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Chase Tribune Aug 2, 1912

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Array ""^"���A^,
THE CHASE TRIBUNE
T   KEEP   SWEET  AND   KEEP   M
OVI NG
IT TELLS^
THEY'RE   COMING   TO   CHASE     j
Vol. 1. No. 15.
Chase. B. C, Fvidav. August 2. 191��
8B3.0O Per Year
J*'
ti
HAY CROP IS
A GREAT ONE
A Hundred Tons More Hay Than Last
Year on Chase Ranch���also
Good Crop on Carlin and
Coburn Ranches.
Jas. W. Robertson used a few years
ago to figure in the public eye aa Dominion Dairy Commissioner. In that
position he won for himself a reputation
aa a speaker and philosopher no less
than as an authority on butter and
cheese. He will be in the limelight
ttain in a couple of months, for he is
chairman of a Royal Commission on
technical education that will report
when Parliament meets.
He la mentioned here because of something he once aaid at a meeting where
he waa talking about the Canadian
prairies. He said that people of Anglo-
Saxon descent would never make a permanent home in any country that did
not produce apples and clover. The'
facts prove him to have been mistaken.
The truth at the bottom of his statement is this, that a country well fitted
to produce apples and clover is the best
kind of a country to make a home in.
If Jas. W. Robertson came to Chase
just now he would want to hang up his
hat and stay, for the smell of clover is
in the air and the apples are getting
a little bigger every day.
The haymaking has been kept back
for a couple of weeks by wet weather,
but more than half of it is now cut and
a few fine days will see it all ready for
stacking. The crop this year is better
than last. On the Chase ranch the
amount cut last year was 700 tons; this
year there will be 100 tons more than
that. Similar conditions hold for the
0/ rlin m\d Cobur.'< rArjeheB' The whole
Shuswap flat will produce close to 2000
tons.
Our cut this week shows a photograph
of the bottom lands along the Thompson river between Chase and Shuswap.
There are none better out of doors. The
Chase ranch appears in the foreground
and farther back the Carlin ranch, which
is under the management of J. P. Shaw,
H.P.P. On this ranch one large storage
barn was built last year and another is
now being got ready for this season's
crop.
George Chase has the Chase estate
leased from the heirs, and jnst now has
a large force of men at wo-k on the big
meadow. Mowers, tedders, rakes, and
Btacking outfit may be seen at work all
at the same time.
On the Coburn ranch at Shuswap a
large barn is in the course of erection
and will be used this summer. The
barns are a great aid in saving the crop
in good condition in a wet season like
the present one.
Where Grass Grows Waist High.
BY
Westminster Man Plans to Pathfind
Canadian Highway from Halifax
to Vancouver.
New Westminster, B. C, July 31.���
An attempt to traverse Canada from
Halifax to Vancouver is to be made this
fall by Mr. Herbert Gilley, of New
Westminster, who is making this trip
in the interest of the Canadian Highway
Association, flying the pennant of that
organization on his Canadian-built
machine,
It is Mr. Gilley's intention to make
Halifax his starting point, although he
is a resident of the Pacific Coast. He
is now on his way to his old home in
Charlotte County, New Brunswick,
where he will complete his preparations.
In so far as possible, it is his intention
to follow the outlined route of the Canadian Highway for the entire distance.
No man, perhaps, is better acquainted
with the roads in the different parts of
Canada than Mr. Gilley, for in addition
to the many years spent in lumbering
enterprises in British Columbia he haB a
A View of the Chase Ranch.
OF EXPANSION 111 DEVELOPMENT
Larger Population, Expanding Trade, and the
Exploitation of Mineral Resources
Are Part of the Program.
The next five years will be an era of
expansion and development in the Shuswap Valley. It needs neither a prophet
nor the son of a prophet to foretell it.
Right now signs are pointing that way.
There are movemonts on foot that are
big with promise.
They promise population. In five
years there will be five hundred people
where there are one hundred to-day.
Conditions that have greatly retarded
and almost halted the settlement of
land will soon be removed. Even under
present unfavorable conditions a steady
stream of eager home-seekers is flowing
in to settle as squatters upon homesteads for which at present they can get
no entry.
Hand in hand with the taking up of
the Dominion lands by homesteaders
will go nnother form of  settlement.
Capitalists have Been visions of big dividends to be reaped from the Bale of
ready-cleared ten acre farms. Such
projects require strong financial backing,
for the initial expenditure is heavy.
But large investments of this kind have
already been made. At Sorrento, Seymour Arm and Malakwa three strong
companies have been operating for some
time and now have land upon the market.
Further, there is promise of mineral
development. The late Dr. Dawson, a
geologist of international reputation,
and head of the Dominion Geological
survey, when years ago he was surveying the Shuswap district remarked to
his party, "If I were a young man again
and free to go prospecting, I would come
to the country north of Shuswap Lake.'
The great geologist was no novice; he
knew what he was talking about. When
he talked about minerals he spoke with
the authority of a long life spent in
their study and of an experience that
covered Canada from the Atlantic to the
Pacific.
The confidence of Dr. Dawson in the
mineral wealth' of the Shuswap district
is about to be justified. Thirty years
ago a considerable placer mining camp
was located at the mouth of Scotch
Creek. When the gravel beds were exhausted the camp disappeared. Since
then occasional efforts have been made
to locate the ledge from which the gold
had come. Within the next few mouths
things are scheduled to happen that will
bring swarms of prospectors into this
whole region and the properties on
which work is now about to begin will
prove to be but the forerunners of many
others just aB rich.
With increase of population and the
growth of mining activity will come an
expansion of trade. Every industrious
settler means at least five hundred dol
lars added to the volume of thecountry's
business. Industries will spring up.
More boats will ply up and down the lake.
Lime from Marble Mountain at the narrows will be needed for building and by
the farmers for use on their land. Copper and zinc will be shipped from Seymour Arm. The water powers of Scotch
Creek, Ross Creek and Celista Creek
may provide the juice to run cars on an
electric railway along the north shore of
the lake. Everywhere man's industry
will win new victories, and new territory
will be subdued to human uses.
Those who have watched with intelligence the building up of the west know
that these things are no dream, Three
things only are required to accomplish
the result, resources, capital, and an
industrious population. The resources
have been on the ground for a thousand
years; capital is already coming and will
continue to come in increasing volume ;
the population will come as the opportunities are made known to those who are
looking for just such a place as the Shuswap Valley in which to pitch their tent.
wide knowledge of road conditions in the
eastern provinces, where he spent the
best part of his life. He believes that
the most difficult trip for an automobile
in all British Columbia is over the Hope
Mountains, a journey which has never
been attempted. A road is being built
over this section at the present time;
and it is possible that a temporary way
may be made for an automobile, but it
is a foregone conclusion that by the time
any machine has travelled over the
Hope Mountains it will be fit only for
the scrap heap or for exhibition purposes.
Should this cross-Canada tour be successfully negotiated, it will reflect considerable credit on the path-finders, for
neither Mr. Gilley nor his brother, G.
Emerson Gilley, are practical motor
mechanicians, and the only knowledge
they have of the interior economy of an
automobile 1b that gained through the
use of machines for the past few years.
Valuable data is to be collected during
this trip and later embodied in the
archives of the Canadian Highway Association, which is to be the custodian of
the log of this cross-Canada tour.
A Cemetery Secured.
Tho'citizens of Chase will be glad to
learn that the heirs of the Chase estate
have consented to have the land adjoining their private burying grounds used
as a public cemetery.
R. P. Bradley acting for the Board of
Trade, has received a letter to this effect from J. Howard Smith, manager
of the estate.
The site is an ideal one, being situated
just about the right distance from town,
and close beside the main highway.
The ground will be fenced and surveyed
into lots which may be purchased from
the estate by those wishing to obtain
them.
A Good Show.
Lakeman's pictures on Friday night
were the best he has given us yet. He
will be in the Chase Opera House again
tonight with seven reels that he says
are better still.
After August he will move to the
Black Douglas Opera House.
The Old Reliable Again.
On Wednesday, the 24th Inst., Commodore Haldane set out with his family
and Mrs. Ross, of Shuswap, for a
coasting trip about the lakes.
On Wednesday they camped at the
narrows, and the next day went to
Kault. Salmon Arm was their next
port of call where they ran into a severe hail storm.
In spite of some unsteady weather,
the voyage was a pleasant one. The
Old Reliable made the home port again
on Sunday afternoon.
An Enjoyable Day.
R. P. Bradley's launch made two
trips to Sorrento on Sunday. In the
morning he took up Mr. and Mrs.
Mowat, who are here from Kamloops
camping by the lake. In the afternoon
he went up to Wm. Hemstridge's with
a party that included Mrs. Bradley,
Miss Mertina Bradley, Mr. and Mrs.
Kyle and Mr. and Mrs. Billy Bradley.
They returned the same evening.
Inspect Work on C. N. R.
Sir Richard McBride and party arrived at Kamloops from the coast ou
Tuesday night and slept on board the
Distributor which left at an early hour
next morning for Camp 71 mile, North
Thompson. The party consists of Sir
Richard McBride, Hon. D. M. Eberta,
speaker, Hon. Thos. Taylor, Minister
of public works, W. Manson, M.P.P.,
R. F. Green, M.P.P., F. C. Gamble,
engineer railway department, J. P. Shaw
M.P.P., Hon. A. E. McPhillips, Col!
Hon. Sam Hughes, minister of militia,
Mayor Robinson, T. G. Holt and T. W.
White, of the C. N. R., JohnTwohy and
Robert Twohy. They will look over the
railroad work under construction on the
Twohy contract and the 60 miles of
wagon road being built by the same
firm. The trip will partake largely of
the nature of a pleasure jaunt.
E
PROGRESSING
The Popular Musical Organization
Under the Leadersnip of Bandmaster Jimmy Allan has
Become Credit to Town.
There are plenty of bigger towns thin
Chase, and there are lots of those towns
that can't boast of as good a band.
Chase thinks it haa reason to feel a
trifle chesty over the kind of prog reel
ita band has made. When they advertise a concert we know they are able to
deliver the goods, so we all go.
It is about a year and a half since t
bunch of the boys got together in the
cottage back of Barry's hsll and decided that Chase should have a band.
The charter members themselves paid
half of the $260 that bought the instruments, and the other half waa raised
by public subscription. Contrary to the
prophecies of the doubters, they have
made it stick.
The late lamented "Dad" waa engaged as instructor and for several
weeks admiring groups of small boys
gathered around the hall, from whoae
open doors floated endless repetitions
of "The Tale of the Kangaroo."
Dad was a good teacher and wae
worth much to the band in ita kindergarten Btage, but they couldn't stand
the price. After six weeks he surrendered the baton to Jimmy Allan. Later
on Charlie Melvin took charge for about
three months until his sudden retirement, when Jimmy had again to atop
into the. gap. If he holds the job until
someone underbids him he is fixed for
life, for he does it for nothing.
The course of things has not always
run smooth. A band is about .as diffi-
;ult tj manage as a church choirv But
from all its' troubled it has come, ouf
better than ever, and for the last six
months the ones who cared most for
the success of the enterprise have been
seeing the fruit of their patience and
perseverance.*
The boys have always been ready to
spend two evenings a week practising.
The managers have nailed every man
who came to town who showed signs
of musical ability. In the changing population of a mill town many members
have gone and their places have been
taken by others. There are now only
six left of the original membership.
These are James Allan, W. T. Gordon,
Egnar Sandahl, Louis Cumming, John
Westburg and Percy Weaver. Men
may come and men may go but tha
Chase Band will go on as long as they
can put up the kind of music they have
been giving us lately at their Sunday
concerts.
Perils of the Sea.
On Wednesday while Mr. Sawyer
and Chief McLaughlin were coming
down the lake in the "Tillicum" they
sighted a strange looking craft on their
starboard bow. They immediately shifted
their course and bore down on her to
investigate.
She was about eight feet long and
four feet in the beam, and carried a
crew of three able-bodied seamen. She
had been built and launched at the
warehouse on the north side of the lake
from which port she had made her last
clearance, She was bound for Chaae,
and due to arrive about Christmas.
The ship was constructed of some
pieces of driftwood with a few Btrips of
hoard placed crosswise on them. The
captain reported fine weather and a
smooth sea from the date of sailing.
The log showed a distance run of a mile
and a half.
The captain of the "Tillicum" tactfully suggested to the captain of the
"Dreadnought" that the former had
the faster boat and the latter might
save a few days by abandoning his ship
and coming aboard. The captain of the
" Dreaduought" replied that time was
no object to him and his men, for they
had no job.
Chief McLaughlin then drew vivid and
forcible word pictures of what might
happen to a dreadnought if a storm
arose. The daring mariners at last
consented to heave to and allow themselves to be rescued.
Among the fishing parties that went
out on Sunday were Messrs. Zilka and
Seagraves to the Dam Camp and W. F.
Barnes in the Topsy to the Little River.
I
if
I
_
i.
The painting of R. P. Bradley'B store
front is completed. It is now one of
the most attractive looking business
houses on the street.
mm
: OT
^
THE CHASE TRIBUNE
|      KEEP    SWEETAND    KEEP    MOVI N~
-IT TELLS^
THEY'RE COMING TO CHASE  |
Vol. 1. No. 14.
Chase. B. 0., Fridav. July 36, 1913
SS.OO Per Year
II
Adams   River   Lumber  Company's
Mill Taking the Biggest
Cut in its History.
"We have enough loga to keep our
mill running at the present rate until
Christmas, and I guess we don't want
to run any later than that."
This was General Manager Sawyer's
answer to a repreaen ative of the Tribune
recently when asked heKithe supply of
. logs was holding out against the continuous eating, eating, night and day,
of the sawa in the company's big
mill.
The demand on the prairies for the
product of the Chase mill has been
greater this summer than ever before.
Their efficient sales department has not
been slow to take advantage of the
opportunity which has been so freely
presented by the rapid influx of settlers into the fertile plains to the eaat of
us. A majority of these immigrants
come to the country with money enough
to their credit to go ahead at once
and put up substantial buildinga on
their newly acquired farms.
The development that is going on all
through the middle Canadian west is
rapidly changing villages into towns and
towns into cities. Nor 1b there any indication of a slackening of the pace.
Rather does it tend to increase. The
dullest can spell out what this means to
the lumber industry in British Columbia.
For the present it has made the pay
rol' the largest in the history of the town.
. W.>r\..���.:\--<:)3fr:illl>i..:,::#KM>
pulse of bigger and bettor business. The
merchants tell a story of an expanding
volume of sales. There 1b no boom, no
wild spectulation, people are keeping
their heads, but everywhere you can
feel an atmosphere of quiet confidence in
the future of the town and district.
No doubt as the years go by we shall
become less dependent upon the lumber
industry. The time will come, for no
force, however stong, can stay the
wheels of progress, when every twenty
acres of arable land in the Shuswap Valley will support a family. Other com.
mercial activities that depend upon
farming will spring up and thrive. The
tides of trade and industry will then
begin to flow through many channels.
When that time comes, and as things
go in the west in these days it is not far
away, the citizens of Chase will not forget that it was the Adams River Lumber Company and their big saw mill
that set things going.
A Real Railway Minister.
Over on the other aide of the Dominion or down east as they Bay in Ontario,
where politics have become the exact
ecience of office holding, the political
hangers on are having a hard time of
it. The trouble lies in the department
of Railway Minister Frank Cochrane,
Who is said to be "raising cain" among
those who have for a lifetime looked
upon the Intercolonial Railway as a public enterprise to be run for the party in
power and as a secondary consideration
for the interests of all the people of
Canada. The new Railway Minister in
the Borden Cabinet has a different notion about administering the Intercolonial. To him the government railway
is a business proposition, to be run for
the advantage of Canada. That means
receiving value for value for all money
spent and appropriations for use not for
the ornament of the party. And his
ways are so disconcerting that the saying among the French Canadians is reported to be that "Monsieur Cochrane
is not a ministre politique, but a buzz
saw."
Artist Smith on Some Local Happenings.
The Old Poet journeyed into the office last night and pulled this one anent
the "swat fly" stuff:
"Swat  the fly and Bwat him when
you will,
But on the cake his foot-prints linger
still,
I guess I am a knocker on the fly,
For I don't like hia foot-prints on my
* pie."
Regular stuff, Old  Scout, and if you
played the same boarding house I do,
they'd hook you extra for the  "feet-
prints". ,       .,   ,
(My landlady please take notice).
- ��� Albertan.
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Covj&M    o--&s\ow-\\v*1
Allnc^f^B-H* ���   We'll   Ke\ijv tftKc to tRTt^VX*
uA\-\v vtou VKya to ur\\odit tt\e "��U.sV .
FAIR, FAT AND
v
T
f<i     \   A ������- N--.-
y Up Now, Boys, and Go   In
To Win-Faint Heart Ne'er
Won Fair Lady.
Does it pay to advertize in the Tribune?
Just ask the boys in the little valley
across the river.   Look at this:
Kamloops, B. C,
July 16, 1912.
To Niskonlith Bachelors,
Chase, B. C,
Care of Chase Tribune.
I read the advertisement in your paper,
and as I am looking for a husband, I
thought I would write to you about
myself.
I am a girl of twenty-one years, stand
five feet, four inches, and weigh 160
pounds, and can cook and keep house.
I have lived on a ranch before and like
ranching very well.
Will exchange photographs or letters
with any of the bachelors. Hoping to
hear frome some of them soon,
Miss	
Now, Bob, remember the spiel you
handed out at the dance in Celista. The
eyes of an expectant public are upon
you to Bee if you make good. And don't
let the grass grow under your feet.
Her spelling and punctuation are faultless, and she might be useful around a
newspaper office. The Tribune will be
at home to Niskonlith bachelors in the
evenings after the dredge quits work.
If you mean business you can get the
lady's address. Come early and avoid
the rush.
Dredge Resumes Work.
Captain Joe Johnston has once more
emerged from his retreat on that ranch
of his up among the tall uncut, and is
in his old familliar place on the bridge
of the government dredge Pelican. Seamanship is Joe's vocation, but between
times he devotes his attention to agricultural pursuits.
After reducing himself to a skeleton
in a hand to hand tussle with the big fir
and cedar stumps he returns to his quiet
life on the river. There he basks in the
light of Uncle Bob's sunny smile and
relieves the anxiety of his friends aa he
fills up one of Vic's fancy cooking and
again gets bo he can make a shadow.
The Pelican will continue through the
fall the work of deepening the South
Thompson River. The object is to have
a channel three feet deep at low water
from Chaae to Kamloops.
Hon. Price Ellison Says Outlook For
Bountiful Harvest Was
Never Better
Hon. Price Ellison, Minister of Fin-
nance and Agriculture, who haa been in
the interior for some days on public and
private business, during the course of
which he paid a visit to his farm at Vernon, has returned to the city and spend
a busy day at his office attending to correspondence and to the matters which
were awaiting his official action.
Speaking of the general harvest outlook in the Okanagan for both fruit and
agricultural products, the minister stated that it would be impossible to speak
to optimistically of them. At present
the outlook for a bumper crop of all tree
fruits iB of the brightest, and the growers are making plans to handle and
market a larger crop of all varieties
than they have yet done. There are
very, many men coming in and taking
up fruit raising; throughout the Okan-
gan, and along the Thompson and other
valleys, and Mr. Ellison believes that as
a result of this year's crops there will
be a very materially increased demand
for lands. The ordinary farm crops are
also in fine shape.
Saps  Manager  Brooks Returns
From Meeting of Lumbermen's Association.
E.E.Brooks returned on Monday from
Calgary, where he has been representing
the Adams River Lumber Co. at a meeting of the Mountain Lumbermen's Association.
Mr. Brooks remarked upon the very
promising outlook for a record yield of
grain in our neighbor province. The
growth of straw is particularly strong
There |s only one anxiety felt by the
farmers on behalf of their crop. There
is danger lest the abundant rains delay
the ripening and expose the grain to
early frosts.
The fulfilment of the present bright
prospects will mean a year of unexampled prosperity for the prairie provinces.
E. G. Warren, manager of the B. C.
Copper Co, died in the hospital at Greenwood last week as the result of an automobile accident. The deceased, who
was 38 years of age, was a Past Master of the Masons, and was given a
Masonic funeral.
vvv\vvvvvvv��v��v*tvvvvvvvvvv*vvvvv��w��vwvwv��*>
FROM OUR FILES TEN YEARS AHEAD.
From The Tribune of July 26,1922.
An additional room will be added this year to the
Niskonlith public school. The rapidly growing school population is one of the fruits of a vigorous advertising campaign
in the Tribune carried on about ten years ago by the enterprising bachelors of this section.
The new four story tourist lintel that has just been completed for Dick Underwood will lie open to the public in time
for the beginning of the hunting season in September. The
building contains three hundred rooms and covers a city
block. The roof is to serve as a landing stage where airships will be docked. During the hunting season a regular
service of these craft will be run between this point and Turn
Turn Lake, under the supervisiun of Aviator Laurie Taylor.
The Tribune has received word of an important transfer
of mining property. The Black Douglas gold mine at Scotch
Creek has been purchased by a syndicate of Scotch and Irish
capitalists. The secrecy that has always enveloped the
working of this claim hangs over the present deal. Our reporter has, however, pried into the mystery, using a bottle
of Hudson Bay rum as a lever. We are prepared to state
authoritatively tbat the price paid waa half a million dollars.
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IIP TO DA1E
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Sitting in a Buggy and Driving
Along the Creek is the Latest
Way of Doing It.
Those little fish residing up the creek
dearly love to come to Chase. About
five hundred of them arrived in town
last Sunday afternoon. They were
strangers, so we took them in���those of
us who could get any.
On Sunday morning a small regiment
of Chase citizens in various small detachments set out for a day's outing along
the shady banks of Chase creek. They
had such fine sport that they never
knew it rained.
The roll of those who went included
Mr. and Mrs. Blaisdell, Mr. and Mrs.
Ferguson, and Messrs. Gould, Toffee,
Willson, Taylor and Leadstone.
The feature of the day was Mrs. Ferguson fishing from a buggy while driving
along the bank of the creek. In this
way she caught about thirty trout.
The list of fish caught reads like an
account of the first ballot in a political
convention.   Here it is:
Toffey, Willson, Taylor and Leadstone 30
Blaisdell 180
Cassidy 60
Gould 115
Ferguson  140
Mrs. Ferguson  80
Total.... 606
Thanks, boys, for the samples, we are
still licking our chops.
At the Opera House.
Mr. Lakeman, proprietor of the Maple
Leaf and Isis Theatres, Kamloops, has
been putting on a show in the Opera
House each Friday night for the past
few weeks. He shows three nights each
week in Kamloops and picks out the
best things in the three programmes for
his night in Chase.
Two weeks ago he gave a dance after
the show, which was so well attended
and so much enjoyed that he has decided
to repeat the dose this evening.
The programme for this week has
some specially attractive features. It
is as follows: Lady Audley's Secret-
Suffrage and the Man���Rag Picker's
Dog���Ocean, Thou Mighty Monster���
A Servian Gipsy'B Marriage���A Well
Washed House.
At aome time in the near future the
citizens of Chase will hold public meeting to discuss matters of local interest
The meeting will be addressed by J. P.
Shaw, M.P.P.
Complete Survey and Larger Grant
Asked for Shuswap
Avenue
After aome delay and considerable
discussion the citizens of Chaae have
decided on the manner in which they
wish the Government appropriation for
Chase streets spent, and Provincial
Government Engineer Forde has approved of their recommendations and
haa given Road Supt. White instructions
to proceed with the work immediately.
Shuswap Avenue will be properly graded and gravelled from the hotel to tha
station, the C. P. R. gate being removed
and the street being run straight through
and the turnstiles on the sidewalk being
moved to where the new railway fence
crosses it.
This street will also be opened up
where it crosses the flat between the
hospital and the railway track eaat of
town, and a connection made from it to
the present road leading to the wharf,
which latter road will be put in good
condition for use as a temporary connection between the wharf and the
town.
The balance of the appropriation will
be expended in the construction of necessary sidewalks.
The Tribune considers that tne citizens
have made a wise recommendation for
this year's work, but trusts that tha
project of eventually having Shuswap
Avenue graded straight through from
th6 station to the wharf will nit be loat
step* o.*' all' v c .;���; \<r&if��s\,. ..jnsfs-one'���
tht necessity of keeping this before our
mtmber, Mr. J. P. Shaw, M.P.P1., so
that he may secure the placing of tha
necessary amount for the work in the
estimates for the coming year.
The Ladies*Aid Social
The Ladies' Aid had the weather
made to order this time for their lea
cream social. Louis Bean, nothing if
not a ladiee man, closed his popular parlor for the evening, and that also helped
some. The Japanese lanterns hung
about the trees on Mrs. Leadstone's
lawn made a very pretty effect. The
ice cream was just right, the cake waa
the kind that mother used to make, and
everybody went home satisfied.
An Abbreviated Trip.
On Wednesday morning two boats carrying sixteen passnegers started for
Kamloops to attend the regatta. The
one belonging to H. Mclean balked when
opposite Shuswap, and it was found
that the shoe protecting the propeller
waa broken. Thus ended the excursion'
so far aa that boat was concerned.
The party in R. P. Bradley's boat
then decided that they didn't want to
go to the regatta either. They took the
derilict in tow and made the return trip
at their leisure, while some of the shipwrecked came back by the overland
route. '
The Band Concert.
The next Sunday evening band concert will be in the afternoon. There ia
not enough daylight after7o'clock these
evenings to allow the boys to do justice
to their extensive repertoire.
So don't forget that the concert on
Sunday will be on the government wharf
from three to five o'clock. It sounds
good either on the wharf or on the
water. Thia will be the program:
March Roll of Honor
K. L. King.
Waltz American Beauty
K. L. King.
Overture The Conqueror
K. L. King.
Serenade Queen of Night
A. M. Laurens.
Galop Excelsior
K. L. King.
Flower Song violet Bloom
W. H. Keifer.
March Unique
A. M. Laurens.
Waltz Hearts Haven
G. S. F. K.
,H
!���
d
__ TWO
THE  CHASE TRIBUNE
TWO TOWNS
>-
->
%
They were twenty miles apart.    They had equal
k
advantage   of  location.      Back  in    the    nineties
\
-_Sc_
they got away to an even start.   So far they were
alike.   But there was a difference.
One   had   a   live,  healthy   newspaper;   the   other
���
couldn't' afford such extravagance.
��������*----.> ���
"rJ0j   \
J, i   ,,-.,.  v. .v And ^iiqjy .fcefep^                                              h,       \  .>.*,    ,
I
lr��   ���������-*-*��
lived business kept growing, the town kept growing,
and best of all its men kept growing.
.
They had to accept the  challenge   that  publicity
brought them, and play up, and so they have come
to be the big men of the district, who lead others
in doing big things.
And the other town.   There's no need to tell its
story.    Its   people   had   their   chance   and   they
PASSED IT UP
j                                                                                              .	
t
a
7 �����
THE CHA8E TRIBUNE
&/)e Black
Doug'las
Opera
House
���. a ROBINSON, PtoprUlot <_, Manx<r
Vtt Box Appointed Public Hall In Town
After W��r_ Drop In tad
Enjoy ��� Gam* of
P O O L
BILLIARDS
Full Stock Cigars
and Tobaccos. A
First Class Barber
Shop in Connection
Ideal
POOL
ROOM
GEO. L. GOLLEN
Boat Builder
Boats of Evbby  Debckiption
Mntni* Boats a Specialty
BARRY k CUMMING
REAL ESTATE
INSURANCE
Notary Public Chase, B. C.
mm
J. W. Clifford
General j&
Blacksmith
Horseshoeing a Specialty
R. J. MINER
* Painter % *
to to
$ Decorator jj
Fall Line Sherwin-Williams
Paints, Latest Designs
in Wall Paper
I
Electrical and Motor Boat
Supplies
Chase
Restaurant
and Bakery
(X��30C^00O*X��*t>X*����t��ftSft
Board and Rooms, Bath
Good Table, Reasonable
Rates, Meals at All Hours
YEP NUM J. CO.,  ���   ��� PROPS.
Try the
Chase Tribune
for Job Printing
We have every modern
facility for turning out
Work in Tip-top Style
at keen prices.
PROVINCIAL
W. A. Lang, of Peachland, haa sold
136 worth of cherries from one tree this
year.
Two lots recently were wild in Prince
Rupert for $46,000, nearly $1000 per
front foot
Revelstoke is trying to secure aviatoi
Stark to make flights at their fair on
Oct. 6.
A paper mill recently established in
New Westminster at a cost of $250,000
is working two shifts and turning out
IS tons per day. The product is in big
demand.
David Moore has been appointed by
the government to inspect the timber
and mineral resources of the Big Bend
district, above Revelstoke. For many
years he was ore buyer for tae Trail
Smelter.
R. H. Agur, president of the B. C.
Fruit Growers' Association and formerly
provincial managerof the Massy-Harris
Company in Manitoba, died at his home
in Summerland on 17th inst.
In a well contested game at the ball
park Tuesday evening Savona won from
Asheroft in ten innings by a score of
10-9. For the winners Sinclair pitched
good ball. DeMuth in left field for Asheroft fielded and batted well for Asheroft.
The visitors were entertained after the
game by some of the Asheroft boys and
report having a splendid time.
Henry McArthur, of Greenwood, after
brooding over domestic troubles, the
other day drank some muriatic acid in
an attempt to make his wife a widow.
He was caught with the goods on him,
first brought round and later brought
up in court on the charge of attempted
suicide. After a lecture the magistrate
sent Harry back to his spouse as punishment for his crime.
T. J. Cummiskey, inspector of Indian
reserves, accompanied by J. F. Smith,
Indian agent of Kamloops, held a meeting with the Indians at the head of the
Okanagan Lake on Monday, when a new
chief was elected in place of Baptiste
Logan who has been deposed. Pierre
Mischel waB the Indian elected to the
office, and he was invested with his honors in due form, the Rev. Father LeJeune
taking part in the ceremony. Inspector
Cummiskey has done a great deal towards straightening out affairs on this
reserve.
We clip the following from the Greenwood Ledge: Bob Fitzsimmons, the old
pug, was in town last week and delighted the prize ring fiends. One of the
ladies of his company had a Japanese
Pomeranian female dog that she said
was worth $5,000. Bob also had a bear
cub attached to a rope that he is taking
home as a souvenir. Bob also neglected to pay for movinvg his baggage in this
town, but no doubt he will get over that
some day.
Mr. Thomas Cunningham, the provincial inspector of fruit pests, has ten experts engaged in a campaign of orchard
inspection and cleansing in the Okanagan Valley.
In addition to this work, Dr. Bonequet,
recently from Pullman Agricultural
College, has been giving some lectures
to the farmers. A hundred farmers
form a double ring around a sick apple
tree, and the learned Doctor tells them
what is the matter with it and what
sort of medicine to give it.
The fruit growers are so eager to know
all about it that they drag the Doctor
from his hotel after dinner and make
him tell them some more until bedtime.
The Baden-Powell Girl Guides of Salmon Arm go to camp at Canoe on July
25th, remaining till Aug. 1st. Miss
Francis Moule, their captain, writes as
follows in the Observer:
Summer camps for girls are yearly
becoming more popular and justly so.
Last summer there were thousands of
little people in children's camps, and
this year there will be tens of thousands.
Camp life helps a child to get out of a
summer what it ought to have���health
and happiness. Camp life recognizes
the child's right to adventure and joyful
co-operation. To live happily in a well-
conducted camp means that a girl learns
how to work with others���rowing a boat,
preparing a meal, playing all sorts of
team games, teaches her this."
It is strange how things work out in
thiB wicked world, says the Carman
Standard. To some it is all peaches and
cream, to others all thornes and thistles.
Take the case of Harry Millie and Premier Roblin for example. They both
started business in the same old town,
in the same old way. It is not on record
that Harry is more clever than R. P.,
indeed it is doubtful if he could beat him
in a " hoss trade." But in a matter of
telephones there IS a difference. Harry
ran a telephone bnsiness in Carman and
made it pay. He went out to the Okanagan Valley and started a second telephone system and was a winner. He
recently sold out his telephone system,
and passed through Carman the other
day on his Way to visit his early home
near the Lake of Killarney in Auld Ireland, with $75,000 in his jeans, while
Premier Roblin though only a couple of
years in the telephone business, is a
million dollars or so in the hole. And
there you are.
At Service
Hackney Stallion
Barrow Hoss
Wonder. 10003
FOALED 1906. Register*-, Hack-
uey Horse Society, London Eng.
Certificate No. 15378. Imported
1907. COLOR-Cbestnut, white
on face and legs. BREEDER���
William Murray, Barrow Moss,
Wigtown, Wigtownshire.  .
Sire -Lord Loudoun 8934
Dam - 3308 Sweet Grass
W. P. Pritchard,     Prop.
Pritchard  P. 0. B. C.
Terms $15 for the season, payable at close of season. Accidents at owners risk.
THREE
WATER NOTICE.
FOR A LICENCE TO TAKE AND USE WATER.
Notice is hereby given that Timothy
T. Harrington of Shuswap B. C. will
apply for a licence to take and use 3
cubic feet per minute of water out of
unnamed creek, which flows in a North
Easterly direction through N. W. H Sei*.
27 and sinks 1500 feet from east line
The water will be diverted at about 1800
feet from S. W. corner and will be used
for irrigation and domestic purposes on
the land described as N. W. Stf, Sec. 27,
Township 20, Range 13,   Merridean 29.
Objections may lj filed with the said
Water Recorder or with the Comptrol-
erot Water Rights. Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C,
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 3rd day of June, 1912. The application will be filed in the office of the
Water Recorder  at Kamloops  B.   C.
Timothy T. Harrington,
Applicant.
U/>e
WATER NOTICE.
FOR    A   LICENSE   TO STORE   AND    VSE
WATER..
UNDERWOOD
Notice is hereby given that George
Stewart of Ducks B.C. will apply jf1"'   g
a license to store and use the water put _
of the lake known locally as The Pooley
Lake, situated about one and* a half
miles north of Ducks station.
The water will be run out by a natural channel, on to the land, where it
will be used for irrigation purposes, described as the fractional S. W. i Sec. of
Sec. 31, Township 19, Range 14 west of
the 6th meridian.
Objections may be filled with the said
Water Recorder or with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 9th day of July 1912. The application will be filled in the office of
the Water Recorder at Kamloops B. C.
George Stewart,
Applicant.
Men Wanted, for sawmill, yard and
camp. Apply either in person or by letter to Adams River Lumber Company,
Ltd., Chase, B. C.
For Sale, good saddle horse four years
old, gentle to drive.   Also three mares
with foal at foot broken to work.
Grant & Ballard, Chase B. C.
Church of England
Services are held in All Saints
Church Room, Chase, as follows:
1st SUNDAY IN EACH MONTH
Evensong and Address at 7.30 p.m.
3rd SUNDAY IN EACH MONTH
Holy Communion at 11 a.m.
Evensong and Address at 7.30 p.m.
PresbyterianChurch
Notices
MORNING WORSHIP - 10.30 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP - 7.30 P.M.
BIBLE CLASS, TUESDAY 7.30 P.M.
YOU   ARE   WEU.COME
Pastor : J. HYDE
Teacher Wanted.
Chase Public School 1st division.
Salary $80.00. Must have 2nd class
certificate.   Man prefured.
CHASE SCHOOL BOARD
by J. A. Graham, Sety.
I. U/ye HOTEL
of QUALITY
i
I
i
-
CHASE,
B.C.
j. p. McGoldrick
President
W. F. LAMMERS
Treasurer
A. J. LAMMERS
Vice-President
B. W. SAWYER
Sec. and M'n'g Director
Adams River Lumber Co.
*
LIMITED
Manufacturers of
-i
Cedar, Fir, Spruce and Pine
H
LUMBER
We intend to arrange for the delivery of
Lumber to the different points on the Lake
_______
m__i______
___.
_ _'oi:r.
THE CH <SE TRIBUNE
i
We CHASE TRIBUNE
Published  Every Friday  Mousing at Chase. British  Columbia
  =   BY THE   ���
CHASE PUBLISHING COMPANY*
T. J. KINLEY  Managing Editor
Lass than 10 Inches, one insertion.
60c  per  Inch.
Display, contract, 100 inches to be
used in three months, $1.00 per inch per
month.
Display, full page, 130.00 per Issue,
1100.00   per  month.
Display, half page, $16.00 per Issue,
150.00 per month.
Display, quarter page, $10.00 per
Issue, $25.00 per month.
Coal Notices, thirty days,  $6.00 each.
KeglHtrar's Notices, thirty days,
$6.00  each.
Lanil   Notices,  sixty  days.   $7.60  each.
Reading Notices, 20 cents per line
each Insertion.
Legal advertising, 10 cents per line,
first Insertion; 6 cents per line each
aubsequent Insertion.
Subscriptions  In   Advance,  $2  a
Year, United States, $2.50 a
Year.
To insure acceptance, all manuscript should be legibly written on one side of the papoi
only. Typwritten copy is preferred.
Tho Tribune does not necessaril>
endorse the sentiments expressed in any contributed artlole,
Advertisers will please remember
that to ensure a change, copy
must be In by Tuesday noon.
'THEY'RE    COMING    TO   CHASE'
BOOST THE SHUSWAP VALLEY.
Not long since a gentleman whose interests are more or less tied
���up with the future of the country around Shuswap Lake, called our
attention to the need of the Shuswap country being advertised as a
whole.   He is right.   He has placed his Bnger on one of our mistakes,
We have been telling the public about Seymour Arm and Malakwa
and Salmon Arm and Sorrento and Chase, at the same time leaving it
in blissful ignorance of the fact thnt they are all located iu one and the
same charming lake district. Let your mind wander buck to the time
when you lived two or three thousand miles from here nnd this country
was known to you only by its fame. Did you hear much about Armstrong or Vernon or Kelowna ? But Okanagan ; twenty years ago that
name began to have a meaning to the reading public everywhere. It
was heard on both sides of the Atlantic. And the boosting of the
valley has made the towns.
But if we are going to talk to the big world about our little para
dise we must have a convenient name to handle it by. Shuswap Laki
District describes it all right, but the name iB too hard to get your
tongue around. Shuswap Valley would sound better. A name that
runs smoothly off the tongue goes a long way toward muking a place
well known. Who that once heard the name of, say, Kalamazoo ever
forgot it f
Tht right name settled upon, the next thing is to use it every
chance we get.' Let it stare men iu the face when they look at our
letter heads, our envelopes, our advertising. The towns should use
it in their publicity work.
A man reads one day about Malakwa in the Shuswup Valley where
fine fruit lands are to be had; the next abont Seymour Arm, beautifully
located at the head of the Shuswap Valley; a little later about the
-bumper crops at Salmon Arm, the oldest farming town in the Shuswap
Valley; then about'Sorrento, the new residential towu of the SliuBwap
Valley; and about Chase, the laBt best town in the golden weBt, located
in the glorious Shuswap Valley.
By thiB time he begins to say to himself, "When I go west there's
one place I'm not going to miss, and that's the Shuswap Valley." And
once the Shuswap Lake gets its beautiful a-ms around him he won't
want to leave.   He'll never forget the sensation.
Until the district us a whole is steadily and systematically advertised it will be slow in coming into its own.
FORGET YOURSELF.
Keep the windows of your mind wnBhed, and every day take a look
through them away off across the ocean and the continents, and farther
if your vision is good enough. It makes for mental health aud sanity,
When you are tired of your own big little problems, go aviating on the
wings of thought to where Asquith and Lloyd-George and the others
are trying to solve tbe questions of an empire, to wbere the esquimo on
the Labrador coast is watching his wife cook the codfish, to where the
financier is planning how he may farther increase the cost of living
and his own fortune, or to where the pioneer in the virgin forest is
laying the foundation of a home.
It is a fine thing to get out of and away from yourself for a while and
get the other mans point of view, it will correct your distorted sense
of value. Some of tbe things that looked so big to you will dwindle.and
some little things will begin to look worth doing.
Hon. Frank Cochrane, Minister of Railways, will paddle his own ca
noe when he goes down the Nelson River to locate the terminus of the
Hudson Bay Railway. He will also prepare his own mulligan.
"The big silent minister" will not travel in state but will be attended
by one Indian.
The Kamloops Standard estimates that 7,600,000 tons of rain fell
within the ciiy limits on Sunday. The thrifty citizens ure storing the
precious lipuid in their cellars against the time when their climate goes
back to its old habit.
The Ottawa branch of the Royal Mint finds there is not much
demand for the new gold coins. So far, however, none have been turned down at the Tribune office.
China is said to be on the verge of another revolution. Two revolutions per annum wouldn't be much speed for a gasoline engine, but
perhaps China is only cranking yet.
The Hotels at Lethbridge are stocking up in preparations for the
Dry Farming Congress and Dry Products Exhibit in October. The
rule tbat the exhibits shown must not be irrigated does not apply to
the exhibitors.
Keep  Sweet  and Keep  Moving.
Recent Verse
WAITING.
t
Serene, I fold my hands and wait,
Nor care for wind nor tide nor sea,
I rave nc more 'gainst time nor fait,
For lo! my owu shall come to me.
I stay my hastt, I make delays,
For what avails this eager pace?
I stand amidst the eternal ways
And what is mine shall know my face.
Asleep, awake, by night or day,
The friends I seek are seeking me;
No wind can drive my bark astray
Nor change the tide of destiny.
The waters know their own, and draw
The brook that springs in yonder heights,
So flows the good with equal law
Unto the soul of pure delights.
The stars come nightly to the sky,
The tidal wave unto the sea;
Nor time, nor -Jmce, nor deep, nor high,
Can keep my own away from me,
John Bobboughs.
THE MARTYRS OF THE LAW.
By Arthur Hobson Quinn.
There was murder in Carroll County and the sheriff had taken his man.
But through the hills and the valley the ominous rumor ran
That if ever the word was spoken that Bent to jail their kin
The Aliens would rear a shambles where the court of law had been !
But still untouched by the terror^the law had had its way;
Floyd Allen stood for senteuce iu the peace of a quiet day.
Silent, ufettered, he stood there, his face the hue of stone,
And it seemed that his clan had left him to beat his fate alone.
Then ere a word was uttered the door swung open wide,
And the pride nnd strength of the mountain strode noisily inside.
Around the judge and the jury ami the officers of the law
The circle slowly tightened, and Thornton Massie saw
That he framed his own death sentetice.but he roBe and the dingy room
Took on the spell of splendor as he spoke the words of doom!
Then tbe guns roared out their answer, and the judge fell on his face
And the murky smoke of murder spread through the tainted place
Goad, who read the record, and Foster, wbo made the plea,
Fell in the self-same volley, but/-/   ihe room was free
From the shock, a pistol sounded, and each man held his breath
As the sheriff of Carroll County strode in to his certain death!
Cruel were the odds ugaiust him, but the odds were nought to him,
For h.o bullet found Floyd Allen ere the sight of his eyes grew dim.
Then down with Massie and Foster, in the growing heap on the floor,
In his clutch the empty weapon that Mb hand should use no more,
He dreamed that he still protected the dead that round him lay,
Till the thiftt for murder .slackened and the Mountain rode away.
Massey and Webb and Foster- long may their memory live,
Who had nought to give but their life blood aud gave what they
had to give!
They died for thy laws, Virginia���on thy historic breast
No braver sons have fallen, no truer heroes rest!
Not in the roar of battle, when the blood rniiB strong and high,
In the stiller paths of duty they laid them down to die.
Aud the nation that is waiting, with half-averted ear,
For the low and distant murmur that the Future has to hear,
Should make their names the slogan of the Cause their vision saw���
The sanctity of human life and the majesty of law!
The slogan that shall echo till it drowns all local cry���
The Cause our lives must cherish lest our great Republic diel
Steamboat Service
Freight and Passengers
Steamers:    C. R. Lamb or Andover
Kamloops-Shuswap Lake
Leave   Sicamous  every   Saturday   at 6 p.m.  for
Salmon Arm.
Leave   Saloon   Arm   every   Sunday Morning at
6 a.m. for Kamloops via  CHASE.
Leave   Kamloops    every    Monday   Morning   for
Sicamous.
Seymour Arm-Sicamous
Leave Sicamous for Seymour Arm every Tuesday,
Thursday and Saturday, returning same day.
The above subject to change without notice.
SPECIAL HATES FOB PABTIES.
Arrow Lakes Lumber Co.
Limited
Phone B10
-**~��**-w*-w*V^V��^S^S_-W^W\ OB e ^
CZZH Impenal
Bank of Canada
HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO
D. R. WILKIE, Pbes.     ::     Hon. R. JAFFRAY, Vice-Pbes.
R. A. BETHUNE, Manages Chase Bbanch
Interest Allowed On
Deposits
From Date of Deposit
Savings BanK
Department
-S^tfVtf-tf*^-*-*'--**'-^^
Special   *   Attention * Given * To
Banking By Mail
Agents in England:-Lloyd's BanK, Limited, London,
and Branches
I Eat At The	
City
Restaurant
COMFORTABLE ROOMS
* IN CONNECTION *
Babby & Gumming,
Propbietobs
Knights
of Pythias
Chase Lodge No. 47
Meets   Every   Tuesday   Night.
R. P. Bradley, C.C.
H. M. Law, KjOfR.&S.
Visiting Knights are Welcome.
T
Fruit Salts
For Hot Weather
50c   75c   $1.00
Per Bottle.
Macdonald's
Drug   Store
THE Only Dead Ones
in  Chase    are   the
Mosquitos���They took too
much Crude Oil
N. B. Hake good on this, now, Hac. ������i'K chase ti :;:;
FIVE
T
The Gossip Comer
���-~.
G. Grant made a business trip to
Kamloops on Monday.
A. E. Underwood has been at the
coast for several days, where he is registered at the Hotel Vancouver.
Don McDonald has come back from
Squilax, where he was driving one of
McLean's teams hauling lumber for
Philip McBryan.
Philip McBryan has just completed a
shipment of five cars of lumber from
his mill at Squilax.
Andy Bond and Jim McDonald took
in the regatta at Kamloops on Wednesday.
Bob Robinson has returned from his
prospecting trip up Scotch Creek.
It is probable that the Chase Band
will play at the centenary celebration in
Kamloops in September. W. T. Gordon,
business manager for the band, was
down last week making arrangements.
Bo and Smith seem to be enjoying
their roundabout trip to the coast according to the post cards they are scattering among their friends about town.
J. Dayton Williams, of Kelowna, rep-
senting the Mason & Risch Piano Company, was in Chase this week. He reports business in the Okanagan better
this summer than ever before.
Ab Coy blew into town yesterday from
the coast. He is the same sporty boy
we used to know. He can only spare
one day for Chase thia time, going on
from here to Penticton. He has been
touring the stateB to the south in the
interests of Albert Coy.
The Prince of Wales.
With few exceptions, the newspapers
of the world announced that on his eighteenth birthday the Prince of Wales
attained his " majority." As a matter
of fact no subject comes of age until he
is twenty-one, and so long as the prince
remains a subject, though the first in the
empire, he is legally an infant, and that
for three years longer. Thus he cannot
take his seat in the House of Lords until
1915. Even then he will lack full liberty
to manage his own affairs, for not until
he has completed twenty-five years may
a king's son marry in opposition to his
father's wishes;. Indeed, people made
fun of the Royal Marriage Act at the
time it was passed on account of the
anomaly it set up, by which a prince
could undertake the government of England at eighteen, but was not held wise
enough to choose his own consort until
seven years later, to which some an
swered that it was much easier to rule
a kingdom than a wife. At any rate,
that is the law, since an English sovereign undoubtedly assumes the whole
authority of his office at eighteen.
$10 REWARD
LOST!
Hail's Finger Ring
With Initials W. M,
Please  return  to A. E.   Uhderwood,
Chase.
. Wm. Barkla, planer foreman, left on
the 18th. to take another position. His
place here was taken by Teddy Joliffe.
Provincial Government Engineer Forde
was in town on Friday and Saturday on
business connected with the grading of
streets.
Misses Sandahl and Nelson went down
to Kamloops on Tuesday and stayed
over to see the regatta on the following
day, returning on Wednesday evening.
Miss Hemstrige arrived from the east
on Tuesday and stayed at the hame of
R. P. Bradley until Thursday, when she
left with her brother, Billy Hemstrige,
to spend a few weeks with him at his
ranch in Sorrento.
Lovers of movies msy indulge to the
limit this week. Beside the regular
show tn the Chase Opera House on
Friday night there will be a show three
nights in the Black Douglas Opera House
put on by W. A. Smythe, of Revelstoke.
J. P. Shaw, M.P.P., received a wire
yesterday from Sir Richard McBride to
meet him in Kamloops to-day, when together they will make a trip up the
North Thompson, on the Distributor.
On Sunday more than one pleasure party got caught in the rain. Mr. and
Mrs. Rittman, Mrs. Brooks and Miss
Hazel, Mr. and Mrs. Delamater, and
Mr. Milton McGoldrick, looked at the
showers from the shelter of the Adams
Lake House. Those who stuck to Shuswap Lake fared better, for the rain
here did not last long. The Old Reliable
made a trip to Celista, carrying Mr. and
Mrs. Haylock, Miss Lauder and Mr. Keyt.
Murder At Asheroft.
What appears to have been a coldblooded murder was committed at Asheroft on Monday. In a C. N. R. camp
on the north side of the Thompson
river a foreman named Mulligan made
a brutal attack on a laborer whom, for
no apparent reason, he had dismissed
on the proceeding day. He terribly
slashed the face of the uufortunate
man, who died from loss of blood half
hour after.
The knife used by the foreman
weighed about ten poutds, the blade
being a foot and a half long. Had it
not struck the victim's jaw-bone the
head would have been severed from the
body.
The body was taken over to Asheroft
to await the coroner's inquest, and the
prisoner was placed in the local jail.
Houses for Port Aiberni.
While in Port Aiberni last week
Thomas Meredith, managing director of
the Canadian Pacific Lumber Company,
gave instructions for the immediate
commencement of work on the building
of twenty residences on property, in
the vicinity of the mill, recently acquired
from the Aiberni Land Company. The
plans are being prepared by Wm. E.
Ryder & Co., and the building will be
done by Wood & Story, who have already
completed half a dozen houses for the
company.
There is a man named Uncle Bob,
Who surely is on to his job;
He has got a homestead,
A stove Bnd a bed,
And now���well, now, like a sensible
man, he advertises for a wife in the
Chase Tribune.��� Jobiah Bug.b.
Any Rags?
Bring them in and get
ten cents a pound for
them. We want 'em, but
we'll never tell you what for.
They must be clean, though,
and cotton.
The Tribune
U-A-FOWLER.
x)\J\J Boat builder
Celista _C
W. F. Barnes
Contracter and Builder
Doors, nnd  Window Frames.
Screen Doors, nnd   Window
Screens, Doors nnd Windows
B o a t s~
Built to order
AlexR.McKay
Contractor and
Builder
E��uii!>i>e�� Furnished 'on  Appli-
en iui*.   All Work Guaran
*ecd Price. K'vht.
Notch Hill, Shuswap Lake
Harvey, ...Carter ��
PinKham
Barristebs,   Solicitors,  Etc.
Offices:   Imperial'Bank
Revelstoke, B. C.
The   Tribune:   subscribe  now
$1.50 per year.
Uf>e
SHUSWAP
HOTEL
18
Beautifully Situated
On the So. Thomp-
sonJRiver. An Ideal
Summer Resort.
Livery Stable in
Connection. Charles
Byers, ::   Proprietor.
SHUSWAP,
B.C.
KAMLOOPS
Undertahing Co.
61 VictorUStr.et
Funeral Directors, Undertakers and Embalmer*
Parlors   open   Day   and   Night
Telephone 117     Box 810
A.   McConnell
General Merchant
CHASE
British   Columbia
Hardware, Farm Implements, Building Material,
Garden Seeds, Paints and
Oils, Groceries, Hams
and Bacons, Clothing,
Gents furnishings, Hats
>
Mail Orders Promptly Filled
^.";__-j"_; - _
1
Lots! Lots! Lots!
Now is the Time to Buy at Right Prices
Terms:  1-3 Cash
Balance 6, 12, 18 Months
No Interest
Call for Further Particulars.
Specials at Shooting Gallery
See Them
INSURANCE AGENCY.
"Insurance, well done, as the greatest comfort of modern times, realize the full meaning of the word; the certat��ity of something hoped
for a danger half feared, averted a combination by which loses are
turned backward and dark clouds are maflfe to show their silver lin-
-��*;
ing.
OUR PHONOGRAPH  AGENCY
enables ua   to supply you   with   Phonogrsphr,
Beoords, Supplies nf all kinds.   Rer��ir work done
Here.
REALITY
N w is Ihe time to list your prnperly ���� I am
making ao exclusive lifting of Chsse. I buy and
sell for ynu. 8��ti*far?'i<��n grtmn'eed hIwhvm or
ivoney refunded Yes tven our H,.t lo Creams
���nd Cold Tea' Coffee ete. are garsntei d u. enjoy.
Louis A. Bean
CHASE,
tx
BRITISH  COLUMBIA en
THE CHAr-3 TREBDMt
R
Boot  and Shoe
epairing
First Class Work
Promptly and
Neatly  Done
J. Clegg
Chase, B. C.
I Want   Your Watch Repairing <
R.V. BOULTON
Certified Watch and Clock ',
Maker
THE DANGER
TRAIL
janes ouvcft cunvooo
CoerrU-l    IHO.   Or   Bob_ MvrlU
Company.
[COItTllfUBD.I
Henry
Herzog
MERCHANT
TAILOR
Chase,
B. C.
F. H. Sturgill
Adams
Lake
House
Fishing and  Hunting
10 m"es from Chase by Boat and
Stage.   At the Outlet of
Adams Lake.
G?o. Chase
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALER IN
Hay, Grain
Vegetables
Stock * *
Chase Ranch
Chase, B. C.
l_H
(' HAS K    HA'   A   Fl It ST
C 1. \ S S
LAUNDRY
All Our  Work1! Cuiiranteed  First
Class
H. O. POY, Proprietor
MDTOI BOAT
EXCURSIONS
JOHN: HALDANE
is prepared to take
parties to any point
on ShuBwap Lake.
A_C* impotent Hoat-
niau 1 Who Knows
the Lake   ....
Fou Saws���Young pigs pure bred
Berltshires H4 each. Grant &
Ballard
CHAPTER   XI.
  TB_ rionT.
^y^EYOND ibe door Howlan.
I O I beard Jean pause. Tbere fol
!_UR lowed a few moments' silence.
BB-B M though tbe otber were
listening for sound within. Tben there
came ��� fumbling it tbe bar and tbe
door swung Inward.
"Bob Jour, m'seur!" called Jean's
cbeerful voice aa be stepped Inside.
"Ia tt possible you are not up, witb all
this dog barking and"-
Hla eyes bad gone to tbe empty
bunk. Despite bis cbeerful greeting
Howland aaw tbat tbe Frenchman's
face was haggard and pale as be turned quickly toward bim. Be observed no
further tban that, but flung bis whole
weight on tbe unprepared Croisset, and
together they crushed to the floor.
Tbere waa scarce a struggle and Jean
lay still. He waa flat ou his back, his
anna pinioned to bis sides, snd bring*
lug himself satrlde tbe Frenchman's
body so tbst each knee Imprisoned an
arm Howland coolly began looping
tbe babeesb tbonp< tbat be had snatched from tbe table aa he Bprang to the
door. Beblnd Howland's back Jean's
. lega ahot suddenly upward. In a quick
choking clutch of steel-like muscle they
gripped about ills neck like powerful
arms, and ln another Instant he was
twisted backward with a force that
sent bim half nel'k broken to tbe opposite wall. He staggered to bis feet,
dazed for a moment, and Jean Croisset
stood ln tbe middle of the floor, bis
caribou skin coat thrown nfr. bis bands
clinched, bis eyes darkening with a
dangerous Ure ah quickly as it had
come tbe Ure died away, and as be advanced slowly his shoulders hunched
over, his white teeth gleaming in a
smile. Howland smiled back and ad-
tanced to meet bim. There was no
humor, no friendliness, ln the smiles.
Both had seen that flash of teeth and
deadly scintillation of eyes at other
times, and both knew what It meant
"I believe tbat I will kill you,
m'seur," said Jean softly. Tbere waa
no excitement, no tremble of passion,
111 hla voice. "I have been thinking
that I ought to kill you. I had almost
made up my mind to kill yon wben I
came back to this Malson de Mort
Rouge. It Is tbe Justice of God tbat 1
kill you!"
The two men circled like beasta ln a
pit Howland In the attitude of a boxer. Jean with hla shoulders bent, bis
arms slightly curved at his side, the
toes of bis moccaslned feet bearing his
weight Suddenly he launched btm
self at tbe other's throat.
In a flash Howland stepped a Ilttle
to one aide and shot out a crushing
blow tbat caught Jean on the side of
the head and sent him flat on his
back. Half stunned. Croisset came to
bis feet. It was tbe Brat time that he
had ever come Into contact with science. He was puszled. His bend
rang, and for a few moments he was
dizzy. He darted In again ln his old,
quick, catlike way and received a
blow tbat dazed him. This time be
kept his feet.
"I am sure now that I am going to
kill you. m'seur," he said as coolly as
before.
There was something terribly calm
and decisive In bis voice. He was not
excited. He wns not afraid. His fingers did not go near the weapons ln
his belt, and slowly tbe smile faded
from Howland's lips as Jean circled
about bim. He bad never fougbt a
man of this kind: never bed be looked
nn the appalling confidence thnt w:is
In Ills antagonist's eyes. From those
eyes rather tban from the man he
found himself alowly retrentlnji. They
follciwed him. never taking themselves
from bis face In them the lire re
turned and grew deeper. Tbe dull
rpd spntB began tn glow in Crolssct's
cheeks, nnd he laughed softly wben he
suddenly leaped In so that Howland
struck at hlm-and missed. He knew
what to expect now. And Howlnnd
knew what to expect.
It- was the science of one world pit
ted ngalnst that of onother-the science of civilization against that of the
wilderness Howland was trained in
tiis art For sport .lean hnd played
with wounded lynx His was the quickness nt sight, of Instinct���thp quick
ness of the great north loon tbat had
often played this same game with his
rifle Are. of the sledge dog whose rip
ping fangs carried death so quickly
that eyes conld not follow A third
and a fourth time he came within
distance, and Howland struck snd
missed
"1 am going to kill you," be said
again
- To tbis point Howland had remained
cool Self possession In his science be
unew to be half the battle But he
felt In bim now a slow, swelling anger.
The smiling flash In Jean's eyas began
to irritate him; tbe (earless, taunting
gleam of bis teeth, bis audacloua confidence put bim on edge. Twice again
be struck out swiftly, * but Jean bad
c..ifie SUi gone like a dart   Hlajlthe
body, rift j humus lighter than How
land's, seeuieu iu ot* that of a boy
dodging him in aoiue tantalizing apart
Tbe Frencbiuan iiinde no effort at attack Hla were the tactic* of tha wolf
at tbe beets ot ihe bull mooa*. of the
lynx hefure the prong* ot a * .marad
buck- tiring, worrying, cea-elaaa.
Rowland's  striking   uiuMclea
"Too are nilstakeu In some things,
m'seur." Croisset MM quietly. -Until
today I bare fougbt for you aud not
.galnat you. But now you have left
me but one choice. I will take you to
Meleese. and tbat ine-ua"*-
"Good!" cried Howland.
"La. la. m'aaur. uot so good aa you
think.   It means that aa surely aa tb*
to ache, and his breath waa growing  don earry  ua there you  will never
come back.   Hon Dim. your death la
shorter wilh the exertions which
ed to bave uo effect on Croisset t'or
a few momenta be took tbe aggrmaire.
rushing Jean lo tha stove, beblnd the
table, twice around tbe room, striving
vainly to drive him Into a corner, to
reach bim witb one of tbe sweeping
blows which Croisset evaded with the
lightning quickness of a bell diver.
When he stopped hla breath came In
wind broken gasps Jeun drew nearer,
smiling, ferociously cool.
"I am going to kill you. m'seur." he
repeated again
Howland dropiied bis anna, his Angers relaxed, aud be forced bla breath
between his lips as If be were on the
point of eibaustlon. There were still
a few tricks In his science, and theaa
he knew were about his last cards.
He backed Into a comer, and Jean
followed, his aires' flashing a eteely
light bis body growing more and
more tense.
"Now, m'seur, I am going to kill
you," be aald In the same low vole*.
*- am going to break your neck."
Howland backed against the will,
partly turned as If fearing tbe other's
attack and yet without strength to
repel IL There was a contemptuous
smile on Crolsset's lips as he poised
himself for an Instant. Then be leaped ln. and as bis fingers gripped It
the other's throat Howland- right
arm shot upward In a deadly abort
una punch tbat caught bla antagonist
���wv
BOWL-ND'S BIGHT -BH SHOT UPWARD Ol
A D-1DLY SHOBT ABU PUNCH
under tbe Jaw. Without a sound Jean
staggered back, tottered for a moment
on bis feet and fell to tbe floor. Fifty
seconds later he opened his eyea to
And his hands bound behind bis back
and Howland standing at hla feet.
"Mon Dleu. but that was a good
oner' be gasped after he bad taken a
long breath or two. "Will you teach
it to me, m'seur?"
"Get up!" commanded Howland. "I
have no time to waate jCrolsset." He
caught tbe Frenchman by the shoulders and helped him to a chair near
the table. Then he took possession
of the other's weapons, Including the
revolver wblch Jean had taken from
him, and began to dress. He spoke
no word until be was done.
"Do you understand wbat Is going to
bsppen, Croisset?" he cried then, hit
eyes blazing hotly "Do you understand thnt what you bave done will put
you behind prison bars for ten years or
more? Does It dawn on you thst I'm
going to take you back to tbe authorities and tbat as soon as we reach the
Wekusko I'll have twenty men bsck on
tbe trail of these friends of yours?"
A gray pallor spread Itself over Jean'e
thin face.
"Tbe great God. ra'ienr, you cannot
do that!"
"Cannot!" Howland's fingers dug
Into the edge of tbe table. "By tbis
great God of yours, Croisset but I will!
And why not? Is It because Meleese I)
smong this gang of cutthroats and
murderers? Plsb. my dear Jean, you
must be a fool. Tbey tried to kill me
on the trail, tried It again In the coyote,
and you came back here determined to
kill me You've beld the whlphand
from tbe first Now lfa mine. I swear
that If I take you hack to the Wekusko
we'll get you all."
"If. m'seur?"
"Yes. If."
"And that Mr"- Jean was straining against the table.
"It rests with you. Croisset I will
���mrgnln with you. Either I shall take
iou back to the Wekusko. band yon
iver to the authorities and send a force
ifter the others or you shall take me to
Meleese    Which shall It be?"
"And If I take you to Meleese,
���u'spnr?"
Howland straightened, bis voice trem-
Mlng a little with excitement
"If yon take me to Meleese snd swear
lo do as 1 say I shall bring no harm to
vou or your friends."
'And Meleese"- Jean's eyes darkened again "You will not barm her,
m'aeur?"
Harm ber!"   There was a laughing
tremor  fn   Howland's   voice,    "Good I
God, man, are you so blind that you j
can't see that I am doing this because
of ber?   1 tell you tbat 1 love her snd
thnt 1 am willing to die In fighting for
her     Until   now   I   haven't  had   the
chance.    You and your friends hsve
played a cowardly underhand game.
Croisset   You have taken me from behind at every move, and now It's up to
rou to square yourself a little    Un* j
lerstnnd?   You take me to Meleese or
certain!"
Howland turned brlakly to the stove.
"Hungry. Jean?" he aaked morecom-
panlonably. "Let's not quarrel, man.
You've had your fun, and now I'm going to bave mine. Have you had
breakfast T"
"I waa anticipating that pleasure
with you. m'aeur." replied Jean, with
grim humor.
"And then, after I had fed you. you
were going to kill me. my dear Jean."
laughed Howland, flopping a huge caribou stesk on tbe naked top of the abeet
Iron stove. "Real nice fellow yon are,
eh?"
, "You ought to be killed, m'aeur."
"Bo you're aald before. When I aee
Meleese I'm going to know tbe reason
why or"-
"Or what, m'seurr
"Kill yon, Jean. I've just about made
up my mind tbat yon ought to be killed. If any one die* np where we're going, Croisset It will be yon first of all."
Jean remained alieot A few minute*
later Howland brought tbe caribou
Sfeak, ��� dish of flour cakea and a big
pot of coffee to tbe table. Then he
went behind Jean and untied hla hands.
Wheo he sat down at his own aide of
the table he cocked bla revolver and
p&eed it beside bla tin plate. Jean
grimaced and shrugged his shoulders.
"It means business," said hla captor
wai ningly. "If at any time I think you
deserve It I shall ahoot you ln your
tracks, Croisset ��o don't arouse my
suspicions."
"1 took your word of honor," aald
Jean sarcastically.
"And 1 will take yours to an extent,"
replied Howland, pouring the coffee.
Suddenly he picked up the revolver.
"You never saw me ahoot, did you?
Bee lhat cup over there?" He pointed
to a small tin pack cup banging to a
Dull on the wall u dozen paces from
them Three times without missing be
drove bullets through It and smiled
across at Croisset
"I am going to give you tbe use of
yonr arms and legs except at night,"
be said.
"Mon Dleu, it Is safe!" grunted Jean.
"I give you my word tbat 1 will be
good, m'seur."
Tbe sun waa up wben Croisset led
tbe way outside. His dogs aud sledge
were a hundred ysrds from the building, and Howland's first move waa to
take possession of tbe Freuchman'8 rifle and eject the cartridges while Jean
tossed chunks of caribou flesh to the
buskles. When they were ready to
start Jean turned slowly snd half
reached^out a mlttened hand to the engineer.
"lister," he said softly, "I cannot
help Uklng you, tbougb I know that
I should have killed you long ago. I
tell you again that If you go Into tbe
north tbere Is only one chance Id a
hundred that you will come back alive.
Great God, m'seur. up wbere you wish
to go the very trees will tall on you
Midsummer
Hardware
AT
"TOD S_V_H SAW Ml SHOOT. DIB TOO?"
and the carrion ravens pick out your
eyes! And tbat chance-that one
chance ln a hundred, m'seur"-
I will take," Interrupted Howland
decisively.
"I was going to say, m'aeur," finished
Jeun quietly, "that unleaa accident haa
befallen those wbo left Wekusko yesterday thtt one chance It gone. If you
go south you are safe. It you go Into
the north you nre no better than a
dead man."
"There will at leaat be a little fun
ct tbe finish," laughed tbe youug en*
glueer.   "Come, Jean, bit up the dogs!"
Mod Dleu, I soy you are a fool���and
a brave man," said Croisset and bla
whip twisted sinuously ln midair and
cracked ln sharp command over tbe
yullow backs of tbe buskles.
[TO H -oarrnrD���D.]
Try n Tribune want ad.   They'
great.
Old Papers
l<'or covering shelves and under-
laying carpets.
Chase Tribune
Bradley's
Haying Tools
Hammocks
Picnic Baskets
Garden Hose
A Big Shipment of
Granite Ware Just
Opened.
Chase, B. C.
They're
Coming to Chase
CHASE
OPERA HOUSE
FRIDAY NIGHT
July 26th.
Big High Class Program
of
Motion
Pictures
An Up-to-date Selection of
the Best Photo Plays from
our   Kamloops   Theatres
comprising
Dramas, Scenic,  Educational,
Western Comedy Dramas,
and Comedys.
DOORS OPEN 7.30,
COMMENCE 8 O'CLOCK SHARP.
ADMISSION:
Children 15c. Adults 25c.
DANCE
After the Show.
FOUR PIECE   ORCHESTRA
Tickets 75c.
H. Percy Weaver
Carpenter and Builder
Electrio Wiring
Photo Developing and
u. :: finishing ll ::
Pictures Taken to Order
Work   Guaranteed
You can get
The Chase Tribune
for $1.50 per year
now if you hurry.
The Regular Price
is $2.00.
GET  IT   NOW. " THE CHASE  TRi:.i X_
SEVEN
w >
wm
SCENE ON TNE SOUTH THOMPSON RIVER
BETWEEN CHASE AND SHUSWAP.
-���1 1
LL
.  .'If., '';vi
- ���������^
11
if i
r- ^ f
��       J*Z��^JSmJ&tfkLM
'     _��       '__
HOME FROM A DEER HUNT IN THE ADAMS
LAKE COUNTRY.
Some Facts
Chase
It is located on the main
line of the Canadian Pacific
Railroad at the foot of the
Shuswap Lake at its outlet into
the South Thompson River.
It is the outfitting point for
the Adams Lake and Turn Turn
Lake country where Caribou
and Bear are to be found in
abundance.
It is situated in the heart of
one of the best agricultural
districts in British Columbia, yet
undeveloped.
It affords greater opportunities
for the fisherman and hunter
than any point along the line of
the C.P.R.
The bathing beaches here
are admittedly the best to be
found in the interior. The water
is warm and clear; the bottom
is sandy with a gentle slope
to deep water.
Two of the most beautiful
waterfalls in the west may be
reached in ten minutes walk
from the Chase station. There
are many more waterfalls along
the streams flowing into the
Adams and Shuswap Lakes.
The Adams River Lumber
Company, located at Chase, employs upwards of 500 men in
the mill and in the woods. A
second large mill is soon to be
erected which will likely more
than double the present pav roll.
For further information, wrUe to ihe Secretary of
the Chase Central Board of Trade, Chase, B. C "SHT
THE CHASE TRIBUNE
Seymour Arm
Mr. D. B. Cameron, the obliging
olerk ol the Weiit Logging Co.,intend)
���lipping down to Vanoouver lor a few
daya ihortly. We wondered why tbat
little buugalow waa being built.
We hate recently received word tbat
Mr. 8. W. Sawyer and party, ol Chaae,
who visited our induatrioui oen t re tome
weeki ago in their gaioline launob, bad
arrived home safely.!
Hr, R. A- Emmons, of the Riverside
inrieriM, Grand Fork*, Hr. P. E.
Trenoh, Government Horticulturist.
and Mr. R. Trinder, Provt. Timber
Inspector, ell paid business viaita to
the Arm recently.
The steamer "Anavana,'" Oapt. Free-
man'a lateit addition to the local
Seel, ii keeping ita genial purser, Hr.
G. Alfreds-Crerar busy handling the
tourist traffic. We hope this steamer
will ihortly make Obase a port of call
aa well as Salmon Arm and Sicamous.
Hr. and Mrs. F. G. Bergen, late of
Bellingbam, Wash., are spending tbe
summer nn a houseboat on the lakes.
As tbe weather at present is ideal, we
hope they will enjoy their summer's
outing snd bave nothing but kind
words for this district, when tbey return to their Washington home.
Hr, Wm, McKenzie, tbe well known
lu:*iberinan,interviewed byyouroorrea
pondent recently stated that in an experience of over 40 years, he bad never
aten such severe beat and bad forest
fires so early in the season. Tbe recent
rains, however, have proved of inestimable value and there is now no
dsnger to the forests from busb fires.
Mr, McKenzie intends shortly re-visiting his old home in the east, prior to
making a tour of the world.
Another distinguished visitor is
Count Bragato, ot Trieste, Austria,
who.witb the Countess and the Infanta
Miriam Bragato has spent some weeks
here. Count Bragato, who is a distinguished nomologist and bacterio
loglst, is making a study of fruit
lands and fruit culture in B. 0., and it
is understood that tbe results of his
investigations will be communicated
to the Australian Government,
Mr. V. N. Daniels, J.P., the oldest
settler here, is busy with bis hay crop,
which far eioeeds his expectations.
The potato crop will be a heavy one
end the fruit trees are in excellent
shape.
Hr. Jaa. J. Argyle, late consulting
engineer of tbe British Government at
the famous Assouan dam in tbe Soudan, ii spending the summer on Shu
iwap Lake recuperating his health
He states that the Shuswap 1-akes district is one of the prettiest spots he
haa seen in Canada, and gives it as his
opinion tbat the water powers of
Canada are one of ita strongest assets.
Hine Host Hog ridge, ot tbe Seymour
Hotel finds bis hostelry taxed to its
utmost capacity to provide accommodation for tbe numerous tourists who
are arriving on the different steamers.
Among recent arrivala we note Hr.
and Hrs. Harlow, of Salmon Arm, and
party.
Seymour Arm has recently been
favoured witb a visit from Hr, 0. H.
Tretheway, D.S.O., wbo bu been connected with the Civil Service in India,
for over 30 years. Hr. Tretheway,who
is a magasine writer of aome note, is
touring Canada in tbe interests of the
Overseas Club, and a series of articles
from his able pen will shortly appear
in the Standard of Empire,
One of our hardy annuals has
turned up agaiu in the person ol Mr.
H. V. Harris, of Shuswsp, B. C, a
very nice young man, wbo represents
W. J. Bowser and law and order at
Shuswap, Mr. Harris spent sometime
witb the employees of the FruitlandB
Co,, and is now being entertained by
the Weist Logging Co. From out own
observations we can truthfully state
tbat he has met with better success
in hia collecting tour than anybody
else who has been here this summer.
The poll tax is evidently a prolific
source of revenue to the Government.
We hope tbat when next there is a
bop across the bay, it will not be necessary to requisition all the available
craft (hereinbefore mentioned) as we
will bave a government road over that
way. This, of course, could hardly
be until after Mr. Harris turns in his
receipts,
Hr. C. R. McPherson, one of our
well-known residents, waa obliged to
seek medical advice laat week. Accompanied by Mrs. McPherson he went
down to Salmon Arm, returning Saturday, and we are glad to aay he is
feeling muob better.
Mr. and Mra. G. F. Hulbert entertained a large number of friends at a
very enjoyable dance in tbeir new home
across tbe bay last week. All the
available motor boats and crafta of all
kinds on this end of the lake were requisitioned to ferry the guests aorosB.
Dancing waa kept up until the early
hours, when all set sail for home after
a thoroughly enjoyable evening, Hr.
Hulbert has a very nice location and
we are glad to know tbat he will be a
permanent resident here.
The enterprising secretary ol the
Revelstoke Heat Market, Hr. W. H.
Horrobin, paid a visit lo our sequester
ed vale tbe other day. He wai aooom
panied by Mr. 1. D. Sibbald, Jr. secretary of tbe Revelstoke General Agencies Ltd., another of Revelstoke'e rising young business men, Revelstoke,
aa we understand it, is one of the heal
towns in tbe Interior, but our credulity waa all exhausted and our imagination largely drawn on before we
discovered tbat Mr. Horrobin was secretary of tbe Progress Club of that city
We hope be gets a salary-he's worth it.
Both gentlemen expressed themselves
as highly pleased with Seymour Arm
and hope to return again this summer.
Notch Hill.
Mr. J. Ashdown has moved here from
Sicamous,
Mr. J. Switcher was a visitor to Notch
Hill this week.
Mrs. Johnson and daughter, Ida, paid
a visit to Mrs. P. Lundin in Armstrong
last week.
Mr. Chas. Beemer has received a car
of lumber for his lumber yard.
There was another survey party here
surveying for the new C. P. R. railway
which will be built around the lake.
Mr. White, government road inspector made a call here in his auto inspecting the government roads.
An Overseas Club is being formed in
Armstrong,
ITS UP TO YOU
To  Get   the  Best   Value  for Your Money
Visit    Our    Store    and    Get    Our    Prices
JUST ARRIVED THIS WEEK
One Ton of Choice Tea direct from
Ceylon  packed   expressly  for  us.
EVERVTHING   UP-TO-DATE   IN
MEAT   MARKET
OUR
Choicest Cuts of Beef, Pork, Veal and Mutton
at Keenest Prices
Try our Home-made Pork, Beef and Balogna
Sausages There's  Nothing  Better
We  Specialize
STEWART'S
HAMS AND
BACON
ri^>��2*_?��*p"*_>P5**^
GRANT & BALLARD
Grocers and Butchers
Chase, B. C.
Are You Getting Your
Share of these Bargains?
8 DAYS MORE ft
Prices on the Summer Merchandise Simmered Down to
Startling Values. People from out of Town should avail
themselves of the Splendid Bargains this Sale affords.
Specials for Last
Week of Sale *
Ladies Sweater Coats
$1.90
In  grey, h!ue nnd red.
Regular $3 00 values for
Ladies Suits
Three only
$10.00
BandCNavy Melton Skills
for Women.
Sizes 24 to 26.
Regular $2 50 to $30(1 values for
$2.00
Prints
Four pieces Dark Prints
to go out at per yard
10c
Dress Lengths
Seven yards. One piece Evening Dress Goods.
dolor���Heliotrope. Regular $1.10 per yard. OA.
Sale prioe per yard OWC
One piece of Dark Orey Dress Goods. (\f\n
Six yards.   Regular 85o.   Sale prioe DOC
One piece Olive Green Serge. Seven yards. OC^��
Regular prioe $1.26.   Sale price OOC
Childrens and Misses
Sweaters�� Sweater Coats
To move ou' at U���If -%�����.��._
Red, Grey, Blue and Green        Oail-prlCe
Corsets
Eight pairs at
75c
Print Dresses
for Children
Sizes 1 to 3
Sizes . to 6.
Sizes 10,12 and 14.
Prioe 50c
Prioe        75c
Price        90c
Print Dresses I Ladies
Only Four left,
lo go at
$1.25
Ladies Waists
Regular up to $2.25.
To go at
95c
Ladies Shoes
Ladies black and tan Oxfords. All sizes.
Regular $3.00, $3.25 and
$4.50 values for
$2.25
Ladles Mack Dongola and Velnnr calf
Bluchers, in high cuts. All sizes.
Regular $3.25, $3 50 t����V f ��
vaiue for ��P��fi*. ��������� J
Pumps
Fifteen pairs Ladies black
Kid   Pumps.     All   sizes.
Regular $225 for
$1.50
Ladies Shoes
Twenty-five pairs of potent Oxforda
and   high   outs. Worth   regularly
$4.00 and $5.00. dJO Q/\
To go out at ��p_a.��/U
Childrens blaok and
tan Oxfords
25% off
Mens and Boys Suits
All Suits  in   Stock for Men and Boys to go at a   Reduction    of    25%)
Shoes for Men
Patent Oxfords,
Regular 6.00 for
Patent Oxfords.
Regular $5.00 for
Tan Calf Oxfords.
Regular $5 50 for
Calf Boots
Regular $3 75 for
$3.80
$3.35
$3.65
$3.00
Shirts
50c
Three dozen Men's Working Shirts,
* Regular 75o and* $1.00 for
Three dozen Mens Fine Shirts with soft    (t Of
collar.   Worth $2.00 and $2.50.   To go at ��pl.O J
Hats
Three dozen Men's Han, worth $2.50      ��Q (\(\
to $3 50    Sale Price y&,\J\)
Special
Fourteen Pair. Mens Patenr, and C'lf Shoes in both huttm and lace.
All sizes.   Regular $6 00 to $6.50 for
$3.85
We prepay   the   transportation charge, on all goods ordered by mail.
H"ibr any reason the goods are unsatisfactory return them to us at our expense.
Chase, B. C.
A. S. FARRIS
Chase, B. C
t ���w"
SoatcUnf, _r D   ,.
THE CHASE TRIBUNE
|     KEEP   SWEET   AND   KEEP   M 0 V I N~
IT TELLS
THEY'RE   COMING   TO   CHASE     |
Vol. 1. JSTo. 15.
Chase, B. C, Fridav. August 2. 1012
��S.OO Per Year
IS
A GREAT ONE
A Hundred Tons More Hay Than Last
Year on Chase Ranch���also
Good Crop on Carlin and
Coburn Ranches.
Jas. W. Robertson used a few years
ago to figure in the public eye as Dominion Dairy Commissioner. In that
position he won for himself a reputation
as a speaker and philosopher no leu
than as an authority on butter and
cheese. He will be in the limelight
Again in a couple of months, for he is
������> ' chairman of a Royal Commission on
technical education that will report
when Parliament meets.
He is mentioned here because of something he once said at a meeting where
he was talking about the Canadian
prairies. He said that people of Anglo-
Saxon descent would never make a permanent home in any country that did
not produce apples and clover.   The'
jpHy* facts prove him to have been mistaken.
The truth at the bottom of his statement is this, that a country well fitted
\ to produce apples and clover is the best
_' kind of a country to make a home in.
If Jas. W. Robertson came to Chase
A just now he would want to hang up his
hat and stay, for the smell of clover is
in the air and the apples are getting
-J a little bigger every day.
The haym.iking bas been kept back
for a couple of weeks by wet weather,
but more than half of it is now cut and
* a few fine days will see it all ready for
stacking.   The crop this year is better
tl than last.    On the Chase ranch the
amount cut last year was 700 tons; this
Ft year there will be 100 tons more than
II that.   Similar conditions hold for the
yM^ \      Cf rlin and Cobu*".'*' ratlcHeft   The whole
Shuswap flat will produce close to 2000
tons.
Our cut this week shows a photograph
of the bottom lands along the Thompson river between Chase and Shuswap.
There are none better out of doors. The
Chase ranch appears in the foreground
and farther back the Carlin ranch, which
is under the management of J. P. Shaw,
M.P.P. On this ranch one large storage
barn was built last year and another is
now being got ready for this season's
crop.
George Chase has the Chase estate
leased from the heirs, and jnst now has
a large force of men at work on the big
meadow. Mowers, tedders, rakes, and
stacking outfit may be seen at work all
at the same time.
On the Coburn ranch at Shuswap a
large barn is in the course of erection
��� " ��� and will be used this summer. The
barns are a great aid in saving the crop
in good condition in a wet season like
the present one.
Where Grass Grows Waist High.
I'll'.,1,'lWj.i
BY
Westminster Man Plans to Pathfind
Canadian Highway from Halifax
to Vancouver.
New Westminster, B. C, July 31.���
An attempt to traverse Canada from
Halifax to Vancouver is to be made this
fall by Mr. Herbert Gilley, of New
Westminster, who is making this trip
in the interest of the Canadian Highway
Association, flying the pennant of that
organization on his Canadian-built
machine.
It is Mr. Gilley's intention to make
Halifax his starting point, although he
is a resident of the Pacific Coast. He
is now on his way to his old home in
Charlotte County, New Brunswick,
where he will complete his preparations.
In so far as possible, it is his intention
to follow the outlined route of the Canadian Highway for the entire distance.
No man, perhaps, is better acquainted
with the roads in the different parts of
Canada than Mr. Gilley, for in addition
to the many years spent in lumbering
enterprises in British Columbia he has a
���**0t4*ts   ��,
'__3Sr**4*'
fi-tft*-*-   , :*y
MRS. '
A View of the Chase Ranch.
ENIII ON f El
EXPANSION AND DEVELOPMENT
E
The Popular Musical Organization
Under the Leadersnlp of Bandmaster Jimmy Allan has
Become Credit to Town.
Larger Population, Expanding Trade, and the
Exploitation of Mineral Resources
Are Part of the Program.
The next five years will be an era of
expansion and development in the Shuswap Valley. It needs neither a prophet
nor the son of a prophet to foretell it.
Right now signs are pointing that way.
There are movemonts on foot that are
big with promise.
They promise population. In five
years there will be five hundred people
where there are one hundred to-day.
Conditions that have greatly retarded
and almost halted the settlement of
land will soon be removed. Even under
present unfavorable conditions a steady
stream of eager home-seekers is flowing
in to settle as Bquatters upon homesteads for which at present they can get
no entry.
Hand in hand with the taking up of
the Dominion lands by homesteaders
will go another form of  settlement.
Capitalists have seen visions of big dividends to be reaped from the sale of
ready-cleared ten acre farms. Such
projects require strong financial backing,
for the initial expenditure is heavy.
But large investments of this kind have
already been made. At Sorrento, Seymour Arm and Malakwa three strong
companies have been operating for some
time and now have land upon the market.
Further, there is promise of mineral
development. The late Dr. Dawson, a
geologist of international reputation,
and head of the Dominion Geological
survey, when years ago he was surveying the Shuswap district remarked to
his party, "If I were a young man again
and free to go prospecting, I would come
to the country north of Shuswap Lake.'
The great geologist was no novice; he
knew what he was talking about. When
he talked about minerals he spoke with
the authority of a long life spent in
their study and of an experience that
covered Canada from the Atlantic to the
Pacific.
The confidence of Dr. Dawson in the
mineral wealth of the Shuswap district
is about to be justified. Thirty years
ago a considerable placer mining camp
was located at the mouth of Scotch
Creek. When the gravel beds were exhausted the camp disappeared. Since
then occasional efforts have been made
to locate the ledge from which the gold
had come. Within the next few mouths
things are scheduled to happen thatwill
bring swarms of prospectors into this
whole region and the properties on
which work is now about to begin will
prove to be but the forerunners of many
others just as rich.
With increase of population and the
growth of mining activity will come an
expansion of trade. Every industrious
settler means at least five hundred dol
lars added to the volume of thecountry's
business. Industries will spring up.
More boats will ply up and down the lake.
Lime from Marble Mountain at the narrows will be needed for building and by
the farmers for use on their land. Copper and zinc will be shipped from Seymour Arm. The water powers of Scotch
Creek, Ross Creek and Celista Creek
may provide the juice to run cars on an
electric railway along the north shore of
the lake. Everywhere man's industry
will win new victories, and new territory
will be subdued to human uses.
Those who have watched with intelligence the building up of the west know
that these things are no dream, Three
things only are required to accomplish
the result, resources, capital, and an
industrious population. The resources
have been on the ground for a thousand
years; capital is alreadycoming and will
continue to come in increasing volume ;
the population will come as the opportunities are made known to those who are
looking for just such a place as the Shuswap Valley in which to pitch their tent.
wide knowledge of road conditions in the
eastern provinces, where he spent the
best part of his life. He believes that
the most difficult trip for an automobile
in all British Columbia is over the Hope
Mountains, a journey which has never
been attempted. A road is being built
over this section at the present time;
and it is possible that a temporary way
may be made for an automobile, but it
is a foregone conclusion that by the time
any machine has travelled over the
Hope Mountains it will be fit only for
the scrap heap or for exhibition purposes.
Should this cross-Canada tour be successfully negotiated, it will reflect considerable credit on the path-finders, for
neither Mr. Gilley nor his brother, G.
Emerson Gilley, are practical motor
mechanicians, and the only knowledge
they have of the interior economy of an
automobile is that gained through the
use of machines for the past few years.
Valuable data is to be collected during
this trip and later embodied in the
archives of the Canadian Highway Association, which is to be the custodian of
the log of this cross-Canada tour.
A Cemetery Secured.
The'citizens of Chase will be glad to
learn that the heirs of the Chase estate
have consented to have the land adjoining their private burying grounds used
as a public cemetery.
R. P. Bradley acting for the Board of
Trade, has received a letter to this effect from J. Howard Smith, manager
of the estate.
The site is an ideal one, being situated
just about the right distance from town,
and close beside the main highway.
The ground will be fenced and surveyed
into lots which may be purchased from
the estate by those wishing to obtain
them.
A Good Show.
Lakeman's pictures on Friday night
were the best he has given us yet. He
will be in the Chase Opera House again
tonight with seven reels that he says
are better still.
After August he will move to the
Black Douglas Opera House.
The Old Reliable Again.
On Wednesday, the 24th inst., Commodore Haldane set out with his family
and Mrs, Ross, of Shuswap, for a
coasting trip about the lakes.
On Wednesday they camped at the
narrows, and the next day went to
Kault. Salmon Arm was their next
port of call where they ran into a severe hail storm.
In spite of some unsteady weather,
the voyage was a pleasant one. The
Old Reliable made the home port again
on Sunday afternoon.
An Enjoyable Day.
R. P. Bradley's launch made two
tripB to Sorrento on Sunday. In the
morning he took up Mr. and Mrs.
Mowat, who are here from Kamloops
camping by the lake. In the afternoon
he went up to Wm. Hemstridge's with
a party that included Mrs. Bradley,
Miss Mertina Bradley, Mr. and Mrs.
Kyle and Mr. and Mrs. Billy Bradley.
They returned the same evening.
Inspect Work on C. N. R.
Sir Richard McBride and party arrived at Kamloops from the coast on
Tuesday night and slept on board the
Distributor which left at an early hour
next morning for Camp 71 mile, North
Thompson. The party consists of Sir
Richard McBride, Hon. D. M. Eberts,
speaker, Hon. Thos. Taylor, Minister
of public works, W. Manson, M.P.P.,
R. F. Green, M.P.P., F. C. Gamble,
engineer railway department, J.P.Shaw
M.P.P., Hon. A. E. McPhillips, Col]
Hon. Sam Hughes, minister of militia,
Mayor Robinson, T. G. Holt and T. W.
White, of the C. N. R., John Twohy and
Robert Twohy. They will look over the
railroad work under construction on the
Twohy contract and the 60 miles of
wagon road being built by the same
firm. The trip will partake largely of
the nature of a pleasure jaunt.
There are plenty of bigger towns than
Chase, and there are lots of those towns
that can't boast of as good a band.
Chase thinks it has reason to feel a
trifle chesty over the kind of progress
its band has made. When they advertise a concert we'know they are able to
deliver the goods, so we all go.
It is about a year and a half since a
bunch of the boys got together in the
cottage back of Barry's hsll and decided that Chase should have a band.
The charter members themselves paid
half of the $260 that bought the instruments, and the other half waa raised
by public subscription. Contrary to the
prophecies of the doubters, they have
made it stick.
The late lamented "Dad" was engaged as instructor and for several
weeks admiring groups of small boys
gathered around the hall, from whoae
open doors floated endless repetitions
of "The Tale of the Kangaroo."
Dad was a good teacher and was
worth much to the band in its kindergarten stage, but they couldn't stand
the price. After six weeks he surrendered the baton to Jimmy Allan. Later
on Charlie Melvin took charge for about
three months until his sudden retirement, wben Jimmy had again to step.
into the. gap. If he holds the job until
someone underbids him he is fixed for
life, for he does it for nothing.
The course of things has not alwaya
run smooth. A band is about h�� dlffl-
ciUt tJ miliage aa a church choir. .But
from all its trouble!!''.: lias come, out'
better than ever, and for the last six
months the ones who cared most for
the success of the enterprise have been
seeing the fruit of their patience and
perseverance*
The boys have always been ready to
spend two evenings a week practising.
The managers have nailed every man
who came to town who showed signs
of musical ability. In the changing population of a mill town many members
have gone and their places have been
taken by others. There are now only
six left of the original membership.
These are James Allan, W. T. Gordon,
Egnar Sandahl, Louis Cumming, John
Westburg and Percy Weaver. Men
may come and men may go but the
Chase Band will go on as long as they
can put up the kind of music they have
been giving us lately at their Sunday
concerts.
Perils of the Sea.
On Wednesday while Mr. Sawyer
and Chief McLaughlin were coming
down the lake in the "Tillicum" they
sighted a strange looking craft on their
starboard bow. They immediately shifted
their course and bore down on her to
investigate.
She was about eight feet long and
four feet in the beam, and carried a
crew of three able-bodied seamen. She
had been built and launched at the
warehouse on the north side of the lake
from which port she had made her laat
clearance, She was bound for Chase,
and due to arrive about Christmas.
The ship was constructed of some
pieces of driftwood with a few strips of
board placed crosswise on them. The
captain reported fine weather and a
Bmooth sea from the date of sailing.
The log showed a distance run of a mile
and a half.
The captain of the "Tillicum" tactfully suggested to the captain of the
" Dreadnpught" that the former had
the faster boat and the latter might
save a few days by abandoning his ship
and coming aboard. The captain of the
" Dreaduought" replied that time was
no object to him and his men, for they
had no job.
Chief McLaughlin then drew vivid and
forcible word pictures of what might
happen to a dreadnought if a storm
arose. The daring mariners at last
consented to heave to and allow themselves to be rescued.
Among the fishing parties that went
out on Sunday were Messrs. Zilka and
Seagraves to the Dam Camp and W. F.
Barnes in the Topsy to the Little River.
The painting of R. P. Bradley's store
front is completed. It is now one of
the most attractive looking business
houses on the street.
__.
_a_H_M_B
\
-I	 TWO
THMHASE  TRIBUNE
DIFFERENCE
Between the eastern and western development is not
t
hard to understand.   The east was developed slowly
by money made on the spot.
The marvellous growth of the west has been due to
~<S*J-~,.,      \
the constant flow of outside capital.
riji W -I ->.'i   J       |1       V   ���    ') S        ,'   ' M     *   <���   |        .        J
The reason for the difference is easy to find.   In
those early days there was no advertising  in the
modern sense of the term.   Millions have come to
British Columbia for investment because the country
has been advertised.
The  wonderful  growth  of  advertising  is  one of
the phenomena
OF MODERN TIMES J
J .
THE  CHASE THinONE
Gfce Black
Douglas
Opera
House
R. B. ��OBINSON, Propriator <* Muuit
t�� Bail Appoint.. Public H.ll la Tows
After Work Drop In and
Enjoy a Gam* of
P O O L
BILLIARDS
Full Stock Cigar*
and Tobaccos. A
First Class Barber
Shop in Connection
Ideal
POOL
ROOM
: GEO. L. GOLLEN ���
���     1     e
��� Boats of Bvehy Desckiption e
�� Motor Boats n Specialty         *
���   e
Boat Builder
PROVINCIAL
Fort George now has a station of the
provincial weather bureau.
American capital will erecta $100,000
store and apartment building in Victoria.
Many settlers are coming into the
country around Athelmer.
Construction work on the C .N. R. line
is proceeding rapidly.
Princeton has a band that gives a concert on the street every Wednesday
evening.
Four boats now make regular trips between Golden and Athelmer on the Columbia river.
A branch of the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway will be built from Duncans
to Cowichan.
Railway Construction on the G. T. P.
haa begun within the city limits at Fort
George.
A Big stampede to the Summit camp
in the Hope mountains west of Tula-
meen is predicted by old timers.
The C. P. R. has appropriated $180,-
000 for a ten stall roundhouse at Grand
Forks.
The S. S. Marama, recently arrived
in Vancouver from New Zealand, brought
"' 'boxes of butter.
BARRY k CUMMOG
REAL ESTATE
INSURANCE
Notaey Public Chase, B. C.
������+���������������-���
I. W. Clifford
General j&
Blacksmith
Horseshoeing a Specialty
R. J. MINER
* Painter % *
to to.
% Decorator %
Fall Line Sherwin-Williams
Paints, Latest Designs
in Wall Paper
I
Electrical and Motor Boat
Supplies
Chase
Restaurant
and Bakery
Board and Rooms, Bath
Good Table, Reasonable
Rates, Meals at All Hours
YEP NUM A CO., -  -  PROPS.
Try the
Chase Tribune
for Job Printing
Good Workmanship.
Reasonable Prices.
15^bc
Qn Wednesday last the eleventh car
of rhubarb for this season was shipped
from Hatzic in the Frazer valley to
eastern points.
The farmers, mining Bnd business men
of the Tobacco Valley in the South Kootenay district are forming the Tobacco
Valley Development Association.
Half a million of British capital will
be used in erecting a big saw mill at
Cowichan to cut lumber from 11,000
acres of heavily timbered land.
Last week ground was broken for a
$50,000 government building at Victoria,
which will be the home of the forestry
and hydrographic departments of the
provincial service.
The printing plant of the Moyie Leader
is to be removed to Athelmer, Chas.
,'Johnson has purchased the outfit and
will shortly issue the Columbia River
Herald.
A Williams, janitor of the courthouse
at RosBland is growing a banana tree
which is just breaking into flower. He
also has a lemon tree with a lemon on It
as big as an orange, besides two orange
trees, a fig tree and many other plants
rare in this section.
The Canadian Pacific Lumber Company .of Port Aiberni is filling an order
for twenty cars of heavy bridge timber
for the C. P. R. to be used in bridge
building in the Rocky Mountains and as
far east as Manitoba. The cars will be
shipped by car ferry from Nanaimo to
Vancouver.
The C. P. R. will inaugurate a car ferry service on barges between Kalso and
Nelson on Kootenay lake, so that ore
from mines in the Slocan and Kalso districts can be shipped to the smelter at
Trail without breaking bulk.' The reduction thus made in the cost of transportation will place on the producing
list many-mines that have been idle.
With big buildings, whose totai cost
aggreates $4,770,000 all under construction at the present time, not to mention
the hundreds of smaller buildings and
dwelling houses being erected at the
cost of additional thousands of dollars,
Vancouver heads the list in the story of
the development of the west. It is a
story of magnificent buildings and won-
detful developments, and it is a story
told in figures.
One IB-story building to cost $600,000,
three of ten storeys to cost $1,700,000;
one nine storey building to cost $100,000;
two eight-storey buildings .to .cost $30,-
000 each; three four-story buildings to
cost $160,000; two apartment blocks to
cost $350,000. a new Vancouver club to
cost $230,000; a womans club to cost
$150,000; Y. M. C. A. to cost $350,000;
Home for the B. C. Bible society to cost
$225,000; new school to cost $160,000;
a police station to cost $175,000; a new
hotel to cost $100,000; a Methodist
church to cost $50,000; and a big viaduct
to cost $150,000.
Whatever may have been the justification for the sweeping .-action of the
government three years ago in placing
a general reserve on the lands in the
railway belt, there is no question but
that it has worked a great hardship in
places, by retarding, and in fact by preventing entirely, agricultural development. The possibility of relief in the
very near future as a result of the efforts of Hon. Thomas Taylor, provincial
minister of public works,' and Mr. R. F.
Green, member for Kootenay, will be
welcomed. The manner in which the
matter has been taken up also serves to
show that the new government, but
particularly the minister of the interior,
appear at least willing to investigate
the claims of British Columbia and to
deal with these on their merits: Nelson
Duly News.
PEBBLES
What It Sounds Lite.
A Dakota court ia struggling with a
prisoner named Siciyz. We don, t know
what he ia charged with; but, from hia
name, we suspect that it ia soda-water.
Ottawa Citiaen: A woman in Wetland
haa had five children in ten mouths. As
there are three of a kind and a pair, it
la a full house.
Power.
Chairman H. S. New, of the sub-committee on arrangements, aaid at a dinner at the Auditorium, in Chicago apropos of a State that had evinced great
faith, reminds me of a little boy whose
father showed him, through a fragment
of smoked glass, an eclipse of the' sun.
When the eclipse was over, the youngster said eagerly : " Do it aden, daddy I
Do it aden I"
Then and Now.
The young wife had given her husband
a dance. "You're improved wonderfully, Jack," she said, as they sat down.
" Don't you remember how you used
to tear my dress ? "
"Yes, he replied, I wasn't buyiug
them then."
Second Nature.
Many things in this world seem very
strange to us until we know why they
are done.
'Why do you look under the bed at
ni ght ? " as ked a woman who was visiti ng
a friend.
"You'd never guess," was the reply,
'but since my husband hast taken to
motoring, I often find that he has
crawled underneath."
What General Grant Wore.
A little girl was reading a composition
of her own on "Grant's Work in the
Civil War." She got on swimmingly
until she reached Lee's surrender at
Appomattox Court House. Then she
told how Lee wore his sword and was
handsomely attired in full uniform;
"while Grant," she announced, "had
on nothing but an old, ragged union
suit."
Thoughtful Wife.      ,   I
" Think I'll go to the ball game today."
"All right, is there a telephone at
the grounds?"
"There's one near there.   Why?"
"If the home team loses I want you
to telephone me, bo that I can take the
children and go over to mother's until
you get your temper back."
How Long Can He Stand It?
This is Mrs. Forbes-Robertson Hale's
latest suffrage story:
'A negro woman was arguing and
arguing with her husband, and when
she' had finished, he said, 'Dinah, yo'
talk don' effect me no mo' than a flea-
bite."
' 'Well, niggah,' she answered, I'se
gawna keep yo' scratchin'.'"
At Two o'clock in the Morning.
The Jolly Fellow (to the man above,
who has been dragged from his bed by
the wild ringing of his front door bell):
"Onepf your windows is.wide.open."..
Mr. Dressing Gown : " Thanks awfully, old man.   Which one is it ? "
The Jolly Fellow,: "The one you have
your head out of.   Ta-ta!"
No Gentleman.
A temperance lecturer displayed to
his audience two geraniums. The first,
watered in the usual way, was a beautiful and vigorous plant. But the other
had been dosed with alcohol, and its
foliage was shrivelled and sparse, its
stem twisted and its vitality decayed.
"Now, ladies and gentlemen," cried the
lecturer, "what can you say to a demonstration such as this?" "It's all
right," said a shabby man in the gallery,
'I'd stick to water, but I'm not a
geranium."
Moral Suasion.
William Phillips, the American secretary of embassy at London, tells of an
American officer who, by the kind permission of the British government, was
once enabled to make a week's cruise
on one of his majesty's battleships.
Among other things that impressed the
American was the vessel's Sunday
morning's service. It was very well
attended, every sailor hot on duty being
there. At the conclusion of the service
the American chanced to ask one of the
jackies: "Are you obliged to attend
these Sunday morning services ?" "Not
exactly obliged to, sir," replied the
sailor-man, " but our grog would be
stopped if we didn't, sir."
THRJ_
&/>e
UNDERWOOD
��.
il &/>e HOTEL
o/ QUALITY '
]F
f
CHASE,
B. C
j. p. McGoldrick
President
W. F. LAMMERS
Treasurer
A. J. LAMMERS
Vice-President
B. W. SAWYER
Sec. and M'n _ Director
Adams River Lumber Co.
LIMITED
Manufacturers of
'.'  : ���
Cedar, Fir, Spruce and Pine
LUMBER
We intend to arrange for] the delivery of
Lumber to the different points on the Lake FOUR
THE r.llA 5E TRIB.XK
v
���:*.
We CHASE TRIBUNE
Published Every Friday Morning at Chase. British Columbia
 =^ -. =   BY THE ���
CHASE PUBLISHING COMPANY-
T. J. K1NLEY Managing Editor
ADTsanaota katm.
Le_s than 10 Inches, one Insertion,
10c per Inch.
Display, contract, 100 Inchsa to be
used in three months, 11.00 per Inch per
month.
Display, full pais. 110.00 per Issue,
lioo.oo per month.
Display, half pale, 116.00 per Issue,
l.o.no per month.
Display, quarter pace, 110.00 per
Issue, 125.00 per month.
Coal Notices, thirty days,  S6.00 each.
Registrar* Notices, thirty days,
18.00 each. 	
Land Notices, sUty days, 17.60 each.
Heading Notices, 20 cents per line
each Insertion.
Legal advertising, 10 cents per line,
rlrst Insertion; 6 cents per line each
subsequent Insertion.
Subscription* In  advanoa,  $2  ���
Year, United SUUt, U-M a
Year.
To insure acceptance, all manuscript should be legibly written on one side of the pupci
only. Typwritten oopy is preferred.
The Tribune does not nccessarib
endorse the sentiments expressed in any contributed article.
advartlaara will pleats ramambar
that to ensure a change, oopy
mutt be In by Tuesday noon.
'THEY'RE   COMING   TO   (SHA8E'
OUR FUNDAMENTAL INDUSTRY.
In almost all industries the workers claim and exercise tlie right
to 8trike| But there is one industry in which there has never been a
strike, namely, farming.
When the workers in any trade or industry throw down their tools
and make their demands, they choose a time when that particular work
is most needed, andjwhen tht stopping of it would cause the most hardship.   That is good business policy for them.
Suppose the farmers should strike. And suppose thoy should
choose seedtime or harvest as the season to quit work, what would be
the result 1 The world lives from Imnd to mouth and never has enough
food to last its inhabitants two years. A. general strike of the farmers
for one season would spell starvation.
Nonsense, you say, there never could be a farmers' strike. We
admit that. And the reason is that in this particular industry to a very
large extent the workman owns the plant. Yet merely supposing the
case leads us to consider how farming is our greatest industry.
The nation or province or district that neglects the land is making
a (rrave mistake. If we want to raake our mines pay, if wt- waut to be
able to sell lumber at prices that will hold the market, we must not
have to bring butter for onr workmen from New Zealand, nor mutton
from Australia, nor jam from England. Our trade should not consist
in bringing from the other r.ide of the earth products that we should
produce as easily as they.
What is true about the world at large is true about Chase and the
Shuswap Valley. We want our lands settled and worked We want
the acres that are lying idle to be yielding crops of apples and plums
and pears and strawberries. Last Sunday deer were seen feeding in
the pasture on the Chase ranoh, not more than a mile from town. The
hills that will feed deer will feqd sheep, and British Columbia will still
have room for the deer a little farther away from its towns.
AH the mills and, mines and factories weroan get will be none too
many. But the towns that can most safely weather a spell of hard
times are the towns that are backed up by a hinterland of well cultivated farms.
CONDITIONS THAT HAVE HINDERED.
In the opening up of a new country conditions are bound to arise
that hinder instead of help. In trying to did one kind of enterprise
another kind is often handicapped. Governments are made up of men
and men make mistakes-   They always have and they, always will.
In the Shuswap district two conditions have arisen that have stra-
gled all efforts to get the land settled and the country opened up. They
are the result of good intentions that ran amuck. There is reason to
hope that these harmful conditions are soon to be remedied.
First, a definite policy for the settlement of lands in the railway
belt is bound to come at an early date. The demand for such a policy
is becoming too insistent to be disregarded. Reference to a clipping
tbat appears at the bottom of our column of provincial news will show
that the powers that be are awake to the urgent need ot a ohange.
The second of the retarding conditions is the holding as timber
reserves of land that should be thrown open to settlement. There is
an example of this at Notch Hill. A tract of land surrounded by farms
is held a* a timber limit, though there is scarcely any merchantable
timber on it. A similar state of affairs holds good in many other
places.
There are some good reasons that can be urged why these limits
should not be opened. The run sons are good but they are not good
enough. These timber lands pay u revenue to the government of >140
per square mile. They also add to the credit of the companies holding
them. The companies can raise money on them just as if they were
heavily forested, for bunkers are not timber cruisers. Yet because a
piece of laud produces a public revenue and also strengthens the
position of the company holding it, is not reason for holding it as
a timber limit if it is of more use as farming land.
A despatch from Creston, which appears in another column, indicates a policy on the part of the provincial government that aims at
remedying this evil where it is brought to their notice. It is up to
those who feel the hardship of it to speak ont and Tet the state of things
as they exist be brongbt to the attention of the proper authorities.
We wish to call the attention of our readers to the letter from
" Subscriber in the Shusway Valley," which appears in this issue. All
residents of the Shuswap district will do well to bear in mind his admirable suggestion for a central board of trade for the district. Such
a board would not supersede but supplement the work of the local
boards. It could speak for the district with a weight of authority corresponding to the magnitude of the interests represented.
As our correspondent remarks, the Salmon Arm Farmers' Exchange has struck the right note. In printing " Shuswap Lake fruit
is good fruit" on their literature they are helping to advertise every
settlement in the district. The way in which the Farmers' Exchange
and the Obssrver have recognized that the Shuswap country is a unit
and its interests cannot be divided is worthy of praise. Let us support
each other ii our publicity work and all will reap the profit.
\ living isn't hard to earn, Any healthy mini can (Iu .th.it. lt'*��
fuming food fur his vanity, or his wife's, tlmt kills the ayvnigH num.
It's Coddling his moral cowardice that tokens tlin henrt out nf him.
Don't yon rt*uu*tnl**r what Emerson suya���" most of our t-x|>t"isi* is fur
conformity to other men's ideas. It's for cuke tlmt the average man
runs in debt."���The Squirrel Cage, by Dorothy Cantield.
Fort George Herald: The law of compensation should be intro.
duced for amendment. That cyclone that tore the heart out of Keginn
the other day, and Uttered the ruins of that fair city with bruised and
mangled corpses, could have twisted itself into knots around nine-
tenths of the Nechaco river townsites without killing anything bigger
than a chipraonk.
Read the clipping in this issue abo.it "Agricultural Lime." Why
should lime be brought from Vancouver Island to the Okanagan wben
there are unlimited quantities of the very best limestone at Marble
Mountain in the narrows of Shuswap Lake? Whose opportunity is
this?
Lethbridge News: You will have noticed that the man who operates
on the theory tbat a sucker is born every minute nearly always has
plenty of money.
Correspondence
To the Editor of the Chaae Tribune
Dear Sir:
I think thia is my first offence, not
having yet formed a habit of "writing
to the Editor," but I cannot let the opportunity pass without writing you
letter of congratulation on the excellent
leader in your last iaaue s "Boost the
Shuswap Valley."
The Salmon Arm Fanners Exchange
are to be commended for what they have
already done along these lines, In their
Literature they print "Shuswap Lake
Fruit is good fruit." I trust the Salmon Arm Observer which is the only
other paper we have in the valley, will
aid you in this good work. Healthy rivalries between the settlements on the
lake will be good. Petty jealousies are
an abomination.
All should aim when the time ia opportune to form a Board of Trade so
that all can join in the work, no matter
what their political opionionmay be.
When the time la ripe all these Local
Boards of Trade should meet together
at least once a year. There is so muck
intelligent work thst can be done in
cooperative way. General publicity
work and the transportation question
should be tackled in this way, and many
more questions will no doubt arise in
which the whole Shuawap Valley com*
munity v*\\ bevitally.intereated.
''Apologizing for taking up your valu-
ablespace, I will sign myself, one of your
subscribers In the
Shuswap Valley.
to take 1000 homeseekers into Alberta'
within the next two months.
The local men have taken over a big
tract of Western Canada Lands and expect to have the greater part of them,
placed under cultivation this year. The
total holding is 98,000 acres. Of this,
20,000 acres is at Taber, Alberta; 14,000
at Sedgwick, Alberta, and 69,000 acres*
in the PeBce River district in British
Columbia.
Messrs. Young and Taylor will devote:
their attention exclusively for several
Agricultural Lime.
Some time ago, Hr. P. Brooke, Secretary of the Kelowna Farmers' Institute, had enquiries regarding lime for
agricultural purposes from several
members of the Institute. As the reault of his investigations, he has received
f. letter from the Victoria, Vancouver
lime ft Brick Co., Victoria, quoting
special prices for a limited period on
lime, aa followa:
We have been advised by the
Deputy Minister of Agriculture that
a demand exists for the supply of agricultural lime, and he has kindly fur-
Ished us with a list of Farmers' Institutes in which your name appears; also,
the Department haa arranged very low
transportation rates with the C. P. R.
" We have put in the necessary equipment, and are now in a position to
supply any quantity; at this moment
we have about 400 tons on hand which
we are desirous of shipping immediately to save the expense of shifting
Into store, snd for which we would give
buyers the benefit of leaving in labor
charges made thereby.
Our staple price ti $4.26 per ton
"F. 0. B. our Works, Atkins Siding, but
up to lstAugust we will quote the above
quantity at $8.75 per ton.
��� "In certain cases we are prepared to
inake special terms In respect to payment.
"The special rate quoted so Kelowna,
Okanagan Mission, Peachland snd Penticton ia 18 cents per 100 lbs., with s
minimum of 60,000.
j "At the low price nsmed above, and
in view of the agreement amongst the
various authorities of the benefits accruing to farmers by the use of lime, we
j hope your members will accord us support, and also take advantage of the
Coming to B.C. * Alberta
Spokane.���C.  F. Young and E. C.'
Taylori the organi-ers of the Spokanel (Present low quotation.
Valley Irrigated Land Company, expect    " We ��nBl1 ta Ples86a to n8Ve any or
ders you, or your members, can place,
mow or in the future."
All members of the Institute desirous
of obtaining a supply of lime on these
favorable terms should place themselves
Un communication with Mr. P. Brooke
jat once.���The Kelowna Courier.
Teacher Wanted.
Chaae    Public  School  1st division.
months to colonising the^ lends.   The3 L-,  ^.m.   Must hsve 2nd  class
expect to leave with the flrat delegation ,
of prospective settlers in about two certificate.   Man prefured.
weeks.    They recently returned from
an extended trip .lp Alberta and British i CHASE SCHOOL BOARD
Columbia, during which they visited :
their new holdings. ii by J. A. Graham, Sety.
���is
Steamboat Service
Freight and Passengers
Steamers:    C. R.lLamb or Andover
Kamloops-Shuswap Lake
Leave  Sicamous every   Saturday   at ti p.m. for
Salmon Arm.
Leave   Salmon  Arm   every   Sunday Morning at
6 a.m. for Kamloops via CHASE.
Leave   Kamloops   every    Monday   Morning   for
Sicamous,
Seymour Arm-Sicamous
Leave Sicamous for Seymour Arm every Tuesday,
Thursday and Saturday, returning same day.
The above subject to change without notice.
8PECIAL BATE. FOR PARTIES.
. | || , ���  ���   ���     ���
Arrow Lakes Lumber Co.
United
Phone B10
CZZI3 Imperial
Bank of Canada
HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO
D. R. WILKIK Pm��.     :;     Hon. R. JAFFRAY, Vick-Pbes.
R. A. BETHUNE, Manage. Chase Bbanch
Savings BanK
Department
Interest Allowed On
Deposits
From Date of Deposit
Special  *  Attention * Given * To
Banking By Mail
.��>a*��aC������iS*S*5��<��*��3��������#^^
Agents in Enibndt-Lloyd's Bank, Limited, London,
nnd Branches
lEtAt
The..
City
Restaurant
COMFORTABLE ROOMS
* IN CONNECTION *
Barry & Cumming,
Proprietobb
Knights
of Pythias
Chase Lodge No. 47
Meets  Every  Tuesday  Night.
R. P. Bradley, C.C,
H. M. Law, K.ofR.&S.
Visiting Knights are Welcome.
TRY A
ZEPP
Safety Razor
For a Clean, Easy Shave,
at
Macdonald's
Drug   Store
THE Only Dead Ones
in  Chase    are   the
Mosquitos���They took too
much Crude Oil
.���.'.������,'--.- 'i      ��� -._
1  .N. B. Make good on this, now, Mac. THE CHASE  TRIBUNE
FIVE
The Gossip Corner
W. F. Lammers returned on Monday
from ��� short visit to Spokane.
Oliver Freeman of Shuawap Lake waa
s visitor to Chaae on Saturday.
Ed Anderson has gone to the coaat
tor a short holiday.
Henry Anderson of the printing staff
of the Mail-Herald epent Sunday in
Chsse.
A new settler named Bloom haataken
up s homestead in Celiata near W. A.
Hudson.
Billy Brown, who had been working
in the sawmill, went up to Celista the
first of the week to hold down his claim
that aome one haa been trying to jump.
The Adams River Company have
painted the roofs of all their buildings
with fireproof paint. The job wsadone
by workmen from Victoria.
W. F. Richardson, who haa been doing
some work here in connection with the
Dominion Public Works Department,
left on Wednesday for the Big Bend
country to make hydrographic surveys
on the Columbia River.
W. A. Smythe, who owns the Empress
and Star theatres in Revelstoke, was in
Chase this week and bought the Chase
Opera House from Barry and Cumming
Mr. Smythe will take over the building
in thirty days, when the lease held by
the Knights of Pythias will terminate.
The Pritchard government ferryboat,
thst went visiting about two months
ago, arrived last week at Chase. By
way of Kamloops. W. LeHuray and
Gerald Bradley escorted it home on
Tuesday. After spending s plessant
day with the Pritchard lassies they returned to Chase the same evening vis
C. P. F.
Mr. snd Mrs. David N. Slack, of
Windsor, N. S��� are visiting at the
horns of J. W. Clifford, Mrs. Slack's
cousin. They arrived on Wsdnssday
and leave this morning for the west,
making s leisurely tour through Canada,
and returning through Uucle Sam's
country.
Placer mining has been revived on
French Creek In the Big Bend country.
The pay streak that waa lost years ago
has been discovered again. They go
in now by way of Revelstoke, but in
the old days the trail went in from Seymour Arm,
r Mrs. McDonald and her daughter Miss
Nelson, and Mr. Jinks, all from Celiata,
went down on the C. R. Lamb Monday
to Kamloops. On Tuesday Mr. Jinks
and Mrs. McDonald returned and Miss
Nelson went on to Vancouver, where she
will remain with her sister, Mrs. JohnBon.
Ernest Lsne, who hss been to Alberta
on a business trip, returned on Sunday.
A. R. MacKay, of Shuawap Lake,
waa in Chase on Wednesday.
Born, on Sunday, July 28th, to Mr.
and Mra. Jas. A. Graham, a eon,
Ed Jones, cleik in the poet office, is
behind the Wicket again after a two
weeks vacation at the coast.
Miaa Gladys Spence hss returned from
sn extended visit to friends at Ducks
Rsnge.
Lionel T. Morris, of Scotch Creek,
hss sold his ranch to an old country
party, and haa bought an acre of land
for a building site from Oliver Freeman.
Frank Burling, a teacher from London, who came out from the old country
about a week ago, was s visitor in Chsse
on Monday. Mr. Burling expects to
tesch in the province. He is st present
staying with friends in Salmon Arm.
Head Clerk Tracy from the Depot
Camp was up to" Seymour Arm laat
week scaling timber recently purchased
by the Adams River Lumber Company.
On Ms way back he stopped at Kault
to havj; a look over the mill there.
M. C. Hamilton, who will be remembered by many residents of Chase aa
having been at one time clerk at the depot camp, but who is now In the reel
estate business in Calgary, has been
visiting friends here.
Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Brown, of Moose
Jaw, went to the coast on the 21st and
returned on the 29th. Mra. Brown has
been spending the summer with her
parents, Mr. snd. Mrs. Thos. Brown,
of CellBts. "*���'
The L*_tes' Attain always trying to
make us happy, This time they are
going to do it with another of those
ice cream socials. - Gome to Mra. McLaughlin's next Wednesday evening
snd Snd out about it,
R. W. Bruhn with his road gang is
camped out on Coburn Street. Work
began yesterday on the street improvements mentioned in our last issue. Mr.
Bruhn is a veteran, road builder snd
msy be depended upon to mske 11500
do the work of $2000.
Harry Noake, recently arrived from
Victoria, left on Tuesday for Celista,
where he hss taken lip a homestead.
His household effects and stock were
moved up on the Adams River Lumber
Co's scow. The stock included three
goats, a kind of herd that should prove
profitable in a country like British Col
umbia. On the same trip the scow carried 14,000 feet of lumber for L. T. Morris of Scotch Creek.
McC
onne
11
Correspondence.
Dere Mr. Editur,
1 see by your paper the other day
. that yu printed my letter to yu about
'' SkeeterB.'' It looks all right only yu
have spelt sum of the words rong. Fer
instance you spell "bludd" with only
only one d instead of two. However
fer a new paper yu dont do bad. Bye
the way why did yu not explain aa to
the reason the skeeters got drunk. Well
Mr. Editur I wss resdin yure paper the
other dsy while I wss a .satin of my
dinner, which by the way consisted of
sossige. I wss in s most contented
frame of mind, for I had the psper
propped up agin the milk jug, and my
hands snd jsws were workin st a good
comfortable 2.40 gait. I was a resdin
of Oncle Bob's sdvertisement for a
women to share his lsbors in the ranch
and stay home snd shoo the bfwks iff;
tbe chickens' while Bob wud be in town
explalnin the political eltusshun to an
admiring audience and casually releivin
that irritatin brabble (which ia so common in this country) commonly called
"Squatter's Thirstirltis." Well, my
thoughts turned from Oncle Bob to
Woman, and as I gazed at the last lone
sossige on my plate I set to myself ses
I, " How like a women yu are." And
I thunk some more and at last ses I to
myself I will rite that editur fellow and
tell him my conclusions and here goes.
Woman and Sossiges.
Being the phillosoffical thots of
Josiah Buggs.
Woman is like a sossige. Why? Well
they are both full of all kinds of possibilities ranging from the hot and peppery
variety to the bread and water mushy
variety. From the kind who open up
under the genial glow of convenashun
to the kind who shrivel and shrink within themselves under the same genial
glow.   From the kind who are quick
to retort when the sharp fork of raillery
and sarcasm is used to the kind who
wilt and bust under the same influence.
Woman and a sossige. From the
sublime to the rediclus Bay you. Nay
verily, for after all there ie a great similarity in that both are capable of making
man think that the* world is a lair and
butiful place orsof jriving him inward
qualmB and s pessliniBtleiopirilon of the
earth snd all that therein Is. Agsln
both (judging from the dress worn by
the ladies at present) are similarly
clothed in tight fitting garb. Both look
lonesum'imd forlorn when alone but
when linked together with others of
their kind both ere spt to be strong snd
the longer they remain linked the
stronger snd more overbearing they
becum.
Well Mr. Editur, these *ere the high
high end -netting thots I had* when I
was a eafln of that sossige but slas a
chunk ot bone got wedged in a tooth
with a hole in tt end when I had finished
gouging thst durned chunk of bone out
snd hsd got the roof of my hed back in
place my mind had taken a pessimistic
turn snd I finished my discourse by Baying " Gol duxn the luck. Sossiges snd
woman are alike becos they can both
find the way to a man's touchiest spot
whether it.be his tooth or his pocket.
They both know thst the best wsy to
s man's heart is thru his stummick.and
lastly, but by no mesns least both very
often contain a bone of contention somewhere."
Well Mr. Editur, I wae once told by
a man who owed me fifty cents that I
should make a good preacher becos I
could ask for a contribution fifteen different ways, but I think myself that a
man who can fill seven sheets of note
paper with philosophy just by eatin of
a sossige ought to make a good preacher.
What do yu think?
Yures as once before,
Josiah Buggs.
K
EEP SWEET AND
EEP  MOVING
W. F. Barnes
Contractor and Builder
Doors, and Window Frmnes,
Screen Doors, and  Window
Moreens, Doors and Windows
Boats
Built to order
AlexR.McRay
Contractor and
Builder
Estimates Furnished on Applies! ion.   All Work Guaran
teed Prices Right.
Notch Hill, Shuswap Lake
Harvey, HcCarter tt
PinKham
Barristers,   Solicitors, Etc.
Offices:  Imperisl]Bank
Revelstoke, B. C.
The !Tribuhe!   sub-bribe  now
$1.60 per year. .  v
&f>e
SHUSWAP
HOTEL
Beautifully Situated
On the So. Thomp-
soo'River. An Ideal
Summer Resort.
Livery Stable in
Connection. Charles
Byers, :: Proprietor.
SHUSWAP,
B.C.
KAMLOOPS
UndertaKing Co.
*' i .i. 11 =
61 Victoria Street
Funeral Directors, VtAtt-
takers and Enbalmers
Parlors   open   Dsy   and  Night
Telephone 117      Box 810
General Merchant
C     H      AS      E
British   Columbia
Hardware, Farm Implements, Building Material,
Garden Seeds, Paints and
Oils, Groceries, Hams
and Bacons, Clothing,
Gents furnishings, Hats
Mail Orders Promptly Filled
Lots! Lots! Lots!
Now is the Time to Buy at Right Prices
Terms: 1-3 Cash
Balance 6, 12, 18 Months
No Interest Call for Further Particulars.
r_r
J H
Specials at Shooting Gallery
See Them
INSURANCE AGENCY.
"Insurance, well done, as the greatest comfort of rt^odem times, realize the full meaning of the word; the certanity ofy something hoped
for a danger half feared, averted a combination-'hy which loaes are
turned backward and dark clouds are made to show their silver lin-
ing.
OCR PHONOGRAPH AGENCY
enables us  to supply you   with   Phonograph.,
Records, Supplies ot sll kinds.   Repair work done
Here.
REALITY
New ia the time to Hat yonr properly ������ I am
making an esrlusive listing nl Chsse I buy and
sell for you. 8��ti��fa��ti"n garni'teii ilwsys or
money refunded Yes tven our Hot Ioe Cresms
and Cold Tea' Coffee etc. are garantecd to enjoy.
I
Louis A. Bean
ii
CHASE,
;:
BRITISH COLUMBIA
r\ SIX
TUB CHASE TRIBUNE
R
Boot   and Shoe
epairing
First Class Work
Promptly and
Neatly   Done
J. Clegg
Chase, B. C.
THE DANGER
TRAIL
ly
JAMS AMR CUftOOD
CesrrlgU    isio.   ay   Bob_.l_.rrm
comoaar.
�����������������
I Want   Your  Watoh Repairing ���
R. V. BOULTON
Certified Watch and Clock
Halter
**************************
Henry
Herzog'
MERCHANT
TAILOR
Chase, ti       B. C.
F. H. Sturgill
Adams
Lake
House
Fishing and   Hunting
10 miies from Chase by Boat and
Stage.   At the Outlet of
Adams Lake.
Geo. Chase
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALER. IS
Hay, Grain
Vegetables
StocR **
Chase Ranch
Chase, B. C.
CHASE    HAS   A   FIRST
C L A S S
LAUNDRY
All Our Work" Guaranteed First
Class
H. 0. POY, Proprietor
MOTOR  BOAT
��(.URS10NS
lOfl.Y: HALDANE
is prepared to tuke
piirticia to any point
ou Shuswiip Luke,
A Competent Bout-
iii.tn Who Knows
the Luke    ������   .    .    .
Men Wanted, for sawmill, yard and
camp. Apply either in person or by let-.
ter to Adams River Lumber Company, i
Ltd., Chase, B. C.
fOOHIINUID.) '���
CHAFl'EK XIL
  THS poaa.n.
f n lEHlNL) the ile-ire ran How
| Q I land; to the right of the team
ZSS nn .lean. Once or twice
VBI when Croisset (lenced back
hla eyes met those of the engineer He
cracked Ua whip and smiled, and
Howland's teeth (teamed back coldly
In reply. A mutual undemanding
flashed between them In these (lances.
In s sadden sport Howland knew thst
tbs Frenchman could quickly pat die*
tsnce between them, bat nor s distance
thst his ballets could not cover to tbe
space ot a breath. Ht bad made qp
Bis mind to Bra. deliberately and with*
Ills greatest skill. If Croi&sei made the
slightest movement toward escape. If
he waa compelled to kill or wound hla
companion be could still go on alone
with the dogs, for ths trail of Meleese
und Jackplne would be ss plain aa
tbelr own, which tbey were following
back into tbe south.
"Mon Dleu. but yon are a strange
man!" exclaimed the Frenchman when
he brought the dogs down to a walk
after a half mile run. "Blessed saints,
m'seur, you are laughing, and I swear
it's no laughing matter."
"Shouldn't a man be happy when he
Is going to bis wedding, Jean?" puffed
Howland, gasping to get back the
breath be bad lost.
"But not wbeu he'a going to bla fu*
neral, m'seur."
"If 1 were one ot your blessed saints
I'd hit you over the head witb a thunderbolt. Croisset. timid Lord, wbat
sort of a heart have you got inside of
your Jacket maul Dp tbere wbere
we're going ls tbe sweetest little girl
In tbe whole world. I love her. She
loves me. Why sliouldu't I be happy
now that 1 kuow I'm going to aee ber
again very soou���and take her back
into tbe soutb with me?"
"Tbe devil!" grunted Jean.
"Perhaps you're Jealous, Croisset,"
suggested Howland. "Ureat Bcottl I
hadn't thought of that!" ,
"I've got one of my own to love,
m'aeur, and I wouldn't trade ber for
all else In the world."
"I can't understand you," cried tbe
engineer. "Tou appear to he half human: you say you're tn love, snd yet
you'd rather risk your life tban help
out Meleese and me. Wbat the deuce
does It mean?"
"That's what I'm doing, m'seur���
helping Meleese. J would bave done
ber a greater service if 1 bad killed
you back tbere on tbe trail and stripped yonr body for those things tbst
would be foul euough to eat IL I
have told you a dozen times that It Is
God's Justice that you die. and you
are going to die very soon, m'seur."
"No, I'm not going to die, Jean. I'm
going to see Meleese, and she's going
bsck into tbe south with me. snd If
you're real good you may have tbe
pleasure of driving us bsck to the
Wekusko, Croisset. and you can be my
beet man at tbe wedding. Wbat do
you say to tbat?"
"That you are mad or a fool," retorted
Jean, cracking his whip viciously.   .
The dogs swung sharply from tbs
trail, beading from tbelr southerly
course Into the northwest.
"We wiil bsvp ti day by doing this,"
explained Croisset at tbe other's
sharp word ot Inquiry. "We will hit
the other frail twenty mlies west.of
here, while by following back to
where tbey turned we would travel
sixty mlies to reach tbe same point
That one chance In a hundred whlcb
you have depends nn this, m'seur. If
the other sledge has passed"-
Fle shrugged his shoulders and started tbe dogs Into a trot.
"Look here!" cried Howland. running beside bin. "Who Is witb tbis
other sledge?"
"Those wbo cried to kill you on the
trail and at tbe coyote, m'seur," he
answered quickly.
Howland fell half a dozen paces beblnd. His bean leaped with Joyous
hope, and he leaned forward on tbe
sledge to examine Croisset's empty
gun. It was an automatic, and Croisset. glancing back over tbe loping
backs of tbe buskles. caught bim smll
Ing He ran more frequently now,
und louger distances, and with the
pnsslng of each mile bis determination to strike a decisive blow Increased If tbey reached tbe trull ot Meleese and .liM'kplne before the cross
ing of tbe Hecond sledge be would lie
in wait fur bis old enemies. If they
hnd preceded them be would pursue
and surprise tbem In camp. In either
case be would possess an overwhelming advantage.
With the same calculating attention
to detail that he would have shown ln
tbe arrangement of plans for tbe building of a tunnel or a bridge, be drew
a mental map of his scheme and its
possibilities. Tbere would be at least
two men with the sledge and possibly three. If tbey surrendered at the
point of his ride without a tight he
would compel Jean to tie tbem up witb
dog traces while be held them under
cover. If tbey maae a move to ouer
reatetanc? he would about With tbe
sutomatl** be could kill or wound tbe
three before tbey coold reach tbelr
rifles, which would undoubtedly be on
tbe sledge. Tbe situation had bow
reached a point where he no longer
took Into consideration what these
men might be to Meleeee.
As tbey continued Into the northwest Howland noted tbat tbe thicker
forest wss gradually clearing Into wide
areas of small bansklan pine and tbst
th* rack ridges and dense swsmps
which had Impeded their progress wars
becoming less numerous. An hoar before oooo. after a tedious climb to tht
top of a troaen ridge, Croisset pointed
town Into a vast istm plain lying between tbem sod other (rest ridges tu
to the north.
That Is s bit of tbs barren lands
that creeps down between those mountains off tbere, m'seur." he said. "Do
you ass tbat black forest that looks
like s charred log In tbs enow to tb*
sooth aad wast of the mountains?
Tbat Is tbs break that leads Into tbs
country of tbs Athabaaco. Somewhere
between this point and tbat wt will
strike tbs trail. Hon Dleu. I bed half
expected to sse them oat there on tbs
plain."
"Wbo?   Meleese and Jackplne, or"-
"No; tht others, m'seur. Shall wt
havt dinner here?"
"Not until we hit tht trail." replied
Rowland. "I'm anxious to know about
tbat one chance In a hundred you'vt
given me hope of. Croisset It they
Bsve paased"-
"If tbey sre ahead of us ynu might
fast as well stana out mere aud let
me put s bullet through you, m'seur."
He went to tbe ncsd of the dogs,
guiding them dowu the rough side of
tbe ridge, while Howlsnd steadied the
toboggan from beblnd. In a small
open space free of busb Croisset's
voice rose sharply and ths team
stopped.
"Wbat do you tbtnk of it m'seur?"
he cried, pointing to tbe snow. "Whst
do yon think of that?"
Barely cutting Into the edge of the
open waa the broken crust ot two
sledge trails. Croisset bed fallen 00
bis knees in tbe trail.
"Tbe crust ls freshly broken," ht
ssld sfter a moment "Tbey bave
been gone not less than two or three
hours, psrbsps since morning. See
this white glistening surface over the
first trail, m'seur, like a billion needle
points growing out of It? Tbat Is the
work of three or four days' cold. Ths
first sledge passed that long ago."
Howland turned and picked up Cresset's rifle. Tbe Frenchman watched
him as he slipped a clip full ot cartridges Into the breech.
"If there's s snack of cold staff ln
the pack dig It out" be commanded,
"We'll tat on tbe run It you'vt got
on. Jttnl- bt cried. "IT*
got enough, you're right tod 1 waot
to apologist. Ws'rt bustsd-tbat la.
tbe doga aad I art boated-and wt
might at well give It op until we've
bid t feed.    Wbat do yoo atyr
"1 say that yoo htvt stopped fm m
tint, m'seur." replied Croisset with
purring softness "Another bait boor
and we would bave been through tbe
forest aod Just beyond tbat���In tht
edge of the plain-art those whom yoo
seek, Meleese and her people. Tbat it
wbat I started to tall yoo back there
wbtn yoo that ait up. Mon Dleu, It
It were not for Meleese I wonld let
yon go un. Aod tben-what would
happen then, m'teur, If yon made yoor
rtelt to tbem In broad day?   Mateo!"
Jean lifted a warning hand. Faintly
there came to tbem through tbe forest
tbt distant baying of I hound.
"That Is ont ot oar dogs tram tbt
Msckensle country," bt went on softly,
an Insinuating triumph ia bit low
voice. "Now,- m'seur. that I htvt
brought you here what art yon going
to do? Shall wt go oo tod take dinner
with those wbo are going to kill yoo.
or will yoo wait a few boon? Eh.
which shall It bt?"
For s moment Howlsnd stood motionless, stunned by the Frenchmen's
words. Quickly he recovered himself.
Hla eyee burned with t metallic gleam
u tbey met tbt half taunt ln Crolattt't
cool smile.
"if 1 bad not stopped you we would
hsve guile un'/" Ue questionea teiiMij
"To be sure, m'seur," retoned Croisset still smiling. "You warned me to
luse no time-that soniethlui* would
happen It I did."
Witb a quick movement Howland
drew bis revolver snd leveled It st
tbs Frenchman's besrt
"If you ever prayed to those blessed
salntt of yours do It now, Jesn Croisset. I'm going to kill you!" he cried
fiercely.
[to aa ooimstTiD. I
PresbyterianChurch
Notices
MORNING WORSHIP - 10.30 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP - 7.30 P.M.
BIBLE CLASS, TUESDAY 7.30 P.M.
YOU   ARE   WEIoCOME
Pastor: J. HYDE
K VUlfR*.
"I'M 001X0 TO up. Ton I"
anything to eat  If you haven't we'll
go hungry.   We're going to overtake
that sledge some tlmt this afternoon
or tonight���or bust!"
"Tbe salnta be blessed, tben we sre
most certain to bust, m'seur!" gasped
Jean. "And if we don't tbe doga wlU.
Non, It la Impossible I" .
. "Is there anything to eat?"
' "A morsel of cold meat; that It all.
But I say that It Is Impossible. Thai
sledge"-
Howlaod Interrupted bim witb an
Impatient gesture.
"And I say that if there la anything
to eat in tbere get It out and be quick
about It Croisset. We're going to over
take those precious friends of yours,
and I warn you that If you make any
attempt to lose time something unpleasant Is going to hsppen. Under*
stand?"
Jean bad bent to unstrap one end of
the sledge pack and an angry flash
lenped Into his eyes at the threatening
tone of the engineer's ve'ee. For s
moment be seemed on tho point of
speech, but caught himself snd In silence divided the small chunk of meat
which he drew from tbe pack, giving
tbe larger share to .Howland as be
went to tbe head of the dogs. Only
once or twice during the next hour did
be look back, and after each of these
glances be redoubled his efforts at
urging on tbe huskies. Before they
had come to tbe edge of the black
bansklan forest whlcb Jean had pointed out from tbe farther side of tbe
plain Howland saw that the pace was
telling on the team. The leader was
trolling lame, and now and tben the
whole pack would settle back In tbelr
traces, to be urged on acnln by the
fierce cracking of Croisset's long whip.
To add to his own discomfiture Howland found that he could no longer
keep up with Jean and tbe dogs, snd
witb his weight added to tbe sledge
the huskies settled down to a tugging
walk.
Tbne they came Into the deep, low
forest, snd .lean, apparently oblivious
of tbe exhaustion of both man and
doga, walked now In advance of t_��
Church of England
Services are held in All Saints
Church Room, Chase, as follows:
1st SUNDAY IN EACH MONTH
Evensong and Address at 7.30 p.m.
3rd SUNDAY IN EACH MONTH
Holy Communion at 11 a.m.
Evensong and Address at 7.30 p.m.
WATER NOTICE.
A  LICENSE   TO STORE  AND    USE
WATER.
Notice is hereby given that George
Stewart of Ducks B. C. will apply for
a license to store and use the water out
of the lake known locally as The Pooley
Lake, situated about one and a half
miles north of Ducks station.
The water will be run out by a natural channel, on to the land, where it
will be used for irrigation purposes, described as the fractional S. W. i Sec. of
Sec. 31, Township 19, Range 14 west of
the 6th meridian.
Objections may be 'filled with the said
Water Recorder or with the Comptrql-
ler of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 9th day of July 1912. The* application will be filled in the office of
the Water Recorder at Kamloops B. C.
George Stewart, *
Applicant.
At Service
Hackney Stallion
Barrow Moss
Wonder, 10003
FOALED 1905. Kegistered, Hackney Horsu Society, Loudon Eng.,
Certificate No. 15378. Imported
1907. COLOK-Cliestuut, white
on face and legB. BREEDER-
William Murray, Harrow Moss,
Wigtown, Wigtownshire,
Sire -Lord Loudoun 8934
Dam - 3308 Sweet Grass
W. P. Pritchard,     Prop.
Pritchard  P. 0. B. C.
Terms $15 for the season, payable at close of season. Accidents at owners risk.
Midsummer
Hardware
AT
Bradley's
Haying Tools
Hammocks
Picnic Baskets
Garden Hose
A Big Shipment of
Granite Ware Just
Opened.
Chase, B. C.
They're
Coming to Chase
E.M.
The
Music
Man
Gerard-Heintzman Fianoa.
Columbia Gramophones.
Ail Kinds of Records and Supplies.
Guitars.  Mandolins,  Banjos.
Anything in the Music Line.
Kamloops - B. C.
Century Ten Cent Sheet Music.
Any Piece You Want.
Mail Orders, Promptly Filled.
Send for Catalogue.
Try a Tribune want ad.   They're
great.
H. Percy Weaver
Carpenter and Builder
Electric Wiring
Photo Developing and
il, :: Finishing :: ::
PictureB Taken to Order
Work   Guaranteed
You can get
The Chase Tribune
for $1.50 per year
now if you hurry.
The Regular Price
is $2.00.
GET  IT   NOW.
il
L_ r
V
THE  CHASE TRIBUNE
Si v::n
It is located on the main
line of the Canadian Pacific
Railroad at the foot of the
Shuswap Lake at its outlet into
the South Thompson River.
It is the outfitting point for
the Adams Lake and Turn Turn
Lake country where Caribou
and Bear are to be, found in
abundance.
It is situated in the heart of
one of the best agricultural
districts in British Columbia, yet
undeveloped.
It affords greater opportunities
for the fisherman and hunter
than any point along the line of
the C.P.R.
The bathing beaches here
are' admittedly the best to be
found in the interior. The water
is warm and clear; the bottom
is sandy with a gentle slope
to deep water.
Two of the most beautiful
waterfalls in the west may be
reached in ten minutes walk
from the Chase station. ��� There
are many more waterfalls along
the streams flowing into the
Adams and Shuswap Lakes.
The Adams River Lumber
Company, located at Chase, employs upwards of 500 men in
the mill and in the woods. A
second large mill is soon to be
erected which will likely more
than double the present pav roll.
For further information, write to the Secretary of
the Chase Central Board of Trade, Chase, B. C.
<��
f\ \
F'^HT
THE CHASE TllITtl'NE
From Our Neighbours
Items Gathered by Our Special Correspondents
Seymour Arm.
Boot hobiee will be at a premium 11
eropa turn oat according to ezpeeta*
tion*. Mr. Goodwin eetimatei the
potato arerage aa 10 tone to tbe aere
on bla land.
Ur. Boaa Hewitt gave a ��ery enjoy
able danoe ou Friday night. Boat ia
the happy owner ol a million dollar
���mil* and a diipoeition to match, and
needleta to say everybody enjoyed
themeehee tbourougbly.
Aa tbe reault ol a quiet tip, Leslie
Homan, Bob Beattie, Geo. Aliaon and
Bootty Mo'ougall beid themralvea 10
the outton belt on a proepeotiog trip.
Tbey took an enormous quantity ol
beans and can openers and expect to
be away some timeat least we hope
so.
Doric ^Latremouille has gone to
Kamloops co open up a barber shop
on Victoria Street. Dovic expects to
trim the governor general's moustache
when be visits the Kamloops centenaiy
celebration next tall.
Aa live stock bave no regard lor the
sacred rights of property, Squire Johnson ia busy hanging gates for the Fruit*
lands Co. We might add in passing
that as an official gate hanger, the
Squire is some exeoutioner.
Ur. and Mrs, Burgess, tired of touring along beaten paths and wearied
of the incessant warning to hurry up
and catch the train for all points ol
thecompass,are leading the simple Hie
at this point, aud enjoying the home
cooking of tbe Seymour Hotel.
Mr. R. U. Salt, thoughtful and indefatigable as ever, piloted a party
down to Blind Bay on the launch Seymour last Sunday, and all reported a
good time. Mr. Goodwin and Mr.
Mogridge, two members ol the party,
have been smiling, cheefuly and obliging ever since, and we respectfully suggest tbat they "get the habit".
Many cattle kings boast ol starting
in business with one brlndle cow, but
the historian of the future will not be
believed when he tells how Messrs. G.
A, Oreerer and B, S, Freeman laid the
foundations ol their immense herds
with one little bull calf. This animal
is uow doing tbe Crusoe act at tbe
juoutb of the river, all, all alone.
V'. W. H. Lookley, quondam Vancouver hrnsh artist, but now domiciled
in our fruitful valley, has just completed painting the Seymour Arm Sup
ply Co. warehouse. We understand
that he will now perform his little scenic change act on some of the Fruit-
lands Co. houses, This all helps to
make the city beautiful.
A Mr, W. Brennan, whom we understand is an offlcia ol the Dominion
Government, is here making a study
ol local conditions. It is rumored that
on his report, the Land Deparument
will formulate regulations dealing with
local homestead conditions when this
section of the railway belt is thrown
open to entry.
Tbe steady development ol tbis place
haa resulted in another addition being
built to the Supply Oo.'s store. Under
the skillul hands ol H. W. Tansley and
bis able assistants tbe work ia neating
completion. A cellar underneath will
help to store aome ol tbe root orop.
That vile ghoul ol all new settlements is, we fear, gradually worming
his insidious way into this peaoelul
and progressive settlement. We rater
to the whiskey peddlar and bootlegger. When tome poor erased wretch
runs amuk. their criminal carelessness
in not providing efficient polioe patrol
for these lakes, will then be brought
home to the Provincial authorities and
on them will rest the responsibility.
A patrol boat is one ol the needs of
Shuswap Lake. Speaking lor this
place we oan say there bas not been a
case of drunkenness bere this season,
and we have yet to find a settlement
where so many men are employed and
where tbere is so slight a disposition
at least to make a little noise once in
a while. Shuswap Lake borders on a
large territory and a solitary policeman
dependent on uncertain passenger
boats cannot be expected to look alter
everything Irom inquests to poll taxes.
TO SELL LAND
AT
Notch Hill.
Mr. W. F, Smith has reoeived a n��w
set of harness lor his delivery team,
Messers, Peacock and Hammond are
cutting their grain this week.
Mr. J. Lundy paid a visit to his home
laBt Sunday.
Mrs. W. Loltns left last Monday for
Revelstoke, where she will visit friends.
Mr, T. Kilpatriok paid a business
trip to Notch Hill last Tuesday.
The C. F. R. are now using their oil
tanks. Mr, J. J. Winters has the position ol running the pump and looking
after the tank,
Mr, Traynor of Celista paid a visit
to Notch Hill last Tuesday, and reported of having sold his ranch. He will
soon be looking lor another one,
Several new bicyoles arrived in town
these last two weeks. Messers, Peacock,
Widmark and Smith are tbe three purchasers.    	
Shuswap.
Miss, Margaret McMabon ol Revelstoke ls visiting friends bere.
Miss Ida Mathews and her little sister Irom Kamloops are visiting Mr* and
Mrs. George Coburn.
Mr. Ellis Talbot is spending some ot
his vacation here with his parents.
Mr. L, 0. Byers paid a visit to Kamloops on Tuesday.
Mrs, H. Antonsen and daughter
Myrtle ol Chase, were visitors here on
Wednesday. Tbey were the guests of
Mrs. Nelson.
A party from here went np to Chase
creek on Sunday to fish and returned
with ISO fine trout. Who said there
wasn't any fishermen at Shuswap,
Blind Bay.
As waB to be expeoted, the pr <luc-
tion of "Box and Cox" by the Blind
Bay Amateur Dramatio Club, on Friday evening was a success. The Crom
bie biought over a bunch Irom the
Driving Camp, H. L, McLean's boat
brought up a party Irom Chase, and
there was a large attendance from nearer points. The actors were Mrs. Dunne,
Stanley Reedman and Ernest Buckingham,
Miss Jean Brown gave an exhibition
ot her ever popular sword danoe. Tbere
was a piano solo by Miss. Maggie
Smith, also a duet by the Misses Smith,
Tbe danoe that finished off the program lasted till . o,clock. Tbe oral
report given us ol tbe good supper they
had made us sorry we didn't go.
We Specialize
in making the very best Aerated
Waters from the Best Ingredients.
Try a Bottle at Louis Bean's Parlor.
Wisdom's
Wonderful
Aerated
Waters *
Factory   -       -  Armstrong
Try a Kola Champagne!
Government Cruisers at Work in Say-
ward Timber Limits���Preparations
for Auctioning 4500 Acres Later.
Creston.���For the purpose of selling
the timber and opening the land to
settlement on Timber Limits 491,279,
better known aa the Sayward Limits,
and 281 at Corn Creek, Mr. G. H. Prince
of Victoria with a crew of local men i,
cruising in the vicinity. This government land lies from within one mile of
Creston to eight miles. Whether the
land will be soon opened depends on the
opinion as to the value and the need of
the land of the cruiser and Mr. John
Lafan,, the chief forester, who was in
town last week. The land on limits
nearer Creston have been investigated
and is of the same quality as thnt on
which the best local fruit is grown and
some' of it is famous bottom land. The
opening of this land which comprises
4,600 acres, will greatly stimulate the
growth of this district. After the timber is logged oft* the land will be plotted
and probably sold at auction. The purchaser will probably have to pay one-
tenth down and the balance in ten yearly
payments.
Residents of Creston are glorying in
the thought that the opening up of this
land will mean the extermination of the
rats and gophers which are at present
troubling the ranchers.
The land will not be open for settlement until after the report of the cruisers is submitted to the government this
fall, but Mr, Prince is assured that preparations will shortly be made to place
it on the market.
Three Valley.
The Three Valley people wish tbat
you would scare a few fish up this way.
The Three Valley Mill is running
again, having been shut down a week
for engine troubles.
There are a lew young men here anxiously awaiting the return ol tbe
school-mam, as that is the only girl
in the Valley,
Taft.
A sad aooident occurred at Taft on
Tuesday last, in which the Rev. Q. A,
Davis lost his life. He was on his
way up to tbe camps on the logging
train when somehow he fell between
the oars. Two oars ran over his body
before the train waa brought to a standstill. He was horribly mangled. His
body bas been taken to Revelstoke,
CHASE
OPERA HOUSE
FRIDAY NIGHT
August  2nd.
Big High Class Program
Motion
Pictures
An Up-to-date Selection of
tlie Heat Photo Plays from
our   Kamloops   Theatres
comprising
Dramas, Scenic,   Educational,
Western Comedy   Dm mas, .
and Ouiedys.
DOORS OPEN 7.30,
COMMENCE 8 O'CLOCK SHARP.
ADMISSION :
Children 15c. Adults 25c,
Specials for Next WeeR
Mens Neckwear.
���5*."^      2 for 35c
Reguler 50c for
25c
Regular 75c       2 for $1.00
Mens Half Hose.
Hens  Colored   Lisle   Thread   Hose
Regular  25c  to  50c    Black  and
Fancy.
6 pairs for $1.00
Ladies Lisle Hose.
Ladies Black Lisle Hose in Plain and Lace Styles
Regular 50c per pair Three pairs for
$1.00
Straw Hats.
All Children's Straw Hats to go out at
each   25c
Watch for Ad. of Pay Day Sale
of Mens, Women's, Boys' and
Misses' Shoes in Next Issue
We prepay   the   transportation charges 011 all goods ordered  by mail.
If for any reason tlie goods are unsatisfactory return them to us at our expense.
Chase, B. C.
A. S. FARRIS
Chase, B. C.
rrs up to you
To  Get  the  Best  Value  for Your Money
Visit    Our    Store    and    Get    Our    Prices
JUST ARRIVED THIS WEEK
One Ton of Choice Tea direct from
Ceylon  packed  expressly  for us.
EVERYTHING   UP-TO-DATE   IN   OUR
MEAT   MARKET
Choicest Cuts of Beef, Pork, Veal and Mutton
at Keenest Prices
Try our Home-made Pork, Beef and Balogna
Sausages ���There's  Nothing  Better
We  Specialize
STEWART'S
HAMS AND
BACON
GRANT & BALLARD
Grocers and Butchers
Chase. B. C.
/

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