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Cascade Record Jun 23, 1900

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 d
THE CASCADE RECORD
Published in the Interests of the Boundary and Christina Lake   Mining Districts
Vol. II.
CASCADE, B. C, JUNE 23, 1900.
No. 33.
SHALL  WE   HAVE   COMMUNICATION    WITH  FRANKLIN
CAMP?
Mr. AngU9 Ciimei'tn, who is largely interested in Gladstone, tells a reporter of The Record,
that the property owners and citizens generally
of that town, would gladly co-operate with
Cascade in opening up a road from the head of
Christina, lake to Franklin camp. It is suggested
that a citizens' meeting be held here to discuss
the matter, and tbat a committee be appointed
to confer with like committees from Gladstone
and Franklin, and that, an active move be made
to have tbe route viewed out at once. The open-
in*; up of a road to the camp would be of great
benefit to all concerned, and if tbe proposition
be energetically taken hold of it would not be
long before the road would be in actual existence. The thing first needed in the movement
is the determination to take active steps to that
end. There is no doubt but that government
aid can be obtained when once the undertaking
is in proper shape to present to authorities. Let
us move in the matter. Where there is a concerted will in affairs of this kind, ways and
means can   readily be evolved.
A NOVEL IDEA.
Mr*. Egerton, an English lady, who did
nursing work in Dawson City, carried out an
original idea in London, which greatly gratified
the C. P. R. people Mrs. Egerton had been
much struck by the scenery along the line of the
C. P. R., as well as with the service which tbe
company rendered across the continent, and
she determined to let the folk in England know
something about both. For this purpose she
availed herself <>f a fancy ball at Co vent Garden, to appear in a costume which took the
first prize for originality, and which illustrated
Canadian scenery and tbe C P. R. in a highly
striking manner. The lady's bat was trinied
in a manner to show the C. P. R. trains in motion; her cape set forth Lake Ontario, Lake Superior and the Rocky Mountains, while the
front of her dress showed a train rushing at full
speed through the wonderful ravines in the far
Northwest. In the lady's hand was a banner
which contained the coats of arms of the several Provinces constituting the Dominion. The
tout ensemble, as the London press remarked at
the time, was wonderfully striking and impressive, and gave at a glance an idea of a
country of which Londoners, previous to the
jubilee, knew very little. Mrs. Egerton, as Mr.
Baker, the C. P. R. agent in London, pointed
out, did all this'off her own bat,' and solely
with the patriotic view of making Canada
known. The lady is coming out again, probably this summer, when she will make an extended tour of the country. Photographs of Mrs.
Egerton in her unique costume are at the general offices of the C. P. R.���Montreal Witness.
Boundary not favored by tbe reduction are,
Gilpin, Sutherland, Eholt and Niagara���to
and from this point. We fail to understand
why the company, while it favors the greater
number of shipping points with about a 25 per
cent reduction, Cascade is discriminated against
and held to the old rates. Then again, weights
are often guessed at to the great disadvantage
of the consignee or consignor. As an instance:
A few days since S. W. Bear shipped a box
from Grand Forks to Casuade,which he positively
asserts weighed less than 30 pounds, for which
transportation service the Express company exacted 75c. The box was bulky but light. It
having been billed by the Grand Forke agent
at that weight, the agent here was in no way to
blame, and Mr. Bear paid the charge, with a
mental reservation, however, that he would
avoid shipping by express whenever possible to
do so. Our beef all has to come in by express
at 60c per hundred from Gr��nd Forks, which is
double what the rate ought to be, to be reasonable.
NEWS OF THE TOWN AND BOUNDARY.
ARE WE "KNOCKING" WITHOUT CAUSE ?
Several weeks since The Record contained a
short article referring to the rates charged by
the Dominion Express company. It was stated
in the item referred to that the reductions previously made by the company were confined to
through business, as we understood the case.
The statement came under the notice of several
of the leading officers of tbe company, a copy
of The Record having been handed along the
line from Vancouver to Toronto. The company
has taken great pains to enlighten The Record
and furnished it with copies of two schedules,
the old and the new, done with pen. By the
exhibit thus made The Record is shown to
have been somewhat in error in its statements.
The claim that the rates are still excessively
high is well founded. To many points in the
Boundary district the old rates are maintained. The rates between Cascade and Grand
Forks are the old���75c per hundred, or fraction
thereof down to 70 pounds. Other points in the
Father Palmer celebrated mass here Monday
morning.
Eight hundred tons of ore were shipped out
of the Boundary last week.
Thirteen cars of ore were were shipped from
Eholt to the Trail smelter last week.
Mr. Wm. Anderson returned last Tuesday
from a two weeks' trip to the coast, where be
went on nusine>;s pertaining to the affairs of the
Cascade Water Power & Light Co.
Mr. G. K. Stocker has been in Spokane this
week, attending the annual meeting of the Cascade Townsite company, and visiting with his
relatives and  old-time acquaintances.
The burial services last Sunday at the funeral
of the late Alexander Lynch were conducted
by Rev. Father Palmer, and the funeral cortege
was the largest ever witnessed in thiscommuity.
D. McLeod and R. Macpherson were in Cascade yesterday from Nelson. The latter is representing the Ontario Powder company whose
factory is located at that place, and this is his
first trip into the Boundary.
Mr. A. H. Thompson was the successful bidder to carry the Cascade mails between the
postoffice and the depot, he having been awarded the contract to perform this service for Her
Majesty during four years from July 1 proximo.
The Boundary district cast 1,110 votes at the
recent election. Esquimau cast only about 700
votes, and Cariboo 900, each of these ridings
electing two members, while this whole riding,
including Rossland, elected only one member.
This is manifestly an unjust condition.
Harry Cook killed a big rattlesnake one day
this week. The two met just below the wagon
road near the dam, ami his snakeship was soon
rendered lifeless. It was said to he posessed of
16 rattles with the button, and measured four
and one half feet.   A snapshot has been taken.
Since the change of running time on the C. &
W. branch, the Grand Forks stage has been
pulled off, as passengers coining across from
Bossburg, can take the train here and go on to
Grand Forks or Greenwood. So the new R. R.
schedule has facilitated sta^e travel between
Bossburg and Cascade rather than injured  it.
Miss Pearl Grant of Gladstone will write for
a teacher's certificate at the examination to begin in Nelson on Wednesday, July 4th. Inspector Burns will preside at the examination,
which will beheld in the public school building. The subjects for the first day will be British history, English grammar, education and
geography in the order given. The examination will continue till Tuesday, July 10th, for
those who write for the highest grade of
certificate. Her many friends sincerely hope
that Miss Grant will stand high in the list of
successful candidates.
THE GREAT NORTHERN   FINDS A ROUTE FROM MARCUS
TO REPUBLIC.
Great Northern surveyors are believed to
have discovered a feasible grade for a railroad
to Republic, says tbe Spokesman-Review. It
branches from the Spokane Falls & Northern
at or near Marcus, follows up Kettle river and
Little Boulder creek, crossing the divide near
the bead waters of tbe latter stream, on west to
the head waters of Deer creek, anil down that
stream to the Curlew valley and southerly to
Republic.
Engineer Lupfer, who surveyed the route
from Wenatchee, recently went over tbe country, ami discovered the new route. His report
is now at St. Paul. His orders from Chief Engineer Stevens were: "Stay until you find a
route." As he spent less than a week on the-
trip, the inference is that he discovered what he
sought.
Mr. Lttpfer's route of exploration was as follows: He started at Marcus with a guide, followed up Kettle river to Rock cut, went west
up Little Boulder creek to the divide, followed
a trail along the divide, and down St. Peter
creek to Curlew valley. Then he went north iu
the valley, and followed Deer creek to its headwaters, and east to where he had crossed the divide. Then he went back down the creek, and
north to Lone Ranche creek, followed this
stream to its source, on then to the divide and
down to Marcus.
According to this survey, the road will not
come nearer to Cascade than within about 16
miles, hut-evtn this will be a great advantage,
and will lessen freight and passenger rates considerably.
THE UPRAISING IN CHINA.
Some fifteen or twenty years ago a foreign
company had a contract for building a railroad
in China. It built inward from the coast
twelve miles, when the Chinese government revoked the contract, settled the damages and
tore up the railroad. That was because the line
of the road was to run through a burial place
of the Chinese, and so profound is the reverence of the Chinese for the graves of their ancestors, and so deep-seated is the superstition
that their sleep can still be disturbed, that the
government saw it must either retrace its way
or face a rebellion. It is possible that the present clash over there is not because the railroad
track runs over the gardens and through the
villages of the people, but that it trenches upon
the graves.
CARD OF THANKS.
The relatives of the late Mr. Alexander
Lynch desire to express to the residents of
Cascade their sincere thanks and appreciation
for the many services and kindnesses performed
by them in connection with the funeral obsequies of their deceased father. And whilst their
own absence and the modesty of various assistants has perhaps left them only partly informed of tbe full measure of good acts performed,
they believe that to Mrs. Southam, Mr. Victor
Monnier, Mr. John Earle and Mr. George K.
Stocker and  others, special  thanks are due.
We understand that Mr. James Kelley is
having some of his mining claims near Sutherland, surveyed.
Work in the Water Power company's tunnel
is progressing very satisfactorily, it having heen
already driven about 70 feet.
Tbe Cascade Public school will close next
Friday, for the summer vacation, on which occasion there will he the usual examination and
literary exercises.
Mrs. S. H. Dowdy will leave early Monday
morning next for Spokane, where she goes to
join her husband and remain permanently.
She will be accompanied by her daughter, Miss*
Jessie Hyde. 2
THE  CASCADE  RECORD
June 33, 1900
���r?
Ml
TME B. C.
MERCANTILE:
MINING SYNDICATE:
���AND
LIMITED
Our Stock Taking has Revealed Various Remnants and
Slightly Shop-soiled Goods which we will Sell
AT COST!
WE CAN ALSO SUPPLY
Hardware, Boots, Clothing, Drugs, Stationery,
Groceries, and all Miners' Requirements, at the
Lowest Rates in Town!
Clc $i����cs* flections aT1^ C]eaPegt Prices are to be
ftad at tlje ���
n r   j '   a
nie
oi
Branches at Gladstone, English Point (Christina lake) and at Eagle City on North Fork.
Assay office and Long Distance Telephone at CASCADE.
��� !t
--V'
J
*tog.
mamm *
June 28. 1900
THE CASCADE RECORD
CASCADE CURRY,
A LOCAL  HASH  WITH   FOREIGN  SEASONING,
DISHED UP BY STANLEY MAYALL.
To-day fa the anniversary of
Clive's momentous victory at Plas-
sey, and to-morrow will be the fiftieth birthday of Lord Kitchener,
of Khartoum, the hero of Omdur-
man, and probably the greatest
military commander of any nation
during the last decade, not even
excepting General Otis.
The Republic Pioneer sayB: "With
the war over and liberty in South
Africa crushed, perhaps England
can look after her 80,000,000 starving subjects in . India." "Now
wouldn't that jar you?" When in
tbe name of Omnipotent Heaven
may Britain ever expect to hear
reason and get justice from a certain section of the American Press?
Liberty, forsooth; the abominations
that have been perpetrated in that
name in the U. 8., would turn Nero hoary with disgust, and give the
Spanish Inquisition the everlasting hump. Why, by all that is
reasonable, consistent and logical,
don't the Republic Pioneer and
such elements of light, truth and
liberty form a combine, trot out
their hard-earned dimes, and so
raise a fund sufficient to replace
that magnificent statue of Liberty
at the entrance to New York harbor, with an equal sized image of
Paul Kruger, in the act of distributing Justice and Liberty to Uitlan-
dfcTH?
In the meantime a course of
Ambrose Bierce and Spokesman-
Review would do the editor of the
Pioneer no harm, and for the present a resume oi the facts bearing on
the subject of the Liberty that was
may do some good. In 1883, Kruger cordially invited immigrants lo
the Transvaal, under promises of
equality and protection to all.
Shortly afterwards someverdomde
rooinek discovered the Witwaters-
rand. In consequence, the revenue
of the bankrupt state rose from under one million dollars to over
twenty millions.
The population increased accordingly, and Kruger, as emblematic
of the truth and justice that was in
him, ordained that any incoming
American or Britisher must wait
fourteen years before he would he
allowed a vote; he must moreover
present a written petition from the
majority of Boers in his district,
showing him tn he persona grata to
them, and then obtain approval
from the executive council. During the time of probation, he was
liable to military service, but. not
otherwise allowed the use of firearms. This kind of liberty was so
hiihly appreciated by the British
portion of the Uitlander element,
that 21,000 (a really gigantic proportion   of the whole),  petitioned
against it. Two thirds of the Transvaal population were Uitlanders;
they had turned what was useless
in Boer hands, into the greatest
mining region on earth. They
owned, by purchase, more than half
the land, they paid nine tenths of
the taxes, they were discriminated
against by monopoly, taxation, and
in matters of education, representation, justice and freedom, whilst the
Catholics and Jews were ranked
with niggers and illegitimates
as nonentities. Then the British lion, whose tail is so constructed
that it will stand a certain amount
of twisting, and not one jot or tittle
more, rose in defense of his cubs,
and in the majesty of his wrath
wiped the blatant, bullying Boer
off the swine-encumbered landscape.
And now the Republic Pioneer
deplores the crushing of the liberty
that was. Ye gods and giddy
whelks! Liberty? The man who
would describe the old Transvaal
life as liberty, would ram a ruined
alarm clock into a battered kerosene can and call it the S. S. "Great
Eastern;" he would select the biggest lunatic asylum in the States,
and' endow it with legislative capacity, or he would take an erstwhile
unsullied sheet, fire at it a handful
of pied type and called it the Republic Pioneer.
And as for Britain's poor, starving
subjects in India, are they better or
worse off for their domination by
the Kaisar i Hind? Is the Republic Pioneer so warped that it would
sneer at the British nation for an
act of God, or so biased that it can
allow no credit and see no virtue
in the giving of $25,000,000 of
charity to the famine stricken fellaheen, to be followed by a further
sum of equal magnitude? Or is it
merely that the Republic Pioneer
is as ignorant of "Afric's Sunny
Fountains" as it is of "India's
Coral Strand?" If so, as seems
likely, ii would appear to be eminently in accordance with the eternal fitness of things that the editor of that Heaven-born organ,
should iu future confine his atten-
sions to the dimensions of the giddy pumpkin or as an alternative
continue framing lengthy lucubrations on that species of "hole in the
ground" which, an eminent authority has stated is "generally owned
by a linr."
When the present Viceroy of India, Baron Curzon of Kedleston,
who also achieved the distinction
of marrying a prominent American
heiress, was a mere untitled boy at
college he had a sufficiently clear
idea of his own worthiness as to be
generally voted very conceited.
And one day one of his class-mates
gathered together his books, and
wrote on the fly leaves in token of
sarcastic derision :
"My name is Oeorg* Nathaniel Curzon,
I am a molt important person."
What was intended for   satire,
proved a prophecy.
As I write, tbe funeral cortege of
our genial old fellow townsman
Alexander Lynch is slowly winding
out, destined for that bourn from
which no traveller returns, our own
God's acre above the foaming
stream. And men who have viewed
fell death some scores of times
without a pang, seem touched by
this. If there be a man here who
feels amiss toward Alexander Lynch
I know him not and never met
him. First magistrate in Rossland,
first citizen in Cascade and first in
honor and integrity during life, he
needs no eulogy in death, which
found him as he had lived, in
Peace. Verging on the allotted
span of life he closed his earthly
vigil with the words, "I am aweary,
1 must rest"���and resting, died.
And so may it be with all of us I
When our own good time comes to
pierce the mists which tangle human creeds, may we, too, pass away
like poor Alex. Lynch, peacefully
and quietly, rich in the knowledge
of the mysteries of the Great Beyond,
Can it be that the Dominion
parliament is about to do its electorate a part of the tardy justice
so long overdue in railroad construction? May we hope from the
new railroal bill, that at last an
existing town along the proposed
construction line will not risk being side-tracked in order that a
frog swamp four miles off may be
exploited for the benefit of the C. P.
R.? So mote it be 1 But there is
"Many a slip 'twixt cup and lip,"
and the iniquities perpetrated on
the long suffering Canadian public
by a soulless and corrupt legislature on behalf of the C. P. R., are
so numerous, that even this email
boon must not be expected until it
iB seen.
From which it may he noted that
this is one of my 364 days brother
Turner. When the 365th comes
round I shall choose the lesser evil
as of yore. Besides "a mouse that
trusts to one poor hole, can never
be a mouse of auy soul," and unless
and until some individual succeeds
iu establishing the Hon. Mr. Mackintosh's political connection with
the C. P. R. better than has been
done up to date, a good deal of verbiage will ne wasted.
Strange that the two nm.<i interesting objects in Cascade, are direct
opposites of each other in every
respect. One is real, the other artificial; one falls, the other rises;
one is water, the other wood; one is
flowing, the other fixed;   one is the
work of God, and the other of
Mann. I rtfer, of course, to our majestic falls and our magnificent
viaduct.
The success of American jockeys
in England this year is phenomenal; and little Johnny Reiff is earning an income which rates per annum at half that of the President
of the United States, earning it
moreover whilst still at school, and
probably earning it honestly, with
a little extra in the shape of bets.
It has tieen my lot to spend some
few years of my life in a training
stable, and though I never bet myself, I have knotvn some peculiar
things transpire on behalf of those
who do���at least one of which I
was, innocently enough, implicated
in myself, and will some day relate. The whole racing business
has more of a tragic than a comic
side, and as an excuse for the perpetration and improvement of the
equine species is a palpable fraud.
Among the tragedies, the Caul-
field Cup disaster in the late eighties must long stand pre-eminent,
though I subsequently saw a smash
up on the Bois de la Cambre course
that looked like equalling it. At
Caulfield, among 42 starters, the
leading horse fell, and instantaneously twenty others came down iu
a kicking, struggling, plunging,
horror stricken mass, with results
that were appalling, too appalling
to realize personally until a few
years later, I happened to be one
item in half a regiment of the Duke
of Lancaster's Cavalry, generally
known as the Peterloo Butchers,
that iust met the same fate.
Amongst comical incidents, albeit, at the same time dishonorable,
I remember an event at a recent
Waterloo Cup meeting. We were-
getting towards the finals, and a
promising dog, "Merrylegs," owned
by Sir Robert J ,was just being.
stripped ready for the leash. "Even
money, Merrylegs," the bookies
were yelling, whilst one smarter
and more unscrupulous than the
rest, seeing Sir Robert passing,,
bawled out with his brass bound
lungs, "50 to 40 Merrylegs." The
dog's owner resented it. "All right,
I'll take you twice," he quickly remarked. When shortly afterwards
Merrylegs was pronounced the
winner of his heat, Sir Robert
sought the bookie and held out his
hand. A ��5 note (one hundred
shillings) was placed therein. Sir
Robert flushed, pocketted the money and quickly said,"I understand;
and remember this, if-ever-I-catch-
you-alone-i'11-pound-you-into-put-
ty." What was the trouble, eh?
Simply this. That bookie knew
well that Sir Robert only bet in
sovereigns, and would have paid
sovereign had he lost, and it
nmounted to ibis, that instead of
giving Sir Robert odds of 50 to 40 or
100 to 80, he was in reality taking
16 to 1, there being twenty shillings iu the sovereign, and consequently 1600 in the ��80 Sir Robert
would have paid. Which is another
argument in favor of the decimal
table.
f"" ^'!'iswrTawffftsireri *"������
-1��������� THE   CASCADE   RECORD
June 33, 1000
THE CASCADE RECORD
Published on Saturdays at Cascade,  It. ('.,
BY H. S. TURNER.
Women have been made eligible
to sit as aldermen and councillors
of the London boroughs.
���o���
Tbe jawbones which have for the
past six or eight months been dis-
cussing Transvaal matters till they
present different phases of deformity, will now be twisted into more
hideous shapes in efforts to pro-
nonce Mongolian place names and
titles of leading officials.
���o���
Hewitt Bostock's medling course
in tbe politics of this province during the recent campaign puts an
end to his future political prospects
so far as the people may have a say
in the matter. Notwithstanding his
goosely conduct he's a dead duck
from Ducks.
���o���
"Joseph Martin has been relegated
to the rear," says the Moyie Leader.
Just take note, Mr. Leader, of coming events. As soon as Mr. Martin comes to the surface again he
will be found well up in front. We
expect to find him on the front seat
on July 5th, and when the curtain
on the legislatiye drama billed for
that occasion goes up, Hon. Joseph
will appear in ihe cast as one of the
star performers.
���(i���
The late Mackintosh managers
are a mass of soreheads. They expected him to no through n kiting.
and then they aimed to take an
upholstered seat at the provincial
pie-counter. The election of Mr.
Curtis punctured the tires of their
political ambitions, and they found
themselves left out in the cold. As
Martin is inaccessible at present,
being securely hidden under an
avalanche of ballots, to vent their
rage at defeat by an avowedly Martin supporter, they send up a great
howl against Governor Mclnnes.
The Governor's selection of a premier knocked out their finely laid
political schemes, which were already badly damaged by the loss
of their intended benefactor, and
they find their plans all topsyturvy.
The movement to secure Mclnnes'
removal was of Conservative origin,
backed by a few renegade Liberal
spoilsmen, whose political opinions
;iie regulated by supply and demand.
���o������
Wo always advocate the aims of
the workingmen and help them in
their struggles, when we can conscientiously do so, but it seems to
us that the men who are working
on the streets in Nelson, B. C, are
going too far in demanding $3.25
for a day < f eight hours. They
have been getting hitherto $3.25 for
a day of nine hours. The men who
sire doing the same kind of work
here in connection with the development of our water-power, get only $2.25 for a day of ten hours, and
men who do the same kind of work
on the railways, get only $2.50 for
a day of ten hours. Jn the towns
of Eastern Canada, similiar work
would be paid for at the rate of
from $1.25 to $1.50 fur a day of ten
hours, and il seems to us that tbe
men working on the streets of Nelson are well treated in being allowed $3.25 for a day of nine hours.
The ancients had a saying to the
effect that those whom the gods
wished to destroy they first made
mad, and we commend this saying
to the careful attention of the labor
unions in Nelson.
���o���
The Nelson Miner charges Hon.
Jos. Martin with fathering a "somewhat rascally Election Act devised
and passed while he was Attorney
General of that Province (Manitoba). The act gave into the hands of
the Government entire control of
the voter's lists, a control that enabled a Government not to scrupulous in its methods to doctor the
lists in any manner most favorable
to itself." Those who live in glass
houses should not throw stones.
The Miner only recently defended
an attempt of the Conservatives in
Nelson, to disfranchise nearly 600
voters, which course resulted in
failure, and a good trouncing of its
pet candidate at the pells.
���o���
The insurrection in China' is
spreading to all parts of theempire,
and has become so powerful as tn
endanger the lives of all white people on Chinese soil. The various
foreign powers, to protect tbe lives
and property of their various legations and citizens,found it necessa
ry to hurry to the rescue. The approach of foreign war ships to Ta-
ku and Pekin was the signal to the
Chinese fortresses to declare war
against all other nations by opening fire, which they did. The war
vessels representing France, Germany, Great Britain, Russia, Japan
and the United States, (tho latter
excepted), rturned the fire at Taku,
killing many hundreds of Chinese
soldiers, and resulting also iu the
death and wounding of many soldiers on board the foreign war vessels. The insurrectionists, or "Boxers," are said to be acting under
the advice and consent of the Uow-
argess ruler, and in defiance of her
legally constituted advisers. The
powers arc pouring in immense armies, and putting the insurrectionists to flight in every direction, but
it is feared that many missionaries
and other white people have been
massacred. Li Hung Chang has
been called upon to take the reins
of govermont, and peace will ultimately be restored, but upon a basis to the satisfaction of the powers,
which may mean the peaceful dismemberment and division of the
empire among the different European nations, or it may result in
contention for possession aud a
universal war. The situation is
most critical. Were ii not for the
existence of the ��emi-barbaric gov
ernments of China and Russia, the
balance of the civilized world might
hope for universal peace. The band
writing on the wall indicates that
the march of Christian civilisation
will 80oneror later force more modem and enlightened principles of
government upon these nations, or
overcome and absorb them.
���o���
The Vancouver Liberal association shied a resolution at Hewitt
Bostock the other night that landed
hard on bis fading political reputation. Before the Liberals get through
with him he will be so buttered, as
to be heard soliloquising : "Am I
am I or am I not am I, aud if I am
not am I, who'n th'devil am I?"
���o���
There is said to be considerable
dissatisfaction in Grand Forks, relative to the doings of some of its
officials in the past, and it is claimed the unwholesome report recently
made by an expert accountant, is
wrongfully withheld from publication.
MINERAL ACT.
CERTIFICATE OP IMPROVEMENTS.
"Effle" Mineral claim situate in the Grand
Forks Mining Division of Vaie Distriot.
Khcro located, on Tixascseck, two miles east
of Christ Urn hike
Tnke notice flmt I, Allien B, Ashoroft, as agent
for Mary Louise Teal), Froo Miner's Certiflcuio
No, B80700, Intend sixty days from the dele here,
of lo apply to tho Minlug Recorder for a certificate of improvements for the purpose of obtaining
ii crown granl i m.c above claim.
And further take notice that notion, under section ili'.musl ou commenced before ihe issuance
of such Certificates of Improvements.
Dated lid   lsl day of June, A. O., Itftiil.
ALBERT 13. ASHCKOFT, P. L. S.
MINREAL ACT, 1896.
Certificate of Improvements.
WOMAN KAQLK Mineral Claim, situate in
the Grand Korks Mining Division of Yale Dis-
tri t.
Where located:��� About a mile southeast, of Cascade City.
Take Notice thai I, F. <'. Green, or Nelson, noting as agent for J. .1. Walker, Free Miner's
Certificate No. BlS7,625, intend sixty days from
dale hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder
for a Cortltioatoor Improvements, tor the purpose
of old n I nig a drown (Irani of the above Clnini,
And further lukc notice that action, under section 87, must be commenced before the issnnncn
of such Certificate or Im, rovements.
Dated this 5th day of April, moo,
F. O. GREEN.
The Cascade Sawmill
A large stock of Rough
and Dressed Lumber.
Laths,. Shingles, Houldings, Etc
Estimates Furnished and
Prompt Delivery Made.
Correspondence Solicited.
JOHN EARLE, Prop,
The Wm. Hamilton
HANUFACTURING COMPANY,
LIMITED.
MINING flACHINERY
PETERBOROUGH, ONT,   '
 CANADA.
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We do not keep "everything
under the sun," but we
have in stock just what
you want when you start
out in the hills or "up the
line."
J, LYNQHOLM
Clothing,
Boots,
Shoes, Etc.
CASCADE, B. C.
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June 23, 1900
THE CASCADE RECORD
2aKsscHi53csKKK:a:s5��:sM
MERE'S  A   POINTER.
If You Wish
To keep thoroughly posted on the fast
moving events in the growing Boundary and Christina Lake sctions, there is
only one way to accomplish it, viz:
Just get in line, follow the
crowd and subscribe to..
���* Cascade Record.
It costs only Two Dollars to get
in out of the wet, and receive 52
copies of the Record. Printed
on good paper with good type
and good ink.
THE LATE ALEXANDER LYNCH.
A   Memoir, by Stanley Mayall.
By the death of Alexander Lynch, Cascade
lost one of its earliest, best known and most
respected citizens, and the West one of its most
persistent and typical pioneers; and a pioneer,
unfortunately for himself, is a man who faces
manifold dangers-,endures untold hardships, incurs endless- labor, maker- straight the pathway
for other*, and gets little or nothing for it himself.
Burn at Kingston, Ont., in 1834, Alexander
Lynch decided, when he came to man's estate,
to do like many others, "Go West." Wise in
his generation, he avoided th�� Indian-haunted,
blood-stained trail, and sailing southward,
crossed ihe Isthmus of Panama, thence again
taking the water lo Portland, where he joined
relatives who were in  business as  merchants.
In 1862. a spirit of restlessness overcoming
him, he set out from Portland on foot, and actually walked to the spot now known as Boise
City, Idaho, where with others he staked th��
now celebrated Silver King mine, the first
quartz location in Boise Valley.
From Boise, Mr. Lynch launched out for
Salmon river, and subsequently was one of the
earliest pioneers of the Stickeen. Generally
speaking it may be said that during the ten
years next following 1864, every mining excitement in Montana, Nevada and Arizona, was
participated in and eagerly sought for by Alexander Lynch. Then he concluded that he had
had enough of foot and horseback travelling,
and converting his precepts into practice, became a railroad contractor, spending nearly
twenty years al various branches of the work,
mainly for the Northern Pacific and 0. R. & N.
Among the enterprises that occupied his
time, was the celebrated Dr. Baker railroad,
from Walla Walla to Walula, (he first ever
built in Washington. Sixteen miles of this
railway was made anil laid by Alex. Lynch,
and by way of contrast to existing roads,it may
he mentioned that the "rails'' consisted of 4x6
lumber bearing one inch straps of iron to protect them from the wear and tear of the fiery
freight train.
It fell also, to the duty of our late fellow
townsman to inaugurate and install almost the
entire water system of the Northern Pacific,
from Ain��wortb. Wash, o Missoula, Mont.,
and the magnitude of that task can be best appreciated by  those who  know the difficulties
presented in a black sand country.
Of course like every one of the pioneers iu
the State* alluded too, Alexander Lynch had
his share of Indian experiences, but he was one
of the while men whom the red race had faith
in, and that doubtless saved him many difficulties; albeit the time came when he had to take
sides with General Howard during the Nez
Perce trouble.
In 1893, Mr. Lynch once more getting the
scent of gold in his nostrils, quitted steel and
shortly found himself at Trail, and immediately
as a result of his pioneer spirit, blossomed out
into the first merchant, and the first magistrate
of the now world-renowned Trail creek mining
district. And then again, as in the Boise valley,
flowed by him that tide, which taken at the
flood, leads on to fortune For it fell to the lot
of Alex. Lynch to become a temporary shareholder in that celebrated property which Colonel Topping secured for $10, and is mw able to
pay a 25 per cent dividend on $5,000,000, the
Golconda of the Rossland camp, and the idol
of its visitors���the bountiful Le Roi. Unfortunately, Alex, owed for a "bill of goods" nnd
the Spokane firm to whom he was indebted,
generously took his Roi shares into account at
a valuation of 3 cents. We know the firms
name, but are not going to advertise it.
To Alexander Lynch belongs, we believe, the
credit of sinking on Le Roi the first 200 feet of
shaft, under the Topping regime. From Trail
and Hossland, Mr. Lynch came to Cascade,
where he entered the lumber business, in partnership with Mr. John Earle, and let us hope
participated, beneficially, in the boom which
shortly after set in. It will be of interest to
many, who well remember the burly and grandly framed form of our late friend, to learn that
among his six brothers he was the Tiny Tim of
his family, some of whom verged on seven feet.
Of Mr. Lynch's final moments little, indeed,
can be said. The genial, kindly smiled old
gentleman, cheery to the last, went to his death
as to his sleep. He felt tired, he sought hi bed,
and a few hours later, when his decease w
nounced, the pitying, sorrowing throng f
ing around him felt from the placid look n
hia face, that the grief which had become the a,
was in no way shared by him.
Solicit." Poor Alex had at last obtained
a crown grant to a claim of his own staking,
and had entered into possession thereof with a
smile upon his time-scared countenance, and a
joy in his heart which passeth all understanding.
an-
MORE SETTLERS FOR CANADA.
The veteran missionary supeintendentof the
Presbyterian church in the Canadian Northwest, who is well known in Vancouver, at the
recent meeting of the synod at Toronto, made
some interesting statements. He said that in
1898 there arrived 40,000 settlers in the Nortl -
west. In 1899 there were 50,000 new comers
and this year it is expected there will be between 70,000 and 75,000 who will enter the
western districts of Canada seeking to establish
homes. There has been some criticism of the
quality of the new settlers, particularly the
Donkhobors. In the estimation of Dr. Robertson, these people are the right kind of settlers.
They are people of good physique, they are not
lazy, they build good houses, anil, above all,
they are occupying lands that the Canadians
left idle for years and years. "They don't seek
for soft jobs in the cities, where ihey can wear
good clothes and keep their hands clean,*' Dr.
Robertson said, with emphasis. "There is too
much of that among ourselves. The store keep-
ere speak well of them, and their women have,
many of them, married Canadian farmers out
there. Why? Because Canadian girls won't go
ont and become helpmates to the Canadian farmers. And," continued Dr. Robertson, "what
better proof of industry could you wish than
this? A Galician farmer and his son spaded 24
acres in the absence of the necessary implements, and grew their crops on the land so prepared. These people will make good settlers,
their children will make better settlers than
they, and this is the reason the people of the
east should look after them." That is the way
to talk. It is only politically prejudiced per-
sons, or those who know nothing about these
interesting new settlers, who run them down.
There can be no doubt that in many districts
of the United States they would be heartily
welcomed as an element of strength in the development of waste places. This was shown the
other day when a strong effort was made to get
the whole colony to pack up and go to California. What is needed, as far as Dr. Robertson
points out, is sympathetic friendship for the
new comers. The veteran missionary pleads
from a church standpoint, it is true, and already the Presbyterian church haj done wonders in building up missions in all parts of the
new land, but the advuv given is worthy of
general acceptation.���Midway Advance.
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Will Prove.
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Htai THE   CASCADE   RECORD
June 23, 1900
BRIEF LOCAL MENTION.
The local mails close at 1 and 8,
p. m.
The   passenger    train    for   the
Boundary   leaves   Rossland  ahout
2:30 p. m.
The Mutual Aid Society ladies
of Cascade are arranging to carpet
the aysle and rostrum of the Presbyterian church.
Rev. Mr. Barton conducts divine
services every Sunday morning at
Gladstone, and in the evening at
Cascade. The local Sunday school
is held at 11 o'clock in the mornine.
The Columbia Review is said to
"have go into another trance, for a
while to commune with other departed spirits of a kin. The fall of
Mr. Mackintosh carried with it serious and far-reaching consequences
in the newspapar field, the deflth
of two being already noted in the
Boundary district.
When any of our readers find it
necessary to make purchases in
"Grand Forks, they can favor the
Record by calling at the business
places represented in onr Grand
FoTks advertisment department,
not forgetting at the same time to
inform the proprietors that their
ad. has been noticed in this paper.
The new running time on the
Columbia & Western, which took
effect Mondav week, is not wholly
satisfactory to all the towns in the
Rnnndary, it being calculated more
for the convenience of through
travel than for local. The east
"bound passenger train now arrives
here at 13:39, and the west bound
at 20:23���in other words, at 1:39
and 8:23 p m.
Just previous to its demise the
���Grand Forks Gazette warned its
readers that the town cows were becoming to familiar on the streets
and sidewalks of that city. Can it
be possible that grass on the streets
of that formerly ereat and growing
city is the seductive object which
attracts the visitors of the cow
���character? It is said they frequent
the sidewalks and feed on the borders of convenient nwails.
Spokane Falls ft Northern Railway Company
Change of Tine.
Effective Sunday, June 3d. The
Spokane Falls & Northern Railway
will change lime and inaugurate
new service as follows:
Day Train will leave Spokane
10:35 a. m��� arrive Nelson 8:00 p.m.,
arrive Rossland 5:30 p. m.; will
leave Nelson 9:30 a. m., leave Rossland 12:05 p. m., arrive Spokane
7:10 p. m.
Night train (new service) will
leave Spokane 9:45 p. in., arrive
Rossland 6:30 a. m.; will leave
Rossland 11:00 p. tn., arrive Spokane 7:05 a. m.
Great Northern standard sleeper
will be attached  to  night  trains.
H. A. Jackson.
General Passenger Agent
We do Business in Grand Forks.
THE
RAPID STAGE
LINE
YOU
CAN
Save
Money
And
Time
By
Patronizing
The
RAPID
STAGE
LINE
Between
CASCADE
And
BOSSBURG
To
SPOKANE
In
ONE
DAY.
Five
Dollars
SAVED.
Ill
I
iiii
li":
Cascade to Bossburg!
Local OSice at Hotel Cascade.
BELL & DUNCAN, Props.
********/\********
M
"MYRTLE: B."
PLYING ON
BEAUTIFUL CHRISTINA LAKE
Excursion Parties
and Freight
Carried to Order.
Wave the Flag at the foot of the Lake when you
desire either Steamer or Rowboats.
BEN. LAVALLEY, Capt.
********V********
White Bros.,
Jewelers
and
Opticians
Bkidok Stbkkt,   GRAND FORKS
WATCHES,
CLOCKS,
JEWELRY.
Watch repairing a specialty.
mm
f��T Leave your repairing orders at tola office
Clark & Son,
GRAND FORKS,
Sell Everything Hen Wear
Drugs and Stationery.
We carry an up-to-date
and complete stock.
H. E. Woodland & Co.
GRAND FORKS.
^^Furniture
|^~Goto
H. BROWN
FOR FURNITURE
Johnson Block,
GRAND FORKS.
W. E. Megaw,
General Merchant
Makes a Specialty Fine
DRY GOODS,
CLOTHING,
BOOTS AND SHOES,
AND GROCERIES,
Fisher Block, ORAND PORKS.
New and Second-hand
GOODS OF  ALL  KINDS
....Bought and Sold....
BY W. W. STEWART,
Bridge Street. Near Custom House,
GRAND FORKS.
City Barbershop
AND BATHROOMS.
Everything neat, clean and   convenient, and
workmanship the best.
Robert Prebilsky,
GRAND FORKS.
7?
Mrs. I. F. Cross,
Proprietress JOHNSON BLOCK
LODGING HOUSE,
First Ave.,      Grand Forks.
Rooms 50c nnd up.
DR. H. S. SIMMONS,
Dentist,
GRAND FORKS.| Wm    Di���smore,
Miller Block, over Woodland's Drug Store.       I BRIDGE STRENT, GRAND FORKS.
Or rather, your old hoots
and shoes, do they need
repairing; or would you
prefer something new-
made to order? Anyhow, call on
Spokane Falls k Northern Railway Co. j
Nelson k Ft. Shepnard Railway Co.
Red Mountain Railway Co.
Canadian <\
^Pacific Ky.
The only all-rail route between oil points east,
west and south to Rossland, Nelson and intermediate po'nts; connecting at Spokane with the
Great Northern, northern Pacific and O. R. & N.
Co.
Connects at Nelson with steamer for Kaslo and
all Kootenai lake points.
Connects at Meyers Falls with stage daily for
Republic, and connects at Bossberg with stage
daily for Grand Forks nnd Greenwood.
LEAVE    DAY   TRAIN    A R R I V
10:35 a m     Spokane 7:10 p
12:05 p m     Rowland 5:30
9:30 a m     Nelson 8:00
NIGHT TRAIN
9:45 p m     Spokane 7:05
11:00 p in      Rosslmid 6:30
H. A. JACKSON,
General Passenger Apent.
MINERAL ACT.
Certificate ol Improvements.
"Wren" and "Rlx" Mineral Claims situate
in the Grand Forks mining division of? Vale
district.
Where located:���In Summit Camp.
Take Notice that I, Isaac H. Hallett, as
agent for Albert E. Keough, Free Miner's Certificate No. B6719, Intend, sixty days from
the date hereof, lo apply to the mining
recorder for Certificates of Improvements,
for the purpose of obtaining crown grants
of the above claims.
And further take notice that action, under section 87,must be commenced before the issuance of
such Certificates of Improvements.
Dated this 80th day of April, A.D., 1000.
I.H. HALLETT.
"Imperial
Limited"
Service for the year 1900 will
be commenced JUNE 10th.
The "Imperial Limited"
takes you across the Continent in four days without
change. It is a solid vestibule train, luxuriously
equipped with every possible
essential for the comfort and
convenience of Passengers.
Ask your friends who have
travelled on it, or address
W.F. Andkrson,      E.J.Coyle,
Trav. Piifg.AjitMit, A.G.P.Agt.
NeUon, B.C.    Vanciuiver.B.C.
MINERAL ACT
Certificate of Improvements.
"Alexandria" Mineral claim situate In the
Grand Forks Mining Division of Yale District.
Where located, in Summit camp.
Take notice that I, Albert E. Ashcroft, Free
Miner's Certificate No. B29438, for myself, and as
agent for E.D. Olmsted, Free Miner's Certificate
MflOttu, and James M. Fitzpstrick, Free
Miner's Certificate No. 84688a, intend
sixty days from the date hereof, to apply
to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements for the purpose of obtaining a Crown
Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that aotlon, under section 87, must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 1st day of June, A. D. 1900.
, ALBERT E. ASHCROFT, P. L. S.
mm at
June 28, 1000
THE CASCADE RECORD
FERGUSON & RITCHIE,
SUCCESSORS TO THE
Dominion Supply   Company
**************************
A Full Assortment i Staple and Fancy jj
mm. J. ���'I
^^ GROCERIES
rimers' Supplies, Hay, Oats, Coal, Etc
r
��
if
Ss* S%~
s ggigagaarmaanpa������roa����i
HOTEL CASCADE
if
OBSMMM �� ��� M *MMmMttXMMMMMJ%MMM MM*'������ - ��� ��� ��� ��� ��� ������'
1
C. B. THOMAS, Proprietor.
The Original and Oldest Hotel in this
part of the district. Headquarters for Cascade and Bossberg Stage Line; also for
Contractors, Mining Men and Travellers.
Well Stocked Bar in Connection.
[Second Avenue, Cascade City, B. C.
^^^^^^^^^^^^4?^
Latest Official Returns.
RIDINGS���CANDIDATES.
Vote.
Alberni-1
Redford
Gov
57
Thomson
Con
33
Neil!
Ind
108
COMOX-1
Mou nee
Tur
346
McPhee
Gov
282
Cassiar-2
Irving
Ind
240
Clifford
Con
286
Stables
Gov
237
Godfrey
Ind
188
Cariboo-2
Hunter
Con
286
Rogers
Con
289
Kinchant Prov
111
Jones
Prov
241
Chilliwack-1
Ash well
Con
240
Munro
Gov
267
Vedder
Ind
COWICHAN-I
Dickie
Tur
198
Ford
Gov
106
Delta-1 Berry
Con
226
Forster
Prov
80
Oliver
Gov
306
Dewdney-1
McBride
Con
340
Whetham Gov
285
E8QUIMALT-2
Pooley
Tur
235
Hayward
Tur
272
Higgins
Ind
103
Fraser
Gov
74
Bizantson Gov
49
East Lillooet-1
Prentice
Ind
165
Graham
Gov
43
West Lillooet-1
Smith
Tur
135
Ekinner
Ind
83
Lochore
Gov
7
Northeast Kootenay-1
Burnett
Gov
77
Armstrong Con
118
Wells
Ind
241
Southeast Kootenay-1
Smith
Gov
423
Costigan
Con
169
Fernie
Ind
380
Slocan-1
Kane
Gov
166
Keene
Con
378
Green
Prov
644
ROSSLAND-I
Mackintosh
Con
1285
Curtis
Gov 1321
Nelson-1
Fletcher
Ind
507
Maj.
51
64
86
3
85
88
27
92
80
55
132
169
122
52
123
48
266
36
504
355
753
86
195
73
238
249
225
541
629
138
218
204
Houston Prev 742
Hall Ind   292
Revelstoke-1
Taylor Con
McRae      Gov
Nanaimo City-1
Smith Labor
Yates Gov
McKinnel Con
North Nanaimo-1
Bryden Tur
Dixon Labor
Mclnnes   Gov
South Nanaimo-1
Dunsmuir Con
Radclife Labor
Westminster City-1
Ried Con
Brown      Gov
Richmond-1
Wilkinson Con
Kidd Ind
Rowan      Gov
Victoria City-4
Turner Tur 1552
Helmcken Tur 1668
McPhillipsTur 1449
Hall Tur 1597
Martin Gov 1352
Yates Gov 1233
Brown Gov 1259
Beckwith  Gov 1154
North Victoria-1
Booth Tur 123
White Gov 117
Robertson Ind     41
South Victcria-1
Eberts Tur 259
Sangbter   Gov   208
Vancouver City-1
Martin Gov 1737
Gilmour Gov 1462
McQueen Gov 1392
McPherson Gov 1433
Williams Labor 726
McLain Social 856
Dixon Labor 684
Cottou Prov 809
Wood Con 1349
Wilson Con 1456
Garden Con 1799
Tatlow      Cun 1663
West Yale-1
Murphy Ind 351
Beebe        Gov   152
East Yale-1
Ellison Con 177
Raymer Prov 27
Snodgrass Gov     85
North Yale-1
Fulton Con 506
Deane Prov 387
Palmer     Gov '104
235
149
66T
4&
24
88-
14
20O
316
91
245
6.
51
281
&
343
207-
199-
92,
lift*
P1"--0 -���,..���.....���.... .. .aan���mmmm��� 8
THE   CASCADE   RECORD
June S3, 1900
CASCADE,
s
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,    |Hirst I^DDi-riforfj  to (P4^cad|e:i ]
Avcnuc   t
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11
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m [ip pnp up
[Emu ttmD Ljm] oma
filMEIimililDMlfBQlDI
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Cascade City
^] [nun lteio] dud] [lum
,;fn rap cup rap rap
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11
The coming Commercial, Industrial and Mining Centre of East Yale.
The Gateway City
Of the Kettle River, Boundary
Creek and Christina Lake Countries.
A Magnificent Water Power of 20,000 Horse Power.
k
The center of a marvellously RICH MINERAL DISTRICT. A most promising opportunity for business
locations and realty investments. A most advantageous smelter location and railroad center. One mile from Christina
Lake, the Great Pleasure Resort.   For further information, price of lots, etc., address,
GEO. K. STOCKER, Townsite Agent, Cascade, B. C.       Or L. A. HAMILTON, Land Com. C. P. R., Winnipeg, Man
^mMat^MMMmtm
MsM

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