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Brooklyn News Sep 24, 1898

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Array c^c���r tt.*^^--^-.--,
THE BROOKLYN NEWS.
VOL.  i.
BROOKLYN, B. C, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24,  1898.
NO. 15.
The California Wine GL
Wholesale Importers and Dealers in
Wines and Cigars.
Josephine St., Nelson, B. C.
Have just received  300000 CHOICE  CIGARS, and  are
prepared to fill orders on the shortest notice.
<^b��^ Prices always right.
When you come to Brooklyn, come
straight to the	
Varnamo Hotel
GUS. JACKSON, Prop.
You will get good accommodations, and will be pleased.
Finest Wines, Liquors and Cigars
BROOKLYN, B. C.
When you strike Brooklyn,
take a straight course to the..,,
Brooklyn House
Mcdonald & bolan, Props.
You'll find Everything Neat and Clean, and.the Prices
are Just Right.
Finest Wines, Liquors & Cigars.
First Street, BROOKLYN, B. C.
Hotel Stockholm.
JOHNSON & LOCKHART, Props.
New and Up-to-Date in
Every particular.
Don't fail to give the Stockholm  a call  when you come  to  Brooklyn.
First Street, BROOKLYN, B. C.
^BROOKLYN*
Furniture Store.
Everything at Lowest Prices.
LARGL STOCK.
Practical Manufacturer and UNDLRTAKLR.
Furnishing Road Houses and Hotels a Specialty.
D. M, CROWLEY,
First Street, South End.
BROOKLYN, B. C.
THOMAS & GREIGER
Wines, Liquors # Cigars.
Brooklyn, B. C.
LEMP'S ST. LOUIS EXPORT  and BLUE  RIBBON  BEER.
BLUE RIBBON.
LABATT'S ALE.       LABATT'S STOUT.      CALIFORNIA WINES.
*������   ^Agents for LION BREWERY^1bibb^.
���������������a****************
���������****���********���������'
City Drug Store.
;*����
Has a Complete line of Everything
that should be found in a Drug Store, including Patent Medicines, Perfumes, Toilet
Soaps, Sponges, Tobacco, Cigars and Stationery. Prescriptions a Specially. Careful
and Prompt attention to Mail Orders	
BOTH PELL DOWN
Steep Precipices, But Live to
Tell the Tate.
HAPPENED LAST MONDAY
Johnson and Pureed, One at Burns
ft Jordan's and the Other at
Olsea's, Had Miraculous Escapes���They Will Recover.
FRED POLLOCK, Prop., Brooklyn, B. C.
in**n*w***��*mm*mmm��tm-m*tw-0w-w-��m��****mmm*mmmv
On Monday of this week there
were two serious accidents on the
line of construction, one at Burns
and Jordan's camp and the other at
Olaf Olsen's camp. Theie were
two peculiarities in the cases, namely that both men fell from high
points, but not as a result of careless blasting, and both are doing
well and on the road to recovery.
Monday afternoon a man named
Purcell was striking a drill on Burns
and Jordan's work, about four miles
below Brooklyn, on Lower Arrow
lake, when he suddenly lost his
balance and tell backward down the
steep precipice to the ground some
80 feet below, and then rolled about
200 feet further down towards the
lake. It was almost a miracle that
he was not killed outright.
He was picked up by his companions and brought to this city on the
Oriole in a semi-conscious condition. On being carried to the hospital, the unfortunate man was
examined by Dr. Diettar, and most
strange to relate, not a broken bone
could be found. There were no
serious injuries except some severe
scalp wounds. He is now doing as
well as could be expected and the
doctor says he will recover in due
time. How Purcell escaped instant
death, falling from such a height,
is a mystery to all. There was room
enough for a horse on the ledge on
which he was working, but in some
way he lost his balance and toppled
over.
FELL 75 FEET.
The same day the above accident
happened. Wm. Johnson, who has
been working for Olaf Olsen for
nearly two months, 23 miles out,
had an accident almost identical
with that of Purcell. He also lost
his balance while trying to remove
a piece of rock with an iron bar and
fell down the side of the hill over
75 feet. He fared worse than Purcell, and in addition to the serious
scalp wounds, broke his right fore
arm.
The next day he was brought on
a stretcher the entire 23 miles to
Brooklyn, to get proper nursing
and medical attendance. The trip
was a laborious one, and required
the services of seven able-bodied
men to get him here safely. This
was done because he could not
stand the shaking and jolting of a
freighting wagon.
Johnson's brother came to town
also at the same time and informed
the News man that the injured man
was netting along as nicely as could
be expected, and that he would get
well with proper attention and careful nursing, which he will undoubtedly receive.
teamster hurt.
Jerry Cavanah, the well known
teamster, was thrown from his wagon last Saturday, when one of the
wheels grazed his head, almost
severing his left ear. The accident
happened about two miles from
Gladstone on the tote road, and
with the help of Mr. Bailey the
heavily loaded wagon was gotten
to that point with Jerry still pluck-
ily holding the ribbons. It was a
narrow escape for him, and he feels
thankful it was no worse. That
was his'first trip freighting for Mc
Lean Bros., having worked up to
that time in the same capacity for
the tote road camp.
ELECTION NEXT THURSDAY.
Prohibition   Plebiscite Will   Then
be Voted on.
Arrangements are now complete
for the prohibition plebiscite to be
held all over the Dominion on
Thursday, Sept. 29th. In this city
L. M. Livingston has been appointed the deputy returning officer, and
the voting will take place at police
headquarters on Front street, the
polls being open from 9 a. m. to 5
p. m.
The following is the official form
of the question to be voted on:
"Are you in favor of the passing
of an act prohibiting the importation, manufacture or sale of spirituous wines, ale, beer, cider and all
other alcoholic liquors for use as
beverages."
All persons whose names are upon the provincial voters' list 60 days
preceding the taking of the plebiscite, which was August 1st, will be
entitled to vote,
Daniel O'Hara, general returning
officer at Kamloops, will open the
ballot boxes on October 27th at 11
a. m. and count the votes.
WILL OPEN OCT. 1st.
Postmaster Livingston Ordered to
be Ready Then.
Inspector E. H. Fletcher has sent
Brooklyn's new postmaster, L. M.
Livingston, an order to be ready for
business on October 1st, one week
from today, and also advised him
that he has forwarded the necessary
record books and papers to properly conduct the busineis of the new
office.
In accordance therewith, Mr.
Livingston has neatly fitted up a
corner of his store with letter boxes
and everything is conveniently arranged for the speedy transaction of
business,
Brooklyn will be put on a par
with nearly all other British Columbia cities, so far as the despatch of
mails is concerned. Mails will be
received and despatched from this
point every day in the year, special
bags going to Rossland, Nelson
and Revelstoke by each mail. Rossland bags will contain all mail for
Spokane and United States points,
Nelson bags will carry mail also for
Slocan and Kootenay lake offices,
while other British Columbia, Dominion and general foreign mail
goes by way of Revelstoke.
KOOTENAY'S REPRESENTATIVE.
Leading Mining Journal Congratulates This District.
The people of West Kootenay
have reason to congratulate themselves upon securing Cabinet representation in Mr. Semlin's Government. As executive head of the
Department of Mines, Mr. Hume,
the new Minister, has a very responsible, and, under present condition, difficult part to play in the
management of the affairs of the
country. He has yet to demonstrate
his executive ability in this direction. But as a resident of long
standing in one of the most important mining centres of the province,
where he has earned an excellent
reputation in private life for shrewdness in business and good common-
sense, Mr. Hume should perform
the duties of his honorable office, if
not with distinction, at least with
credit to himself and benefit to the
country. At the next session of the
Provincial Legislature it may be,
therefore, expected that some necessary reforms���notably the abrogation of the unjust tax on working
miners���long insisted upon by the
present Government when in Opposition, will be introduced.���B. C.
Mining Record.
IT TAKES 125 MEN
Just to See That Contractor!.
Do As They Agree.
ENGINEERS DEPARTMENT
Interesting Story ot How This Important Part ot Railroad Build-
lag Is Carried Out Here���Mr.
Tye Talks.
One feature of railroad building
about which little is heard while
construction is proceeding is the
work of the engineers. Yet, as
everyone is aware, it could not go
on without them. They are constantly on the ground till the work
is completed, and it is only on their
estimates that payment is made.
Mr. W. F. Tye, the chief engineer of the Columbia and Western
railway, has immediate charge of
the surveyors on the Robson-Pen-
ticton branch of his company's road,
now building, and he has given the
News man some interesting details
about his branch of the work.
It was February 1, 1898,���the
dead of winter���when the first party
of surveyors, under Mr. Tye, landed
at Dog Creek and began the labor
of running the preliminary lines of
the road as far as Midway, the
present contract. That this was
not all a picnic may be seen by the
fact that 100 pairs of snowshoes
were worn out in the course of the
survey.
When the contract for the 105
miles was let to Mann, Foley Bros,
and Larsen last June, and actual
construction began, Mr. Tye separated his engineering corps into four
divisions, each having about 25
miles to care for, and each being in
charge of an assistant engineer.
The first of these is under F. M.
Young, the camp being located at
Shield's Landing, his jurisdiction
running from Robson to the long
tunnel, about 22 miles.
George Farr has the second division, with headquarters at the
summit, some 18 miles from Brooklyn. Oscar England has the third
division, with headquarters at Cascade City, and L. M. Rice, of the
fourth and last division, is located,
or will be soon, at or near Greenwood, running to Midway,
Each one of these division engineers has his work divided into four
smaller camps, each of which is in
charge of an assistant engineer.
Every assistant engineer has an instrument man, two chainmen, one
or more axemen and a cook. In
addition to these there are, of
course, timekeepers, timber inspectors, etc., all tinder the supervision
of the engineering department.
Altogether about 125 men are
required to keep up the work oi the
engineering branch oi the construction, and they have nothing whatever to do with the contract proper,
except to see that the work is done
according to specifications. They
are in the immediate employ of the
Columbia and Western railway, now
the property of the C. P. R.
Every detail must pass muster of
the eagle eyes of the engineers during construction, not only in grading and rock cutting, but also bridge
building, tie making, tunnel boring,
depot building, track laying, etc.,
until the road is completed and
turned over to the operating department. Not a contractor or subcontractor can get a dollar until
estimates have been made by the
engineers.
Mr. Tye is acknowledged to be a
most capable man for this great
work, being fortified by a long and
varied experience.      He   informed
the News man that in all his years
of railroad engineering, he had never seen so much heavy work on the
the same distance of construction.
He has an able assistant in J. G.
Sullivan, the headquarters of both
being at the company's offices at
Trail.
2   CONSTRUCTION NOTES.   2
��� ���
Forest fires are once more beginning to be troublesome to some of
the camps along the construction
Hue.
The powder famine is not over
yet, and it looks as though the
Hamilton Powder Co. was being
severely taxed to meet the enormous demand on the contract. That
fact alone is an indication of the
large amount of rock that must be
displaced.
A, C. McLean and Bros, have
about 250 men at work on their
heavy contract of two and a half
miles near Gladstone. One estimate
is that it will require seven months
to complete.
Contractor McHugh's camp,
known as No. 1, near Robson, has
been pulled up, the contract, which
was largely easy grading, having
been completed. One or two others
of the same character will also move
shortly.
P. Genelle and Co. now have
four logging camps and one tie
camp at work in full blast. The
latter is located in the narrows, opposite Burton City. The two saw
mills are also running at their full
capacity on double time, getting out
bridge timbers for the new railway
line.
A, C. McLean and Bro. now have
four camps running. The 14-drill
air compressor, for boring the 3,100
foot tun nel, is to be on board the
cars at the works in Ontario on
October 1st, and will take about a
month to install and get it in operation.
Contractor A, J. McLellan has
brought his wife and family to live
in Brooklyn for the best part of the
winter���while his work lasts.
The bridge on Porcupine creek is
to be 200 feet high and 700 feet
long, requiring 1,200,000 feet of
timber in its construction. The
timber will be largely hewn.
"I have about 225 men on my
two and one-half mile contract,"
said Contractor McMurtin to a
News man this week. Of these
only 45 are employed at station
work. His work is at an altitude
of 3,700 feet, and he is crowding it
as fast as possible, in order to get
a good start before snow flies.
Paymaster Woodman started out
on the road last Thursday, making
the rounds of camps lor file distribution of something like 3,000 pay
checks.
Contracts la Boundary District.
J. W. Stewart, manager lor
Mann, Foley Bros, and Larsen, the
railway contractors, has been in the
city for several days, lie is sizing
up the situation and will let subcontracts covering the entire line in
a very short time. All the work to
Grand Forks has already been taken
by subcontractors. Next week a
construction gang will be at work
in the vicinity of Fisherman creek,
and by the end of October Mr.
Stewart expects that the whole of
the work will be covered. Mr.
Stewart and Mr. Rice, the C. P. R.
engineer, went down to Midway
yesterday.���Boundary Creek Times.
The Brooklyn News is prepared
to furnish the best in the world���
bar none���in the line of job printing
and general office stationery, Bring
in your orders for envelopes, letter
heads, cards, tags, and in fact,
anything made with ink and paper BROOKLYN NEWS, BROOKLYN. B. C, SEPTEMBER 24, 1898.
THHl^BROOKLVN NEWS.
Subscription Hates $2.00 per Year
Six Mouths, $1.00.
Advertising Rates made known upon
Application.
Office at Townsite Headquarters.
NEWS PUBLISHING S PRINTING GO.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24,   1898.
1898   SEPTEMBER   1898
SUN
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MILES
2 1-2
3 >���-
Camp Distances from Brooklyn
TOWARDS   ROUSON.
Ericson's camp	
Johnson's camp	
Koykehdall's camp, No. 10 .. 3
Foss  & McDonald's camp ���
No- 9  5
Burns & Jordan's camp���N0.8 4
O'l.earv's and Mann's camps,
(Shield's Landing)���N0.7 6
V. W. Smith's camp���No. E 7
McCormack's���No. 6  8
V. W. Smith's camp���No. 6 8
Ryberg's camp���No. 5  i'/i
Swanson's camp No. D  9
Videen's camp No. 4  10
Hanson's camp���No.C ....... n
Johnson  & Anderson's camp
No. B n#
Pat Welch's camp���No. A... 11
Pat Welch's camp���No. 3... 13
Genelle's camp���No. 2  16
McHugh's camp���No. 1  17
Robson  18
DISTANCES  ON TOTE  ROAD.
Twohy's camp 2 1-2
Nugent's camp        3
McLean Bros, camp (tunnel).       4
Mclver& Phillips camp 41-2
Foote's camp        6
Cotton's Hotel        6
John Martin's camp        7
McMartin's camp        8
Winters, Parsons & Boomer.      10
Porcupine Hotel       10
John A. Cameron's camp .... iol/i
McPherson Bros. & Stout, 1st
12
13
'4
>4
>S
17
18
19
camp	
Farr's camp	
McClellan's camp	
14-Mile House	
Divide Hotel	
Summit House	
Andersan & Applequist's camp
Donaldson's Hotel	
McPherson Bros. & Stout, 2nd
camp       20
Anderson's camp       21
Oleson's Tunnel camp       23
Gladstone   Townsite,   (J.   S.
Wisner)       24
A.  C.   McLean  &  Bro., 2nd
camp       24
Burns & Jordan's camp       25
J, G. McLean & Co.'s camp.,      26
Wilson & McDonald's camp.  26^
Rod Cameron's camp       27
Jack Hasting's camp       28
Arthur Murdoch's camp       32
BROOKLYN TIME TABLES.
Via Steamers Kootenay and Rossland.
and Columbia 8 Western, and Columbia 6 Kootenay Ry's. Dally.
6.00p.m., Leave..BROOKLYN,..Arrivei.ma.m
8.30  "    Arrive Robson Leave 10.00p. m
iojo " "      Nelson       "    6../Q   "
10.00 " "       Trail        "    7.00   "
11,1$ " "       Rossland       "    6,00   "
Via Steamer Illicilliwaet.
r.osfi. m��� Leave. .BROOKLYN'. .Arrive 10.00 a. m
J.oo    "    Arrive Robson Lea.'t   6.00   "
Via Steam Yacht Oriole.
Leave Brooklyn for Robson and wry flints at 8,a
a, in., daily.
THE COMING PLEBISCITE.
By a resolution of the Dominion
Parliament a plebiscite will be taken
on the question ol prohibiting the
manufacture and sale of intoxicating drinks throughout the Dominion of Canada, on the 29th inst.
The fact that the prohibitionists are
strong enough to command a parliamentary majority in favor of the
plebiscite does not alone prove that
the present Parliament is pledged to
prohibitive legislation. It cannot
be doubted, however, that the prohibition party are strong in the
eastern provinces, as they have
been endorsed wherever the issue
has been raised. In British Columbia the question has never been a
prominent issue, outside of the
ChilliAack district, where prohibition has been endorsed for some
years, and enforced by a local option law.
The liquor traffic should be
shorn of many of the abuses under which it is at present clouded.
Licenses should not be granted to
parties who have no intention of
catering to the civilized wants of
the public, and if the authorities
were more careful to restrict the
Dumber of licenses by discrimina
ting in favor of entrusting the business to men who would live up to
the requirements of the license law
as it is, we would hear less of prohibition. Meanwhile the issue of the
vote on the question of "whiskey or
no-whiskey"���important as it may
be���will be doubly interesting by
reason of the introduction of the
principle of the plebiscite, which" we
fervently hope, as a voting power
will be af'ain used "early and Often
in sounding public sentiment on
public evils, quite as bad as bad
whisky.
UNCLE SAM'S JOB
There now seems to be no doubt
but that Uncle Samuel has a long
job on his hands to specify���not to
say satisfy���the recent territorial
acquisitions, the result of the Spanish-American war.
Aguinaldo, in the Philippines,
has an idea that he can run things
in his bailiwick, although he does
seem to be a trifle at sea as to the
best way to get at it. He thinks
the American soldiers ought to go
home, now that the Spaniards are
driven out.
In Cuba there are yet many signs
of unrest. General Gomez and
other leaders are reported as saying that the island is fully capable
of self-government, and therefore
they believe the soldier boys of
Uncle Sam ought to evacuate the
"Queen of of the Antilles" at an
early date. All over the island the
same opinion seems to prevail to
some extent among the Cuban population, who are endeavoring to get
the Spanish planters to side with
them.
In the meantime, under instructions from President McKinley, the
peace commissioners are going right
along with the work mapped out
for them, and will continue to do so
regardless of what malcontents may
think or do. It is evident that in
both the islands a strong, guiding
hand is needed to preserve tranquility among their half-civilized
population. This will undoubtedly
be supplied by the United States
government as soon as the details
can be worked out.
���  -���
No one has risen yet to explain
why, in the formation of the' personnel of the Quebec commission
there was no representative of the
province of British Columbia. With
its varied resources, it is virtually
interested in the recommendations
of that commission, and should
have had at least a voice in its deliberations. One thing, perhaps
above all Others, that needs "fixing," is the import duty on lead and
lead products. With adequate protection on this metal, it would riot
be long before its beneficent effects
would be felt. With a well informed representative at the sittings of
the commission, the people of the
province could feel that their interests are being properly looked after. As it is, if we are the gainers
by it, it will simply be' our good
luck.
It is pleasant to note that notwithstanding the devastating fire
that laid that city low two weeks
ago, the New Westminster provincial fair will go on as arranged,
and will take place' October 5 to
13th, according to programme. The
people of the province' will now
doubtless give it a greater patronage than ever.
Appearances now indicate that
Gen. Kitchener's troops in the Soudan will have to fight a few French
soldiers, as well the Kalif s hordes.
The British commander does not
propose to let a little thing like
that, however, deter him from carrying out his instructions.
��� ���
2     THE OBSERVATORY.      2
��������������������$����������������������*������������
"That was a wise decision," said
a Brooklyn business man to the
Observer, "in the owners of the
yacht Oriole to keep her on the local
run to the camps between here and
Robson. We have felt her loss
severely in the ten days she was
pulled off for repairs. Then, too,
if it seems best to put her in service
on Christina lake, she can be sledded
over on the first show at much less
expense. Not only that, but there
is likelihood of there being too many
boats on that lake just now for the
traffic that will probably arise this
fall."
The Myrtle B., which was taken
over the mountains to Christina
lake some two weeks ago, has been
put together again and is now in
active service on that beautiful sheet
of water. The little yacht was gotten over the tote road without serious trouble, although it was a slow
and expensive process.
��� ��� ���
Comparatively little interest, apparently, is being taken in the plebiscite on the prohibition question,
which will be taken throughout the
Dominion on the 29th inst. A
number of people are airing their
views, pro and con, in some of the
papers of the province, but the people at large do not seem to be at all
agitated on the subject. So far as
the Observer has been able to note
in his rounds, the voters of Brooklyn are particularly'apathetic about
it. The result of such a law, if
finally adopted, would indeed be far
reaching, and no one should throw
away his franchise at this time, who
has decided convictions along this
line.
��� ��� ���
"I like the looks of this town
more and more as it grows older,"
said a prominent railway contractor
to the Observer this week. "I can
see a distinct advancement in the
last month. Several improvements
of a substantial character have been
made, and almost everyone is preparing for winter in one way or another. All your merchants are doing
a good business, and some of them
report trade remarkably brisk." All
of which goes to show that Brooklyn will be a good town to do business in this winter.
��� ������
The Observer���always a modest
man���has been made to blush several times of late by the praises bestowed on this paper and its general
appearance and contents. And in
this connection it wilt be of interest
to all of the friends and patrons of
the News to learn that no effort
will be spared to keep it up to the
high standard adopted when the
present management took hold.
Thbie interested in Brooklyn and
the new railroad now building at a
cost of about $4,000,000, cannot
keep posted unless they take and
read the Brooklyn News each and
every issue. At least, this is getting
to be the universal verdict.
��� ��� ���
If any one thinks there are too
many hotels in Brooklyn to accommodate the traveling public, he
should try to secure a bed after the
midnight boat arrives. Many and
many a time he will tramp up one
street and down another before
finding a place to lay his more or
less' weary anatomy. It is frequently the case in several of our ' hotels
that not a room is left after the
down boat arrives, and the northbound traveller must shift as best
he may. As a matter of fact, the
travel is increasing rather than
diminishing, and the hotel keepers
are correspondingly happy.
��������� ���
Last Saturday night was chilly in
Brooklyn���in fact the so-called
"Yellow Kid" minstrels thought it
was frosty Indeed, judging by the
size of the house that greeted those
Knights of the sock and buskin.
How these young men, of questionable experience can expect to "take
in" the people of a place like Brooklyn���who came from the enlightened centres of the country���passes
the comprehension of the Observer.
Certainly the bringing . of one
squeaky violin, manipulated by a
novice, and'the ignoring of the accepted methods of advertising; will
not accomplish it. The patronage
of 27 persons���including deadheads
���Was more than the entertainment
given by those Nelson amateurs
warranted.
The Observer.
LET 00 THE LION'S TAIL.
Application for Liquor License.
We, the undersigned, King, Mc-
Innis & Co., intend to apply in 30
days' time to the gold commissioner
for > liquor license for our hotel,
located 14 miles from Brooklyn, on
the wagon road to Christina lake.
King, McInnis & Co., Brooklyn, B.
C, Sept. 3, 1898. 4t
Events bare conie to pass of late,
Ye demaK'itn'c politicians,
That have transformed, how'er yon prate,
Some international condition..
Toe memory of "an ancient wrong"
Whose burial's grandly sung by Austin,
A racial concord deep and strong
���   Has  been���thank  heaven!���completely
lost in.
To wring that member will no more avail.
Let go the Lion's tail.
Not e'en the shallowest will be
Found henceforth in your ranks enlisting;
Fate wills this caudal toy to tree
Fron Cheap John patriotism's twisting.
No more that bushy pendant vex
For parasitic schemers' boosting;
But for the Lion, on our necks
All Europe might now bo roosting.
For a new tack, then, trimmers, trim your
sail.
Let go the Lion's tail.
Hail, llritonsl To your standard red
"Old Qlory" dips in salutation;
To yon our hearts cross ocean's bed
tn grateful love and admiration I
With Freedom-light,otlrcomnion mothers;
One in ambition, purpose, blood,
Not "cousins" wc, but truly brothers!
Dropping the Lion's tail, in jusler cause
We take his proll'ered paws I
���John Talman, in Chicago Post.
Make your Headquar-       J
ters at the  *
Windsor
HOTEL
When you stop off in  Busy
Brooklyn.
You'll find Everything
First-class, from the
Dining Room to the
well appointed Bar....
RATES REASONABLE
Give us a Call.
E. A. DILLS, PROPRIETOR,
Front Street,  -  -  Brooklyn, B. C,
Canadian Pacific
Railway
And Soo Pacific Line
From Kootenay Country.
Is the Shortest, Quickest and Best
Route to Pacific Coast, China,
Japan and Australia, and to all
Eastern and European points.
Tickets issued through and Baggage
checked to destination.
4Ut TOURIST CARS ����
Pass  Revelstoke, daily to St.
Paul; daily (except Wednesday) to Eastern points.
Daily connection from Brooklyn by
Steamer to   Revelstoke   and
Main Line Points,  and to all
points in Kootenay country.
Ascertain present Reduced Kates and full
information by addressing nearest
local agent, or
P. HUCKI11BY, Agent,
Brooklyn. II. C.
W. F. AlDERSOM, E. J. CoYLC,
Trav. Pass. Agt.,      Dlst. Pass. Agt.,
Nelson, B.C.     Vancouver, B. C,
Spokane Falls &
Northern,
Nelson 8 Port Sheppard and
Red Mountain Railways.
The only direct route to Nelson,
Kaslo, Kootenay Lake and
Slocan  Points.
Daily.
Leave Arrive
No. 4-8 ;45 a.m. Rossland No. 3-11:20 a.m
No. 0-12:05 p.m.      "    No. 6-3:10 p.m.
Train leaves Rossland at 8:45 a. m;
makes close connections at Spokane for all  PACIFIC COAST
POINTS....
Train leaves Rossland at 12:05 p.m j
arrives at Nelson at 5:35 p, m.
Close connections with steamers for
Kaslo and all Kootenay lake
points....
Passengers   for   Kettle   river  and
Boundary   Creek    connect   at
Marcus with stage daily.
C. G. DIXON, G. P. T. A.
Nothing hut the very best the market
atl.ml.-i, cuu be found at	
Barry & McKaig's
Bakery and Restaurant.
The long line &f people coming out of their place at all hours owe that sat-   .
if tied expression on their faces to tbe splendid bill-of-fart laid out
there for their delectation,   (iive them a call and you'll be in the
happy throng.   This is no josh	
Fresh Bread Every Day. f
First Street, near the Bridge,   -   -   -   BROOKLYN, B. C.
COSMOPOLITAN HOTLL
Lindeman & Anderson, Props,
Bar stocked with Finest Wines, Liquors * Cigars
....GIVE US A CALL....
Front Street. Brooklyn, B. C.
f&999999999999999999999999999999999999
The place to buy GROCERIES, and
GENERAL MERCHANDISE is
the place where you get the most for the
least money. That is the way you are
treated by	
L. M. LIVINGSTON & CO.
who are constantly adding to their complete stock,    Anything you   need   can , ,.
be had  there, including   Dry   Goods,
Boots, Shoes. Full line of Ammunition.
First Street,
W^V^WWwVW WWW *WWW*��
BROOKLYN, B. C.
Thomas Wilson,
GENERA! MERG/tftNT
Groceries, Provisions, Clothing,
Boots and Shoes, Campers Outfits, Etc.
...Ft Good Stock; ot Everything-
BROOKLYN,      -
B.C.
For Pure Drugs and Toilet Articles
(s**2���Always go to the���^%
Brooklyn Drug 1.
Patent Medicines, Toilet Articles, Perfumes, Spectacles ''
Cigars, Etc.  Prescriptions Carefully put up.
Watches and Jewelry carefully Repaired
and Warranted.
YUILL S PARDUE, Props. nJSr.r
Parson's Produce Go'y.
Winnipeg, Man.  ���* Vancouver, B. C.  ��  Nelson, B. C.
WHOLESALE ONLY.
The Largest dealers in Western Canada.
Creamery and Dairy Butter, Eggs
Cheese, and Cured Meats.
Specialties���Creamery Butter In Hermetically Sealed Tins; lib, 21b, Sib, lad
101b.  Creamery Butter In I pound bricks.
Mail and Telegraph orders promptly shipped from our Cold Storage
... .warehouse, Nelson.   Write or Wire....
All Warehouses under perfect p, J, RUSSELL,
system of Cold Storage.       Manager Nelson branch, NELSON, B.C.
Aerated Waters.
1 till,  KINDS ���
Fabst Bohemian Beep.1
SYRUPS, ETC.
THORPE A CO., Ltd., Victoria, Vancouver; Nelson.
SSSS��89SS6SeSS9e98S6SSSSS8SSSSS��SS9eSi
The only Strictly Wholesale House in Kootenay.
A. MACDONALD 6 CO.,
Wholesale Merchants
NELSON, B. C.
Fancy and Staple Groceries,
Tobaccos and Miner's Supplies.
Call or Write lor Prices. BROOKLYN NEWS, BROOKLYN, B. C, SEPTEMBER 24, 1898.
j BROOKLYN BUDGET "\
��%>%i��>ty%%%%%%%%%%%%^%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% ��
Wanted to Buy���A good second
hand range with one fire box and
two ovens.    Apply at this office.
For several days this week snow
could be seen on several of the
mountain peaks surrounding Brooklyn.
Those fine fruits that Wm. Parker is selling at the Townsite headquarters are the freshest and best
to be found in any market.
D. M. Crowley, the furnituri.
man, has decided to open a branch
at Cascade City, and has ordered a
stock of goods sent there.
The Brooklyn Furniture store is
prepared to furnish road houses,
hotels or families with anything in
that line at most reasonable prices.
! Kootenay Laundry will call at the
hotels for washing every Monday,
Wednesday and Friday. Nothing
but first class work done.     Work
The Cosgrove Merry-Makers, who
are billed to appear in Brooklyn
next week, are meeting with crowded houses throughout the Kootenays.
The partner of Frank Oliver, who
has a sub-contract under McLean
Bros., met with a severe accident
last Monday, the result of a premature blast.
D. M. Crowley, the Brooklyn
furniture man, is now making a
specialty of furnishing hotels and
. road houses with anything they
may need In his line.
E. Parris and Co. have this week
received a large addition to their
stock of general goods, and have
found it necessary to secure a warehouse for storage purposes.
The Dominion Express company
has notified its agent at Brooklyn,
P. Huckerby, that articles or money
for the Westminster relief committee will be carried free of charge.
Miss Maud Mackintosh, daughter of Hon. C. H. Mackintosh, who
recently bought the Deer Park
townsite, for residental purposes,
was married last Wednesday at
Vancouver.
Within the last three days Mann,
Foley Bros, and Larsen have te-
ceived over twenty carloads of general merchandise, including potatoes, canned goods, etc. And there
is more now on the road.
A. J. Lapworth, proprietor of the
Lake laundry and bath house, has
been rebuilding his establishment
on the lake front, arid now has a
good drying room, so that his business goes on rain or shine.
Many changes in Provincial officials in West Kootenay have been
rumored of late, and it looks as
though some new office holders
would be soon announced by the
Semlin Government.
The new sidewalk from Townsite
Owner Parker's store to the Hotel
Stockholm, is a much appreciated
improvement. It is no longer
necessary to carry a lantern to
safely navigate that section of the
city after nightfall.
Subscribe to the Brooklyn News
and get all the news of the Magic
City and of the construction camps
along the line. Send a copy to
your friends back east, and let them
see what a progressive city is like,
Only $3 per year or $1 for 6 mos.
I Bradshaw and Co.'s new store on
First street is now completed and
ready for business. A general slock
of clothing, boots and shoes and
men's'furnishings will be carried.
Mr, Bradshaw is also opening a
similar store at Porcupine hotel,
about 10 miles out.
'Sam McOrmond, the Gladstone
general store keeper, was in town
Monday on a supply purchasing
trip. He will soon open a restaurant and bakery in connection with
his other business. He informed
the News man that Gladstone was
aH right.
Capt. Hughes and his crew of the
Illicilliwaet rescued two mem from
drowning on Thursday about three
miles   below   Brooklyn,   near   the
shore. One of them had a very
narrow escape from a watery grave,
and both were quite sobered up
after the event, though they did not
give their names.
While Captain Seaman, of the
Steamer Slocan, is taking his vacation, several changes among the
skippers of the Kootenay fleet have
been made. Capt. Fraser goes to
the Slocan, Capt. Whitmore to the
Trail, Capt. Short to the Kootenay
and Capt. Gore to the Rossland.
Try the Central short order lunch
counter. Open night and day. Just
what you want,    tf
The Nelson and Ft. Shepard and
S. F. and N. railways will sell round
trip tickets, Nelson to Spokane,
good for five days, for $9.50���one
fare. The Fair occurs from Oct.
5th to 15th, and will doubtless be
liberally attended from Kootenay
from Kootenay under this liberal
rate.
Short order lunch counter, open
day and night. Call on the Cen-
ral.    tf
For the last two weeks the demand for copies of the News has
exceeded the supply. This is a
pleasing state of affairs for the publisher, as it shows how the paper is
growing in favor. Hereafter there
will be enough for all. Bring in
your subscriptions���only 25c per
month, $1 for 6 months or $2 per
year.
Go to Manuel's for freshest fruits
and choice imported and domestic
cigars. ft
Brigadier Howell, of the Salvation Army, who made the recent
tour of British Columbia towns with
the Washington Marine Band, has
returned to Spokane. In an interview he speaks glowingly of the
reception accorded him, and among
others refers to the rousing welcome
received by the excellent band in
Brooklyn.
Everything neat and clean. Open
night and day at the Central lunch
counter,    tf
Angler Owens made the record
catch of the season, when he landed
an immense trout, tipping the scales
at 29 pounds. It will be of interest
to those thinking there is no fishing
near here, to learn that this member of the finny tribe was taken within a mile of Brooklyn. Another
weighing eight pounds���this time a
fine rainbow���adorned the window
of the Owen Restaurant on Monday.
��� ���
2     COMING AND GOING.     2
��� *>^~.~  ���
Pat Burns, Kootenay's widely-
known butcher, came in from Grand
Forks on Sunday with his manager,
Grant Wilson. They made the distance, 57 miles, in time to catch the
evening boat from Brooklyn the
same day the start was made.
Timothy Foley and Peter Larsen,
of the contracting firm, took a trip
of inspection over the line of construction as far as Cascade City last
Saturday, and expressed themselves
as well satisfied wilh the progress
made thus far on the work.
Mrs, Meyer, sister of Mrs. H. Y.
Anderson, of the Hotel Anderson,
who has been in Brooklyn for several weeks, left on Sunday's boat
for a visit to Rossland.
C. W. McMillan, manager of the
Brooklyn branch of the Calgary
Brewing Co., is spending a few
days with the home concern,
Thomas Wilson, of Trail, spent
last Sunday visiting his Brooklyn
branch store, and noting the large
business being done in town.
Dr. Frank J. Ewing, Justice G.
C. McGregor and G. H. Owen went
to Nelson on Monday to give evidence in the Fitzgerald stabbing
case, which occurred in this city on
July 13th.
Timothy Foley, of the railway
contracting firm, who has been in
town for some ten days, left on
Monday for Spokane and other
points.
T. S. Shanks, manager of the
Windsor hotel, visited Nelson early
in the week to meet the proprietor,
E. A. Dills, who was en route to
Toronto.
D. B. Bogle, publisher of the
Rossland Leader, and a well known
mining man, was in town Tuesday
to examine some promising claims
on Bull Dog mountain.
Andy Cummings, of the Summit
House, was in town Thursday on a
trip lo purchase goods.
H. J. Ernest, of the California
Wine Company, favored local business men with a call this week.
John M. Barry, of Barry and Mc-
Kaig's bakery and restaurant, spent
three or four days this week at his
old home in Silverton,
Tim Cronin, a well known mining
man from Rossland, arrived in the
city yesterday, and today started
out to examine some claims.
BROOKLYN
BOAT HOUSE.
McDonald A Fafftior, Props.
Best of Row Boats to Rent at all
Hours.
iiiGlve us a Call:::
BOATS MADE TO ORDER.
Agents for P. Genelle
Lumber Co,
Lake Front, Brooklyn, B. C.
THE KOOTENAY
U3MBE.R
COMPANY.     S. OLIVER. AGENT.
Full stock of Good Dry
Lumber on hand.
BROOKLYN, B, C,
Call on
MITCHELL BROS,
For a
NOBBY SUIT.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
Brooklyn, B. C.
F. L. BONNEY
Artistic
Photographer
VIEWS A SPECIALTY.
Lake Front, - - - Brooklyn, B, C.
Interests in Promising
PROSPECTS
For sale at Reasonable
Figures.
For further information apply to
W.B.WILLCOX,
Brooklyn, B. C.
Park ttotel.
Frederick & Peterson, Props.
Nearest Hotel to the
Dock,
flood Clean Rooms,
Everything First-class,
First Street. Brooklyn. B. C
SHAW St SHAW,
Daniel's It)
Hay, Feed,
Produce St
Vegetables
Branches at Sainton tfent aqa 8l|li.W.f, B.O.
BROOKLYN, B. C.
��33a^-ra^��g?^mm:mm^jgrai^^
James Gill & Co
 Dealers in	
Clothing, Gent's Furnishings,
Boots and Shoes.
FULL   LINE   OF   BLANKETS,   PILLOWS,
WINDOW SHADES,  ETC.
lleitiK exclusive agents for large Eastern makers.   We can aell goods at exactly the right p.-ircs.  That's why we are doing such a good busineia.
C. H, Walker, Manager, Brooklyn, B. C.
fM7^!^(E3BISBESEE��!ES^IEBKBKSre8SSSSS^KB^K2KaSK!affiKaEKE
C. E. MALLETTE & CO.
Wholesale dealers in
Fruits, Vegetables, Peed, and
Produce, SSI Fresh Fruits
Received Daily.
MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
Baker Street,
-  Nelson, B. C.
P. Burns Si Co.,
WHOLESALE
BROOKLYN,
B. C.
JUST WHAT YOU
NEED:::
Our tvett assorted stock includes
Staple and Fancy
: :HOTEL::
ANDERSON.
MRS. H. Y. ANDERSON, Prop.
Ratesf$1.50 to
$2.00 per day.
Thi' Dining Room is under the management ot
Mrs. H. Y. Anderson. The Table is supplied
with the Best the market affords ::::::::
Good Airy Rooms ��������� ��������� Clean Beds
First-class Bar in connection
St, Louis Beer Pabst Beer Schlitz Beer
Brooklyn Exchange.
AUNE & HOVEN, Props.
Fine Wines  Liquors and Cigars
Comfortable Rooms
GIVE US A CALL..
...BROOKLYN, B. C.
CENTRAL HOTEL
FIRST STREET, BROOKLYN, B. C.
Best brands of Wines,
Liquors and Cigars
BLOMBERG & DAHL,
Proprietors
W. H. GRAHAM
J. H. McMANNUS
International Hotel.
Front Street, Brooklyn, B. C.
Headquarters for Railroad Men
��� Bar supplied with Best brands WINES, LIQUORS and CIGARS
Everything New and First-Class.
Best Table in Town ��� Rates Reasonable
GRAHAM & McMANNUS, Proprietors.
Hoffman House.
Coughlin & McDonald, Props,
SS69S96S
Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
esessses
BEST SCOTCH HOUSE IN THE CITY.
EVERYTHING FIRST-CLASS.
Front Street,
Brooklyn, B. C.
When you come to Brooklyn���the Arrow Lake Metropolis���
. .do not forget the..
Columbia Hotel
McNEIL & HECTOR, Props.
The proprietors are experienced Hotel men, and know  how  to  cater to
the comforts of travelers and the public generally.
Drop in and see them.
Front Street, (over the Bridge)
BROOKLYN, B. C.
DO NOT OVERLOOK^
e. parris a ca,sasasm^
The Palace
GROCERIES,   BOOTS,   SHOES,
CLOTHING, UNDERWEAR,
Tents,     Blankets,     Canned Goods,      Cured Meats,     Etc.   When you come to Brooklyn.       Everything that  the thirsty or weary
traveler needs can be found at this popular establishment.
PRICES ALWAYS RIGHT.
GIVE US A CALL...
Wm. WALMSLEY, Prop.
First Street,       ...       -       Brooklyn, B. C. BROOKLYN NEWS, BROOKLYN, B. C, SEPTEMBER 24, 1898.
��� ���
S        CURRENT TOPICS. 2
������������������������*������������;��*����������������
The one-cent stamped envelope
shortly to be issued by Mie post-
office department is said to have
many features to commend it to the
public. The price in excess of the
face value is 10 cents less per hundred than that uf the old stamped
envelopes, so that a hundred of the
new one cent stamped envelopes
may be obtained at any office for
$1.20.
The editor of this poper, says the
New Denver Ledge, intends to
make a journey East in a few weeks
for the purpose of studying the
ways of the tenderfeet. While in
the cent belt of this great and glorious Canada ol ours, wc will picture life as we find it, in a series of
letters to New Denver's leading
journal. As our expenses will be
very heavy, all our backward subscribers would do us a favor by
putting what they owe us under our
door. The size of the time we will
have will only be limited by the size
of our sack. Thousands of our relatives and others are waiting to see
us, and we trust that we will return
alive. During our absence, gentle
reader, do not forget to advertise
early and often, and remember that
God never made a nobler creature
than the man who always pays the
printer.
Because the government has dismissed a few incompetent and useless officials the cry goes up from
some quarters, "the spoils system
has been introduced." As a matter
of fact, Mr. Semlin and his confreres are opposed to the spoils system. They have had under discussion the management of the different departments of governments
and came to the decision that no
one should be removed from office
who was competent and upright in
performance of his duties. They
have strictly adhered to that decision. The dismissals that have been
made were for cause, into explanation of which it is not necessary to
enter.���Nelson Miner.
During the cruel rule of the
Khalifa, to whose power the Anglo-
Egyptian force put the finishing
touches al Omdurman, the sacrifice of life in the Soudan was awful.
Whole tribes were exterminated by
the bloodthirsty dervishes, so that
areas once populated are now given
over to wild beasts.���Colonist.
S     KOOTENAY KERNELS.    2
��� ���
Rossland's ore shipments last
week broke all previous records,
reaching the total of 4,053 tons,
more than half of which came from
the Le Roi mine.
The several Kootenay Boards of
Trade are endeavoring to get the
Hon. Joseph Chamberlain, now in
Eastern Canada, to honor the
Kootenays by a visit.
The Labor Day celebration was a
great success in Rossland last Monday and Tuesday. Nelson won the
hub and hub hose reel racn, while
Rossland won the wet test race.
At Grand Forks there is not a
vacant store building of any kind.
Track laying on the Crow's Nest
line is now within a few miles of
Kootenay lake.
Many sections of Kootenay are
making preparations to send mineral exhibits to the Spokane Fruit
Fair and to the New Westminster
Fair.
Over 1,000 men arc now said to
be working in the mines of Sandon
and vicinity.
Kaslo has formed a Liberal-Conservative association, with Mayor
C. W. McAnn, president; Col. O.
T. Stone, vice-president; Geo. E.
Martin, secretary-treasurer.
Greenwood City is now without a
provincial constable.
Nelson citizens are said to be
praying for rain, that the water of
Cottonwood creek, which furnishes
power for the electric light plant
may rise sufficiently to once more
light the city o' nights. At present
the smelter city enjoys Egyptian
darkness.
MONEY IN  THE BANK.
Cash Paid tor the Mountain Chief
Qronp.
D. B. Bogle of Rossland was in
Brooklyn last Tuesday, and in company with T. J. Alexander went up
to the Mountain Chief group of
claims on Bull Dog Mountain to
look over the copper properties.
Mr. Bogle also brought the welcome
information that the money for the
purchase price of the group had
been deposited in the Bank of
Montreal at Rossland the day before.
Twelve Months at Hard Labor.
Patrick Fitzgerald stabbed Matthew Hays an July 13th in the
Brooklyn Exchange in this city.
The prisoner was taken to jail at
Nelson by acting officer G. H.
Owen, to await trial, which came
on last Wednesday. Hays recovered and left for Ymir and other
parts, not being on hand for the
trial. John Elliott appeared for
the crown at the trial and W. A.
Galliher for the defence. Fitzgerald was found guilty and sentenced
to 12 months at hard labor.
Oriole Again Running.
After being laid up for ten days
and undergoing a general course of
repairs, the steam yacht Oriole began her regular trips between
Brooklyn and Robson once more
last Monday morning. While the
boat was out of the water her boiler
was taken out, a new keel was added, and she was put in first-class
condition throughout. A new coat
of paint inside and out has made
her look as fresh as a young school
girl in a new dress.
Stage to Cascade City.
George    Cormack    and   Ernest
Livermore have established a stage
line to run  between Brooklyn and
Cascade City.
Church Services.
Services will be held tomorrow
at 11 a. m. and 7.30 p. m. in the
the new store building recently
built by Mr. Parker. Rev. John
Munro, pastor.
it
STEAM LAUNCH
ORIOLE"
Makes Daily trips between
Brooklyn and Robson
touching at all intermediate
points.
Tlin Oriole can lie hired for pleasure excursionists.   Orders taken for Supplies,
Outfits, Etc.
Apply RUMBALL &BULLEN
11HOOKLYN, B. 0.
1898   PROVINCIAL   1898
EXHIBITION
Under die direction of
The Royal  Agricultural and Industrial Society of British Columbia.
OCT. 5 to 13 INCLUSIVE
-AT-
New Westminster
in conjunction with the
Citizens Grand Yearly Celebration
$18,000
PRIZES
$18,000
Tho Premium List lathe Largest
ever ottered West of Toronto
Pyro-Spectacular Bonhardnent ol'SaMtU-
ko dc Cuba and Blowing up of the Maine.
Followed by an up-to-date Fire Works
Display, which lias been specially secured for Four Nights at an enormous
expense.
Lacrosse and Baseball Mutches, Bicycle
Meet, Aquatic, Sailor and Caledonian
Sports, Pro men ade Concerts, Home
Races.
DOG SHOW, OPEN TO THE WORLD.
The Finest Bands in the Province will
provide music.
Special rates over all Railway and Steamboat Limn.
No entrance fees charged Tor Exhibits.
Premium Lists,  Entry Forms, and full
information on application to
MAYOR OWENS,   W. H. EDMONDS,
Chairman Cel. Com.        Seey. Cel. Com.
T. .1. TRAPP,      ARTHUR MALINS,
Pres. R. A. & I. Hue. Seey. R. A. & I. Hoc.
W.H. KKART,
Exhibition Commissioner,
Hotel Gladstone.
Situated at the town ot Gladstone, 24 miles from
Brooklyn and ID miles from Christina lake. Fine
stable uccninnioiiutions to patrons. One of tbe finest
buildings between Cascade City and Brooklyn	
******
Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
DORSEY <* WISNER, PROPS.
GLADSTONE, B. C.
Porcupine Hotel |
ENNIS & BOLAN, Props.
Located.io miles from Brooklyn on the tote road
to Christina Lake.
Bar stocked with the best of ]
Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
Ample Stabling for Teams. i
Slfm.iiiiuuuiimiuiimiuuimumiuuiiuuuuuuniiuuuiiuuimmm��imiimm;
Summit House.
CUMMINGS & JACKSON, Props.
Located 17 miles from Brooklyn on the road to
Christina Lake.
Good Accommodations for Man and Beast
Half way to the Lake, and a Comfortable place to stop.
14-Mile House.
McINNIS & CO., Props.
A First-class Road House, located one day's
drive from Brooklyn.
Best aGGommodations for
Teamsters at 14-Mile House.
DON'T FAIL TO STOP THERE.
Cotton's Hotel.
H. W. COTTON, Prop.
Located 7 miles from  Brooklyn on  the
main road to Christina lake���half a day's drive.
Meals and Lodgings First-Class.
Workingmen's Home.
Divide Hotel
.GRAHAM & SPARKS, Props.
Located 15 miles from Brooklyn on the main  tote road, about
half way to Christina lake.
PINE WINES. LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
A Good, Comfortable 3-story House, with the
Best of accommodations. Give us a call when
you come out on the line	
SS9S98SSSS9S9SS8SSSSSS9SS SSSSSS6*
A. B. BARBER
Heavy Freighting and Trucking
done for all points along the main
Tote Road to Christina lake.       Prompt attention to Orders.
BAGGAGE TRANSFERRED.
a nil 11 n II111 b. c.
M696SS
COMING!
WAR-EXTRA
ILLUSTRATED
..CIGAR..
ASK FOR IT.    ASK FOR IT
A. B. GRA Y, Nelson, Agent British Columbia.
Washing called for and
delivered.
In connection, Hot and
Cold water
Opposite International Hotel, Lake Front.
BROOKLYN, .... British Columbia
LAKE LAUNDRY
BATH HOUSE:::
Old Curiosity Shop.
Opp. Clark Hotel, Josephine Street, Nelson, B. C.
New and Second Hand Goods.
We buy ANYTHING and sell EVERYTHING.
Call or drop us a line���we can lit you out.    Money  made by dealing
 with us	
 Fitting our Road Houses a Specialty	
w. h. eooPER & eo.
Brokers, Financial Agents, Etc.
Money sent to any part of the world.       Time Checks Cashed
Money received on deposit and placed in Chartered Banks
to credit of depositors.
Real  Estate   Bought  and  Sold
Conveyancing and all papers required under the  Mineral
Act executed.
Townsite Office,      -       ���     ��� ���      Brooklyn, B. C.
Merchants' Bank of Halifax.
Incorporated 1869.
Capital Paid up, 11,500,000.00.   Reserve, $1,175,000.00
Head Offices  Halifax, Nova Scotia.
BRANCHHS.
Antigonlsh, N. 8
Hitiliuiut, N. B.
Bnducwater, N. S.
Clinrlottetowii, V. ��. I.
Dorchester, N. B.
Frcdericton, N. B.
(luysboro, N. H.
Halifax, N. 8.
Kingston, N. B.
Londonderry, N.8.
Kossland, B, 0.
Sackvllle, N. B.
Shubenacadle. N. S.
Summerslde, P. B. I.
Sydney, N.
St. Jobn, NHd.
Truro, N. 8.
Vancouver, B. 0.
Victoria, B. C.
Weymouth, N. 8.
Woodstock, N. B.
Lunenburg, N 8.
Moitland.N.B.
Moncton, N. B.
Montreal. 1*. Q.
"       West End.
"       Westniount
Nanaimo, B. C.
Nelson, B. 0.
Newcastle, N. B,
Pictou, N. B.
Port Hawkesbury, N. 8.
A General Banking Business Transacted. Sterling Bills of Exchange
Bought and Sold. Letters of Credit, Etc., Negotiated.
Account, received on tk. moat uvor.ble term..  Int.re.t .llow.d on ap.cl.1
deposits aid on Saving. Bank account*.
Branches In British Columbia:
NANAIMO, NELSON, ROSSLAND VANCOUVER, VICTORIA
A Suvinua Hunk department litis been established in connection with the
Nelson branch of this bank.
Deposits at one dollar and upward received, and current rate of Interest allowed (at
present 3 per cent, per annum).
George Kydd. Manager, Nelson, B. C.
fBROOKLYNl
#
#
&��<    Is the Gateway to the     jl
* Midway Mines. J��
B
Forty Miles of Wagon Road Leading; to the Richest *&)
Mineral section In British Columbia, ^
B        I
'���starts from BROOKLYN. ���
Thousands of Workmen have
a*, Headquarters, BROOKLYN i
K       *
Millions of Dollars paid to J*
JL *
ty Workmen at BROOKLYN. ���
Y
aMfc  BROOKLYN is the New Town on Lower Arrow Lake,  JL
f1      B.C., where the headquarters camp is located for con- ^^^
��� f           strucLion work of 105  miles of heavy Railroad jj
WSL'                              work, costing $4,000,01x1. 'tt^ft
t       N I
#W. Parker, Sole Owner. &
BROOKLYN, B. C. ^
jjfe                   Time Checks bought at current rates. W

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