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Brooklyn News Aug 6, 1898

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 THE BROOKLYN NEWS.
VOL. i.
BROOKLYN, B. C,  SATURDAY, AUGUST 6,  1898.
NO. 8.
THE"
"ADMIRAL DEWEY"
nr/ID takes the
LlUTtlY      cake  J&
<5^i
CALIFORNIA WINE COMPANY,
Nelson, B. C, agent for British Columbia
When you come to Brooklyn, come
���straight to the.	
Varnamo Hotel
GUS. JACKSON, Prop.
You will get good accommodations, and will be pleased.
Finest Wines, Liquors and Cigars
BROOKLYN, B. C.
THOMAS & GREIGER
Wines, Liquors # Cigars.
Brooklyn, B. C.
���  PABST MILWAUKEE EXPORT and BLUE RIBBON BEER.
PABST EXPORT.   BLUE RIBBON.    ���,
LABATT'S'ALE'.      LABATT'S STOUT.     CALIFORNIA, WINES^
>��� -   -Agents for LION ��"""" ���
Old Curiosity Shop.
Opp. Clark Hotel, Josephine Street, Nelson, B. C.
New and Second Hand Goods.
We buy ANYTHING and sell EVERYTHING.
Call or drop us a line���we can fit you out.   Money made by dealing
 with us	
w. h. eooPER & eo.
Bankers, Brokers, Financial Agents, Etc.
Money sent to any part of the world.       Time Checks Cashed
Money received on deposit and placed in Chartered Banks
to credit of depositors.
Real  Estate   Bought  and   Sold
Conveyancing and all papers required under the  Mineral
Act executed.
Townsite Office,     - Brooklyn, B. C.
<��) BROOKLYN ��
LUMBER
Yard. * P. Genelle & Co.
Dry Building Lumber,
All Sizes. All Kinds
Doors, Windows, Sash.
Dimension Timbers in all sizes
Dry Cedar Shingles
Persons desiring lumber must place orders at once.
E. 6. Beer, Agent.
WATER IN PLENTY
Brooklyn's System Now In Active Operation.
STARTED ON THURSDAY
Business Men Show Their Appreciation by Liberally Patronizing the System.
Brooklyn is nothing if not up to
date. In fact, this month-old wonder among cities is very much up to
date. Nothing is too good for the
people' of Brooklyn. The latest
metropolitan air that this city has
put on is in the shape of a good
serviceable system of waterworks,
and our citizens have to thank F.
W. Crocker for his commendable
enterprise in inaugurating this much
needed improvement. Water was
turned into the newly laid pipes
last Thursday evening for the first
time, and the plant worked to a
charm. Mr. Crocker has been
working for a couple of weeks with
his assistants laying the mains and
laterals, and is to be congratulated
on his successful enterprise.
The supply is taken from the
creek, the dam being over 1,000
feet from First street, far above all
tents or dwellings, and at an elevation of 70 feet above the town.
From the dam it is brought down -
for 600 feet in a 4x4 covered flume,
to a reservoir having a capacity 0/
1,500 gallons. Thence a two-inch,
iron pipe delivers the clear mountain water to First^treet, the laterals
being laid as far as possible down
the alleys between the blocks. That
our citizens* appreciate haying a
good supply of pure spring water,
is shown by the fact that already
between 20 and 30 business houses
have placed orders with Mr.
Crocker for the delivery- of the
aqua pura at once. Another commendable feature is that his rates
to consumers are reasonable, when
the age of the city and the heavy
expense of installation are considered.
Still another admirable arrangement is a fire plug in the center of
the town, that will be invaluable in
case of a blaze in the city. This
will be especially appreciated by
our business men.
WASHINGTON MARINE BAND.
Brooklyn to Be Favored by This
Pine Organization.
Townsite owner William Parker
has been working to get the Washington Marine Band, a Salvation
Army organization, to visit Brooklyn and give one of its choice concerts, and has finally succeeded.
Last Friday Captain Frank Atkinson, the advance agent of the band,
was in the city and made final
arrangements for the appearance of
the band next Friday evening. The
contractors have kindly loaned a
large tarpaulin, which will be
stretched on First street, near the
center of town, and which will holl
the hundreds who will come to hear
the music.
This band, traveling under the
auspices of the Salvation Army,
consisting of a high order of talent,
has received universal praise where-
ever it has appeared. It includes
1 a performers, three of whom are
ladies, who are also soloists. The
German violinist and the X-man-of-
wars-man on the banjo and mandolin are said to be particularly fine.
There will also be an attractive
street parade.
The entertainment will commence
at eight o'clock, and tickets are to
be sold at the low rate of 25 cents.
The Salvation Army work is a
most commendable one, and Brooklyn's citizens will doubtless turn
out and give their Washington Marine Band a rousing welcome.
THE TRAIL AGAIN RUNNING
Several Changes In Kootenay Fleet
Officials.
Brooklyn now has another steamer touching at her dock. Monday
evening the Trail came down from
Nakusp, where she had been on the
ways for a couple of months,
caused by blowing out one of the
cylinder heads. While laid up she
was thoroughly renovated and
painted, and is now as fresh as a
daisy. Her first work was to transfer the old Columbia & Western
station from Trail to West Robson
on the new line, for which she
brought down a barge. Hereafter,
she will do a general freighting
business between Robson and Arrowhead, and will carry coke, coal
and smelter supplies in unbroken
car loads.
Several changes have taken place
this week in the officials on the
boats. Captain Fraser, now of the
Trail, was transferred from the tug
Columbia, running between Arrowhead and Nakusp. Captain Esta-
brook, of the steamer Hunter on
Slocan lake, has been given charge
of the tug Columbia. Mr. McClel-
lan, the pilot of the Kootenay, is
now captain of the Hunter, 'while
Mate Atfsmo, of the Rossland, takes
the position of pilot on the Koote-.
nay. Mate" Griswold, of the Nelson,
on Kootenay lake, now acts in the
same capacity on the. Rossland*
and Mate Sutor, of the Slocan, acts
as mate on the Trail..'
SI IPBNDIARY. MAGISTRATE
Appointment ofrMelJor Coo per, J.P.,>
Petit loaed-^or.   ' . \'*
' Major W. 'H. Cooper, justice of
the peace for East and West Kootenay, has been in Brooklyn for the
past week looking after the interests of justice as local magistrate.
Efforts are being made to induce
the judge to remain here, and it is
understood that a petition will be
sent to the government, urging upon them the pressing necessity of
the appointment and asking that he
be appointed stipendiary magistrate
There are a number of civil cases
which can not be tried without going to Nelson or Rossland, which is
a great inconvenience to the public.
Brooklyn in the last few months has
contributed considerable revenue to
the treasury of the province and is
deserving of some consideration at
the hands of the government.
The sooner the appointment is
made the better for the interests of
all concerned.
ALL READY FOR GUESTS.
Free Board Furnished at the City
Calaboose.
Constable Allan Forres ter has
at last succeeded in securing a
location for a jail for the temporary
accommodation of offenders against
the majesty of the law. It is a new
building on the lake front, back of
the Anderson house, and is being
fitted up for this special purpose by
the lessor, John Robinson.
The building is 12 1-2x36 feet in
size, one story, and the back end is
arranged for two separate cells. In
front will be a room large enough
for Judge Cooper to dispense justice
and wisdom in, while just to the
rear' f this are accommodations for
the officers.
Mr. Forrester hopes that there
will be little need to use the cells,
but proposes to be prepared for any
and all emergencies that are likely
to arise in a new town. Brooklyn
promises to have all the latest improvements, and this is but one
step in this direction.
MUST HAVE MEN.
There   Is  Still  a Shortage of
Laborers.
4,000 CAN BE WORKED.
Fnll Force to be on the Line by
September 1st.���Will Get Workmen In the East.
During the last week quite a
number of men have been added to
the pay rolls of the contractors on
the line of railway from Robson to
Penticton. But the demand is as
yet in excess of the supply, and if a
sufficient number of men do not
show up soon for work, laborers
will be brought in from the east.
In fact, an agent of the contractors
has already started for the largest
eastern centers for the purpose of
securing the necessary help.
Messrs. Mann, Foley Bros. & Larson are determined to push the construction with all the speed that unlimited capital and energy can command.
As will be noted elsewhere, the
tote road has been completed for a
distance of 20 miles from Brooklyn
and' men are strung out ay along
the line at the different camps' of the
sub-contractors. , But there is '{he
.universal eomplamt that; sufficient
help cannot be had. However;*
gBqd progress with the 1500 men
now at work,.and the force is continually being, augmented. ���. J. W.
Steward, the general superintendent
of construction, f* one*bf the busiest
men in the'ta'mp, but'hak.-tqe" best
of assistants.. *..
Paymaster Woodman states that
if the men can be gotten, at least.
4,000 men will be constantly employed until the line is completed,
but that this end will be well advanced before much is done on the
other end.
Mr. Woodman will start out on
his interesting trip of distributing
the funds for the monthly pay roll
promptly on the 20th, two weeks
from to day. Of course he'll not
forget to take along his little check
book. The trip will require nearly
a week between here and Robson
and between here and the end of
the tote road. An unpleasant feature of it at this time is that most
of the trip must be made on foot.
While business has been good in
town for the past week, it undoubtedly will be much better by the 20th
and thereafter. Altogether, things
arc looking bright all around and
the early predictions of the NEWS
are being verified.
CAUGHT IN BROOKLYN
fe CONSTRICTION NOTES!
Atlantic Steamship Tickets.
To and from European points via
Canadian and Ameriaan lines. Apply for sailing rates, tickets and
full information, to any C. P. Ky.
agent or W. D. Bkewkter, C.P.R.
agent Trail.
William Stilt, General S. S. Agt���
Winnipeg.
John   Lawson    Cashed    Another
Man's Check.
Last week Chief of Police McKln-
non, of Nelson, notified Constable
Forrester of this city to be on the
lookout for one John Lawson,
wanted for having cashed a check
on the Bank ol Montreal made in
favor of J. McPhail, which had
been lost. Mr. Forrester had no
difficulty in locating and arresting
Lawson, who had registered at the
International hotel, and on Monday
took him to the provincial goal at
Nelson.
It seems that Lawson formerly
worked in various places at Nelson,
his confederate having found the
check, as he claimed, Lawson succeeded in getting it cashed at the
bank, and the two "whacked up"
on the proceeds.
Another man named Scott was
implicated in the transaction, and
he also was gathered in for examination as to connection with the
matter.
They were brought up before the
magistrate on Thursday at Nelson,
and committed for trial.
A gopd many single carts went
out on the line Wednesday.
At Winters, Parsons & Boomer's
Camp, ten miles out, there is a force
of 75 men and more wanted.
John F. Stevens, chief engineer
for Mann, Foley Bros. & Larson,
was in the city for a few days this
week.
Constable Forrester is reported
as keeping a weather eye on one or
two "blind pig" manipulators, both
stationery and itinerant.
McLean Bros, have 65 men at
work on the preliminaries for their
big 3100 foot tunnel contract, but
need nearly a hundred more.
Cotton's restaurant is a new institution located in a tent just beyond the first summit, below Foot's
"amp. He is doing business for
the present under canvass.
Between a point about three miles
above Robson, and Brooklyn, it is
said that, on account of the many
curves in the new line, there will be
scarcely a hundred feet of straight
track. ." ������
James Innes#is tfu'ildin'g a log hotel at Porcupine creek5,',"about ten
miles out, on the line of cbnstruc-
tion. It Will be open in a-Dew days
for the accommodation of the weary'
traveler; ��� ���
������'.'
The tote road is now built for  a
distance' of 20 miles from Brooklyn.
There are about, 80' me,n at .work
on the job uhder Qotttractqr-^pwn,f
and progress is,flefng made"at uMs
rat? of a quarter of a'milgjjef day.
Tote wad No: 2, fiom '<Shierd's_
landing' to tfie hig*l' grttde *aftd/'
JJridge, is 4,790 feet' long. The
bridge .will be?-1 go. feet high and-400
l��ng.' Work has been p commenced
on the abutments.' ���    ,.
'Mail Carrier.Tgrney, who returned from a trip up the line, on 'last
Wednesday, represents that nearly
every contractor he met along, th��
line complained of a shortage of
help and are anxious to get more as
soon as possible.
Genial Owens Kenny, who does
the cooking act for the tote road
camp, is said to be one of the most
useful men in that gang, and has a
host of friends all along the line.
He is never too busy or too tired to
wait on a weary traveler.
Ole Eggleston, an old charcoal
burner from Norway, has a contract
for making 1500 bushels of charcoal for blacksmithing purposes.
The work is being done at a point
about a half a mile this side of
Boomer's camp and will take a
month to finish.
Burns & Jordan, who have a
quarter of mile of work a few miles
below town, now have 90 men employed, but could use 250 more.
Mr. Burns says he will slart another contract of two miles way up on
the line next week, when he will require as many more men.
George Atkins, who is learning
for Contractor McLean, whose camp
is 15 miles out, took up a ton of
giant powder on Thursday. This
contract for two miles of work,
consists almost eulirhly of rock cutting. Mr. Atkins says that 40 or
50 more men can be put at work at
once I here at the best of ruling
wages.
.;���;
The Prlfe of Hvvr.
The hotel men of Trail think that
5 cent beer should be a thing of the
past, and have taken steps to bring
the price to the old standard of 12^3
cents. With this in view they held
a meeting in the opera house yesterday to discuss matters of general
interest and the beer question in
particular. The meeting was unanimous in favor of raising the price,
with but one exception, and the
matter was allowed to remain as it
is until Monday next. If all concur
the price will then be advanced. If
not, it will remain as it is, THE BROOKLYN NEWS, SATURDAY, AUGUST   6, 1898
THE BROOKLYN NEWS.
Subscription Rales S2.00 per Ycnr
Advertising Rates made known upon
ApftlicMton.
BROOKLYN, SATURDAY, AUG.  6,   18
By W. B. WILLCOX.
1898       AUGUST       1898
SUN
MON   TUB|WED
THU
4
11
"75"
25
h'RI
5
12
'9
26
SAT
1          2
JlJl
'5     ���"
22     23
20,       30
.1
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6
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"28"
FUTURE OF THE NEWS.
With this issue of the B��ookly>.
News, the paper passes into new
hands and appears under new management. But there will be no
change, whatever, in the general
policy and plan of the paper, as
adopted from its beginning, which
was to work early and late for the
good of Brooklyn and its enterpiis-
ing business men. The new editor
and manager will devote his entire
time to the News, and will make it
as complete as possible in every
respect. Particular attention will
be given to news and notes of the
railway construction and to local
matters, making its weekly visits
welcome to all.
One more thing. All this costs
money and we are not philanthropists. We were healthy before we
came here, and in this salubrious
atmosphere expect to remain so.
We expect also to deserve and receive the hearty support of every
man, woman and child in Brooklyn.
The beginning, like that of the
town has been auspicious, but it has
been impossible to see every one as
yet. Any one who has been overlooked will please call on the publisher at the old Townsite office, so
that they may not miss an issue of
the paper. Those wishing friends
at a distance to see what the town
is, can have papers mailed direct
from this office.
With serviceable systems of
water works and electric light
Brooklyn will soon break another
record among progressive young
cities by getting these modern improvements so soon after its foundation.
Brooklyn is today the liveliest
town in Kootenay, and is growing
every day. In fact, one can almost
see it grow. Another particularly
pleasant feature is that merchants
here are doing a good business and
are more than saislied with the
outlook.
More men are being put to work
on the line of construction daily,
but there is yet a great shortage of
help. No able-bodied men need go
hungry in the Kootenays this year.
Brooklyn's contractors can keep
them all busy for the next few
months at least.
If any, town on inland waters has
a belter class of steamers than land
al Brooklyn, it has yet to be heard
from. Such palatial craft as the
Rossland and Kootenay are a credit
to any company and a pleasure to
patronize. Travelers can go hack
and lorth between Brooklyn and
Robson and intermediate points no
less than four times daily.
While universal attention just
now is on the railway construction
and its many associated interests,
the possibilities of Brooklyn from a
mining point of view have been partially lost sight of. The article in
last week's News, however, on the
mines of this section has attracted
no little attention. Just keep your
weather eye on Brooklyn and see it
grow into a mining center.
This issue of the News will be
found  to be  four columns   larger
than the last, and  appears under a
' new management,     Every resident
of Brooklyn is cordially invited to
step up to the editor's office and be
everlastingly immortalized by having his or her name enrolled among
the fortunate ones on the select list
of subscribers of this great family
journal. Do it today, before you
overlook it.
The passing of Count Bismarck,
the grand old man of Germany, last
Saturday, takes from the world's
political arena one of its most prominent and forcible characters.
Probably no man throughout the
entire German Empire was so much
thought of and loved as Bismarck.
Not only was he held in high esteem
by royalty and those of high degree
but he was very close to the hearts
of the common people. The crowned
heads of Europe listened attentively
when Bismarck spoke, and his
death at the advanced age of 83, is
a distinct loss to his country.
"Personally I have always believed that beneath the sometimes
troubled surface there was a deep
and strong current of sympathy for
each other, as well as a sense of
essential unity in the two great and
free English peoples on the opposite sides of the Atlantic. Some 15
years ago 1 ventured to say to a
large and representative American
audience that I felt sure that if some
day England were to be hard
pressed by a combination of European powers, America would not
stand indifferently by and see the
old country in peril. So, likewise,
England would not look on unconcerned nor remain neutral were
ever America to be in any like risk.
For the stories which seem to be
put in circulation of British designs
regarding Hawaii and of British
sympathy with Spain on the Cuban
question, there is not a shadow of
foundation. We seek nothing in
either quarter. We wish nothing
in either matter but that you should
take the course which will make for
your own peace and well-being.
We are divided among ourselves on
many questions, but are all united
on one, in the des ire to maintain
the most friendly relations with your
republic and in the belief that your
interests in the world at large are
substantially the same as our own,
so that cooperation between the
t*'o countries will be as practically
beneficial to both as it will be in
accord with the genuine feelings of
ourpeople."���Letter 0/James Bryce
M. "P., Author of "The American
Commonwealth." ,
"Such an alliance is natural.
Now is the time to accomplish it,
when the advantages are apparent
to both countries. A decade hence,
when, if she desires, the United
States can have become a first class
naval powcFT"and will, perhaps,
have adopted the policy of free
trade, it might not be worth her
while to undertake the responsibilities of an alliance with Great Britain. When America has built her
navy she will be in a position to
enforce her demands, which will not
take her long now, with her enormous latent resources and mechanical engineering facilities." ���Lord
Charles 'Beresford, Vice-Admiral,
and Member of the 'British 'Parliament.
"The announcement that the
United States will adhere strictly
to the principles of the Treaty of
Paris is an expression of a genuine
desire to conform to the more
humane views ot warfare accepted
by the powers. The sympathy for
the United States felt by Great
Britain can not but be strengthened,
especially among the commercial
community, by the sense of relief
thus afforded.
"It is to be hoped that in the
interests of both countries and the
world at large the better understanding now being arrived at may
be permanent. The Americans will
observe, no doubt, that there is
little sympathy and even little toleration for them anywhere but in
this ccuntry, her colonies and dependencies."���The Times.
"The idea of ridding Cuba of
Spaniards has been threatened by
American statesmen during the last
half-tentury, but the merit of acting
upon it, with all its tremendous responsibilities and risks���for it is a
merit���belongs to President McKin-
ley. The adequacy of his justifica-
ticn can not be doubted in England,
and every voice is raised to wish
the Urited States success."���The
'Daily Graphic.
"As the world progresses and its
several parts are drawn more closely
together, weaker peoples and races
are crushed and the strong rise into
greater prominence. So it is that
distinctions which once were of
great importance have been in late
years losing their significance. The
small and weak are sinking out of
sight. The strong are becoming
stronger. The conflict is reducing
itself to a battle  among the giants.
"Already in this process of evolution and readjustment the Latin
races have distinctly lost ground.
Spain is threatened with destruction
even as a nation. Italy has recently
asserted a distinct national character, but the Italian race as such has
not gained in a corresponding way.
France has lost ground to a notable
degree. The Latin race is in its
decline. Germany is making great
strides in commerce and is increasing in population at home. But the
Germans are not as a race progressing in a way to indicate that they
may ever be world-conquerers.
"Of European races, those that
occupy the most promising places
in the field of the future are the
Anglo-Saxon and the Slav. The
former is the world ruler of today.
But to find the seat of its power one
must go beyond the British Empire.
The dominion of this race is co-extensive with the use of the English
language. It extends over the
United States and all the self-governing parts of the British Empire.
On the other hand, the Slav represents practically the whole of eastern and southeastern Europe, except
those comparatively small areas occupied by Turks, Greeks, Hungarians and a few others. It is represented politically by the advancing
power of Russia. All that Russia
gains politically is a distinct gain
for the Slav race. Although Russia
governs many people not of Slavonic blood, its influence is in one
direction, and the strength of its
subjects, whatever their race or
creed, will be employed for the establishment of Slavonic supremacy,
"The coming conflict is between
the now dominant Anglo-Saxon and
the rising Slav. It would seem that
ei ther of the two great branches of
the Anglo-Saxon race may prove
incapable in itself of resisting Slavonic encroachment. If this proves
true, cooperation may come as a
necessity for the sake of that protection which races as well as
individuals recognize as the first of
nature's laws."���The Republican
(Sil. Rep.) Denver.
"Undoubtedly where there are
common interests there ought to be
common action between us and
America, and the far East just now
seems to me to be a case in point."
���The T)uke of Argyll.
"Chamberlain in his recert speech
appealing for an alliance between
England and the United States insulted Irishmen by referring to Irish
Home Rule as 'an unclean thing.'
"Make the insult known to the
twenty-five million Americans of
Irish blood, who are heart and soul
with the republic today against
European power, as were their kith
and kin with Washington, Jackson
and Lincoln against England.
"The alliance is wanted solely
for selfish British ends. It is desired by England not for the sake
of the United States, but against
Russia, who sent her fleet to American waters and put her ships at the
service of President Lincoln when
England, for the third time was
plotting and actively engaged in the
effort to destroy the republic.
"America will surely never join
in a coalition against France and
Russia in order to take British
chestnuts out of the fire. The rumors of a European coalition against
the United States are purely a
fabrication, 'made in England,' for
American consumption, the object,
of course, being to promote the
much desired and, for England, the
much needed alliance.
"It is an insult to America to insinuate that she is not able to defend
her own shores without British
help."���Michael (Davitt.
Camp Distances from Brooklyn
TOWARDS   ROBSON.
MILES
Ericson's camp 2 1 -2
Johnson's camp 3 1-2
Koykendall's camp, No. 10 .. 3
Foss & McDonald(s camp ���
No. 9  4
Burns & Jordan's camp���N0.8 5
O'Learv's and Mann's camps,
(Shield's Landing)���N0.7 6
V. W. Smith's camp���No. E 7
McCormack's���No. 6  8
V. W! Smith's camp���No. 6 8
Ryberg's camp���No. 5  9
Pat Walsh's first camp���N0.4 10
Hanson's camp���No.C  11
Pat Walsh's camp���No. A... 11
Pat Walsh's camp���No. 3... 13
Genelle's camp���No. 2  16
McHugh's camp���No. 1  17
Robson  18
DISTANCES  ON  TOTE ROAD.
Twohy's camp 2 1-2
Nugent's camp  3
McLean Bros, camp (tunnel). 4
Mclver & Phillips camp 41-2
Foote's camp  6
McMartin's camp  8
Winters, Parsons & Boomer. 10
Farr's camp  13
McClellan's camp  14
Olsen's camp  23
it
STEAM LAUNCH
ORIOLE"
Makes Daily trips between
Brooklyn and Robson
touching it all intermediate
points.
The Oriole can be hired for pleasure excursionists,   Orders taken for Supplies,
Outhts, Etc.
Apply RUMBALLSBULLEN
BROOKLYN, B. 0.
THE KOOTENAY   .
L.UMBE.R
COMPANY.     S. OLIVER. AGENT.
Full stock of Good Dry
Lumber on hand'
BROOKLYN, B. C.
MITCHELL BROS,
MERCHANT
TAILORING.
GENT'S
FURNISHINGS.
Now open for business
Brooklyn, B. C.
S. H. BROWN,
BROOKLYN.
CONTRACTOR
..AND:.
BUILDLR.
Lstimates Made.
Plans Furnished.
James Gill &@.
Clothing.
6ent's
Furnishings,
Boots,
Shoes,
Blankets,
Pillows, Etc.
Window Shades,
Curtains,
Carpets, Rugs.
All our goods  have been shipped
direct from eastern manufacturers
and will be sold here at prices
that are sure to satisfy you.
Brooklyn,
B.C.
FOR THE BEST MEAL IN
TOWN, GO TO THE-
Queen Restaurant.
OPEN NIGHT AND DAY.
Try our Evening Dinner, 5:30 to
8:30, for 25 cents.
Hyde & Whines, Props.
Brooklyn, B. C.
Parson's Produce Co'y.
Winnipeg, Man.   *  Vancouver, B. C.   ��   Nelson, B. C.    '
WHOLESALE ONLY.
The Largest dealers in Western Canada.
Creamery and Dairy Butter, Eggs
Cheese, and Cured Meats,
Specialties���Creamery Butter In Hermetically Sealed Tins; lib, 21b, Sib, and
101b,  Creamery Butter In I pound bricks.
Mail and Telegraph  orders promptly shipped from  our Cold  Storage
.... warehouse, Nelson.-   Write or Wire....
All Warehouses under perfect P, J. RUSSELL,
system of Cold Storage.       Manager Nelson branch, NELSON, B.C.
The only Strictly Wholesale House in Kootenay.
mmmm
A. MACDONALD & CO.,
Wholesale Merchants
NELSON, B. C.
Fancy and Staple Groceries,
Tobaccos and Miner's Supplies.
Call or Write for Prices.
Thomas Wilson.
GENERAL MERCHANT
Groceries, Provisions, Clothing,
Boots and Shoes, Campers Outfits, Etc.
...Mr Good Stock; ot Everything-
BROOKLYN,       -        -       -       ���       -
B.C.
f
i
m Stationery
to
BROOKLYN
PIONEER
STORE.
W. Parker, Proprietor
Fancy Groceries,
Tobaccos, Cigars,
1FRESH FRUITS.
3
i
3
3
3
3
I
3
3
3
1
1
to
to
^
Bananas, jjj
Oranges, jjj
Lemons Nuts, jj-
Papers, Magazines!
to Brooklyn,
J! Spokane, Seattle,
~ Portland, Trail,
Rossland
to
m
to
to
'Now located in the'
NEW STORE BUILDING,
BrooKiyn, B. G.
*
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
i
s THE BROOKLYN NEWS, SATURDAY, AUGUST 6, 1898.
1 BROOKLYN BUDGET {
' ����*��%%%%**%*%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%*%%%% v
All kinds of stationery, magazines and newsyapers at Udalls.   tf
A B. Gray, merchandise broker,
of Nelson, was doing business in
town last Wednesday.
Local nimrods acquainted with
the best fishing grounds report having many excellent catches during
the past week.
H. L. Sawyer has had trouble
with his male cooks. Too much
booze, he says, so he inserts the
following ad:
Girl Wanted���A first class camp
cook, good wages, references required. Landing No. 9. via Brooklyn. H. L. Sawyer.
For Sale���Cheap, quarter interest in a promising mining claim.
Inquire at Brooklyn News office
if you want a snap. tf
A new cigar will soon be on the
market here, called the War Extra.
It is said to be made of a particularly fine article of tobacco
Remember the Brooklyn News
when you want printing. Letterheads, bill-heads, envelopes, cards
and all classes of printing promptly-
executed.
Cigars by the box at wholesale
prices at Udall's. tf
.*
On Friday the new Windsor hotel
was opened up for business. Mr,
Shanks has lost no time in completing this commodious First St.
hostlery.
John W. Manuel, formerly of
Burton City, has opened a neat
cigar store adjoining the Brooklyn
house, and will' be pleased to see
his friends there.
Messrs. Graham and McMannus
are refitting the International hotel
in first class shape and are preparing to do the large share of trade
they are sure to receive.
How do you like this issue of the
News, in its enlarged and improved
form? If you think it's a good thing
and worthy of suppo.t, come in and
show it by subscribing.
Several new verandas adorn the
front of as many First St. hotels
this week, and greatly improve their
appearance���notably the Anderson,
Park, Columbia and Brooklyn hotels.
Business generally is reported as
being better than usual last Sunday
since when a large number came
in from along the line. Consequently our business men wear a
happy smile.
The fish are biting at Udall's
baits. tf
The newly constructed plank
walk, about a quarter of a mile
long, to a point leading to the boat
house, will 'be a great convenience
to those having business in that
neighborhood.
William Parker, the genial town-
site owner, spent several days in
Nelson early this week on business.
He says that the Washington Marine Band, which he heard there, is
��� fine musical organization.
Chief of Police Fountain, of
Nelson, spent 1 ast Sunday in town.
He says that the Sunday laws in
regard to closing saloons will be
enforced, and already the schools
of blackjack have  taken a vacation
P. Burns & Co. are beginning to
doconsiderable business in their line.
Three times weekly they ship 18
or 20 quarters of beef to the camps
down the lake, to say nothing of
v, hat goes up the tote road.
The Pioneer Store has moved into the new building on First St.
with a brand new stock of goods,
and Mr. Parker will be pleased to
welcome his many friends in the
new and commodious quarters.
Subscribe to the Brooklyn News
and get all the news of the Magic
City and of the construction camps
along the line. Send a copy to
your friends back east, and let them
see what a progressive city is like.
Only $2 per year or $1 for 6 mos.
John White was given 30 days
by Judge Cooper   on Monday, his
condition being superinduced by
too liberal a use of whiskey. The
same evening Constable Forrester
kindly escorted him to the provincial
jail at Nelson.
Brooklyn is literally a hot town
nowadays. At least, such is the
case if one can judge from the appearance of the thermometer. In
front of the News office it has been
up to and over the 100 mark during
the last week.
Messrs. Dixon and Williams,who
have been conducting revival services daily in their large tent on
Larson street, will continue till next
week Friday, when they leave for
the new mining camp ol Republic,
Washington.
McDonald's boat house has a
large patronage all the time. In
fact, he does not have enough boats
to supply the demand. However,
with his assistant, he is turning out
excellent boats right along and
adding to his stock.
The Brooklyn News is prepared
to furnish the best in the world���
bar none���in the line of job printing
and general office stationery, Bring
in your orders for envelopes, letter
heads, cards, tags, and in fact,
anything made with  ink and paper.
All persons wishing mail delivered
on the line of the Robson & Pentic-
ton railway are requested to leave
their names with time-keepers at
any. of the company's camps, and
mail will be promptly delivered,
tf W. Parker.
Constable Forrester relieved a
warlike Italian ot a wicked looking
revolver and a razor on hoard the
steamer Rossland Sunday evening
on the up trip. Sons of sunny Italy
and others will do well to take
notice and be guided accordingly,.
The crowd that surges around
the townsite office daily when the
mail comes in is a sight to behold.
But it is a good-natured crowd that
seems to appreciate the difficulties
under which the town is working in
regard to postal facilities���or rather
lack thereof.
R. Geiger, of the firm of Thomas
& Geiger, came in from Rossland
on Thursday, and will spend a week
in the environs of Brooklyn while
Mr. Thomas makes a business trip
to Spokane. They report sales ol
the Lion Brewery product as increasing steadily.
As an evidence of the immense
volume of business done with
Brooklyn, the phenomenal young
city of the Kootenays, it may be
mentioned that the steamer Rossland required nearly three hours
last Saturday night to unload her
freight. And it was all general
merchandise and supplies.
A. G. Bonney, who "tooks your
likeness" while you wait, has arrived in town and will spend a few
weeks in this vicinity and along the
line. He makes a specialty of
buildings and landscapes, and is an
artist in his line. He will have
headquarters at the Arrow lake
metropolis.
J. W. Stephens, an under graduate of Knox college, of Toronto,
held divine services in the Brooklyn
Tabernacle last Sunday. At the
evening service several hundred
were present and the large audience was attentive throughout.
Mr. Stephens made many friends in
town before his departure on Monday evening's boat.
Brooklyn will have another hotel
this week, the Stockholm, which
will open up just over the creek on
First Street. Messrs. Johnson and
Lockhart, the proprietors, are old
hands at the business, having formerly run a hotel at Coal Creek on
the Crow's Nest line. They deserve
credit for the speed shown in the
construction of the Stockholm.
George Olson came in Tuesday
from the Burnt Basin district with
some fine specimens of copper and
galena ore, on which he located the
Golden Spoon and Silver Ball. They
are situated about 12 miles from
Christina lake and only a mile or
two from the new railway line. Mr.
Olson says that there is quite a
stampede into the district, and many
promising locations are being made.
Denny Coughlin and James McDonald have bought out the Hoffman House, and are now running
the best Scotch house in town.
When you hear the rhythmical
strains of the "Cock o' the North"
and other highland airs floating out
these pleasant evenings, remember
that they come from the Hoffman and
that D. Duer is the artist on the
bagpipes.
The local postmaster Is a long-
suffering individual, but has relieved
the situation somewhat by the addition of a couple of boxes of pigeon
holes for the larger letter mail that
arrives daily. The papers, however, still occupy the cracker box in
front of the office. Post office inspector Fletcher should wander this
way and take note of the inconvenience thrust upon several hundred
people.
L. M. LIVINGSTON
6 COMPANY.
General
Merchandise
Groceries,
Provisions,
Gent's
Furnishings,
Hardware.
Brooklyn and Deer Park, B. C.
BROOKLYN
HOUSE
McDonald & Bolan, Props.
First-class in
all respects.
First Street. Brooklyn, B. C.
Park rtotel.
Fredurick ,t Peternon, Props.
Nearest Hotel to the
Dock,
Good Clean Rooms,
Everything First-class,
front Street.
Brooklyn, B. C.
Steam Yacht
MYRTLE B.
���" Copt. C. Bcnjifleld. ������
Makes Daily trips
TO ROBSON
Leaving Brooklyn at 8 a. m.,  and
stopping at all intermediate points.
Returning, leave   Robson
at 2:00 p. m.
KOOTENAY
WIRE WORKS CO.
TRAIL, B. C,
-Manufacturers of-
Bed Springs, Mattresses and
�� �� Cots. �� ��
For Sate by Ml Furniture Dealers,
SHAW & SHAW,
Dealers lq
Hay, Feed,
Produce 6k
Vegetables
Hanctiea at 8alit|oi) ftrrn. and SqUttWap. B. 0.
Brooklyn, B. C.
C. E. MALLETTE & CO.
Wholesale dealers in
Fruits, Vegetables, Feed, and
Produce, 8.21. Fresh Fruits
Received Daily.
MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
Baker Street,
Nelson, B. C.
City Drug Store.
 Just received a full line of	
Drugs, Patent Medicines and Druggists* Sundries.
We are fully prepared to fill
all orders in this line.
Tobacco, Cigars, Stationery, Sponges, Perfumes
and Toilet Soaps.
FRED POLLOCK, Prop.,
Prescriptions a Specialty.
BROOKLYN, B. C.
Mail orders promptly filled
P. Burns 6t Co.,
-i-i-HOTEL-:-*
ANDERSON.
MRS. H. V. ANDERSON, Prop.
Ratesf$1.50 to
$2.00 per day.
The Dining Room is under the management oi'
Mrs, H, Y. Anderson. The Table is supplied
with the Best the market affords ::::::::
Good Airy Rooms ��������� ��������� Clean Beds
First-class Bar in connection
St. Louis Beer Pabst Beer Sclilitz Beer
Alliance Hotel.
NELSON & JOHNSON, Props.
Railroaders' Headquarters
.   ��K��HIH��
Fine WINES, LIOUORS       DINING ROOM IN CON-
and CIGARS. NECTION.
-^^First Street, Brooklyn, B. C.
Brooklyn Exchange.
AUNE & HOVEN, Props.
Fine Wines  Liquors and  Cigars
Comfortable Rooms
GIVE US A CALL...
��� BROOKLYN, B. C.
CENTRAL HOTEL
FIRST STREET, BROOKLYN, B. C.
Best brands of Wines,
Liquors and Cigars
BLOMBERG & DAHL,
Proprietors
W. H. GRAHAM
J. H. McMANNUS
International Hotel.
Front Street, Brooklyn, B. C.
Headquarters for Railroad Men
Bar supplied with Best brands WINliS, LIQUORS and CIGARS.
Everything New and First-Class.
Best Table in Town���~~~ ~-~--���~ ������Rales Reasonable
GRAHAM & McMANNUS, Proprietors.
WHOLESALE
MEATS
BROOKLYN,
B. 0.
Our well assorted slock includes
Staple and Fancy
JUST WHAT YOU
NEED:::
GROCERIES,   BOOTS,   SHOES,
CLOTHING, UNDERWEAR,
Tents,     Blankets,    Canned Goods,     Cured Meats,    Etc.
PRICES ALWAYS RIGHT.
GIVE US A PALL...
IB"   p/iPPfC JB Ort    row mrmmmT,
JS.   rMl\t\l9   <X.   \+SJ.,   BROOKLYN, b. c.
Hoffman House.
Coughlin X: McDonald, Props.
Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
BEST SCOTCH HOUSE IN THE CITY.
EVERYTHING FIRST-CLASS,
Front Street,
Brooklyn, B. C.
COSMOPOLITAN HOTLL.
Linderman & Anderson, Props.
Bar stocked with Finest Wines, Liquors * Cigars.
....GIVE US A CALI	
Front Street. Brooklyn, B. C.
Aerated Waters.
Pabst Bohemian Beer.
SYRUPS, ETC.
THORPE & CO., Ltd., Victoria, Vancouver, Nelson.
i��Se9SSSSe9SSSSeSS9S9��SeS8��i9��S����i����SS9��9S�� THE BROOKLYN NEWS, 9ATURDAY, AUGUST 6, 1898.
ALL WANT LE ROI
W. A. Carlyle is Appointed as
Receiver.
CASE BRIEFLY   STATED.
The Principal In the Case Makes a
Statement   as    to    the
Situation.
The Le Roi company, -.ays the
Rossland Miner, is now in the
hands of a receiver, who is none
other than W. A. Carlyle, the chief
engineer of the British America
corporation. This, the latest and
most dramatic of the long series of
developments in connection with
the fight of the British America
corporation to secure the property,
occurred a few minutes after midnight last evening, when, acting
under an order issued by Judge
Spinks of the county court, Mr.
Carlyle, accompanied by Sheriff
Robinson, formally took charge of
the property, after serving the necessary legal notice on Nicholas
Tregear, the superintendent of the
mine. W. J. Harris, the former
manager of the company, who represented the Turner interests in
Rossland, was in Spokane at the
time and consequently he was not
aware of the developments.
WHAT WILL THE TURNERITES DO?
It is possible, though, that the
minority, represented by Senator
Turner, will at once make application before the supreme court of the
province to have the appointment
of the receiver set aside; but this is
mere conjecture for no one knows
as yet how the Turner faction will
view this latest development.
WHAT M. P. MACKINTOSH SAID.
Hon. C. H. Mackintosh, the resident director of the corporation,
was seen shortly after midnight by
a Miner reporter.
"Is it true that the British America corporation has secured an injunction against the management of
the Le Roi company?" Mr. Mackintosh was asked.
"Yes," said Mr. Mackintosh.
"Why did the  necessity arise?"
"Because the British America
corporation owned a majority of the
stock of the Le Roi company, and
because on the resignation of Col.
Peyton as managing director of the
company, a vacancy occurred which
in" the interest of all the share
holders should be filled.
THE MAJORITY SHOULD RULE.
"Our corporation throughout all
its dealings has endeavored to conduct its affairs on absolutely British
commercial principles, which naturally means that a majority should
have control. We held a control
in the Le Roi company, and still
hold a control, as I believed with
the consent and the desire of the
minority share holders. I say this
advisedly because of my conversations with Senator Turner and Col.
Turner.
"On Tuesday last, which was the
day of the usual monthly meeting of
the trustees, it was deemed necessary that a general manager should
be appointed to succeed Col. Peyton. Our legal advisors in Spokane advised us that although live
out of the nine trustees were in
favor of the appointment of Mr.
Carlyle to that position jet Colonel
Turner, the president of the company, absolutely refused to put the
motion to that effect, and a motion
of adjournment was declared carried, although a majority of the
trustees present was opposed to the
motion.
THE COt'RTS APPEALED TO.
"This afternoon Judge Hcybum,
our solicitor at Spokane, arrived
here and presented affidavits which
convinced me that the minority was
not living up to the agreements
which it had personally professed to
me that it desired to carry out. I
submitted the proposition to our
Rossland solicitors, and the result
was an application under the statutes of British Columbia to Judge
Spinks, who happened to be in the
city, asking that an injunction be
issued and that a receiver be appointed. After very deliberate consideration, Judge Spinks granted
the application, and appointed Mr.
Carlyle the receiver, under a bond,
which was approved by the judge.
Acting under this authority,  Mr,
Carlyle and Sheriff Robinson proceeded to the Le Roi, where the
necessary papers were served on
the oflicials of the company. Mr..
Carlyle then took possession and
appointed Nicholas Tregear, the
superintendent of the mine, agent on
behalf ot the share holders of the
Le Roi."
' 'What was the nature of the injunction?"
NATURE OF THE INJUNCTION.
"As I have said before, the nature of it was simply that as five
out of the nine trustees were in favor
of carrying out the wishes of the
majority, while the chairman absolutely refused to allow the majority
to rule, legal proceedings were
necessary. In our country, where
we have a reasonable judiciary system, a mandamus would have been
at once granted, requiring the
chairman to put the motion, but as
the Le Roi company is incorporated under the laws of the state of
Washington, that was an impossibility, and accordingly we came to
the conclusion that Canadian law
and Canadian courts should be invoked to protect British investors,
especially as they held so many
shares in the company. So far as
our corporation is concerned, we
still desire to be absolutely fair and
honorable and to mete out even
handed justice, be it to the minority
or to the majority."
THE 0. P. R. DEPOT.
It I. to Be Constructed on Second Avenue Near Wa*blnicton.
The Canacian Pacific railway has
settled upon Second avenue between
Washington and Lincoln streets as
the sight for ifs new Rossland passenger and freight depot, says the
Rossland Miner. The contract for
the construction of the improvements has been let to Winters,
Parsons & Boomer, who are widening the gauge of the road between
here and Trail, and the new station
will be ready by October 15, when
it is expected that the standardization of the line will be completed.
The railway company has bought
30 lots along Second avenue, running in a line from the present wye
near the school house, to Washington street, with the exception ot
four lots directly on the corner.
The station itself will be on Second
avenue, midway between Washington and Lincoln streets, while the
freight depots and the yards and
the other buildings in connection
with the station will extend as far
as the wye.
The passenger station will be a
thoroughly first class building, such
as the importance of the town demands, and it will be completely
fitted throughout with every convenience. The Red Mountain station is only a stone's throw away
and their nearness will be of great
convenience to through travelers
and the public generally.
0. R. & N,
Only Line Last via Salt
Lake and Denver.
Shortest and Quickest Route to-
Coeur d'Alcnc mincH, PalouM, Lcwtoton,
Walla Walla, Raker City mi it cm, Portland,
San Francisco, Cripple Creek gold ralucH,
and all pofntH Kant and South. Only lino
East via Salt Lake and Denver.
Steamship Tickets to Europe
and other Foreign Countries,
taoi, m.
dai(y.
&ooa.m.
daily.
Spokm
Time Schedule.
Paul Mail-Walla, Portland,
San f'ttindseOt flaktrCity
and tlit Bast,
/.out! Matt���Coeur dAlenes,
Parminirfon, Garfield, Colfax, Pullman, Moscow,
(1:411 p. m.
daily.
Steamer Lines.
San FrancIhco-Portland Route.
Steamship .tailsfrom Ainstmrth dock, Portland,
at Kixi p. m., and from polsom street Pier No. ia,
San Prancisco. at lavo a. m��� every three days,
Portland-Alaafca Route.
Regular tine A-i steamers behveen /brtlandand
Dyea and Skagtvay, raiting at Juneau and all other
important points. Sailing dates furnished on af$li*
cation.
Port land- Asiatic Line.
Monthly Sailings between Portland and the principal ports of China and Japan under the direction
of Dodwell, Carlill 6f Co., general agentt.
Snako River Route.
Steamer /.etviston betiveen Piparia and Istvt'ston;
leaves Piparia Mondays, Wednesdays, and Pridayi
at 1:4s a. m-; returning leaves f.nvialon Sundays,
Tuesdays, and Thursdays ats-'4S a. m.
Por through toetets and further information apply to any agent of the S. P. ��V A', system, or O. P.
A* .V. Co.'s office, 430 PitYrside Avenue,, Spokane,
Wash. H, M. ADAMS, General Agent.
W* H. liurlburt, Gen, Pas*. Agt., Portland.
Merchants' Bank
of Halifax.
Incorporated 1869.
Capital Paid up, SI,500,000.00.    Reserve, $1,175,000.00
Head Office:  Halifax, Nova Scotia.
BRANCHHS.
Anlijioiiish, N. 8
11.1 hurst. N. 11.
Bridgwater, N. S.
Charlotte-town, 1'. E. 1
Dorchester, N. B.
Frcdericton, N. B,
Guy��horo.N.8.
Halifax. N. H.
KliiKHton, N. B.
Londonderry, N. S.
Kos-'and, B, C.
Sackvtlle, N. B.
Hhuhcimcadie, N. S.
Suiiuiicrside, P. E. I.
Mvilnev, N. 8.
8i. John, Nil*.
Trurn, N. 8.
Vancouver, B. 0.
Victoria, B. C.
Woviuouth, N. 8.
Woodstock, N. B.
Luneiilmrj:. N 8.
Mail land   N.lt.
Moiiclon, N. H.
Montreal. V. Q.
Weal End.
"       Westmount
Nanaimo, B. C.
Nelson, B, C,
Newcastle, N. B.
Pictou, N. 8.
Port Hawkesbnry, N. 8.
A General Banking Business Transacted. Sterling Bills of Exchange
Bought and Sold. Letters of Credit, Etc., Negotiated.
Account, r.ulv.d on the moat l.vonbl. term..  Intere.t .llow.d on .pedal
deposit, and on Savings Bank account..
Branch.. In British Columbia:
NANAINO, NELSON, ROSSLAND, VANCOUVER, VICTORIA
A Savings Bunk department 1ms been established in connection with the
Nelson branch of this bank.
Deposits ol one dollar and upward received, and current rate of interest allowed (at
presents percent, per annum).
George Kydd. Manager, Nelson. B. C.
LAKE LAUNDRY
BATH HOUSE:::
Washing called for and
delivered.
In connection, Hot and
Cold water
Brooklyn Drug Co.
J. M. PERDUE, V. S., Prop.
Druggist and Stationer
PATENT + MEDICINES, + TOILET + ARTICLES, + PERFUMES,
LEDGERS, + CASH BOOKS, + CIGARS, * ETC.
Prescriptions carefully prepared Sole Agent for B. Lawrence's
with Pure Drugs. SPECTACLES.
Canadian Pacific
Railway * Soo
Pacific.
Is titled the Superior Service Line.
And is the Most Direct and Quickest route
to all points East, to Pacific Coast points and
the Popular Mining districts of the Klondike
and the Yukon	
Tourist Cars run Daily, and are Models of
Comfort and Llegance
numtn
Ascertain present Reduced Rates and full information by
addressing nearest local agent, or	
W. F. ANDERSON, Trav. Pass. Agt. Nelson.
E. J. COYLE, Dist. Pass. Agt. Vancouver.
Job Prffting...
Of Every Description
*#. The New:���rf
/ 7wS
COLUMBIA &
WESTERN R. R.
BntWooq
ROSSLAND, TRAIL. AND
ROBSON.
Commencing Aug.  5th,   1898, the
following changes in Passenger
train schedule will'be
effective:
Trains No. 3 and 4 between Rossland and Trail will be abandoned.
Train No. 6 will leave Smelter for
West Robson at 11130, arrive
Robson 12:45.
Train No. 5 will leave West Robson
for Smelter at 14:30, arrive at
Smelter  15:45.
F. P. Guteuus, Supt.
Spokane Palls &
Northern.
Nelson 6 Port Sheppard and
Red Mountain Railways.
The only  direct route to  Nelson,
Kaslo, Kootenay Lake and
Slocan  Points.
Daily except Sunday!
Leave Arrive
No. 4-8:45 a.m. Rousland No. 3-11:20 a.m
No. 6-12:06 p.m.      "     No. 5-3:10 p.m.
Train leaves Rossland at 8:45 "��� m!
makes close connections at Spokane for all  PACIFIC COAST
POINTS....
Train leaves Rossland at 12:05 p.m;
arrives at Nelson at 5:35 p. m.
Close connections with steamers for
Kaslo and all  Kootenay lake
points	
Passengers   for   Kettle   river  and
Boundary   Creek    connect   at
Marcus with stage daily.
Opposite International Hotel, Lake Front.
BROOKLYN, . . . . British Columbia
FOR, SALE.
FURNITURE
Of the Butte Hotel
In Whole or In Part.
Crescent Dry Goods Co., Ltd. Lby.
ROSSLAND, B. C
SbrooklynS
^     Is the Gateway to the    4fo
Midway Mines.
Forty Miles of Wagon Road Leading; to the Richest  j��
Mineral section In British Columbia, On
^Starts  from BROOKLYN. 4^
m
*
Thousands of Workmen have
<#���
St, Headquarters, BROOKLYN jl
f
Millions of Dollars paid to
*
Workmen at BROOKLYN.
BROOKLYN is the New Town on Lower Arrow Lake,
B. C, where the headquarters camp is located for construction work of 105  miles of heavy Railroad
work, costing $4,000,0110.
W. Parker, Sole Owner.
Address all Communications to ^99*
4jl W. E. BLACKMER, Exclusive Agent, dfe

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