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Chase Tribune Dec 6, 1912

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peatchawl, M. D., ijunj_3
THE CHASE TRIBUNE
f    KEEP   SWEET  AND    KEEP    MOVInT
IT TELLS-
THEY'RE   COMING    TO   CHASE      \
Vol. 1. _STo. 33.
Chaa?e. B. C, Fridav. December 6, 1912
$3.00 Per Year
ASKED FOR CHASE
Board of Trade Honor* Vice-President Brooks
Who Is About To Remove From The
Town.   More New Members Elected.
The meeting of the board of* trade on
Holiday evening was on. of more than
usual interest.
G. G. Chase reported for the committee that had been appointed to wait
on Mr. Haylock to ask that he reconsider his resignation. The secretary
had been prevailed on to retain his
office. This announcement gave the
greatest satisfaction to the members,
for no one waa in sight so exactly fitted
to the duties of the office.
Three applicants were ballotted on
and admitted to membership: B. J.
Sainsbury, proposed by G. G. Chase;
W. P. Pritchard and C. H. Mathewaon
proposed by H. J. Haylock.
A communication was read from Mr.
Forde, road engineer, stating that the
C. P. R. were opposed to making two
open crossings at Chase. If the one to
the government wharf was opened they
wished to close the one to the mill. If
the people of Chase wished it, he
would take the question to the board of
railway commissioners. The secretary
was directed to advise Mr. Forde that
it was the wish of the town that both
crossings be opened.
A suggestion was put forward that
the board should communicate with the
Department of the Interior concerning
the acquisition of that part of the Chase
Creek gorge below the bridge that is
still in the hands of the Dominion government with the object of improving
ii at^wnc fi,:*.i;*e time, as ap'.'hliir nark.
The matter waa left in the hands of the
civic and district improvement committee,
Mr. Haylock then in fitting terms
moved a resolution expressing the regret of the board at the prospective
loss of its honored vice-president, Mr.
E. E. Brooks, and also voicing the appreciation by the members of his very
valuable services to the board and to
the town. Mr. Brooks had been one of
the most enthusiastic and faithful
members.
In reply Mr. Brooks spoke of the
value the board of trade had been to
the town and district. He was, he said,
proud to have been a member of such a
body. He then went on to speak of the
bright future that is before this section of British Columbia. By the nature of the country and on account of
its unlimited water power to be turned
into electricity it was fitted to become
a great manufacturing country. Somewhere in the interior of the province
there would grow up a city of a hundred thousand people���a centre of manufacturing industries, indeed, there
might be several such. It was for our
board of trade to see that we get our
BLIND BAY
A Good  House Enjoyed a Pleasant
Evening,   The Visiting Players Surprise Expectation,
The performance of the Blind Bay
dramatic club at the Black Douglas
opera house on Saturday evening was
even better than most of us expected,
and thot is saying b good deal, for we
had heard that they put up some good
shows in their own hall.
The program included two farces. In
the first, entitled "Chopsticks and
Spikens", Messrs. T. H. Dunne and
Stanley Keedraan played the leading
roles. Mr. Dunne did credit to his long
experience in amateur theatricals. He
and Mrs. Dunne, who played the mother-
in-law, have been prominent in amateur
dramatic clubs in the various places
throughout the weBt where they have
lived since the time more than thirty
years ago when Mr. Dunne was in the
mounted police stationed in the Cypress
share  of  this  coming   business    and
growth.
Mr. Brooks went on to speak of his
regret at leaving Chase. It was only
the necessity imposed by his business
interests that waa taking him away.
While in the future he would not be
present to help in building up the town
he might even in his absence be able to
drive a spike occasionally. He would
never lose his interest in our welfare.
Mr. Joseph Brown, a visitor from
Celista was then called upon by the
vice-president to tell something of the
prospects! in his district. Mr. Brown
spoke of the misunderstanding on the
part of some of the settlers in Celista
as to just wbat were the various proposals for giving them a road to outside points. He thought that if they
knew exactly what had passed between
the committee of the board and the
government officials at their recent
visit they would be able to judge intelligently as to what they should ask for.
There were also present at tho meeting two gentlemen fromPetosky, Michigan, who were looking for an opening
for a shingle mill. Mr. Mesick spoke
interestingly of the shingle busihess in
his home state. They had a mill down
In Michigan that had worked itself out
of a job, for there waB no more timber
available. Mr. SloBser explained that
even the stumps of trees that had been
cut twenty-five years ago were now being dUt off close tAxhc ground. **rld using mhde into shingles.
If they could be assured of a steady
supply of timber and a good market for
their product they would move their
machinery to Chase and put up a mill
here. It was explained by the chairman that the settlers all around the
lake had quantities of timber on the
land they were clearing that would
make shingle bolts and that they would
be glad to dispose of. There was also
a certain amount of hollow ceder that
broke in falling that was left on the
ground by the Adams River company
that would be the best of shingle stuff.
Mr. Mesick was recommended to take a
trip up the lake with some members of
the board and talk with the settlers and
ascertain what the supply from that
source was likely to be.
Mr. Slosser explained that in the east
he had been managing editor of the
PetoBky Herald. But the newspaper
business was too hard work and he proposed to join his friend in the shingle
business.
The chairman thanked the visitors
for their presence and for bringing
their business to the attention of the
board.   The meeting then adjourned.
Life In The Open.
Frank White, Ernest Bradley and
Happy Stafford spent the week end from
Friday to Monday up among the anow
at th. foot of Fly Hill. They aay there
are no flies there just now.
It was not a hunting expedition.
They merely wanted to enjoy the pure
upland air for a few daya and took gun*
along to protect themselves against
possible attacks by wild beasts. But
the rabbits were not ferocious, snd th.
bears were all away visiting wife's relations. Frank says they made some
nourishing soup on Sunday from a few
deer tracks that they found in the snow.
Moving Pictures Again.
Capt. Barry is making arrangements
to put on teh movies regularly in th*
Chase opera house. Percy Weaver will
be the operator and will combine it
with his other work. In the summer
we had two houses running and more
pictures than busy people had time to
look at, but for the last couple of
months there have been none at all.
Away From The Snows. |
Victoria, Dec. 3.���Evidently there i*
some mistake In the report that Mr.
Thomas Kilpatrick of Revelstoke was
to become inspector of bridges in the
provincial department of railway*.
"Mr. Kilpatrick is an excellent man
and we would be glad to have him in
th* provincial service if he would come,''
say* the deputy-minister, Mr. W. W.
Foster, "but nothing of the kind has
been suggested. Mr. Kilpatrick has
been fighting snowslides for twenty-five
year* and I understand he hi* decided
to take a rest. I believe he haa contracted a desire to spend a winter some
place where there is no snow."
Band Organized
At a meeting of the descent Valley
social and athletic club it was decided
to go ahead and organisie a band and
A. D. Robarge was unanimously elected president and leader. 'Instruments
are to be obtained immediately and it is
fully expected that practices can be
commenced inside of two weeks. Twelve
Many will be glad to see regular shows or fourteen men signified their will-
put on again.
A Minneapolis street car conductor
r��fused to accept a Canadian quarter
for a fare. The supreme court has
ruled that. Canndian money ia a legal
tender in every state on the Canadlatr -tor?'
border.   This United StateB decision
cost a fine of (50 and costs,
ingness to join. Mr, Robarge is well
known in Chase having been at one
time a valued member of the Chase
band.
"But why do you operate now, doc-
"He is recovering so rapidly we can't
afford to wait."���Life.
0=0
ESTERN CANADA
WEEK BY WEEK
The New One.
Have you seen the new derby.
The one that is flat
And looks like a fried egg
Instead of a hat?
But still the hatmakers
Are nowise afraid;
Some boneheads will wear
Anything that is made.���Calgary
NewB-Telegram.
Hills. Mrs. Dunne was the first lady
to take ladies' parts in theatricals anywhere between Winnipeg and Vancouver. Before that the female parts were
taken by men.
Mr. Reedman did some very clever
acting that showed dramatic talent
and good training. The parts taken by
Mrs. Baines and Miss Barnard were also
well handled and the part of maid was
played by Mr. Jessup so well that no
one suspected his sex. In the second
part of the program Mr. Wellbanks
came in for a leading role.
The success of the evening's entertainment showB what can be accomplished in even a scattered community when
there iB a capable stage manager in the
club and the members are willing to be
managed. The Blind Bay amateurs
may be sure they will not have to play
to any empty house if they should again
favor Chaae with a visit.
The Greeks are building a forty thousand dollar church in Vancouver.
The 1912 Fraser river salmon pack
was 173,9.1 cases.
Ninteen  hundred  miles of, railway
aVive" bee!, lupin SatMWMwVJ/ ���. fti ti,:
last five year's.
The B. C. electric railway has ordered one hundred new cars for delivery at
the first of the new year.
On one day recently fourteen vessels
sailed from Fort William with upwards
of three million bushels of grain.'
The campaign to raise a hundred
thousand dollars to extend the work of
the central mission in Vancouver is
meeting with success.
At Saskatoon announcement 1b made
of an eighty thousand dollar apartment
house to be built by one financier at a
cost of over a hundred thousand dollars.
Kamloops has installed a new system
of cluster lights on its principal streets.
The cost was a little under twentv-four
thousand dollars. The first illumination was on the night of November 26.
On November 28 the city of Kamloops
let the contract for the dam for the
municipal power plant at Barriere river.
The price is close to eighteen thousand
dollars.
Three thousand settlers from Ontario
will move on to land they have secured
on the branch railway running northwest from Swift Current as soon {as
the road is in operation.
On November 26 British Columbia
won the potato contest at the Northwest Land Products show at Portland,
Oregon. Also thirteen firsts and four
seconds at the Spokane apple show.
The Canadian Pacific railway is clearing land at Courtenay on Vancouver
Island, along the route of the new extension of the E. & N. R, The land
will he sold to farmers.
The Cooper Ranch at Grand Forks
containing 107 acres was sold last week
at a price of a little less than three
hundred dollars per acre. The Ruckle
ranch of 160 acres was sold for sixteen
thousand dollars.
British Columbia can clairq the distinction of possessing the largest electrically equipped lumbermill on the North
American continent. This was recently
inaugurated by the British Columbia
Lumber Corporation, Limited, and is
situated ou Lulu Island on the Fraser
river, New Westminster, IB miles from
the ocean, a distance which makes the
piling foundation immune from the
ravage of the teredo worm. The mill
has a capacity of 250,000 feet B. M. per
day of ten hours. It is operated by the
latest type of electrical turbine engines,
generating 8000 horse power. After
the first of next year it is proposed to
run a double shift.
Regina used nearly a hundred thousand cars of cement this year.
The C. P. R. has opened thirty new
jpwnsites in the west this year.
.contract was let last week for the
&4iii< ' iT lV**Wl*Vf;' irf VH'��ia to
coat forty-two thousand dollars.        i,
A wholesale grocery concern in Winnipeg sold its business a few days ago
for two and a half millions.
Vancouver voted last week to spend
three quarters of a million dollars on
new schools.
The gold output of the Yukon this
year was in the vicinity of five million
dollars, reaching the highest figure
since the early boom days.
Medicine Hat iB to have a paper
mill. They will manufacture from
straw. Utilizing a waste product of
the prairies.
The Hess Flume Company of Denver,
Colorado, are contemplating the erection of a steel flume factory at Kamloops.
Another new industry has located a
factory at Medicine Hat for manufacturing chocolates, biscuits, and general
confectionery. They are erecting a
brick building costing thirty-five thousand dollars and will employ twenty-five
hands to start.
A company is being formed in Grand
Forks, composed of local and Phoenix
capital, for the purpose of erecting a
fire proof garage in the city. Owing
to the increased number of autos in
Grand Forks and district the need of
such an institution is keenly felt at present, and it is the intention of the new
organization to erect a suitable structure
and place a competent staff in charge
to look after all of the local business' as
well as attend to the tourist traffic,
which is rapidly on the increase through
the city.
Port Arthur, Ont., Dec. 4.���This
week will witness the last heavy rush
of shipments from Port Arthur before
the navigation season of 1912 comes to a
close. '
Saturday 22 hulls cleared with an aggregate of about eight million bushels
and by Wednesday midnight it is expected fully 25 more will be ready tor
their last trip. They will carry away
10,000,000 bushels ond during the last
three days of the week there will be another heavy shipment. A large fleet of
boats are on their way to Port Arthur,
and there will probably be about 50 of
them winter here. Their holds will be
filled and they will be used for storage
purposes. The rush to handle the incoming freight on the steamers and to
load them with grain for the return, in
so short a space of time, bas created a
scene of unprecedented activity along
the water front.
Large Stock Now In The Yards.   Immediate
Improvements To  Be  Made  In
The Water System.
The biggest season's cut yet. That
is the record the Adams River Lumber
Company's mill made in the eight and a
half months run that ended when the
mill shut down on Friday laat. The
amount of the cut was thirty million
feet, made up of cedar, fir, spruce, and
white pine.
The mill has given employment during the summer to from 150 to 200 men,
besides those in the camps. A few of
the men will leave the district for the
winter but the majority will go to work
in the wood.. The plsning mill will continue to run through the winter as usual, with only a short shut down for
overhauling.
Throughout the season the market
conditions have been good and have
strengthened considerably in the last
few months. The company now has in
stock in its yards here about twenty
million feet of lumber to ship from until the next year'B cut is ready to move.
The aim of the company is to maintain
a minimum stock of ten million feet, as
when the total falls below that amount
it means that some lines are sold out
and the stock is broken.
It is e::pected that during the present
winter more logs will be got out than
last year and that next season's cut at
the mill will be correspondingly increased. The chute over the Bide of the
mountain from Lavigne's camp will be
in operation next week. Through it
about five million feet of logs will be
put into the lake.
The engineering work preparatory to
the building of the big log flume down
Bear Creek and Adams River to Shuswap Lake has been halted for the present by the arrival of the winter weather. The whole project will be poshed
to rapid completion as soon as spring
opens. General manager Sawyer has
just returned from Idaho, where he hu
been looking into the construction and
working of other flumes with a view to
combining all their excellences and
eliminating all their faults in what will
be the largest log flume in existence.
In California there are lumber flumes
a hundred miles long, but nowhere is
there any log flume that equals in capacity
the one to be built here.
An improvement in connection with
the water system that supplies the
town and mill will be undertaken at
qnce. This is the supplementing of the
reservoir now in use by an additional
one above it. From the new reservoir
the water will be carried In a boxjflume
to the brow of the hill. There a triple
settling box will be installed, thua doing away with the trouble caused by
sediment in the boilers. While ths
maximum pressure will not be increased
the average pressure will be much
greater because of the improvements.
tlSIfil
A Large Crowd Attends the Funeral
of the Late D, G, Macpherson
At Chase Ranch.
The death occurred at the Chase ranch
on Friday, November 29, of one of the
original settlers of this part of the
province, Donald Grant Macpherson,
at the age of eighty-six. A large concourse of friends attended the funeral
ceremonies and witnessed the interment
at the Chase cemetery on Sunday. December 1st. Mr. Macpherson is survived
by one daughter.
The deceased was born at Keith,
Banffshire, Scotland, in 1826. He came
to America at the age of twenty-two
and worked at hia trade>f stone mason
in Missouri until the opening of the civil
war. Crossing to Canada, he became
superintendent of bridge construction
on the building of the Grand Trunk
railway. He afterwards came to British Columbia, making the trip round
the horn. He joined in the gold rush
to the Cariboo and afterwards to the
North Bend of the Columbia. On his
way in to tbe North Bend he passed
through what is now Chase and became
aquainted with Whitfield Chase, who
had already bought land and settled
here.
On his return from North Bend in the
fall of the year 1862, he wintered in
the first house built on the present site
of the city of Kamloops. William
Fortune, who still resides in Kamloops,
had built the house for the Hudson Bay
Company. That was when the company
was moving its trading post from the
opposite side of the river, where it was
first located.
It is more than forty years now since
Mr. MacpherBon took, up land in Back
Valley and went into partnership with
his friend, the late Whitfield Chase, in
thestock raising business. Since then
he has spent his time between Chase
and his Back Valley ranch, in later years
residing here altogether. For the last
ten years he had been troubled more or
less with rheumatism that kept him
from taking his former active part in
directing the work of his ranch.
The funeral on Sunday was attended
Arrangements Have Been Made for
Meetings Throughout the
Country,
Victoria, Nov. 30.���The livestock
branch of the department of agriculture has arranged for courses of lectures at Ladner December 2 and 8;
Huntingdon, 4 and 5; Chilliwack, 6 and
7; Ganges Harbor, 16 and 17; Comox, IB
and 20. The courses at each place will
include a livestock demonstration; illustrated lectures on poultry and forage
crops; and instructions in veterinary
science. The lecturers will include
Prof. W. T. McDonald, Henry Rive and
H. E. Upton of the provincial department of agriculture; Dr. S. F. Tolmie
and Dr. Seymour Hadwin of the Dominion Government service; H, Riddle
of Salmon Arm; C. Drinkley of Cobbe
Hill and H. L. Blanchard of the West
Washington experiment station. These
courses are free to everybody and the
public is cordially invited.
Farmer's Institute meetings have
been arranged as follows; Nicola and
Rosehill, December 9; Lower Nicola
and Salmon Arm, December 10; Agassiz,
Heriot Bay, Mara, December 11; Gif-
ford and Enderby, December 12. The
subject taken up will be crop rotation,
poultry, diseases of farm animals, forage crops, dairying and swine.
"What kind of a pain is it, darling?"
"A big round pain wiv jaggy edges."
���Punch.
by all the old-timers of the district as
well as by many of those whose acquaintance with the deceased had been
slight or by reputation only. The service was held in the home on Chase
ranch and waB conducted by the Rev. J.
Hyde. There were numerous lloral tributes from various groups of friends.
In conversation many friends recalled
interesting incidents in the life of Mr.
Macpherson, Bpeaktng of the days when
he used to ride the ranges with them.
Until past seventy he had been a strong
active man, taking his share of the
rough work of the pioneer.
f;
rf'rn
_____ 'iN
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- ��� .������-,���*- -M   ' ������*��������� " TWO
TU CHASE  TRIBUNE
The Use of Folders
For Advertising Xmas Goods
fekfe-Uk-ffll
In order to let the public know what he has tb
sell, a good method for the city merchant to
adopt, besides using the local newspaper, is to circularize his district. A jteeatly printed 4 or 6-page
folder, showing the different articles in stock which
would be suitable for Xmas presents and general
use, will be very effective if the matter is neatly
and logically arranged. In the distribution of these
folders the better method would be to mail one
to each customer, both regular and transient. It
would be appreciated, and the suggestions contained therein would surely fall on fruitful ground.
,1 t
\ '   -. *   ���   ���---.���.
.'     -*-..:'
-a*
THE  CHASE TRIBUNE
THREE
Alter Work Drop In ud
Emjoy ��� Game of
P Q Q L
BILLIARDS
Full StocR CMari
end Tobacco*. A
First Clese Barber
Shop in Connection
Ideal
POOL
ROOM
R. J. MINER
* Painter �� |
S Decorator f
-s"-*.��vr*.
Fall Line Sherwin-Williams
Paints, Latest Designs
in Wall Paper
1
Electrical and Motor Boat
Supplies
Chase
Restaurant
and Bakery
Board and Rooms, Bath
Good Table, Reasonable
Rates, Meals at All Hours
YEP NUM A CO.,
PROPS.
Try the
Chase Tribune
for Job Printing
9|e
Good Workmanship.
Reasonable Prices.
PresbyterianChurch
Notices
MORNING WORSHIP - 10.30 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP - 7.80 P.M.
BIBLE CLASS, TUESDAY 7.30 P.M.
YOU   ARE  WEI-COME
Pastor: J. HYDE
Church of England
Services are held in All Saints
Church Room, Chase, as follows:
1st SUNDAY IN EACH MONTH
I     Evensong and Address at 7.30 p.m.
3rd SUNDAY IN EACH MONTH
Holy Communion   at 11 a.m.
and Evensong Address at 7.30 p.m.
����������<r������<HCH8>gHt,��3
ADVENTURE
By
JACK LONDON
UfflHM NN si tort* t -MM
.'����������������������������������
SYNOPSIS
Sheldon, ownar ot Uerande plantation,
though deaperately III. nvirawu and controls DO head hunting Solomon lalaaaera
by force of will and weapons, -hlel -sits
calls with forty rota
Ho nturns Arunga. a runaway laborer.
Sheldon nas Arunga aod Billy whipped to
quail a mutiny. His sickness iporism.
Hla partasr, Hugbte. and many laborars
dis.
Joan Lackland, a pretty girl, arrivee
with Btr craw ot Tanitlans, Uheldon oa-
oomaa uneotuwloua, and ab* taaaa charaa
of tbtaga
���be S t HU rallaat American girl, a
lover ot adventure, a native of Hawaii
and ao orphan. Her sblp baa oaea
wrecked, ahe provea lo Sheldon tbat eke
can ahoot
aha reeenta ala tliindly suggeotlona. and
tbey quarrel, .be makee It plain tbat sbs
la not matrimonially Inclined, aba and
Sbeldoa save two olack women from
death.
The aavage laborera demand tbe woman.
Sheldon attempts to dleolpllne tbem. and
Joan shoots a native and aavea ma Ufa.
She scolds him for making der aboot
Satan, a aavage dog, arrives, Deeplte
Sheldoa'a warnings Joan goes to explore
an Island aba contemplates buying. Financial dlfflcultlea threaten Sheldon.
He (alia In love with Jo,.-. Left alone
by Sheldon, Joan has trouble witb Uo��
goomy and other aatlvee Armed aavagos
arrive, and danger threatens Sheldon and
Joar
CHAPTER XIL
TR- LOGIC or YOUTH.
SHE) nodded her head ruefully.
'That's whin i wanted to
say, but It sounds different on
your lips. It sounds as though
you meant It yourself nnd thnt you
meant It because ol me Well, i nm
going to bed. Let me be your partner
and you'll see me rattle tbe dry bones
of tbe Solomons t'onfuHS. I've rattled
yours already '
"1 should say so," be answered.
"Really, you know, you bave I never
received such a dressing down In my
life. If any one bnd ever told me
tbat I'd be a party even to tbe present
situation- Tea, I confess you have
rattled my dry Dones pretty considerably."
"But tbnt Is nothing to the rattling
they are going tn get" she assured bim
as be rose nnd took ber band. "Good
night And do. do give me a rational
decision In the morning "
"1 wlsb I knew whether you are
merely hendntrong or whether you
really intend to be it Solomon-planter."
Sheldon said In tbe morning at breakfast
"1 wish you were more adaptable,"
loan retorted, "Tou bare more preconceived notions than any man 1 ever
met Why In the name of common
sense, in the name of-fnlr play, can't
you get It Into yonr head that 1 am
different from the women you bave
known and treat me accordingly? You
surely ought to know I am different.
I sailed my own schooner here���skipper. If you please. I came bere to
make my living Ton know that; I've
told you often enough It was dad's
plnn, and I'm carrying It out, Just as
you are trying to carry ont your
Hughle's plan. Dad started to sail and
sail until he could Unit the proper
Islands for planting. He died, and I
sailed and sailed until 1 arrived bere
Well," ahe shrugged her shoulders,
"the schooner Is at the bottom of the
sea; I can't sail any farther; therefore
I remain here. And a planter 1 shall
certainly be. Do you want me for a
partner1"
"Bnt do you realise that I wonld be
looked upon as the most foolish Jackanapes la the south seas If I took a
young girl like you lo with me hen
on Herande?" he asked,
"Mo; decidedly net But there yoa
art again, worrying about what Idiots
and th�� generally evil minded will
think of you. 1 should have thought
yon had learned self reliance on Bt*
rande, Instead of needing to lean upon
tht moral aupport of every whisky
gtuillng. worthless south sea vagabond."
Ht smiled and said:
"Yea, that la the worst of It Ion
an unanswerable. Yours It the logic
ot youth, and no man can answer that
Tht facts of lift have no placa In tht
logic of youth. Youth must try to llvt
according to Ita logic. The facta always
smash youth'a logic, and they usually
smash youth's heart too. Ifa likt
Platonic friendships and-and all such
thlngi; they art all right In theory, but
they won't work In practice.
"Suppott wt do become partner* on
Btrande," ht aald. "either I'll fall In
lovt with you or yon with me. Propinquity la dangerous, you know. In
fact It la propinquity that usually
give* tha facer to tha logic ot youth."
"If yon think 1 came to tht Solomons to get married," tht began
wrathfully. "Well, thtt* are bettet
men ln Hawaii, that*t all Really, yoo
know, tht way you harp on that ont
string would lead an unprejudiced
Hgtener to conclude that yoo art prurient minded"���
She ttjpppad, appalled.. Hla face had
gone red and while with aaeh abruptness as to startle her. Be waa patently very uugrv Rhe alpprd tha
last of her euffee. aud arose, saying:
"I'll wuli until yon are, In'a better .
temper before taking'up the discussion
���gain.   Tbat Is what- ibe matter with J
you.   Yon get uugrv too easily.    Will
you come swimming?   Tbe HUe Is lust
right"
"If sbe were a man. I'd bundle bet,
off   the   plantation,   root   aud   crop,
whaleboat   Tabliinn    sailors,   sovereigns,  and all.'    lie  said  to  bimself
after she bad left i he room.
But lhat wus ihe trouble She waa
not a man. and where would sbe go.
and what would happen to ber?
He got to nls reel, lighted a cigarette, and ber stetson bat. banging on
tbe wall over her revolver belt, caught
bis eye Thnt was ibe devil .of It, too
He did not want Iter to go After all,
sbe bud not grown up yet. Novel
uguln would he lose Ills temper with'
ber she was a child; be must remember ihitt He sighed benvily. But
why iu rensoii;ii,i**iiess bad such a
chili] been incorporated in such a worn*
an's form?
Her trilling Inughter emote upon hit
reverie and be stepped to the screen
door, through which he could see bei
running down ihe path to tht beach*
At ber heels ran two of ber sailors,
Papeuara aud Mahameme, in scarlet
lava-lavas, with naked sheath knives
gleaming In their belts It waa another sample of ber wilfulness. Despite entreaties and commands, and
warnings of the (lungers from sharks,
sbe persisted In swimming at any and
all times, and by special preference,
It seemed to bim. Immediately after
eating.
He watched her tnke the water, diving cleanly like a boy, from the end
of the Utile pier, and be watched bei
strike out. with single overhand stroke,
her henchmen swimming a dosen feel
"t'l.l.   WAIT   UNTIL   TOtJ   AHE   IN   A   DBT*
TEH TKMl'EH   '
away on either side He did not bave
much faltb in tbelr ability tu beat oil
a hungry mnu enter, tbougb be did
believe implicitly that tbelr lives
would go bravely before bers in cuss
of un attack.
Straight out tbey swam, tbelr beads
growing smaller and smaller. There
was a slight restless heave to tbe sea,
and sua. the three heads were disappearing behind It with greater frequency He strained bis eyes to keep
tbem In sight and finally fetched the
telescope on to tbe veranda. A squall
wns making over from the direction of
Klorldit: um tben she and ber men
laughed at squalls and tbe white,
eboppy sen at such times
Tbe squall blackened the sky, beat
tbe ocean white where he had last seen
the three heads, anil then hlotted out
sen and sky and everything witb Its
deluge ot rain It pnssed on. and Be*
runde emerged in Ihe'might sunshine
as the Hiree -.whinners emerged from
the sen Sheldon slipped Inside with
the leVsiope niiti through the screen
dm" wiitcnefl Her run up the path.
shaking down her halt- as she ran, to
the rrc,*!i water shower tinder tbe
���louse
Hit the veranda that afternoon bt
or.,*., n..n * .. '������..position ut a chtntron
aa delicately aa bt could, explaining
tha necessity at Barande for sue- a
body, a housekeeper to run the boys
and tht storeroom and perform divers
other useful functions. Wben he bad
finished ht waited anxiously for what
Joan would any. *
"Than yoo don't like the way I've
been managing tha house?" waa bet
Int objection. And -tit brushing bit
attempted explanations aside; "One of
two things wonld happen. Either I
should cancel our partnership agreement aat go away, leaving yon to gel
another chaperon to chaperon your
chaperon, or else I'd take tht old ben
oot ln tht whaleboat and drown ber.
Do yoo Imagine for ont moment that
I sailed my schooner down here to this
taw edge of tht earth In order to pot
myself onder a chaperon?"
"But rsally-er��� yoo know-a chap*
eron Is a necessary evil," he objected.
"Wf vt got along nicely so tar with
oot oaa. Did I hart ont on the Hieltl
And yet 1 was the only woman on
board. There are only three things
I am afraid of-bo'mblebees, scarlet
fever and chaperon. Cgh, tht clucking, tvll minded monsters, Indlni
wrong ln tverything, seeing sin In ths
most Innocent actions snd suggesting
sin-yes, causing sin by their diseased
Imaginings I"
"Phewl" Sheldon leaned bsck from
till table in mock tea]-. 	
(���Continued on page 6
&/>e
UNDERWOOD
.,
i
&>e HOTEL
of QUALITY
L
CHASE,
D.C.
tu
11
LUMBER
/
In All Its Different
Products such as:
DIMENSION
BOARDS
SHIPLAP
SHELVING
FINISH.
MOULDING
LATH
SHINGLE, Etc.
ADAM
cm
S RIVER LUMBE
_SE,     -     -     B*
:R CO.
c. Torn
,���*,-*-
We CHASE TRIBUNE
Published Every Friday
Morninq at Chase. British Columbia
= BY the =
CHASE PUBLISHING COMPANY*
T. J. KINLEY  Managing Editor
Leis than 10 Inches, one Inaertloa,
10c per Inch.
Display, contract, 100 Inches to be
used In three months, 11.00 per Inch per
month.
Display, full page, $30.00 per Issue,
9100.00  per  month.
Display, half pare, 116.00 per li��ue,
$10.00 per month.
Display, quarter page, $10.00 per
.���sue, $25.00 per month.
Coal Notices, thirty day*.  $6.00 each.
Registrar's Notices, thirty days,
$6.00  each.
Land Notices, sixty days, $7.50 each.
Reading; Notices, 20 cents per line
each Insertion.
Legal advertising, 10 cents per line,
first Insertion; 5 cents per line each
subsequent Insertion.
TIF.  CHA8K TP.ini.'ME
Subscriptions  In   Advance,  S-
Year, United States, $2.60 a
Vaar.
To insure acceptance,
script should be
nil nianu
legibly wrii-
tcn on ono side of Ihe papei
only. Typwritlen copy is preferred.
The Tribune docs not necessarily
endorso the sentiments expressed in any contributed article.
advertisers will please remember
that to ensure a Changs, oopy
muat b�� In by Tuesday noon.
'THEY'RE   COMING   TO   OHASE
_____
LOOKING AHEAD FOR PLEASURE.
There nre some tilings thnt can be done for a town in its youth
that can never be done afterwards at so little expense. Among, these
things is the provision n. land for parks. No such provision has'beeii
made iu Chase to date. Open country near town iB so plentiful Unit,
the need hns not been felt, But that state of things will not lust for
ever.
The gorge of Chase Creek from the town up to the bridge is the
making of mi ideal park of a certain type ���the rugged, scenic type,
The land is useless for any other purpose unless for athletic grounds
for a herd of goats. Some of it at least is still in the hands of the
Dominion government und doubtless could be had free if asked for by
the board of trade. It is the duty of the present residents of the town
to their own future and to those who will come after to get that land
while the getting is good.
In a few months the land will be thrown open to hoinestending.
The useless laud in the gorge will become part of the hoinesteuds that
will be filed on. Th* n unless human nature changes there ia a fair
chance that we should be held up for a big price.
The value of such a park should not be underestimated. It would
not be good for games, or race tracks, or anything of thnt kind. But
when we get ready for it trails could be built ulong even the most iu.
accessible places, and the more inaccessible the better.
If Chase aBpires to Bhine as a summer resort it is iimi.peu.ible that as
many attractions as possible be provided for the. eutertainmeii t of visitors.
Nor should the needB of the resident population be lost sight of. Few
towns have such a natural beauty sjjoj* available for the purposes of quiet
jleapuB^nrOSmmer tifterhoon as the gorge would be if il had trails
along the sides of the hills and bluffs, It will be a cause for regret
and shame if we neglect to nail Bitch of it ns is yet public property.
MREBTI WM "FAIL TI MM."
When a school pupii fails to paaa his examinations, or drops
behind in the routine work of his studiea, it is on him that his parents
and his teachers place the blame. To him it belongs in most oases,
but not in all, and perhaps in any case not allot it. His parents, too,
have a responsibility, and it is often they who have "failed to pass,"
rather than the boy.
A teacher telephoned to the mother of one of her pupils to suggest
that he wns not putting time enough on his lessons. "\Vhy," snid the
mother, "I expect you to attend to that." "Madam." the teacher answered, "Johnnie is only one of my pupils, but he is all the son yon
have."
The school provides opportunities for learning; the parent mnst see
thnt the child uses them. Do you point out to your boy the personal
and the business value of an education? Do you help him to select
the courses that will bo most useful to him? Do you Bee thnt he has
a definite time for study, and that during that time be is not interrupted?
Do you provide a quiet place for him to study in, or mnst he prepare
his lesBons in the midst of all the distractions of a family evening?
When he has a hard problem to solve, do yon work it ont for him, or
do you give him the judicious help that will enable him to work it out
himself. Do you make him take daily exercise in the open air? Do
you see that he has nine hours pf sleep every night, so that he can go to
school fresh nnd alert? Do yon insist that he eat a good breakfast? Do
you try to prtvent him from scattering his mental and physical energies
by going to theaters, dances, picture shows and club meeting, or loafing
abont the street corners during the week? Do you know your child.s
teachers, and do you ever go to sohool to talk over with them his pro-
gresB, and to find out what his difficulties are?
If you will answer these questions honestly, you will know whether
it is yonr child who has "failed to pass," or yon.���Tooth's Companion.
PEBBLES
"The mere proposal to set the politician to watch the capitalist has been
disturbed by the rather disconcerting
discovery that they are both the same
man. We are past the point where be.
ing a capitalist 1b the only wav of becoming a politician, and we ere dangerously near the point where being a politician is much the quickest way of becoming a capitalist.'1'���G. K. CheBterton
in December Century.
"I have the same experience with my
chauffeur as my friend has with his
leaky canoe."
'What's that?"
'I'm always bailing him out.' '���Baltimore American.
LOST!
On Wednesday, between the Post
Office and Mr. Sawyer's residence,
a BLACK SEAL PURSE, con-
turning a quantity of currency and
a bunch of keys.���The tinder will
be liberally rewarded on returning
the same to Mrs. Sawyer.
MISS   BOND
TRAINED,NURSE
Medical, Surgical and Maternity.
CHASt,   ���  B.C.
LIKE THE NATIVE GRANITE.
Last week witnessed the passing of another of the men who blazed
the trails of civilization for us who have followed them into this new
land. The large gathering that assembled in spite of a heavy Bnowfall
to do honor to the memory of Donald Grant McPherson shows the respect that is felt for those who went through the unavoidable hardships
which attend the noble calling of the pioneer. As we looked at tht
face in the casket and read the lines of strength that still marked the
features at the end of n journey of eighty-six years, we could not.help
but feel that while he had done much to change the face of the wilderness, the wilderness had also done much for him.
The fact that the deceased was a stone mason by trade recalls at
least two other stone masons who came from the east coast of Scotland.
One is the Honorable Alexander MacKenzie, who was premier of
Canada from 1874 to 1878. The other is Hugh Miller, who began in
the stone quarries of his native laud the studies that made him the
greatest geologist of his day. He was also one of tbe masters of Eug-*
lish prose, author of "The Old Red Sandstone" aud "Testimony of the
Rocks." Those Scottish stone masons seem to absorb some of the
qualities of their native granite.
Not only the residents of Chase but thoBe of the outlying districts
as well will be glad to hear of the prospect for a shingle mill being established. It will not be a big industry as regards the number of
hands employed or the capital invested, yet it will add its share to the
business of the town. One of its best contributions to local needB will
be the market it will make fur shingle bolts and the opportunity it
will give the homesteader to turn his timber that was formerly almost
useless into good hard wish.
There is one kind of federal interference with provincial rights
that will never be resented. That is the interference with our right
to pay for our own ronds. The grunt to the provinces for the construction of highways that is included in the estimates for this year
amounts for this province to a little more thau fifty thousand dollars.
That won't go very far iu building roads in British Columbia but it
will help some.
SU ino.es of snow, elegant sleighing, and a temperature running
from twenty-five to thirty degrees; all that is ueeded to make happiness
complete ia a pair of horses and a cutter. Can you think ot anything
���laa?
It ia an open qnestion whether or not senators are of any particular
aae, bnt aince there have to be senators British Columbia wants her fall
quota,
Thirty years ago the man looking for
turmoil went to Arizona and fought
Apaches. Today he riina over to New
York.���The Philadelphia Telegraph.
A British steamer crossing the Pacific
ran out of coal and to burn her cargo,
Lucky she didn't carry a load of asbestos.���Ottawa Journal.
Doctor���"Are you anaemic, Pat?"
Pat���"No, doctor���Irish."���Life.
"My wife read me a curtain lecture
last night."
"Eh 1   Does she read 'em?"
"She has to read 'em now. Her
memory is failing."���Cleveland Plain
Dealer.
"I was once a physician enjoying a
large practice," confidently whispered
the tramp. "A stroke of the pen reduced me to want."
"Did you subscribe for worthless
stock?" asked the woman.
'No, mum. In Ailing out a death
certificate I inadvertently signed my
name in the space reserved for 'cause
of death.' "���Buffalo Express.
WANTED
JO Cords  24-inch
Wood
WANTED.-Girl to serve at candy
counter till Christmas.���Apply at
Louis Bean's.
To be delivered at Chase Public
School,
JAS. A. GRAHAM, Secretary.
For Sale
GOO
Tons of Hay
40
TonsofPotatoes
Apply
G. G. CHASE
CHASE,   B.C.
The Tribune for All the News
BLACK DOUGLAS
Opera House -*?.-?<-? Chase, B. C.
Dramatic^
Entertainment
Will be given by the Public School,
assisted by local talent, on
Friday, Dec. 13th, at 8 p.m.
Admiuion:  75c and 50c.   Children 25c
Protects is aid of the childres's Christmas Tree.
DANCE     B_te*Iin_U��t
L���~J Imperial [
Bank of Canada
HEAD OFFICE i TORONTO
D. R. WILKIE, Pb_s.     ::    Hon. R. JAFFRAY, Vi.e-Phks.
R. A. BETHUNE, Manageb Chase Bbanph
_Q��*-Q����*_C**'����-C>_*^*������*:-C����5ll*��aW3CC<3C<*<��0OO0<*��XXX��a
Savings BanK
Department
Interest Allowed Os
Deposits
From Date of Deposit
Special   0  Attention 0 Given 0 To
Banking By Mail
i    	
Agents in England:   Lloyd'. Bank, Limited, London,
and Branches
������_
Knights
of Pythias
Chase Lodge No. 47
Meets   Every   Tueadny   Night.
R. P. Bradley, C.C.
H. M. Law, K.ofR.&S.
Visiting Knights are Welcome.
XMAS IS COMING
Lots of
Nice Presents
at
Jl.
Macdonald's
Drug  Store
Call and see our
Toy* for the Children.
DANCE
Will be given by the wharf crew
On Friday, December 13th,
AT
Bellevue   Hotel,   Sicamous,
At   8.30   p.m.
Admission: Gentlemen Two Dollars
Ladies Free.
Proceeds   will   be   devoted   to   the
Solsqu*   School ������   ��mwg*me
���1US-JMM
���
-"T-  r'MOE  TRIBUNE
FIVE
The Gossip Corner
W. T. Gordon waa in Kamloops on
Tuesday.
WANTED. Young Fat Turkeys and
Geese, highest prices paid, bring them
along. Grant a Ballard,
The Hisses Gladys and Lois Underwood and Mildred Scatchard were home
from the convent at Kamloops for the
week end.
Miss Bond, a trained nurse whose card
appears in this issue, is staying with
Mrs. Scatchard.
L. J. Brooks of Turtle Valley returned
on Wednesday from Vancouver whither
he had been summoned aa witness in a
law suit.
Owen Conrad left the first of the
week for his home in St Margaret's
Bay, Nova Scotia. He anticipates being back in Chase again next spring,
Joe Brown of Celista came down
from there on Friday and remained to
attend the funeral of the late Mr. Macpherson. He also visited the board of
trade on Tuesday evening.
Messrs. Zilka brothers and Seagravas
who have been operating the lath mill
this season, left on Sunday for Spokane.
J. Zilka, who had the contract, expects
to take the job on again for next season
H. H. Mackenzie, inspector of public
schools, visited the Chase school on
Monday and the schools in surrounding
districts on Tuesday and Wednesday.
He waa accompanied by Mrs. Mackenzie
and family.
At the magistrate's court held by R.
P. Bradley, J. P., on Tuesday, Gilbert
Baglee was fined five dollars and costs
- for deing drunk and disorderly and use-
ing obscene language on the street on
the previous day.
Children's Concert.
By Chase Public School
\ Programme.
Part 1.
"The Great Sale."
Introducing   fairies,     rabbits    and
characters from well known Nursery
rhymes���by Chase Public School.
Part 2.
Violin and Guitar Popular Airs
Ruth and Walter Loffmark
Plantation Song.. .The Ringtailed Coon
The Pierrots
Vocal Solo Mrs. Farris
Live Gramaphone.... Stop your Tickling
K. Scatchard
Monolgue The Missing Spectacles
Mrs. Scatchard
Vocal Solo Miss Stewart
Plantation Song De Old Banjo
The Pierrots
Comic Song Jimmy Law
Mr. Burling
Flag Drill 20 Boys
Plantation Song Good Night
The Pierrots
Tableau by all the company	
The Maple Leaf
God Save The King.
E.M.
WILCOX
The
Music
Man
Gerard-Heintzman Pianos.
Columbia Gramophones.
All Kinds of Records and Supplies.
Guitars. Mandolins,  Banjos.
Anything in the Music Line.
Kamloops - B. C.
Century Ten Cent Sheet Music.
Any Piece You Want.
Mail Orders Promptly Filled.
Send for Catalogue.
Stock Ewes for Sale.
Arrjone"withing to atart a herd ten
procure stock ewaa or awa la��b�� ttom
Grant A Ballard. About Owe bondred
topiek-na.
Born, on Friday November 29, to Mr.
and Mra. J. McGiverney, a daughter.
G. G. Chaae wu a visitor to Kamloops
on Wednesday.
Mrs. A. McConnell and children arrived on Sunday from the coast.
Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Brooks expect to
leave about the 20th inst. for Vancouver,
where they will make their home.
Grant and Ballard have installed a
new beam Butcher Scale this week.
Drop in and get weighed it costs you
nothing, all under 2000 lbs. free.
T. B. Johnson has returned from Canoe
where he spent most of the summer
He leaves in a few days for Bellingham
to remain until spring.
L. J. Brooks, one of the recent settlers
in Turtle Valley, was in town Monday.
He left the same day for Vancouver,
where he has business to attend to.
Has it struck you that Christmas is
near. Buy now your Turkey, Geese,
Ducks Chicks and Sucking Pigs.
Grant _ Ballard.
C. W. Cameron was down from Sicamous in the early part of the week and
reported that the wharf boys were giving a dance in the dining room of the
Bellevue hotel on the ISth of December.
It is the custom of that merry bunch to
punctuate the end of each job with a
grand ball.
The juveniles are industriously re
hearsing for their dramatic entertainment on the thirteenth of this month.
They hope to raise enough money to
supply Santa Claus with a big roll to
spend on ft Christmas tree. Judging by
the style of show they put up at their
last Christmas entertainmet two years
ago they ought to draw a packed house.
Song Service.
Program for song service to be held
at Presbyterian church Sunday evening
Dec, 8, 1912.
Psalm j
Invocation
Ladies Quartette by special re
quest.
Scripture Reading.
Anthem
Prayer
Solo
Announcements
Collection
Anthem Hark, hark my Soul.
Hymn
Short talk by Pastor.
Anthem
Hymn
Benediction
Dismission Hymn >
The manager of a Winnipeg insurance
company purchased a barrel of Ontario
apples from a retail store the other day
paying $5.26. When he opened the bar;
rel he found a letter addressed to 'the
purchaser.' It read. "I got seventy
cents for this barrel. How much did
you pay for it?"
" LIIUOR ACT, 1910."
(Section 42).
NOTICE is hereby given that on the
first day of December next, application
will be made to the superintendent of
provincial police for renewal of the
Hotel License to sell Liquor by retail in
the hotel known as The Underwood Hotel, situated at Chase, m the Province
of British Columbia,
Dated at Chase, B.C., Oct. 23rd, 1912.
Underwood Hotel Co., Ltd.
A. McConnell, Manager.
Eyes
Tested
AH Our Work   Guaranteed.
OUR GUARANTEE MEANS SOMETHING. We are not here to-day
and away to-morrow. You know
just where to find us. Comfortable
vision or your money back. No guess
work, but accurate scientific measurements and tests. All work done
by a QUALIFIED OPTICIAN.
The Mallery
:: Drug Co. ::
LIMITED
KAMLOOF*
UflFOWLFR.
x)\J J Bo'itb-ildrr
LAUNCHES
A SPECIALTY
AlexR.McKay
Contractor and
Builder
Estimates  Furnished   on Application.    All Work Guaranteed.   Trices Right.
Notch J!i!S, SI>._wap Lake
Haw?! HcCartar ��
Pls-thasi
Barristers,   Solicitors,   Etc.
Ofneaa:   Imperial Bank
Revelstoke, B. C.
Typewriters
For Sale.
$132.50
$45.00
$35.00
One new L. C. Smith, latest model, back
space key, two color ribbon attachment, visible writer
One Smith Premier,
rebuilt, a snap at
One Empire, in
splendid condition
One Williams, good to learn on, has
Universal keyboard $10.00
These are but samples. We can furnish you with new or rebuilt machines
of any make at regular prices.
We  also   handle   Cowie's   famous
"Sunset" brand of typewriter carbons and ribbons. Write to
Chas. P. McRostie
(il Victoria Street
Kamloops   -   B. C.
W. F. Barnes
Contracter and Builder
Doors, an'1 Wi  ,   v Frame.,
Brawn t , >r_.
Window
Kcrwns. Pvu.      [ Windows
B o alts
Built to order
MEN'S
OVERCOATS
In Black Heltons
ud Fancy Tweeds
12.00, 12.50
14.50, 15.00
A. S. FARRIS
TV   Tribune,   subscribe  now'
11.60 vet yaw.
.4
I
t
body
A. McCONNELL'S
Attention, Please
We give below a few of the lines in Candy which we carry at onr store.
From Bunte Bros., Chicago.
Harsh Mallow.     Candy Figs.     Fruit Flips.     Cream Wafers.
Assortment of Gross Goods.
From Buchanan Bros.. Limited, Glasgow.
Noisette Creams.     Liquorice Times.     Liquorice Jelly Beans.
Algerian Almonds.        Cocoanut Nuggets.       Swiss Caramels.
Chocolate, Fruit and Raspberry Creams. Assortment of
Satines and Mixed Candy.
From Riley Bros., Halifax, England.
Cream Butter Nut. Cream Bon Bon. Creamy Toffee.
Maple Mints. Fruit Toffee. Creamy Toffee Rolls.
Assortment of Riley's Dainties.
Our Turkish Delight is fine. Our Kisses are normal in siie
and neatly wrapped.   Try them.
WATCH  OUR  WINDOW  for  Other Displays.
View and Comic Post Cards, Stationery, &c.
Watch Repairing  Promptly Done
Louis A. Bean
Commission Agent, Real Estate and Insurance
CHASE,     11     BRITISH COLUMBIA Torn
We CHASE TRIBUNE
Published Every Friday  Mobninq at Chase, British Columbia
CHASE PUBLISHING COMPANY.
T. J. KINLEY  Managing Editor
-Dfumnra    	
Lews than 10 Inches, one lneertloa,
10c per Inch.
Display,   contract,   100
used in     	
month. ^_^_^_.
Display, full page, $30.00 per Issue.
1100.00   per  month.
Display, half page, 116.00 per Issue,
110.00 pe    L
Dlspfa*           ,
Issue, $26.00 per month.
Coal Notices, thirty days, $6.00 each.
Registrar's Notices, thirty days,
$6.00 each.
Land Notices, sixty days. $7.60 each.
Reading Notices, -0 cents per line
each Insertion.
Legal advertising, 10 cents per line,
first Insertion; 6 cents per Una each
subsequent Insertion.
    ...   Inches   to   be
i three months, $1.00 per Inch per
$60.00* per month'.
play, __ quarter   page,    $10.00    per
Subscriptions  In   Advance,  $2  a
Vear, United States, $2.60 a
Year.
To insure acceptance, all mniui-
script should be legibly written on one side of the papal
only. Typwritten copy is preferred.
The Tribune does not necessarily
endorse the sentiment* expressed in any contributed article.
Advertisers will please remember
that to ensure a changa, copj
must be In by Tuesday noon.
jnr. CHASE TnilU'HF.
'THEY'RE   COMING   TO   CHASE"
���_TT*'
LOOKING AHEADF0R PLEASURE.
Theie are some things tlmt ciin be done for a town in its youth
tbat cuii never be done afterwards at so little expense. Among those
things is the provision HI land for parks. No such provision has heen
made in Chase to date. Open country near town is so plentiful Unit,
the need has not been felt. Bnt that state of things will not hint for
ever.
The gorge of Chase Creek from the town up to the bridge is the
making of an ideal park of a certain type���the rugged, scenic type.
The land is useless for any other purpose unless for athletic grounds
for a herd of goats. Some of it at least is still in the hands of the
Dominion government and doubtless could be had free if asked for by
tho board of trade. It is the duty of the present residents of the town
to their own future and to those who will come after to get that land
while the getting is good.
In a few months the land will be thrown open to homestending.
The useless land in the gorge will become part of the homesteads that
will be filed on. Tli* n unless human nature changes there is a fair
chance that we should be held up for n big price.
The value of such a park should not be underestimated. It would
not be good for games, or race tracks, or anything of that kind. Hut
when we get ready for it trails could be built along even the most in-,
accessible places, and the more inaccessible the better.
If Chase aspires to shine as a summer resort it is uvliupeusible that as
many attractions as possible be provided for the, unturtaiiimoi 11 of visitors.
Nor should the needB of the resident population be lost sight of. Few
towns have such a natural beauty spojiftvailable for the purposes of quiet
--s^ pleasjijiHlinr*S5_imer afternoon as the gorge would be if it had trails
along the sides of the IuIIb and bluffs. It will be a cause for regret
and shame if we neglect to nail such of it ns is yet public property,
LIKE THE NATIVE GRANITE.
Last week witnessed the passing of another of the men who blazed
the trails of civilization for us who have followed them into this new
land. The large gathering that assembled in spite of a heavy snowfall
to do honor to the memory of Donald Grant McPherson shows the re
spect that is felt for those who went through the unavoidable hardships
which attend the noble calling of the pioneer, Ab we looked at tin
face in the casket and rend tho lines of Btrength that still marked the
features at the end of a journey of eighty-six years, we could not help
but feel that while he hud done much to change the face of the wilderness, tbe wilderness had also done much for him,
The fact that the deceased was a stone mason by trade recalls at
least two other stone masons wbo came from the east coast of Scotland.
One iB the Honorable Alexander MacKenzie, who was premier of
Canada from 1874 to 1878. The other is Hugh Miller, who began in
the stone quiirru's of his native land the studies that made him the
greatest geologist of his day. He was also oue of tbe masters of English prose, author of "The Old Red Sandstone" aud "Testimony of the
Rocks." Those Scottish stone masons seem to absorb some of the
qualities of their native granite.
���MINTS WM "FAIL TI MM,"
When a school pupii fails to pass bis examinations, or drops
behind in tbe routine work of his etudiee, it is on him that his parents
nnd his teachers place the blame. To him it lielongs in moat cases,
but uot in all, and perhaps in any case not all of it. His parents, too,
have a responsibility, aud it is often they who have "failed to pass,"
rather than the boy.
A teacher telephoned to the mother of one of her pupils to suggest
that he was not putting time enough on his lessons. "Why," snid the
mother, "I expect you to attend to that." "Madam." the teacher nns-
wered, "Johnnie is only one of my pupils, but he is all the sou yon
have."
The school provides opportunities for learning; the parent must see
thnt the child uses them. Do you point out to your boy the personal
and the business value of an education? Do you help him to select
the courses that will bo most useful to him? Do you see that he has
a definite time for study, and that during that time he is not interrupted ?
Do you provide a qniet place for him to study in, or must he prepare
his lessons in the midst of all the distractions of a family evening?
When he has a hard problem to solve, do yon work it ont for bim, or
do you give him the judicious help that will enable him to work it out
himself. Do you make him take daily exercise in the open air? Do
you see that he has nine hours pf sleep every night, so that he can go to
school fresh nnd alert? Do you insist that he eat a good breakfast? Do
you try to prevent him from scattering his mental aud physical energies
by going to theaters, dances, picture shows and club meeting, or loafing
about the street corners during the week? Do you know your child.s
teachers, nnd do yon ever go to sohool to talk over with them his progress, and to find out what his difficulties are?
If you will answer these questions honestly, you will know whether
it iB yonr child who has "failed to pass," or you.���Youth's Companion.
PEBBLES
Not only the residents of Chase but those of the outlying districts
as well will be glad to hear of the prospect for n shingle mill being established. It will not lie a big industry as regards the number of
hands employed or the capital invested, yet it will add its share to the
business of the town, One of its best contributions to local needB will
be the market it will make fur shingle holts and the opportunity it
will give the homesteader to turn his timber that was formerly almost
useless into good hard cash.
Tbere is one kind of federul interference with provincial rights
that will never be resented. That is the interference with our right
to pay for our own rondB. The grant to the provinces for the con
struction of highways that is included in the estimates for this year
amounts for this province to a little more than fifty thousand dollars
That won't go very far in building roads in British Columbia but it
will help some,
Six inches of snow, elegant sleighing, and a temperature running
from twenty-five to thirty degrees; all that iB needed to make happiness
complete is a pair of horses and a cutter. Can you think of anything
���lsa?
It il an open question whether or not senators are of any particular
Die, but since there have to be senators British Columbia wants her full
quota,
Tht Tribune for All the News
"The mere proposal to set the politician to watch the capitalist has been
disturbed by the rather disconcerting
discovery that they are both the same
man. We are past the point where he.
ing a capitalist is the only wa" of becoming a politician, and we sre dangerously near the point when1 being a politician is much the quickest way of becoming a capitalist.'*'���G. K. Chesterton
in December Century.
"1 have the same experience with my
chauffeur as my friend has with his
leaky canoe."
"What'B that?"
"I'm always bailing him out. "���Baltimore American.
Thirty years ago the man looking for
turmoil went to Arizona and fought
Apaches. Today he runB over to New
York.���The Philadelphia Telegraph.
A British steamer crossing the Pacific
ran out of coal and to burn her cargo.
Lucky she didn't carry a load of asbestos.���Ottawa Journal.
Doctor���"Are you anaemic, Pat?"
Pat���"No, doctor���Irish."���Life.
"My wife read me a curtain lecture
last night,"
"Eh!   Does she read 'em?"
"She has to read 'em now. Her
memory is failing."���Cleveland Plain
Dealer.
"I was once a physician enjoying a
large practice," confidently whispered
the tramp. "A stroke of the pen reduced me to want."
"Did you subscribe for worthless
stock?" asked the woman.
"No, mum. In filling out a death
certificate I inadvertently signed my
name in the space reserved for 'cause
of death.' "���Buffalo Express.
LOST!
On Wednesday, between the PoBt
Office and Mr. Sawyer's residence,
a BLACK SEAL PURSE, containing a quantity of currency and
a bunch of keys.���The tinder will
be liberally rewarded on returning
tlie same to Mrs. Sawyer.
MISS   BOND
TRAINED NURSE
Medical, Surgical and Maternity.
CHASE,   ���   B.C.
WANTED���Girl toserve at candy
counter till Christmas.���Apply at
Louis Bean's.
WANTED
JO  Cords  24-inch
Wood
To be delivered at Chase Public
School,
JAS. A. GRAHAM, Secretary.
For Sale
600
Tons of Hay
40
TonsofPotatoes
Apply
G. G. CHASE
CHASE.   B.C.
BLACK DOUGLAS
Opera House _-?_-?_-? Chase, B. C.
Dramatic:
Entertainment
Will be given by tbe Public School,
assisted by local talent, on
Friday, Dec. 13th, at 8 p.m.
Admission:  75c and 50c.  Children 25c
Proceeds is aid of tht childrts's Christmas Tree.
DANCE      Entertainment
_��N***>��*>*"-'VV%''V^*"w-��*��>."^<*>       ��M ��� ^
CZZD Imperial
Bank of Canada
HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO
D. R. WILKIE. Pbes.     ::    Hon. R. JAFFRAY, Vkje-Pbes.
R. A. BETHUNE, Manageb Chase Bbanph
Savings BanK
Department
Interest Allowed Os
Deposits
From Date of Deposit
Special   0   Attention 0 Given 0 To
Banking By Mail
i	
Agents in England:  Lloyd'. Bank, United, London,
and Branches
Knights
of Pythias
Chase Lodge No. 47
Meets   Every   Tuesday   Night.
R. P. Bradley, C.C.
H. M. Law, K.ofR.&S.
Visiting Knights are Welcome.
XMAS IS COMING
Lots of
r
Nice Presents
at
Macdonald's
Drug  Store
Call and see our
Toys for the Children.
DANCE
Will be given by the wharf crew
On Friday, December 13th,
AT
Bellevue   Hotel,   Sicamous,
At   8.30   p.m.
Admission: Gentlemen Two Dollars
Ladies Free.
Proceeds   will   be   devoted   to   the
Solaqua   School _. X^":. '-'i
tarn
MM * msetm
 > ������
m
tr hhse TRiniWE
t-
The Gossip Comer
W. T. Gordon was in Kamloops on
Tuesday.
WANTED. Young Fat Turkeys and
Geese, highest prices paid, bring them
���long. Grant * Ballard.
The Misses Gladys and Lois Underwood and Mildred Scatchard were home
from the convent at Kamloops for the
week end.
Miss Bond, a trained nurse whose card
appears in this issue, is staying with
Mrs. Scatchard.
L. J. Brooks of Turtle Valley returned
on Wednesday from Vancouver whither
he had been summoned as witness in a
law suit
Owen Conrad left the first of the
week for his home in St Margaret's
Bay, Nova Scotia. He anticipates being back in Chase again next spring.
Joe Brown of Celista came down
from there on Friday and remained to
attend the funeral of the late Mr. Macpherson. He also visited the board of
trade on Tuesday evening.
Messrs. Zilka brothers and Seagravas
who have been operating the lath mill
this season, left on Sunday for Spokane.
J. Zilka, who had the contract, expects
to take the job on again for next season.
H. H. Mackenzie, inspector of public
schools, visited the Chase school on
Monday and the schools in surrounding
districts on Tuesday and Wednesday.
He was accompanied by Mrs. Mackenzie
and family.
At the magistrate's court held by R.
P. Bradley, J. P., on Tuesday, Gilbert
Baglee was lined five dollars and costs
- for deing drunk and disorderly and use-
ing obscene language on the street on
the previous day.
Children's Concert.
By Chase Public School
\ Programme.
Part 1.
"The Great Sale."
Introducing   fairies,     rabbits     and
characters from well known Nursery
rhymes���by Chase Public School.
Part 2.
Violin and Guitar Popular Airs
Ruth and Walter Loffmark
Plantation Song...The Ringtailed Coon
The Pierrots
Vocal Solo Mrs. Farris
Live Gramaphone.... Stop your Tickling
K. Scatchard
Monolgue The Missing Spectacles
Mrs. Scatchard
Vocal Solo Miss Stewart
Plantation Song De Old Banjo
The Pierrots
Comic Song Jimmy Law
Mr. Burling
Flag Drill 20 Boys
Plantstion Song Good Night
The Pierrots
Tableau by all the company	
The Maple Leaf
God Save The King.
WILCOX
The
Music
Man
Gerard-Heintzman Pianos.
Columbia Gramophones.
All Kinds of Records and Supplies.
Guitars.  Mandolins,  Banjos.
Anything in the Music Line.
Kamloops - B. C.
Century Ten Cent Sheet Music.
Any Piece You Want.
Mail Orders Promptly Filled.
Send for Catalogue.
Stock Ewe* for Sale.
AByo-WwIsl-nf to sUrt a herd can
pjoe-ra stock swss or ����������� lambs from
GrantiBaUard* AUnt(WMbondnd
topltk-toa.
Born, on Friday November 29, to Mr.
and Mrs. J. McGiverney, a daughter.
G. G. Chase was a visitor to Kamloops
on Wednesday.
Mn. A. McConnell and children arrived on Sunday from the coast.
Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Brooks expect to
leave about the 20th inst. for Vancouver,
where they will make their home.
Grant and Ballard have installed a
new beam Butcher Scale this week.
Drop in and get weighed it costs you
nothing, all under 2000 lbs. free.
T, B. Johnson has returned from Canoe
where he spent most of the summer
He leaves in a few days for Bellingham
to remain until spring.
L. J. Brooks, one of the recent settlers
in Turtle Valley, was in town Monday.
He left the same day for Vancouver,
where he has business to attend to.
Has it struck you that Christmas is
near. Buy now your Turkey, Geese,
Ducks Chicks and Sucking Pigs.
Grant _ Ballard.
C. W. Cameron was down from Sicamous in the early part of the week and
reported that the wharf boys were giving a dance in the dining room of the
Bellevue hotel on the 13th of December.
It is the custom of that merry bunch to
punctuate the end of each job with a
grand ball.
The juveniles are industriously re
hearsing for their dramatic entertainment on tlie thirteenth of this month.
They hope to raise enough money to
Bupply Santa Claus with a big roll to
spend on a Christmas tree. Judging by
the style of show they put up at their
last Christmas entertainmet two years
ago they ought to draw a packed house.
Song Service.
Program for song service to be held
at Presbyterian church Sunday evening
Dec, 8, 1912.
Psalm /
Invocation
Ladies Quartette by special re
quest.
Scripture Reading.
Anthem
Prayer
Solo
Announcements
Collection
Anthem Hark, hark my Soul.
Hymn
Short talk by Pastor.
Anthem
Hymn
Benediction
Dismission Hymn .
The manager of a Winnipeg insurance
company purchased a barrel of Ontario
apples from a retail store the other day
paying (16.26. When he opened the bar;
rel he found a letter addressed to 'the
purchaser.' It read. "I got seventy
cents for this barrel. How much did
you pay for it?"
" UlUOIt ACT, 1110."
(Section 42).
NOTICE is hereby given that on the
first day of December next, application
will be made to the superintendent of
provincial police for renewal of the
Hotel License to sell Liquor by retail in
the hotel known as The Underwood Hotel, situated at Chase, m the Province
of British Columbia,
Dated at Chase, B.C., Oct. 23rd, 1912.
Underwood Hotel Co., Ltd.
A. McConnell, Manager.
Eyes
Tested
AH Our Work   Guaranteed.
OUR GUARANTEE MEAN8 SOMETHING. We are not here to-day
and away to-morrow. You know
just where to find us. Comfortable
vision or your money back. No guess
work, but accurate scientific measurements and tests. All work done
by a QUALIFIED OPTICIAN.
The Mallery
:: Drug Co. ::
muT-D
KANLOOP1
FIVE
.A^Vbo.U bolder
AIexR.McKay
Cor, tractor and
Buildor
Estimates   Furnis-ed   on Application.    All Work Guaranteed.   Prices Right.
N.t*-.h i-ih, Sh.swap Lake
Harvey, ?.-Carter ��
Pink-tam
Barrister's,   SO-i'piTORS,  Etc.
Officas:   Imperiul Bank
Revelstoke, B. C.
Typewriters
For Sale.
$132.50
$45.00
$35.00
n on, 1
$10.1
One new L.C.Smith, latest model, back
space key, two color ribbon attachment, visible writer
One Smith Premier,
rebuilt, a snap at
One Empire, in
splendid condition
One Williams, good to learn on, has
Universal keyboard $10.00
These are but samples.  We can furnish you with new or rebuilt machines
of any make at regular prices.
We also   handle   Cowie's   famous
"Sunset" brand of typewriter carbons and ribbons. Write to
Chas. P. McRostie
(il Victoria Street
Kamloops   -   B. C.
W. F. Barnes
Contracter and Builder
Doors, au'1  Wi  ,   v Frames,
Screen Dyr_,
Window
Hcreens. PwrB    �� Wiudows
eH_H_B-_H-^B    > H-B-M
B o a| t s
Built to order
MEN'S
OVERCOATS
In Black Meltons
and Fancy Tweeds
12.00,   12.50
1450,   15.00
A. S. FARRIS
Thi"   Tribnne:   ���nbecribe   now
11.60 yet yew.
A. McCONNELL'S
Attention, Please
We give below a few of the lines in Candy which we carry at our store.
From Bunte Bros., Chicago.
Marsh Mallow.     Candy Figs.     Fruit Flips.     Cream Wafers.
Assortment of Cross Goods.
From Buchanan Bros., Limited, Glasgow.
Noisette Creams.      Liquorice Times.      Liquorice Jelly Beans.
Algerian Almonds.        Cocoanut Nuggets.       Swiss Caramels.
Chocolate, Fruit and Raspberry Creams. Assortment of
Satines and Mixed Candy.
From Riley Bros., Halifax, England.
Cream Butter Nut. Cream Bon Bon. Creamy Toffee.
Maple Mints. Fruit Toffee. Creamy Toffee Rolls.
Assortment of Riley's Dainties.
Our Turkish Delight is fine. Our Kisses are normal in size
and neatly wrapped.   Try them.
WATCH  OUR  WINDOW  for  Other Displays.
View and Comic Post Cards, Stationery, &c.
Watch Repairing  Promptly Done
Louis A. Bean
Comtniaaion Agent, Real Estate end Insurance
CHASE,     ��     BRITISH  COLUMBIA
\    _^
��� SI\
Henry
MERCHANT
TAILOR
CHase,    :      i    B.   C.
f"F  ri:\<K
'inrvK
ADVENTUP.2.
(Continued J
. page throe).
H.L.
IdLean
Baggage
Transfer
Storage
!���'
Hay,   Grain
i
and    Feed
Rig's for Hire
_r��
hase, B.C.
G^o. Chase
WHO.-.B-L- AND RETAIL
I1EA1.KR IN
Hay, Grain
Vegetables
StocR * *
I Chase Ranch
[Chase, B. C.
CHA8K   HAS   A   FIRST
CLASS
LAUNDRY
AllJOur Work Guaranteed First
Class
H. 0. POY, Proprietor
MOTOR BOAT
EXCURSIONS
JOHN: HALDANE
is pri!|iiiri*il to take
purtii'sjlo any point
on Shuswap Ijiiki'.
A Competent Bout-
iiniii Who Knows
tho Lake   ....
We
Specialize
in
Butter
Wrappers
mtwvwwvmHtmni
;oman's
Column
nAi TT anyTBTrm flood were worth
while wben it bus tu bt* emtrd*- nnd
put tn leg Irons und bundc-uH's tu order
to keep tt good     Vout  desire fur .   iw*vvww%wv*W*VW
chaperon aa much as tnipitiw thai t am -.- ��� -wr-^����
that sort of a creature i |<refer to be A few days ago I met a book-loving
���food because it Is kwkI Iu be good | friend on the stepa of the Carnegie Hb-
rather tban becunae | mu t be bad be- j rary ,n this city.   "Let me carry some
of those books for yuu," I said, for her
cause  aome  Argus   eyed  old   trump
Won't Jet me have a chance to be bad."
"But It- it is not tbat.   be put lo. "It
Ii what others win think "
"Let them think, the nasty minded
wretches: It Is lifvauae im-n like you
are afraid ot the nasty mindpd tbnt
you allow their opmloua ro nil. you."
"1 am afraid you ure u female Shelley," he replied "And aa sucii you
really drive me lo become your partner In order to protect you "
"If you infce tue aa a partner in
order to protect me-l-l shan't be
your partner, Units all. You'll drive
me Into buying Mn-rt Sulay yet."
"All tbe more reason"- be attempt
tcL
"Do you   know   wbat   I'll do?'
demanded.    "111 uud some man In tba
Bolomoua who won't want to protect
me."
Sheldon could imt conceal tha shock
her words gave him.
"You don't mean that, yoo know,"
he pleaded
"1 do; I really do. I am alck and
tired of thla protection dodge. Don't
forget for a moment that I am perfectly able to take care of myself.
Besides, 1 bave eight of tbe best protectors ln tbe world���my aallora. Tou
were living like a aavage wben 1
came along and found you���eating
nothing but tinned meat and scones
that would bave ruined the digestion
of a camel. Anyway, I've remedied
that, and since we are to be partners.
It will stay remedied, Tou won't die
of malnutrition, be sure of that"
"If we enter tuto partnership," he
announced. It must he thoroughly
understood that you are not allowed
to run the schooner. You can go
down to Sydney and buy ber. but a
���kipper we must tmveM���
"At so much additional expense and
most likely a whiskey drinking. Irre
sponsible and lnnipahle man to boot.
Besides, I'd nave hip business more at
heart tban any man we could hire.
As for capability. 1 tell you I ''an soil
all around the average broken captain
or promoted able seaman you find In
tbe south seas. And yon know I am
a navigator"
"But being my partner,*' he said
coolly, "makes you none tbe teas a
lady."
"Thank you for telling me that my
contemplated conduct is unladylike."
Sbe arose, tears of anger and mortification In her eyes, and went over to
the phonograph.
"1 wonder If all men are aa rldicul
ous as you?" Rjje *ald.
Be shrugged his shoulders and
ainlled. Discussion wns useless���be had
learned that: and he was resolved to
keep his temper. And before tbe day
was out sbe capitulated. She was to
go to Sydney ou the Qrst steamer, purchase the schooner, and sail back with
an Island skipper on hoard. And then
sbe Inveigled Sheldon Into agreeing
tbat she could take occasional cruises
ln tbe islands, though be was adamant
when It came to a recruiting trip on
Malalta. Tbat was ibe one thing
barred.
And after It was al) over, and a terse
and burjlnessllke agreement (by her
urging) drawn up and signed, Sheldon
paced up and down for a full hour,
meditating upon how many different
kinds of a foot he had made of bimself
Be bad never seen a more independent
woman who stood more ln need of a
protector than this boy minded girl wbo
had landed on bis beach with eight
picturesque savages, a long barreled
revolver, a bag of gold and a gaudy
merchandise of Imagined romance and
adventure.
Be bad never read of anything to
compare with It Be smoked cigarette
after cigarette. Satan, back from a
prowl around tbe compound, ran up to
him and touched his band with a cold,
damp nose. Sheldon caressed tbe animal's ears, then tbrew himself Into a
chair and laughed heartily. What
would tbe commissioner of the Solomons think? What would bis people
at homo think? And in the one breatb
he was glad tbat the partnership bad
been effected and sorry tbat Joan
Lackland had ever come to tbe Solomons. Then be went Inside and
looked at himself In a band mirror.
He studied the reflection long and
thoughtfully and wonderingly.
(continued).
Those Old Songs.
I cannot sing the old songs.
Like "Sally in Our Alley;"
I dreamed I dwelt in  Marble halls;
I'm dreaming now of Hallie.
By the blue Alsatian mountains
I'd lay me doon and dee;
Jennie, my own true loved one,
Then you'll remember me.
Could you come back to me, Douglas,
Douglas,
Nevermore would I care to roam;
I don't want to play in your yard;
I was seeing Nellie home.
When first I saw sweet Pepgy,
When the lights were dim and low,
Oh, laddie was somebody's darling;
No, sir!  No, sir!   No!
After the ball iB over
Deep sorrow fills my cup.
Oh, I can.t sing the old songs���
I get them all mixed np!���Life.
arms were full. "You may always be
found here." I continued impertinently,
"and always staggering under a load of
books. Here are poetry, biography,
history, essays, a problem novel, and
I'll wager that in two days you'll return
for a fresh supply. You certainly can't
read everything you carry home. Do
you take them just to gloat over and to
turn t.-ii pages?"
She laughed, but was instantly serious
again as she turned a loving wistful i
took on the noble building. "There
would be satisfaction in simply handling
them, " she answered, "Think of having
any book worth reading just for the
asking. Until two years ago 1 could
put my whole library on a four foot
shelf."
"Yet one seldom meets a better read
woman than you." "That is true,'
she replied, with houest simplicity,
"There are the distinctly literary women, of course, who must be great
renders, but I never meet them except
in the pages of magazines. It is a
wonder to me' that the average city woman, with her opportunities, doesn't
read more, Mrs. Hill went with me to
see Sothern in Hamlet and I really believe . the story was new to her. She
thought Komeo and Desdemona had been
married in tne friar's cell and she was
almost tearful when she talked of
Othello smothering Juliet with a pillow.''
"You surely can spare me half'an
hour," I said, "let us sit in the park
while you tell me about your reading."
"I can't remember learning to read,"
she answered. "The bookshelves of my
chidhood were filled with religion bound
in leather. My first book was the New
Testament and the next was Pilgrim's
Progress. This latter I proceeded to
dramatize and stage right in my home.
The farm was the City of Destruction
and my twin brother and I fled from it
for our lives. But we got into the
Slough of Despond in earnest, for it
rained, and we returned to the City of
Destruction to get whipped for running
away.
"When I could reach it,by standing on
a chair the top shelf yeilded Cowper's
poems and Milton's Paradise Lost. That
was a red letter day for my brother and
me for it opened to us the world of poetry.
With our childish experiences .we could
comprehend little ol the sense, but the
wonder of it that words could sound and
roll like that!
"About this time a neighbor loaned
us Ivanhoe and the woodpile became
the scene of many a tournament, I resented being asked to play the part ol
Rebecca or Rowena, .just because I was
a girl, but always wanted to be the
merry DeBracy. Mounted on the biggest logs for warhorses, we charged
each other in full career, and the unhorsed champion often wept ingloriously
as with scratched nose and torn banner
he rose from the chip-yard.
"At the age of twelve I became the
possessor of seventy-five cents and ob-
tainedmy parents' permission to spend it
in books. My selections were paper bound
copies of Mrs. Hemans and Shakespere.
Don't laugh; I had become acquainted
with the tender Felicia through herpoem
in the fourth reader, and I still love the
dear boy who stood on the burning deck.
But Shakespere! My tasks were quickly despatched that I might return to his
magic world. I read the book from
cover to cover, skipping the long speeches. I don't claim for myself any literary
appreciation; I loved the book because
it took we into a wonderful realm of
story.
Another realm than that of books,
but nearly related to it, was opened to
me in my boarding school days. It was
the realm of pictures. You have seen
my note book illustrated with Perry
prints. But I had to learn to love pictures; they belonged to a territory that
I deliberately invaded and took by force,
while the world of books seemed mine
by inheritance. I am always at home
there."
Bidding me good-bye she walked away
with that large, free grace of step acquired in upland meadows.
JUSTITIA.
Will Build Bigger.
Another place of business will be added to those on Shuswap Avenue.
On Monday J. Wittner purchased from
Percy Weaver the lot adjoining on the
east that occupied by W. P. Barnes's
carpenter shop. It is his intention to
put up on it a two story building with
basement. In it he will carry on on a
large scale the business which he recently purchased from John Clegg.
Mr. Wittner has found that there is
an opening here for a much larger shoe
and harness business than has been carried on and intends to make room for
the expansion. In the new building he
will carry on a complete harness and
saddlery business and have the best
equipment for repairing. It is understood that Mr. Barnes will have the
contract for the work.
OFFICIALS OF
CHASE CENTRAL BOARD OF TIADE.
President: A. McConnell.
Vice-President: E. E. Brooks.
Secretary: H. J. Haylock.
Council: G. G. Chase,
L. Cumming,
G. W. Rittman,
T. J. Kinley,
R. P. Bradley,    ���
Hon. F. W. Aylmer,
J. Johnson,
H. I.. McLean.
Committees:
Civic and District Improvement���
G. A. Coburn,
R. H. Brett,
H. L. McLean.
Finance: H. J. Haylock,
G. W. Rittman,
C. W. Cameron.
Retail Merchants:
A. McConnell,
R. P. Bradley,
H. Ballard.
Advertising: W. H. Bohannan,
T. J. Kinley,
E. E. Brooks.
Transportation:
A.1 McConnell,
J. W. Clifford,
J. Clegg.
Agriculture and Livestock:
G. Grant,
G. G. Chase,
L. Cummings.
WINTER
IS AT HAND.
Get Ready for it by
Installing your Heater
at once. We carry a
First  Class  Stock  to
Select from.
Our Store is also replete
with a Fine Selection of
STOVES
R.  P.  Bradley's
Hardware   Store
Chase, B.C.
The Best Buy
In Farm Land
In the District.
160 acres only six miles from Chase.
Three miles from a shipping point on the C. P. R.
On a good road and near a School.
This is some
of doors.
of   the   best land that lies out
Twenty acres cleared and fenced.
A small but well built house on the property.
If you want   a   Farm
investigating.
this   is   worth
r
Apply at the Tribune Office.
_____
��� ��� mnmMWmtuultqb ��� - -  ���
,/V^
T" "~T
THE CHASE TRlBt'M'.
!_VBH
CHASE, BRITISH COLUMBIA
���71
Chase has all the advantages that go to the
making of a great manufacturing centre.
tt UJ tt
First of all there is it's location.
Chase is situated at the outlet of a system of
lakes that tap a country rich in raw material.
There is cedar, fir, pine and spruce timber running
into billions of feet. There are limestone and marble,
copper, zinc and gold in quantities that are just
beginning to be discovered, and appreciated. There
is the farm land to feed with vegetables and fruit
a large manufacturing population. .
The vast wheatfields of the northwest provinces
supply the breadstuffs, at   the same time that they
furnish one of the best markets  in the  world   for
manufactured  products.
tt \li tt
The  twentieth century  motor   power,  electricity
can nowhere be   developed   more   economically  than
from the streams that abound near Chase.
tt  tt  tt
For information regarding opportunities and avail
able  sites   communicate   with  the  Secretary of  the
Board of Trade.
\,
i i V
\
\y\
^S
EIGHT
THK CHASE TniniMT
From Our Neighbours
Items Gathered by Our Special Correspondents
Pritchard.
H. A. Peel went to Cliase Tuesday
nigjht to ride the hr lamed K P. Goat.
Douglas Ross made a trip to Ksm-
loops on Thursday ol last week.
W. P. Pritohard has purohaacd a new
Watson Ayr a rain crusher.
A. Oillort made a trip to Kamloops
the latter part ol last week.
J. Peterson and ioo Henry ol Van
oonter were up this way during th
week looking (or homesteads.
Edwant Milne, W n. Miliieand Bert
Boyde were busily engaged in loading
��� ear olwood during the week.
Mrs. J. T. Hutohiiis.ni ia spending a
lew days as the guest of her daughter,
Mrs. Denny, no the north side ol the
river.
The Brut (all ol snow this season arrived on November 28, makiug the
oor-lwood raerohancs and logging oon
tractors smile Irom ear to ear.
Mr. A Bolen brought down two
heads and seven deer hides to U*.
mounted by our local tatidermist, M
A. Peel, who, by (be way, has purchased a house in whioh he is about to
open up a full grown taxidermist's
shop.
Andy Bond and Harry Fierce, two
mighty hunters oi Chase, put in the
latter part of last week out this direction hunting. We were unable to
obtain anv authentic information nn
the result*, but we notice none of the
local geese arewearing orepe.
A petition is being circulated for a
telephone service to be installed at
Pritchard. About fifty signers have
been obtained. Ab soon an the other
residents of Pritchard and vicinity
have had a ohanceto sign, the petition
will be forwarded to the Honorable
Miniater nl Public Works at Ottawa.
Salmon Arm West.
Fred Balsberry who bas been in
this district for two years, left last
weekjcr HI. Tohn, N. B.
:,\y Kew spent a pleasant evening
at the home of Mr. Bush on Thursday
evening.
Geo. Campbell, Jub. Moorf, Walier
and Clifford Bobinson returned from
Merrit last week,
Hr. Wm. Deen and Miss May John
eon, spent Hunilay with Misses. Ids
and Abbie Harbell.
There will be a recital iu the opera
house in the near future, by this valley
sohool.
School Inspector Mackenzie, visited
the valley school on Friday, and re*
ported every thing in fine en dition.
Off again, On again.
Mayor J. L. Ruttan, Miss M. Rut
tan and son Percy, returned from Fort
Fraser late Monday evening. The trip
was made by auto. The roads, newly
built by the government in the vicinity
of Fort Fraser and Fort George, were
in very bail condition. It wus while on
the way from Fort Fraser to Fort George that Mr. Ruttan had the misfortune
to lose a wheel off the csr by the machine dropping on one side into a mud
hole while the wheels on the upper side
were wedded tightly in a deep rut.
Hie experience of the party lifter this
uccident waa one that will not be soon
forgotten. Miss Ruttan and brother
liruvely camped two days by the roadside, while Mr. Ruttan wont to tho
nearest telegraph office, several miles
uway, to wire for repairs and get ii
vehicle to Ret them out. The roads
were deep in mud real mud��� mud
that clings, hiuigH, holds fust and won't
come off. He spent !i>3fi in one day
wiring to get traHt of the repair part
after it had been shipped, and when lie
finally found it, it proved to be the
wrong part, and he took the wheel off
of his other machine, left at Fort Fraser
and drove home. There are difficulties
ami hardsips to he met in that far-away
country yet, and this will give an idea
of some of them. --Enderby Press
Notch Hill.
Bufns Hammond ie busy bulling
coal for J. R Kinghorn,
W T. Smith t Son recently received
a oarload ol groceries.
N E. Sjudin reoeutly received a car
of grain.
The farmers have begun fattening
their turkeys for Christmas market.
The Blind Bay Dramatic club left
here Saturday for Ohaae where tbey
gave a dramatic entertainment.
The few inohes of snow thnt bu recently fallen baa set everyone busy
preparing for the winter.
D. J. Smith Is building on hia (tore
an addition tbat is to be used as poet
office.
Mr. Boyd is the Presbyterian minister (or tbe Notch Hill, Balmoral and
Carlin dietriots. He hat hired a te��m
for reaching the different sections ol
his parish during the winter.
The 0. P. R. bave been making an
addition to their land house at tbis
point. To trains approaobing Notch
Hill (rum either direction sand is as
necessary as steam.
Blind Bay.
0. Baines and 0.0. Freeman left on
a hunting trip on Monday., They are
up on the hill? at tbe baok of Scotch
Greek Flat.
Tho roads in this district at the present time are in poor chape owing to
tbe (not that there is not enough snow
for oleighing and enough to make bad
wheeling.
The Blind Bay hall has recently
been improved by raising the ceiling
to a height nf seventeen feet. The
work waB done by A. R. MacKay. It
ie proposed to build a stage and. dressing rooms on to the rear of the hall in
the near future. '
The Blind Buy Anrateim went down
on HaVOtAvy Witfiiing in Oliver Free-
man'fl launch to Chaso, where iu the
evening they presentnd two laughable
farces ot; tit led "Chopsticks and
SpikonB" and "Should this meet the
eye." Thev were well received and had
a gtiodhnu��e. They greatly appreciated the kindnesu shown them during
their stay. The parry returned to
Blind Bay on Sunday morning, all
having enjoyed their pleasant outing.
The Trail To Lillooet.
(From "Flint and  Feathers,"   by E.
Pauline Johnson.)
Sob of fall and song of forest,   come
you here on haunting quest,
Calling through  the seas   and   silence
from God's country of the west.
Where the  mountain  oass is  narrow,
and the torrent white and strong,
Down its rocky-throated canon,   sings
its golden-throated song.
You are singing there together through
the God-begotten nights,
And   the   leaning  stars art.   listening
above the distant heights
That lift  like  points  of  opal in the
crescent coronet
Above whose golden setting sweeps the
trail to I.illooel.
Trail that winds anil trail that wanders
like u cobweb hanging high,
Just a hazy thread outlining midway of
the stream and sky,
Where the Fraser Rivet canon yawns
its pathway to the sea,
Hut half the world has  shouldered up
between its song and me-
Here the placid   English   August, and
the sea-encircled miles,
There���God's copper-colored   sunshine
beating through the lonely aisles.
Where the waU fall and   forest voice
forever their duet,
And call across the   canon on  the trail
to Lillooet.
ELECTJimCERS
Enthusiastic Annual Meeting of Kamloops Conservative
Association.
The annual meeting of the Kamloops
Central Conservative Association last
night was well attended by an enthusiast gathering of party supporters. Dr.
Archibald as president occupied the
chair and in a lengthy address gave an
interesting report of the work done
during the past year as well as an account of his own stewardship. The association had progressed in every way
and a great deal of valuable work had
been accomplished.
The principal business transacted was
the election of officers which resulted
as follows:
Hon. Presidents, Rt, Hon. R. L. Borden,
The Hon. Sir Richard McBride, The
Hon. Martin Burrell and J. P. Shaw,
M. P. P. President, J. R. Michell; 1st
vice, S. C. Burtou; 2nd vice, M. Crawford; 3rd vice, E'. Shaw; Treas., S. C.
Burton; Sec. Major H. T. Wilson;
Auditor, F. E. Young.
A large number of names were proposed for the twenty members of the
executive and ballottinfe will take place
on Monday, December, 16.
On the retirement of the president
Dr. Archibald, and in the absence of
the president, S. C. Burton, 1st vice
took the chair.
Excellent addresses were then given
by Mayor Robinson and Mr. J. P. Shaw
M. P. P.
Among the general business, it was
decided that any outside district calling
a conservative meeting and appointing
a chairman, the same would be recognized as an ex-officio member of the
executive and entitled to be presentfat
its sessions. ��� . w
Sweet SarAa Claus.
Last week a letter written in Alabama, and"' addressed to Santa' Claus,
Greenland, B. C, was sent to Greenwood, although this city just now is
Jike the sunny south, more than the ice-
touched scenery of far-off Greenland.
The postmaster who is somewhat of a
humorist, gave the letter to us, although
we do not resemble Santa in any particular, He throws his wealth down
chimneys, while we have ours stolen by
the farmers when we are asleep. He
has four deer to draw him around in a
fine sleigh, while we have not even a
a bull dog left. And, our dear, why
they are all pushing clouds with the
angels. Santa has ice in his whiskers,
whily we never have anything stronger
than maple syrup, or an irate and partially demented subscriber. He studies
astronomy through an inverted bottle,
while half of our time is devoted to
nailing cushions on water wagons,
Santa Claus is a myth, a delusion of
youth, and lives upon spooks and
air. We too, live largely upon air, but
we are no delusion when there are any
ham and eggs in camp. However this
is what the little tot away down in
Alabama says in her touching letter:
"Dear Santa Claus.���I want you to
bring me a doll with long curly hair, or
a picture of you. Santa Claus, you are
the sweetest man in the world, and 1
want a little chair, and a box of perfume. I wish you could live with me,
for I know you are pretty and sweet.
If it is not too much for you to bring
me, don't bring about half of it, from
Margeurite Daniel to sweet Santa Claus,
I will write you another letter."
And would you believe it, Patricia,
we were once just as innocent as that
dear little girl in the sunny south. There
was a time when we prayed to God to
keep Santa from breaking his neck until he reached our house. Then we also prayed direct to Santa Claus and
Hold him what to bring us, and how
many pair of socks we had with holes
on one end. We also made doubly sure
of results by attending three Sunday
schools, for a short time before Christmas. Somehow or other all the years
since then we have been under impression that Santa Cluuswas a mad Scotchman, and that his real name was Sandy
Claws.���Greenwood Ledge.
A. St, Catharines wife-beater's plea,
when brought before the police magistrate, that he beat his wife because of
his great love for her, will not avail in
this part of the world. 1'ut it is a
strange fact that in some parts of Russia wife-heating is regarded as evidence
of conjugal affection, and wives sometimes complain that their husbands have
left off whipping them, believing that
when their husbands spare the lash that
is evidence that they have transferred
their affections. There is a great work
for militantsuffragettesinRusBia.���Ex.
While a hoy at school in England, a
certain Japanese wrote in his diary:
"If one says he could not succeed his
ambition because he has not money
enough, 1 would call him a slave of
money. If one says he could not because
he is not strong enough, I would call
him a slave of his body; and if one cays
he could not becauae his relatives or
friends would not let him do so, I would
call him a slave of his neighbors. By
no means could I be a slave of any of
them!" The English may be dubious,
but the sentiment shines with a beauty
that would dignify any language.���
Youth's Companion.
Authorized by wealthy associates in
England to increase the investments
[held by them in British Columbia to the
| amount of $1,000,000. Mr. R, Mason, a
financial man from London, England,
has arrived in B. C. and is now at Van'
couver. At his own expense Mr. Mason
will shortly erect a hotel in Okanagan
j Valley for the British Women's Immigration Society. The hostelry is to be
built at Penticton and will be utilized
as a distributing point for young wo-
,men domestics sent out by the parent
society in Great Britain.���Summerland
Review.
After all Roosevelt is a great man.
He delivered a stirring speech with
only one shot in him, and we knowhuud
reds of people, who could not talk half
as well, even if they had a dozen shots
in them.���The Ledge.
Suitable Christmas Gifts
Imported from England���a Splendid Range of Slippers.
Ladies Slippers
In colore purple, grey, cardinal and moss-
all sizes , <*1 m*g\
nt per pttir                                      *p 1 ��3U
LadieB Slippers, made of fancy wool cloth with
a heavy felt sole,
a beauty.   Per l��ir
$1.10
Child's Slippers,
same as above.   Price
lufauts' Slippers,
same as uliove.   Price
60c
50c
Mens Slippers
Carpet Slippers,
at per pair
$1.00
Woolen Slippers, with a heavy felt sole, per pair
$1.10, $1.25, $1.50
Misses Slippers
Made of red material wiih white dots���has one
ankle strap. *J C^��
Price I OC
We expect to have our Christmas Stock
displayed by Saturday.    You are cordially
invited to come in and see it.
We prepay   the   transportation oharges on all   goods ordered by mail.
If for any reason the goods are unsatisfactory return them to us at our expense.
Chase, B. C.
A. S. FARRIS
Chase, B. C.
SPECIALTIES
FOR THIS WEEK
./���>���*
Just unloaded-a car of King's Quality Flour
from Brandon {the centre of the hard wheat belt).
We have 300 boxes of Salmon Arm Apples:
Jonathan,   Ben   Davis,   Rome   Beauties,
Wagners, Russets, Greenings,
All at $1.25 per box
Fine  Assortment of New Fruits, Raisins,
Currants, Cranberries, Peel, Nuts, etc.
The headquarters for best quality Beef,
Pork, Veal, Mutton, Chicken.
FRESH   FISH   EVERY   FRIDAY
Grant & Ballard
4
Grocers and Butchers
CHASE.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
_���_���
/
S$

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