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Brooklyn News Jul 23, 1898

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Array THE BROOKLYN NEWS.
VOL. 1.
BROOKLYN, B. C.   SATURDAY, JULY 23,  1898.
NO. 5.
IS GROWING FAST
Business    Men  Are   Making
Money at Brooklyn.
NANY     IMPROVEMENTS
It U the Gateway to the Rich
Mineral and Fertile l.nnils of
the Boundary District.
In another week the merchants of
Brooklyn will have their stocks of
goods in their buildings and business will be fairly under way. It is
indeed surprising, as all express
themselves, to see the wonderful
amount of work in the matter of
building which has been done in
the past thirty days.
For a town only a month old 72
buildings are not t'.o bad a showing. Many of these are large frame
structures, fairly well built, considering the rush in which the carpenters are under at all times.
Many of these are hotel buildings,
restaurants and lodging houses to
accommodate the heavy travel. A
number of well stocked stores are
now doing business, where one can
find almost everything needed in a
new town.
The writer knows of no other
town 30 days old having a gas
plant, yet Brooklyn has two stores
lighted by gas, and the pipes are
being laid for at least ten or twelve
other houses. W. B. Youmans is
erecting the plant to supply the
town, and apparently has all the
work he can do in the manufacture
of his process.
B M. Smith, of Revelstoke, has
caused considerable work to be
done on an electric light plant and
water system. The little creek
which cuts the town in two will
furnish plenty of pure water for all
purposes, and the flow is thought
to be sufficient to operate a wheel
for the light plant. Mr. Smith has
had years of experience in both
light and water companies and the
town is looking forward to the establishment Of the plants with considerable pleasure.
The many pioneer features are
gradually giving way to the manners
of civilization, but the demand has
been so great and so urgent that
many "make-shifts" have held on
tenaciously but are pushed aside by
the demand for more perfect and
modern conveniences. The new
wharf is one of the many new improvements, yet it is found to be
too small to accommodate the vast
cargo of goods daily unloaded, and
steamships must seek the beach for
a part of the shipload. The structure is 50x100 and is reached by a
260 foot runway, but the ideas of
man were built too small for the
bounding, boomiig trade of Brooklyn. Yards and yards of snowy
canvas covers tons and tons of
merchandise, through necessity unloaded on the beach these rainy
mornings, while teams, drays, carts,
pack trains and anxious seekers of
boxes and bundles soon diminish
the pile, much to the satisfaction of
the C. P. freight agent, It mav
seem odd that immense loads of
potatoes, flour, milk, wagons, carts,
horses, and dozens of other things,
are unloaded here daily, but when
the fact is considered that Brooklyn
is the headquarters for 105 miles of
railroad through the heaviest mountain rock work in the northwest,
employing fully 5,000 men along the
line, it is not wonderful in the least.
This point is the supply station, the
headquarters and general offices for
construction work of this line.
Brooklyn will be one of the best
points in British Columbia for trade
and as a mining center the prospects are good.
PICTURESQUE BROOKLYN.
Some of the Scenic Beauties of the
New Camp.
One of the show places of Brooklyn is the "Natural Bridge" which,
high up the mountain side, spans a
wide chasm in the rock through
which trickles a small mountain
stream. The best view is obtained
from the upper deck of the steamers. The drive across is about 70
feet wide and is solid rock, covered
with moss. Pine cones rolled from the
hills above and a luxuriant growth
of grass and flowers find a footing
on this high point. There it hangs
hundieds of feet above the lake,
almost sublime in its wild, grand
beauty. The stream, which chums
itself to a milky foam, looks like a
silver thread, swayed by the wind,
now glistening in the sunlight, or
again hidden by the thick foliage.
One must endure quite a climb to
reach this natural arch, but the trip
is well worth the struggle, torn
clothes and bruised hands,  for the
THE BIG TUNNEL
McLean   Brothers   Have   Secured the Contract.
TO BE 3100 FELT LONG
Work Will Commence in a Few
Days and Air Drills Will Be
Used.     Other Work.
The extensive outfit belonging to
the McLean Bros., railroad builders,
consisting of horses, wagons, carts,
camp outfits, and all the paraphernalia and appliances belonging
to a first-class camp, reached
Brooklyn Wednesday.
The McLean Bros, have secured
the contract to bore the tunnel,
3,100 feet, and several miles of
grading near the tunnel site. As
yet the contractors are unable to
give much information regarding
their work, but in the course of a
few days they will have their work
well under way.
The approaches to the cut will be
open rock work several hundred
feet in length. The tunnel proper
is 3,100 feet long and will be
worked with air drills at this end.
It is expected 130 men will  be em-
The Sabbath breaker had laid down
his tools, the tents disgorged their
inmates and the streets were again
alive with people. Now and then
a mother appeared with the baby in
arms, perhaps a toddler followed.
The boat steamei away, the triangles rang out their welcome jingle,
and a rush was made for the several
boarding houses. In an hour or
two all was quiet. Brooklyn sieeps
in tents, log houses, hotels and
bunk houses, carefully guarded by
Her Majesty's provincial police.
CURRENT COMMENT
Among the many Fourth of July
orations in the United States was
one by Rev. Dr. Evans, of Columbia, South Carolina. After Dr.
Evans had reminded his hearers
that he was pleaching in the city
where the first secession convention
was held in 1861 and the scale
where the first gun was fired
aga inst the old flag, and pictured
the desolation which remained after
Johnson's army had surrendered to
Sherman, he declared that any man
who would have prophesied in 1865
that the men who so gallantly led
our armies would some day fight as
fearlessly under the Stars and
Stripes and defend it with their life's
TO WHOM CONCERNED:
����� >     -     . ���
Brooklyn, B. C, July 21,1898.
W. Parker is the only person
authorized to Deliver Mail to
our Camps and collect for Mail
service.
MANN, FOLEY BROS., & LARSON.
view is one of nature's own painting. Far away up the lake the
blue Columbia winds its way, on
many peaks snow yet remains to
cool the summer winds, while 'way
across the lake rise the ragged saw
tooth mountain peaks, clothed in
dark green vestments, tall and
stately in their solemnnily. Over
and above you are the sweet smelling pines, rising high as in an
effort to hold up the oft times drip
ping clouds, while at your feet lies
the beautiful waters of Arrow lake.
Nestling among the crags and overturned tree trunks, grow beautiful
wild roses of many delicate shades,
the fragrance filling the air with
a grateful sense of nature's works.
Deer are plentiful in this section,
and this particular place is a favorite stamping ground for these
pretty, mild eyed creatures, and the
hunter has often taken advantage of
this fact that he may not return
empty handed. The approaches to
the bridge are easy when once the
altitude is attained, and many of
the Brooklyn people who have made
the ascent claim that the great
Brooklyn and New York bridge has
no grander view or more pleasing
sights than the natural bridge of
Brooklyn on lower Arrow lake.
At the company mess house Dixon
will furnish you a first-class meal
for 25 cents.
ployed for a year in the const ruction
of their work.
The camp will be established at
the mouth of the tunnel or some
convenient spot near where they
will direct the movements of the
work in hand.
McLean Bros, have the contract
also for building the several miles
of switchback across the summit.
SUNDAY IN BROOKLYN.
Routine from Sunrise to Sunset In
the New Camp.
A Sunday in Brooklyn is not so
bad as many would expect. The
morning was gloomy, rain fell occa-
sionly and about noon the wind
kicked up the white caps on the
lake. Toward tight the sun escaped from the dark clouds, the
wind died away and the surface of
the lake was soon calm, only broken
by a gentle ripple. The sun brought
out the loungers, the boating was
splendid and away back in so.ne
tent in the wood the plaintive notes
of a violin could be heard, while
down on Main street a small organ
assisted a minister of the gospel to
collect a congregation. The rain
drops glistened in the pines which
surround the town and just as the
shadows were approaching, the
steamer Rossland came in sight,
several miles up the lake, steaming
rapidly to the wharf to discharge
her cargo of freight and passengers.
blood; that a Lee and a Rosser of
Virginia, and the intrepid Wheeler
of Alabama, and the gallant Butler
of South Carolina, would some day
command a corps, or a division, or
a brigade composed of troops from
Georgia and Indiana, or from New
York and North Carolina, or from
Pennsylvania and South Carolina,
and that they would all march as
brothers under the old flag, would
have been shot on the spot or
hanged to the nearest apple tree.
And yet this had all come about
through a threat at the nation as a
whole by an outside enemy and a
direct attack by the blowing up of
one member of the United States
navy.���Exchange.
DEVELOPING PROPERTIES.
Men Who Arc at Work on Brooklyn's Mines.
The Brooklyn mine has begun
work and Sam Bates and W. C.
Coppick are putting in their time
on this promising prospect, located
a mile back of the town. This
claim has a large cap of black iron
several feet wide. The Cuba claim
had the same surface showing, but
when work was done the showing
turned quickly into copper ore and
the workmen found copper stains
abundant. It will be remembered
the assays on the Cuba gave n#
per cent copper and has been bonded
for $5,500. The owners of the
Brooklyn hope to make a favorable
showing in a few weeks, as the capping is very similar to the Cuba.
LOWERY SAW IT
His Views  on   Brooklyn Town
and Its Locator.
SOME OLD TIME FRIENDS
What He Thinks of the Place and
Its People, Only a Few ot Whom
Drink Water.
Bill Parker came into this country
several years ago and staked out a
large amount of hard luck. Two
years ago he discovered some fine
clay opposite Deer Park and preempted the land around it. The
railroad people picked upon his
ground for their headquarters during
the construction of the road from
Robson to Penticton and Parker
called his townsite Brooklyn. The
crowd flocked in and changed Parker's name from Bill to Mr. A
month ago the shore line was dotted
by a few tents and Parker's original
cabin. Now there are 10 hotels
ready for business with five more
building, and nearly all lines of
business are represented. About a
half a dozen dwelling houses have
red curtains. Schools of black jack
and horse poker have been established and sleep is scarce in the
town. Brooklyn is swift, but a
mushroom. Peterson, of Trail,
opened the first hotel, and in a short
time raked in $3,000. Everybody
wanted to drink, and they lined up
to the bar as thick as editors in
Paradise. James McNeil, Gus
Jackson, H. Y. Anderson, Sandy
McDonald, James Martin, Fred
Richardson and several others are
in the hotel business. The town
needs a postoffice. M��il is now
brought in a gunny sack from Robson, dumped into boxes in front of
Parker's cabin, where every man
sorts the mail and picks out what
belongs to him. Parker has a
sign displayed upon which is painted,
"No Chinese Need Land." Major
Blackmer, who has been addicted to
the newspaper habit for several
years, has charge of the townsite.
In the camp can be seen old timers
who have followed railroading all
over this continent. McMartin,
Jack O'Leary, Jim McDonald and
many others have contracts on the
line. Brooklyn is a hot town, and
only a few of the inhabitants drink
water. There are plenty of business
people there now and a few more
will spoil the effect of the million
dollars that is to be expended in the
vicinity during the next year.���New
'Denver Ledge.
The management of the Great
Northern railway evidently has a
high opinion of the future of the
Kootenays. That company does
not seem content with the railways
it now has in this district, viz., the
Corbin system and the Kaslo &
Slocan road, but has, it seems, decided to forthwith construct a line
of railway from Bonner's Ferry,
Idaho, down the Kootenay river to
the international boundary, there to
connect with the proposed Nelson
& Bedllngton railway. From another, and u reliable source it is
learned that the Great Northern
controls certain valuable railway
charters in East Kootenay, and that
in the near future a branch commencing at Jennings, Montana, on
the main line of the system, will be
extended northward as far as
Golden, The completion of these
projects together with the Kettle
River valley extension, will give the
(ireat Northern access to every
mining camp of importance in
southern British Columbia.���'Rossland Miner. mm
THE BROOKLYN NEWS, SATURDAY, JULY 23, i8gg
THE BROOKLYN NEWS.
Subscription Hate* $2.00 per Year
Advertising Rate* made known upon
Application.
BLACKMER  S ESLIN6.
BROOKLYN, SATURDAY, JLLV 23,  IC
Many of the old-time railroaders
predict Brooklyn will be the smartest camp in the history of railroad
building. After the second pay
day money will be abundant and
those in business will profit. Only
parts of the line have been cross-
sectioned as yet and little of the
the right-of-way cleared. The tunnel work has not commenced, the
outfit only arriving Wednesday.
Only a few hundred men are working now where thousands will be
employed in a lew months. Brooklyn's future is bright.
Did you ever watch a lot of bees
gathered about a sweet-smelling
flower or a deserted syrup can?
How they struggle, crawl over each
other and push into the sweets,
all anxious for a sip or a footing
to get his share. So the crowd
surges and sways around over the
soap mail box, anxious for letters
from home. News delayed makes all
anxious and the crush is sometimes
similar to a crowd around a circus
ticket-seller. Strange the government should allow such a primative
way for a thousand men to get their
letters from home. If tardiness
were a crime, the officials who conduct the mail service for Kootenay
would have been in jail long ago.
Brooklyn is growing rapidly.
The wharf is completed and freight
and passengers are unloaded there.
The "tote" road is completed almost half the distance. The contract calls for several "halfway"
houses, which have been stablished.
The fact that a water system and
electric light plant are being con
structed gives the town an air of
stability. The manager of the
company store has been unable to
secure sufficient stock to supply the
demand made upon him by the various sub-contractors. The right
of way is cleared to the summit and
grading, blasting and other construction work is going ahead as
rapidly as can be expected. All the
men who apply for work are sent
out on the road or to the various
camps along the right of way. The
progress of work is very satisfac
tory,.
A gentleman who is connected
with the building of the railway returned from a trip to the Boundary
country this'week, and to a News
man spoke of it in the most flattering terms. That section in the immediate vicinity of Greenwood, he
predicts, will make another camp
like Rossland, while the splendid
water power at Cascade City will be
brought into use for commercial
purposes. Grand Forks and Midway not only have a mining section
but a rich agricultural country
is tributary to them. Their farm
lands, like their mines, are awaiting
transportation facilities to make
them valuable. Large orchards,
extensive gardens and farms are laid
out which, when the railroad reaches
that section, will he ready to produce freight for the company and
money for themselves. All this can
be had in Brooklyn. There arc
farm lands for the asking and the
soil is fertile. Our mines are handy
to smelters and transportation and
our location is ideal. If you want
to invest come to Brooklyn before
the prices soar beyond your reach.
Time is money.    Act quickly.
Stored away in the hills which
surround Brooklyn are vast stores
of mineral. The indications on the
surface   show   it    and    the   small
amount of development work prove
conclusively that the country is
rich. The several claims in the
neighborhood which have been partially developed show good walls and
fair sized ledges. As yet there has
been but little work done, but this
small amount is evidence sufficient
that only capital is required to make
the Brooklyn district one much
quoted and sought alter by mining
men and those interested in mines.
From ledges in the Dog Creek district assays have been obtained
running as high as $42 in gold and
copper. These are general sample
assays and not from picked pieces.
This is not only encouraging but
extremely gratifying to the owners
and those whose interests are in this
section. At present there are many
eyes turned in this direction. The
coming of the Columbia & Western
railway hits opened an avenue for
the prospector 'o sell and the capitalist to buy, Brooklyn and the
country tributary to it has a
wonderful future.
BROOKLYN
Cat Assayed $18.31.
An amusing mining story comes
from the Mocking Bird mine in the
Warm Springs district, says a Butte
dispatch of the 5th inst. L. J.
Rowen, who owns and works the
mine, also owns a pet cat. This
cat climbs up and down the shaft,
through drifts, crosscuts, stopes
and levels, and lives down there
most of the time, being fed by the
miners from the contents of their
dinner pails. A brilliant idea struck
Rowen the other day. He took
the cat into the ore house and
washed the hair as clean to the
skin as it could possibly be washed.
Then he panned the dirty water to
the highest percentage, and the entire cat assayed $18.31 on an assay-
er's scales. It is doubtful if any
mine in the Rocky mountains can
assay better than $18.31 to the cat.
I am here with a Stock of
HARDWARE,
STOVES *
TINWARE.
^
SAVE MONEY
By Buying Here.
F. C. BOLES, Brooklyn.
Boot and Shoe Shop
Boots, Shoes and Rubbers
Repaired.
It. It. Bllqef   Prop.
D. D. McDOUGAL,
CONTRACTOR AND
BUILDLR.
Plans and Estimates Furnished
First-Class Work
Reasonable Prices
s
Crown
Point
Hotel:::
Petersen Bros,
Proprietors.���
0000
Dining and
Lodging
Rooms ���?��� ���*���
Under timnaucmcut Charles
SapnudowNki.
First-Class Heals.
Good Clean Beds,
OOOO 1
Brooklyn, B. C. I
Fresh and
::Salt::
MEATS
A Good Supply.
Fair Prices.
mm
Everything First-Class.
mm
A. Sanderson.
Brooklyn Drug Co.
J. M. PERDUE, V. S., Prop.
Druggist and Stationer
PATENT + MEDICINES, + TOILET + ARTICLES, + PERFUMES,
LEDGERS, + CASA BOOKS, + CIGARS, 4 ETC.
Prescriptions carefully prepared Sole Agent for B. Lawrence's
with Pure Drugs. SPECTACLES.
THE'
"ADMIRAL DfcWEY"
rirJIP takes the
UUnly     cake J%3>
<5^L
CALIFORNIA WINE COMPANY,
Nelson, B. C. agent|for BritishjColutnbia
hHOTELh
ANDERSON.
MRS.  II. Y. ANDERSON, Prop.
Ratesf$1.50 to
$2.00 per day.
The Dining Room is under the management of
Mrs. II. Y. Anderson. The Table is supplied
with the Best the market affords ::::::::
Good Airy Rooms ��������� ��������� Clean Beds
First-class Bar in connection
St. Louis Beer Pabst Beer Schlitz Beer
The only Strictly Wholesale House in Kootenay.
A. MACDONALD fc CO.,
Wholesale Merchant.
NELSON, B. C.
Fancy and Staple Groceries,
Tobaccos and Miner's Supplies.
Call or Write for Prices.
PIANO.
C. R. Raymond of
Trail, B. C, will sell a
Second-hand Piano for
$150.00. CASH.      $150.00 CASH.
��
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m
m
^
Papers, Magazines
Brooklyn,
Spokane, Seattle,
9\ Portland, Trail,
* Rossland
m
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3
*
3
3
Or
3
3
3
3
*
3
3
m
3
3
Or
3
3
i
3
3
3
3
3
Of
3
Lemons, Nuts i
3
3
ill
3
3
3
3
3
3
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BROOKLYN
NOVELTY
STORE.
W. Parker, Proprietor
Fancy Groceries,
Tobaccos, Cigars,
Stationery
FRESH PRUITS.
Bananas,
Oranges,
"Store at the"
Little Old Pre-emption Cabin
COML IN. THE BROOKLYN NEWS, SATURDAY, JULY
1898.
�� BROOKLYN BUDGET j
S7 %>���/%-���/*%%%%%*%%*'*%%*%%%*%���%*%%*%%% ^
Subscribe for the News. [ ashore with a fishing pole, he would
have drowned. The crowds are a
hindrance to the dispatch of business
and a menace to life.
J. W. Stout has signed a nice
contract for timber work on the new
road.
The little steam launch, Myrtle
B., is doing a big business in freight
and passenger traffic.
Powder wagons going over the
"tote" road have the right of way.
No one crowds them.
Engineer Proctor, from the
Crow's Nest, will have charge of
the tunnel and is expected daily.
The Evangelists have erected a
large tent in the edge of the forest.
and are holding evening services.
It is rumored the C. P. R. purchased the land at Shields' landing
from Jack  Livingstone for $6,000.
P. P. Cullen has established an
eating house at Second creek crossing, eight miles out. Sleeping accommodations will also he furnished.
Remember the Brooklyn News
when you want printing. Letterheads, bill-heads, envelopes, cards
and all classes of printing promptly
executed.
W. Parker has the contract to
deliver all mail to the various camps
along the route. Leave your name
with the time keeper and get your
mail regularly.
Twohy Bros, killed a big black
bear last week 150 yards from their
camp. It was a very large one, requiring six men to bring it in.
Others have been seen along the
right of way.
Captain Whitmore of the Lytton
is unhappy. While at work on the
Robson whaif he lost his pocket-
book containing $112. He has purchased another Brooklyn lot to earn
another hundred.
John Dorsey has rented the large
log building erected by Forrest &
Cameron, twenty miles oul from
Brooklyn. The house is two stories
and will accommodate fifty people.
A hotel and barn for accommodation of hands is the purpose of the
venture. It's half way to Christina
lake.
The first serious accident along
the line of the C. & W. occurred
last week when Ed Lind'slegs were
broken by a falling rock. Dr.
Ewing amputated the left leg above
the knee Saturday in the operating
room of the new hospital. The unfortunate man is about 38 years of
age, The accident was in the
Videen camp.
Major Cooper, J. P. of Rossland,
has made his second trip to Brooklyn, During his stay he made an
example of two camp loungers who
have made themselves a general
nuisance, by imposing a sentence of
30 and 60 days at hard labor at
Nelson. The Major took occasion
to read them a severe lecture and
impressed the listeners that this
would be no place for any one who
would not work.
Application for post office boxes
may be made at this office. The
rate has been fixed per month
follows: soap box 25c; condensed
milk box 50c; egg crate 75c; gunny
sax for free delivery $1.00 each.
Keys for the boxes and strings for
the siix, renter must furnish. Call
early as the boxes arc limited and
will only be supplied as the grocery
stock is used up.
The great crowds which flock to
the wharf on approach of the down
river boat have been stopped on the
lake's shore, only those with tickets
are admitted. Thursday night a
man was pushed off the wharf, and
had not Dr.   Dutton  pulled   him
Street services have been held on
the corner of First and Brooklyn
the past few evenings. The attendance is exceptionally good and very
respectful. Frank Dixon of the I',
P. church and Walter Williams of
the M. E. church were conducting
the services. A small organ helps
the mooting and singing very
materially.
Now that Brooklyn has a free
mail delivery, the soap boxes are
not so badly crowded. Sunday the
larger one was used as a rocking
hair, but the remainder of the
week held papers from all nations.
Johnnie Magney is delivering mail
to the camps. There are few towns
30 days old with water works, electric light, gas and free delivery, but
Brooklyn has all the latest and
best.
"I congratulate you, sir, upon
having made as gallant a fight as
was ever witnessed on the sea,"
said Lieutenant Commander Wain-
wright to his prisoner, Admiral
Cervera, as he received the gray-
bearded Spanish sea-dog on board
the Gloucester and grasped his
hand in hospitable greeting and unreserved admiration. Lieutenant
Commander Wainwright then placed
his cabin at the disposal of the
Spanish officers. Looking back at
the Spaniard's thoughtful notice to
admiral Sampson of the safety of
Hobson and his comrades and his
courteous treatment of those famous
heroes, honors are easy between the
naval leaders of the United States
and Spain. Such incidents take
from war's grim visage some of the
sterner wrinkles, leaving still enough
to show the direful aspect that tells
the cruel story of passion, courage
and woe, says an exchange.
Those who are opposed to the
acquisition by the United Stales of
territory 'abroad should have their
attention directed to the spectacle
of this great country having several
thousand tons of coal at the little
island of St. Thomas but being forbidden to take any of it by little
Denmark. The Danish government is justified under the iaws of
neutrality in withholding permission;
indeed, to give it would be an offense to Spain. The need of
coaling stations may become so impressed upon us that poseession of
the Canaries will not be such
shock to the anti-annexationists.
U. S. Exchange.
A. J. LAPWORTH
��� ��� Sign
������Writer.
L. N. LIVINGSTONE, & @.,
4 General
4 Merchandise
4 Groceries,
4 Provisions,
4 Gent's
4 Furnishings,
4 Hardware.
TilE KOOTENAY
L.0MBE.R
COMPANY.      S. OLIVER.  AC.ENT.
Full stock of Good Dry
Lumber on hand.
BROOKLYN, B. C.
KOOTENAY
WIRE WORKS CO.
TUMI- It. C
-Matititnoturera <>t
Bed Springs, Mattresses and
�� �� Cots. �� ��
For Rale by all Furniture Dealers.
In a Few Days a
BUTCHER
SHOP
Will be Opened
...BY.,.
AL. HOYT.
SHAW & SHAW,
Dii.ilm's li]
Hay, Feed,
Produce or
Vegetables
tfiiqUies at Mttlniut) Hviii .nicl Sljli&Wup. fi. G.
Brooklyn, B. C.
S. H. BROWN,
BROOKLYN,
CONTRACTOR
::AND::
BUILDLR.
Lstimates Made.
Brooklyn and Deer Park, B. C.
Plans Furnished.
MITCHELL BROS,
*$*
MERCHANT
TAILORING.
GENT'S
FURNISHINGS.
Now open for business
P. BURNS
t^���
WHOLESALE
MEATS
BROOKLYN,
British Columbia.
^THE CITYfc
DRUG STORE.
FRED POLLOCK,  Proprietor.
A full line of Fresh Drugs, Patent Medicines and all kinds of Druggists Sundries.
PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY COMPOUNDED.
Stationery, Novels, Fishing Tackle, Candies, Nuts, Fruits,
Cigars, Tobaccos, Postage Stamps.
FURNITURE
Of the Butte Hotel
In Whole or in Part.
Crescent Dry Goods Co., Ltd. Lby.
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Thomas Wilson.
GENERAL MEFjCttftNT
Groceries, Provisions, Clothing,
Boots and Shoes, Campers Outfits, Etc.
...ft Good StocK of Everything.-.
BROOKLYN,	
B. C.
Parson's Produce Co'y.
Winnipeg, Man.   *  \ uilcouver, B. C.   *   Nelson, B. C.
WHOLESALE ONLY.
The Largest dealers in Western Canada;
Creamery and Dairy Butter, Eggs
Cheese, and Cured Meats.
Specialties���Creamery Butter In Hermetically Sealed Tins; lib, 21b, 51b, and
101 It.   Creamery Butter In I pound bricks,
Mall nncl Telegraph   orders promptly  shipped  from  our  Cold   Storage
.. . .warehouse, Nelson.    Write or Wire....
All Warehouses under perfect P. J, RUSSELL,
system of Cold Storage.        Manager Nelson branch, NELSON, B.C.
: i)���KAAKE & WILLIAMS,����� {
Polished Cast Iron Frying Pans, Be and ft J.
Polished Cast Iron Kettles, $1 and$1.25.
Woven Wire Fencing, 5c. a Hod.
Sereen Doors, Stained Hlaek Walnut, each $1.75.
Genuine Maple Hardwood Screen Doors, each $2.5.
Importers of Belgian Glass,
_ W.'. Onrry ii Omriplete stm.K oL
{ rfardware, Tineware, Windows ��
��� Doors, Paints, Oils, Etc. S T~
THE BROOKLYN NEWS, SATURDAY, JULY 23, 1898-
##*��##########*#*��**#*##**********
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1
*
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BROOKLYN
LUMBER
P. Genelle & Company.
Dry Building Lumber, |
*
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All Sizes, All Kinds.
Doors, Windows, Sash.
*
   I
Dimension Timbers, all Sizes. ��
*
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...DRY CEDAR...
SHINGLES
Persons desiring Lumber, must place
orders at once.
E. G. BEER, Agent.
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l###f######t#*##S#t##*#**#********

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