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The Prospector Jul 4, 1914

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 Provincial   Legislative Assembly
Auto
,50c.
Wilson
Goggles
from
to $2.00
- Jeweller
Mptitat
The Leading Newspaper
in the
Kootenays
The
"Prospector"
$2.00 Per Year
V O L U M N E    20.
CRANBROOK,    B.    C.       SATURDAY       MORNING    JULY    4,     1914.
No. 27
Industries Follow Farmers
Is Paternalism Advisable ?
By A. E. Watts
During the vlBlt ol Mr. (1. J. Bury, i
vice-president ol the Canadian Pad- |
He railway, to the weat, he said he
"lound that mnny industrial bureaus
and hoards ol trade were giving mora
time to fanning questions and less
to ellorts towards transporting Industries to places where they were
entirely out ol place or a long time
lu advano? ol the times. He found
the belle! was gradually taking hold
that it would he better to develop
tbe surrounding country rather than
to endeavor to attract a greater population than the mtrroundlng country would support.
Amongst many other things of
ttreat Interest Mr. Bury said: "I
wish to emphasize more than ever
my conviction that until there is a
better adjustment ol urban and rural population in this country tbere
will continue to be a lack of adjustment ot the financial and commercial business. By this I mean that
cities and towns must stop doing so
much to attract people to the centres until they have more people on
the land."
It is a very encouraging sign ot
the times when we see eminent men
taking an interest In matters ot tbls
kind. Many writers, including myself, have written volume after volume on thla Bubject, and whilst Mr.
Bury Is correct in his analysis ot
the situation up to a certain point,
his assertions will not bear the
probing of a deeper and more search -
ing analysis.
Mr. Bury says: That tbe people
should move lor themselves, and that,
cne other of the troubles that he believes is confronting us is tbat we
expect too much paternalism. Kvery
move that is made or every proposition that ia put carries with lt the
idea that the Government must father it. Why not stop tbls paternalism
idea and try something ourselves?
Got up strong organizations that
will deal each with its own district
and ask the cities to devote as much
energy to promoting the industry ol
the farm as they'attempted to do in
promoting industries in tho cities.
Industries will come and will locate
in the centre ol the district tbat offers tbe best market for their goods.
All other efforts must be abortive.
Whilst Mr. Bury's remarks aro lull
ol sound common sense, his strictures on paternalism to my mind are
rather out ol place. Presuming that
the people ot Canada had never
treated great railway corporations
paternally, tbe railways today would
bo non-existant or pretty nearly bo.
Without paternalism or protection
whore would the lead, Bteel and iron
industries in Canada be to-day? Infant industries stand in need of
nursing, hence the rapid strides made
by tbe United States ln building up
her mighty manufacturing concerns
owing to the appreciation of this
lact. Nd person possessed ot any
business acument should object to
tho nursing of inlant Industries or
governmental assistance to great
railway corporations to a reasonable extent, but the public aro beginning to realize that rather too
much assistance has been given to
mighty corporations and too little
assistance to the worklngmcn and
producers who will he called upon ln
the near Iuture to bear thc mighty
bunt-no which will bo imposed upon
Canada, to pay interest on tbe mnny
hundreds ot millions spent in advance
ol the country's requirements, und it
is rather ungrateful for representatives of corporations to preach the
discontinuance ol paternalism atter
moot of it baa been exhaused on
themselves.
Whilst tho worklngmen of Canada
(the producers) would not object to
wbat has bison done lor tbe'corporations, provided tbey, the producers,
received say one-tenth part ol the
consideration that the corporations
havo enjoyed hitherto, and in,preaching this doctrine, il the corporations
Irom a business point ot view would
study thoir own interests they would
assist, rather than discourage the
proposal so many times made, that
tho Government assist the producers
or would-be producers to produce Instead ol attracting hundreds of
thousans of people to this country
to shift for themselves as hest they
may.
It is all very well to tell the people to form strong organizations
amongst themselves hut it Is not so
easy to tell thorn how to form
strong organizations. It Is absolutely impossible for an aggregation
ol struggling BettlerB to lorm a
atrong organisation, very lew things
in this world are strong without
great tlnancial backing. Neither can
rapid strides he made in the development ol thc agricultural possibilities, especially in BritlBh Columbia,
without lin.tncinl assistance trom the
Government, and the reasons are so
obvious to any person who really understands tbe situation,
Mr. Bury says that British Columbia possesses thousands of acres of
good agricultural Innd, somo ol lt
cleared; lie might go further and say
that British Columbia possesses hundreds of thousnnds ot acres1' of the
finest kind of agricultural land which
presents the greatest opportunities
for producing .more than the Province could consume, and yet statistics show that out of every six eggs
consumed In British Columbia, it
produces one, and other agricultural
products in equal proportion are consumed but not raised in the country. Potatoes in the Interior of British Columbia' today are sold at $40
per ton, and they are being Imported from the States. Yet there are
thousands of people in the Province
unemployed, hundreds ot work teams
arc idle, mills and tactorles closed
down, and the aloresaid hundreds of
thousands of acres remain unfilled,
and I am sadly atraid that Mr.
Bury's suggested panacea will not
prove a cure-all for the serious state
of affairs now existing. That is,
without prompt and energetic Government paternalism ot the same nature that mads Denmark a prosperous country, which today is furnishing our own Mother Country with
thrsMourths of the butter used, and
which is also doing so much tor New
Zealand, Australia and other overseas Dominions.
Whilst the struggle is hard for the
poor settler on the clear prairie land
which is neady for thc plow, it is a
hundred times harder for the poor
settlor of British Columbia to transform thj primeval torest into a productive garden. Thousands of abortive attempts have;been made by honest struggling men to root up the
stumps and till the land, but the difficulty which confrontB the greater
proportion of the poor settlers iis not
lack ot muscle or determination but
lack ot lunds. I can point to many
instances where log shacks have been
abandoned and attempts made to
clear i the land and render it productive and in most cases the men had
to .leave their holdings'and soek employment to obtain the means ol Bttb-
sistance.
Whereas, many have made abortive
attempts the same to my knowledge
could have been successful had the
struggling settlers received a very
small amount of financial assistance
or paternal caro trom the Government. It hns never been suggested
that this should be done to an extent as generouB with the poor
would-bo producers as it has been
done for the mighty corporations,
Canada would lind no dlfflrulty in
raising one hundred' million dollars
or more when required at 4 per cent.
and would Hnd less difficulty In lending the money i at 6 per cent, to
those engaged in the agricultural industry, that is the only kind of
Btrong organization tbat can possibly bo effective and Mr. Bury will
admit this would bn sound business,
at the samo time I am sure the peoplo would be glad to hear Mr. Bury's
views on this vital matter nt greater length, and possibly he may he
converted to tbe toregolng slnco I
bnve shown thnt it would be sound
business. There ls no valid reason
why the Government should not advance money to the tanner nt a low
rato of interest to purchase better
grades of stock of all kinds, or to
loan money on improved Inrms and
also to struggling settlers, in proportion to the Initial improvements
under way. Tbe security w.ould be
good provided of course the land wns
good, und if It Ib of no value then
tbe people ought not to bo invited
to come to the country.
The paternalism ot tho Dominion
and Provincial Governments bas been
more than paternal, we might say
oven maternal in Its loving care ol
the great corporations, many being
provided with lltindrods1 of millions
ol dollars, and million after million
of acres ot land including timber being presented to them.
Now, let us analyze tho lumber situation and paternalism toward one
railway compnny which wns granted
over $13,000.0(1 per mile In cash lor
building tbe Crow's Nest Pass Railway, and lour million acres ol tho
(Coutiuued on Page   8.)
New Water System
A special meeting of tho Municipal
Council was held on Tuesday evening in the council chamber to consider tenders for tbe construction of
the new wnter system. Thore were
present Mayor Taylor, and Aldermen Campbell, Leask, Hickenboth-
nm, Cameron, Horie and Genest.
The lollowlng bids were filed:
P. Benin, of Fernie, for the construction of thc pipe line only, $34,-
9113.
tl. Broley & Co., of Penile, for the
construction of the pipe line only,
.88,(80.81.
Vnncouver Wood Tank nnd ripe
Co., pipe laying J2!i,Ml.M; construction ol dam, $11,107.89.
Horton, Leader ft Oood, ol Lethbrldge, pipe laying, f2tl,000; dam, X,-
000. II granteed thn contract for
pipe laying, will reduce thc cost ot
constructing dam to $4,000.
The council then resolved into a
committee ol the whole to consider
thc several tenders. On rising, it
waB reported that the tender ot Horton, Leader ft Good had been accepted; tbat the company would put
up a bond of $20,000 as a guarantee
to complete the work as Bpecltled by
December 31, 1914, provided the Pipe
arrives in Cranbrook on or before
August 15; tbnt white labor, resident of Cranbrook, would be pKeferr-
ed, the wage to be $2.50 per day of
ten hours.
A contract for smnll fittings, such
as service valves, clamps, etc., was
given to Mueller Manufacturing Co.
of Sarnia.
Engineer McCullough was instructed to purchase one No. 20 tapping
machine, and n No. 1 Miller drilling
machine.
On motion of Aldermen Cameron
and Genest the Chief of the Fire Department and City Clerk were Instructed to enter Into a contract for
the purchase of 500 feet of Are hose.
Council then adjourned.
McConnell Sues the "Sun"
Vancouver, B. C, July 2.—John
P. McConnell, former editor ol the
Vancouver Sun, a morning paper, has
issued a writ out ot the supreme
court againBt the Burrard Publishing company, owners ol the Sun, and
F. C. Wade, K. C, president of tbe
company.
Mr. McConnell alleges tbat bis sus-
' pension and subsequent dismissal
'from the position of editor came as
j a result of Mr. Wade's desire to himself control the policy of tbe paper
' and their differences of opinion which
j developed particularly over the newspaper's comments on the case of
|jai>: Kong. McConnell alleges that
j Wade's view was, in his opinion, too
friendly to the Chinese side of the
case and an editorial written by McConnell, and published against instructions, denouncing orientals and
approving wholesale dismissals of
Chinese from private homes, was thc
climax, according to the lengthy recital of the writ, which caused thc
final brca»i.
| Mr. McConnell Is suing for $30,000
damages and an injunction from the
j court to prevent Mr. Wade continu-
1 Ing to dictate the policy of the pap-
'er.
| Mr. McConnell alleges that Mr.
| Wade's pro-Chinese attitude wus in
' direct contradiction to tbo articles
,ot incorporation ol the company,
which called lor support ol the Liberal party.
Sent for Trial
High Kiver, Alta,, July 2.-Com-
mltted for trial on a charge of an
attempt to kill and slay one Edward
Little, by exploding dynamite in the
vicinity of hiH dwelling house is the
result of tha preliminary hearing of
the ease in which Tom Ulshop and
Iiiii Kummer, Ugure as the defendants. The evidence was taken today
at the police barracks before Frank
J. P. Crean, justice of the peace.
i<Mward Little was the chief wit-
uesH and his statemeut of the case
was to the effect that Ulshop and
Kummer in an intoxicated condition
camo to his shack at Coal Coulee
about 10 o'clock on Haturday night
and broke a window. Ou the Thursday previous there bad been trouble
mid Bishop and Little had fought.
Both men bit and Mishop made the
parting threat that he would come
bnck and lick him. 'I'he approach of
the men on their return on Saturday
night was known to witness by the
shouting of Bishop. Little saw the
men through the window and fearing
trouble turned the catch on the door
witli the hope that when the men
found it locked they might go away.
He then laid down on a bed and
about half an hour latei he heard a
scratching noise under the end of the
shnck not far trom wliere tho bed
stood.
BLOWN OUT OF BED.
There was an explosion, the witness Was thrown out of bed, the concussion forced tbe door open, blew a
large opening in the end of the building and tho bed on which he was lying was broken ln pieces. Witness
immediately ran out and at the front
of the house met Kummer wlio asked
whnt had happened.
Dynamite for use in coul mining is
opt in a Bhed, some distance from
the shack, the.door of which Is' fastened with lock and staples, the staples were drawn and the door brok-
eu open. Witness was positive that
dynamite was the cause of the explosion aud thought tbat perhaps
two or three sticks h? believed came
from his supply in the Bhed. Constable Carr gave evidence as to the
arrest of the men at a house near
Conl Coulee. Both men wpre in an
intoxicated condition, the house was
searched and a revolver and two otber guns were found and retnined by
the ofllcers. The case is creating
considerable locul interest as all
three parties are well known i in High
River.
Drink figures largely all through
the case and it is another demonstration of the remarkable eRrape
which Intoxicated men so often appear to have, for the explosion under the circumstances might have
easily bcen the destruction of all
three men.
Mr. Little was formerly a resident
of Cranbrook, and owned a ranch
near WattBhurg, and has many old-
time friends who will b» sorry to
learn of his troubles.
Death of Jim Barton
On Monday last Creston was
thrown into mourning by the death
of Mr. Jim Barton, a resident of
that place.
Mr. Barton had been suffering for
some time and his end, though expected, yet came as a surprise to his
friends. To mourn his loss he leaves
a wife and aaveral ibhlldrcn, Marshall,
Dorothy, Frances, Ellen, Ocorginu,
Boss and the baby.
During the last few years Mr. Barton has been developing his valuable
property at Crcston; previously to
this he held the position of express
ageut at Cranbrook, in which position he held the respect of all with
whom he came into contact. Though
possessed of peculiarities all his own
hi' wns a man who wns conscientious
aud-absolutely trustworthy in all h"
did; a member of the Masonic Order
and the Order of Oddfellows, in each
of which he was a good worker.
The last services were held on Wednesday wben the remains were laid
to rest in the Creston cemetery. The
Masonic Order and the Order of Odd-
fellows together with his many sorrowing friends accompanied him and
his bereaved relatives. Rev. Blake
officiated.
School Children Happy
Heveral hundred school children ln
Cranhrook wore a happy nnd contented smile on Friday ol last week
following the closing exercises held
In every class room, tho pupils being relieved from further duty until
August 24. To wstch them streaming Irom the school house left no
doubt that the call ot thc summer
vacation had taken a Ilrm bold upon
Cranbrook's coming citizens. The pupils taking the entrance eiame will
he compelled to wait several weekB
before they wlll bc In a position to
know if they have passed what many
of thom thought to be a very stiff
examination.
News of the Oil Fields
I Several oil companies hnve been
formed   In   Spokane for  the  cxplorn-
< f ion  of oil lands in  tlm Flathead.
I   The Flathead Petroleum    company
.have erected a drill ou Huge creek,
and drilling will commence uext
week.
With    tllfl    Innumerable   oil     wells
about to be drilled in the Flathead
I valley, thn question nf mft* ing Cranbrook    the   nltlcial   headquarters   of
• companies  now  operating should    be
,rar.-fully considered. They ,will soon
he an asset to tbe city.
City Band Concert
The Cranbrook City Band will give
their regular weekly open-air concert Sunday evening, July Sth, com
mencing at 8,45 p. ,m.
PROGRAM.
March—Golden Dome  Taylor
Overture—Criterion   Miller
Waltz—Southern Dream  Lincoln
Medley—Selection   Lampe
Serenade—Moonlight  in   Venice  ....
  Beyer
March—Wedding Feast   Taylor
GOD SAVR THR KING.
.Tames Austin, Bandmaster
Orange Celebration
Crnnbrook will have an Oriytge celebration on Monday, July 12th. It
will he participated in by lodges
from Creston, Fort Steele, Fernle,
Moyie and other points ln Southeast
Kootonay. In all some two hundred
Orangemen are expected.
Several stirring speeches will he
made hy prominent Orangemen, The
Cranbrook brass band will be in attendance, and the " Boy m^. Water"
will be heard all over tbe city. At
tllfl'recreation grounds, there will be
a lacrosse game, ball game and oth
er athletic sports, which will conclude with a dance at the Auditorium
in the evening.
Stabbing Affray
A serious slabbing alTray occurred
at the Hoyal Hotol, Fernle, on Mon
day night. A number of Russians
were drinking when, It is,said, John
Ynrovitch attacked two companions,
Ono wns stabbed In the back aii'l the
other Is iu a very precarious condition in the hoHpitnl, having been severely stabbed tin the intestines. Ills
recovery Is considered doubtful.
Ynrovitch escaped on the east bound
train, but was apprehended at' Hon*
mw and brought back to Fernie.
Death of Mrs Greaves
It is our sad duty to chronicle the
death of Mrs. W. H. Greaves, wbo
died on Monday evening from a very
sudden attack of heart trouble.
Mrs. Greaves had seemingly been in
the beBt of health, and during th?
early part of tbe evening, in company with her daughter, had been
visiting at the residence of Mrs. T.
C. Armatrong. Just as she was leaving Mrs, Armstrong's residence she
had a severe attack of coughing, and
Mrs. Armstrong accompanied ber as
far as the corner of Norbury avenue
and Clark street. Mrs. Greaves feeling better, Mrs. Armstrong returned home. When MrB, Greaves reached the corner of Armstrong avenue
and Clark street she suddenly scream
ed, threw up her hands and fell to
the sidewalk. Her scream being
heard by the occupants of the telephone ofllce, tbey went to ber assistance, and sent a call for a doctor.
An automobile was called and she
was hurried to tbe St. Kugene hospital where she died shortly after
arriving.
The news of her death was soon
known, and received with sorrow hy
her many friends who could hardly
realize that such an event was possible owing to her apparently good
health during the past months.
Mr. and Mrs. Greaves are among
the old-time residents of Cranhrook,
having came here during the early
days of construction, some fourteen
years ago. They have heen married
some 22 years. Two children and a
sorrowing husband are left to mourn
her untimely loss.
Funeral BerviceB were held from the
Catholic church with requiem high
mass on Thursday morning,.conducted by Rev. Father Plamondon. The
pnll-ibeaters were : T. C. Armstrong,
F. O'Hara, E. Shackleton, D. Burton, J. Jackson, and J. A. Genest.
The funeral was under the direction
of F. M. McPherson, and Interment
was made in the Roman Catholic
cemetery.
Calgary-Alberta Oil Fields
Early History • First Drilling Successful in Discovering Finest
Oil on North American Continent-Geology - Field Activities
BY W.  B.  ELLSWORTH in tbe "Mining World."
Expect Announcement Shortly
Quebec, July 2.-Diver Chisingen-
son recovered four more bodies from
the Rmpress wreck today, two men
and two women. One of the women
had jewels on her lingers, otherwise,
owing to the condition of the bodieB,
there would be hut little chance of
identification.
Butler ABplnnll, who represented
the Canadian Pacitic railway in the
inquiry, left today for Kngland on
the Alsatian, hut the American lawyer for the Storstad and otber In
terested parties are l.'tely to hi1 here
in person to hear the judgment, of
the tribunal, whleh will probably ufi
rendered late neit week.
New Zealand Supports Canada
London, July 8.—TUo Telegraph's
Sydney correspondent sayH tbe pro
posed amendment lo the New /ea
land Immigration act aiming at tli'
exclusion of Hindus and otber A Bin
tics, follows the general trend of t lie
Australian laws, including a , dicta
tlon tost.
Fooling has been warmly lu (avor
of the Canadian attitude and satis
faction Is expressed Hint the domin
hum arc bringing legislation Into uniformity and adopting u commau
practice, The matter will probably
be raised at tbe Imperial ronlenn'.fl
next year.
Within an area more tban 31) miles
n length on the anticlines, aud
about 10 miles in width, tlwre is now
being developed by deep drilling in
the southern part of the province of
Alberta, Canada, with the city of
Calgary the distributing point,  what I
romlses to he one of the greatest
gas and petroleum centres discover
ed in recent yenrs. Eminent, geologists who have made a thorough examination of the Held agree that big
capital is warranted in exploring it.
At;the present time II wells are being sunk, til- deepest being 271ft ft.,
and this one is now Intermittently
producing a naturally pure gasoline
of Mf* degrees Baume. It is said to
be one of tbe few almost pure gasoline wells ln the world. Contracts
have been let by various companies
recently organized and well financed,
for tbe drilling of a score or more
additional wells, and there is every
reason to believe that within another 90 days not less than 50 drilling
outfits will be at work.
There ls (lowing from the Discovery well at the present time an estimated 2,000,000 cu. ft. of "wet"
gas every 24 hours, offering an industrial feature of great magnitude in
tbe manufacture of gasoline hy
im uns of compression.
Local capital to tbe extent of more
tban $2,(11111,000 has been subscribed
for development purposes, and capitalists from the east and west are
being attracted. Representatives of
heavy capitalists, as well as petroleum geologists and experts from the
oil fields of Pennsylvania and California and other parts of the world,
are on the ground looking into the
situation.
While tbe active operations in the
Calgary-AlbM-ta oil fields are confined to an area of about 300 Bq, miles
on the anticlines, government filings
have be-'ii made on an area of 3600
si),  miles.
A HTTLE OF THR RARLY
HISTORY
The presence of oil In the underlying strata of the country south of
Calgary has been known for many
years. Weils sunk a quarter of a
century ngo, for the purpose of obtaining water, tapped seepages of oil
and the water was so contaminated
with petroleum that the horses anil
cattle refused to drink it. In the
early dnys it was a common thing
to dig up what was known as oil
gum or oil rock, containing marked
indications oil, and this substance
burned freely and brightly when
Placed  in a fire.
For many years much interest haa
nttached to that part of the country south of Calgary, because of an
anticline formed by a fault or break
fn the upheawd strata, which brings
the oil-bearing strata close to the
surface. It Is on this anticline that
the Discovery well is located.
Tbe first serious prospecting for
oil was undertaken by W. S. Her-
ron in a quiet way in 1904. Calgary
is deeply Indebted to Mr. Herron, as
well as other pioneers, wbo spent
not only tbeir time but considerable
money in proving that their confidence in this discovery of oil waa
well placed. Mr. Herron enjoys the
distinction of having located the Discovery well. In 1904 he came west,
locating on a ranch near Okotoks,
the nearest shipping point to the
Calgary'Alberta oil fields, 12 miles
distant on the Canadian 1'acific railroad.
Having an excellent knowledge of
geology and being interested in mineralogy, the fact that the underlying
strata were oil bearing became impressed upon hltn both because he
found gas escaping through fractures in the ground and because the
outcropping ami anticlinal structure
was almost Identical with that of
tli • Pennsylvania district. Heroin
iug satisfied that tbe ground was
worth prospecting for (til, he purchased 1200 acres of surface rlgbts
and 701)0 acres of petroleum and natural gas rights, including the ground
I where the Dingman or Discovery well
of tha Calgary Petroleum Products
■ Co. Is located, foi tbe sum of $40,-
1000. He placed the proposition of
developing this ground for oil before
A. W. Dingman and Rugene Coste,
I two Calgnry capitalists, but at first
1 he met witb little encouragement. He
I appealed to the elty council of Cal-
jgary to take the matter up, but
witb like success.
I In the spring of 1912 Mr. Herron
j Induced Mr. Dingman to mukf atrip
, to the claims, with the result that
the Calgary  Petroleum Products Oo.
was formed for the purpose of boring for oil.
Drilling operations were commenced on January 30, 1913, un ler the
direction .,( William Rider, whn has
hnd,0 wide experience in drilling (or
gas lu the province. Mr. Hflrron is
much tiie larger stockholder in the
company and in closely Identified
wltll a number of other well-tiiinncecl
companies   engaged   in   tha duvelop*
unit of the oil tields in tlhs dlB
trict. Me has proved bis ability ns
an oil expert, and through his ef
forts and those of bis associates
who pinned their fnith to bis judgment Oalgary ban tfjen given a valuable asseti and the Domininu has
been placed in a position where, with
in the next few years, it iB predicted by geologists and oil experts of
international reputation, in till probability It Will'lead in th* production
of petroleum products,
FIRST DRILLING WAS
SUCCESSFUL
Drilling proceeded in the Discovery
well at the rate of from 10 to 20
ft. a day. At a depth of about 350
ft. gas was first encountered and increased as il'pth was attained. The
Dakota sandstone was reached at a
depth of about 1600 ft., and at a
depth of 1562 ft. tha first indications
of oil were found on May 6, 1914.
At first the flow was light, but it
was substantial evidence that oil
waB in thi.' ground. High-grade gasoline, .fi4.1 degrees Baume, developed
in increasing quantity as the drills
bored deeper, and on May 16, at a
depth of 2718 ft., the Kootenai formation having been pierced, the flow
increased to tbe extent thnt there
was 1000 ft. of oil in tbe well. On
that dnte the pressure of oil and gas
wns so great that a stream from the
mouth of tbe well was forced to a
height of 85 ft. in the air.
It became necessary at that time
to cap tbe well until provision could
be made for the handling of the (dl.
Equipment is being installed to convey the oil to tanks holding 12,000
gals., located a short distance away.
Wben this equipment is completed,
sinking will be resumed to n point
where It is confidently believed by
Cunningham Craig, consulting geologist for the company, thnt a permanent flow of oil will be developed.
It is considered probable that the
well will finally become a gusher,
The gas registers a pressure of 320
lbs.
The boring of a second well by tbe
company was commenced the latter
j part of May, and on June 14, at a
depth of 420 ft., gas was encountered. This well is located about 1200
.ft. southwest of the Discovery well,
[OO the same anticline, but generally
considered a more favorable location.
DRILLING  ACTIVITY
On the creat of the anticline, about
3 miles to the north and slightly
west, the United Oils Co. bas attained a depth of about 2000 ft. The bottom of the hole is now in the Dakota sandstone and there is a good
showing of gas. It is believed that
tbe    Kootenai    formation    will    be
!reached at a depth of 2300 ft. It is
conceded by geologists,that tbe United Oils well is in the choicest location on the anticline, and there are
none who 1 question that this well will
I give as good a record as the Discovery. This compnny has let contracts for tbree additional  wells.
I Other wells being drilled, wltb
th. ir depths, are as follows; McDou-
gall-Hegur, 2880; British Alberta,
1600; Southern Alberta, 870; \Monarch
820; Federal 600; and the Western
Pacific, 420.
I Plans for drilling have been completed by several other companies,
one of tbe most Important of which
Is    thfl    Herron-Rider  Co.,   which    is
' now erecting a derrick a short dis
tance west of the Discovery No. Dot
the Calgary Petroleum Products Co.
The location is On tthfl edge of Sbeep
river, atta point where llie formation
outcrops strongly, indicating! that
the o|| hearing strata will he reach
ed within a com para I Ivaly short
depth from the surface. This compnny is strongly financed, and with
the first well successful, will ^Ink a
number of others.
j   PRUDENTIAL  IS.ADOPT READY
' TO DRILL.
j Within 70(1 yards of the Discovery
well, nnd on tha same anticline, he
Prudential oil A tins Oo., Ltd,,   is
I preparing to drill, Tbe site was io<
footed by William K. Herron, nfter It
had heen ascertained thnt the Dis
covery well Is n certainty as a pro-
(Continued  ou  Page   3) THE PROSPECTOR. CRANBROOK, B. C.
®he iproepector, ©ranbrook, §. <&,
ESTABLISHED   1895
Published  Every Saturday Morning at Cranbrook,  B.C.
F. M. Christian, general manager
SUBSCRIPTION   RATES  $2.00 PER YEAR
Postage to  American,  European  (British   Isles  excepted)   and  other  foreign countries,  50 centB a year extra.
ADVERTISEMENTS-Advertiising rates furnished on application. No
advertisements but those of a reputable character will be accepted for
publication.
ADVERTISERS AND SUBSCRIBERS.-Unless uotice to the contrary
is given to local manager advertisements and subscriptions will be kept
running and charged up against their account.
20th YEAR
CRANHROOK,   B.C      July 4
No.27
In this week's issue we wish to
draw to our readers' attention nn
excellent article contributed by Mr.
A. E. Watts of Wattsburg on "Ib
Paternalism Advisable'"' It is an article of fundamentals, twhlch If itaken
properly to heart by the statesmen of
our country would solve many of the
difficulties that are confronting the
civil authorities, not only In the
larger centers of tbe country but the
smaller municipal centers where population Is but In Its babyhood and
the baby is making its tirst efforts
to walk. If the principles involved
in the suggestion ot assistance received from the Provincial or tbe
Dominion Governments were copied
from tbe laws that exist in Ney
Zealand or even Australia, the time
would soon come when the log cabins and land would not be deserted
because of the lack of sustenance
during the period of preparation to
prepare it toward a productive as-
Bet; but rather we in the city would
rejoice with the settler in the prosperity of the country in which we
bave made our home. The subject
"Ib Paternalism Advisable0" is a
comprehensive one and would be
much more productive.of good if the
country at large understood the feeling of the several centers of population; toward this end we cordially
invite correspondence on the subject.
There are many citizens in the Cranbrook district who may differ in
opinion, perhaps, from the spirit of
the article, this being so, we should
be glad to hear what your views
are. We will try and give in our
next issue an article on the condition
of the settlers in Australia and itbeir
' relative position to the Government.
Tbia article will he written by a
man who bas spent a good many
years in the country and who understands thoroughly the benefits derived by tbe settler from the government in tho initial stages of development.
•   •   •   •
The Cranbrook boys are, going from
place to place to take part in tbe
different celebrations that are held
and usually are successful in bringing home a large  number of   prizes.
It is pretty marly time that someone got to work and celebrated in
Cranbrook as they used to,celebrate
yenrs ago, and not let all the out-
islde cities have nil the fun. If it
1 Ib possible (and there is no COB
son why we shouldn't) whygiot bnve
I another labor day calibration on thfl
lines of old, the last one being still
fresh in the memory of many.
• •   •   •
The contract for the laying of thfl
new pipe In connection with the new-
water system was let to a Leth
, bridge firm, this week By the conn
Cll. We are glad to see that the
work has been let by contract for
, we believe that iu the end it wilt bfl
much cheaper in tbe long run and
the work will in all probability bfl
j mor? expeditiously executed. What
lever the terms of the contract may
he, and we trust that the council
' have seen that the ratepayers of the
! city are fully protected in their
! agreements, it is to he hoped that
[ the resident engineer m charge will
see to it that the work is done to
: specifications and allow none to be
passed over in the rush to have the
1 work completed. Another thing the
' city must see to, and that is the
! wishes of the people so strongly ex-
! pressed a few weeks ago he properly
respected whether the firm undertaking the contract undertakes tt carry out the wishes (tf the people ia
another thing, it is up to the City
Fathers to see that they do. We
| want our boys to work if they will.
Some of them have lived here long
I enough to warrant then- employment
on the new works, nml now that the
scarcity of work exists it is a good
j opportunity for thom to earn a lit-
i tie to lay aside for the coming winter.   Respect the wishes of the home
boy.
• •   •   •
tn the enquiry now being held into the cause of the recent HUlcr>st
disaster it is to be hoped that some
scheme may he evolved that will better protect tbe lives of the braw fellows who daily risk their lives to enter the bowels of the earth to provide those of us on the surface witb
that warmth so n -cessary in the cold
winter months.
glery of word or phrase can interpret; its > bewilderment of grand ?nr
and beauty. Memories of English
fens, of Scottish moors, ot Irish
lakes aud glens, of Italy's sunny
slopes, of Herman forests, of the
towering peaks of the Appenines and
the'Alps haunt the mind of the traveller as his vision sweeps the valley; but there is a difference that
balks comparison, for tbere the more
delectable charms of all those varied
scenes are blended in one majestic
picture. Here is Inspiration for generations for posts, material for armies of artists, enterprises to whet
the ambition of the most enthusiastic mountain-climber, endless oppor
tunlty to test the skill, endurance
snd pluck of the game hunter and
satisfy the cravings of tbe most exclusive angler, while those who seek
only rest and quiet can find Ideal retreats in which to enjoy the dignity
Of absolute  isolation  and  repose."
Karl drey, wh,-u Governor General
of Canada, visited the Kootenays iu
October of 190*. and in a letter to
thfl Hon, Richard McBrlde from
winch wo take bi tracts, bo said
"Ottawa,   Oct,   isth.   1908,
•Denr Mr. McHride. I Imve Hist
returned to Ottawa from iny trip to
the WeBt and my first letter (must bfl
one of thanks to you   for the   gift
from   your   beautiful   Province   of   one
of the most delightful holidays t
hape enjoyed since t Ilrst began to
enjoy holidays, nearly fifty years
ago.
"Wherever     1     went   1       founu     the
same   enthusiasm ami confidence   In
the future of thfl fruit   industry.
■ If your fruit industry is properly
pushed and cared for your fruit valleys will Boon allow a larger number of happy, prosperous, wealth-
producing homas to the square mile
than will be found in ten times a
large: area in any other part of
Cnnada.
I have travelled much, but I have
never seen any district ottering in a
larger degree a combination of spltn
did climate, beautiful scenery, rich
land, and convenient situation.
One cannot refrain ftom saying in
parsing, about the peoule who are
CreBton's leading citizens, tbat they
are generous in all they undertake,
unselfish in their trade dealings one
with the other, enthusiastic over the
future of th'ir district and enterprising  to  a large  degree,"
far Cranbrook has not celebrated.
We bave lacrosse and baseball teams,
athletes that are second to none In
the district, yet they bave to go
abroad   to   compete iu games,   and
What a visit to Creston
will  prove
Creston is looking good. That
means a lot to the residents of the
Fruit Olty of tbe West. Fruit
nln minis on every hand nnd the
ranchers are expecting a huge harvest,
Ou every hand ns one steps from
the train arriving iu CreBton are to
be Been evidences of its prosperity.
The city ts a thriving one and the
Stores are all progressive in the
stocks tbey hold. The large building,
recently erected in which tbe fruits
of the soil are bandied by the Fruit
Growers Association, Is close to the
station, and the produce brought in
la being ably handled by Mr, Bradley, who is iu charge.
The markets on the pairie have already come to tbe knowledge of the
quality of the fruits grown in this
district. Its soil is rich, its situation is delightful, and every facility
is afforded to the settler for mixed
farming. Nowhere in the West, we
venture toi say, are better (opportune
ties offered to the settler or the investor than in this fertile ami prosperous region.
In this connection, in addition to
tbe usual market already anxtOUS to
ootaln all the fruit tbey can handle,
there is going to be in the future a
certain amount of surplus fruit for
which the enterprising citizens are
maKing all the (preparations they can
to handle it with a canning factory
nn a large scale. To those who do
not know this may seem absurd, for
we have heard the remark "(th
Creston, why it is only a llttlo place,
whnt do they want with it rannlnir
factory''"     The    sarcasm     underlying
this remark can readily be answered
by tbe evidences ro dearly shown.
Tbe writer had the pleasure <>t being
on the-* ground (bis week and took
an hasty survey nl thfl prospects <>f
the district., and In- was astonished
Ut the woudeifiil progress made In
tbe Kin It. Valley of the Went
Strawberries are being grown In
MUrli quantities that in innuy enam
(be owner will tell you in "(lo and
pics for yourself, we have more thnn
we run handle at present; we bave
other fiull, to see  to."   To  Cits   one
case, the Strawberry King, as lie Ls
called, shipped ou Tuesday of this
week over 300 cases- This is perhaps more than the smaller rancher
can grow but It carries out the
truth of tbe fertility of the soil.
The apple trees are full of fruit,
to say nothing of the raspberries,
cherries, pears, blackberries, plums,
etc., all of which when fully matured will bear witness to the prospects
of a bountiful harvest in tbeir season. In addition to these few mentioned there are acres upon acres of
land laid out with tomatoes in
splendid growth. Potatoes and cabbages are there in abundance. Ihe
care exhibited in their weltare is of
the bust and the results will repay
|tbe rancher for the labors taken.
Tbe city authorities are showing
l enterprise in having prepared an.l are
i preparing excellent roads and grading where necessary to reach the out-
1 lying larnih in Such B wav that all
lean reach the city witli east-. By following theHe plans tbey InCTflaSfl the.
loan to be drawn by providing comfort for the horses. I IDS interpns
ing farmer is about to receive un
auLo truck. This, by the way, only
Illustrates tbe spirit that is being
exhibited by tha citizens in the lis-
trict. Nothing im too good If it
doaj the work required.
Mr,   It.   Bevun,    the    father of    thfl
'auto in tbls district, and owner of a
splendidly equipped   garage,  informed
!un tbat there w--re a  number of the
I farmers whn are using a enr of one
i make or another to get over the dis
! trict ns time is   too short to   wait
lor the   slow   transit   made   when   sitting    behind   a   In tbi* drawn    vehicle.
And   the  truth   of   hla'remark    coitld
t asily   verified for there   worn   n
■ number of cars running all over the
plan".
[ Regarding thfl scenery of the Creston valley * we * quote from nu emln-
J Hit writer and lover of nature nud
'the truth of his remarks as applied
j to this, wonderful < valley cuu easily
' he verified as follows
"Mnny writers have essayed n de
iscriptlon of tllfl scenery nl tbls mug
I uilieent   valley,   but   no  possible    jug
Miss Pye's Success
The pupils of Miss Alice Pye gave
their third annual recital at the Masonic ball ou Tuesday morning, June
30, nt 10,30 o'clock. Tbere was a
large number of the friends and parents or the pupils present and a very
enjoyable recital was given. The
program included over thirty num
bers, commencing with the simpler
pieces hy the beginners and ending
with some very difficult selections.
The following took part in the pro
glum     Misses  Faith  and   itutb    Ken
dull, Miss Annette Brault, Miss EQd
ith Murgatroyd, Miss Mar jor ie Pur
ton, Miss Faith Kendall, Master
Warren   Itowness,   Miss  Vera    Baxter.
Miss Marion Drummond, Master (tt
tQ   Hill,   Muster   John   Woods,     Miss
Bun Ice Parrett, Miss Bessie    Wood
man.    Master Kittuk   Bridges,     Miss
Itut ti   Kendall, Miss  Mabel  Cameron,
Master  Verne Woodman.  Miss fflthel
Olapp,   Master Brie  MacKinnon,   Miss
Marlon MacKinnon
Part n.
Miss Kdith Caslake. Miss Marv
Brambaugh, Miss Muriel Baxter, Miss
Bertha dill, Miss Helen Bridges, Miss
Bernadettfl Doyle, Miss Wanda Kink,
Miss Francis Noble, Miss Porn Pye,
Miss Meryl Cameron, Miss Lottie
l.eask, Master Vincet Kink, Mr. Wil
fred Dallas, Miss Wander and Mas
ter Vincent  Pink,
After tbo programme tirst prizes
were awarded'to Miss Annette Brault
aud Miss Muriel Baxter, second
prises to Miss May llranbaugh and
Master John Woods. Prizes were
given for well prepared lessons, regularity snd practicing. Miss Wanda
and Master Vincent Kink'and Master Verne Woodman were remembered also for good practicing.
Miss Pye has every reason to be
proud  of the  playing Of her  pupils.
Dominion Celebrations
A large number of Cranbrookites
journeyed to Kernie on Dominion
Day to tasc part in thc sports. It
was 10 o'clock when the local pulled
out, uud three coaches were required
to transport the "fans" to the (Coal
City.
Tbe principal event of the day was
a game of lacrosse between teams
from ('ranbrook and Fernie. It. was
h hot game from many points, especially on the part of the weather
clerk; but it was just the kind of
weather that the Cranbrook* boys desire.   They won hy a score of fj tit '&.
Following are the line-ups:
ORANBROOK.
Ooal, McKay; point, t Scott; cover,
McPhee; first defence. Duff; second
defence, Huthie; third defence, Leitch
center. Chambers; third home, Crowe
second home, McMillan; tlrst home,
Callahan; ^outside home Manahan; inside home, Matthews.
FERNIE.
(ioal, Hovan; point, Dlack; cover,
Smyllie; first defence, Kintpatrlck;
second defence, Collins; third defence,
Cody; center, Waldie; third home,
Todhunter; second home, McDougall;
tirst home, Wilson; outside home,
Burland; inside home, Clode.
COALS.
First Quarter—Oranbrook, 4 min-
uteB,  lu seconds,  McMillan;     Ferine,
9 min. :in sec, Burland.
Second Quarter—-Fernie, an sec,
Clode.
Third Cjuarter—Cranbrook, 20 sec,
Matthews; Fernle, 5 min. UO sec,
Burland,
Fourth quarter—Cranbrook, 4 min.
10 sec, Crowe.
Bxtra Time, B min.—Cranbrook, 4
min. 40 sec, Matthews.
Referee—M, A. Kastner.
Timekeeper—F. 8. Ryckman.
Next followed the baseball game,
I Whlcb was also won by Craubrook.
M. A. Kustar umpired the game
with perfect satisfaction to all, the
score by innings being as follows:
Ferine II    1    II    0   2   0   0   0   0—3
Oranbrook 0 4 l o o u o o x—J
| In the sawing contest, D. Moore
and IC. A. Lutes of Crnnbruok, took
first money, sawing a 3] inch log in
1 one minute lu seconds.
Messrs.   Moore and  Lutes ulso won
[ the chopping contest.
I    In the relay race, Francis, u   Mission Indian, Was Ilrst.
|   in   (he married   n 's race,    mu
{yards, Lea BlmhlS of ('ranbrook took
tlrst  money.
I lu the half tulle pony race, Alex
I Myuke, n Mission Indian, ruptured
flrst money,
The high jump was also min by R,
McTUlvare of Oranbrook,
I    This    makes   the third
elebi
it Ion
which has taken ploco nl Fernle during tbe year, and ull n| them have
been an unqualified success, and
largely attended by residents from
uii parts ot Southeast Kootenay, Ho
Visits the Flathead
A nlimber of oil experts have visited the oil lands of the Flathead
valley during last week. Among
them were Dr. Elliott, Messrs. Arnold and Kirkpntrick, of Vancouver,
and Messrs. E. J. Sinclair and W.
Nicholls of Spokane.
In company with Colonel W. E,
Mann and O. Jeldness, president and
vice-president of Flathead Petroleum
Co., and Fred. Loomis, Mr. Sinclair visited the oil fields on the
north fork of the Flathead river,
just north of the international line.
INVESTIGATED OIL SEEPS.
Mr. Sinclair says: "While Colonel
Mann was directing the preliminary
operations of the placing of a drill
on the ground of the Flathead Petroleum company, t spent four days
working out the geology and Investigating for oil and gas seeps, which
are located on Sage creek,, just
at the mouth of the canyon,
"The British Columbia Oil Compnny has drilled two shallow wells
near the oil seep,a and both of them
show good indications of oil and
gas for tbe depth, aa neither of them
Ib much more than 100 fe*t In bedrock. All the geology west of the
oi< seep is covered by glacial deposits, bo that it is Impossible to say
at present wbat iB the souioj of tbe
oil, but all the seeps come from the
shale.
THINK OIL IS THERE
"The country has undergone so
many changes in its geological history that it would be impossible to
say just where the oil will be found,
but that lt ls there fn commercial
quantities Cflntiot be doubted after
seeing the amount ot gas and oil
that is forced through the rock at
the oil seepages and the strong gas
pressure in the two wells drilled by
the B. C. Oil Co.
"Tbere is no doubt that oil will
he encountered in tbe wells now being drilled hut it is impossible to
tell bow deep they may bave to
drill."
The Kootenay Telephone
Lines, Limited
n
E I TERMINATION
of the Agreement with THK GREAT NORTH WESTERN and
WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANIES, effective July 1st,
1914, and after that date cannot accept Telegraph Business for transmission over these lines.
Instead our efforts will he directed to the improvement of our Local and Long Distance Service, particularly the connections with points
on THE ALBERTA GOVERNMENT and THE PACIFIC TELEPHONE t* TELEGRAPH SYSTEMS.
Phone 112 for Information and Rates
Kooienay Telephone Lines Limitet
Dan Speers of Creston received a
telegram last Saturday saying that
his father was very sick. Sam immediately made preparations to
make the journey and left for Rose-
town, Man., on Monday. His many
friends are in hopes that his father
will he found much better than the
telegram would indicate.
Lawn
Mowers
That
almost
run
themselves
Priced from
$6.00 to $24.50
(jet one from
F. Parks & Co.
HARDWARE   and   HOUSE
FURNISHINGS
CRANBROOK,    -    Iritiih Columbia
Paternalism Advisable
(Comtlnued from Page One)
finest timber land in the interior of
British Columhla, the railway company selected and sold the greater
proportion of the best, and kindly returned the leavings to the Oovernment, that is to the people, reserving for their own use some ol the
best timber,, nnd at one po'nfc in
this timber the company operates
tie-camps and a sawmill, according to
the laat report supplied to me one-
thousand men are employed in manufacturing lumber and ttss, whilst
some of the oldest milling concerns
have their mills idle and hundreds or
work teams out grazing because thev
cannot tind work for them nor for
their workmen, owing to the fact,
that the lumber business has h.'en
practically destroyed through the
lack of paternalism or simple protection, The mighty corporation is operating with unlimited capital . n
timber that cost them abso'utely
nothing, the struggling lumberm tn
hns to meet American competition in
hla own restricted market, free lumber, no bounty, no bonus, many of
the smaller lumber men are paying
$2.00 per thousand stumpage for their
timber and the great corporation
pays nothing, and is consequently
, to-day operating in full nlsst and is
the only great lumber concern In the
interior of British Columbia doing
so.
My contention is that what paternalism bas done for the great corporations it can do for the agricultural community and that class
would not he tbe only one to reap
the benefit—the teeming po nln tion
of the cities would tie supplied with
cheaper food, tbe great railway corporation's trattic would increase ami
as Mr. Bury truly ssys Industries
would be attracted lu consequence of
the development of tbe country.
Itailway eipnuslon and development, like real estate business or
anything else can be overdone. Whilst
railways provide a modern convenience It must be remembered that
great cities esisted ages hefore Stevenson noticed the wabbling kettle lid
oi  Watt maif ■ his tlrst engine.
Thinking people will admit that
there are things of vastly more importance than railways, and the one
greater than all Is to make the
country tn which we live productive
and S'lf sustaining, and tbls should
ho the highest aim of politicians nnd
statesmen.
ASK FOR
FIVE ROSES
Send/or Five Roses
Om'i lji|ti u «>tl9M T«n <
MtHI or w*u» „
Cook Book-
BEING A MANUAL OF COOD RECIPES corcfully
ehoren from th« contribution! of over two thowind
■uccmM uene of Five ftbm Flour thro««houl Canada.
Abo Uwlul Note* on iht vwiow cImk* ot food thing*
to Nt tU of whuh h»v« htm ce-tuHy chocked *n4
r*chtth*d bjr cot
_^_gs________j_e__m__________
Oranbrook  Jobbers.  Ltd.
DISTRIBUTORS.   OBANBROOK
Buy at_Home
Kersmltb ft Kickshaw deal In wax
and Chinese eggs ami carpet tacks.
They are good sports In every way;
they cough up money every day to
make the town a better place In
which to live and puhIi your face.
They hire a dozen clerks or more
who wait on patrons In tbelr store.
Our cross mails burg they would upbuild, and see it wltb glad people
tilled, and to tbat end tbey blow
Hieii scads like truly patriotic   lads.
But when we need of eggs a few, we
send away to Timbnctoo, and when a
carpet tack we wish, it's shipped
from Ypsllunli, Mich, Kaeh tins the
notion in bis dome tbat things nre
best away from home, and so wv order bods and hats, ami hummingbirds aud Maltese cats, from strung
ers in some town remote, who would
uot know us from a boat. We ship
away our hard-earned knle, and get
our fourth-rate junk by mail. Hay,
ar* we seers, or are we fools? Those
strangers don't support our schools,
or keep the peeler on his beat, or
help to pave Commercial street.
They do not paint the village pump
or build a fence around the dump.
If our old burg were blown away
they wouldn't care a bale ol bay.
Kersmitb & Kickshaw ought to get
the local trade, already yet.
WAl/T MASON
Well to the Fore
Victoria -Colonel William Hutchinson, exhibition commissioner for the
Dominion government, spent yesterday In the city in the course of nn
(illlcial visit to the coast. Colonel
Hutchinson, In tbe execution of his
departmental duties, bus under his
jurisdiction the supervision of the
j Canadian exhibit nt. the Panama eihibition at Rati Francisco, which op-
(im tn February next.
Colonel     Hutchinson     Is   desirous
.that  the exhibit shall lie mit'onil In
its scop", demons!rating In the most
comprehensive fashion, the wonderful natural wealth of the various
provinces.   Ills present visit to llrlt
ish Columbia is made witb the idea
of enlisting tbe cooperation of the
provincial  government.
Yesterday Colonel Hutchinson conferred    with tbe premier   and   other
ministers on the matter or a provincial exhibition. He was assured that
the go\f.>rnment would co-operate
wltb tbe Dominion authorities In every way. It Ln planned tbat the mineral exhibit from tbe province t-hull
be on the most attractive scale, and
In his capacity of minister of mines,
Hir llirhard McBride promised Colonel Hutchinson that tbe entire field
staff of tbe department would be
placed at his dlsi osal to get tbo
particular elass of exhibits which
would be considered tbe most us.'ful
from nn educational standpoint, ns
nn advertisement of tbe mineral resources of the country.
Speaking of Colonel Hutchinson's
mission, Hir Diehard said: "1 ns
Hined the commissioner that British
Columbia could be depended upon to
do everything possible to make tbe
display from this section of the country in keeping with the wealth of
natural resources wblcb we possess
nml reflect credit upon tbe efforts of
thc federal authorities, While wo
rhall make no Individual effort as a
province at the great I'nunmn exposition, we shall, to tbe fullest extent, cooperate witb Ottawa. To
tbnt end the government has Instructed the beads of all depart
meats to lend every assistance to
Colonel Hutchinson, under whose direction 1 nm sure the Canadian ills
play at Han Francisco will prove a
striking success." .
THE PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK, B.C.
Recent Amendments to the
Homestead Regulations
From the standpoint of Western
Canada, perhaps the most important measure which passed Parliament
last session won tbe bill amending
tbe homestead regulations. The
amendments were all designed to
lighten the burden ou the Western
settler. They have been advocated
for years, but hitherto refused. Tho
changes which have been uiuif> by
Hon. Dr. Roobe are greatly appreciated by the West. They are a real
boon to the homesteader and newcomer, There hns been such u demand for accurate information tbat
we summarize the chief cbunges.
CHANG BB MADE).
The following, iu brief, are the
main points lu the new regulations:
1. Dpon earning homestead patent, the pre-emption patent may ulso be obtuiued, at once, upon paying for tbe laud lu full aud showing tbat certain duties have been performed.
2. The holders of pre-emptions nr*
relieved of interest until three yenrs
have elapsed from tbe date of the
pre-emption entry.
'A. No interest is chargeable now
upon any instalment in connection
with either a pre-emption or a purchased homestead until after such instalment falls due.
4. With certain restrictions, stock
may hi substituted In lieu of cultivation.
It iB believed that the new regulations in regard to stock in lieu of
cultivation will not only prove a
(treat boon to homesteaders who
have land not altogether suited for
cultivation, but will give an impetus to mixed farming.
CAN SUBSTITUTE STOCK.
If a report from a homestead inspector shows that a quarter section does not contain arable land to
the extent required to obtain patent
under the regulations with respect
to cultivation, authority will he
granted to the entrant to substitute
stock in lieu of breaking and seeding.
If this privilege is conferred on
tbe entrant, he will be required to
abow when making application for
patent that he has, in the case of
an ordinary homestead, been the sole
owner during the whole of the flrst
year, of at least five bead of Btock,
during tbe second year of at leant
ten head of stock, and from nnd after the expiration of the second year,
np to the date of application for
patent, of at least sixteen head of
stock.
IN CASK OF A PRE-EMPTION
In the ease of u pre-emption, the
entrant will lie required to show,
when making'application for patent,
that he has Continued to own his
homestead, and that be has had upon the laud, iu the fourth and liflli
years of the performance ot duties,
stock to the number of at least
twenty head, and from and after the
expiration of the fifth year up to the
date of the application for patent
at least,twenty-four head of cattle.
Ia the case of a purchased homestead, when making application for
patent, the entrant will he required
tu show tbat he was the sole owner, during the whole of the tirst year
of at least tive head of stock; during the second year, of at least ten
head of stock, and from and after the
expiration of thc second year, up to
the dnte of application for patent,
of ut least sixteen {.end of stock.
The term "Stock" Includes cattle,
that is, cows or hulls and their
young, nnd horses, male and female
and their young. Sheep and hogs are
also included.
If sheep and hogs are kept, ten
sheep or ten hogs, or ten sheep and
hogs, will only be reckoned as
the equivalent of one head of cattle,
that is, equal to one horse, or ona
cow or bull.
All stock must he kept on the
homestead, pre-emption, or purchased
homestead, as the case may be, either for summer grazing or for winter feeding.
BUILDINGS  FOR  STOCK.
Substantial buildings for the accommodation of the whole number of
stock to be kept In any year shall
be erected and maintained during the
whole period such stock is to be
kept and solely owned hy the applicant for patent.
Such buildings shall, in the case of
an ordinary homestead, be erected
upon tbe homestead itself, in the case
of a pre-emption such buildings Bhall
be erected upon such pre-emption or
the appurtenant homestead, and in
the case of a purchased homestead,
such buildings shall be erected   upon
sucb purchased homestead or upon
the entrant's free homestead, if his
residence has been performed tbereon
lu accordance with.the regulations.
YMAKLY RECORD
The entrant, or in the case of his
death, his legal representative, Bhall
furnish to the Minister a statutory
declaration duly made and completed according to law, promptly after
tbo expiration of each yeur during
the period that he has kept stock
upon his land, us to the numbers he
lias kept thereon during stieh year or
period, ami that they are and have
been during tbat year or period, as
speellled iu tbe statutory declaration,
solely owned by blm.
The whole quarter section of land
entered for shull be enclosed by a
substantial fence to tbe satisfaction
of tbe Minister.
In reference to entries that have already beeu made, stock may he allowed to count, in cases where the
land has been reported by tbe inspector bb being altogether unfit for
grain growing.
WORK OF EQUAL VALUE
So fur us homesteads are coucern-
■ ed, the provision in the regulations
for the reduction of the area of cultivation in cases where the laud is
difficult to break by reason of woods
rock, or the broken character of
ing always understood that the Beting ulwais understood tbat the settler iB required to do work equal in
value to what would have been required if he had an ordinary prairie
homestead.
Tbere may be cases where only a
small area can be cultivated, and
such cultivation would not involve
any very great expense. In those
cases, if it is shown, by the,inspector's report, that the full area required by the regulations cannot be cultivated, and the entrant shows that
he has performed all the cultivation
possible, and has sufficient stock to
make up for the proportion of the
cultivation which is lacking, this may
he accepted as sufficient, but settlers
cannot be allowed to count stock as
performance, or part performance of
duties, if the quarter diction is one
where the full area of cultivation ,re
quired by tbe regulations can be per
formed.
Character Sketch
HON. BRUNO NANTEL.
Miuieter of Inland Revenue
Hon. Bruno Nantel, Minister of In
Und Revenue in tbe Borden Government, occupies a portfolio which
does not possess the spectacular
qualities ot other departments. It
is not a large spending department
lile that of l'ublic Worts, uor does
it undertake the large enterprises,
which are beard ot in connection
with the Railways and Canals. But
yet, at the Bame time, laws are;carried ont and regulations imposed by
tbe Inland Revenue Department
which enter vitally into the common,
every-day life ol Canadian cltiams.
For example, the purity of foodstuffs, of butter, bread, baking powder, maple syrup, and a thousand
otber every-day commodities, is the
constant care i of the Inland Revenue
Department.
WORKING QUIETLY,
The present holder ol the ofltce is
A man who takes pride aud pleasure in tbe work which he Is doing.
He dons not seek the glare ot publicity, hut at the same time is not
only carrying out iiuietly regulations
laid down, but he is also engaged in
perfecting tbe system ol preserving
the purity of the food of the people. Of French-Canadian atock, Mr.
Nantel lias always occupied a high
and trusted position In the town ol
Bt. Jerome, in the province of Quebec, where be was born nearly lllty-
seven years ago. Possessing the con
•ervatism wblcb Is the distinguishing
characteristic ol a French-Canadian,
he preferred to remain In the village
ln which he was born rather than to
sei»; the life ot the city, with Its
teeming opportunities. The results
of his career have justiiled his early
decision. He has bad the satisfaction ot seeing tbe village grow Into
• large and populous center and of
knowledge that the progress of the
town of St. Jerome is in no small
measure due to his own energy. He
began to take an Interest in the md-
nicipal politics of Ht. Jerome ai tar
back as 1194, and lor sli years previous to becoming Minister of Inland Revenue was mayor of the
town. He thus secured the confidence
of the people ol Ht. Jerome, which
was a good beginning in obtaining a
•hare nf the trust nf the penple nf
hla province ami nf the country. He
represents In the Dominion House
the county of Terrebonne, to which
bs was first elected in the year 1908.
Ha was sworn ol Ihe I'i ivy Council |
and appointed Minister of Inland
Revenue in Mr. Borden's Cabinet in
1911, and was elected by acclamation
alter assuming office.
OPPOSED  RECIPROCITY.
In tbe general election ol 1911 the
Hon. Mr. Nantel secured prominence
by the manner in which be fought in
bis native county in opposing the
Laurier candidate. He took a decided stand upon tbe reciprocity question, and, bnving a thorough knowledge of tbe conditionn and the interests of the French-Canadian farmers, was able to iIIbcurb clearly bow
tbe passing of the Fielding and Paterson proposals would have affected
tbe agricultural cunditions of the
people of tbe province of Quebec.
His style ot orntnry had a good effect upon the farmers. Mr. Nantel
speaks In tbe language of the people. He addresses them as a man ol
business aud as one who appreciates
the difficulties and the labors ot the
farmers wbo are compelled tn seek a
living from tbe soil in the outlying
portions of the province. In the
prnvince nf Quebec political opponents meet in wbat is known as un
"Assembles Contradictnire," or a
meeting in which both opponents
mnke speeches ench in bis turn replying to the other. Mr. Nantel was
singularly eilectiv- in his meetings
with his rivals, nnd whin the llorden
forces were returned to power he was
chosen as n gnod representative of
the people of Quebec.
flOOl) LEGISLATION.
Tlmt the confidence reposed in blm
ri 1911 hns not been misplaced Is
shown hy the amount uf good legislation to the credit ot tbe Minister
ot Inland Revenue.since he came into
power. During the present session he
introduced two meaiuros of Importance, one dealing witb the "Dominion Adulteration Act" and the other
with the "Weights and Measures
Act." Every citizen and every
housewife can understand the Importance of having themselves protected
from dishonesty on tho part of those
from whom they buy. They wish to
secure not only proper weight, hut
also demand that what they huy
ahould be the genuine article. Perhaps tbe hest known section of his
Adulteration Act Is that dealing with
the manufacture and sale ot maple
syrup. Mr. Nantel had legislation
passed this year which clearly defined that merchants could sell only the
real article for maple syrup. A limitation from bis hill will show how
stringent the new legislation Is and
how earnestly the Minister nl Inland
Revenue Is eudeavuring to   see   that
the   interests of tbe Canadian   con
sunier, are safeguarded.
Tbe Inland Revenue Department is
run as a business institution. Combining aB it does, not only the making, but alBo the enforcement ot the
law ot land much tact, diplomacy
and patience are required from day
to day. Hon. Mr. Nantel iB a silent
man. He dnm his duty by the people fait hi ally, though the i interests ot
many who seek tn profit Illegally suffer as a consequence.
KNOWS HIH PEOPLE.
The Minister of Inland Revenue is
essentially a man of the people.
From Inng habit, being a lawyer,
he has been nccustnmed tu advise
nnd assist. Living, as he has doi.e
fnr many years, and being tbe chief
figure in his liatlv-3 tnwn, he knows
what the man on the street wants,
and thus his presence in the Cabinet
iB a guarantee that all sections hid
classes in the country are well represented. Mr. Nantel has done good
work, and' having put his hand tu
the plow he will not cense imlll
much more snnnd legislation of t'te
snme kind that he has had pasa'd
will hnve been placed on the statute
bonks ul the country.
Bringing Them Over
the Bonier
"As a British tariff relormer, I am
struck by the way in which Amoil-
can industrial concerns are forced to
establish branch factories over tbe
Canadian line." — Sir A. Conan
Doyle.
Britain's most famous novella'.
would seem to he gifted with some
of the powers of observation with
which he endowed his famous character—Sherlock Holmea. He has heen
In Canada scare 'ly a week, hut that
Is sufficiently long a period Inr him
to be convinced of the efficacy and
wisdom of the gnnd old N. P.
Hi-flovernor Fosb, of Massachusetts, established large factories
In   Canada   this   year, because,    he
Id, there wns little chance of Reciprocity between Cannda 'and the
United Htatea carrying for some
yearB to come. According to the ot-
llclal reports of the Canadian Pacific
Rnllway, nn less than siity Amerl-
enn factories established branches In
Cnnada last year. These wlll employ thousands nf Canndlan workmen, pay millions each year In
wages, and contribute generally to
nut- Industrial and commercial development.
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July 1, 1914
ADVERTISING   RATES-SPECIAL  DISCOUNT
Dear Sir;
We beg to call your attention to the new advertising rates we are mnking beginning July I st-
The "Prospector" today is being read by more subscribers than ever; we ure adding new-
subscribers with every issue. Wn ure going to make a great effort to help our local tradesmen to
use our columns in advertising their goods and bring same to the attention of the general public.
IN ADDITION to the lower rates we are making a CASH DISCOUNT OF 5 PER CENT
on all display advertising accounts if payment is made at the "Prospector" office nr through ihe
mail on or before the 10th of each month. This discount will not be allowed unless payment is
made on or before the 10th.    All accounts for other advertising and job work are net
NEW RATES
Full Page Advertisement        -        - -       $25.00
Half Page Advertisement        -        - -         15.00
Quarter Page Advertisement   -        - -           8.50
Advertisements less than quarter-page, -  25c an inch
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS
One cent a word per insertion, 3 cents a word for 4
weeks, when cash accompanies order, otherwise one
cent a word per insertion straight will be charged. No
accounts opened for want adverts. Minimum charge
for all adverts 25c.
CASH DISCOUNT OK 5 PER CENT on all display accounts if paid at the "Prospector"
office or through the mail by the I (Jt 11 of each month,
Contracts  for  longer periods
particulars.
than one issue will be cheerfully entered into.    Phone H5 for
Yours respectfully,
THE PROSPECTOR PUBLISHING CO.
Per F.  M. Christian
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Prospector"
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professional   Curbs
- ixnb ■
Cobge   Hottces
HIIII4IIIHII llll IHIII-H+H-M-II IMIIII **■',',
m——e~—_—-m.'
ANCIENT ORDER OF FORESTERS
Court Cranbrook No. 8943.
Meet in   Maple   Hall,    ou   2nd   and
tth Thureday ol each mouth.
J. MeI.ACHI.UN,   O.K.
Loulf Pearson, Sec., P.O. Boi HI
▼letting Brothers Cordially Welcomed
Cranbrook Farmers' Institute
OVERSEAS   CLUB
(Craubrook   branch)
Meete   in   Maiile    Hall ou the 2nd
aud 41 b Tuesdays in every month, at
I  p.m.   Membership  opsu   to  British
OlttHOi.
B,  V.  Brake, l'rea.
W. J, Lower, Hec.-Treas.
Box 247.
Vlaltlng mtmbart cordially wslcoms
CRANBROOK   LODGE   No
A. F. * A. M.
Regular   meetings   on   ths
thirl  Thursday   ot   nary
month.
Visiting brethren welcome.
Hiotienbotham,   W.M.
Lee Cranston,  Bee.
34
H.
J.
Pr
B.—A.
B.
Hmlth
Hei
.—A,b
H.
Webb
Meeti
lg«
are
belt
ou   the
Thursday  in  the month at S p.m.  iu   Cladyn Br
tbe Old  Gymnasium All Welcome
Women's Institute
Meets in tbe OarmdOB1 Hall 1st
Tuesday alteruoon tu every mouth
al il p.m. The fancy work classes
ni'ietB on 3rd Friday evening iu tbe
seme  place at  li p.  tn.
Mrs. _,  H, Leamaa,  President
Mrs.   J.   Hbaw.   Sec Trees.
P.  0.   Hoi  442.
All ladles cordially invited.
ROCKY   MOUNTAIN   CHAPTER
No. 12S, R.  A. M.
Regular meetings—2nd Tussday in
sach month at eight o'clock.
Sojourning   Companions   ara   cordially Invited.
Bi. Comp.—A. 0. Shankland, _.
Cranbrook, B.C.
T. T.  M c v i r r i t
p.l.i. * a.m.
ORANBROOK,     ...    B.O.
HARVEY,   McCARTER,   MACDONALD
and NISBET
Barristers, Solicitors and Notarial
Mousy to Loan
Imperial Bank Building
CRANBROOK,     -    Britiah Columbia
Public School Report
DIVISION HI,
Perfect Attendance—Gordon Argue,
Margaret Davit*, Mny Dunning, Sydney Murgatroyd, ICilwiu Malcolm,
Alec. Mennie, Mary Malcolm, AgiM
Reekie.
Marion Henderson, Oand&ce Henderson, Mary Rene*, Al«B Messenger,  Velma Patmore.
DIVISION IV.
Perfect Attendance— Charles Arm
Btrong, Horatio Jerks, John NoVe,
Nettie Robinson, Fred Swain, lor-
lIoq Taylor, Hugh Fraser, MtiUol
Flnley, Mary Mann, David Reekie,
Margaret Lacey, Ferris Bousau,
Frank Bridges,
DIVISION V.
Perfect Attendance Nina Belanger,
ks, Harold Haslam, Jen
jnie Hopkins, Iiir Wai Hoy, Faith
Kendall, Ruth Kendall, Wilfred Ken
uedy, Allan Lacey, Walter Laurie,
Harold Leask, Annie MoBirnie,
Qrace McFarlane, Dewey McNeil, Kd
[ith Murgatroyd) Dorothy Reed, Doris
Sainsbury, I'liflonT St. Hloi, Bdward
i Turner. David WatHoti, Hai burn
jdreeu, Alfred SimlaU, Crossley Tay
1 lor.
DIVISION   VI
I Reflect Attendance Msrle Bennett,
Mary Bartlami Christine Oarson,
Obarlie Ohapman, Fanny Qartslds,
Ralph     Qreen,    Herman   Hollander,
Rnsseii i.eask, Lily Lancaster, Ella
McQoldTlc, Hric MacKinnon, Alma
Sums. Kathleen Snook, Viola Snr-
vis, Hugh SimpBou, John Turner,
Pmia Taylor, Vivian Fraser, Flossie
Robinson, May Lancaster, Donald
Dallas, Verne Woodman, Roy Robl-
chand.
division vil
Perfect Attendance- -Leonard Dur-
ton, Willie Ueorge, (.JertruJe Hopkins, Kila Kendall. Fred Brlggs,
Maud Malcolm, Martha Messiugvr.
Cyril Selby. Maud Scott. .Ray Scott.
Ruth Simpson, Sam Speers, John
Stevens. Garrteld Taylor, Norman
Sam Watson, Bessie   Wood-
Senior 1st Primer-Mildred ,Clarice,
Harvey Dixon, Jack Dixon, Julie
Frost, Frnnk Hawkswurth, Ralph
Ladds, Madge Johnson, Paddy Kennedy, Oeorge Nicholas.
Communication
WU
. Wassoti
: man.
KNIGHTS   OF   PYTHIAS
Oranbrook, B.C.
Orsacsnt Lodgs, No, it
Masts every Tuesday at I p.m.
at fraternity Hall.
A. Hurry, C. C.
E. IlttlHull, K. ot lt. & S,
B. A. HIU, M. F.
Vlaltlng brethren cordially invited
to attend.
I.O.O.F.,    KEY   CITY    LODGE
Oo. 41
lleets arery Monday nlgbt
■t Baw   Fraternity   Hall.
Sojourning Oddfellows cordially luvltad.
f,  Broughton. W.  M.  Harris,
N. O. Bao'y
PRIDE    OF    CRANBROOK
Circle No.   Ill
Oompanloni ot tha Forest
Meeta ln Maple Hull , First and
Third Wednesday ot each niOBtb at
1:00 p.m., aharp.
Mrs. A. M. Laurie, C. 0
Mra. A. K. Hbaw, Bee.
Vleltlng   Oompanlona   tardlally   welcome. Mil
CRANBROOK LODGE
No.    10M
MeetB every Wednesday at 8 p.m.,
in Royal Black
KntghtB' Hull on
Baker  Street.
W. Matthfcws, dictator.
F. Carlson, Box 7r>6, .Secretary.
INDEPENDENT   ORDER   OF
FORESTERS
Meeta In Royal Black  Knlghta Kali
Baker Street
Meete every 2nd and Ub Thursday
ot each montb at a p.m. aharp.
Mrs.  L.  Haywarii. reo   sec.
W. B.  MacFarlane. duel ranger
Visiting brethren made we. ..me.
The
Cranbrook   Poultry   and
Stock Association
Pet
LAIDLAW   A   DE   WOLF
Civil   and   Mining EBglneers-Britlth
Columbia Land Surveyors
P.O. Box 236
CRANBROOK,
Phone Ml
...    B.O.
Drs.     KING    *    GREEN
physicians and Surgeons
Olllce at Residence,  Armatrong Ave.
Ottlce Hours:—
Forenoons - - 9.00 to 10.00
Afternoons - - 1.00 to   4.00
Evenings - - - T.IO to   I.U
Sundays I.U to   4.10
Oranbrook, ■•*>•
F. M. MacPherson
UNDERTAKER
Norbury Amine Nsi, In Citv Hsll
Opsu U«i snU Nlgbt Pboes Ul
I'erln
DIVISION
Attendance-
X.
Malcolm
W.  R.   BEATTY
Undertaker,
Eiubaliuer,
Funeral Director,
CRANBROOK, B.O.
I'. (J. HOX 685
PHONE 346
Cranbrook
Cottage Hospital
GARDEN AVE.
Matron:    Mrs. A. Salmon
Terms on Application
Phone 250 P. O. Box 84S
President   A
Smith.
Meeta regularly on tbe First Friday
evening ot eacb month.
Information on poultry matters
supplied.
Address the Secretary W. W Mr
Qregpr,  Cranbruuk.
Loyal Orange
Lodge No. 1871
Meetn 1 Ht mid
lini Thiiimliiv In
It <> v >i I lllack
Knights nt Ire-
It p.IV. eli-ill-     ViHitorn
lam] .mil at
| Welcoms.
it.  H. (terrett, W.   M
,W. Dnnatau, Ree, He.
NOTICK   OK   CANCELLATION   OI
RESERVE
Notice is hereby Kiven that a re
serve, notice of wblcb appeared u
the B.C. Oasette, on October loth
1912, m cancelled in tin far us It re
lllt.-H   |
ii tin- following
e,|iir,-il
timber
licence
1- —
4411,
91)112,     11347,
ai'J07.
22661,
83110,
'itt'.ii,    26737,
26921,.
241K2.
88183,
30358,    31180,
31184,
81186,
31201,
31830,    B1481,
32022,
32711.
33411,
33459,    33460,
34221,
:ii27:i,
34310,
.'165112,    37B80,
37998,
37994,
41344,
4142G    umi    42170.
It.   A.   Itl
INWIOK
Deputy  Mil
later ol
1.iiiiiiu
1   II ll-lll
Department,
Victoria, B.O., Maroh :nm
.   1914,
IB :im.
Dr. de Van'* Female Pllle
A rellabl* French laftlUtos; m vet um T htrt
pllle era eicttdinflf powerlul la tvgultllu thi
genetellve portion ut the female lyitem. Refuel
ell cheep HtiitMioni Or, de fni art mid el
■Rt hox, or three lor I Hi. Mallei! lo nny eddreth
to *wfe«U Urmg «••- •*• Vunttetit.ee, Oov
Hro-
gan, M*ryl Carson. Hing Cun, Alice
Hallet, Frank HawkBworth. Dorothy
Henderson, Gladys Johnson, Ralph
Ladds. Harry Louis. Orey Moseley,
Florence Renii, Kric Stone, Willie
Stuart, Irene Taylor, Davie Watson,
Wilhelmine Woodman.
DIVISION  III.
Promoted tu Entrance Class—Gordon Argue, Philip Briggs, Celia Carson, Margaret Davis, William Daniels,
Mary Dunning, Herbert Fyles, Bertha (Mil, Merritt Leask, Bernard
Lees, Sydney Murgatroyd, Edwin
Malcolm, Alec Mennie, Mary Malcolm
Cladya Spence.
DIVISION III.
Promoted from Sr. Ill to Jr. IV.
—Muriel Baxter (honors), John Noble (honors) Hugh Fraser (honors),
Mary Baruhardt, Willie Atchison,
Melville Dallas, Gordon McKenna,
Barcley McNeil, Milo Drummond, Josephine Severe, Grenville Musser,
Nettie Robinson, Francis Cadwalla
der, Nellie Marcellais, Charles Armstrong, Fred Swain, Arvil Thomson,
Gordon Taylor.
Junior  III.  to  Senior  III,—Kvelyn
Moore, Mary Mann, Frank Bridges
DIVISION V.
Junior III. to Senior III.—Irene
Beech, Nina Belanger, Gladys
Urookes, Ruby Deacon, Grace Doris,
Banbara Green, Harold Haslam, Hat-
tie Hollander, Jennie Hopkins, Wai
Hing Hoy, Violet Jones, Faith Kendall, Ruth Kendall, Walter Laurie,
Harold Leask, Grace McFarlane, Mabel McGoldric, Nellie McKenna, Dewey McNeil, Wilma McNabb, Dorothy
Reed, Violet Simpson, Alfred Sm-
dall, Doris Sainsbury, Clifford St.
Eloi, Lily Taylor, Edward Turner,
David Watson, Irma Ward.
DIVISION VII.
Promoted to Junior Third—Ruby
Appleyard, Kathleen Atchison, Norman Beech, Herbert Bradley, Danny
Daniels, Faith Kwiu, Willie George,
Kila Kendall, Maud Malcolm, Hugh
MacDonald, Annie Parnaby, Maud
Scott, Helen Worden,
On Trial—Martha Messinger, Job-
epb Mueller, Joseph I'attinson, Ray
Scott. Gflriield Taylor, Roy Leaak,
Bessie Woodman.
DIVISION vm.
Promoted to Division VII., Senior
Second, in order of Merit.—Isabel
Parker, Patricia McDermot, Vera
Baiter. Murray Henderson, Roderick
Kennedy, Alfred Jollifle, Lenore Little, .lark Ward, Kli/ahetb Chapman,
Christopher Duekerlng, Gordon Armstrong, Maggie can-, Howard Brogan, Lou fee Keisey, Kneaa Hogarth,
Jimmy Logan, Thomas Hogarth,
Gerald Cllne, Ethel clapp, Him
h.n.'. Kitty Roeindale, Char let. Muh-
Cranbrook, 24 June
The Editor tile Prospector:
Dear Sir—With reference to Mr.
llobeau'H communication iu your in
sue of 27th iutit. re my letter iu the
Craubrook Herald of nth inst., 1
wish to point out that Mr. Ltubeuu
in laboring undor a false iiupressiou
and had he taken the trouble to
inline himself ui'tiiiamted with tliu local controversy, he would never have
ventilated um optuloua and thinly
veiled sarcasm lo the prosa us tie
lias done.
To BUllghteo Mi. Bobeau and to
use the concluding remarks of bis
letter "mainly to assist in removal
oi unnecessary opinion," i Biuuinao
ise the  [acts  at.  follows:
iii    .M>    "Qcouomy"   letter    was
written not nn ci itu-i/.mg "a retainer
fee" nut to draw the ratepayers' at
tentlon to the action ol the olty
il, whose policy when assuming office was "soonomy at any
pme" and Dot against the engines!
whom the■>■ have retained. Had (hey
givon huu the recognised lee ol LO
pei cent, or even I'D per cent. Ciun-
mlssion, nn a brother professional I
should uot bave criticised bin accep
tance of it, but the authorities who
were responsible for so doing, especially wheu they pass over proles
atonal men iu this city.
(2). .My next point is this, witb a
scheme involving the expenditure uf
so large an amouut the council
should have advertised for engineers,
when they decided to retain extra
help in tbe matter, and give everybody an opportunity of competing iu-
stead of inviting one engineer to the
exclusion of all others. This is a
very  sigtutieant  fact  in  itself.
Iu the interests of the taxpayers of
Cranbrook, 1 think my "Economy"
letter was fully juBtitlnl.
As the writer has bad a long professional experience both in England
and Canada he is tiuite as well nc-
uainted with the scale of * professional fees as Mr. Bobeau, and as
the question of a "retainer fee,"
which is the salient point of his letter, was not raised in my letter of
llth June excepting as a reference to
an expenditure by the council of the
ratepayers' money, which could have
een avoided, and which was fully
explained by me, I fail to see wby
Mr. Bobeau should worry himself
about a matter which does not affect the profession, and go to the
trouble tn write about the matter at
11.
Youth itruly,
V. O'HARA,
Civil Engineer and Architect
most complete and unique exhibit ot
the sort ever brought together under one roof—and a considerable
part of it has never heen under a
ron/ hefore.
To get it all together the Smlth-
Hoiiiau Institution or Washington has
sent its explorers unto the ends of
the earth—and otber [ilaces where
they dug up some of the prehistoric
red men and then dug out before the
descendants of said prehistoric red
men could dig in and shoot tbem
full of poisoned arrows and other
souvenirs. The School of American
Archaeology has contributed extens
Ively and has fallen In with the idea
of making  the  whole exhibit   graphic
ami oomprohenalblc to an im scientific
lowbrow lire mc, and another one
like you. *
And so we may go to school
again, without the iiieouveiileuce of
set hours, or text-bo()ks or the stern
eye of a long suffering teacher; nud tu
n few days, or oven hours, of such
intnim'    interest    (lint    they pass all
i quickly, we may learn more
about our human history-and re
member  It    than   we  learned    lu    all
' school years combined. And then
when the youngster says: "Dad, tell
me about the Crustaceans," or "Wby
huh a troglodyte?" you'll be able
to lay down the evening paper and
say with becoming Impreisivenen
"Well, BOD, being blind on one side,
the troglodyte progressed iu a circle,
thereby boating Senator--well, you
know tbe dub I mean—to It by a
couple of million years, and"—but I
haven't seen the complete exhibit yet
myself.
Talk about your royal roads to
knowledge!
Yours tor the logos of ethnos,
SCOTTY
Eton Diego, Cal., June, 1914.
COAL AND PBTROLEUM NOTICB
NOTICK li h<Beby~given that, sixty daya after date hereof, I iutend
tu apply to the Minister of Lands
for a Licence to prospect for coal
and petroleum over the following described landB, situate in the Fernle
District or South East Kootenay, 1„
Block 45D3.
Commencing at a post planted at
LeBter Clapp's South-East corner,
thence East MU chains, north 80
chains, West NU chains, Houth M
chains, to point of commencement,
and1 containing ,tn acres more or
less.
Located  this lithday of June, 1914,
RLLA  CLAPP,
Locator
JOHN  EWIN,
2-r' Agent
COAL   AND   PETROLEUM NOTICE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, sixty days after date hereof, 1 intend
to apply to the Minister of Lands for
a Licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described lands, situate lu the Fernie District of South East Kootenay, iu
Block 4698,
Commencing at a post planted at
W. F. Doran's North-East, corner,
tbence South HO chains, West 80
Chains, North 80 chains, East 80
chains, to point of commencement,
and containing 040 acres, more or
less.
Located this 6th day of June, 1914.
MRS.  ANNA KENNADY,
Locator
JOHN FiWIN,
25 Agent
Block 4593.
Commencing  at a post planted at
One mile    West   of   the South-West
corner of Licence 9496, thence North
80 chains, West 80 chains, South 80
chains, East 80 chains   to   polut   of
commencement,   and   containing   640
acreB more or less.
Located this Sth day of June, 1914.
T. B. O'CONNELL,
Locator
JOHN EWIN,
2fi Agent
The Unscientific Scientist
aer.
un Trial HtHniry Pylei,, James
Oenrfe.
Promoted to DlvlBlon v 11.. Junior
Second- Dorothy' Leask, l^etin Hro
enn. Qerald Bartlam, Vivian Kummer, Wlllii' L.'iihK, Freda Osborne,
[im,ni.i Morriaon, MargAfet l.onek,
Niirvirl Oaalake, Gordon Woodman,
I f ■>■■•• Taylor.
(in Trial   Jamea Kembjtll,
ipIVIHION IX.
Promoted in DIvlHlon IX. Irom Hit.
X, Second Primer—Malcolm Brogan,
Hing Cuu, liiitiivH Jobnaon, Rovennn
McGlnnla,   Hrey   Monday,   Qwirudo
Mrotl,   Kii.'   Htuue.
Dear Herb:—Have yuu the time lo
read thousands—or even hundreds—ot
tomes upon tbe subject of .Ethnology
and Its first cousin, Archaeology?
Neither have I! Neither have some
ninety-nine per cent ol our fellow-
citizens. Would you read them if
you had the time? Neither would II
Neither would the same percentage of
our hrother-m'en. I don't believe I
would wade clear through one of the
aforementioned tomes on a bet and
probably I wouldn't understand or
remember any appreciable part of .t
if I  did—to win the bet.
But If you could walk into a beautiful big building on tbe crest of a
sightly hill overlooking San Diego,
the Bay, Coronado, Point l.omu, the
Coronado Islands, and a nickel's
worth of Mexico—whlcb is considerable ground at present market values— 1 say, if you could walk into
such a building and see before you a
history of your kind portrayed by
pictures, models, relics, all of them
absolutely authentic, graphically It
lustratlng tbe evolution ot yourself
from the paleozoic ase—lf that waa
tbe start—down to the perfected product embodied in your own hand-
iiome self—wouldn't you jump at the
chance?   I would.
How do we hest remember things
in general? By our mental Images of
them, of course. How do you re-
uii'mbftr Napoleon Bonaparte, for example? Through the pictures you
have seen of him—probably aa the
saddest, moat serloua little fat man
you ever knew of—that, however, being hut one of his characteristics.
Ilow do to remember the earmarks
ol the Meaozolc or the Caenozolc period?   W»ll, frankly, I don't.
lint hern in the mnssivci Kthnology
Dnlldlng wlll be collected the moat
remarkable exhibit that has ever
Iiiiii Attempted,   It In a most   amhl-
i ii undertaking and wlll represent
llie hu in total of Ii ii tn ■• ii knowledge of
lln- history af you anil men nnd the
real of ua. The ablest lali-nt in the
ild Ima been working upon this for
yeara, No eiponan hna been apared.
Ami where It ban been Impossible to
nliiiHe    certain  collectiona    which
were logically  iwniy t.i   complete
round out tl iblliit, they were
horrowoil, Inelileiitnlly the Inalltu
linn which loaned them did not take
niif chances—they exacted huge honda
for the aafe return of their Invalu-
ahle collections.     The reault la   the
8TNOPSI8   OF   OOAL   MINIHO
REGULATIONS
Ooal mining rlghta of tht Dominion
is Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Al-
barta, tht Yukon Ttrrltory, tht North
wttt Ttrritorita aad in a portion of
tht Prorinot of BrlUth Columbia,
may bt leased for a ttrm ot twtntr-
oot years at an annual rental ol $1
an acre. Not more than I.MO aent
will bt leated to ont applieant.
Application for a leatt mutt ht
madt by tht applicant in ptrton to
tht Agent or Sub-Agent ol tht dlatrlct In which tht rlghta applltd lor
art aituattd.
In turvtytd territory tht land mutt
bt deecrlbed by ttctiont, or legal subdivision! of tectiont, and In untur-
vtytd ttrrltory tht tract applltd lor
shall bt ttaktd out by tbt applicant
blmatlf.
■acta application mutt bt accompanied by a let ot »5 which will ht
relunded il tht rlghta applied lor-an
not «v .Habit, but not otberwltt. A
royalty ahall bt paid on tht a
cbantablt output ol tht mint at tbt
rata of llvt rente ptr ton.
Tht ptrton operating tht mint ahall
furnish tht Agtnt with tworn rtturnt
accounting for tht full Quantity of
mtrchantablt coal mined and pay tht
royalty thereon. II tht coal mining
rlghta art not being optrattd, auch
returns ahould bt lurnithtd at ltaat
onct a ytar.
Tbe lease will include tht coal mining rlghta only, but tht lesttt may
bt permitted to purchatt whattTtr
available surface rlghtt may bt »
tldered necessary for tht working of
tht mint at tha rate ol 110.01) ao acre
For lull information application
should bt madt to tbt Secretary ot
the Department of tht Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agtnt or Sub-Agtnt ol
Dominion Lands.
W.   W.   CORY,
Deputy Ministtr of tbt Interior
N.B.—Unauthorized publication of
thla adTtrtlatmtat will not bt paid
for.-30690. Jan. 3rd-tf.
COAL AND PBTBOI.KUM NOTIOE
NOTICE Is hereby given tbat, sixty days after date hereof, I intend
to apply to the Minister of Landa for
a Licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described lande, altuate in the Fernle District of South Eaat Kootenay, in
Block 4593.
Commencing at a Poat planted at
Ella Clapp's South-East corner,
tbence North 80 chains, East HO
chains, Soutb 80 chains, Weat 80
cbalna, to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acret, more oi
less.
Located this 6th day of June, 1914.
JOHN  EWIN,
25 Locator
COAL AND PETROLEUM NOTICE
NOTICB ia hereby given that, sixty dayB after date hereof, I intend
o apply to the Minister of Landa fur
a Licence to proapect for coal aud
petroleum over the following descrlhed landa, altuate in the Fernle Dlatrlct of South East Kootenay, In
ilock 4593.
Commencing   at a poat planted   at
T. B. O'Connell'a Boutb-EaBt coiner,
then North 80 chains, East 80 chains
South 80 chains, Weat 80 chains, to
point   of   commencement, contalitl.ig
640 acrea, more or leaa.
Located thla 8tb day ot June, 1914.
JOHN A. TANNElt
Locator
JOHN  EWIN,
2S Agent
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE IS HEREBY WIVEN tbat
a reserve, notice ot which appeared
in the B. C. Gasette on the 27th of
December, 1907, ia cancelled in ao far
as it relates to Lot 11804, Oroup 1,
Kootenay DiBtrlct, for the purpose of
tbe sale of same to the Canadian Pacific Railway.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Landa
Landa Department,
Victoria, B. C,
4th June, 1914. 24 3m
MINERAL ACT
(FORM F.)
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENT
NOTICB.
HTRATHCONA MINERAL CLAIM,
SITUATE IN THE FT. STEELE
MININO DIVISION OF EAST KOOTENAY DISTRICT.
TAKE NOTICE tbat 1, Oeo. M.
fluid, agent for H. II. Steele, Free
Miner's Certillcate No. 07372 b, Intend, Hiity daya from date hereof,
to apply to the Milling Recorder for
a Certillcate of Improvement for the
purpose of obtaining a Crown 11 rant
of the above claim.
AND FURTHER TAKB NOTICB
Ibat action under Section 37 muat be
commenced before the lasuance of
such Certillcate of Improvement.
Dated tbls 15th day of June, A. D.
1914.
'•ti.lt OEO. M. JllDD.
COAL AND PETROLEUM NOTICE
NOTICE ia hereby given tbat, sixty days atter date hereof, I Intend
to apply to the Minister of Landa for
a Licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum over tbe following described lands, Bituate in tbe Fernie District of Soutb East Kootenay, in
Block 4593.
Commencing at a Post planted at
Lester Clapp's South-East corner,
South 80 chains, West 80 chaina,
North 80 chains, East 30 chains, to
point of commencement, and containing (40 acres, more or less.
Located this 6tb day of June, 1914.
W. F. DORAN,
Locator
JOHN EWIN,
25 Agent
COAL AND PETROLEUM NOTIOE
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty days atter date hereof, I intend
to apply to the Minister of Landa for
a Licence to proapect for coal and
petroleum over tbe following described landa, situate in the Fernie Dlatrlct of South East Kootenay, In
Block 4593.
Commencing at a Post planted at
One Mile North of tba North-East
corner of Licence No. 8731, being one
and one-balf miles North of Commerce Crfek, one and one-half miles
East of Flathead river, thence North
80 chains, West 80 chaina, South 80
chains, East 80 chains, to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Located this 6th day of June, 1914.
LESTER CLAPP.
Locator
JOHN EWIN,
25 Agtnt
COAL AND PETROLEUM NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given fhat, sixty daya after date bereol, I intend
to apply to the Mlnlater of Landa for
a Licence to proapect for coal and
petroleum over the following described lands, situate in the Fernie District of Soutb Bast Kootenay, in
Block 4593,
Commencing at a Poet planted at
Jobn A. Tanner'B Soiith-Woat coiner, thence Eaat 80 chains, thence
South 80 chains, thence West 80
chaina, thence North 80 chaina, to
point of commencement, containing
640 acrea, more or leaa.
Located tbia Sth day or June, 1914.
JAS. DOWNEY,
Locator
JOHN EWIN,
26 Agent
COAL AND PETROLEUM NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty daya after date hereof, I Intend
to apply to the Mlnlater of Landa for
a Licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described lande, altuate in the Fernle District of South East Kootenay, in
Block 4593.
Commencing at a Poat planted at
T. B. O'Connell's North-Weat corner,
thence North 80 chaina, thence Kaat
80 chaina, thence Soutb 80 chaina,
thence West 80 chaina, to point of
commencement, containing 640 acrea,
more or leas.
Located this Sth day or June, 1914.
J. D. McBRIDE,
Locator
JOHN  EWIN,
25 Agent
COAL AND PETROLEUM NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given tbat, Bixty days after date hereof, I intend
to apply to the Minister of LandB for
a Licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum over tbe following described lands, situate in the Fernie District of South East Kootenay, in
Block 4593.
Commencing at a Post planted at
J. D. McBrlde's South-Eaat corner,
West 80 chains, thence South 80
chains, thence East 80 chaina, thence
North 80 chains, to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres
more or leaa.
Located this 8th day or June, 1914,
B. H. McPHF.E,
Locator
JOHN EWIN,
25 Agent
COAL AND PBTROLEUM NOTICB
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty daya after date hereof, I Intend
to apply to the Minister of Lands lor
a Licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described lands, situate ln the Fernie District of Soutb East Kootenay, iu
Block 4593.
Commencing at a Post planted at
John Ewln's Houth-West corner,
chains, North 80 chains, West 80
chains, North 80 chains, Wast »u
cbalna to point of comment 'ment,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Located tbis 6th day of June, .914.
A. A. EWIN,
Locator
JOHN EWIN,
25 Agent
COAL AND PETROLEUM NOTICE
NOTICB Is hereby given that, sixty daya after date hereof, I Intend
to apply to tha Minister of Lands for
a Licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described landa, situate In the Fernlt Dlitrlct of   Soutb   Bast   Koottnay,   In
COAL AND PBTROLEUM NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that, sixty daya after date hereof, I intend
to apply to the Mlnlater of Lands for
a Licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described landa, altuate In tbt Fernie Diatrict of South East Kootenay, ln
Block 4598.
Commencing at a Post planted at
Jas. Downey's Bouth-West corner,
South 80 chains, But 80 chains,
North 80 chains, West 80 chaina, to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or leaa.
Located this 8th day or June, 1914.
R. EAKIN,
Locator
JOHN EWIN,
25 Agent
COAL AND PETROLEUM NOTIOE
NOTICE Is hereby given tbat, sixty daya alter date hereof, I Intend
to apply to tbe Minister of Landa for
a Licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described lands, situate in the Fernle Dla
trlet of South Eaat Kootenay, in
Block 4693.
Commencing at a Poat planted at
R. Eakln'a South-West corner, South
80 cbalns, Eaat 80 chains, North 80
chaina, West 80 ehalna, to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Located tbls 8th day or June, 1914.
A. WALLER,
Locator
JOHN EWIN,
IS Agent THE PROSPECTOR,  CRANBROOK.  B.C.
Calgary-Alberta Oil Fields
(Comtlnued from Page One)
ducer. The boldlngR consist of 10,175
acres, a considerable portion ot the
acreage being in the heart of the
proved area and In the center of a
section where live wells nre now being sunk. The holdings nre also well
scatterod, aud Include quarter sections of ground in the inimedinte vicinity of the Monarch well which developed crude, black petroleum nt a
depth of 808 ft. on June 17. Tlio
Prudential Oo, ln strongly Hnnnced,
numbering among its piUccrs and directora a number of Calgnry citizens
of the highest standing.
LUCKY BTRIKE WILL DRILL
FOR QAfl.
WItli a view to developing natural
gas, and producing therefrom gasoline In commercial quantity, the Lucky Strike Oil & Oan Co., with extensive holdings lu the vicinity of
Aldersyde, where gas'was Ilrst struck
at a depth of 152 ft., adjoining thr
site of the Federal Co., and at 280
ft. 3 miles west of thin, from which
gas ls being furnished for hotel and
domestic purposes, hns decided to
sink a number of wells, until a permanent flow,of at least 4,000,000 cu.
ft. of gas a day has heen developed.
This petroleum, commonly cnlled
"wet"' gas, which conies from a body
of oil and which is generally considered a favorable indicating In boring
tor oil, can be treated under compression and will produce 1 gal. of
gasoline for every 2000 ft. of gns.
The Lucky Strike Co. proposes to
install Bessemer condensers and compressors at the wells to treat tho
gas as it comes from tb/e ground.
It has been demonstrated that this
can be done at small cost, and thnt
the product of higher grade than the
commercial gas can he eold at 25c
a gallon to good proat. After compression 90 per cent, of the gas remains and can be utilized commercially at' a handsome profit. J. Wads-
worth Travers, vice president and
managing director, nnd George Reynolds, superintendent, arc oil operators of wide experience, and under
their direction thia company will be
the flrst to entet the Industrial field.
The Lucky Strike Co. Is well financed and active operations in drilling
for both oil and petroleum gas will
soon be commenced, an order for the
necessary machinery having been
placed a few days ago.
THE FEDERALS AT GLADYS
Operating under the direction of
J. Ricket, a aj.-ologtst of high standing, the Federal Oil & Gas Corporation Is operating near the village of
Gladys. The well Is being sunk on
the crest of the anticline near wliere
a well was sunk for water mnny
years ago. The water was so impregnated with petroleum tbat tbe
cattle refused to drink it. Tbe Federal well ls now down G50 ft. and
the indications are highly -encouraging. The formation In whlcb the anticline is traced is of the Kootenai
structure to the east, and forms a
shale to the west of the Cretaceous
age. There is every evidence on the
surface of the anticline that oil haa
seeped from below, and it is quite
certain that oil has floated in greater quantity where tbe surface indications are taint. The Federal will
ia being pushed with all speed and It
ia believed that it will develop within the next 60 days.
THE B. A. WILL SOON BEGIN
OPERATIONS.
The British American Standard Oil
Corporation, Ltd., which has acquired 10,000 acres of oil land, selected
before recent oil excitement, Is about
to commence active operations. The
holdings are splendidly located on
the anticline and being widely scattered, a site for tbe well will be
chosen as near br possible to where
the hest indications are being shown
by the wells already under way. Tbe
company is conservative nnd well
financed.
OTHERS WILL ERECT DERRICKS
Other companies about to erect
derricks are the• Stokes-Stephens Co.,
Calgary Alberta Petroleum Co., Canadian Petroleum Resources, Swift
Current Syndicate, Northwestern l'n
eiflc, Calgary A Sweet Grass llll
Co., Bouthweat Petroleum Co., Copper Oils, Prudential Oil Co., Western Pacific, British American Oils,
Rei Oil Co., Rocky Mountain Oil
Co., Huron A Bruce Investment,
Piedmont Pttroleum Co,, and the
Herron Oil k Natural Oaa Co.
THK COMPRESSION OF NATURAL
GAS INTO OASOLINE.
By F.  John Bur,
The compression of gases from oil
wells, both of asphaltum and paraffins bases, Is now commercially successful, and lt opens up a wide field
In tbe future development of oil   in
the Calgary-Alberta district.     Up to
3 years ago this wbb done only   by
chemists in an experimental way.
The compressed product in thla
field IS a gasoline which may he mixed with distillate, ono part of natural or compressed gasoline to one
part of distillate, producing a gasoline fully 25 per cent, greater efficiency tban the commercial article
used in automobiles at the present
time.
There Is now going to waste In
tbls Held hundreds of millions of cubic feet of gas every day, purely boot the lack ol knowledge   on
the part of tho operators of a manner of conserving it. Most ot the
gnses contain a great percentage ol
volatile oil, which by compression at
a certain temperature, will compress
into gasoline or nnptha, and the remaining gas, which is dry, can he
used for fuel or illuminating purposes.
The "wot or caning head gas" as
It. ts usually called, generally coiiiob
from tho main body of the oil, and
is one ot tiie favorable indications
loolted for by the oil men, particularly uh to Its cxlntcnce iu tho formation in which the drilling Is going on. Sometimes, In a compact
sandstone or coarse-textured Bandy
shale, this gas in found as a satur-
nti'd gns in the form of a high-grade
gnsoline, hundreds of feet from its
source, being compressed under natural conditions. Thoso conditions
ivive been duplicated artificially, the
method involving certnin pressure at
u certain temperature For example
n tost plant was erected by Irving
0, Allen and G. A. Burrell at f-c
compressor plant of the pennsylvan
In Gasoline Co., Bt Follansbeo, W
Vn., which consisted of a gfls en
gine, a amall compressor, cooling
colls of ordinary 1-ln. pipe Immersed
In a tank containing tho cooling mixture, -Bnd a storage* tank composed of
li-lu. steel tubing. A pressure of 415
llis. at a temperature of 2 degrees 0.
will liqiilly practically all'the gas. A
pressure of 430 lbs. requires 4 degrees temperature; 506 lbs.,'9.1 degrees, and 600 IbB., 77.5 degreeB.
By reverse procedure, a gram of liquid will yield 600 c. c. of gas at
zero centigrade, or 1 gal, of liquid
will yield 50 cu. ft. of gas. Higher
prtBsiircs require higher temperatures. In all of tlte experiments a
wet" gas, or one free of all oil
body, waB used. About 2000 cu. ft.
of gas compresses into 1 gal. of
gasoline.
Sometimes the natural gases contain lighter products which will not
liquify with the first compression.
a such cases it is passed on to another compressor and even to a
fifth. . The last three, and at times
the lBBt four products, are not liquid, but can be placed in cylinders and shipped over the country
not accessible by pipe lines, for illuminating purposes as compressed
gas.
As the above experiments were carried on by the U. S. Bureau of Mines
for the purpose of Increasing the efficiency in thr production of mineral
fuels, tbey are worthy of note and
study by the oil operators of the
Calgary-Alberta diatrict, as wll as
other places where great quantities
of gas are being wasted dally.
It is predicted tbat the time wlll
come when governments will legislate
against the waste of natural gases.
No new gas Ib bolng made to replenish the rapidly exhausting deposits. Gas takes ages to form—geological ages, far beyond llr- scope of
man's judgment as tar as time figures.
The Srst gas-gasoline plant in California was established in 1911. The
results were so entirely satisfactory
that others soon followed. In 2 years
250 gas-gasoline compressor plants
were In operation in the United
States. California alone produced
7,200,000 gals, ot gasoline In 1912
from 10 compressor plants.
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ONE DAY ONLY
THE CANADA CRUDE OIL COMPANY, LIMITED
Head Office: Alberta Loan Bldg., Calgary, Alberta,
Invite Strict Investigation of their 12,000
OIL
Acres  of  All  Crown   Grant   Holdings
OIL
We Will Own  All Mineral and Surface Land Rights Under Our Agreements
Solid Investment
Is what the Man of Affairs will look for First
The Selling Agents Will Beat Mr. W. E. Worden's Office on Saturday, July 4
—One Day Only—when Prospectus and Geological Report can be had.
SELLING OFFICE:
W.E. WORDEN'S
Baker Street, Cranbrook,   or Company's office, Calgary, Alberta
« al
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toks hy auto trucks. Plans for laying a pipe line are under consideration.
The oil or gasoline, helng ot superior quality, and of an efficiency
25 per cent, greater than the commercial article, is now being used
by many automobile owners in Calgary, and ia found to be highly satisfactory.
In (addition to the natural industry
of treating the "wet" gas in compressors for the production of gasoline, the discovery of natural gns in
this district opens a wide Held for
the development of power. After
having had the gasoline extracted
trom it, 90 per cent, of the gas remains to be utilized for heating and
power purposes. The project of installing an enormous nower plant for
the generation of electricity is now
under consideration by local capitalists. Water power is scarce and expensive.
EXPERTS ADVISE DRILLING
Suggestive Questions
For Sunday School Lessons
(Copyright 1914, by Rev. T. 8. Lin-
Bcott, D. D.)
in    the   Vineyard.
METHOD OF DRILLING POR
OIL IN THK CALGARY-
ALBERTA DISTRICT.
The method of drilling in the Calgary-Alberta oil tields ie similar to
that employed in other oil districts.
Derricks are erected of timber in the
majority of instances, although one
derrick of structural steel is now
In operation. The derricks are built
to a height of from 60 to 90 ft.,
with about 25 ft. sproad at the base.
Tlu: power employed Ib steam, and
engines of the horizontal type are
us>d, connected by belt to a Bhaft-
driving crank connected to a walking
beam, the .latter lifting and dropping
the stem and drill. In the early development coal is used as fuel, but
as soon as gas is struck, as In the
instance of the Calgary Petroleum
Products Co., at the present time,
the latter is piped to the hollers.
Tbe drill holes, are started with an
18- 20 or 22-in. bit, and the size of
thc hole gradually decreases as depth
ls attained, until at a depth of from
2000 to 3000 ft. the bore is 8-ln.
gauge.
Thus far baling hns been necessary
to bring the residue from tbe drill
to the surface, mid in most instances
sufficient water has heen furnished
naturally to keep the drill free anu^
open.
The cost of sinking a well ranges
from !P2..r,0 to $U> per foot when tbe
work is let on contract, hut It la
asserted by some of tbe companies
who bave installed their own outfits that the cost is well under $10
per foot.
Tbe nearest railroad point to
Calgnry •Alberta tields, tbat Is,
center of operations, ts Okotoks, on
tlte Canadian Pncillc railroad, 12
lies distant. The haul is by easy
grndo, and during the greater part
of the year the roads are In excellent condition. From the discovery
well the oil ia being hauled to Oko-
Keen interest in the oil situation
of southern Alberta has been aroused hy the formation of a company
to drill for oil at Macleod. Tbe
opinion that tbe Macleod district
would eventually prove a very rich
one in oil has repeatedly been expressed by prospectors and experts,
and within recent weeks tbe rush tor
leases,has heen so general .that practically everything has now been taken up. Well-known operators have
been quick'to secure leases, and large
blocks of stock bave heen absorbed
hy local investors. It Is realized tbat
an oil strike nt this time should
mean untold benefit to Macleod and
the Macleod district, and results ot
drilling operations will be awaited
with keen expectancy In view of the
known character of the geologic formation of the vicinity.
tbe
tbe
MORE OIL IS DISCOVERED,
The installation of thc new (tower
house on the Elk river by tbe Elko
Water, Light and Power Co. is rapidly approaching completion nnd will
mark a new stage in the development
cf Elko as an industrial centre. The
available power possibilities ot this
project are indicated from th* fact
that the watershed above thc power
site is 1,700 sqtiaro miles in area,
gtvtaff even at low water with nn 80
per cent, efficiency at the turbines
not'less than 1:1,441* horsepower. Tbe
new plant is located nt the government bridge across the river on the
road to Kernie.
Meanwhile surveys just mnde Indt
cate extensive deposits ot high-grade
commercial oil and rhn bearing sands
in the near vicinity and machinery Is
uuw being shipped into the flnge
Creek fields, where oil samples Indicate the remarkably high specific
gravity of .811. Tbe two wells already being sunk are showing a good
Ilow of nil at. depths of less thnn 20(1
feet, and the present outlook Is for a
permanent aud tremendoun output.
cluslvely for his pay, taking n0 delight in bis work as to quantity or
quality, ■ in what class would yon
place him ab to skill   and character?
19. When does God reckon with
the laborers in his vineyard?
20. Verse 16—If the tlrst called is
the last in merit, and tbe last ceiled is the tlrst in merit, what value
Is there in length of service when rewards are given out?
Lesson for Sunday, July 12, 1914.
Greatness Tbrougb Service. Mark x:
32-45.
BUILDING   UP  CANADA.
They came across the line and established in Canada simply because
they could not get our raw material
free, and could not compete witb
Canadian manufacturers over a protective tariff wall. Thus does tbe
National Policy build up an Industrial fabric, create a demand for labour, and a consequent increase in
its price. Every succeeding year
brings a new vindication of the Conservative trade policy, and as the nation continues to expand and (develop
under a tariff that is just and equitable to all, theoretical free traders
will gradually disappear, and event-
ally become as rare in the Dominion as Red Indians on the shores of
Manhattan.
The    Laborers
Matt.  ix:l-16.
-'.{olden Text—He maketb hts sun
to rise on the evil and the good, and
sendeth rain on the just and the unjust.   Matt.  v:45.
1. Verse I—What is the meaning of
the phrase "The Kingdom of heaven" as here used?
2. In what respects does God's
method of rewarding his workers resemble tbe method of this householder? (This is one of the questions which may be answered in
writing by members of the club.)
3. What points of resemblance are
there h'tween Christian work aud
work in a vineyard?
4. Whom    does    God   call to work
i bis vineyard aud  what    are    tbe
qualifications?
Verse 2—How much did "a
penny" in that day represent in our
present currency, and what was then
a fair day's pny for a laborer?
6. Is if right today for an employer of labor to hire men as
cheaply as he can, or should he pay
in proportion to hia own profits,
and why?
7. How much net profit should an
employer of labor plan to make tor
every dollar he pays in wages?
8. Verses 3-4—Who are responsible
for going out to induce men and women to become workers in God's
tineyard?
9. What pay may we safely promise to all those wbo would become
God's workmen?
10. Verses    5-7—Can    any
truthfully   claim   to be
who is not actively engaged in some clue, at least, should oc afforded the
Christian  work, and  why? playgoer as    to the  nature   ot    the
11. What should the state do with play he anticipates witnessing we do
those who can Work, but will not, not feel justified in altering our
when   tbey become a   charge    upon : choice.
the community? The wails in question can be   sub-
12. In the state under moral oh- divided into three parts—bass, ten-
ligation to furnish every willing or and falsetto. The bass wail is
worker with a job, at a living wage, sues from Matt, (sr.) who is big and
when he cnunot otherwise tind era- woolly, because he had a daughter
ployment? who was not better than shit   ought
13. What method is God taking 11-■ to be, ami also because he cannot
day to call laborers into his vino- trace the low-down villain who ns-
yard and when will his call to lnhor sisted ber in the proof of this assertion. The tenor wail proceeds
from a gentleman who nt Ilrst does
not seem quite certain why he Is In
the limelight at all, Imt whose he
nevnlcitce and pathos, if on a parallel with his really gorgeous cottonwool whiskers, would bave reached
tbe (Tarts ot the mediocre umltem'r
wbo bad Assembled in the Auditor!
um and were, more or less, forced to
listen to hliu whilsl be emitted what
was meant to he good ohwr and
cheap platitudes in n rather Dent
voice to hie very respectful fellow
actors who obviously, for the sake
of the play, could not answer blm
back. The third wail id any consequence issues from a very nebulous
somebody who apparently Buffers nn-
Shephard of the Hills
Had we, after seeing this play,
been asked to suggest a title, mayhap the first that would have suggested itself to us would have been
"Wails and Whiskers in the Hills."
■ We realize that there may be cer
person , tain objections to this title, but go-
Christian  ing on ttf< principle that some slight
der the very painful delusion
she (or rather he) is "nobody, who
can't be nothing at all" or something like that. However it ultimately transpires that Wall No. 2
is grandfather to Wail No. 3—his son
being the awful person directly responsible for the obvious annOyanjo
to which Wail No. 1 has for years
past been put. If we are proved to
be wrong in this statement we apologize. At any rate each one of the
audience present is entitled to his or
her own view of the matter, they
having, presumably, paid for the only too doubtful privilege of doing
so. There were, of course, other
character lu the piece characters
whose solo claim to notoriety was
thnt they had neither whiskers nor
wails; but at least one of them had
a tongue which, whilst it might have
proved of inestimable value in discovering the maximum rate per minute that the human voice can articulate Inarticulate words and passages—was useless in the mouth of an
actress, who was, nevertheless, iu
the words of Hill "Some pumpkins of
a girl, ns girls go."   We should have
rested  quite content had  we   merely   m*f.
to sit still and look at her. But
here we are, in duty bound to admit
our humble admiration stops. Oh!
year, and there waB Ollie. He wore,
and was unduly conspicuous for, the
yellow leggings and alleged riding
breeches adorning his weedy person.
His sole purpose on the stage seemed to b? to enable nn un-wasbed mu
sical-comedy pirate (by sonic anom-
ly styled "Wash" Gibbs), to maul
him  about in  the presence of his fl-
that ancee, (she of the voice aforesaid),
who thereby might learn to dospi.ic
him (Ollie) and thus make the wny
clear for the true hero wbo is without doubt, If we are to believe the
author of this play, a mill-hand
enamoured of the simple life but o
viously addicted to frequent—nnd expensive—visits to n really classy
barber. Oft if only our ranch and
farm hands had nice curly blnck
hair like his, ninl such a nice, clean,
newly shorn neck! And then we
must not overlook some others
whose purpose in the play was not
so clearly detined. We refer! more
particularly to sundry persons whose
sole business was to whittle chunks
of shapeless wood into other shapeless, but smaller, chunks id wood.
We could not precisely ascertain the
real usefulness of nil this, hut we
cannot help thinking what a lovely
lot of kindlings the proprietors ot
the Auditorium must have harvested
after the last curtain bad dropped.
The play itself, as presented, is a
very crude and , inconsecutive rendering, or rather adaptation, of the
really excellent book which bears its
So   far as   the actual acting
was concerned, saved for Hill, the
actors and actresses were decidedly
mediocre and, in parts, positively
amateurish—the one ha'f Of them
drawling their words along in a most
depressing sign song manner-the remainder gabbling their lines in the
evident deslne to get the play over
in  a hurry.
On    this   last  wore,  at   least,    we
must note our appreciation.
OYNIO0S.
cease?
14,   Verses H-9-Wlmt   prlneipln    Is
Illustrate!    In  tiie (net thnt    those
tho
rki'd
A'll.)
llie
Willi
who worked hilt mi hour Kot
sfiine imy iih those who luul wi
ii full ilny?
ir..   Notwithstanding thnl nil
nre found working for (tod nt
close of life will he rewarded
eternnl   happiness,  whnt advantiwns,
If nny,  will  those who hnve   served
Cod from Iholr youth?
IC, Verso H> ir. -Should all skilled
tnechnnlcs get the snme pny rogat'tl-
less ol the degree of thetr skill? Why'
17. Whnt run you sny lor or
against the men iii this parable ihnt
grumbled nt their l>ny?
1H.   When   "i   workman woikn   ei
The Point of Contact.
The merchant who is alive to his opportunities
will keep in constant touch with his customers,
and with others whom he hopes will become his
customers, lle will keep them informed of Ihe
arrivals of new goods, the prevailing tastes or
fashions, the latest improvements in things to eat
or to wear, or to make housework easier.
And the point of contact is advertising. To ad
vertisc intelligently, is an evidence of progress
iveness. It is safe to conclude lhat you will receive the best service and best value from thfl
merchant who seeks your patronage by modern
methods.
,i
zz.-A-i-m TTTF, PROSPECTOR, CRANBROOK,  BRITISH COLUMBIA
ECONOMICAL-—Heats   the   house   well
without burning all the coal you can buy.
McClary&
1/7* Gives steady,  even
£UrilQ.C2   heat   on  least   fuel.
See the McClary dealer or write for booklet.
Sold by Patmore Bros., Cranbrook, B. C.
Mr. und Mm. A. MoKlnnon und
children were ohtlng nt Perry creek
Dominion Dny.
V. M, ciiiiiiiinn. ol tho Prospector
stall wns in. Creston on Mondny nnd
Tuesday trnnsnotlng IiuhIiichh.
Messrs. Jonos and Piil'iH are llxine
a Hro-cscape ii> tho weal side ol tho
Bt. Ehigone hospttnl,
Kred Simpson hns gono Into tho
nil bllBlnosB, See liis nhe rl Iseiuenl
in nuothcr coluiun.
Mr.   and   M™. Halsall, and Mrs
Halaall'a mothor, nn vi   to Pens
crook on Dominion! Dny.   Tliey report
having n very pleasant i Ime.
It
BBHHHS « B « » li « HB ! SH ■ «' »: « » » « I «,;« ■!»««,
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"Firestone"
Tires' Tubes, '
«
»
«
and Accessories,
always in stock at thc
i     HANSON   GARAGE
IIHHIII[fffi(f> «« s ... .s,s .««««« ■ ■ a a
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■
Steamship Ticket Office
SAFETY
Canadian   Pacitic   Royal   Mail
Steamers,
Allan Line Royal Mali Steamers,
French Line to Havre.
White Star New York and Canadian Service.
Canard Line, New York ami Canadian Service.
Canadian Northern Royal Mail
Steamers.
Donaldson Line to Glasgow.
Anchor Line to Glasgow,
North German Lloyd.
Largest and Fastest Steam) rs;
cheapest fares; direct Balling, Antwerp and Hamburg connections,
Czermonltz, Krakitu nml all other
Continental points.
Buy your ti?kets when' you get
your train.
J.    W.    S P K N C 10,
roported  tlmt
« an .Mitii n
southern  Brltli
l pokai
pa
oral hrei
otumbfa.
Nlblock's Clean ts and Tailors, i n
.•Hia after July 1st, will occupy So,
32 Norbury Yvenue m theli' [dace ot
business,   Phone 870. II
IV. ii. Wilson and wife, accompnn
led bj Mr. and Mrs. H. \. Mi Kown
tt ■■!'■■< i iday "ii nn automobile trip
to Windermere,
Mr, nml  Mrs.  w. Burton leave   to
day ou a motor trip    tht     b    I
Kootonaj    valley.   Thoy will   return
Suuday,
Todaj  Is the day whi ti the  Vnu i i
eau Eagle screams and will be heard
all ovei  iin' world,  i    especlall;
south ol the {Canadian line,
Sou i thoughi Johnson would iiml
thi white mnn. \h.rnn, enough to.-
him, bul the champion liad n shade
tbi    esl <>f it.
■ el of police wns at Creston
M ndaj. hai ing to i ia te   a   trip
■    bring back Geo -,■   Ruddell,
.i        en   trying to heat   bin
Littl      -    uport.
Want a Wedding Ring?
iBBf
At the end of the month, June 31)
the Kootenay Telephone'Lines Ltd.,
terminate (heir ng
Greal   North    Wes
Union Telegraph C
not after tlml  dat
llUBlll 'HS  lor  tntiiHt
lines.
ement witb the
in and Western
upnnles, and can-
accept telograph
Bsion  over those
2(1-21
action.
oi i nn ii*
and pri do       to e    n id   will \
tin   rind  iti \m\e yu    pal] and t
it lam o, {
satire   lo <
I
Inspect tli tu nl
1'hero will he n
bitj 1
ids   tompl
Mr. \v.  RJ, Ollno nnd Miss Macdon
aid   accompanied by Mr. nnd Mrs. A.
L.   McDermot,    left    on  Mondny    far
Spokane, where Mr. < 'Une and   Miss
he married.     After
. nml Mrs. Ollne will
on  n  ihree   months'
WUH    hIIOWU      III
Monday   tind
"Through Fire
to Fortuno, or tho Sunken VlllugV
Tho    plotuto    had   n   peculiar    sir
nlllcnnro Lo thos igagod tu mining, !
In the work ol rescue tho pul moi or
and hnmtvr apparatus, such hm was
<i'<i ai Mif disaster nt lllllcreat,
played al  Important part,
RUING  YOUR OLD PIPE TO DOB'S
fl \CK FOR REPAIRS
Whitney Elected
The Ontario electioiiH for the provincial legislature wan tidd throughout that province on Monday, resulting In the return of Hir James
Whitney's government to power with
a   Slightly decreased  majority.
In the last house the opposition
imiHtereil at IH. lu the uew house
tho straight liberals will number 85,
I with three Independents, ono each
from the lahor, temperance aud in-
do|ttiulon|  libera] parties.
i The Composition of the now house
will   he as follows:
Conservatives, n;t; liberals, 3C| lnhor I, temperance, 1; Independent liberal i. Counting now Boats the Oon-
Bervatlvos have gained,ntftj and tho
liberals 13.
i   All the cabinet minlstors, with the
i exception of Ur. Iteaunie, minister of
public works, were elected hy large
majorities,
Prize at Spokane
Fair
0
il
RAWOR'I
BROS.
Jew iiii - 6 Opticians
Irnnbrook, li. ('.
"VvVAVv\'AV"V'vV
(i king
Three
Favorite
Talcs
-Made of the highest quality
talc money can liny—milled
to infinite smoothness, and
then perfumed with the
genuine "cohhon" perfumes.
/J) ,    Ideal Orchid
t^OrSOft S Pomander
Violet
Don't buy chupi Inferior tulci.
eoereely milled and  cheaply
-. t -ni r.i. wlirii  liy .inkinij fur
CORSON'S you eat* get tho beat
Ask your Druggist
39
SUVKMBIUN I'lHIT.MI^ I.IMIl'ttl), TORONTO
TIMBER BAIjK X 202.
Healed tenders will be received Ity |
the Minister o( Lands not Inter than
noon on the 13th day ol July, 1914,
for the purchase of. Licence X iut, to
cut hm.imhi teet of Umber, sit.imt.eil
in- the vicinity of Lot 6271, Qroup
One, Kootenay District, north ol
Kort Hteele.
One year will  he allowed   for   tho
removal of the timber.
Further   particulars   of thu   Chief
Forester, Victoria, B, C 27-lt
For Sale Rents & Wants
FOB RENT—Excellent store on Arm
strong avenue,   lately occupied    by
Nlblock   &    Barker.   Apply     W.     ff.
Kilby.
TO RENT—Furnished room for rent
with or without board. Apply
Mrs.  (J.  B.   Powell,  2;S4  (ianlii  av
enue or Phone 224.
AGENTS.-Wreck ol Empress of Ireland. Heart-thrilling dollar hook.:
Extraordinary seller. Authoritative;
profusely illustrated. Listen to
Canada's heart-rending cry Wire or
write for free canvassing book. Big
commission. Freight paid. Credit,
given. Bradley-Qarretson, Brantford,
Ont.
Plants for Sale
Victoria Rhubarb 2)0, per lh. $2.00
per 100 lbs, Bedding plants, Asters,
Lobelia, I ansy, stocks, Petunias,
Chinese Blnks, etc., 35c, per dozen,
Fuschlns, Geraniums, Ivy, etc. in
pots 20c. to BOc, each, Cabling and
Celery planta BOc. per 100. Rhubarb
toots 10c, raspberry cntU'B ,"ic. Russian Poplars 10c, 2 year Asparagus
root Sc, cash with order, delivered
free.   Address, H. Creese, Wattsburg
Local   News
igl      Picture Framings,  BO samples to
FOR     BXOH A Nt IV.- -Hav,.     (6000.00
equity in   inside port  Mann   acreage, subdivided,   What, have   you   to
otier.    Phone   818.   Ed,  Bbackleton.
•24-4t
ACTIVE TEACHERS ■ Wby nol
U*aki> twenty to lifty dollars week
ly during vacation taking orders for
Tragic Story of Empress of Ireland?
Marvellous dollar hook going like a
prairie lire. Rush Drtlor for free sample book. Bradley i larretson, I loak
H , Brantford, (lnt
Any member of tho re organised
Church of Josus Christ of Latter
Lay Saints residing In Lho ell v or
district, please write a newly arrlv
ed member—Oeorge w Winn, Cran
brottt.
Picture   Fn
ing!   Hest   M
1 choose     from.    Good   workmanship
.and reasonable prices.     Kilby frames
pictures.
!    Mr. nnd  Mrs.   I.awe of Fernie spent
! Dominion day al   Cranbrook.
j   N. Hanson was visiting In Calgary
tli,-. week.
If,  B   Foster of  Nels «     whs    in
town  Monday.
BRING YOUR OLD PIPE TO BOB'S
PLACE  PI H  REPAIRS
Mr. and Mrs Fred li nmoro ol Fori
Steele   were  Cranbrook   visitors   on
Monday.
Mr. and Mrs   P. W Is   of   cherry
creek  were   registered at  the   Cran
hrook on Monday.
Mi E, ,f, Cann and daughtei ol
Port Steel were visiting al ' Iran
hrook  on   Monday.
\ yard is enough ror a kiss, nays
a mot it -i c n toi \ oozy cornet is
amide.   Why  llll fl  wh do yard?
Mr,  | Mrs   R   13, Berrj of Utial
mer were gposts at tho Cranhrooli on
Wednesday.
KTLBY     PRAMRH     Pll TiltPM
Mm. .1. Wolf of Fori Steele was In
town Thursdny on hei return from »
VlHltto  Kimberley,
KIl.HV   FRAMES    PICTURES
Win.  Dunston   tats  with Ward and
Uld   foi ■ erly   with  tbe Fink
Mercantile Co., '"ft for tht  Eaat this
; week.    His   n ai >   friends  will   miss
from their" circle.
G.  w*.   Jon«    is bavli
■ ■■■ on  Watl   avenue      p   ■ ed    bj
raising the  b     ling and  placing  un
'■•:   it   i concrete foundation,   .1 ssrs.
rones and Doris are di Ins the work.
WANTED—At once, salesman for
Cranbrook and district, for our
high-grade nursery stock, British
Columbia   Nurseries  Co.,   Ltd.,    1493
! Seventh a veil lie West. Vancouver,
B.   C. 27 21
, Tonight special features will he
'shown at the Rex theatre. "The
Di udgo," n two-reel production
"The Model Christian anl His First
Experience" will be the programme.
Messrs. Wm. Macdonald, A. Shank
land, Harry Spence and Bert Carter
leave today for Windermere to at
imd a meeting id Columbia LodgJ,
A.F. & A.M.. which will take place
tonight.)
Yesterday the officers and dlrect-
rs of the Women's Institute enjoyed
nn outing to Mrs. Norman McCluro's,
The party was driven out in Mr.
McFarlane's and Mr. T, S. Gill's
cars,
KILBY     FRAME8      PICTURES
The Overseas Cluh are having tbelr
monthly Whist Drive and Social on
Tuesday, July Hth. ThU ia going
to be a big night ami promises to Ue
very Interesting, A cood programme
bas heen'prepared.
Ex-Mayor Bleasdell and John Wal-
ttic', manager of the Fernie Free
Press, were in town Monday. They
were the guests of the Cranbrook
rifle association, and spent tho afternoon at the "butts."
The
'Rexall Store'
I'he Store with ;t Reputation
KOOTENAY'S
GRli \ riiST
DRUG
6
BOOK
STORE
mui Mrs, Geo, Stovoimon
Mr.    Martin MoOreory, ll,
y,   Mlaa  McOroery  mul
y. hi., woro holtilnylni
ok  mi    Tttoaday,   tin
tlio colebratlon nl >i
Mrthtlny.    An olognnl
i inns Itlotl In  Mcb.  Dnrgo,
■ry rropk  hotol, wliiili   wiih
oyi i   bj  nil.    Among tlio
8   Mofwrs.  I.  Blrtclt, il. T
I Huh Thols,
W.  W.   KIl.HV
i'i; VOTIOAL    PICTURE
ABMSTRONt
P. 0. H^v sti2
Mr.
Mc
Mr,  Mo
ni   Por
occasion
Btovon-
llilllllM'
. ol   tho
iniioli
Spi
Woll
i limi'
ilu
PRAMBR
AVKNUR
Oranbrook, B.O,
Waah, -Tho   womon    aa
mon of tlio liiliind Em- J
iiiii' aro oflorod special Inducements J
hy Hi • Spokane Ail Olub in a new
mul lutorostlng contest which it has |
arrangotl tn connection with ailver-
tlslng tho 21st annual Spokane ln-
torstato Pair.   The Spokane jVil Oluli
oilers thr..' nrst prises of  .10   each'nature that give reason for success,
for    the   boat   display   nils   written  ,,■.,,,,„„,,„     fh,     ,   ,,       .,       .
,   .,      ,..,,, ,    Following   thia   policy, thc   chnnceB
guosts at miiiii   tbo   features ol tbia    year's
,  oarr '»"•   The contest began .Inly 1   and|"my be «ooi' ,,ut ll "    Alw^»    »
olosos August 10.   Tho prizes are        | chance,   a   chance   to loao   and    a
$10 for best ml sltbmlttod liy ania- chance to win, like every other buai-
teiir residing outside Spokane   coun-.nen   one might enter.
F. E. Simpson
(Formerly of Oranbrook, Kamloops and  Victoria.)
General Broker
References:   People who know tne,
Address:
CALGARY.    ALBERTA
Queen's Hotel Block
I would he pleased to handle any
coiuiuisaliina for my frlenda and others who dealre to transact business
In tho Oil Fields of Alberta. The
chances are good for legitimate speculative prolit, but every well will
not be a gusher. It will bo our endeavor to handle those Blocks Issued
hy Companies with reputable Directorates and  whose holdings are of a
ty.
Hi
The
Beattie
Co.,
"Where ll
Cranbrook
Murphy
Ltd.
Election of Officers
in tho afternoon of Dominion Day
Onward Bible claps of the Methodist church went for a most enjoyable rnmblo, returning hnme about
i: o'clock, Mr. Rendall, convenor of
tho Hoclol committee nnl his able
stall of workers. Including Mesdames following
O. Patmore, G. Patmore, W. B. Dun-
Iimni nnd Misses Quanco nnd Bird,
prepnrod an excellent spread fnr the
hungry   ramblers    on     their   return
By Investing
now, when Companies are honestly
working, it is a chance for the rich
and tNa poor. But when Oil has been
struck on a well, or there are good
properties near a well of that har-
acters, the stock of those Companies
are for the men with plenty n[  non-
Mr, and  Mrs.  II    U    Dnvlfl, of Wy
nllffe,  speiil   Dominion   hnv  nl    I'riiv
rreek, returning during ti vjnfng.
W. S. Santo, J, Martin and T. H.
Batnfield loft on Friday on an ex-
ten.led automobile trip to Winder
iniu.'. While at that city they will
attend a special meeting ol Columhla
Lodge, A.F. fi ,\.M.
The Women's institute will meet
in Maple Hall on Tuesday, July 7th,
at 3 p. in., when tba subject to bfl
taken up will ho "Sandwlchts," The
paper will be given by Mrs. B, Palmer and different recipes will lie gly
The imperial Parliament is to ho
asked to authorize the appointment
ol nino new senators for tho Western
Provinces it hogfns to look as if
Die Onnadian iienplo will havo n
chance to send thoso three dread
noughts after .-ill.
KlUn      KHAMKH      PTOTURHH
Hpocinl features wtll ho bIiowii uf
the  K-li ion theatre lonlghl   Tlm pro
Kran  »ili consist of tho threo cool
feature entitled "The Bride «-[ Mya
ti ry," "Won hi i b>' innt .'* i mnody,
and "Hhe Wrote » Piny," Vou onn
not afford io mlM ihln i limine.
According i" nn offlidni rumor,
Promloi (lordon will viitlt tin w ; i
i.nd spenlt ni several poinU, The
wast   will   ho ploiuod,   in it tii,   and
particularly   Oranbr i,    in    grail
I'm mlor Borden, nml will -ive him a
'.■ i im jreccpllon,
I'resbyi
L'lillll Ctiurc
1
ll
Rev.  Vi.  li
Thomson,  pas
ur.
Morning Rei
fi'.   H   ;i.   in.:
Tho
-■;.'ninii'itl. ol
lie Lord's Supp
T will
ic dispensed n
tbls service.
Sunday Srij.
nml  liihli' il
iks:   :t
'.  in.
IUvcnlng Sir
ico:   7.30 p. in.
Mr,   .).   Wall
r of Olnsgow,
Scot-
and, will |irci
h.
Music select!
hi  hy  Choir nt
both
lervlccs.
Choir l.'inli'
Mrs.  E.  I'nli'i
son.
Organist   Mi
M. Stephens.
"It    is    II
...I    thing   to
give
thanks unto 1
ic Lord, .'iml tt
sing
lH'irscs    niilo
'Illy     11111111',    ll
Most
High.
Bapt
ist Church
Pastor, 1
:",. 0. !•:. i.i'iiili
11.
Services:   11
n. in. ninl 7.:n
|>.     HI.
Sunday Sch
iol, 3,00 i>. in.
Fellowship Bible class, 3.00
i. tn.
Unptist     Yi
ung     People's
Union,
Monday, s.im
■■ in.
At a meeting held afterwards the
reports for the half yenr were given,
Mr. Ft, Hoi»:ey, the retiring pr?si-
_, denfc, in n few well chosen words,
IJ. v^, thnnked the officers nnd members of
j tho class for the support they had
given him during his t nn ol office.
The   report of t he  secretary
thrn read nnd adopted.
Tho report of the treasurer t-howeil
a favorable balance on hand.
[inmodiatoly following the reports
of Lho various officers the election
of the n»w officers for the ensuing
term toolt place nnd tho following
were elected:
Hon.  I'resiilmt-C. W. Rendall.
1'resident—M. T.  Harris.
Vice-President—A. Ashworth.
Teacher—Rev. W. B. Dunham.
Secretary—K.  M.  Spencer.
Treasurer—Miss Eeger.
Aftor nn exceptionally irood vocal
and instrumental programme took
Place, in which Mr, 0. P. Nidd and
Mr, It. Hockey were promin nt,
gamw weie indulged in nnd the singing of Auld Lang Syne brought n
most enjoyable dny to a close.
$10 for best ad submitted by amateur residing within Spov&ne county.
fiO for best ad submitted by professional ad innn.
In  each of the above thee classes :
tbo other prizes are second prize, two
season   tickets   to    the   fair;   third, i
fourth   and    fifth prizes, oue   season e* l» ai'ar"-
ticket to the fair.
The  women    are given special    in- j
duccmont to enter the contest by the
prizes:    Kor best ad   submitted hy woman residing in the Inland Empire, $2,ri pair of opera gins- j
ses from the Standard Optica'   Co,, j
717 Riverside avenn;, Spokane.     For;
6econd best nd  submitted  by a   wo- .
mnn,   $5  pair   Walkover   shoes from |    D°o't buy Oil Shares and stand off
the Walkover shop, 719 Rivereld-3 av-; y°l'r local merchants.
enne. Don't be sure you are a rich man
The ads are limited to 20 inches of   when yon have bought Oil Shares.
newspaper   spac*.   but    may   be   as j   Don't fail to hear in mind that in
small as the contestant desires.   All !every   0il   KieU1  SnareB |mve   bfltn
the entries   in the contest must   be ,rom ten centa to tWenty-five dollars
was   turned into the Ad Club office in the and dropped to nothing; and on tbe
A FEW DONTS
Don't   buy   Oil   Shares when
need the money for home.
Don't borrow money    to   buy
S lines.
you
Oil
Peyton Block, Spokane.
Philosophy
The
tho'
And,
other hand, they have gone up to
hundreds and thousands of dollars.
Stocks like thc Monarch, once One
Dollar, now Forty; the Dingman,
one One Dollar, now eighty-live Dollars; the Southern Alberta, once One
Dollar, now Right Dollars; tbe Black
Diamond, once One Dollar, now Six
and a Half Dollars; the Stokres-
Stepliens, once Twenty-live Cents,
now Forty-two Cents. This illustrates the chances, but tbe failures
are also to be taken into consideration. It is an investment pure and
simple, in which the element of
chance largely predominates, but if
you win you generally have an op-
and worry | portnnlty of winning big. If you ean
j adord to invest, you can afford to
if you cannot   afford
world  kei'l'H   mi  nsmiling
yon may loon so glum,
'attended by ill fortune you may
he;
Hut just discard your cari'-cloa'; and
you'll    Dnd    th!ngs  ain't    so
"bum"
As they   sometimes stvin to he   to
you and me.
Now  In  this  world  there's ladnpss—
if you like to make it ko;
And  there's lots of care
in it, too,
Hut there's also lots of glndncssanl [take a  chance
Salvation Army Hall
CAPT, and Mlts. HU8Tl.BR
Saturday nlgbt, Juno 27, a bright
service will H' hold. Also "ii Hun
day, tho 38th, At .1 p, m. tbo Bun
day School Classes, BUhjoct, "David,
Steps   to  I'.i rill ness."    Sunday
nt s p. in. a Salvation mooting,
All nre heartily invited.
night
Methodist Church
Rev, Vi.
Sunday bo
preach at 11
levelling b
fncrcaso."
There will
nf music
<'Iiiih. l'\
Sunday
.'Inns
Ml
Iron.
IHlBOll   l)llllllll:u,   I'll-tor
■ii in's'    'I'he pastor   w
and 7.30 p. in.
"Invest nf   n
iimlri
Nldd.
lhe
lhe
ugrftiiimi
i ui Mr
lim,l   ninl Onward   itilde Hi
:t
Mr.  ninl   Mi i.   .1.iim  Pollock,    Miss
Pollack uu I  Hi is liheiii To ul of I'et
me wore 1"  lown Thliwlay. Tho par
ty  lunl  red to Windermere dur
uu; the early ; .m  ol tho woi' ,   and
were    rellllliili:'    Inline   lillleh     plensod
Willi     then           ill   the   Kll •IIUH'
I valley. I
British Ordered from
Mexico
In vimv of the existing conditions
in Mexico, Sir Mom] Garden, the
British minister, on Mondny advised
nil British subjects to loave Mexico,
He said that the shortage of fuel]
used in the operation of trains was
becoming acut'j daily and tbnt. tbe
trntiiH probably would noun stop running, which would make difficult the
departure of persons in the interior.
sir Idoiti'i Garden snid he baliovcd
it his duty to urga nil Hritisb subjects to leavo tin1 capital Irnmodl*
alcty, and be especially advised thnt
the womon and children be removed,
.Sight hundred British subjects nre
registorod at tho legation as now residing In Mexico City.
Hi- legation was crowded with
Britishers Monday ami a mooting ol
the members of the British colony
wan called fo- during tho afternoon
viih iin' object of making tho noces;
pnry arrangements ror those who decided in dhpnrt.
MqUOH  LIOBNBH)  ACT.
(Section 18.)
Notice is heroby given that oa the
Ural    dny   of   Aui^iihI,    I'lll,  appllca
will  hi   iinih' in   the Buporln
nt   of Brovtiicinl Pollco  for   »
-<• in sell Hi|ilor by a   wholosftlo
wholesnlo sbon Hennw,    on   the
i ion yoi  lo ho soloctod    afl    to
iml blneh  number on the   main
l   lu  the    town nf Kort   Hteele.
loi nml block  number    will   he
•■il on ,thn npplicntlon,
there's comfort, don't yon know,
If you take it right, you'll   Had   it
straight and true.
So just keep on nsmiling, when sometimes something's wrong;
You will And    it  pay you better   in
the end,
To keep a cheerful    aspect and thru
life go with a son;.
And you'll Iin I this good old world
is still your friend.
KltANK (iBKKN
Klmberley.
11 re i
nml
inch
i.In
l(.
Mn linger for
Liquor fo.
ed  tills  Iut  day
A.  li'ltAHKIl,
the  Iforl   Uleeli'
ol  July,  IUM.
J7-4I
Prevention of Fires
Prevention of forest fires is a keynote of the policy of the British Columbia department of lands, of which
the forestry department is a! branch,
und settlers, campers, hunters, rnll-
waymen, loggers and all whose business or recreation takes them into
the bills nnd mountains where they
como in contact with dry grass or
standing timber should govern thetn-
selvksijin such a way that every precaution he taken to prevent aa outbreak of fire.
lit recent years much valuable timber bas been destroyed In this district by carelessness, and all possible precaution should'be taken by
«vcrjtbady, while camping out, to prevent nn outbreak, with its consequent (Iftmngfl and hiss to the valu
able tlmhOS and soil.
'i'he forest; rung'TH and other offl
clalfl will do their duty, hut without.
Ibe InNllgcnt ro-opcrntlon of the
general public their efforts cannot,
produce the best results.
Scobell'5 Liquor, Tobacco
and Drug Cure &B¥&tr
Alciiliul, Tolincui and Hni^i. It counteract! the
eftecli nlimist lusuiiilv icimm-i nil craving!.
A lu i ink iim llm tin.itiK.nt thi'iL'wtll navtrbt my
iii'fil ti»li ink liituxlcmili ur UM drug* af nln. C»
re KiMii mn'ily. Wo hi>v« ytt lo bttir ul on*
t.iilnitr. Mallid under fleiiniato co««r to any od'
theis, I'i it !■ tu 0U dux or 8 Iiokm lur 11000. Tkm
Usakell llruff Cv^ M. UlkNlm, Oak
to take a chance, you cannot afford
to invest. I want your business, but
I want it on the square.
F. E. SIMPSON
Expert Piano Tuning
ALVIN E. PERKINS
of Vancouver, B. C.
PROFESSIONAL, PIANO AND
ORGAN  TUNKR
with highest poiwihle recommemla-
tliiim from llrlntzinnn Piano Co.,
tliiuilay Piano Co., Morris _ Karn
Ou., Dominion Piano Co., Newcombe
& Go., Gerhard Helntzman Piano
House, of Vancouver, guarantees the
I lini'Ht workmanship, and will make
i regular trips. Tuning and regulating
U Piano Is not a trifling piece of
I work 11 you have regard for your
i piano. Mr. Perkins will be ine the
! rlty some time during August. Orders may he left at the Prospector
ofllco or mail care of Mr. Perkins,
llox :120, Olty.
Don't know they have
Appendicitis
Many Cranbrook people wbo have
chronic appendicitis, whlcb Is not
very painful, hava doctored for years
or constipation, Thn ilmittle Murphy
Co. states if these people will try A
for gus on the stomach, sour stomach
SINGLE DUSK of simple buckthorn
bark, glycerine, etc., as compounded
In Adler-1-ka, tbe remedy which became famous by curing appendicitis,
they will h* surprised at ths QUIOK

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