineers:
SCHEDULE OF CHARGES.
Full  professional   services,  including
active superintendance and management  10 per cent.
Full  professional  services,  Including
general supervision ... 5 per cant.
Preliminary study   1 per cent.
Preliminary study, general drawings
and specifications ... 2, per cent.
Preliminary study, detailed drawings
and specifications ... 3J per cent.
Commissions computed upon entire
coBt of the work, and the travelling
expense to be paid by the client.
The writer Is absolutely independent of any interests connected with
the work and the situation of tb-.
City of Cranbrook, and mak.'S thiB
reply mainly to assist in the removal of unnecessary opinion.
Respectfully,
L. M. BOBEAU,
Civil Engl tor
Nelson, B. O.
Special coins with designs commemorating the century of peace between Canada and the United States
will, in all probability be issued as
current tender by the Dominion Oovernment January flrst, 1915, and
throughout tbe year. Tbe pieces to
be designed will likely be 2d cent and
1*3 cent pieces. Tbe obverse side of
the coins with the King's portrait
will be retained and a suitable design commemorating the peace centennial will be extended to postage
stamps, which, although an innovation in ttte country, has been adopted with success in Australia in the
famous "Kangaro" penny stamp.
The United States Government has
already adopted tbe scheme.
Lawn
Mowers
That
almost
run
themselves
Priced from
$6.00 to $24.50
Get one from
F. Parks & Co.
HARDWARE   and   HOUSE
FURNISHINGS
CRANBROOK,   -   British Columbia
cing le Opening Sale
of Seventy Thousand Shares of
Capital Stock of the
LDMMMEN'S CINMIMEfl
OU FIELDS. UNITED
J
Capital $400,000
- $1.00
Per Share
Par Value
HOLDINGS-Petroleum and Natural Gas rights
in 2,400 acres in the vicinity of Dingman and
McDougall-Segur wells.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS:
President.-     CHAS.  KNipHT,     Cal
G. H.  SADLER, Cranbrook,   B. C,
gnry,   Alta.    President    Alberta
Manager King Lumber Mills, Li
Box Co.,  Limited.
mited.
Vice-Pros.:   E. T. CKITCHLEY, Cnl-
gary,    Alta.,     Secretary    Crown
Lumber Co., Limited.
J. A. EDGECUMBE, Calgary, Alta.,
Vice-President   M. _ _.   Lumber
Secretary-Treas.:   R. B.  McKAMEY,
Calgary,  Alta.,  President  M.    &
E. Lumber Co., Limited.
C.  J.   WILLIAMS,   Calgary,   Alta.,
Manager Alberta Boi Co.,   Lim
DR. J. H. KING, Cranbrook, B. C.
ited.
President King Lumber Mills, Limited.
R. S. WHALEY, Calgary, Alta., Capitalist.
HAROLD J. SCOTT,
TELEPHONE 178
AGENT
Cranbrook, B. C.
Office: 3 Doors East of Royal Bank
Post Office Box 396
PRESS CONVENTION
AT VERNON, B. C.
The dates ot the 1914 Convention
of the Alberta and Eastern British
Columbia Press Association have
been fixed for Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday, September 2, 3 and 4 at
Vernon, B. C. Mr. Ball, of the Vernon   News,   Is   organizing   extensive
preparations tor the reception and
entertainments of the delegates and
their ladies, and he intends to make
it one of the most successful conventions the Association has ever
held. Mr. John M. Imrle, the Dominion Secretary, and Mrs. Imrle,
will be present, and the programme
for thc Conventian has, been started.
Owing to thc generosity of the C. P.
11., and other railways, and the hospitality promised by the Vernon people, the expenses of attending this
Convention will be very reasonable,
and it is very important that as
many of tit.? members of the association as possible should attend, in order to show appreciation of their
kindness, and also to gain the benefit of tbe papers and discussions.
The Kootenay Telephone
Lines, Limited
I
[ I TEH
of the Agreement with THE GREAT NORTH WESTERN and
WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANIES, effective July 1st,
1914, and after that date cannot accept • Telegraph Business for transmission over these lines.
Instead our efforts will be directed to the improvement of our Local and Long Distance Service, particularly the connections with points
on THE ALBERTA GOVERNMENT and THE PACIFIC TELE-
PHONE & TELEGRAPH SYSTEMS.
Phone 112 for Information and Rates
e
ed
C.I'.H. REORGANIZE FIRE
PROTECTION STACK
Tho Cnnndlnn Pacific Railwny haH
recognised the local administration
of the speclnl lire patrols on Its
western Hues, required hy tho Board
of Railway Commissioners, hy   plac
Its Forestry Branch, ol which Mr.R.
.li. I'lettio is Superintendent, with
lieniUpiattors at Calgary. The new
ntrungoment affects the handling of
.fire protection work on all lines of
the I!. P. It. running through forest
sections west of Fort William,   Ont.
Ing the mutter uuder tho direction ot, Thc 0.   P.   R. Forestry Branch   has
previously beon closely associated
with Are protection work, through
tho assignment of inspectors, but tho
new arrangements will greatly increase Its scopo hy giving It administrative control as well. The new
plan is altogether logical tn an age
of specialisation. ,■ _ l|,|,|l|l|ll||l||,|,.t.|l||lll,|l|ll|l||1r|l,|.l^1,|,l,|l,|,1||,|,||,|l|,H,
Professional   Carbs
 anb	
Cobge   Hotices
w..i,,i,.|.,t..|.,|,.|.,|.l|l,).l|,l|l,|,.|,,|,,i,,l,|,<,,t,|l,|.l|l|,i.l|,l|ll|l.|l,|,,|ll|,|,l|.l,,|,l|,,l„i.,|,^
ANCIENT   ORDER   OF   FORESTERS
Court Oraabrook No. 8943.
Meet in   Maple   Hall,   on   2nd   and
4th Thuraday of each month.
J,  McLAOHLUN,   O.R.       ,
Louis Pearson, Bee, P.O. Boi 911.
Visiting Brothers Cordially Welcomed
OVERSEAS  CLUB
(Oranbrook Branch)
Meets   ln   Maple   Hall on the 2nd
■nd 4th Tuesdays in every month, at
I p.m.   Membership open to British
Oltltens.
B. Y. Brake, Prea.
W. J. Lower, Sec-Treas.
Box 247.
Visiting numbers cordially welcome
CRANBROOK   LODGE   No.   34
A. F. ft A. M.
Regular   meetings  on  the
third   Thursday   of   every
month.
Visiting brethren welcoms.
H.  Hlcftenbotham,  W.M.
J. Lee Cranston, Sec.
Cranbrook Farmers' Institute
Pres.—A. B. Smith
Sec—A,b. H. Webb
Meetings    are    held on the Third
Thursday in the month at 8 p.m. in
the Old Gymnasium All Welcome.
THE PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Dates of Fairs
Women's Institute
Meets in tbe Carmena' Hall 1st
Tuesday afternoon tn every month
at 3 p.m. Tho fancy work classes
meets on 3rd Friday evening ln the
same place at 8 p. m.
Mrs. E. H. Leaman, President
Mrs.   J.   Shaw,   Sec-Treas.
P. 0. Box 442.
All ladies cordially invited.
ROCKY   MOUNTAIN  CHAPTER
No. 125, R. A. M.
Regular meetings:—2nd Tuesday ln
each month at eight o'clock.
Sojourning   Companions   ars   cordially Invited.
Bi. Comp.—A. 0. Shankland, B.
Cranbrook, B.O.
KNIGHTS   OF   PYTHIAS
Oranbrook, B.O.
Orescent Lodge, No. II
Mists every Tuesday at I p.m.
at Fraternity Hall.
A. Hurry, C. C.
E. Halsall, K. of R. & S.
B. A. HIU, M. F.
Vleltlng brethren cordially Invited
to attend.
T.   T.   McVI TTIE
P.L.I. * o.a.
ORANBROOK,    ...    B.O.
HARVEY, McCARTER, MACDONALD
and NISBET
Barristers, Solicitors and Notaries
Money to Loan
Imperial Bank Building
ORANBROOK,    -    British Oolumbla
LAIDLAW ft  DE WOLF
Civil   and Mining Engineers-British
Columbia Land Survsyors
P.O. Box 236
ORANBROOK,
Phone 211
...    B.O.
Drs.    KING    &    GREEN
Physicians and Surgeons
OSIcs at Residence. Armstrong Avs.
Office Hours:—
Forenoons - - 9.00 to 10.00
Afternoons - - 2.00 to   4.00
Evenings 7.10 to   1.10
Sundays - - - 1.10 to  4.10
Oranbrook,    .....    B.O.
I.O.O.F.,    KEY   CITY    LODGE
Uo. 41
Meets every Monday night
•t Ksw   Fraternity   Hall.
Sojourning Oddfellows cordially Invited.
F. Broughton, W. M. Harris,
N. O. Bee'y
PRIDE   OF   CRANBROOK
Circle No. Ul
Companions of ths Forest
Meets in Maple Hall, First and
Third Wsdnesday ot eacb momth at
1:00 p.m., aharp.
Mrs. A. M. Laurie. O. O
Mrs. A. B. Shaw, Bk.
Visiting  Companions  cordially  welcome. Htt
CRANBROOK LODGE
No. 104*
Meets every Wed
nesday at 8 p.m.,
In Royal Black
Knights' Hall on
Baker Street.
W. Matthbws, dictator.
F. Carlson, Box 750, Secretary.
INDEPENDENT  ORDER  OF
FORESTERS
Meets in Royal Black Knights Hall
Baker Street
Mseta every ind and 4th Thuriday
ol sach montb at » p.m. sharp.
Mrs. L. Hayward, ree. sec.
W. B. MacFarlane, chlel ranger
Visiting brethren made welcoms.
Ths  Cranbrook  Poultry  and   Pet
Stock Association
President-A. B. Smith.
Meets regularly on ths First Friday
svenlng of sach month.
Information on Poultry mattars
supplied.
Address the Secretary—W. W. McGregor, Oranbrook,
F. M. MacPherson
UNDERTAKES
Norbury Annus Neit lo CU; Hsll
Open Da, ted Night Phoiolu
W. R.  BEATTY
Undertaker,
Emualmer,
Funeral Director,
CBANBROOK, B.O.
P.O. BOX 085
PHONE 346
Cranbrook
Cottage Hospital
GARDEN AVE.
Matron:    Mrs. A. Salmon
Terms on Application
Phone 259 P. O. Box 845
CIRCUIT NO. 1
Cobble Hill—September 3.
Nanalmo—September 15-111-17.   ,
Islands—September IC.
Comox—September 17-18.
Cowichan—September 17-18-19.
Sooke—September 18.
Victoria—September 21-2C.
North and South Saanich—Oct. 2-3
CIRCUIT NO. 2
Kent—Scptembor 3 (or 15th).
North Vancouver—September 4-5.
Vancouver—September 5-12.
Central Park—September 16-111.
Coquitlam—September 18.
Mission—September 21-22.
Maple Ridge—September 23-24.
Burquitlam—September 26.
New    WeBtmiUBter—Sept. 29 to Oc
tober 3.
CIRCUIT NO. 3.
ChilliwacH—September 15-16.
Richmond—September 16-17.
Aldergrove—September 17.
AbhotBford—September 18.
Delta—September 18-19.
Surrey—September 22.
Lnugley—September 23.
MutBglll-September 24.25,
CIRCUIT NO.  4.
Bnderby.
Nicola (Merritt)—September 15.
Prltchard—September 17.
North Thompson—September 19.
Salmon Arm—September 21-22-23.
Kamloops—September 24-25-26.
Kelowna.
Armstrong—Octobor 0 7.
Vernon—October 8-9.
Oyama.
Penticton—October 27.
Suinmerland—October 29-311.
CIRCUIT NO. 5.
Windermere—September 2-3-4,
Golden—September 8-9.
Elk Valley—September 11-12.
Cranbrook—September 15-16.
Trail—September 17-18.
Frultville—September 22.
Nelson—BepilMuher 23-24-25.
Slocan Valley  (Slocan City)~8ep-
tember 29.
New Denver—October 1-2.
Rossland.
CIRCUIT NO.  6.
Revelstoke—September 17-18-19.
Greenwood—September 22-23.
Grand Forks—Septomlier 24-25.
Burton—October 1-2.
Needles—October 5-6.
Nakusp—October 8-9.
Kaslo—October 13.
Creston—October 15.
RobBon and Lower Arrow Lakes.
CIRCUIT NO. 7.
Bulkley   Valley   (Telkwa)—September 10-11.
Quesnel—September 18-19.
Fort George—September 24-25.
Prince Rupert—Sept. 30-Oct. 1-2.
•Bella Coala—October 9.
•Graham Island, Lawn Hill.
•Subject to change.
Loyal Orange
Lodge No. 1871
Meets 1st and
3rd Thursday in
Royal Black
Knights of Ireland .tall at 8 p.m. aharp. Visitors
Welcome.
R. S. Oarrett, W. M,
W. Dunstan, Ree, Sec.
NOTIOE   OF   CANCELLATION   OF
RESERVE
Notlco ls hereby given that a reserve, notlco of which appeared in
thc B.C. Gazette, on Octoher 10th,
1912, is cancelled ln sn far ns it relates to thc following expired timber
licences:—
4481, 9082, 11347, 21907, 22861,
23116, 24432, 26737, 2G926, 28182,
28183, 30358, 31180, 31184, 31185,
31201, 31330, 31481, 32022, 32711,
33411, 33459, 33460, 34221, 34273,
34310, 36502, 37580, 37993, 37994,
41344,   41426   and   4317G.
R. A. RKNWICK,
Deputy Ministor of Lands.
Lands Department.
Victoria, B.C., March 31st, 1914.
15-3m.
Dr. de Van's Female Pills
A reliable French regulator j utwfilli. ThtM
pills irs exceedingly powerful In regulating thi
generative portion ol the female system. Kefusl
all cheap Imitations. Dr, da ▼no's art lold al
IB a box, or three lor fit). Mailed to any add real,
Ibe Koaball line tie., at, Catbarlaea, Oat
Prehistoric Remains In California
Great interest is taken in the fossils of extinct animals and birds of
tbe Pleistocene period, and that naturalists believe disappeared with the
close of the Tertiary age, about 250,
000 years ago, which are being found
at La Brea, on the outskirts of Los
Angeles.
Complete skeletons of these animals and birds, it is reported, have
been taken out of the accumulations
of black pitch in petroleum pitH on
a tract of about forty acres of land
which the Los Angeles County Museum of History, Science and Art have
leased for three years, with the privilege of excavation.
According to the theories of scholars in this line of research, 300,000
or 400,000 years ago giant animals
and marvelous birds inhabited thiB
section of country and roamed admit
in a jungle where now stand tine Los
Angeles homes. It is thought that
ages ago petroleum bubbled up
through the ground, a process still
going on, being driven from below by
immense quantities of gas. As the
pits at La Drae occupy a depression
among the bills, during the rainy
season water collected und covered
the masses of sticky asphalt. The
supposition Is that thc smaller, herbivorous animals came down to
drink, but were caught liy their feet
In the sticky pitch; this predicament
subjected them to the cornivorae—
the tigers, wolves aud lions—and in
the struggle they too were mired and
became th > victims of huge birds
which swooped down upon them, and
which in their turn were imprisoned
in the asphalt. All together, sinking
deeper into the pits, they were covered by the petroleum, which shut
out thc air and water and preserved
them until the present time.
Thus far the excavations havi!
yielded thu following treasures of
great value, some of which will be
exhibited tn Loh Angeles, and some,
duplicates, which will he exchanged
for trcastiioH of othor collections:
More than 200 specimens of the sabre-toothed tiger, 100 woIv'jh, three
mastodons, twenty-one skulls and
eight complete skeletons, of the
riant sloth, fourteen hisotiH, seven
lions, one skull being eighteen Inches
from linse to end of jaw, probnbly
the largest BpCCimont of lion ovor
known; oight horses, seven camels,
between fifty nnd sixty specimens of
birds, ninny of them carnivorous,
and of gigantic size, and at least
three specimens hitherto unknown.
The skeleton uf un imperial elephant.
recovered from the pits is practically complete, except for a portion of
one tusk. Ivory has proved less enduring than the material of which
the bones are composed. This ele
phant was probably twenty feet in
height. The tUBka were eighteen feet
long and eight inches in diameter.
This is aaid to be probably the larg-
est elephant known in history, and
the only skeleton of an "elephas lm-
perator" to be found in the world.
A skull of a mastoden taken to the
museum was so heavy that it required four men to lift it to the
auto truck. A single leg hone is all
that one man could carry out of the
pit. Part of a tiger kitten's .skull
was bo well preserved that the milk
teeth were iu perfect condition when
found.
The skeleton of a wolf was found
which was as large as an elephant
of the present day. The boneB, which
are held togethor by the sticky petroleum, are first sorted and placed
in boxes, which are labeled with tbe
names of the animals they are supposed to represent. They are next
taken into some rough sheds and
there washed in kerosene hefore being shipped into the workrooms of
the must-urn. What, is regarded as
oue of the greatest finds waB a prehistoric cypress tree, believed to be
more than 200,000 years old, and the
wood of which was in u perfectly preserved condition. The tree iH said
to be entirely extinct except for a
very small variety in Northern California. Smithsonian and Government experts at Washington have declared it a Bpecies of thc cypress
found only in cold climates, and one
that evidently flourished in this section ot California just nfter the glacial period.
A few weeks ago tbe attention of
scholars was drawn by the discovery
In the oil pits at La Brea of a skeleton of a mau, full grown, but only
was found at a depth of about twen
three feet in height. The skeleton
ty feet and after the finding of tbe
skull the excavators were instructed
to do all tbe work possible witb
their hands. The skeleton was near
the trunk of it tree, which in itself
is considered a notable discovery.
Tills tree is,about six inches through
the trunk and twenty feet high. It
antedates by at least half a geological period, it is said, the petrified
forests of Arizona. It is Baid, therefore, to be tho oldest tree ever
found. To what age the man he-
longed is yet to be determined—
whether or not tli > bones were in tbe
same stratum with the mammoths.
Two or three feet above or below,
say tbe scholars, might mean multiplied hundreds of centuries nearer to
or farther from the present age. It
Ib understood that the skeleton will
be sent to tbe Smithsonian Institute
at Waahington for examination and
classification .—Colon let.
most complete and unique exhibit of
the sort ever brought together under one roof—and a considerable
part ot it has never been under a
roo/  before.
To get it all together the Smithsonian Institution of Washington has
sent its explorers unto the ends of
the earth—and other places—where
they dug up some of the prehistoric
red men and then dug out before the
descendants of said prehistoric red
men could dig in and Bhoot them
full of poisoned arrows and other
souvenirs. The School of American
Archaeology has contributed extensively and has fallen in with the idea
of making the whole exhibit graphic
and comprehensible to an unscientific
lowbrow lite me, and another one
like you.
And so we may go to school
again, without the inconvenience ot
set hourB, or text-hooks or the stern
eye of a long-suffering teacher; and in
a few days, or even hours, of such
intense interest that they pass all
too quickly, we may learn more
about our human history—and re
member it—than we learned in all
our school years combined, And then
when the youngster says: "Dad, tell
me about the Crustaceans," or "Why
waB a troglodyte?" you'll be ahle
to lay down tbe evening paper and
say with becoming impressiveness
"Well, son, being blind on one side,
the troglodyte progressed in a circle,
thereby heating Senator—well, you
know the dub I mean—to it by a
couple of million years, and"—but I
haven't seen tbe complete exhibit yet
myself.
Talk about your royal roads to
knowledge!
Yours for the logos of ethnos,
SCOTTY
3nn Diego, Cal., June, 1914.
COAL  AND PETROLEUM  NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given tbat, sixty days after date hereof, I intend
to apply to the Minister of Lands
for a Licence to prospect for coal
and petroleum over the following described landa, Bituate in tbe Fernie
District of South East Kootenay, in
Block 4593.
Commencing at a post planted at
Lester Clapp's South-East corner,
thence East 80 chains, north 80
chaina, WeBt 80 chains, South HO
chainB, to point of commencement,
and containing C40 acres more or
ass.
Located this Gth day of June, 1914,
ELLA  CLAPP,
Locator
JOHN  EWIN,
25 Agent
The Unscientific Scientist
Introducing Scotty
Dear Herb:—Have you tho time to
read thousands—or even hundreds—of
tomes upon the subject of,Ethnology
and its first cousin, Archaeology?
Neither have I! Neither have some
ninety-nine per cent of our fellow-
citizens. Would you read tbem if
you had the time? Neither would I!
Neither would the same .percentage of
our brother-men. I don't believe I
would wade clear through one of the
aforementioned tomes on a bet and
probably I wouldn't understand or
remember any appreciable part of it
if I did-to win the bet.
But if you could walk into a beautiful big building on the crest of a
sightly hill overlooking San Diego,
tbe Bay, Coronado, Point Loma, the
Coronado Islands, and a nickel's
worth of Mexico- which is considerable ground at present market values—I say, if you could walk into
such a building and see before you a
history of your kind portrayed by
pictures, models, relics, all of them
absolutely authentic, graphically illustrating the evolution of yourself
from the paleozoic age—if that was
the Btart—down to the perfected product embodied in your own handsome self—wouldn't you Jump at the
chance?   I would.
How do we beBt remember things
ln general? By our mental images of
them, of course. How do you re
memhtr Napoleon Bonaparte, for ex
ample? Tbrougb the pictures you
have Been of him—probably as the
saddest, moat serious little fat man
you ever knew of—that, however, being but one of his characteristics.
How do we remember the earmarks
of the Mesdzolc or the Oaetlosole period?   Well, frankly, I don't.
But here In tbe massive Ethnology
Building will be collected tbe most
remarkable exhibit tbat has ever
been attempted. It Ih n most ambitious undertaking and will represent
tbe sum total of bumnn knowledge of
the history af you nnd men nud the
rest of uh. The nblest talent In tbe
world ban been working upon this for
years. No expense has been spared•
And where lt hns been ImptHHlble to
purchnHn certain collections which
were logically necessary to complete
and round out the exhibit, they were
borrowed. Incidentally the Institution which loaned them did not take
an* chances—they exacted huge bonds
for tbe safe return of their invaluable collections.     Tho result is   tiie
COAL   AND   PETROLEUM NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty daya after date hereof, I intend
to apply to the MiniBter of Lands for
a Licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described lands, situate In the Fernie Dis
trict of Bouth East Kootenay, in
Block 4593.
Commencing at a post planted at
W. F. Doran'8 North-East corner,
thence South 80 chains, West 80
Chains, North 80 chains, Kant 80
chains, to point of commencement,
and containing t>40 acres, more or
less.
Located  this Uth day of June, 1914.
MRS,   ANNA KENNADY.
Locator
JOHN EWIN,
25 Ageut
Block 4593.
Commencing   at a Post pianted   at
One mile    Weat    of   the South-West
corner of Licence 9496,  thence North
80 chains,  West  80 chains,   South 80
chainB,  East  80 chains   to   point   of
commencement,    and   containing   G4U
acres more or less.
Located thia 8th day of June,  1914.
T. B. O'CONNELL,
Locator
joiin" EWIN,
25 Agent
SYNOPSIS   OF   OOAL   MINING
REGULATIONS
Ooal mining right* of the Dominion
ln Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, the Yukon Territory, the North
weat Territories and tn a portion ol
the Province of British Columbia,
may bs leased for a term of twenty*
on* years at an annual rental ol 11
an acre. Not more than 2,M0 acres
will bs leased to one applicant.
Application lor a lease must be
mads by the applieant in parson to
ths Agent or Sub-Agent of the district in which ths right* applied lor
are situated.
In surveyed territory ths land must
ba described by sectione, or legal subdivisions ot seetlona, and in unsur-
veyed territory the tract applied (or
shall be staksd out by ths applicant
hfmsslt.
Bach application must be accompanied by a fee ot $5 which will be
refunded if the rights applied for are
not available, but not otherwise. A
royalty ehall be paid on the merchantable output ot the mine at the
rata of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish tha Agent wltb sworn return*
accounting tor the full quantity of
merchantable coal mined and pay the
royalty thereon. If the coal mining
rights are not being operated, auob
returns should bs turnlshsd at least
once a year.
The lease will Include the coal mining rights only, but the teesee may
be permitted to purchase whatever
available surfacs rights may be considered necessary lor the working ol
the mine at the rats of $10.00 an acre
For full information application
should be made to the Secretary of
the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent of
Dominion Lands.
W.   W.   CORY,
Deputy Minister ot the Interioi
N.B.—Unauthorized publication ol
this advertisement will not be paid
for.-30690. Jan. Srd-tf.
COAL AND PETROLEUM NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty days after date hereof, I intend
to apply to the MiniBter of LandB for
a Licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described lands, situate In tbe Fernie District of South East Kootenay, in
Block 4593.
Commencing at a post planted at
Ella Clapp's South-East corner,
thence North 80 chains, East 80
chains, South 80 chains, West 80
chains, to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Located this 6th day of June, 1914.
.  JOHN   EWIN,
25 Locator
COAL  AND PETROLEUM   NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given tlmt, sixty days after date hereof, I intend
o apply to tbe MiniBter of lands for
a Licence to prospect for cal and
petroleum over the following described lands, situate in the Fernle District of Soutb East Kootenay, in
Jlock 4.193.
Commencing at a post plnnted nt
T. B. O'Connell's South East corner,
then North 8u chains, East 80 chains
South  80 chains,  West  so cliuins,  to
point   uf
CL
.mmt'iii'i'iuent, <
toiitatiiLig
1)40 acres,
lm
ire in' li'UH.
Located
tli
ih xtli (laj ul .1
mc, 1914.
JOHN A. TANNER
Locator
.liHIN
EWIN,
■it,
Agent
COAI.  AND
PBTROLBUM
NOTIOB
-<>lll       llllll
; describ-
l'Vlllie    IliB-
otenay,   in
COAL AND PETROLEUM  NOTICE
NOTICE ie hereby given that, Bitty days alter date hereof, I intend
to apply to the MiniBter of LarnU for
a Licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following deBcrib-
ed landB, situate in the Fernie DiBtrlct ol South East Kootenay, in
Block 4593.
Commencing at a Post planted at
Lester Clapp's South-East corner,
South 80 chainB, West 80 chains,
North 80 chainB, Eaat JO chainB, to
point ol commencement, anil containing bin acreB, more or leaa.
Located this Oth day ol June, 1914.
W. F. DORAN,
Locator
JOHN EWIN,
25 Agent
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
a reserve, notice ot which appeared
in the B. C. Gazette on the 27th ot
December, 1907, is cancelled in bo lar
ns It relates to Lot 11804, Group 1,
Kootenay District, for the purpose of
the eale of same to the Canadian Pa-
cllic Railway.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister ul Lands
LandB Department,
Victoria, B. C,
4th June, 1914. 24 3tn
COAL AND PETROLEUM NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that, siity days after date hereof, I intend
to apply to the Minister ol Landa tor
Licence to prospect tor coal and
petroleum over the following described lands, situate in the Fernie District ol South East Kootenay, in
Block 4593.
Commencing at a Post planted at
One Mile North ol th.' North-East
corner ol Licence No. 8731, being one
and one-half mileB North ol Com
merce Creek, one aud one-hall miles
Bast ot Flathead river, thence North
80 chains, West 80 chains, South 80
chains, EaBt 80 chains, to point of
commencement, and containing C40
acres, more or leas.
Located this Oth day ol June, 1914.
LESTER CLAPP,
Locator
JOHN EWIN,
25 Agent
NOTICE is hereby given that, six-
ty days after dato bereol, I intend
tu ap'ply to tiie Minister of LandB for
a Licence to proapecl for
petroleum ovor tho followlu
ed IuiiiIk, Bituatfl in tin-
trict of South Baat Ko
Ulock 4593.
Commencing ut ii pust planted at
John A. Tanner's South-West corner, thence Eaat SO cliuins, thence
Houth 80 chains, thence West 80
chains, thence North 80 chains, to
point of commencement, containing
040 acres, more or l?ss.
Located this 8th ilny of June, 1914.
JAS.  DOWNEY,
Locator
JOHN   EWIN,
25 Agent
COAL ANJ) PBTROLBUM NOTICE
NOTICE Ib hereby given that, sixty days after date hereof, 1 intend
to apply to the Minister of Lnnds for
a t.icence to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described lands, situate in the Fernlo Dis
trict of South East Kootenay, iu
Block 4593.
Commencing nt a Post planted at
T. D. O'Connell's North-West cornor,
thence North 80 chnins, thence Eust
80 chains, thence South 80 chnins,
thence West 80 chnins, to point of
commencement, containing liln ncreB,
more or leas.
Located this 8th day of June, 1914.
J. I). McliHIDE,
i.orntor
JOHN  EWIN,
25 Agent
MINERAL AOT
(FORM  F.)
CERTIFICATE  OF  IMPROVEMENT
NOTICB.
STRATHCONA  MINERAL CLAIM,
SITUATE   IN    THE    FT.   STEELE
MINING DIVISION OF EAST Koo
TENAY  DISTRICT.
TAKE NOTICE that I, lieu. M.
luild, agent lur S. 11. Steele, Free
Miner's Certificate No. 07372 b, In
tend, sixty dnys Irom date hereof,
to apply to the Mining Recorder lot
Certificate ol Improvement tor the
purpose ol obtaining u Crown Grnnt
ot the above claim.
AND   FURTHER   TAKE   NOTICE
that action under Seel Ion .17 must he
commenced    belore    the  issuance   o(,t
audi Certillcate ol Improvement,
Dated this 15th dny ol June. A. II.
1914.
•25-9t GEO. M. J HDD.
COAL AND PETROLEUM NOTICE
NOTICE la hereby given that, sixty days alter date hereof, I intend
to apply tu the Minister of Landa fur
n Licence to prospect for cuul and
petroleum over the (ollowing deacrlb
ed lauds, situate in the Ferine District ot South East Kootenay, in
Hluck 459.1.
Commencing at a Post planted at
John Ewin's south went corner,
iialns, Nortli 80 chaina, West 811
chains, North 80 chnins, Wimi. so
cliuins to point ol romtuenr.'tni'lit,
and containing Mil acres, more or
leas.
Located thla Oth day of June, lill.
A. A. EWIN,
Locator
JOHN  EWIN,
25 Agent
COAL AND PETROLEUM NOTICE
NOTICE ia hereby given that, six-
ty days after date hereof, i intend
to apply to the Minister of Lands [or
a Licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described landa, situate in the Fernlo District of South Enst Kootenay, iu
Block 4593.
Commencing at n Post plnnted at
J. I). McRride's South-East corner,
Wcat 80 chains, tlience South 80
chains, tbence Enst 80 chains, thence
North 80 chains, to point of commencement, and containing I'.-IO acres
more or leas.
Located this Sth dny of .lime. 1914.
B, II. McPHBE,
Locator
JOHN EWIN,
25 Agent
COAL AND PETROLEUM  NOTICB
NOTICE la hereby given that, sixty days after date hereof, 1 intend
to apply to the Minister ot Lands [ur
a Licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described lands, situate in the Fernie District of South Enst Kootenay, in
Block 4593.
Commencing ut a post planted at
Jas. Downey's BoUth-Wt
St.uth 80 chnins. East
North 80 chnins, West 8U
point of commencement
taining 040 acres, more or
Located this sth duy of
II.
.t corner,
80 chains,
chains, to
and cod-
less.
une, 1914.
BAKIN,
Loiutor
JOHN EWIN,
Agent,
COAL  AND PETROLEUM  NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given Hint, sixty daya alter dnte hereof, I Intend
apply to the Minister of Lnnds tor
a Licence to prospect tor coal and
petroleum over the following described lands, situate ln the Fertile Dls.
trict nl   Houth   Bast   Kontenay,   In
COAL  AND  PETROLEUM   NOTICE
NOTICE la hereby given that, sixty days after date hereof, I intend
to npply to tin' Minister ol Lands jor
a Licence to prospect for run! and
potrolOUm over tho [OllOWjUg described hinds, situnte in the Kernie District of South Eust Kootenay, in
lllork 4698,
Commencing al a post planted nt
II. Enkln's South West corner, Smith
80 chains, Enst in chnins, North HO
chains, West 80 chnins, to point of
commencement, nnd containing oio
acres, inure or less.
Located thin 8th .lay of Juno, I'M I.
A. WALLER.
Locator
JOHN EWIN,
25 Agent THE PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK, B.C.
IE1E,1
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Monarch Struck Black Oil: '"^SoT*1/80"
Application Form
No need to write n letter. Simply return this application blnnk, nnn.e and address plainly written, together with
your check, postal or express money ordor attached, mnde
puyalile to John Leeifi   or Harold J. Scott.
In Are,,uut with the
FLATHEAD PBTIlOLEtlM COMPAN?
Head oniiw  Spokane, Wash.
f'apitai Stork   (50,000.00
Harold .1. Scott, 1'. 0, Boi 306.
Oranbrook, it. 0.
Dear Sir:
Vou  nre  horeby  requested '•" purchase lor my account
nnd   risk     nliiiivn of  II,.*
Capital Stock of the Flathead Petroleum Company, ut 12
cents per share; and l agree t" accept samoor any loaser
number of shares that mny be allotted me,
HncloOd please Iiml lhe sum 	
being   payment on nntno,
Iio!!,un
8HAIES12C TOUT-? TIMOUIW
WHY? Because black oil has already bcen
struck in the Flathead.
Kxperts and parly expected back to-day after locating site No. .1 well, and on their return,
i( satisfied, we doulit if you can buy many shares at anything like the present low figure of 12c
Most of tin; drilling equipment now on the ground, and we expect a gusher shortly that will
startle tic world. It is a long conceded fact that the FLATHLAD will make
big history when developed.
The FLATHEAD PETROLEUM COMPANY certainly has the choice lands
of this district.
$100 invested in a company having a $50,000 capital stock is the same as $10,000 invest
ed in ;i company having $1,000,000 capital stock.
This is a "ground Hum proposition and we believe it will make you big money if you buy
at the present price
Yesterday has been i mc cf record sales, and when the limited amount we have is sold it
completes the sale nf treasury stock.    No more can be had at any price at that time.
Flathead Petroleum
Company
Officers and  Directors
President—Colonel W. K. Mann,   Mining   ami Handling,
Wnverly, Wash.   Mr. Mann has Inspected this property.
Vivo President—0.   Jeldness,   Mining,   Hpoknne,   Wash.
Mr. Jeldness says "oil Is the best of mining."
Soerotary-Treasnrer—M. I). Couch, Oil Hxpert,   care  of
Walter J. Nlcholls ,* Co., Hpokane.
Superintendent .—(leorge   W.   Snyder,    Hxpert   Oil   Well
Contractor, Corbin, U. (!.
Advisory QeolOglBt-
81, Segur, Oil Hxpert, Calgnry.
.1. H. Haninge, Prealdont llawkcyc Kind Company, Spo-
vuuc, Wash.; A. It. Iiniuisch, Oil Hxpert, United Iron Works,
Spokane, Wash.; .1. o. Stewart, Manager Goodrich Rubber
Company, Spokane, Wash.
Attorneys- -l.tiby ft Pearson, Attorneys, Spokane, Wash.;
Harvey, MoOarter, MaoDonalil ft Nosblt, Oranbrook, n. ().
Auditor   W. I'm ter, Spokane, Wash.
Hunkers- Fidelity National Hank, Spokane, Wash.
iliai ■ a (■! a 1.1 m 1 w m '.1. - w M i H i n w m li w a ■ I ■ ll a I m i m m 1*««.- ;.< 1.'. m m m m m m m m i« on m m m m i«i mi m m w pi i-i m h i«i 1*1 m m m m m 1*1 w m m m m m m bi m m m m m m tn m mm mm m w i« m m m m u m ■ ■ ■ hi ■ ■ B THE PROSPECTOR,  CRANBROOK, B. C.
J
y
Suggestive Questions
For Sunday School Lissons
(Copyright 1914, by Rev. T. S. Lln-
scott, 1). D.)
Review—The Seeking Saviour. —
Reading Lesson Only. Heb. iv:14;
v:10.
Golden Text—The son of man camo
to seek and to save that which was
lost.   Luke xlx:10.
The following questions may he
used as an original lesson or as a
review of the twelve preceding lessons.
The date and title of each lesson,
whore found, Oolden Text aad ono
question from each lesson follow:
April 5. Christ's Table Talk. Luke
xlv:7-84. Golden Toxt—Every on'n
that exaltetb himself Bhall be humbled, and he that hiiinbleth himself
shall be exalted.   Luke xlv:ll.
1. Verse 11—Why would you say It
Is true humility to think of our
selves just as we know we are?
April 12. The Journey to EmmaiiB.
Luke ixlv:18-S5. Golden Text-It Is
Christ Jesus that died, yoa, rather
tbat was raised from the dead. Rom.
Vill:S4.
2. Verse 19—What are the quail-
ties in Jesua' life for which he Ib
most talked nbout ami venerated?
(This is one of tho questions which
may he answered ln writing hy members of the club.)
April 19. The Cost of UiBCipleship.
Luke xlv:25-85. Golden Text—Whosoever would save his life shall lose
it, and whosoever shall lose his life
for my sake Bhall find it. Matt xvi:
25.
3. Verses 28-30—Which is the better way and why, to induce people
to be Christians, to picture the gain
and say' but little of tbe cost, or to
put the cost to them bluntly as Jesus does?,
April 26. The Lost Sheep and the
Lost Coin. Luke xv:l-10. Golden
Text—There is joy ln the presence ol
the angels of God over one sinner
tbat repenteth.   Luke xv:10.
4. Verses 7-10—The scribes and
Pharisees thought they did not need
repentance, bnt which needed lt more,
and why, they, or the publicans and
sinners?
May 3. The Prodigal Son. (Temperance Lesson.) Luke xv:ll-32.
Golden Text—I will arise and go to
my father, and will say unto him,
Father, I bave sinned against heaven, and In thy sight. 'Luke xv:18.
5. Verse 18—What was the root
trouble with this young prodigal?
May 10. The Unjust Steward. Luke
xvl:l-13. Golden Text—He that ls
faithful in a very little la faithful
also in much: and he that is unrighteous in a very little is unrighteous also la much.   Luke xvl'.lO.
6. Verse 1—What are aome ot the
advantages aad disadvantages ot being rich?
May 17. The Rich Man and Lazarus.. Luke xvi:14, 15, 19-31. Golden Text—Who so stoppeth his cars at
the cry ol the poor, he shall cry and
■hall not be heard.   Prov. xxi:13.
T.   Verse 1—What ls covetousness?
May 24. Unprofitable Servants.
Luke xvlLl-10. Golden Text-He that
glorleth Itet him glory in the Lord.
I Cor. 1:31.
8. Verse 8—If a person who Injures us does not repent, but iB glad
he did lt, what should our attitude
be to him?
May 31. The Grateful Samaritan.
Luke xvil:ll-19. Golden Text-Were
there none found-that returned to
give glory to God save this stranger?  Luke xVliilS.
9. Verae 12—Wbat is tbe dtoeaBe
of leprosy, and how did lepers in
those days have to comport themselves?
June 7. The Coming of the Kingdom. Luke xvll:20-37. Golden Text
—Lo, the kingdom of God is within
you.   Luke xvii:21.
10. Verse 20—Did Christ over Intend to establish a material or outward kingdom, analogous to the best
of earthly kingdoms? Oivc your reasons.
June 14. The Friend ol Sinners.
Luke xvlll:9-14; xix:l-10. Golden
Text—I came not to call the righteous, but the sinners.   Mark 11:17.
11. Verses 11-12-How do you account for it that from this story, a
man may pray, be honest, just virtuous and a tither, and still not be
right with God?
June 21. Tbe Great Refusal. Mark
x:17-31. .Golden Text-Ye cannot
serve God and mammon. Luke xvl:
IS.
12. Verse 17—Wbat is Jesus' answer today, to those who inquire
what they must do to inherit eternal lite?
Lesson for Sunday, July a, 1914.
The Laborers ln tho Vineyard. Matt.
xxil-16.
Methodist Church
Rev. W. Elson Dunham, Pastor
Sunday servlois:    The pastor   will
preach at 11 a. in. and 7.30 p. m.
' Morning    subject:    "Sacrifice   and
Dedication."
Evoning subject: "Investment and
Increase."
There wlll bo the usual programme
of miisic under the direction of Mr.
Chas. F. Nldd.
Sunday Bchool ami Onward Bible
Class at 3 p. in.
All aro Invited to the above sorv-
ices.
Salvation Army Hall
CAPT. and MRS. HUSTLER
Saturday night, June 27, a bright
service will Ms held. Also on Sunday, the 28th. At 3 p. m. tbe Sunday Bchool Classes, subject, "David,
a Man ol His Word. Sunday night
at 8 p. m. a Salvation meeting.
AU are heartily invited.
Presbyterian Church
Rev.   W.   K.  Thomson,   pastor.
Patriotic Day.
Morning service: 11 a. m. Subject'   "Moses, the Patriot."
Sunday School and Uible Class, 3
p. m. A patriotic Bervico—Peace between Canada and the United States,
1814-1914. Parents ami frienils of tho
scholars aro cordially Invited.
Evening service: 7.30 p. m. Subject "Thy Kingdom Come in Canada."
Appropriate musics at all the services.
Choir Leader—Mr. E. Paterson.
Organist—Mr. H. Stephens.
Knox Literary and Debating Society Wednesday, 8 p. in.
"Thy will be done tn earth as It is
in Heaven."
Baptist Church
Pastor, Rev. O. E. Kendall.
Services:   11 a. m. and 7.30 p. m
Sunday School, 3.00 p. m.
Fellowship Bible class, 3.00 p. m.
Baptist Young People's Union,
Monday, 8.00 p. m.
Topic of the morning sermon will
be, "The Ways of Life, the Broad
Way and the Narrow-Lost on the
Broad Way."
Topic of the evening sermon will
be, "The Sunday School that Makes
Oood."
A cordial invitation is extended to
all.
will more than compensate   for   any
slight loss due to the harrowing.
Good tillage ministers to thc needs
of tho plant In many wayB. It may
not alwaya be possible to work tho
Boil aB froquently as theory requires,
hut it Is well to follow as closely as
practicable.
Conservation of
Ground Moisture
Whence do crops draw tbeir moisture? Do they draw it mainly from
the rains that fall during the rainy
season, or do they draw lt from the
store of water in the soil beneath the
surface which has accumulated from
the April showers, the snows of winter and the rains of autumn? Tbis
is the vital point and on it hangs
the whole question of tillage. It tba
supply is drawn from the summer
rains, our tillage must be sucb that
the soil will quickly absorb tbe rain
and discbarge the surplus supply ;it
it is drawn mainly from the spring,
winter and autumn precipitation, our
tillage must be varied accordingly.
Much will depend on the season, it
tbe season is wet, the current rains
will supply much of the moisture required, but, if the growing season is
dry, the supply must be drawn from
tho underground supplies that have
stored up the previous rains and
snow.
Ab the amount ot water lost from
tbe soil by evaporation and by the
transpiration of the plant is far in
excess of the rainfall during the per
lod of any ordinary season, the
plant must get much of its moisture
from the soil by capillarity; that is,
the water travels or is drawn upward in tbe Boil from particle to
particle as required by the plant.
This can easily he demonstrated by
placing a few plants in crocks and
setting theni down into tho soil, but
so placed that no moisture other
than the rainfall will be received by
tho plant. The result will be that
tiie plants will die from lack of moisture.
This brings up the question of how
to till In order to have the moisture
available when needed. Fall ploughing will do much towards holding
winter and spring rains. By having
the soil loosened, more water Is retained. Bub-soiling is often resorted
to as a means of so loosening the
soil that lt will bold moisture. If
tbls is done, care must he taken to
only loosen the sub-soil and not
bring lt to thc surface. Summer
tillage prevents loss of moisture. If
the soil Is left compact and solid,
tbe water comes to the surface and
Is lost by evaporation. At the same
time, the soil is left cold and less
pervious to tbe air. Frequent cultivation keops tbe weeds down, allows
more air to get into the soil, helps
to warm the soil, and, by keeping a
blanket of loose earth as a covering,
the water is prevented trom passing
off Into thc air hy evaporation and
is retained for use by tbe roots of
tho erop. After a rain lt Is a good
practice—as soon as danger oni
stickiness is paBt—to lightly cultivate or barrow the ground to restore
this blanket. It is a good plan to
run a light harrow ovor unseeded
cereals and corn alter they are up.
Tbe corn may bo lightly harrowed
before it comes up, and a couple of
times aftor lt haa come up. In harrowing cereals, care should be taken
not to harrow when the grain Is too
small to allow it to get a good
root   hold.    The   Increased moisture
Enormous gains havo lately been
made in thh amount of gold hnndloil
by the Vnncouvor government aBsay
olllce. For the ilrst ton days of May
7,000 ounces of gold dust were cashed at a valuo ot $118,000. This waB
seven times tho business dono a year
ago. The shipments were largo in
numbor, nono excessively large in
comparison, hut coming from many
different placos in the Yukon, Kootenay antl Cariboo.
"Reflections"
As   tbe   sun goes   down beyond the
Boa
And stars peep from the.Bky,
1 sit and gaze o'er the watry ways
And list to the sea birds cry.
Then I dream of a land Ho lovely and
fair
RellectV'd in silvery light,
Where   youth   is   draped lu Its garments rare
Resplendent In beautiful white.
And altho' my lot it ne'er may ho
To live in this garden fair,
Yet, I often shnll dream, us I sit hy
the sea,
Of this land that knows no care.
FRANK GREEN
Advertising as an
Imperial Factor
The following article, contributed
by L. O. Jackson to The Britannic
Review, written from the English
point of view, is a striking and cogent endorsation of the policy of
Canada in advertising her resources
by every means in her power:
"At the first glance there may appear to be something of the unworthy mixture of dignity and impudence
in the phrase 'Advertising aB an Imperial Force,' but on examination it
will prove to be by no means i
mere contradictory impertinence, but
instead, a very potent and important
fact. The error that causes the tirst
view consists as a rule in a misconception as to the definition of the
word 'advertisement.' 'A bringing
into public notice' is what the die
tionary calls it; that is to say, advertisement means a presentment of
the facts about something before the
notice of a large number of people.
"Let us apply this delinition to
the case of the Dominions when
they are seeking loans for industrial
or governmental purposes. When an
individual desires financial aid for
his business he seeks it in quarters
where he is known, when a Dominion
requires bucIi aid it, too, must seek
it where it Ib known. But how is it
to become *;nown? There is so much
into which the prospective investor in
colonial stock should inquire; and that
much-courted individual is as a rule
too urgently employed to make systematic search for his information.
If it is not carefully prepared for
him, he will pass by a Dominion
Stock for some more insistently belauded form uf investment. If, however, he has t*>en the agriculture,
the commerce, the development, the
enterprise, the possibilities of tbat
Dominion in pictures, in printed
matter, in windows plenisbed like the
horn of Ceres, and has heard its
praises on the lips of multitudes, his
attention Is prepared and his interest awakened when the call comes to
him to take a tinaucial share in its
prosperity.
"The amazing ease with which Canada within the short Hpace of twelve
months negotiated n loan of twelve
millions Bterling in the London market is a magniliceut example of the
impetus given to Dominion finance
hy judicious advertisement. There is
nothing unworthy ur undignified in
this; there iB no absurd pulling or
exaggeration necessary to real advertisement; bucIi Ingredients in a
scheme of advertising may poison the
whole. Canada has stated insistently and publicly, stated with the aid
of all the available meclmnlsm for
disseminating knowledge, that she
possesses certain great advantages
for the investor and tbe emigrant;
but the factor tbat makes her statement fruitful is that it is true. Yet
were it truo to twice the value, it
would not bear half the fruit were
that truth not told and told again
to the public in many attractive and
convincing forms. In the name way
tbo (Governments of tbe Commonwealth of Australia and of New /en-
land hnve been able to negotiate
great loans for tholr projects and
purposes. For overy important industrial undertaking for which tho
Dominions require money thoy como
to a public prepared by tho method
of advertisement and Instructed by
that method in the vahie and tho
history of the projects In which they
are going to he asked to participate,
"Not only for money, but for thnt
greater asset for a new country,
population, the Dominions make uso
of the great powers of instruction
embraced in wbat we call advertise-
Of All Human Blessings
al liberty Is Riied
the Highes
AMERICANS holding
1 \ such ideals have built the
name and established the fame
of BUDWEISEH. For 57
years its quality, purity, mild-
[  ness and exclusive Saazer
Hop flavor have stood above
all other bottled beers as the
Statue of Liberty towers above
the sky line of New\&rk
harbor. Its sales exceed any
other beer by millions of
bottles.
' BOTTLED ONIY AT THE HONE PLANT
ANHEUSER-BUSCH
ST. LOUIS
A. C. Bowness
Distributor
Cranbrook, B. C.
Budweis
Means Moderation
ment. It is not to be thought that was victor,
tho idea of emigrating and settling ■ which was
in a new country will spring Minerva-like from the rustic brain. The
whole of the possibilities of emigration are carefully thought out and
made widely public; every kind of
career is dealt with and explained;
the minutest details of passage und
accommodation are clearly sot out.
Wbat has been the result since the
inception of this systematic method
of spreading knowledge? Between 1905
and 1912 the raee of emigration from
this country to Canuda increased by
225 per cent and to Australia 530 per
cent.
What is the tendency shown by
these astounding figures and the dir- t,,fi country and received the reins
eet result of their achievement? Sure- of power. He succeeded in that poly this, that circulation, which iH as nition Hon. George Perley, Whosu
vital to the body politic as to the fortune it had bven to lead his par-
body physical, in bolng thoroughly ty through what the facetious al-
stimulated and  invigorated    by   this ways called "the pearly gates."
It was one of the signs
rightly interpreted as
marking the beginning of the end for
the rule of the Laurier Government.
And the same qualities which impressed themselves upon tbe hard-
headed electors of Colchester county
in that famous fight of 1907 soon
won, ia tbe House of Commons, for
John i Stanfield the same eminent
place in the esteem of his fellow-
members.
John Stanfield is today chief whip
of the Conservative forces in the
House of Commons. That position
he was named to after the' general
election of 1911, when the Conservative forces came back victorious from
wise and wide dissemination of intelligence. Sympathies are being
awakened and common interests created between places aud peoples, thnt
but for this had remained in mi indifferent oblivion of each other's
needs and Ideals.
10very pound thnt Is invosted in
our Dominions carries with it nu interest more potent than percentages;
every British subject who emigrates
from these islands to the Greater
Britain overseas ilruws with him the
threads of association for his new
home from his old one. All this advertisement of our Dominions should
serve to keep ns in mind oi the fact
that we are of one blood with our
peoples beyond the seas, nnd the
more we know about each other, the
more will we he able to sympathize
ith the lives, the interests, the
aims nnd the ideals of our fcith aud
kin in tho Dominions and Colonies.
We are told that knowledge is
power, and it is a very obvious
truth that the power of this Empire
will (ie influenced enormously by tho
degree of thoroughness of the mutual
knowledge possessed among the Dominions of each other. For knowledge will beget understanding, and
misunderstanding is as grave n danger to the unity and goodwill of
widely separated peoples as it is to
that of widely separated families. It
Is therefore, of the utmost Importance to encourage in every wny all
the possible means of Widening nnd
increasing that, knowledge; and of
these means the chief is advertisement."
Character Sketch
JOHN  HTANKIIOI.D,  M.  P.
chief Government whip
John Stanfield, chief Government,
whip, will always he known iu Ottawa as the mnn who broke thn "solid eighteen." The solid phnlnn/, "f
Liberal members which Hon. W. B.
Fielding hnd led to Ottawa year after year from Nova Scotia received
ita death blow when the young Conservative stnlwnrt from Colchester,
in   the   famous   by election ot I'M,
POSITION NO SINECURE.
Thc position of chief whip is no
sinecure, whether of Government or
Opposition forces. In the former, in
this case, perhaps, it is the more
difficult, because the large majority
in the beginning, conducive to care-
lield by the Borden Government was,
lessness on the part of Government
members, who imagined that tbeir
abstention from party division would
not have any appreciable effect. But
to John Stanfield, who is responsible
for the attendance of members nt
Important divisions in the House,
abstention from duty was and is a
crime. Today members have become
so well school in their duties in th'o
respect that the chief Government
whip finds that his precepts and
teachings are well observed, an 1
within the last few days Mr. Stanfield had what to him must have
been an exquisite pleasure, wnei
there was rolled up on the first vote
in the C. N. R. debate thc larg'i*
majority since the present. Government came into power.
HB HAS ASSISTANTS.
For the marshalling of the party
forces at Ottawa thu-o is provided
an elaborate machinery. It is at the
head of this that thc chief whin
stands. He must, through his Hen
tenants, ho In close touch with the
wheraboiits of every member of his
party at all times when the House
is lu session nnd when there is any
likelihood of a division taking plnce,
For this purpose there are appointed
assistant whips for the varlous'prov-
inces, one for a province hnvlng hut
a few memliorH, two anil even three
for the provinces winch send a large
delegation to Ottawa, Th'u whole
forcn Is on duty In times when critical questions aro helng discussed,
nnd woe betide the lieutenant who
falls down tn the duty of having Ills
men on hand. It is the practical side
of politics that has to bo played at
Ottawa if tho principles for which
tbo party stands nn' to he really
carried out.
DEMANDS SACRIFICE.
This devotion to duty d-mauds
naturally considerable sacrifice from
tho chief whip.   It Is a tribute to tho
inherent principles of Conservatives
that they can attract young men
with large business interests like Mr.
Stanfield to spend six and seven
months of the year in Ottawa, for
from their own work, for the purpose of advancing tbe cause of tbe
people. To those who arc continually decrying the decay of unselfishness
in politics, thoro is hefore them the
example of mlm like Stanfield, wbo
work hard for the Bake of their party and the people at what must be
to the m a constant financial
loss. Other men with large
business interests criticize from afar.
but tnke cure not to enter into the
party struggle themselves. Such men
cnn learn some lessons from many
young men in the Conservative party today who nre Imbued with a
strong sense of the greatness of tbe
Dominion nnd of how they can exert
strong Influences for its uplifting and
betterment.
Thc Interests of the chief whip are
not alone confined to politics and
business for he takes a keen interest
in the militia movement. He is today the Honorary Lleutonant-Oolon
el in the 7th Colchester nnd Hants
Rifles, a regiment that has a record
for shooting and for general efficiency, due in no small degree to the
personal Interost which Colonel
Stanfield hns taken, In their work.
HIS WORD NEVER FAILS.
It is needless to say that for a mon
to possess influence over such varied
combinations of character, which
are to ho found in the ranks of the
Conservative! pnrty, that he himself
must, be possessed of patience, tact,
good humor and reliability. The last
mentioned   qualification   is  extremely
necessary in the duties of chief whip.
He is constantly in delicate negotiations with members of the Opposition party, concerning the pairing of
members, the dates set for divisions,
the order of speakers in :i debate,
nnd many such like amenities which
enter into the conduct of Parliament.
John Stanfield has never yet had his
puv  '.isuojj .mu ui pspot^senb pjo«
on more than one occasion since the
present party came into power tho
leader of tho Opposition hns given
voice in the Chamber to his appreciation of the manner in which the
chief Government; whip has nlwnys
carried out his promises. Por John
Stanfield a verba! agreement with'a
pnrty opponent is as Bacred ns if it
were sworn to on a Uible, or sealed
in a document. Thus the man who,
in a sense, holds in his own personal keeping the individual honor of every members of his pnrty, has done
credit to ench of them by his high
sense of private and public duty.
THIS GOOD OF THB PARTY.
Mr. Stnnlleld receives no pny for
his work. He simply carries out the
task allotod to him, expecting nothing but that the good of his party
may he finally sought, ln the end
to such men the gods are (rood, and
in a growing country [Ho Canada,
where honorable positions in the
slate nre continually requiring men
of the calibre of the chief 1 onserva-
tive whip, there is sure to be found
a place for the member for Colchester. But for the present he finds a
dully delight iu assisting the Borden
Government in carrying out the mandates given to them by the people.
And In such a work he plays no
small part, and does it well.
Up To Date.
The person who is thoroughly abreast of the
times in in a position to profit hy nil the new ideas
that arc evolved. There ia money-saving and
labor-saving in uuch knowledge.
And in no place is there such a wealth of real
up-to-date news as in thc advertising columns. If
an invention is really good, it can only bc male
profitable by advertising, so wide awako manufacturers and dealers use the advertising columns
to acquaint you with their products.
Are you profiting by their information?
Do you carefully read the advertisements? THE PROSPECTOR. CRANBROOK, BRITISH COLUMBIA
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Gaskell 4 Mac Vittys Splendid Production
at the AUDITORIUM
One Night   -  Tuesday, June 30th
PRICES:  50C   $1.00,  $1.50.
SEATS ON SALE AT BEATTIE-MURPHY'S STORE
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CONVENIENT Burns coal, coke, or
wood. Large feeddoors make firing easy.
WCtaryi
Sunshine
Iluy*'
suita-
S.
.ffrrwen —*_—_-* Water vaa ls *iUe(*
JLiMMliSLCC without removing.
See the McClary dealer or write for booklet.
Sold by Patmore Bros., Cranbrook, B. C.
bi e Uwnersl
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Firestone"
Tires' Tubes,
and Accessories,
always in stock at the
HANSON   GARAGE
■
i!
a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a b a a
Plants for Sale
Victoria Rhuharh 21c per lb. $2,00
per 100 IbB. Bedding plnntu, .Intern,
Lobelia, Pansy, Stocks, Petunias,
Chinese Pinks, etc., 85c, per dozen.
FuHchiaH, Geraniums, Ivy, etc. iu
pots 20c. to 50c, each. Cabbage and
Celery plants 50c. per UIO. Hhuharh
roots 10c, raspberry canes Be. Russian Poplars 10c, 2 year Asparagus
root 5c, cash with order, delivered
free.    AddreBs, H. Creese,  Wattsburg
For Sale Rents & Wants
AGENTS.—Wreck of Empress of Ireland. Heart-thrilling dollar hook.
Extraordinary Heller. Authoritative;
proluHely Illustrated, Listen to
Canada's heart-rending cry: Wire or
write for free CflnvasilDg book. Big
commission, freight paid. Credit
given. Bradley-Garretson, Urantfonl,
Ont.
FOR    BXCHANOB-Have    Siiuou.Oo,
equity in    inside  Port.  Mann   acre-1
age, subdivided.   What have   you   to,
offer.    Phone   318.   Ed,   Bhiictteton.
•24-4t
» ——- .- — ■
ACTIVE    TEACHERS - Why       not
U»ake twenty to fifty dollars weekly during vacation taking ord/UTfl for
Tragic Story ol EmprosB of Ireland?
Local News
We carry J500.II0 stock in Mould-
itiKB and Picture Framing accessories.
80 samples to select Irom. KII.IIV
FRAMES PICTURES.
UoyB' HuitB-C c. S.
Horn—At, Cranbrook, mi June 2ttli,
to Mr. anil .Mrs. „. II. Patmore, a
daughter.
Beale & Klwell, Steatnahtp Agents.
Tbey book yon tbrougb from Cranbrook.
Born—At Crnnbrook on June 18th
to Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Ward, a
daughter.
GRANT REPAIRS HARNBB8.
PHONK 1(6. ORANBROOK BX-
OHANQD,
Mount Baker has neen covered with
storm clouds nil tbis week and as
yet nobody has suspected  oil.
Boys'  Sults-O.  C.  H.
Marvellous
dollar
book
golni
like   a
prairie lire
Rush
order
for f
'00 saui-
j>lo    book.
Urndl
ly-Garrotson,  BeHk
fl., Ilrantti
rd, On
C, M, Penuoek
il Wu
duet
was   In
town Thursday.
Hpaclal
valuo
lu    1
Ittlo
Cents
Tweed and
Merge
Suite.
-0,
:. H.
Mr. and Mrs. J. I). Meliridc and
daughter have gone on a motor trip.
Their destination  is Calgary.
KILBY   FRAMES   PICTURES
Mra. J. A. Starke and child, Mr.
J. Jordan and A. F. Logan of lnvermere, were Cranbrook visitors Thursday.
Speclnl value in Little fonts
Tweed nnd  Serge Suits.—U.  C.  S.
c. H. MoDoiigal of Klmhorloy was
registered at tbe. Oranbrook Thursday.
Mra. Maurice tjnnin will not receive
again this season.
BRINO YOUR 01,11 PIPE TO BOB'S
PLACE FOB  HUPAIRS
Mrs. 0, L. Coflln, and MIsb Kcla-
ler, of Yahk, were visiting at. Cranhrook  Wednesday.
Mrs Lund ,(ud Miss Lun,! of Ward
Der, were guests at the Cranbrook
Thursday.
Mr. and Mrs. Q, Wilson of Lethbridge were registered at the Cranbrook Thursday.
Boys'  Suits—0,  0.  S.
Harry McKowan of the sash aud
door company, was at Letbbridg? on
company business this week.
Heale _ Elwell's Safety Deposit
Vault is the safest place for your
deeds and valuables.   Nominal rental.
Born—At Cranbrook on Thursday,
June 25, to Mr. and Mrs. E. F.
Brierly, a  daughter.
Boys'   Suits—C.  C.  S.
Grading this week has been done
on Edward street and between Garden and Lumsden avenues.
KILBY     FRAMES     PICTURES
New sidewalks have been laid by
the city on Cranbrook street between
Hyde and Harold streets.
Boya' Suits—C. C.  S.
Ed. Home, of Bull River, manager
of the C.P.R.mills, was in town ot
Wednesday  transacting company bu
siness.
Boys'  Suits—C.  C.  8.
G. H. Scott ol Nelson was in town
this week. Mr. Scott is a mining
man, having large IMcrests on Perry Creek.
Nil dock's Cleaners and Tailors, cn
and after July 1st, will occupy No.
22 Norbury Avenue as their place ol
business.   Phone 370. 2C-4t
The public schools closed on Friday. During the past week the High
School pupils have heen engaged in
writing their departmental esanis.
Boys'  Suits—C.  C.  S.
We failed to hear a single complaint about Thursday's rnin Irom
the fellows who have lawns to sprinkle.
Our Hoys' .Suits are new. Juat opened up this wc-'k.—C. O. 8.
Mrs. Beech and children left Thurs-
hoine of Mrs. Beech's parents, where
day morning for Lindsay, Ont., the
they expert to remain for some time
owing to the sickness ot her father.
GRANT REPAIRS HARNESS.
PHONE 166. CRANBROOK EXCHANGE.
The regular monthly meeting of the
Methodist Ladies Aid Society will be
held at tbe home ol Mrs. John Shaw
on Thursday afternoon, July 2nd, at
il   p.   Ml.
Whnt about that, property you
were thinking of buying? Arc you
still paying rent? Properly is cheap
nnd now Is the time to buy, See
Beale & Elwell, who can arrange easy
terms.
The pupils of Miss Alice Pye will
give tbelr annual recital noxt
Tuesday morning, June 30th, nt 10.30
a. m., in tbe Masonic ball. No Invitations are neing Issued, but all parents anil friends of pupllfl aro Invited
to attend.
Want a Wedding Ring?
At tile Rex theatre next week special  programmes have I ,, prepared.
Manager JohOBOII Hays thai houic of
the most exciting anil Interesting
Minn ever produced ate Included In
the week's programme.
A superior line of Dime wlll ho
shown tonight nt tho Kdison theatre, a special feature being "The Kv-
You can get the best in weight
and workmanship here for little money and any other bind
of Rings at a considerable reduction. We have a large assortment of very fine Jewelry
and precious stones and will
be glad to bave you call and
Inspect them at your leisure.
There will be no pressure to
buy unless the goods tempt
you to do so.
RAWORTH
BROS.
Jewelers & Opticians
Cranbrook,    -    -    B. C.
The
'Rexall Store'
The Store with a Reputation
KOOTENAY'S
GREATEST
DRUG
&
BOOK
STORE
The
Beattie - Murphy
Co., Ltd.
"Where It Pays to Deal"
Cranbrook       -        B. C.
11 Genius," ln two reels, also "The
Senator's Bill" and "Slim and the
Dynamiters." See posters lor next
week's programmes.
Hoys' Huits-C. C. S.
T. C. Oosfcrovo, who returned Irom
a holiday trip to Portland recently,
had a narrow escape on Saturday
last Irom a serious injury, while
driving the 41 Market delivery team,
when his horses attempted to run
away. He is now receiving medical
attention nt  the Neal Institute.
KILBY     FRAMES     PIOTURBS
(leo. Powell hns leased Ills cleaning nnd pressing department to Albert Wnrcr nud Margaret Teely lor
onn year Irom June 22nd. Both ol
theso workers are experienced cleaners and work trusted to their hands
will bo taken good care of nnd finished In expert style.
At the end ol tho month, Juno 30,
tho Kootenny Telephone Lines Ltd.,
terminate their agret nt with   the
Great North Western aud Western
Union Telegraph Companies, aud cannot after that dale accept telegraph
business for transmission over these
lines. 26-at
The Cranbrook Agricultural Association issued their annual prize list
tbls weak, copies of which can he
had at the association offices, if not
already received through the mail.
The list contains some good prizes
and portrays some interesting events
to te pulled oil on September ir,th
and 16th,
Clothe your boy now while we have
a good assortment of patterns and
sizes.—C. C. 8.
L. P. Van Decar ol Vancouver aad
formerly ol Cranbrocri was in town
this week in connection with the desired alteration the city have requested him to make to the veranda
in Iront ol tbe Royal hotel, which
is one of his properties. The reason Ior this alteration is that the
city are anticipating altering the
grade on Cranbrook street and placing a new sidewalk thereon.
Charles Moore and Elizabeth Gray
Cameron were united in the bonds ol
matrimony on Thursday at Mayook.
The service was held at the home ol
the bride's parents and officiated over by Rev. W. K. Thomson ol Cranbrook. A large number of friends
and acquaintances were present to
wish them good luck and God's
speed. The happy couple anticipate
taking up their residence in Fernle.
GRANT REPAIRS HARNESS.
PHONE 166. CRANBROOK EXCHANGE.
The Chief ot Police Ib in receipt ol
a communication Irom Scotland ro
the whereabouts ot David Robertson Ferguson, a native ol Perthshire,
who has been known to bave resided
in tbis district within the last two
yeara. Anyone who can give any information as to his whereabouts at
present should communicate at once
with the Chief of Police, Cranbrook.
In Scotland there is awaiting something tbat would be ol advantage to
Mr. Ferguson and well worth his
while to get in touch with the proper parties at once,
BRING YOUR OLD PIPE TO BOB'S
PLACE FOR REPAIRS
Roys' Sults-O. C. 8.
Robert II. It. Edan ol Oxford, Mr.
Walford ot Hereford, Douglas Graham ol Monmouth, Wales, and W.
Orr ol Aye, Scotland, wore visitors
to Wasa this week looking over their
Interests In connection with tbe Unionist Investment Co., owners ol the
Wasa Hotel. Mr. Edan is the managing director ol the company. In
paaslng through Cranbrook they incidentally called in at Harold Scott's
office and purchased $900.00 worth ol
Stock ln thc Flathead Petroleum Oil
Co., ol which he Is agent.
W. W. KILBY
PRACTICAL     PICTURE     FRAMER
ARMSTRONG AVENUE
P. O. Box 802 Cranbrook, B.O.
BEATTIE-MURPHY CO
MME < STATEMENT
Wa alwaya advise peoplo who havo
stomach or bowel trouble to sea a
doctor. But to those who do not
wish to do this we wlll say: try the
mixture ol simple buckthorn bark
glycerine, etc., known aa Adler-1-kal
This simple new remedy 1* so powerful that JUST ONE DOSE uaually
relieves sour stomach, gas on tho
atomach and constipation QUICKLY.
Peoplo who try Adler-i-ka ara surprised at Ita QUIOK action. Tha
Biattle-Murphy Oo. 41-tt
ASK FOR
FIVE RESJt
The World's Best
Send/or Five Roses
COUPON
Write  N«M  sjA  AUm   eUinly.
Pant fw|M MMint T«D C«Q»
m stamp*
•UME OT OCALCR a
Cook Book-
BEING A MANUAL OF COOD RECIPES carefully
them from tho contribution* of ever two thowand
ouccewful wm of FWR6M Flow throughout Canada.
Ako Ureful NotM on tht variow claaee* ol food thing*
10 Mt all ol whkh have been, carefully checked and
re<hecked by competent authority.
M*mwEimli>tt«UUgy wwwBMiiMcautira,wii^
Oranbrook  Jobbers,  Ltd.
DISTRIBUTORS,   ORANBROOK
f.
—When a Lady
buys Perfume—
—She chooses it with as much discrimination as she does her gowns and hats.
It must bo distinctive in character—it must breathe
refinement—und it must be of strictly high quality.
Corson's Toilet Requisites till nil these requirements,
whether in Perfumes, Toilet Waters, Face Creams,
or Talcs.
They nre composed of the most expensive materials, carefully compounded by
skilled chemists.
or~yon.
' perfumesfi'Joilet'fiequisites
Cumin's "IDEAL ORCHID" and Conon'i "POMANDER" lino ul
Perfume. Tuilet Water, lithium t'uwjer, etc,, ure particular favorite!.
Aik J.ir Jreniit l.r 10t. i»p!e el Ibe Ortlld .Jer. 1
SOVEREIGN PERFUMES LIMITED     ■     •     TORONTO, ONT.
f&etlmtivAiytagegem if Ite ma**/ettaeee/Jtnfliimte md Temrl Ki,.i,Hii}

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