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Brooklyn News Aug 13, 1898

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 THE BROOKLYN NEWS.
VOL.  i.
BROOKLYN, B. C, SATURDAY, AUGUST 13, 1898.
NO. 9.
THE"
"ADMIRAL DEW
CIGAR
takes the
cake
CALIFORNIA WINE COMPANY,
Nelson, B. C, agent for British Columbia
When you come to Brooklyn, come
straight to the........
Varnamo Hotel
GUS. JACKSON, Prop.
You will get good accommodations, and will be pleased.
Finest Wines, Liquors and Cigars
BROOKLYN, B. C.
II
���Si BROOKLYN!*
Furniture Store.
Everything at Lowest Prices.
LARGL STOCK.
Practical Manufacturer and UNDLRTAKLR.
D. M. CROWLEY,
First Street, South End. BROOKLYN, B. C.
THOMAS & GREIGER
.DEALERS IN.
Wines, Liquors # Cigars.
Brooklyn, B. C.
PABST MILWAUKEE EXPORT  and BLUE  RIBBON  BEER.
PABST EXPORT.    BLUE RIBBON.
LABATT'S ALE.       LABATT'S STOUT.      CALIFORNIA WINES.
mn��    ^Agents for LION ��'""��v ,m
City Drug Store.
 Just received a full line of	
Drugs, Patent Medicines and Drug-
siictc* Qimrlrioc    We are fully pcepared to 1
giSlS    aUnUTieS.        all orders in this line.
>flll
Tobacco, Cigars, Stationery, Sponges, Perfumes
and Toilet Soaps.
FRED POLLOCK, Prop.,  BROOKLYN, B. C.
Prescriptions a Specialty. Mail orders promptly filled
:::BROOKLYN::.
I0PLRA HOUSE. 1
On the Lake Front.   Crowley 6 Reid, Props.
*TMar*" Monday, Aug. 22.
When will be presented the Grand Cyclorama ot the
American-Spanish
I
��9HWAR*ifi*
From McVicar's Theatre, Chicago.
To be succeeded
0(i      on Saturday
2 By an entertainment, entitled:
Saturday, Aug. 27. J
*
tf
tf
tf
|
Come and Bring your Wife and Children. M-
I Around the World to
the Klondike.
AN OPERA HOUSE
Is Now Under Construction In
Brooklyn.
WILL OPEN AUGUST 22nd.
Located oa a Large Float on the
Lake Front. To be Run on
First Class Lines.
Among the notable institutions of
which this progressive, young and
vigorous town will soon be able to
boast, will be an opera house and
summer garden. This structure
will be 62 feet long by 32 feet wide,
and will be located on the Lake
front. Work has already commenced on the building by a force ol carpenters and will be completed by
the time the next issue of the News
goes to press-August 20th. The
opera house will be constructed at a
convenient point on the lake shore
near the International hotel and a
substantial side walk will be built
to it.
D. M. Crowley and Tom Reid are
proprietors of this new and commendable entertainment enterprise
and they informed the News man
that they propose to conduct a
strictly first class and legitimate
house. There will be no intoxicating liquors of any kind sold on the
premises, but patrons may be accommodated with soft drinks, if
they so desire.
The house will have a seating capacity of about 250 and is to have a
spacious and well appointed stage.
It can, when not otherwise engaged, be secured for any legitimate
gathering on reasonable terms.
Mr. Crowley is a veteran at the
show business and has traveled
pretty much all over the world. For
five years he conducted the opera
house at Honolulu with great success. In the course of his travels
he has gathered a large number of
interesting and instructive views of
places and people.
The opera house will open on
Monday evening, August 22, with
the grand cyclorama of the Spanish
American war depicting most realistically many of the great land and
naval battles that occurred in the
late conflict and the life and scenery
in Spain and Cuba.
One feature that Messrs. Cowley
and Reid have decided on is to have
the theater s-. conducted that it wili
be a pleasant and agreeable place
for ladies and children to visit.
These gentlemen are to be congratulated on their enterprise and
the citizens of Brooklyn will doubtless turn out and show th'iir appreciation by giving it a hearty support.   	
5 CONSTRUCTION NOTES. |
M��**ft������ft&sA��K��Aaaa��&��*a*
Mike Johnson, foreman for Burns
6 Jordan, sub-contractors, who was
laid up several weeks, has made application to the Northwestern Benevolent Society ot Duluth, for relief for the time he was disabled.
Foss & McDonald, who have a
mile and a half contract four miles
down the lake, now have a force ot
150 men at work, but are still looking for more.
Six head daily is the amount of
beef slaughtered in Brooklyn for
the use of surrounding construction
camps, and in the city trade.
The demand for giant powder on
this railway construction contract is
so great that the Hamilton Powder
Co., who furnish it, cannot manufacture it fast enough at the coast
works, but are to bring it in from
Montreal also.
In the neighborhood of $73,000
worth of supplies and general merchandise is now turned over monthly b'y the contractors, and it is all
haitdlAl at Brooklyn. This sum
will undoubtedly be increased when
the full complement of men gets to
work*''
, McLean Bros., who have the tunnel contract, four miles from town,
are said to have one of the best outfits on the line. Mrs. J. J. McLean,
wife of one of the brothers and the
wife of Bookkeeper Pfile are enjoying an outing with their husbands.
John Twohy, the contractor,
dropped in last Sunday and told the
same story ol a shortage of help at
his camp, where he has now some
75 hands at work.
A week .from today���pay day���
it is estimated that $30,000 will be
distributed to the several tub-contractors and others.
Angus McClusker, one of Foss &
McDonald's men, in a quarrel with
some .Italians, jumped out of a boat
last Sunday and started to swim for
shore. He was chilled to the bone
before he had gone fat and was rescued by Mr. Peterson of the Crown
Point, who went out to him in a
boat.
Men in from Boomer's camp who
came down on Sunday, 'say that
about sixty men are employed there,
where 'there is work for 600 or
thereabouts. This is one of the
largest sub-contracts on the road,
being for five miles of construction.
Those who claim to be in a position to know, state that after September 1st, the're will be at least
2,000 men coming over here from
the Crow's Nest line, the most of
the work there being pretty well
done.
Mr. McDonald of Foss & McDonald was in town Thursday, and
states his firm have 146 men at
work. They have a mile between
here and Robson and are putting
men on all the time.
There are now 25 sub-contractors
at work along the line.
Tie makers mork by the piece,
and are getting on an average 15
cents per tie, of which it costs about
six cents to deliver on the right of
way. An expert tie maker will cut
40 ties per day.
The longest sub-contract on the
line is that of McLean Bros., who
have the tunnel and temporary
switchbacks, amounting altogether
to five miles of right 0 f way.
James McMartin, who has two
and one-half miles just beyond the
tunnel, was in town Wednesday.
He has now 100 men on his heavy
rock cutting, but could use as many
more.
The Rossland Board of Trade is
working to secure the construction
of a wagon road in a northwesterly
direction from Rossland to connect
with the tote road, which the contractors are building for the extension of the Columbia & Western to
Penticton. The object is to secure
a share of the large trade sure to
spring up in this section.
James McBeth, the well known
railway contractor, who has been
woiking on the Crow's Nest line,
came in town Thursday on the same
sort of a mission.
At Mann's camp, Shields' landing, there are 140 men at work,
but they have accommodations for
300, which quota they are anxious
to make up. Good progress is being made on the work, however.
A telegram was received Wednesday that Mr. Matthews, of Matthews & Keith,- who have the contract for all the bridges on the line,
had been caught in a railway accident and his leg had to be amputa-
FINES WERE 1330
No "Rolling;" Or Robbing Will
Be Tolerated.
JUSTICE WAS SUMMARY
Citizens Generally Pleased to See
the Matter Dealt With���Tinhorns and Crooks Must Oo.
Heretofore the News has remarked that law and justice do obtain in Brooklyn, notwithstanding
the many nationalities represented
in this new town. The events of
the past week go far to prove this,
and to show that strangers and citizens cannot be robbed or "rolled"
with impunity, at least white Constable Forrester and Judge Cooper
are representing the government
here: And it all happened in this
way:
A stranger from Chicago named
Paul was having a few festivities
Monday evening and spent the
night at the red-curtained house of
Lizzie Oleson, in the east end of
town. When he awoke in the
morning he was minus $75 or $80.
He had a bad cut on the side of his
head ond blood was found on the
bed clothes and on his shirt. The
women claimed he had left the
house about one o'clock and returned about four and had received
the cut and been robbed mean-
While, but Mr. Paul denied this
flatly.
Information being laid, Lizzie
Oleson and Sadie Woods, an inmate, were arrested by officer Forrester and brought before justice of
the peace Cooper. After hearing
the evidence of both sides, the judge
read the law and fined Miss Oleson $50 for keeping a house with
red curtains, $200 for the price of
a liquor license and $50 for selling
without a license, together with $5
costs. Miss Woods was fined $20
and costs for being an inmate. The
total amounted to $330. In as
much as the statutes read that $250
or six months at hard labor may be
exacted for selling without a license
Miss Oleson got off pretty light,
considering all the circumseances of
the case.
The fines and costs were all paid
before the women left the court
room.
During the progress of the trial,
which was held on Tuesday evening, the court room was packed
with interested spectators, the great
majority of whom expressed satisfaction with the outcome of the
case. Constable Forrester says
that there is a gang of crooks in
town operating in this and similar
ways, that he proposes to break up
and drive out of the city.
TO GREENWOOD AND RETURN.
(Continued on Second page)
Several Log Hotels Going up on the
Construction Line.
W. A. Milne and E. M. Dana
have just returned from a trip over
the line of railway construction all
the way to Greenwood City and
Midway. He also crossed the line
a short distance into the reservation. Mr. Milne reports that the
forces of men at the different camps
along the line have been greatly increased since he left Brooklyn. Yet
there is a great demand for more
laborers. At many of the camps a
sign is displayed reading: "Men
wanted." Over toward Christina
lake and especially in the Burnt
Basin district, there are large numbers of prospectors in the hills, and
a Rossland expert who recently
went in there to examine properties, has given a most favorable report on the country generally from
a mineral standpoint. There is a
good deal of activity noticeable already beyond a point 22 or 23 miles
out, to where the tote road is completed. Several hotels are in contemplation or under construction
along the line, and the proprietors
generally seem to expect to secure
licenses. The first log hotel is
about 12 miles out. The next one
is at the summit, about 18 miles
out, and is already doing business.
Another Jog hotel is accommodating
the traveling public on the line
about 25 miles from Brooklyn.
Cascade City has been picking up
wonderfully since the assurance of
the railway line. A new hotel has
just been opened up, and several
stores have come in. In order to
accommodate the building operations the local saw mill is running
over time. Business is good in all
lines, and the indications are that
the place will be one of some little
importance in a short time.
Mr. Milne went over the line
with a view to securing some contracts.
WORKING BROOKLYN MINE.
Force ot Men and Supplies Sent to
the Prdberty.
W. C. Copper left on Monday
with a force of men to do development work on the Brooklyn 'mine,
located about three miles from this
city on Bull Dog mountain. A full
stock of supplies was packed out to
the claim, sufficient to last for some
time, and the work will be conducted on a thorough, systematic basis.
This is one of the promising
claims ot this section and its owners have every reason to believe
they have a good thing in this copper property.
Negotiations are pending for the
sale of an interest in the Golden
Spoon claim located a short time
ago by George Olson in the Burnt
Basin district. The samples from
this property appear to have high
values in silver.
Hotel on the Summit.
A. J. Jackson and A. P. Cum-
mings, who are putting up a hotel on
the second summit, left for that
point Wednesday morning. The
hotel will be known as the Summit
House and will have good accommodations for freighters generally.
Both Mr. Jackson and Mr. Cum-
mings are old hands at the business
and are well and favorably known.
They will doubtless do a good business. The hotel is located 17 miles
from Brooklyn and will be a convenient stopping place.
New Canadian Postal Notes.
Officials of the money order
branch at Ottawa have completed
arrangements of the postal note system, and three denominations are
now on hand. There will be 16 denominations, ranging from 20 cents
to $5,00, but owing to the delay in
printing them it is impossible to issue all at the same time. The commission will be one cent on all orders up to 40 cents, 2 cents up to
$2,50 and three cents up to $5.
The new Canadian special delivery stamps are now ready to be issued. The use of these stamps will
insure an immediate delivery of letters, providing the recipient is a
resident of a city in which there is a
delivery system. In other places
the special delivery letters will be
delivered in the quickest way possible. The stamp costs 10 cents but
the letter must have the ordinary
postage upon it. Ten cents in ordinary stamps will not answer the
purpose of the special stamp. This
system is similar lo the one in use
in the United States for several
years past.
Everything neat and clean. Open
night and day at the Central lunch
counter,    tf
macjasmmMom
- THE BROOKLYN NEWS.
Subscription Rotes *2.l)0 per Year
Advertising Rates made known upon
Application.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 13, IS
By W. B. WILLCOX.
1898
AUGUST
1898
SUN
MOX
Tl/E  WED
THU
1'Kl
SAT
I
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
��� 5
9
16
io
'7
11
~w
12
'9
_13_
20
'4
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22
2.1
24
25
2b
27
28
29
3��
31
Camp Distances from Brooklyn
TOWARDS   ROUSON.
Ericson's camp	
Johnson's camp	
Koykendall's camp, No. io ..
Foss  Hi McDonald,s camp ���
No. 9	
Burns & Jordan's camp���No.8
O'Lcarv's and Mann's camps,
(Shield's Landing)���No. 7
V. W. Smith's  camp���No. E
McCormack's���No. 6	
V. W, Smith's camp���No. 6
Ryberg's camp���No. 5	
Pat Walsh's first camp���No.4
Hanson's camp���No.C	
Pat Walsh's camp���No. A...
Pat Walsh's camp���No. 3...
Genelle's camp���No. 2	
McHugh's camp���No. 1	
Robson. ,	
DISTANCES ON TOTE ROAD
Twohy's camp	
Nugent's camp	
McLean Bros, camp (tunnel).
Mclver& Phillips camp	
Foote's camp	
John Martin's camp	
McMartjn's camp	
Winters, Parsons & Boomer.
Farr's camp	
McClellan's camp	
Summit House	
���Anderson's camp	
Olsen's camp	
MILKS
2 1-2
3 1-2
3
4
5
6
7
8
8
9
10
11
1-2
3
last few weeks there has been a settling down process going on that
has given the town a more solid appearance. Improvements have
been made about the place that
have rendered it more pleasant to
live and do business in and altogether more desirable. In the meantime, also, an excellent water system has been introduced and mains
laid in the public thoroughfares.
Gas has been introduced in many
business houses, snd the city continues to grow generally.
While business has been better
the past week, there is no doubt but
that it will greatly improve after
the 20th of the month, when the
first full pay day on the line of construction will take place. The
News will hazzard the prediction
that within a month business in
Brooklyn will be brisk enough to
suit the most fastidious.
A good sized grist of election
protests have been filed with government at Victoria. In fact, if
there is any candidate on either
side, who was defeated by a close
vote, and has not entered a protest,
he could make a fortune exhibiting
himself as a freak. Evidently there
will be a genteel sufficiency of fun
ahead along this line. Even our
own Fred Hume, whose majority
was only 15, is having his right to
his seat in the provincial legislature
disouted by A. S. Farwell, his opponent.
4 1-2
6
7
8
10
'3
H
'7
18
23
HONOR TO WHOM HONOR
IS DUE.
Penny postage between the United Kingdom, Canada, Newfoundland, Cape Colony, Natal, and such
of the colonies as may, after communication with and the approval
of Her Majesty's government be
willing to adopt it, is now a reality,
says the Vancouver World. This is
another triumph for Canadian states
manship, for it is acknowledged by
Mr. Henniker Heaton, M. P., who
has used persistent efforts to secure
postal reform that its accomplishment was mainly due to three statesmen, Rt. Hon. Joseph Chamberlain,
Sir Wilfred Laurier and Hon. Win.
Mulock, postmaster general of Canada.
The latter took the initiative and
had the honor of moving the resolution to secure this boon to the people of the empire. Mr. J. G. Col-
mer, secretary to Lord Strathcona
and Mount Royal, High Commissioner for Canada, says that in ad-
dititon to the benefit of cheaper
communication the Dominion has
received sucHan advertisement as
will bring her prominently before
the notice of the whole world and
further, that Australia will have to
join the other colonies or else change
her motto "Advance Australia."
The press of Great Britain also
speaks in glowing terms of this
measure and is not backward in attributing a large degree of statesmanship which brought it about
to the Canadian represctatives at
the postal congress. Nevertheless
certain of our papers, which are
jealously opposed to any reform the
government may propose, have decried the fact that our fellow country men have heen the leading factors in securing this important legislation for Britain and her colonies.
Now that the truth of the matter
is clearly set forth by the Imperial
authoiities it is hoped that, for the
sake of justice and fair play to all
concerned, theyjwill accord to Canada that measure of praise which is
due her representatives for impressing so emphatically upon the home
officials the necessity and advantage
of the great change in postal rates
which has now been so happily consummated.
GOVERNMENT CHANGE.
BRIGHT PROSPECTS.
It is now universally conceded
that the prospects for the future of
Brooklyn and its energetic citizens
are exceedingly bright.   Within the
Lieutenant Governor Mclnnes
has cut the Gordian Knot of politics
and called on Robert Beaven, a
former premier, to form a new
government. Mr. Beaven has undertaken the difficult task, and
seems confident, according to the
dispatches, of being able to form a
strong organization with plenty of
vigorous new blood. There does
not seem, at the same time, to be
any disposition to form a coalition
with either of the old parties.
Premier Turner and his cabinet
was asked to resign, and has replied that he will test at Ottawa
the constitutionality of the action
taken, and if necessary, to remove
the lieutenant governor from office.
One feature of the new move that
does not commend itself is the fact
that W. B. B. Mclnnes, son of the
governor, is slated already for the
attorney generalship,
Returns from Cassiar are finally
all received and show that the
Turner forces swept the entire district, giving the government 19
votes out of 38, including the two
independents.
The entire province will closely
watch the next moves on each side,
which appears to be a bitter fight
between the contending forces. The
chances are that another appeal will
be taken to the country before long.
Ernest Terah Hooley, the London company promoter, who has
lately come to financial grief, is a
bird. Talk about rottenness in
Denmark; why, Hooley could give
the average schemer cards and
spades and then beat him at his
own game. He spent from ^80,-
000 to ^125,000 on earls, barons,
etc., in getting the use of their
names on the directorates of his various companies. As for the press,
that incorruptible London press,
they did not do a thing to him. The
editor of the Financial News received $50,000, though many other
journalists were lower priced. There
must have been some profit in the
newspaper business in London during Hooley's reign.
The end of the "Yanko-Spanko"
war is in sight, the preliminaries
for peace negotiations are already in
hand and it is only a question of detail now. The haughty Don has
got a gigantic debt, has lost his fine
navy, thousands of gallant soldiers
and sailors, and his "honor" has
been vindicated. The United States
has been piling up a war debt at
the rate of $2,000,000 per day and
has lost many a brave man. It is
well that the war is over, though its
effects will indeed be  far  reaching.
From Tuesday, October 5th, to
Saturday, October 15, the Spokane
Fruit Fair will be held. This will
be the fifth annual show of this
kind, and unusually extensive preparations are being made to make it
the greatest, most interesting and
most successful of these fall gatherings ever held. Henry Bolster is
again manager of the big show,
which is of itself a guarantee of its
success.
Vancouver did the proper thing
a few days ago when it entertained
the pencil pushers of Wisconsin and
Michigan. And the C. P. R. was
also in line, being the hosts of the
editors across the continent. Its a
paying proposition every time to
treat a party of eastern editors well.
No better advertising could possibly
be done at any price.
The American railways have
been trying to coerce the C. P. R.
into an adjustment of rates, which
have been demoralized for months.
But the big Dominion line is not
built that way. All it asks is the
fair thing���a reasonable differential.
Threats by the American roads do
not seem to scare the C. P. R.
worth a cent.
The name of the so called "Spokane route" to the Klondike should
be changed to the "hard luck"
route���as that especially describes
it. Not one in ten who struggled
over it arc likely to reach their destination, according to the latest reports, and the balance stand a good
chance of starving to death. Kootenay can offer better opportunities,
many times over, to the average
man, than the ice bound Yukon.
Give it the same amount of energy
and capital as the Klondike and the
Kootenays will leave the former far
behind in the amount of annual production of precious metals.
It is reported that Sir William
Mulock, postmaster general of the
Dominion of Canada, is to be
knighted. While Sir William is in
a pleasant frame of mind over it, he
ought to be shown what prehistoric,
antediluvian mail service the several thousand who receive letters in
Brooklyn have to put up with.
Brooklyn is on a firm footing now,
and should have a regularly established postoflice. This the News
believes will be an accomplished
fact some of these fine summer
mornings,
There was such a demand for the
News last week that a second edition had to be printed. The News
is growing more popular every day,
we are pleased to note, but there is
yet room on our subscription books
for a few more names, If you think
it's a good thing, push it along.
An eas tern editor is authority for
the statement that Bismarck, whose
sick room diet was beer, champaign
and tobacco, lived about as long,
and had many times as much fun as
Gladstone, who lived so methodically and painfully.
Spain has concluded to accept
Uncle Sam's terms of peace and details arc now to be arranged. This
is the first grain of common sense
that the Dons have shown since the
good battleship was sent to Davy
Jones' locker.
Scarcity ot Men.
The Canadian Pacific railway officials report a scarcity of men on
the work of construction between
Arrow lake and Boundary, says the
Rossland Miner. J. F. Stevens,
chief engineer for the contractors,
has stated that until the contractors
could have some assurance that the
supply of men could be increased
no effort would be made to scatter
the work, but that it would be concentrated on the worst portions of
the road during the good weather.
He expected to have about 2,000
men at the summit near the North
Fork early in August and possibly
at other points on the Boundary
side of the divide. Mr, Stevens
was one of the chief engineers for
the Great Northern railway, but resigned his position to accept that of
chief engineer for the contractors.
Kaslo & Slocan R'y
TIML CARD.
Subject to change without notice. Trains run on
Pacific Standard time.
Going West. Going East
Leave Kvo a. m Kaslo A rrirc j:<;'> >. m
"    A'yo"   "      South Pork      "    j;/j   "
"    9-J6  "       Sproules       ���'     a.'/.J   "
"    9$l   "     ....Hliitc.vater. ..     "     3.V0   "
"  IOXQ  "      BearLake      "     1:48   "
"   10:18 "      McGuigau      "     i:jj   "
"   IO$S  "      ..CodyJunction...      "     1:12   "
Arr lotfu   "      Sitndou Leave l.iw   *'
cony line
Lve  //.W  "     ..' Sandou ..  .t.Arr 11:4$ a.m
Arr 11:20  " Cody  J.ve 11:35   "
Robt. Irving, f       Geo. P. Copland,
G. P. & P. A. Superintendent.
CHARLES DIXON.
Company's Mess
House.
Puts up a Square Meal for
25c.
GIVE HIM A CALL.
Near the Wharf,     Brooklyn, B. C.
STEAM LAUNCH
"ORIOLE"
Makes Daily trips between
Brooklyn and Robson
touching ��t all intermediate
points.
The Oriole can be hlreil tbr pleasure excursionists.   Orders taken fur Supplies,
Ouilils, Etc.
Apply RIMBALL&BULLEN
1MOOKI.YN, B. C.
THE KOOTENAY
U3MBE.R
COMPANY.     S. OLIVER. AGENT.
Full stock of Good Dry
Lumber on hand.
BROOKLYN, B. C.
MITCHELL BROS,
MERCHANT
TAILORING.
GENT'S
FURNISHINGS.
Now open for business ���
Brooklyn, B. C.
S. H. BROWN,
BROOKLYN,
CONTRACTOR
tiANDt:
BUILDLR.
FOR THE BEST MEAL IN
TOWN, QO TO THE-
Queen Restaurant.
OPEN NIGHT AND, DAY.
Try our Evening Dinner, 5:30 to
8:30, for 25 cents.
Hyde & Whines, Props.
Brooklyn, B. C.
Parson's Produce Co'y.
Winnipeg, Man.   *  Vancouver, B. C.   # ��� Nelson, B. C.
WHOLESALE ONLY.
The Largest dealers in Western Canada.
Creamery and Dairy Butter, Eggs
Cheese, and Cured Meats.
Specialties���Creamery Butter in Hermetically Sealed Tins) lib, 21b, 51b, and
101b.  Creamery Butter In I pound bricks.
Mail and Telegraph  orders .promptly shipped from  our Cold  Storage
... .warehouse, Nelson.    Write or. Wire....
All Warehouses under perfect P. J. RUSSELL,
system of Cold Storage.       Manager Nelson branch, NELSON, B.C.
The only Strictly Wholesale House in Kootenay.
A. MCDONALD ft CO.,
Wholesale Merchants
NELSON, B. C.
Fancy and Staple Groceries,
Tobaccos and Miner's Supplies.
Call or Write for Prices.
Thomas Wilson.
GENERAL MERCHANT
��� ��������
"������H
Groceries, Provisions, Clothing,
Boots and Shoes, Campers Outfits, Etc.
...Mr Good Stock, ot Everything.
BROOKLYN,      -
B.C.
Lstimates Made.
Plans Furnished.
James Gill &@.
Clothing,
Gent's
Furnishings.
Boots,
Shoes,
Blankets,
Pillows, Etc.
Window Shades,
Curtains,
Carpets, Rugs.
All our goods have been shipped
direct from eastern manufacturers
and will be sold here at prices
that are sure to satisfy you.
Old Curiosity Shop.
Opp. Clark Hotel, Josephine Street, Nelson, B. C.
New and Second Hand Goods.
We buy ANYTHING and sell EVERYTHING.
Call or drop us a line���we can fit you out.   Money made by dealing
 with us	
w. h. cooper & eo.
Bankers, Brokers, Financial Agents, Etc.
Money sent to any part of the world.       Time Checks Cashed
Money received on deposit and placed in Chartered Banks
to credit of depositors.
Real   Estate   Bought  and   Sold
Conveyancing and all papers required under the Mineral
Act executed.
Townsite Office,      -       -      ���       Brooklyn, B. C.
��� BROOKLYN <��>
LUMBER
Yard. ���*��� P. Genelle & Co.
Dry Building Lumber,
All Sizes, All Kinds
Doors, Windows, Sash.
Dimension Timbers in all sizes
Dry Cedar Shingles
Persons desiring lumber must place orders at once.
E. G. Beer, Agent.
MIKADO IsAUNDRY.
Brooklyn,
B.C.
GEORGE MOTOSAWA.
Adjoining Boat House, Lake Front, : : : : Brooklyn, B. C.
Goods called for and delivered.
, Work done on short notice.
Give us a Trial.       White Shirts done up equal to Steam Laundry work,
I, {" BROOKLYN BUDGET ']
Cigars by the box at wholesale
prices at Udall's. tf
Only the best work t one at the
Alliance Laundry. Satisfaction
guaranteed,    tf
Try the Central short order lunch
counter. Open night and day. just
what you want,    tf
These warm days the Bath House
on the lake front is one the most
popular institutions in the city.
H. L. Sawyer has had trouble
with his male cooks. Too much
booze, he says, so he inserts the
following ad:
Girl Wanted���A first class camp
cook, good wages, references required. Landing No. 9. via Brooklyn. H. L. Sawyer.
For Sale���Cheap, quarter interest in a promising mining claim.
Inquire at Brooklyn News office
if you want a snap. tf
Benjifield & Cherington have
bought out Fred Hughes and w II
hereafter conduct a general rental
and brokerage business.
Wm. McLean, manager Thorpe
& Co., Nelson, was taking orders
from our business men early in the
week for his choice sodas.
The cheapest and best place in
town to have your watch cleaned
and regulated. John Leighton,
First street, opposite Alliance hotel,   tf
Remember the Brooklyn News
when you want printing. Letterheads, bill-heads, envelopes, cards
and all classes of printing promptly
executed.
There is no diminuation in the
immense quantities of freight being
unloaded every day at the Brooklyn
wharf. In fact, it is rather increasing in volume.
The fish are biting at Udall's
baits. tf
McDonald & Farmer's boat-house
has been a decidedly popular place
during the hot spell, and the supply of boats is at many times not
equal to the demand.
W. B. Davey, who has put in
the electric light and water plant at
Grand Forks, is in the city, and expects to do some contracting on the
line of construction. ,
Patronize the Alliance Laundry.
Satisfaction guaranteed,   tf
The hotel Stockholm, with Johnson & Lockhart as proprietors,
opened their doors to the public
this week, and at once began to do
a rushing business.
Kootenay Laundry will call at the
hotels for washing every Monday,
Wednesday and Friday. Nothing
but first class work done. Work
done on short notice.
The Alliance Laundry will give
you satisfaction every time,   tf
Graham & McMannus have built
a substantial sidewalk from their
popular hotel, the International, to
Front street, which is appreciated
by their many friends.
All kinds of stationery, magazines and newsyapers at Udalls.   tf
Constable Forrester has been
making it warm for light fingered
gentry and crooks of all kinds and
most of them have left for more
congenial climes within the last few
days.
Short order lunch counter, open
day and night. Call on the Cen.
tral.    tf
The new jail was finished and
turned over to Constable Forester
last Wednesday. Two good cells
are in the building which will admirably answer the purpose for which
they were intended.
Adjutant Wilner and Capt. Gooding, of the Nelson branch of the
Salvation Army, are expected to
make a three days visit to Brooklyn
beginning Monday, the 22nd, when
special revival services will be held.
E, J. Paul, president of the North
Star Acetyline Gas Co., of Chicago,
has arrived in the  city,   and  will
make his home here for the present,
being associated with H. W. Youmans in the local acetyline gas business.
Ernest Kennedy, of Kennedy
Bros. & Purgold, the well known
mining men of Rossland, was the
guest of Admiral Rumball, of the
steam yacht Oriole, last Sunday,
and took in the beauties of Brook-
lyn-on-the-take.
Business has so increased in the
C. P. R. office at Brooklyn that an
enlargement of quarters was found
necessary. Accordingly a 12x13
addition has been built and Agent
Huckerby and his assistants are correspondingly happy.
Subscribe to the Brooklyn News
and get all the news of the Magic
City and ol the construction camps
along the line. Send a copy to
your friends back east, and let them
see what a progressive city is like.
Only $2 per year or $1 for 6 mos.
All persons wishing mail delivered
on the line of the Robson & Pentic-
ton railway are requested to leave
their names with time-keepers at
any of the company's camps, and
mail will be promptly deliveted.
tf W. Parker.
The Brooklyn News is prepared
to furnish the best in the world-
bar none���in the line of job printing
and general office stationery, Bring
in your orders for envelopes, letter
heads, cards, tags, and in fact,
anything made with ink and paper.
Pat Friel is now having an opportunity to think over his short
comings in the provincial jail at
Nelson. It was all caused by imbibing too freely and running against
the officers of the law, He will try
the Nelson climate for three months
One of thevmost popular diver-
versions of the day in Brooklyn is
bathing, the warm weather of the
past few weeks having made the
waters of the lake very comfortable
in certain places. Some days large
numbers can be seen playing the
part of mermaids and mermen.
Friday evening the Washington
Marine Band gave one of its splendid concerts on the open lot between the Windsor ��and Alliance
hotels. The organization consisting
of nine pieces had a most appreciative audience. Its tour through
the Slocan country has been a most
successful one.
Messrs. Dixon and Williams, the
young men from Moody's Institute
Chicago, who have been holding revival services in Brooklyn for several weeks, expect to finish their work
here next Sunday evening. They
have made many friends here during their short stay. Beginning
next week they will take up the
same work at Republic, Wash.
2  CONSTRUCTION NOTES.   S
(Continued from First page)
ted. His host of friends will greatly
regret this misfortune.
E. F. Burns, of Burns Kcjordon,
who have a rock contract between
here and Robson, was in town
Tuesday. About 125 men are employed by the firm but they could
easily use 150 more.
Tuesday afternoon the first wagon loads of supplies were sent out
to Burns & Jordan's new contract
on the main tote road. The camp
wilt be located about 25 miles out
and two miles beyond Olson's. The
work consists of two miles of rock
cutting and will give employment to
a large number of men.
Ten miles from Christina lake,
on the tote road trail, a Cascade
city man is putting up a hotel, built
principally of dressed cedar.
At McRae's Landing, the Christina lake terminus of the tote road
trail, Mr. McRae is building a log
store which will soon be ready for
business.
Genelle's steam tug Fawn came
up this lake Monday evening from
the site of the new mill now build-
nig four miles from Robson and returned next day.
During the last week the forces
at all the camps have been materially increased and more men are coming in all the time.
Part of the machinery has arrived
for Genelle's new saw mill near
Robson and in a few days will be
turning out dimension timbers fur
the numerous bridges along the line
A lot of lumber for roofing was taken down from Brooklyn.
Work on the new C. P. R. machine shops has begun at Revelstoke
and will be steadily prosecuted till
they are fully finished, which will
be about October next. The buildings will be very substantial. Then
the C. P. R. will have established
at Revelstoke railway interests that
many a young city would give large
bonuses and long tax exemptions Io
obtain.
L. M. LIVINGSTON
fi COMPANY.
General
Merchandise
Groceries,
Provisions,
Gent's
Furnishings,
Hardware.
Brooklyn and Deer Park, B. C.
BROOKLYN
HOUSE
McDonald & Bolan, Props.
First-class in
all respects.
First Streel. Brooklyn, B. C.
Park ttotel.
Freriurick A: Peterson, frops.
Nearest Hotel to the
Dock,
Good Clean Rooms,
Everything First-class,
Front Street. Brooklyn, n. c.
Steam Yacht
MYRTLE B.
���" Capt. C. BenJItlcld. ���
Makes Daily trips
TO ROBSON
Leaving Brooklyn at 8 a. m.,  and
stopping at all intermediate points.
Returning, leave   Robson
at 2:00 p. m.
KOOTENAY
WIRE WORKS CO.
TRAIL, B. C.
/
- Manufacturers of-
Bed Springs, Mattresses and
�� �� Cots. �� ��
For Sale by all Furniture Dealers.
SHAW & SHAW,
D��aief b In
Hay, Feed,
Produce &
Vegetables
Ff .indies at Salvor) rTfrti an,d ShbttWap, 0. O.
Brooklyn, B. C.
C. E. MALLETTE & CO.
Wholesale dealers in
Fruits, Vegetables, Feed, and
Produce, kLt. Fresh Fruits
Received Daily.
MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
Baker Street,
Nelson, B. C.
P. Burns & Co.,
WHOLESALE
MEATS
BROOKLYN,
B. C.
-K-
HOTEL
H-
ANDERSON.
MRS. H. Y. ANDERSON,  Prop.
Ratesf$1.50 to
$2.00 per day.
The Dining Room is under the management of
Mrs. H. V. Anderson. The Table is supplied
with the Best the market affords ::::::::
Good Airy Rooms ���*��� -f Clean Beds
First-class Bar in connection
St. Louis Beer Pabst Beer... Schlitz Beer
Alliance Hotel.
NELSON & JOHNSON, Props.
Railroaders'Headquarters
Fine WINES, LIQUORS      DINING ROOM IN CON-
and CIGARS. NECTION.
irst Street, Brooklyn, B. C.  ^J*
Brooklyn Exchange.
AUNE & HOVEN, Props.
Fine Wines Liquors  and  Cigars
Comfortable Rooms
GIVE US A CALL..
.BROOKLYN, B. C.
CENTRAL HOTEL
FIRST STREET, BROOKLYN, B. C.
Best brands of Wines,
Liquors and Cigars
BLOMBERG & DAHL,
Proprietors
W. H.GRAHAM
J. H. McMANNUS
JUST WHAT YOU
1%/ EEF f^ F^ ��� ��� * ^"r Wl'^ "sx"r/t'tf ���*'"''* tottttdt*
/ V Emmi Mmmti Ms^kWm m m Staple and Fancy
GROCERIES,   BOOTS,   SHOES,
CLOTHING, UNDERWEAR,
Tents,     Blankets,    Canned Goods,     Cured Meats,    Etc.
PRICES ALWAYS RIGHT.
GIVE US A CALL...
*2.   rMrXIXI9   Ot   \+\J.,   BROOKLYN, B.C.
COMING!
WAR-EXTRA
ILLUSTRATED
..CIGAR..
ASK FOR IT.    ASK FOR IT
A. B. GRAY, Nelson, Agent British Columbia.
iWi
International Hotel.
Front Street, Brooklyn; B. C.
Headquarters for Railroad Men
Bar supplied with Best brands WINES, LIQUORS and CIGARS.
Everything New and First-Class.
Best Table in Town-. ���~_���������~���~~~ Rates Reasonable
GRAHAM & McMANNUS,  Proprietors.
Hoffman House.
Coughlin & McDonald, Props.
��ntt9S9����
Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
BEST SCOTCH HOUSE IN THE CITY.
EVERYTHING FIRST-CLASS.
Front Street,
Brooklyn, B. C.
COSMOPOLITAN HOTLL.
Linderman & Anderson, Props.
Bar stocked with Finest Wines, Liquors # Cigars.
.GIVE US A CALL...
Front Street.
Brooklyn, B. C.
9S9eSS9S9696SSSSSS969SSSSS
Aerated Waters.
��� ALL   KINON ���a
Pabst Bohemian Beep.
SYRUPS, ETC.
THORPE & CO., Ltd., Victoria, Vanpouver, Nelson. MR. TURNER OUT
Robert Beaven Called to Form
a New Cabinet.
MR.  MclNNES DOES   IT
Lieutenant Governor Thinks An
Independent Can Form a Satisfactory Government
Victoria, B. C, August 8.���The
lieutenant governor today called
upon Robert Beaven to form a new
provincial government, and Mr.
Beaven has undertaken the task,
it is understood that the lieutenant
governor acted on his own responsibility in the matter. Mr. Beaven
has not been a member of the legislature since 1894, when he was
deftated at the general elections.
At the election just held he was
again defeated in Victoria, where
he stood as an independent. Mr.
Beaven was minister of lands and
works from 1872 to 1876, finance
minister from 1878 to 1882, and
premier from 1882 to 1883, when
his ministry resigned.
THE  REASON   WHY.
Lieutenant Governor Mclnnis has
intimated in an interview that the
reason for his course of action was
respect for the present government.
He says that it appeared to him
that the result of the elections did
not show sufficient confidence on
the part of the people to justify the
government in making further expenditures or appointments and that
on the 14th of July he notified the
premier to that effect. The government, however, kept on its
usual course, So this morning the
lieutenant governor asked for the
resignation of the ministry. Since
the opposition did not appear to be
united on any leader he had sent
for Mr. Beaven. It is understood
that Mr. Beaven will ask for and be
granted  an immediate dissolution.
Mr. Beaven is an independent,
says an exchange, but at present is
not a member of the legislature.
He is, however, one of the best
known men in British Columbia
politics, having resided in the province for many years. He came to
the Pacific coast in crown colony
days and since his arrival has
played an important part in the
government of this province. Until
1894 he was a member of every
parliament since confederation. Mr.
Beaven was premier of British Columbia from June 13, 1882 to January 30, 1883, when he was succeeded by Hon. William Smithe.
But as early as December, 1872, he
held the portfolio, that of lands and
works in the Walkem ministry.
The defeat of his party in 1883
placed Mr. Beaven and his followers
in opposition, and, as a natural
consequence, the once leader of the
government became the leader of
the opposition. T!ie Beaven party
continued in opposition until its
leader was defeated at the polls in
the 1894 elections. He was then
succeeded by C. A. Semlin, the
present leader of the opposition.
It will thus be seen that Mr.
Beaven occupies a unique position
today in British Columbia politics.
He is not the head of any recognized
party at the time he is called upon
to form a government, but it is
evidently the opinion of Lieutenant
Governor Mclnnes that he is the
only man available to do so and
avoid a general appeal to the country. That he will endeavor to
build up an administration with men
from both sides ol the house is almost a certainty, and it is safe to
say that there will be a general
shifting around politically, the outcome of which it is at present impossible to predict. The public may,
however, rely on Mr. Beaven surrounding himself with the ablest
men available, for he is a shrewd
and able statesman and parliamentarian. His, in all probability will
be a strong government and one
composed of men of long residence
in the province. In opposition Mr.
Beaven gained a reputation for his
very pronounced ideas of economy
in all matters of public expenditure,
and it may be expected by some
that he will not pursue a particularly progressive policy for the general
development of the natural resources
of the province, but as such a policy
is absolutely necessary the Miner
is not at all uneasy on that point.
THE OBSERVATORY.
This beats any camp I was ever
in, for good order and the observance of Sunday, and I have railroaded for twenty-five years.
"That's what she does," remarked
a prominent citizen to the Observer
last Monday. And he was not
alone in this opinion, either, Brooklyn certainly is an orderly place, especially when one considers the
number of people that are gathered
together here fiom all quarters.
Where can another place be found
of similar population and like character, that shows up as favorably?
This state of affairs is undoubtedly
due in large measure to the watchfulness of Constable Forrester and
his capable assistants, backed by
the excellent laws of the province.
Brooklyn is certainly making a good
record.    Let her keep it up.
As a rule the average man has
not lost any bears, either when he
is out in the hills or otherwise. But
apparently there are times when
bruin thinks differently, and proceeds forthwith to argue the point,
generally to the discomfiture of the
individual being hunted. Last Sunday one of the men returning from
a tie camp, about ten miles out,
concluded that he had lost a bear
and finished an immense fellow in
short order, that attempted to dispute his way. There have been a
good many bears seen out along
the line, but they seem to have
some discretion, for usually they
make themselves scarce on the ap-
proac   of anyone.
"There are three classes of men
that can be found in a railroad construction camp," said an old railroader to the Observer this week,
"There are the coming, the going
and the working. And the first
two classes always number a larger
percentage than many people would
believe. There must be one-
third of the laborers who are constantly on the move; that is, going
out to the camps to work. They
wsrk awhile in one place and then
come to town to spend their earnings in what they call a good time,
when they will seek work once
more". An investigation by the
Observer at the offices of the contractors in this city showed that
this unique state of affaii s does generally exist in fact, and that of the
4,000 men expected soon to be employed, at least 1,000 are anticipated to be continually on the "com-
in g and going" list.
"A good many people over in the
Christina lake and in the Boundary
country do not even yet believe that
the C. P. R. is coming over there,"
said a gentleman who had just returned from that section, to the Observer the other day. "There has
been so much talk," he continued,
"in that district for the last three or
four years about railway building,
and so much published along that
line, that some have become skeptical on the subject." If a lew of
the doubting Thomases referred to
could drop down in Brooklyn for a
day or two they would see such activity in construction circles as
would convince them even against
their wills. And if they will travel
over here on the tote road, by the
time they arrive they will be ready
to return again and begin to prepare
for the good times sure to come
soon in that country, as a sequence
of the rail line now under process of
construction.        The Ohserver.
Anpltv.tlon for Liquor Llceuae.
We, the undersigned, Cummings
& Jackson, intend to apply in 30
days time to the gold commissioner
for a liquor license for our hotel, to
be known as the summit house,
about 17 miles from Brooklyn, located on the wagon road to Christina lake. Cummings & Jackson.
Brooklyn, B. C. Aug. 13, 1898.   4t
Hotel Stockholm.
JOHNSON & LOCKHART, Props.
New and Up-to-Date in
Every particular.
Don't fail to give the Stockholm  a call when you  come to Brooklyn.
First Street, BROOKLYN, B. C.
Summit House.
CUMMINGS & JACKSON, Props.
Located 17 miles from Brooklyn on the road to
Christina Lake.
Good Accommodations for Man and Beast
Half way to the Lake, and a Comfortable place to stop.
Give us a Call.
When you come to Brooklyn���the Arrow Lake Metropolis-
.. do not forget the..
Columbia Hotel
"McNEIL & HECTOR, Props.
The proprietors are experienced Hotel men, and know  how to cater to
the comforts of travelers and the public generally.
Drop in and see them.
Front Street, (over the Bridge)
BROOKLYN, B. C.
Brooklyn Drug Co.
J. M. PERDUE, V. S., Prop.
Druggist and Stationer
PATENT + MEDICINES, + TOILET + ARTICLES, + PERFUMES,
LEDGERS, + CASH BOOKS, + CIGARS, 4 ETC.
Prescriptions carefully prepared Sole Agent for B. Lawrence's
with Pure Drugs. SPECTACLES.
Merchants' Bank
of Halifax.
Incorporated 1869.
Capital Paid up. 11,500,000.00.   Reserve, Sl.175,000.00
Head Office:  Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Antisonlsh, N. S
Balhurst, N. B.
HridKi'Waler, N. 8.
Cliarlottetmvn, P. B. I
Dorchester, N. B.
Frederictoii, N. B.
GuVBboro, N. 8.
Halifax, X. 8.
Kingston, N. B.
Londonderry, M.S.
BRANCHHS.
Lunenburg. N 8.
Mnltlnnd. N.B.
Mnncloll, N. B.
Montreal. P. Q.
"        West Knd.
���'       Westmount
Nanainio, B. 0.
Nelson, It. C.
Newcastle, N. B.
Pictou, N. 8.
Port Hawkesbury, N. 8.
Hossland, B, 0.
Sackville, N. B.
Shubenacadie, N. S.
Suninierside, P. E. I.
Sydney, N. 8.
St. John, NM.
Truro, N. 8.
Vancouver, B. C.
Victoria, B. C.
W.vmonth. N. 8.
Woodstock, N. B.
A General Banking Business Transacted. Sterling Bills of Exchange
Bought and Sold. Letters of Credit, Etc., Negotiated.
Account, received on th. most (avorabl. term..   Interest .llow.d 0. special
' deposit, and on Saving. B.nk account..
Branches tn British Columbia!
NANAIN0, NELSON, ROSSLAND, VANCOUVER, VICTORIA
A Savings Bank department, lias been established In connection with the
Nelson branch of this bank.
Deposits ot one dollar and upward received, and current rate of interest allowed (at
present 3 per cent, per annum).
George Kydd, Manager, Nelson, B. C.
Canadian Pacific
Railway * Soo
Pacific.
Is titled the Superior Service Line.
And is the Most Direct and Quickest route
to all points East, to Pacific Coast points and
the Popular Mining districts of the Klondike
and the Yukon	
Tourist Cars run Daily, and are Models of
Comfort and Llegance
Ascertain present Reduced Rates and full information by
addressing nearest local agent, or	
?f*^s>W?%Saj
W. F. ANDERSON, Trav. Pass.    gt. Nelson.
E. J. COYLE, Dist. Pass. Agt. Vancouver.
.iiisas.sMsVs��sstsMiisi..��ss��issfislilj
Washing called for and
delivered.
In connection, Hot and
Cold water
Opposite International Hotel, Lake Front..
BROOKLYN, .... British Columbia
LAKE LAUNDRY
BATH HOUSE:::
FURNITURE
Of the Butte Hotel
In Whole or in Part.
Crescent Dry Goods Co., Ltd. Lby.
ROSSLAND, B. C.
*************
fBROOKLYNJ
*ty    Is the Gateway to the    fa
Midway Mines.
Forty Miles of Wagon Road Leading to the Richest
Mineral section in British Columbia,
*
*
*
* AX *
^Starts  from  BROOKLYN.^
Thousands of Workmen have
*
*
f Headquarters, BROOKLYN
Millions of Dollars paid to jt
T Workmen at BROOKLYN. T
BROOKLYN is the New Town on Lower Arrow Lake,
B. C., where the headquarters camp is located for con-
struction work of 105  miles of heavy Railroad
faMj work, costing $4,000,0110.
*
*&    W. Parker, Sole Owner.   #
& BROOKLYN. B. C ^

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