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The Canadian Labor Advocate 1926-04-29

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 m
plILabor Advocate
line Workers' Notes  .. 3 ^Hi^_^. i
.;         '^W WHh Which It Incorporated tHE B.C. FEDERATIONS	
|epnth Year, No. 17 VANCQUVBR, B. G;, THlipSDAY,   APRIL 29th, 1926   '   '      FOUR PAGES
Special Articles
Labor Press, Unity off .._ 1*
The Week st Ottawa —. 1
Buying Good-will  - 1
VAN(i<flJyp. B.C., THURSDAY,   APRIL 29th, 1926'
sc a cort
iThe Week at Ottawa
By  J.  S.  WOODSWORTH,  M.P.
Northern papers hsve un-
't veritable chamber of hor-
, of the torturers."—News
ave the convicts of Ala*
bn Alabama's convict less- alone, 13,871,326; overalls, 3,037,715,
Enlightened Alabamans and other garments of a similar
character, suoh as flannel shirts,
etc., about* five million pieces, show-
nee Knox, one of the leased Ing approximately 20,000,000 gar-
klcts, after being horribly ments produced in the prisons in
jfor some Infraction of the the United: States, in State instltu-
: of fright at the renewed  tlons only, during*1294.'"
Two Kind, of Prison Lsbor
Two systems of prison labor are
Mb"with the'fa'rmeVsTnd in ™«ue in tHe United States:
r of Canada?   Very much     "Under <*• contra?ts system' the
Iccordlng to the evidence Sute feed8' ***■*****;,*!_ "ouses and
' before tho committee in- guards tne c°nvicts..*. f o do this the
the   Customs    House state «•<••'>••■"»■ an institution and
a force of guards and other employees.   The   contractor   engages
with the State for the labor of the
convicts wliich is to be performed
within or near tbe Institution.  The
contractor pays the State a stipulated amount per capita   for   the
services ot the convicts and supplies
his own raw material and super-
Intends Ihe work."*'
"Under  the  other   system   these
goods are produced under the 'piece
TereonTihat your"Mntention ***m sl"!ton'' ln  *}!lc" the State
r, reading that this shirt n>»""«"»> *■*•> *^}^ *•** te°Al>-
[The Milton Goodman Shirt clotlle8 ona -^j the convicts.
Manufacturing Company of The e™*"***™ "Pity the raw ma-
1 a r i. _.___„ I    -■__!    _,_.,    **__. >C_Y__«__   il*.    __nu_iM
Labor Papers Fail Buying The Public's
ToUkite Goodwill  H.
A   FRANK   STATEMENT   REGARDING
NEGOTIATIONS! TO DATE
As considerable effort has been made during the past
six months to unite the two labor papers in this city, we ber
lieve a review of what has been done and why amalgamation
has not taken place is due our readers and the workers generally. I.
Negotiations for a united labor press in Vancouver were
started last September with the object, so far as the ADVOCATE is concerned, of concentrating our efforts on the publication of a real live labor weekly.
barges are tbat American
[de goodB are being smug-
Canada and distributed
the country. We are
fcerned—not in* the loss ot
Ibut tn the unfair conipe-
[ these goods, and In the
whiob tbey Hold for tlle
J our people, bet me give
lep at the evidenoe:
Chairman:    I  understand,
his end, the ADVOCATE
a basis for amalgamation:
|ilt is prison-made goods,
hy the name of the firm
terial and pay the'State an agreed
amount for the work done on each
piece or article  manufactured by
•parks, the witness, quoted the convle,s-    The ".pervlston °«
[official of the United States lhe work lB generally P«to™*-d ty
a prison official,   although   sometimes by the contractors.   The officials of the prison not .only maln-
(Contlnued on page 3)
ent of Labor: 'A Haf. of
les produced In State Ineti-
vhieh amongst others indl-
producttons of work shirts
ges in Chicago
LOO—(PP)—Dickering    for
;ases ln the Chicago build-
took another turn wtth
El by the painters decorat-
nper-hungers union of a
eement renewing the old
ot tl.50 an hour for a
Iveek as of April 1. Plaster-
|carpenters have demanded
. plasterers to (1.75 snd a
tak from (1.50, and carpen-
1.50 from »1.37J_ an hour.
(inters, while not Joining
lformal understanding for
nd raise, look after their
by a clause providing that
ither three crafts obtain
occur tbe old rates the
will automoatiically be
iccordlngly. It is reported
athers are committed to re-
the tl.50 rate for 3 years,
itlficatlon meeting takes
rll 26. The plasterers took
. of "the fight by fixing May
(day for the showdown with
actors,
tl-labor tactics of the daily
getting vivid Illustration
3VS.*" The Chicago Tribune
lple Is printing front-page
gainst the $14 a day scale
the plasterers,  making
Iirt of Insinuation against
bers of Local 5 which overfly Votes for the Increase,
ireements are to be signed
ins shouts that $14 a day
,.-day week will bankrupt
[actors and boost rents and
'-high.
Iother tlmea It takes the
ourse; repeatedly publish-
to the effect that plas-
Chicago are getting  $13
| a day and that they work
days a woek.   Theae
i ore spread over the coun-
Ihe Tribune to flood the
labor market with plaster-
eat down the scale. It $14
than the contractors can
could they (If you believe
regularly pay $2 and more
|at all these years;
Striker Slashed by
Fur Manufacturer
NEW YORK—(PP)—Wielding a
fur knife, Jacob Llpton, New York
fur manufacturer, made a vicious
attack upon a union fur worker
who came to his shop. The worker
waa cut severely on the face, hands
and body and an ambulance had to
be called to give him first aid treatment. With his head swathed in
bandages be went to court under
arrest with another striker wbo
hsd accompanied him to the shop
and Llpton who Is charged with
felonious assault.
The two workers had gone to investigate Lipton's shop In conneotlon with the strike of 12,000 fur
workors. The manufacturer at
once picked up his knife and attacked the worker so viciously that
scarcely on Inch of his face was
visible after wounds were dressed,
He was weak from loss of blood.
America Trades
With   Russia
As the first step to achieve
set forth the following proposals as
1. That a joint stock eompa iy be formed, five shareholders representing the Trades and Labor Council and four
the owners of the ADVOCATE.  ■
2. That the assets and liabilities of the two papers be
funded.
3. That the policy of the united paper conform industrially to the Vancouver Trades and Labor Council and politically to the Canadian Labor Party.
This was presented to the Council and referred back to
the committee for further negotiation and the Council then
appointed a Special Committee composed of Delegates Page
and Jamieson for the Executive Committee and Delegates
Dunn and Sidaway from the Press Committee. This joint
committee met and concurred in a unanimous report to the
Council providing for the amalgamation of the two papers.
After discussion, these proposals were adopted by the Council
and the committee instructed to complete negotiations.
At a subsequent meeting of the Special Committee from
the Executive of the Trades Council and the Pre_s Committee with the owners of the ADVOCATE, the representatives of the Trades Council took it upon themselves to disregard the previous action of the Council in endorsing the
proposals for amalgamation, and submitted alternative proposals claiming that they wanted "better terms". The counterproposals made to the ADVOCATE provided for ownership
by the Trades Council of the united paper and allowed the
owners of the ADVOCATE two representatives on the board
of management.
No agreement on this basis being possible, the original
proposals were re-submitted to the Council and pn motion,
it was carried: "That the question of amalgamation be left
in the hands of the Executive with power to act, on the
understanding that the ownership of the paper rests entirely
in the hands of the Council."
Some weeks after this, the ADVOCATE received a letter
from the secretary of the Trades Council proposing amalgamation on these terms. To this the ADVOCATE replied that
we were at all times ready to discuss amalgamation as we
were desirous of having a united labor press in the city but
that we felt that the basis laid down by the Council meant
not the amalgamation of the two papers, but the absorption
of the ADVOCATE by the STATESMAN.
(Continued  on  page  2)
ONE OV the cleverest moves made
by any of the local industrial
concerns was made a few weeks
ago by the B. C. Electric under the
pretense of urgent financial needs
for local expansion, and cummunity
sentiment, when they floated the
big bond issue.
Those in charge of this institution are perhaps more aware of
the dawning of a new day in the
present social order than are many
of tho workers themselves who have
been following the trend of events
for years. These individuals know
quite well that if they can get a
sufficient number of Individuals to
Invest their savings In their company they will have a force to be
reckoned with in the event of threatening strikes. Many of the workers who may have felt compelled to
Invest will naturally resent tbe attitude of any group who, by their
activities, might Jeopardise their investments. They will feel; — poor
creatures—that they have some real
Interests to be protected.   Just what
the big fellows want!
Again, tbere has been a grow
sentiment for some time in
of municipal ownership. In sj
of the tact that the B. C. E. R. tt
on many occasions encouraged I
idea that they were hardly :
a cent, of profit, nevertheless tk
obyious that they ate not an iftap
to part with their Institution,
actions rather belie their
Nothing startling about tbat at
course! Should municipal or nillosi
al ownership become a bundle,
question at some future date tbeot
feel now that they will have _o_sa
earnest supporters in their ____■
bondholders, whom they wilt ——_
to believe that they wlll lose Us*
all it they favor pny thing otksr
than private ownership.
IT WOULD APPEAR TO 08
THAT THE B. C. E. R. HAT*
ADOPTED A VERY GOOD STSTOB
FOR THE PURCHASING OF TH*
PUBLIC'S OOOD WILU BE Y»
NOT DECEIVED.
Imperialists Enact
Forced Labor Law
CHICAGO-Ste")—Pacts obtained ty the All .merica Anti-Imperialist league reveal a widespread
industrial revolt, led by the Peruvian Federation of Printing Trades
Workers, against a compulsory labor law put through by Pres.
Legula of Peru at the Instigation
of American financial imperialists.
The law known by number as 4113
requires 12 days a year of forced
labor from each Peruvian male on
road contracts held by a Wall street
concern known as the Foundation
Co. The well-to-do are allowed to
buy themselves out of this peacetime Industrial conscription.*
The trade unions, led by the
printers, are Issuing manifesos calling upon workers not to register.
The determined apposition has
caused Legula to postpone the operation of the law for 45 days.
Peru is a financial slave colony
of the U. S. bankers, with Prss.
Legula as the native slavedrlver,
bought by small blocks of. stock In
some of the enterprises, tbe sntl-
imperiallst league charges.
NEW YORK—(FP)—Carrying a
cargo ot ofl well machinery,, motor
trucks, tractors, twine and other
articles for agricultural uses, the
first steamship flying the American
flag to southern Russia since the
war ls sailing. The Rushville, 4600-
ton freighter operated by Henry
Hunts of the Clifton Co., will bring
back Russian cement. Amtorg Trading Corp., official export and Import agency of the Soviet Government, made arrangements with
Kuntz for the ship. The cargo has
been purchased In tlle U.S. for cash.
Kuntz reports that docking cbargoB
ln Russian ports wlll be considerably higher for his American ship
than for ships of governments
which have reciprocal shipping or
trade agreements with the Russian
Government.
Coolidge Backs Big Business
WASHINGTON— (PP) — Within
24 hours after they went on strike
for a raise in pay from $10 to tit
a day, half of the 135 steam shovel-
men working on excavation Jobs In
the District of Columbia won their
demands.
By LAWRENCE TODD
WASHINGTON-(FP-U American citizens, whether press correspondents or others,, are arrested
and Jailed in Passaic In violation of
their federal constitutional rights,
let them carry their complaints to
the federal district attorney ln New
Jersey.
That Is the answer made by
President Coolidge's spokesman to
questions nBked by the Federated
Press correspondent. The spokesman made plain thc Coolidge attitude, which is:
1. That he knows of no such
violations of federal law or rights
by tlle Passaic local police and de-
putleBe, except in newspapers.
. 2. That he is making no Inquiry
into police activities that rob citizens of protection.
3. That he will Insist that victims
of police thuggery shall first get
the. support of the federal district
attorney for any appeal to his Department   of  Justice,   If  they  are
dissatisfied with the violent methods
nowbeln g used against strikers and
strike sympathizers and press correspondents by New Jersey officials.
4. That he believes the Department of Labor is still offering mediation and conciliation In tho wool
textile strike.
In brief, Calvin Coolldge declines
to Interest himself ln the fact that
the mill owners In Passaic, backed
by the usual financial groups controlling the city, county and state
governments, have created a reign'
of terror in the strike region. He
is somewhat disturbed by the unfavorable press treatment of his
rebuff to the pitiful delegation of
strikers' children who came here
to ask bim to call oft the cosBacks.
Ho wishes that tbey hod not been
permitted to show their half-famished faces, their wearied limbs
and their threadbare garments In
Washington. Hut lie stands by
business.
PASSAIC'S FREE SPEECH FIGHT
REACHES CRISIS
With the reading of tlle riot act
by the sheriff of Bergen County,
li. J*, tiie posting of 50 guards with
shotguns about the textile mills,
and arrest of Norman Thomas, director ot the League for Industrial
Democracy, who attempted to hold
a test meeting In Garfield for the
American Civil Liberties Union,
the thirteenth week of the New
Jersey strike has developed Into a
free speech crisis.
No More War
COMRADES and fellow workof*
of all lands—On behalf of thaw,
who In our own country recognise
the brotherhood of the whole h _!___»
race, we send you May Dsy greasings. Too long we have been operated from each other by ;
nationalism. Too long In the I
tereBts* *of--»-feir-we- hem lea
to mutilate and destroy one snotkat.
We ask you, our brothers wet
sisters, to unite with us In the Hav
Day celebrations, in pledging av
determination to resist, with alt em*
power, any attempt to once aak
create division betwsen us aid *»
hurl our people into the abyss et
another war. In this the springtime of our movement, with Ilia
strength ond the Joy of youth losing us forward, let us clasp Iraata
across all frontiers, determined _•
break down those barriers Uaa
have divided us tn the psst, by cork
one refusing to take up ■___•
against another, and by seeking ta
get the Movement to wliich we la-
long to prepare organised refusal tf
every kind of war service. Left w
work unceasingly, that we may inker ln the dny ot International (__-
operation and service, which Is aar
common goal.
Signed by: Messrs. Ernest llovta,
A Fenner Brockway,, C. T. Cra__&
Geo. Landsbury, M.P., John Ponasa-
by, M.P, John Scurr, M.P., Robot
Smillie, M.P, Ernest Thurtle, M.P,
Ben Turner.
SCRANTON, Pn.—(FPJ-Seran-
ton bridge and structural Ironworkers ln local 23 get lt%e on
hour more pay beginning May I,
This brings the rato to »l.37H per
hour, til for the eight-hour day.
NEARING IX MONTREAL
MONTREAL—In spite of the
fuct that very strenuous efforts
were made to stop Scott Nearing from speaking in connection with the Y.M.C.A. of McGill University recently, one of
the largest and most enthusiastic meetings was held. Principal Curry and stalwarts of the
Bank of Montreal were of no
avail against the growing sentiment that is developing here
for free speech and tbe facing of the facts regnrding our
present social and economic order.
ALL GOD'S CHILLUWC GOT
WINGS
BENTONVILLB, Aink., — (PP) —
Discrimination against negroes, aa
enacted into Jim Crow laws, aal
as upheld by teaching and exasrph
of the older generation, does Mt
meet with the approval of the Bo-
tonvllle youngsters. Almost ur
day one csn see ball games whoreks
whites and negroes compete tar
honors in a most friendly way.
Even mixed teams, of both race*
are not unknown.
Recently the Bentonvilie Higk
School (white) had a "hobo day,"
wherein tlle students canvassed ror
odd jobs to pay for baseball, basketball and similar athletic outfits.
The white business men ot the towa
did not come across very well. But
a negro bootblack turned over his
shine parlor to the students, furnished the materials, and told them
to keep nil tbey got.
During tho period llth Jilr.
1926, and 8th February, ml, IftLr
570 applications (or extended ■*-
employment benett were madt la
Britain and of these 302,013 watt
disallowed. Mfea^ __£ — [ft
'■<r .,!>■.,■'.■■■r.iiY,*., *.;*.;   *,,*, „1
■^OV*..: ■ LK,.; HAk,     •*
THE CAJTADIAN EABOR AlDVOGATE
Thursday, April   29th;
OP£JV FORUM
€*MtoriaI page
II !   IWWJ
.4 V .*?>
■*'•*..■, 8UW;
*"_*.M I.*;.'. aBWIJHM
t Address  All Letters  and
Remittances to the Editor
Cbe Canadian Labor Advocate
521 Birks Building, Vancouver, B.C. Phone Seymour 21S3
11.00 SIX MONTH
|_.*)0   PER   JtEA^
ARE  STRIKES  BEST!
Editor Labor Advocate—
rE New Jersey woolen workers' strike continues, but as
yet there Is no Immediate prospect
of settlement. What ls happening
down there? Strike meetings are
kelng held daily; well-known speakers address the unfortunate crowds,
telling them nothing new, but
merely seeking to encourage the
impossible and uneven struggle,
president Coolidge has been approached, but of course, he is unable to do anything, being himself,
tpo well controlled by the country's
rclal kings. The slightest hosts met with armed force;
iJBaceful resistance is forbidden.
.What does a strike mean to the
Wealthy employer ot labor? A
momentary cessation of dividends,
a. little business friction—no alteration In the standard of living, no
-iardship, no real Inconvenience,
•nly a growing class hatred and
unreasonableness. But to the
f orkers, a strike means more
hunger and misery and degradation;
If It brings clearer recognition of
their untenable position in the social scheme, lt does not bring any
•Destructive appreciation. Strikes
are like wars. The worst is roused.
But If the workers win this strike
-■■■which  we  earnestly   hope   they
*ni-what wlll they gam?   The nr, .understand that the time has come when some re-
»* appointments or new appointments, are   due in conec-
tfoard ot Trade True io Coior
Tat, Vancouver board of Trade, ac us last mommy meeting,
is reported io have gone on record as Deing opposed 'to
tne proposal maoe by the Trades and Labor council to cnange
from a 01/2 day to a 5-day working week.
No doubt these same gentry would nave been opposed to
the working of little seven and eight-year-old children in the
coal mines of England some few years ago, for any period less
than 12 hours per day. On the piea that the devil would
find work for their hands, from which calamity the
children had to be protected, even though incidentally, dividends were swelled.
It is obvious that even five days' work per week, if five
days were available for every worker, would be more than
sufficient to provide all the necessities of life that society
needs, provided they labored for the good of the community
and not merely to enrich the few who controlled the land
arid its resources.
If these gentlemen who represent the Board of Trade
would think for a moment—that is if they could afford the
time from their arduous money-making, soul-destroying labors
—they might possibly realize the unpleasant truth that they
are only modern examples of the intolerant, arrogant, pleasure-
seeking barons of the Dark Ages. Ultimately, however, they
MUST lose out; their control over the lives of their fellows,
their hindrance of a saner and happier social state for the
majority .must pass.
Our Open 3^orum
Readers are invited to send tetters for publication in "Our Open
Forum/' Communications should not exceed 250 words. No views
wilt be censored so tong as writers refrain from indulging in personalities.
The management of the ADVOCATE assumes no. responsibility fob
opinions expressed in this space.	
Compensation Board Due For Change
wage they ask—which will have
meet an inslduously increasing cost
•f living; staggering areas and the tion wltn tne Workmen's Compensation Board of this province.
incalculable worry and anxiety for        lhe Compensation Board was organized, incidentally, for
which   nothing   can   compensate the protection of the workers; the workers should therefore
tornwhartheyWloseneV<!r """ "" See that they are pr0perly rePresen<*d °« the Board, and
Are their leaders ill-advised? Are that the personel as a whole have a proper understanding
they wind leaders, at best?   Are of their relationship to the workers who are unfortunate
strikes really worth while?   The enough as to need care and attention. Is this too much to ask?
*Z_T "wton rehire ^strikes Th6re 'S * Br0wing feeling that some of those in control
■wtll118 be unnecessory"' ^The" of the Board are too much incclined to think they can control
it entirely. When the Compensation Board was formed, there
was an understanding that the workmen were to have a' free
choice of their doctors. A decided amount of favoritism
has crept in—as is the case with most such institutions—
and the workmen do not seem to have the free choice that
they expected.
Free choice of doctors should be insisted upon, and fur-
iHn__SiM_l1'_2J_SaT__J_i™ tolt ther' there should be aome sort of an aPPeal b°a*-a. to protect
in   the
LOCAL LABOR PRESS
For some time past there has
heen a feeling that the two labor
papers should amalgamate. Such
a feeling has been held by those
In control of the Labor Advocate
ever since Its inception as such. In
fact there was an effort made. to
have the B. C. Federatlonist and
the Labor Statesman so amalgamated. Certainly, those who know
what efforts have been put forward
by those responsible for the Advocate will not claim for a single
moment that they have been remiss
In their duty to help further a
spirit of co-operation amongst the
labor groups of this city. There
are occasions, however, when no
matter wjiat efforts are put forward
by one group, the other group will
endeavor to frustrate them under
some guise or another.
In my very humble opinion—I
may say that this ls not the flrst
time I have so expressed myself
and I am being convinced more
and more as the days pass by that
there is ample proof, in my jude-
ment, of the truth of such expressions—there is a decided effort being made on the part of a fow ot-
vclals of the Trades and Labor
Council to forestall the amalgamation of the papers. In spite ot
the fact that on more than one occasion the delegates to the council
voiced themselves as being ln favor
of sucb an amalgamation, official
dom—composed of a group who, In
my opinion, are making a nice comfortable living, riding on the backs
of the masses of the workers, under
the guise of being faithful servants—I say, this officialdom ls, In
my opinion, doing everything possible to frustrate the sincere and
honest efforts that have been put
forward, not alone by these In control of tlle Advocate but also by
members of the Trades Council
who bave acted, upon their own
press committee, and of tbe majority of whom It can be said, 'they
made an honest endeavor to bring
about the much needed co-operation, only to have all tlieir efforts
nullified by a group, who seemingly lack sincerity.
The. Advocate may have to discontinue shortly. The burden it
has entailed has been born by three
or four individuals who have felt
the need of a real, free labor paper
in this city; onc that was free from
the Influence of a group In the labor
movement that Is as pernicious in
its influence as is capitalism itself.
Until the tyjior movement Is Controlled by individuals who have a
higher sense of honor and duty towards the great mass of the workers as a wlloloithan a number of
tlle present local Trades Union
autocrats appear to have, I feel
that there is little hope of the
movement functioning In a manner
that  will  serve -tdfilietter,
slightest degree, the position oj
other than a few officials,
ism and self-sacrifice is ess]
If the labor movement is evor]
to amount to anything, elthj
or elsewhere.
,*   Though the Labor Advocai
go out of business, we may 1
sured that some other paw
someday, bo made .to funcl
fulfill the need that ls obvli
that never can and never I
fulfilled by any paper oontrl
a group who have, in my f
no other purpose to serve!
movement than to make thp
comfortable and happy, peT
Some day the others  will
May that day be not too J
Unt.
J. LYLE TH
52*1 Bid
TOU MOORE  IN
Recently, Tom   Moore, 1
before the Empire Club ini
said tbat the Canadian Lal|
did not voice the opinion i
ized labor, and that the
was under the control of e|
snd was not to be taken i
The Toronto Council was |
In   Its  condemnation .of*
his attempt to discredit *l
al movement of the worke|
statements will doubtless
very effective at election!
the bosses.
gradual, and therefore despised pro
cess of education is our only sal*
■ration.
PRANCES   WILLS.
Union Directory
menterj, ft. H.
Ttet—,e£'ro_>_ the 'n*iured men from an-v Possibility of autocracy
_ handling of their claims.
BAKERY SALESMEN, LOCAL  371—
..Meats,    eecond    Thunday    every
'.ttw.%»Ktwi"'all,Si,.i !££!: now administered, is a credit to modern efficiency, but there
«yr. h. a. bowto., wi lata at«. B. should be a little more humane feeling and tolerance exhibited.
•ITIO EMPLOYEES* UNION, LOCAL '
IB—Meets arst 0>d third Fridays r VT   tits  fTX'ITl*
to tin Milk It HB H«.(lnt_ \V., al l'r-1   *"*■   1*>>I«*-*
a »*ra. John MacRt-tehlc, president,
- rAO-Sth At*. E.i Gm. Harris**, See.
. TV-ss.i     W.   J.   Scrlbbens,   bvslaess
.'. utn HMifw'sr.""_J *** F'M■■*, *- of the world, unite, you have per year and expenses Is too much
msiciAN' mutual PROTECTIVE upthlng to lose and everything to to one man »*hen lt is taken out ot
_OTnon, L*e«i i«, A. f. *f st. — gain" goes on and yet we see the a union card from a man who makes
n_ .   ...       ,_ e_*rm**r a*. c^_  LeBtors making a good living less thsn $1000 per year at hard
It must be admitted, however, that the board, as it is
their turn comes. I say tl|e old
Editor ot tlle Labor Advocate; Labor laws don't suit the present
■pOMRADK, the old cry "workers day conditions.   This 10,000 dollar
, PMdtr Street*, seeead Bandar at
t* *.m. President, II. C. Miller, SOI
>*ls** Streetl secretar*-*, E. A.
Jenleson, SSI Nelson Streetl ananclal
•wretarr, W. E. Willi*,*,., Ml Nel-
M-a Streetl organiser, F, Fleteber,
M Nelso* gtreet. 	
THE  FEDERATED  SEAFARERS'
. onion of Canada—Headnar-
Oeee at Roams », * and 7, Flsek
> BMIdlac, 103 Hastlacs Street W„
Vancouver, R*C. Tel. Ser, SOBS.
I-mldent, Robert Themi Vlee-Presl*.
■sat, David Gllleaflei Scc'r-Treas-
mm,    Wai.    Donaldson. Victoria
■naeh,    Room    11,    Oreea    Block,
■nad  Street, Vletorl*, B.C.    Pkone
without work, keeping the WorkerB work,
apart.   Another with big headlines      Yours for fair play
in the O.B.U. Bulletin, "Hoover and
Ht Forty Thieves    at   Winnipeg,"
"Street   Car-men's   Trouble"   and
"Shelving the Amalgamation of thc
Statesman and  Advocate  for  one
year by the T.L.C."
I   don't   care a
P, DONOHUE,
246—66th Ave.
E„
EDITOR PROTESTS
So flagrant was the abuse of constitutional authority by the Passaic
rap, lt shows police that Oswald Garrison Villard,
weakness be It rod, pink or white, editor of Tlle Nation, telegraphed
Let us all unite under ono banner, the following protest to the defense
*^3ESS*i.'t,H,<-.AS.   Csn?p'b'ellJ°'vlS!  onc Unlon' on8  "arty mi one -***00'1   ™ml"lttec:
prealdeat, R.  Gontbroi    secretar***- Labor paper.   This is an anialgaina-
treasurer, R. H. Neelanda, P.O. Box ,.  -      ,. ., .. .        .
ee.   Meet*   last    Saaday   ot eaeh "on age  'or the capitalist and c
■oath at 2 ».m. In Holden Bid*., is pnr|y fighting age for the workers, of a labor trouble in which there
"In nearly thirty years of active
Journalism I do not recall a case
Hastings  St.  E.
PRINCE RUPERT TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION, No. 41S—President, S.
.B. Macdoooldt seeretsrr-trcsBarer,
I. M. C-mpbell, P.O. Bos 08*. Nests
bsat Tharsdsv of caek month.
THE CANADIAN
lato Ibbocate
With Which Is Incorporated
THE    BRITISH    COLUMBIA    FEDERATIONIST
PUBLISHED  EVERY  THUHSDAY
By the Labor Publishing Co.
Business nnd  Editorial Olllce
5__ Birks Building
The Canadian Labor Advocate Is a
awn-faetloaal weekly aewspaper,
SlTlnjr newa of thc farmer-labor
BMkvemeot  la  sctlon.
The latest in B. C„ Officers Elect- "'ere has been a worse abuse of
ed by the LLP. In S. Vancouver." authority than this one In Passaic
Why tills new party? All our Labor and Paterson. The complete denial
membors wore elected on the C.L.P. ol civil liberty ought to make any
tickets. Too many parties, cut tills American who values his birth-
stuff out. LLP., CUP., P.L.P., r'Bbt rlso in protest. The author-
S. P. ot C. The same thing applies 'ties have not only misused their
to thc press, why not only one good Powers ln the most arrogant and
big Labor paper Instead of a bunch unconstitutional way but they have
of two nnd four page-bits of by tlieir partisanship and one-
papors cutting cacli others throats, sldedness done everything to Incite
scabbing on onc anothor for a liv- the strikers to reprisals. The setting. The Labor movement as I seo it control of tlle strikers and their
ls like the Irish In Ireland—one refraining from violence In the face
fighting tho other and tlle common of brutal police clubbings reflects
enomy laughing up his Blecve at the the greatest credit upon them and
traitors. Most ot thc IrlBh have thoir loaders. They deserve all pos-
beon soldiers, sailors and policemen, s'blo moral nnd financial support.
■MMi-lptloa Hates, United Statea
aad forelffa, SXOO per rcori Caaa-
da, M per year, $1 for slz meathsi
IP  aaleas   eabserlblnc   In  n   body,
S(o per member per month.
Member of Th* Federated Presa aad
Th*  British  L*a*r   Free*
Many have the V.C. fighting for
Iheir Imperial mastors, pensions or
ment here is the same. The Oompers, the Greens on the othor side
have tho V.C. fighting for the work-
OS WALD VILLARD,
Editor, The Nation.
April  26, 1928
Mussolini 'lost tlte point of hla
era on this side. A good meal ticket. <°se the other week, when an arls-
- Look what LbwIb got by fighting tocratlc lady took a shot at hlm. Un-
,,;.('t^e, minersju N. S, Our leaders have fortunately the l-efct of the dictator's
-to..safeguard4het meal.Ulcket f\ygfJffljfl, ***"*tJHt*POP6»h0ttl**JMf.
LOCAL LABOR PAPERS PAIL TO l.VITE
(Continued from page 1)
When the new press committee of the LABOR STATES-
WAN was elected early ih the new year, we were again invited to meet them to discuss proposals for amalgamation,
which invitation was really accepted.
After consideration, the owners of. the ADVOCATE, accepted the proposals for amalgamation as made to them by
the Press Committee of the Trades Council. These were as
follows:
1. The owners of the Labor Advocate agree to join with
the Trades Council in publishing a joint labor paper.
2. The ownership of such paper to be held in the name
of the Vancouver Trades and Labor Council.
3. The Business management and control of policy to be
vested in a committee of eight; four members of the committee to be elected by the Trades and' Labor Council, and
four to be elected by the owners of the Advocate.
4. Th full control of the paper to be in the hands of
the committee subject to the following provisions:
(a) A financial report audited by a chartered accountant to be prsented to the Council each month.
(b) The joint committee shall not'ihcur any debt in
excess of $500.00 over the current assets of the paper, as
indicated by the auditor's statement, without the consent of
the Trades Council.
(c) The Trades Council agrees not to withdraw its support from the new paper without giving the'Joint Press Committee 90 days notice in writing and both,.parties agree not
to publish or participate in the publication of any general
labor paper during the life time of the new paper.
These were placed before the Vancouver Trades Council
at the regular meeting held April 6th and carried by a good
majority. The Executive of the Council, fearing that amalgamation was likely to be accomplished, called a special meeting
of the Executive, to see what could be done'tb prevent amalgamation.
At the regular Council meeting, April 20th, the Executive
reported that resolution of the Council passed, February 16th
had never been rescinded and consequently the proceedings
of the last meeting were out of ordr. The President so ruled
and was sustained by the Council.
A further recommendation by the Executive to the effect
that amalgamation be laid on the table for twelve months
was also concurred in.
We are not prepared to say but that this action on the
part of the Trades Council was a wise one. Ultimately the
workers will demand a paper that will voice the aspirations
of the working class and when that demand becomes strong
enough they will quickly remove individuals who are more
adept at building a.machine to keep themselves in control of
that movement than they, are *yv)th the'^|vancemsft{ of that'
move.ni*3lljt_._   ,.-..„,„,J- ■■■■ ■■•
FOOLING FATE
The two Irishmen were I
way home from a fundi
were talking earnestly
about the uncertainty
'Sure," said one, 'I'd give]
go lt I knew th' place whef
goin" to die." "Faith,
swered the other, "and pluj
would that do ye?"
piled Pat,* "I'd never go |
place at all."
Classified
BATHS
VANCOUVER TURKISH I
Pacific Bldg., 744 Hasting]
BICICIES
HASKINS 8 ELLIOTT. 8<j
St. W. The bat makes 4
on easy terms.
BOOTS  (LOGOINfl
H. HARVEY, 58 Cordova |
CAFE
EMPIRE CAFE, 76 Haatirj
CHIROPRACTOR
DR. D. A. McMILLAN, Pall
uate. Open daily andl
633 Haitingi Street V"
Granville Street.   Phone |
DENTIST
DR. W. J. CURRY,.Ml ]
Bldg.
DRUGS
RED STAR DRUG STCj
Cordova and Carrall.
FLORISTS
BROWN BROS. B CO.
Haitingi St. E.
GLASS   ..
dazing,  Silvering,  Se|
WESTERN GLASS CO.
Cordova St. W„ few doj
Woodward's.    Sey. 8687
iale and retail window g||
HOSPITAL
BETTER BE SAFE THAi
—Grandview Hoipital -T
lurgical, maternity. 1091
Drive.    High. 137.
~      MEN'S FURNISH1IJ
W. B. BRUMMITT, 18-2|
Stmt.
MEN'S stars I
C. D. BRUCE,  LTD.,
Haitingi Streetl.
W. B. BRUMMITT, 1
Street.
MUSIC
VIOLINS REPAIRED, BJ
ed. Columbia ' record]
Gramophones repaired.]
reedi and aupplies. Wil
Muiic Store, 965 Robsl
2994.
OPTICIAN
PITMAN OPTICAL H(|
Hastingi Weit.
PAINT AND t-PLI :
GREGORY B REID, llfl
Street Eait.
..,,...-.        TPBACCOS.   .
MAINLAND 'tJIGAR  stq
Carrall Street. kldsyi April 29th, 1926
THE CANADIAN LABOR ADVOCATE
■.I* *#!■*. J        •
?&:.-*#:.
IcCCAIG AUCTION BOOMS
MBLROSB and MAY
_j and Ysluators
 Use ln House Bales.
 » Listing give us a Call.
I Richards St       Sey. 1M0
Vancouver, B.C
BRITISH LABOR STANDS FIRM
5
Complete
llorugs 'Ustd in Examination
HIS adyertiiement meani high-
[ grade glauei. with s thor-
Wough and advanced eye ex-
Ration by a graduate specialist.
" will fod that we give the
i value for the lean money,
[we Hand back of all work
I out.
■•HftKir «V« ache, ut ul.
BIRD
£YE SERVICE
(UPSTAIRS)
bB SERVICE BLDG.
Robson at Granville
lance 680 Robson St.
I Phone Sey. 8955
Und  hotel
fclAMC-  J. KANH, Props.
Vancouver, B. C.
| Popular Priced Hotel
) and Cold Running Water
Steam Heat
Newly  Decorated
New Fixtures
laing Room  in Connection
J.E8: SOc Per Day and Up
fphone: 24 Water St.
, 1492    Opp. Union S.S. Co.
iRUCE'S
SUIT
SALE
• reductions, splendid vslnes.
dar Prices 122.60 to HMO,
.-
(15.00 to $37.65
IG D. BRUCE
Limited
]f. Homer and Hastings St.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
THE decision of the British mine-
owners to talk wages on a district instead ot a national basis was
a declaration of war on British
labor. It * brought, the industrial
committee of the British Trades
Union Congress Into line behind
tbe miners' execiitfye.
The miners on April 10 adopted
a resolution against wage reductions, lengthening of hours and
substiution of district for national
agreements regarding minimum
wages. The. crisis comeB May. 1.
In turning down district negotiations the miners are ln harmony
with the report of the government's
coal commission, which said:
"We do not see how such a wage,
ln a community so small and closely
united as Qreat Britain, can be ultimately fixed by other than national
authorities. To give a free hand
to each district to settle its own
standard ot living, without consultation and without regard to any
other, ls to expose the standards
of the more efficient and prosperous
areas, on which th'e future ot the
country rests, to undermining by
the weaker areas; lt opens the door
to cutthroat competition between
different districts at the expense
of wages."
The situation ls described by A.
A. Purcell, former' chairman of the
British Trades Union congress and
now president of the International
Federation of Trades Unions, in a
statement to The Federated Press
on April 8 thus: "Things seem to
be developing sternly along lines
leading to a struggle this summer.
In any case my view is that the
Baldwin government is not really
anxious for a fight. I rather lean:
to the view that ln the event of the
trade union movement definitely
arraigning themselves on the miners' side, as I am positive it will,
the Baldwin-Churchill flank wlll
crumble and will offer a further
subsidy. Certain members of the
government are already urging that
the miners and owners ought .to
get together snd bring about peace.
This shows how uncertain they are
of their own forces and how, to
some extent, they do* not relish the
Idea of backing up the very sloth
ful owners."
This feeling that the government
ls looking for a chance to save the
situation by continuing the government subsidy is echoed by the New
York Times correspondent on April
16 after a meeting between the
miners and the government.
The owners refuse to state exactly what wage reductions they
will demand. But assuming that
their demands are the same as last
July the average British miner's
wage, once the subsidy ls withdrawn, will'be under $10 a week.
This average takes account of tbe
highest paid workers ln the most
prosperous fields as well as those
lesB favorably placed.
The latest word (April 19) Indicates that the owning class Is backing down In the face of labor's
united front. It is reported that
an agreement is just about reached
under which a national minimum
wage for the industry will be established. District negotiations will
then establish wages above that
minimum subject to the sanction
of the national union.
With the Marine Workers
Conducted  by  W.  H.  DONALDSON, Secretary  Federated  Seafarers  of
Canada
IHE ORIGINAL
tHARVEY
jogging Boot
HAND-MADE BOOTS
- for -
iGGERS,   MINERS,   CRUIS.
PBS ANV PROSPECTORS
Ruiek- Service for Repairs
AH Work Guaranteed —
I attention to mall orders
[.* Harvey
1st. in Vancouver In 1897
CORDOVA    STBEET    W.
impire
■\Mir.T
!afe
QUALITY
COURTESY
SEASONABLE
76 HASTINGS EAST
HAROLD DEGG and
BOB KRAUSB
tie 64th Batt. and 72nd Batt.
Telephone
Ahead
When travelling in the
busy season, it is wise
to telephone ahead for
reservations.
At tlle last meeting of the Federated Seafarers' Union of Canada
several new members were admitted
to the membership and a number of
applications were listed for reinstatement. All were accepted with
the exception of those that did not
enclose the necessary fee.. A charge
was laid against a member who is
at sea at present by another member who seemed to think that the
matter should be dealt with in the
Brother's absence. Atter consideration the charge was laid on the
table until thc member has a chance
to explain the cause ot his actions.
A lively discussion arose on tho
(mention of the Seamen who were
in good standing, with the organization, who were aboard the S.S.
Famous when that vessel went
aground on the Skeena River, April
4, 1926 the shipwreck benefit
(125.00) to which the financial members aro entitled in such cases.
Brothers Griffiths, Morgan, Borland, took the view that as the
members who were In good standing had not lost any of their belongings, they were not entitled to
thc shipwreck benefit. Brothers
Bell, McClay, the Secretary and
other members were of the opinion
that lt should be paid, regardless.
The Secretary read the clauso from
tlle constitution governing such
cases and mentioned that ou the
S.S. Amur, although members had
not lost any of their clothes
thoy were paid the benefit. In the
case of the S.S. Famous, only two
members benefit by the clause,
namely, Andy Olsen and H. Hedln.
The auditors J. Craddock and J.
McEwan & D. Borland, reported
that they had gone over the books
and receipts >,nd tound everything
in first-class shape and corresponding vrfth the Secretary's roport.
The committee that met the National Association of Engineers last
week    reported     the     result    of
their conferenoe   with   that   body,
_ which was recorded as usual.
[     The secretary was Instructed by
t the meeting to get In touch with
, the Whaling Company regarding the
[ conditions, otc, for the members ln-
| tending to go whaling again this
Canadian Government Merchant
Marine Ltd, That company has
promised to meet us at an early
date, (the appointment Is expected
before this goes to the press).
The M. S. Lillehorn ls ln port
and the crew report that they had
to suffer poor food through an
Inexperienced cook. It is very seldom that the vessels under the
management ot Captain B. Johnson
have complaints of such nature.
Meanwhile the cook has been fired.
Brothers Burnett and Sclater havo
been discharged from St. Paul's as
convaUcent and Brother G. Watton
Is still at the General Hospital; W.
Brown of the S.S. Canadian Farmer
was admitted to the St. Paul's Hospital and Is to undergo an operation.
Mall List at Headquarters
T. Altklnson, H. Becket, W. Burns,
F. Boulet, J. Coll, H. Dobbin, H.
Echs, J Fraser, J. Flanagan, J.
Godwin,' W. Hedln, B. Hamlll, W.
Haley, W. Hannah, R. Jones, J.
Kissock, W. Loxton, K. Larsen, M.
Maddlgan, J. Maskell, J, Mahoney,
D. Martin, J. McQueen, A, E. Pugh,
H. Rhodes, J. Starr, C. Stephens, C.
Tarratt.
TH^ WEEK AT OTTAWA
(Continued from page 1)
tain discipline but also dictate the
dally quantity ot work required."
According to the witnesses:
"There is in-the United States a
general practice of prison contractors to build plants within prison
enclosures. Some of these contractors haVe corrupted whole legislatures.
"It is  stated that 60,000  people
wore contracted for at less thsn a
dollar a day, when, according to
authentic information they are earning on the average six dollars a
day."
The witness stated:
"I have been 17 years ln the
business,    and   practically   all
ready-to-wear   that  comes   Into *
Canada Is prison-made."
Menace To Health
Since' these goods go Into our
homes, It Is well to know! the conditions under which they are manufactured. The witness quoted from
a report on the prison-labor Situation:
"Of far greater moment than
the financial Injustices Involved
Is the mailer of public health.
Prisoners are so largely recruited
from the lower strata of society
thst they are almost" universally
the victims of the communicable
diseases bred In poverty, squalor,
Ignorance and vice. The percent*
age of venereal diseases runs abnormally high, trachoma Is most
common, particularly in the south
nnd among negro convicts, and
the srs.'ss of architecture make
prisons Incubators for tuberculosis among the subnormal, underfed and overworked prisoners. In
few, If nny, of the prisons where
gnrinents are manufactured, is
there any adequate system ol
physical examination, segregation
nnd treatment of communicable
diseases. Prisoners suffering trom
all sorts of filthy and dangerous
ailments handle the garments,
cough nnd spit on them, use them
to wipe Infected eyes and pus-
exuding sores, and then they go
into the market without disinfection to carry the germs ol deadly
diseases to the merchants' counters and the people's homes."
Perhaps some one wonders that
the American people themselves
tolerate such a system.
Here Is what Mr. Milton Goodman, the president of one ot the
companies said In an Interview:
"You think yoa wlll be able to
secure the support and co-operation of social service groups,
prison reform organisations and
organised labor. I am telling you
qnlte frankly that you won't. We
prison labor contractors, have a
firm grip on the existing prison-
reform organisations, and you
wlll get neither help nor comfort
from them. Through onr generous donations, and our ability to
'put over* the right people for*,
the Important jobs, we shape the
policies of the social service or*
guntsations to n large extent,
large enough at least to prevent
you getting any help from these
sources.  In the lalior movement,
aa* In the SUte f»iera«entl„jre
have 'key' men on our pay roll,
and you MU Had yourself* Hooked
and baffled at erery tun.*
These are the goods which .are
said to be smuggled Into Canada.
Again, with the assistance of
powerful organisations.
It is a very serious situation indeed when these prison-made goods
have been the cause ot the failure
of a number of Canadian business
firms—lt Is a much more serious
thing that they may bring disease
Into the homes ot hundreds ot innocent people. *
Labor the,Wori$
PAB-UJUA-a
Colonization—Mennonlte and Que- ;
slan colonisations are being planned ;
for by their respective represents- ;
fives who are now   In   Paraguay
studying agricultural condition* and
arranging for the location of suitable tracts ot land   upon   which
their groups may settle.
AUTOMOBILES
We have Bome Good Buya la
GUARANTEED USED CARS
Cash Payment As Low as (H
PATTISON MOTORS Ltd.
Phone Sey. 7406   lM.6raa.8t
- Stay at the -
Hotel Stratford
. Tho Place Called Home
Corner GORE AVE. and
KEEPER STBEET
,       Phoae Sey. 6131
P.  OIOVANDO,  JOHN THA
200 Elegantly Furnished
Rooms.
60 Rooms with Private Bath
Moderate Prices
FIRST-CLASS SERVICE
PERU
Government Labor Headquarters:
By a Supreme Decree, the Minister
of Public Works has been empowered to build, ln Lima, quarters tor
laborers, and, under tbe Act of October 27, 123, to expropriate the
necessary land. The plan calls for
the building of one thousand houses
to be turned over, upon completion,
to the poorer class of laborers with
families. Schools, a church, plazas
and playgrounds are to augment
the homesttes.
HOLLAND .
The Dutch Union ot Railwaymen
and  Tramwaymen  has  purchased
five motor omnibuses to be oper-
ated for the convenience' ot tie
public on a route now.served by a '
private company, ln the event of
a pending dispute between the company and itB employees coming to a
strike,   ft Is believed that this la I
the first Instance iu which a union
has   prspared  to light  employers
with their own  weayon—competition.
■—,—.*—„«,■-,■— .—■■.»
MEN!
MAKE THIS YOUR STORE!
Every man that is a friend of'Labor will further his intereats by buying here.
Suits from $14.75 to $37.50
We carry a complete line of men's furnishings; work and
dress clothing.     Our strong guarantee goes with every
sale we make.    SATISFACTION OR MONEY BACK.
Mail orders receive prompt and careful attention.
WRAY & McKEE  LTD.
52 Hastings St. West Vaneoaver, B.C.
' A   NORMAL   SPINE   MEANS '
J                    HEALTH
! Dr. W.F.E. Durrant 5
{ CHIBOPRACTOR J
< ' Palmer Graduate
, Backache,    Sprains,    Rheuma- ,
J     tlsm,    Stomach    and    all J
I Internal Troubles. i
» SIXTH FLOOR '
, 61S Dominion Bank Building !
J 207 Hastings St W.   Sey. UM >
Vancouver Turkish Baths
Will Cure Your Rheumatism
Lumbago, Neuritis or Bad Cold
MASSAGE A SPECIALTY
PACII1C  BUILDING
744 Hast St* W. Phoa* Bar N»
H. NEIL
Hand Had* Loggers' aad
Seamen's Boots
1S6 LONSDALE AVE.
NO. VANCOUVER   Pbone UU
SICKNESS THE RESULT OF DEFECTIVE TEETH
DR. W. J. CURRY, DENTIST
OFFICE I Mil DOHHIION BUILDING
Phone Ser. HM for AppolnUaeat
DOCTORS are aow recognising the relationship between diseased teeth and bad health.
Every week or two some physician sends me' a patient to
have hie teetb attended to, and in the majority of eases the doc-'
tor's suspicions are confirmed, and the health improves when tbe
Dental needs bave been supplied.
This ls natural; good blood depends on good digestion, and
this ln turn depends on mastication.
. DR. OURRY combines Long Experience with most Up-to-
date Methods.
■HA
MAINLAND CIGAR STORE
"THE PLACE FOR PIPES"
Mail Orders Receive Promt Attention
310 CARRALL STREET    VANCOUVER, B.C.
RED STAR DRUG STORE
"THE MAIL ORDER DRUGGISTS"
We Make a Speolal Effort to Get Hoods Out by First HaB
Aftor Receipt of Yonr Order
Corner Cordova and Canal
Vancouver, B.C.
-.V*
i A special meeting ot the organl-
i zation was held on Friday last In
J connection with certain matters per-
J talnlng to the Coaster Type ot ves-
l sels of the Ci G."M. M. Ltd., and a
Wt WPP*™-*» comliilfltee was l_ifj>dlnted'to',fco Into
the matter with the officials of the
a......................
Fresh Cut Flowers, Funeral Designs, Wedding Bouquets, Pot
Plants, Ornamental ud Shade Trees, Seeds, Bulbs,
Florists' Sundries
Brown Brothers & Co. Ltd.
FLORISTS AHD NURSERYMEN
3 STORES—S
48 Huting, St. E*. Sey. 988-672   665 GranvilU St., Sey. 9513-1)91
,1*.        ■iivlSli Hsitinji St.^1., Seymour 1J70 ..,    .. ■
,.,r,::.$AYlT WITH FLOWERS'',   ■„.,,. .,,„*
.I*.,*.,.!...!^..,*. I **■■*■.■■__■■*.■_.■_._-,■_.■■_..._■■_■   _.,-,_. I
FOR  GOOD   DEPENDABLE
MERCHANDISE
TRY US!
MEN'S   FINE  STRIPED   SUITS,  Young   Men's  and
Men's   $20.00
MEN'S FANCY WORSTED SUITS, in Young Men's and
Men's 925*00
MEN'S FINE BLUE SERGE SUITS 925*00
MEN'S WORK SUITS IN TWEEDS $17 50
STETSON HATS  98*50
NOVELTY HATS, from  94*00
W. B. Brummitt
18-20 CORDOVA ST. WEST VANCOUVER, BC.
4*
OUR BIG UNLOADING
SHOE SALE
WILL NOT LAST MUCH LONGER
For a few days we are putting on extra specials to
supply those patrons who were unable to purchase earlier.
WATCH OUR WINDOWS
You can positively save 25 to 50% on your new
Footwear. Every pair in the store is guaranteed Solid
Leather.     A big range to choose from.
Men's, Women's and Children's
BUY NOW AND SAVE MONEY!
Kibler's Shoe Store
(TllO  VlGBt  for  I_6f9B_
';'•'"   iOS Hasting*'Strert East     (Almost Opf. the Library)
,,m,*,.*..*,,*.t*,,*.t*i,*tl*..*..*..*.•*..*.i*Tt*t m *..*,•*..*..*..* Page Four
THE CANADIAN LABOR ADVOCATE
_£=___ i  '   iM-'-ift.i wtiiftxtu
Thursday, April   29th,
*l
WRAY
FUEL & SUPPLY
Right at West Burnaby Station
'phone Coll. 827
This Is tbe time to think about
next winter's wood. ' See us
about prices  and terms.
COAL    ALWAYS   IN    STOCK
At City Prices
I ,***.itmutmu Mil in —in Mil t*** ll MIT ii**^i*.___m
Jubilee labor Hall Notes
W. A. WHITE
4617 Klngswny     •     Coll. S18
Groceries
and
Hardware
SATISFACTION ASSURED
- We Deliver -
Burnaby
Private Hospital
V. R. Scott, R.N.
Private and Semi-Private
Rooms.
4207 Kingsway     Coll. 724
■a—MMtii-tb££ii_t£Mt*t*_K&A -wfitm "_*l-
CENTRAL PARK
PHARMACY
4581 KINUSWAV
Prescription Specialists
— lour. Patronage Solicited. —
Store Phone
House Phone
-  -Coll. 382
Coll. 622R1
CENTRAL PARK
DRY GOODS
4518 Kingsway     •     Coll; 474
Special-
Men's Work Shirts   95«.
Full line ot Summer Underwear
tor every, member ot tbe family.
Get our prlcee before you
buy elsewhere.
B. Shewbrooks
ARCHITECT and REAL
ESTATE SPECIALIST
4518 Kingsway • Central Park
Pkoae Coll. S84K1
Evenings Coll. 811X2
On Saturday next May 1st we are
holding our Sixth Annual Rally in
the I.O.O.P. Hall, corner Kingsway
and McKay.' As the day ls also International Lahor Day, a double interest is, thereby acquired. The
meeting will commence promptly at
8 o'clock with Comrade Frank
Brown, M.L.A. for Burnaby ln tlle
chair. Late-comers, be on time tor
once, or you may have to stand, as
seating accommodation Is limited.
For speakers, wte have Dr. Telford
and others representing the white
workers: also a Hindu, Chinese and
Japanese speaking for their respective countries. The dominating idea
is to demonstrate to the people of
Burnaby the spirit of International
Labor Day vis—Unity, Unity of
thought and purpose, Irrespective
of color and creed ls one of the
axioms of Socialism; Are not all we
workers whether white or brown
being exploited at the point of production? Then let us stand together
and prepare for the great day when
our exploiters will vanish as the
leaves In Autumn, before the ad-
i vances ot an enlightened, steadfast
mass of workers. May day Is not
a day of rejoicing and Jubilation. It
Is one day when we should think of
the oppressed workers of all lands
who have dared to speak and act
for their claBS at one time or another. It Is the day for us to think
In loving memory of those who
have not even feared prison,, exile
or death that future generations
might be tree. No monuments are
erected to their memory, they died
as they lived in the fight! Let us
take to heart the message they have
given us aud at least do something
to spread tHe teachings of Socialism, the only way In which International Brotherhood can be attened.
Hodem Harder
Should wo not be Interested in
the workers of Syria who are at
present fighting against the Imperialistic desires of France? The
poor sweated peons of India, China
and Japan? The facts that out of
every 1000 babies born in Bombay
over 700 die before one year of age
and that 67 poor men are In goal In
Bengal without even having a trial
should surely attract our attention.
Workera of Canada, look a bit farther afield than you .have done in
the past and realise that when comrades are being exploited bitterly In
other lands you cannot have economic freedom.
Phone: Coll, 352X1
DAVE SMALL
Tailor
4012 Kingsway
—For   any   Cleaning   or
Pressing,     He will  call.
Some Slogans
,  Let us have as our slogans for
May day-
ID The rigid enforcement of the
eight-hour law day, agreed to at the
Washington Convention.
(2) The All Inclusive Trade Union
International.
(3) A better minimum standard of
living.
(4) The Defence of the Russian
Workers, also those workers ot the
Orient, Africa etc., who are today
the victim of greedy capitalism.
Wake up you overworked, under-:
store clerks, bsnk clerks and drug
clerks, open your eyes you unorganized toilers! The eight hour day can
be made to apply to you lf you want
It! Let tbis May Day be one of resolutions for the future. Start right
on the road you intend to travel.
Educate yourselves ln economics
and Socialism and make yourselves ^
a force in the community.
Come In your hundreds and let the
Burnaby May Day celebration of
the Independent Labor Party be a
huge success. There will be speeches, singing, refreshments and dancing. An instructive, happy evening
is assured for all! Come along, open
your ears and give your brain a
chance to worK. Don't forget that
a thinking people means the downfall of exploitation, oppression, imperialism and capitalism ln all llts
forms.
— H. S. B.
People are talking of the Good Values given by
McKay Dry Goods & Men's Furnishing Store
3968 Kingsway, McKay — Next door to the Royal Bank.
We are pleased to hear these reports. Our
Merchandise at such a reasonable price, that our P
our best advertisement.
For the beneflt of those who have not yet
invite you to visit our store snd see the large and
around and make yourself at home.
Household* Staples, Fancy Dress Goods, Gin
Rods, Notions, Ladles' snd Children's Summer U
A complete stock ot Men's Furnishings, M
Work Pants, Overalls for Carpenters, Painters, Te
Dress Shirts, and Boys' Shirt Waists, Etc.
Children's Coveralls snd Play Suits in L
Picnic Supplies.
aim is to give our customers First Class Reliab
iitions can't help but talk.    A satisfied customer
paid this City Store ln the Suburbs a visit, we
representative stock we carry.     Come in and loof
ghain's, Crepes, Curtain Scrims, Draperies, Kitsch
nderwear and Hosiery, Wools, Oloves, Etc. tj
en's and Boys' Summer Underwear, Khaki Pant/
ainsters    and   Oeneral Purposes.        Work Shirt]
orge Variety.        Life Buoy Brand Canvas Shoei
City Prices — More Often than Not we are Less
— KOTE THE ADDRESS —
McKAY DRY GOODS & MEN'S FURNISHINGS
Phone: COLLISWOOD 848R3 E. PITMAN,' Proprietor. 8988 KINGSWAY.   HeKj
PARK YOUR CAR IH FRONT OF STORE AND SHOP IN COHFORT
BRIGHTS
GROCERIES and MEATS
Quality First
-We Deliver-       h
4615-Kingsway Phone: COLL. 733
H,—■a.-^ii.-vA.^u^.K
PhMlft COLL. 4S7
4018 KINRSWAY
THE THISTLE MEAT MARKET
This is the store of SERVICE & QUALITY
Oui* Meats are nil handled under the most Sanitary Refrigerator
Process.
We ask for your Patronage   —   Just try us once and'you will
come again.
WE DELIVER —
PROFITS,  WAGES  AND TRIFF
Some statements msde by Mr.
Coote ln his recent speech on the
reduction ln tbe duty on automobiles are as follows.
"For 1984 the total salaries and
wages paid by the automobile industry woe 814,219,137; and the
value ot their production, 888,000,-
000. Wages and salaries were,
therefore, 16.1 per cent ot the value
of production. The protection enjoyed is 35 per cent, and the increase in price over the United
States price Ib also 36 per cont. In
other words, the Increased price
which our automobile manufacturers exact from the Canadian people
because of tbe tariff is twice the
total salaries and wageB paid by the
Industry." i.
If- these figures ars correct, and
they have not been challenged, it
does not seem at all clear that a
reduction in the duty need cause
the reduction of wages, much less
the closing of factories.
The wage bill, and even the wage
and salary bill, constitutes a very
small proportion of the cost of produotlon. Why should the mass of
Canadian people continue to pay
in increased prices for twice as
much as would pay the entire
wages and salaries ot the workers
employed? Might lt not be preferable to put all the workers ln a
rest sanitarium? As supplementing
Mr. Coote's figures we might quote
the following. The Ford Company's
McKAY
BARBER SHOP
(J. W. Coutts, Prop.)
3930 Kingsway
QUICK SERVICE
Your Patronage ls Appreciated
POOL ROOH IN CONNECTION
ENTERPRISE
MEAT MARKET
Kingsway and McKay
—wish to announce the opening of an up-to-date Butcher
Store right next door to Wallace's Marketeria.
We appreciate your custom
and guarantee fair prices and
good quality meats at all
times.
THE OLD RELIABLE
E.E.
Ll
LIMITED
EVERYTHING FOR YOUR BUILDING
FROM PLANS TO PAINT
Phis Quality and Service
OF THE KIND WE HAVE
Been giving for the past 20 years
Phone: COLL. 66
2718 McKay Avd
Book, 1925, shows salaries and
wages amount to 810,138,937. The
Financial Post of February 12th,
1926, gives the net profits for 11925
st (6,131,352. Again it would seem
that these net profits might be decidedly lessened without any necessity for the closing of factories
and turning people out on the
streets.
BURNABY   j
TRADING CO.
Cor. Kingsway and McKay
COLL. 469
4269' Kingsway
MIDWAY GARAGE
Phone Colli 7-1
AUTO REPAIRS
We guarantee all our work and when you bring your cd
to us you can be sure that the job will be   done righ
Satisfaction and Moderate Prices
FLAT RATE CHARGES POR FORDS
"'—"—'■> *
New and Used
FURNITURE
Crockery and
Chinaware
wu — h^m-mii-mh-mii-wh—*i*—i.**»
Reliable reports on vacant
or improved property
JOHN MURRAY
Real estate
Insurance - Notary Public
Valuator
Phone Coll. 352R1
Appointments for evenings
Office 4009 Kingsway
McKay, Burnaby, B.C.
BEAUTIFUL BURNABY
Vancouver's Fairest Suburb
■ Homes and Homesltes In this district can be bought at reaso'l
able prices We have a large Hating of specially goof"*1
For detailed particulars see— *
Alex. F. McTavish
Bight at Hae-taj* Station PhoM Co,|hlg,vood |
FIRE, AUTO AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE
IALLACE'S MARKETERIA
Kingsway and McKay
Quality Groceries at the Lowest Possible
Prices.
B.C. SUGAR — 10 pounds  roa
LARD (Pure), — 2 pounds  AKj.
FLOUR, 49 lb. sacks, Best Grades    '    "jjffl 40
BUTTER, Alberta No. 1-3 pounds fori:..: fj.ai
-*... «*«_..
.„—..*>
Lloyd's Studio
3966 Kingsway       McKay
DEVELOPING
PRINTING
ENLARGING
Jl-,,.
^ ANNOUNCEMENT
_. _V_f_.w'8l_ t0 lnform thc public ""•' *"> have taken over til
Post Offloe Store at MacKay Station, formerly occupied by FraJ
Morten, -      I
We carry a full supply of Groceries and Confectionery ai
you can be assured of fair treatment and fair prices at all timi]
R. and E. McMILLAN
The Post Office Store Maekay Statu!
Phone: COLL. 155
MK----.ll.----.l-g,
*,,,,
McKay Bakery
4010 Kingsway    Coll. 369
J. H. Phillips, Prop.
Our Goods are known for
Quality.
TRY OUR DELICIOUS CAKES
They have "That Satlstynlg
Taste."
ALBERTA FLOUR & FEED
4013 Kingsway
Phone Coll. 23
We have a special LAY MASH that   is guaranteed
improve egg production.
Buy your Chick and Poultry Feed from us.
We carry a full line of Feeds and Poultry Supplies
Give us a Trial Order
We Appreciate Your Custom
_**__
__*______________
m m__t
-----   ■-■■

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