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The B.C. Trades Unionist 1908-12-01

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 THE B. C. TRADES UNIONIST
and   Union   Label   Bulletin.
ISSUED   BY  THE   VANCOUVER  TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL, IN THE INTERESTS OF  ORGANIZED LABOR.
Vol. Ill, No. 12.
VANCOUVER,  B.  C, DEC,  190.\
$1.00 Per Tear.
*} Vancouver Trades and Labor Council Proceedings
t"1'.
Vancouver, B. C, Nov. 5, 1908.
The regular meeting of the Trades
and Labor Council was held tblB evening ln Labor Hall, President Pettipiece
ln the chair.
Credentials were received as follows: Bro. Carpenters, P. W. Dowler
vice Bro. Campbell; Bridge and Structural Ironworkers, Peter Colley vice
Allan Foote; Tailors, Bro. O'Connor
vice A. B. Paterson; Musicians. A.
Evans and Mr. Toombs; Bartenders,
Jas. Mclsaacs, Jas. Edwards and Chas.
Lees.
Communications were received as
follows:
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union
re strike now ln progress. It was decided to extend the musicians what
moral support the council could.
Tailors' Union re condition of the
ball.   Go to executive.
Invitation from B. C. Antl-Tuber-
culosl8 Society re laying cornerstone
of sanitarium at Tranqullle.   Filed.
From parliamentary committee asking that a person be*appointed from
this council and he secure the necessary authority to make out naturalization papers.    Concurred in.
Pattern Makers' Association announcing that they would be affiliated
with this council after next meeting.
Filed.
The parliamentary committee reported having Interviewed Coroner
Jeffs in respect to the death of a Hindu
near McGee station. The- latter had
not considered an inquest necessary,
although It was caused by the block
of the tackle breaking. He had not
examined the equipment'to see If It
was in proper condition. The coroner
experienced great difficulty ln getting
evidence.
The committee appointed to Investigate a complaint made by the proprietor of the Gold Dollar Cafe reported that this man had a Just grievance and should be returned his 15.
On motion It wss referred to the Allied Printing Trades for a report.
���
Reports from Unions.
Tailors���Hewitt on Richards street
is now non-union and will employ none
hut non-union men.
Boilermakers���Delegate announced
thai the gasometer being erected for
the gas company in Grandview was
being done by non-union men.
Dele. McVety of the Machinists'
Union, and who was one of the executive during the recent C. P. R.
strike, addressed the council and
showed some of the causes that were
responsible for the unsatisfactory settlement.
Receipts,     $64.70;      disbursements,
$125.86.
���    ���    *
Vancouver, B. C, Nov. 19, 1908.
The regular meeting of the Trades
and Labor Council was held this evening in Labor Hall, President Pettipiece in the chair.
Communications were received as
follows:
From the parliamentary committee
re civic elections.
From F. G. Morris re civic elections.
From Social Democratic party re'
civic elections.
That of the parliamentary committee suggesting that we take part in
the civic elections, was concurred in
and the other two were filed.
Accounts were ordered paid as follows: Province, $4.50; J. C. Morti-
more, $1.50; interest on mortgage,
$14; expense incurred In fixing up
committee room, $13.70.
The executive committee recommended that steps be taken to redeem
all outstanding certificates against
Labor Hall and that the question of
building be deferred until this has
been accomplished.    Concurred in.
In the matter of the Gold Dollar
Cafe affair, a receipt for $5 was read,
which completely adjusts matters.
Reports from Unions.
Cooks and Waiters���Announced that
they were getting out cards of the fair
houses in the city, bnt before completing these they desired a committee
from this council to assist in squaring
up a couple of houses.
Bartenders ��� Dele. Edwards announced that he was now the business
agent of this organisation. Not a bar
la the city could live, he said, If the
patronage of the union men was withdrawn. He hoped that the union men
would assist fn whatever way they
could.   He also asked that a oommlt-
$'&���#.:���:.
tee of three be appointed to
Patronizing Our
them  in settling    up    with    several
houses.
Tailors���Trade still dull.   Brooks, a
non-union man, had started up again
on Georgia street. Lawson, on the
same street, is also non-union.
The president having called attention to cases of destitution in South
Vancouver, he and the secretary were
appointed a committee to investigate.
They were authorized to spend $10.
The bartenders' delegate donated $5
and would come through with $10
more for such a purpose. The delegates were also Instructed to bring the
matter .Wore their respective unions.
President Pettipiece suggested to
the parliamentary committee the consideration of the inadequate supply of
free school books; election deposits,
and the advisability of getting on the
voters' list.
The secretary was instructed to
write the city council asking that a
referundum vote be taken on the question of an eight-hour day for civic employes and the Insertion of such a
clause in the civic contracts.
The president appointed the organization committee to co-operate with
the bartenders and cooks and waiters.
AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF CAR*
PENTERS AND JOINERS.
PRINTERS' HOME LIBRARY.
The board of trustees of the International Union Printers' Home at ita recent annual session decided to begin
the construction of the library addition
ln honor of the late Congressman Amos
Cummings, who bequeathed to the
home his valuable 5,000 volume library. The basement and first story will
now be completed at a cost of $20,000.
This wil afford room for 1,000 volumes
stored about the building and will
otherwise relieve the crowded condition of the home. Later the second
and third stories will be added at a
total cost of $50,000. The addition will
be of stone, to correspond with the
main structure, erected in 1892. It
will contain an auditorium and other
features and will be 40 by 60 feet.
The trustees also decided to add several acres to the home site for tents
and cottages for the use of printers'
families. The home is full of Inmates
and prosperous.
The first of a series of entertainments to be held during the winter
months under the auspices of the
above society was held on Wednesday
night, November 25th, In the Labor
Hall, when a grand concert was given.
Alderman  Morton  presided.
The program, consisting of fifteen
numbers, included: Selection, "Marl-
tania," by orchestra; baritone solo,
"The Skipper," by D. Mathleson; tenor solo, "McGregor's Gathering," by
Bro. A. Hutchison; soprano solo, "For
All Eternity," by Miss Cuttle; cornet
solo by Mr. Balfour; humorous song,
"All for the Sake of Flnnigan," by Mr.
Graham; duet, "Life's Dream Is O'er,"
by Bros. Key and Phillips; descriptive
piece, "The Smithy," by the orchestrs;
recitation, "The Last Shot," a tale of
the Indian mutiny, by Mr. H. H. Phillips; violin solo, "Echoes from Ayrshire," by Bro. Gray; soprano solo,
"Someone," by Miss Anile; baritone
solo, "True as the Compass," by Bro.
J. Key; humorous song, "The Bruise
of  the  Ancient   Lights,"  by  Bro.  A.
Phillips; "March," by the orchestra.
The orchestra, under the leadership of
Bro. J. Gray, consisted of eight players and were very enthusiastically received, particularly ln "The Smithy."
Each of the other numbers were good,
nearly all having to respond to encores. Mrs. Woods at the piano made
an excellent accompanist, and a great
deal of the success of the evening was
attained by the very able manner in
which she played at that Instrument.
At the conclusion, Bro. Reld thanked
all who had ln any way helped to
make the evening the great success
It was, after which one of the most
pleasant evenings was brought to a
close by all singing the national anthem.
The federal high court of New
South Wales on August 6th declared
the registration of the trade union
label as a trade mark unconstitutional.
m^g
Forgetto Nation the Trade. Unionist
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THI   ���.   C.   TRADES UNIONIST, VANCOUVER,  BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
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Uses this label
And Union men will yet good Union Clothes and good
serTtice from him.   No other place
Christian ^Peterson
834 Pender St. Opposite Orpheum
/
THE   TRUMPET   CALL.
HON. FRANK OLIVER.
...
By James H. Cotton.
Blow  ye tho silver trumpet.
And shout the rally-call;
The long, long night is ending
For the tollers, one and all.
The breezes on the land,
The waters of the sea,
Beat  time  unto  a single  strain-
Earth's workers shall be free.
Fling open wide the doors
On  the sweatshop's  baleful air;
Proclaim the jubilation
To those who'ro dying there.
And call the little children
Forth  from  the thund'rlng  mill;
No golden god shall sacrifice
Their bodies to his will.
Proclaim a year of jubilee,
Throughout the groaning land;
And usher In true liberty���
The brotherhood of man.
Proclaim the Golden Age
Upon old freedom's soil;
Let greedy men no longer steal
The fruits of honest toll.
Away with ev'ry demagogue���
Blind leaders of the blind���
And give us men of heart. Instead,
Of conscience, and of mind.
The battle of the ages
���   Shall be fought and won;
Of they that waste and raven,
This race Is almost done.
A weakling's blood Is water,
A virile man's is red,
And sacred is the toiler's cause
For which his blood Is shed.
Among the speakers who appeared
in Kootenay for Mr. Smith Curtis as
he had already done for Mr. Duncan
Ross in Yale-Cariboo, Is that excellent
friend of organized labor, Hon. Frank
Oliver, minister of the Interior. Mr.
Oliver, as is well known, controls the
Edmonton Bulletin which lie personally edited until he was taken Into the
cabinet. It is the government organ
In Northern .\lberta and does all the
official printing for the Alberta government as well as any that Is done
in that part of the country for the
government at Ottawa. In other
words the Bulletin practically lives on
the government pap which it receives.
Notwithstanding this the Bulletin office is the only "unfair" shop In the
city of Edmonton. Every printing office In that city, except the Bulletin,
recognizes the union and pays the
union scale and therefore has the right
to use the union label. Repeated requests have been made of Mr. Oliver's
paper to recognize the union but all
such approaches have been met with
instant rebuffs. Mr. Oliver and his
paper are determined that they will
have nothing to do with the union.���
Nelson News.
THE  SIGNIFICANT   PARALLEL.
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So blow this silver trumpet
And raise the standard high;
The day of victory has come.
Our triumph now Is nigh.
���...''.    ,
���N. Y. Call.
When
A. M. Stirton says (From Star Dust
to Socialism, p. 20) of the period of
confusion ln which the change from
the feudal system to the capitalist system was being made: "The most drastic and bloody legislation was now Invoked to drill this new-formed proletariat into shape as wage-slaves. Men
found .without work were branded,
mutilated, flogged and hanged. No
finite mind can grasp the horrors of
this period."
Read this over again and then read
just the news given in the daily papers
and perhaps they will give you some
faint realisation of the hell-caldron
that Is seething all about us.
MENTAL  REVOLUTION  FIRST.
The noise of guns Is not all there is
to epochs In the world's history.
Physical force is not the essence, but
merely the accompaniment of revolutions. The resort to physical force is
made by those resisting the revolution.
To illustrate:
Tho French Revolution was the
most thoroughgoing class upheaval
known. The oncoming capitalist class
overturned feudalism, the then existing social order, and enthroned itself.
This was the revolution. It was accompanied by the conquest of the political power by the Third Estate. The
battlefields were the hustings, the
weapon was the ballot. The elections
were hotly contested. Noble and capitalist strove for seats in the Third
House. The capitalists won. Tho
thousands of heads that roled off the
scaffold; the massacres that dyed
France purple; these were Incidents
that occurred AFTER the peaceful
parliamentary victory won by the
capitalists over their feudal lords.
When the victors resorted to physical
force it was for the purpose of keeping what they had won. It was the
defeated feudal government that first
made an appeal to arms. The Civil
War in the United States was the result of the Smith's refusal to abide by
the fiat of the ballot box.
In the instances given It will be noticed that physical force was not resorted to by the revolutionists. Each
revolution was peacefully accomplished by the ballot. It was the overthrown parties thatappealed to the
sword, and the revolutionists victorious at the polls were, as a matter of
course, victorious on the field of physical force also.
Education must precede intelligent
action, otherwise a man will not
know to what purpose to use his weapon. _ Agitation that would call to arms
first is insane. A man does not gain
a knowledge of what Is to be done
from the means by which to accomplish a purpose. Grabbing a gun will*
not make a man better Informed upon
the social question than if he seizes
the ballot.���The People.
THE SAME IN CANADA.
The New York World predicted
some weeks ago that probably fifteen
hundred thousand men would be disfranchised ln the United States this
year as a result of the hard times���
workingmen who have lost their jobs
during the last twelve months and
have had to go from place to place In
quest of employment and have not had
time to acquire a residence qualifying
them to vote. While It Is Impossible
to be at all sure as to the accuracy of
the figures, there can be no doubt that
this has happened ln an enormous
number of cases, more than in any
previous national election. And it
cannot be doubted that the Socialist
Party suffered more than any other
from this cause.
MANY   QUESTIONS   TERSELY   ANSWERED.
By Will R. Shier.
"What is the difference between the
Socialist party and tbe Independent
labor parties?"
The difference between revolution
and reform!
��� ���    ���
"How will the transfer of capital
from private to public hands take
place���by compensation, confiscation
or competition?"
In whatever way the majority may
decide!
��� ��� ���
"How will this or that thing be
managed under Socialism?"
The people of tomorrow will doubt*
less be competent to manage their
own affairs without consulting the
cut-and-drled plans we of today may
be presumptions enough to draw up.
��� ���   ���
"What have Socialists done besides
criticizing the existing order of
things?"
They have organized a world-wide
political movement of the working
class whose voting strength has in*
creased from 67,000 in 1867 to nearly
8,000,000 in 1907; produced a scientific
and philosophical library such as no
other organization, the Christian
church excepted, can boast of; mould
ed public opinion to an extent that Is
incalculable; wrung reforms from capitalist governments which only the
fear of revolution would have made
them grant; prevented wp-s between
nations by their timely Interposition;
and inspired millions of working people with an ideal which makes them
sturdy, think and work in a cause
that will benefit all humanity as well
as themselves.
An
iv Pull
sre the most comfortable suspenders because the principle
st their back adjusts itself to
every bend of the body. Every
pair guaranteed. Look tor
"Pi-wtdemt" on the buckles. Trimmings can*
slot rust lladeheavyor
light, wide or narrow.
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Patronizing Our Advertizers
���t Forget to Mention the Trades Unionist
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THI   1.   C.   TRADI8 UNIONIST, VANCOUVER. RRITI8H COLUMBIA.
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Patronise
THE SPROTT-SHAW
BUSINtSS INSTITUTE
836  Hastings  St.,  Vancouver.
If you wish a first-class
course in Bookkeeping, Commercial Law, Penmanship,
Gregg Shorthand, Pitman Short
hand. Touch Typewriting,
Mechanical and Civil Engineering and Telegraphy.
Instruction Individual
Teachers all Specialists
R. J. SPROTT, B. A., Principal
H.  A.   SCRIVEN,   B.A.,   Vice
President.
J. R.  CUNNINGHAM,  Sec.
XL
AMERICAN  FEDERATION
OF LABOR HA8 CONCLUDED
1908 CONVENTION
President     Oompers    Re-elected���Toronto Convention City for 1909.
President���Samuel Oompers, Washington, D. C.
First Vice-President���James Duncan,
Quincy, Mass.
Second Vice-President���John Mitchell. Spring Valley, 111.
Third Vice-President���James O'Con-
nell, Washington, D. C.
Fourth Vice-President���Max Morris,
Denver, Colo.
Fifth Vice-President���D. A. Hayes,
Philadelphia, Penn.
8lxth Vice-President, William D. Hu-
ber, Indianapolis, Ind.
Seventh Vice-President, Joseph F.
Valentine, Cincinnati.
Eighth Vice-President, John R. Al-
pln, Boston Mass.
Fraternal delegates to .the British
Congress���John P. Frey, Editor of the
Moulder's Journal, and B. A. Larger,
of the United Qarment Workers of
America.
Fraternal delegate to Canadian
Trades Congress, 1909 convention at
Quebec���Jerome Jones, of the Georgia
Federation of Labor and Editor of the
Journal of Labor.
Convention city for 1909���Toronto,
Canada.
The above Is the result of the selection of the American Federation of Labor. The Executive Council, which is
made up of the officers, shows no
change, with the exception of the substitution of John R Alpin for Daniel
O'Keefe, who withdrew.
Mr. Gompers was re-elected to the
office he has held since the organisation of the federation ln 1881, with
the exception of one year.
LYNCH   NOT  AN  APPLICANT.
8CHOOL TRU8TE6 ELECTIONS.
Indianapolis Ind., Nov. 2, 1908.
Mr. Frank A. Kenedy,
Editor The Western Laborer,
Omaha,   Nebraska.
Sir:���In your issue of Saturday, October 31st, the following paragraph appears:
"A. Maurice Low, Washington correspondent of the Boston Herald, in
reporting an Interview with Secretary
of Commerce and Labor Straus, says
that President J. M. Lynch of the I. T.
U. Is an applicant for Frank P. Sargent's position of immigration commissioner. The Boston Herald is a responsible newspaper and Mr. Low
signs his name to his interview. If
Lynch made application for Sargent's
job he is not even in Dan Keefe's
class. Keefe had the nerve to do his
stunt in the open."
I now Quote from the Washington
dispatch under date of October 14th
and signed  by A.  Maurice  Low:,
"Mr. Straus said he had received at
least one hundred applications for tho
place, among them being several applications from men who had been active labor leaders. It is stated that
these include ex-Chief Lynch, of the
Typographical Union."
In the paragraph contained hi your
issue of October 31st and quoted herein, you say that Secretary of Commerce and Labor Straus says "that
President J. M. Lynch, of the I. T. U.,
is an applicant for Frank P. Sargent's
position of immigration commissioner." According ^ to the author of the
canard, A. Jiaurice Low, Secretary
Straus said nothing of the kind. I
have an idea that you knew very well
when you read the Low despatch, the
particular ex-chief of the typographical union Mr. Straus must have had in
mind.
I am also firmly convinced that you
knew that I had. not applied for the
position of commissioner of immigration, nor any other position within the
gift of the Republican party, or any
other party. Stated in other terms, I
believe that you deliberately misrepresented the matter.
Let me also suggest that if you publish any portion of this letter or make
any reference to It, that the letter be
given ln full. If It Is garbled, It will
be another instance of attempted misrepresentation.
Fraternally,
(Signed)    JAMES M. LYNCH.
8PLENDID LABOR VOTE.
Nominations for officers for the ensuing six months of Vancouver Trades
and Labor Council take place on
the first Thursday ln January; elections, Thursday, January 7th. President Pettipiece will not he a candidate
for re-election. A
Result of First Socialist Party Campaign . Very Encouraging.
The result of Macleod district (Alberta) election was declared at Clars-
holm on the afternoon of Saturday
last as follows:
Herron   (Con.)     2,935
Macdonald (Lib.)     2.832
Harrington (Soc.)       662
. Herron's majority over Macdonald Is
802, and over Harrington is 2,273. Total vote polled, 6,229
Our Advertizers Don't
The Socialist party at Seattle Is
again taking a lively interest ln the
educational system of that city. Two
candidates are up for the trusteeship.
Their platform follows:
1. Enough school buildings to be
built immediately to accommodate ali.
Ample playgrounds, baths and gymnasiums. Free medical attendance.
School buildings to be open for public
assemblages when not otherwise in
use.
2. Fewer 'pupils to each teached and
more and better paid teachers.
3. Teachers to be encouraged to organize along labor union lines.
4. Teachers' tenure, permanent during efficiency.
5. Women teachers to be paid the
same salary ~A% men teachers for the
same work.
6. Better salaries for janitors and
other employes.
7. Compulsory attendance of all chll-
dred under fifteen.
8. Free meals and free clothing, if
needed, to keep children from necessity of work.
9. Night schools ln every ward to
accommodate those deprived of an
early education.
10. Greatest attention to be paid to
the lower grades.
11. Free kindergartens for all children between three and six years of
age.
12. A general, scientific, industrial
and physical education guaranteed to
every child.
13. Such a general administration of
the school system as will best serve
the interests of the  working class.
14. School buildings to be constructed by union labor.
INTERNATIONAL    TYPROGRAPHI-
CAL UNION.
The A. F. of L. reports show the following from the I. T. U., June 1st,
1907, to May 31st, 1908: Charters Issued, 61; surrendered, 8. Increases ln
wages were secured through new wage
scales In 83 cities. Strike benefits and
special assistance'to locals, 1667,776.97.
Death benefits, $38,660. Donations to
other unions, $1,075. In March, 1905,
the eight-hour day prevailed ln the
jurisdiction of only 1* unions. As a
result of the general strike which was
inaugurated In August, 1905, the eight-
hour day is now ln force in the jurisdiction of 565 locals.
Under the jurisdiction of what
union shall we place the airship operators?    tf
Na
 :_*	
It. Sauer
Phone 1826.
Eagle Sign
works
Neat, Reasonable and Quick
63 Cordova St. West
IN   THE  INTERIOR.
Things have been very quiet In
Fernie since the' election, however,
there has been plenty of rain, and of
course the streets here are thick with
mud. It Is about time that the city
people got a move on and did something to remedy this state of affairs.
Since the fire, Fernie has been the
dumping ground for all out of works
ln and around this locality, and although a great deal of building has
been going on, the labor market has
been constantly overstocked, and my
advice to labor power pedlars Is to
give this place a wide berth, especially as living is very high in this district.
Having occasion to visit Cranbrook,
I found that the Socialist movement
had not taken much hold in that place.
However, I hunted up a couple of Socialists and there ought soon, especially for a town of that size, to be a local
organized.
From Cranbrook I visited all places
enroute to Fernie, and I must say I
met many men searching for employment, which I am afraid they never
found. Most of the lumber companies
through here have made their- men
sign contracts to the .effect that no
wages would be paid until May 1st,
1909, the rate of wages being $1.75 to
$2.25 per diem, with incidental stoppages of 75 cents per day for board
and other stoppages for poll tax, doctor, library, etc., besides have to buy
at the company's store at their price.
It is safe to assume that the wages
received next May, after six months
hard toll, won't amount to a great
deal, and it is only on these conditions
that the mills and camps can be work*
ed this winter, owing to bad trade.
The men are enjoined to stand by the
company at one particular place, and
the bills posted up state that all
wages come from labor. Well, who
would have thought it, but they
omitted that all wealth came from
labor. However, I had conversation
with quite a few men in my travels,
and it Is now a certain fact thst tor
them Socialism is the only remedy for
unemployment.
F. HYATT.
sVo*%^l>
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THI   8.  a  TRADI8 UNIONIST, VANCOUVIR, 1RITI8H COLUMBIA.
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Suits or Overcoats $15
Made-to-order, made-to-flt, made-
to-measure, made-to-satlsfy. Union
men should wear Union Made
Clothes, If they want the best. Our
Clothes are right. Our prices are
right.    Leave your measure with us.
The Scotland Woolen Mills Company
Tbe Big Union Tailors
8TRIDE8 MADE BY
LABOR MOVEMENT
Workers Organizing In Canada,  Says
Oompers.
Dominion    Secretary    of   Trade*   and
Labor Congress  Reports  Enthusiastic   Progress
At the meeting of the American Federation of Labor at Denver, tbe annual
report of President Gompers, which
deals at considerable length with his
so-called political stand, as well as
other Important matters affecting the
Federation, was read.
Referring to the Labor movements
ln Canada, Mr. Gompers says: "It Is
with satisfaction that I can report the
great growth ln the labor movements
among our co-workers ln the Dominion
of Canada. Those entrusted with the
affairs of the movements both local
and provincial, in the Dominion, are
so earnest and'loyal that they see to it
that the interests of the workers are
promoted both nationally and internationally.
"It Is interesting to note tnat despite the efforts of those who would
sunder the reciprocal and beneficial
international fraternal relations which
exist among the workers of Canada,
the United States and the entire continent of America, the bonds of unity
and fraternity are constantly and more
firmly cemented. The frequent intercourse of representative labor men
with our fellows' on both sides of the
border, aided hy special organisers.
John T. Flett, and the volunter organisers' work of unification of the aims
and aspiration of the workers are
bringing beneficially economic and material results. The exercise of legislative and political rights must, of
course, always he mutually recognised
and conceded.
"In a report recently made hy the
secretary of the Dominion Trades A
Labor Congress, whoa we honor and
i with us to-day in the capacity
delegates to our conference, -P. M. Draper says: "Without
���jy exaggeration it can be said that
688 Hastings  St.
never ln the history of the labor movements in Canada has such progress
been shown in the organization of the
workers. The knowledge of power
when united has swept throughout the
length and breadth of the country and
despite the old moth-eaten appeals to
prejudice and self-interest, despite
misrepresentation, persecution and coercion, the forces of labor have continued to unite.
" To-day the organized workers in
Canada breathe the same aspirations,
harbor the same ambitions and struggle for the same end, namely, the elevation and betterment of the masses
of toilers who suffer, not only from
the 'slings and arrows' of outrageous
fortune, but from the oppressive and
unjust laws and their prejudicial ad-
niinistraton. uncivilized conditions surrounding the every-day worker, men,
women and children and more than
the thousands and one ills that affect
the flesh.
" 'Unbounded enthusiasm Is the keynote of the movement In Canada. In
every province throughout Canada,
from British Columbia In the west to
Nova Scotia in the east, the uplift has
begun, the eyes of the tollers are at
last opened to the futility of dependence upon others than themselves.
They see the necessity for strong international organizations. The urgency for sending their own representatives to the legislature to take
part in making the laws which they
must obey, has appealed to them as
never before. A healthy optimism inspires the whole movement ln such a
way as to give promise of the beneficial results.
" 'The two strongest features of the
labor movement In Canada at this
juncture are: First ��� Unswerving
fidelity to the cause of international
trade unionism; and, secondly, an
equal loyalty to Independent political
action support of the candidature or
representative of labor.'"
Money talks all the time. It can be
as an effective "striker" if only
spent for union- purposes.���Seattle
Union Record.
MILLI0N8 EXPENDED FOR
FIGHTING  EFFECT8 ONLY
Noted Professor Proves Economy and
Wisdom of Spending  Lesser Sum
and Removing Cause.
Acording to Professor Irving Fisher,
of Yale, in a paper at the International
Congress on Tuberculosis recently held
In Washington, the "great white
plague" costs In hard cash over $1,000,-
000,000 a year.
There are several reasons why the
cost is so frightful.
In the first place, more people die
of consumption than anything else.
Professor Fisher estimates that consumption kills 138,000 every year in
the United States.
This is equal to the death from typhoid fever, scarlet fever, diphtheria,
appendicitis metingitis diabetes smallpox and cancer all put together.
Then again, it generally takes three
years to die, during which time the
poor victim can earn little or nothing.
Finally, the scourge picks out is
victims when they are young men and
young women, at the very time they
are beginning to earn money.
The cost of such Items as doctors'
bills, medicines, nursing and loss of
earnings before death comes amounts
to over $2,400 in each case, while the
earning power which "might" have
been" if death had not come brings
the total cost to at least $8,000.
If this is multiplied by the 138,000
deaths we find the cost is bigger than
the almost incalculable sum of $1,000,-
000,000.
Professor Fisher estimates that over
half of this cost generally falls on the
luckless victim himself; but the cost
Is over $440,000,000 a year to others
than the consumptive.
This enormous loss falls on the family and friends, or on charitable or
public institutions.,
As a matter of self-defense it would
be worth while to the community, Professor Fisher shows, in order to save
merely a quarter of the lives now lost
by consumption, to invest $5,500,000,-
000.
At present only a fraction of 1 per
cent of this money is being used to
fight the disease.
PRESSMEN'S   UNION.
The pressmen and assistants make
the following showing for the year In
a report to the A. F. of L. just published: Charters issued, 32; surrendered, 13. Gain in- membership, 940.
Number of strikes, 31; won, 5; compromised, 24. Number of persons involved, 1,152. Fifty cents average
gain in wages per member per day.
Eight-hour day secured in 174 cities
in the past year without strike. Attempt to reduce wages were successfully resisted. Cost of strikes, $3,450.
Death benefits, $13,000. Donations to
other unions, $1,800.
A GOULISH  FAL8EHOOD.
There Is something particularly hideous in the statement of a Chicago
press agency In the statement that
"only drunkards' children are hungry
in the windy city."
As if the fact that the children of
those who do the work of the world
were starving were not enough of a
burden. It is necessary that they should
be mocked by those whom their toll
has enriched. It would be bad enough
even if it were true. Even if it were
a fact that the workers, worn out by
overwork and the horror of out of
work, had sought refuge in the insensibility of intoxication, the indictment
would still lie against those who had
exploited them.
But the whole thing Is a lie. In spite
of the efforts of "scientific philanthropists" who have prostituted themselves
to the service of those who live upon
the labor of the fathers of these children in order to show that the vices
of the workers themselves are responsible for the condition of their children, the fact becomes more and more
evident every day that it Is lack of opportunity to work and produce that is
responsible for the hunger of fifteen
thousand school children.���New York
Call.
BOOKBINDERS' UNION.
In an official report the Bookbinders' union makes the following showing to the A. F. of L. for the current
year: Charters-issued, 8. Strike for
the eight-hour day throughout the
trade was inaugurated October 1st.
1907, and it has been successful to the
extent of 85 per cent., 550 members
still on strike to make the effort entirely successful. Cost of strike,
$165,508.95.    Death benefits, $8,250.
I
���
When
Our Advertizers Don't
the Trades Unionist
��� I
THE   B.  C.   TRADES UNIONIST. VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA.
��
investigate and buy your clothes from tbe
stote that handles uuion-made clothes.
We carry labels on all our goods.
Sole Ag nts tor
PEABODY'S RAILROAD KING OVER-
ALLS   AND   SARGENT   GLOVES
(Johnston, Kerfoot
��Co.
123 and 127 Hastings SL W    <
THE TRADE8 AND LABOR
CONGRESS OF CANADA
By  P.  M. Draper
The Trades and Labor Congress of
Canada owes Its Inception to the forethought, the wisdom and the active initiative of the organized labor elements of Toronto, exercised through
the Central Trades Assembly, the prototype of the present District Trades
and Iaabor Council of the centre of
patience, perseverance and unflinching
adhesion to sound trade unionism and
the cause of ALL who work for wages.
In 1873���thirty-four years ago���the
Trades Assembly of the city of Toronto Issued a call for the holding of a
convention of representatives of the
trades unions of the country. The appeal was well responded to throughout
Ontario, and on the 23rd of September
of that year the first organized Labor
Congress of Csnsda began Its sessions
ln the Trades Assembly Hall, ln Toronto, there being forty-three delegates in attendance. These delegates
��� .Represented trade organizations ln Toronto, Hamilton, London, Ottawa, St.
Catharine, Seaforth, Bowmanville and
Cobourg, all ln Ontario.
* That the "labor men," who met for
the first time ln Toronto ln 1873, were
fully seised of the needs of tbe time
is evidenced by the nature and scope
of the subjects upon which the Congress went upon record on that occa-
r slon. and among the principal of these
^ -were resolutions in favor of a law
-��� against  the  employment  of  children
���-S.-''of ten years of sge ln factories, mills
end   other   manufacturing   establlsh-
a% CjMents where machinery is used; the
"\�� ^enactment of an equitable and Just
^^Sleu law; arbitration in law disputes;
.
bP�� -
DEMAND THIS LABEL
Ai Printed Matter.
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mawmwmojm
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a Saturday half-holiday; a regular
system of labor organization throughout the Dominion; a more stringent
apprentice law; the appeal of the
Criminal I.aw Amendment Act; the
abrogation of the contract system in
connection with the Dominion and
Provincial prisons; a nine-hour working day, and the creation of a bureau
of laws and statistics. Resolutions
condemning overtime work and Imported cheap labor (labor imported
under contract), were also concurred
in.
The Canadian I-abor Union met at
Ottawa (the capital of the Dominion),
in 1874, and through the courtesy of
the premier���then the Right Honorable Sir John A. Macdonald���held Its
three days' session ln room 16 of the
House of Commons, and during which
It changed the title to that of "The
Canadian Labor Congress."
The third of August, 1875, found the
Congress meeting ln the city of St.
Catharines. This session also lasted
three days, and the subjects dealt with
were mainly those which had engrossed theattehtion of the Toronto and Ottawa conventions of 1873 and 1874.
Although the city of Toronto was
chosen as the meeting place for 1876,
there was no session held that year,
nor until seven years afterwards. An
epoch of idust rial depression was severely In evidence during these years,
and al forms of labor organization suffered more or less as a consequence���
even the Toronto Trades Assembly became dormant. In 1881, however, the
International Typographical Union
held its annual session in the "Queen
City" of Toronto. Taking advantage
of the occasion, the "stalwarts" of
that municipality called a public meeting of workingmen, and at which the
most prominent and eloquent speakers were delegates to the International
Typographical Union convention. The
result was ss anticipated, and the Toronto Trades Council was ushered into
existence, and hss continued doing admirable work ever since.
Despite the fact that "The Canadian
Labor Congress" had not held a session since 1876, its usefulness within
the scope of ita constitution had not
been lost sight of, and Its resuscitation
was merely a matter of time. Consequently, it was no matter ot surprise
���indeed it was looked for���when Toronto Trades and Labor Council, with
Mr. Charles March as president, assumed the responsibility of issuing a
call for a Trades and Labor Congress
in that city, ln December, 1883. On
this occasion some forty-five delegates
were in atendance. and Mr. March was
elected president. He was also president of the subsequent congress of
1886 and 1887. The principal subjects
which called for resolutions at the
Congress meeting in 1883, were the
organization of trades councils, extension of magistrates' powers respecting
employes' wages, the Insolvency Act,
cumulative vote, land grants tax exemptions, government aid to colleges,
abolition of piece work, board of arbitration in labor disputes, organization of female labor, bureau of labor
statistics, the temperance question,
Torrens' system of land transfer. Employers' Liability Act, and factory Inspection. The Congress adjourned,
subject to call again by the Trades and
Labor Council of Toronto.
In  1886 Toronto Trades and  Labor
P. M. DRAPER
Council deemed the time oportune, and
again summoned a meeting of the Congress, to begin on the 14 th of September of that year. This was the first
Congress at which any other province
but Ontario was represented, the city
of Quebec, in the Province of Quebec,
being honored in the person of R. H.
Leahy who represented Local Assembly No. 4003, K. of L., of that city.
There were no less than one hundred
and nine delegates at this Congress ln
1886. Among the principal subjects
considered and passed upon at the
1886 Congress were labor representation In Parliament and the Leglsla
tures of the different provinces, manhood suffrage, property qualification
for aldermen, amendments to the Municipal Act, the publication of assessment lists ln dties and towns, the
raising of the exemption of income tax
from $400 to 1800, the better enforce
ment of existing factory laws, and the
abolition of the senat branch of the
Parliament of Canada. A resolution
wss also concurred ln "that It Is the
duty of the Government to enact a law
to regulate the hours ot al workers In
the employment of the state, as well as
the hours of those employed by all
public bodies and companies and
others obtaining contracts or concessions from Parliament, and that eight
hours being the maximum time of the
working day in such cases." At this
session the name of the body wss
changed to that of "The Trades and
Labor Congress of the Dominion of
Canada." Subsequently at the Congress held in London In 1895, the title
was once more changed, this time to
"The Trades snd Labor Congress of
Canada," which it still retains.
Every year since 1886 the Congress
has held its annual session regularly,
and widened its scope of deliberation
and action as the exigencies of time
required. ���
So as to be in full accord with both
the British Trade; Congress snd the
American Federal ion of Labor, the
Trades and Labor Congress of Canada,
at Its annual session ln Berlin in 1902,
exchanged the word "compulsory" and
substituted the word "voluntarily" ln
clause 13 of Its platform of principles.
As a consequence, the clause Is now
as follows: "13. Voluntarily arbitration of labor disputes."
Being an acknowledged necessity,
the Trades and Labor Congress of
Canada has corns to stay, and Its future usefulness snd power for good
will be ln proportion to the confidence
reposed in It, the widespread unity behind It, and the willing and steadfast
support accorded It. Granted these
essential adjuncts, there can be no
doubt but thst the Trades and Labor
Congress of Csnsda will always be
found a vigilant and valiant "sentinel
on the tower," watching over and safeguarding the rights and the Interests
of the working people of the whole Dominion.
%/Lmas
{Presents
*\ We have now a splendid assort-*
ment of Fancy Suspenders,
Neckwear and  all  lines of
Men's  Furnishings, suitable
for the Holiday season.
Special Prices on all Lines
of Clothing:
*} Give us a call and see our die-
play before purchasing elsewhere, we can save you money.
:-N
* CO.
605 Naatla��a Street Waat
J
Dont Forget to Mention tha Trades Unionist
M.
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THE   B.   C.   TRADES UNIONIST, VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA.
3
m
'"���;
The Royal Bank
Of Canada
Capital    f 3,000,000
Iteserve  Fund   ..       4,300,000
Total   Assets    46,400,000
Five Branches in Vancouver.
Seventeen Branches in British  Columbia.
Savings Bank
Departments
At all    Branches    up-to-date;
No delays-���Prompt attention  to the Smallest
of Accounts.
Interest Paid 4 rones
Each Year.
WAITERS' UNION.
The waiters wil lbe Interested to
know how their union is progressing,
as the following report to the A. F. of
L. will show: Number of charters issued, 114; surrendered, 53. Number
of strikes, 17; won, 16. Number of
persons involved, 12,248; benefited,
12,230; not benefited, 18. In several
cities the ten-hour day was secured
for members who had formerly worked on an average of 12% hours per
day. Gains in other respects: Improvement In sanitary conditions. Cost
of strikes, $19,870.30. All proposed reductions in wages were successfully
resisted except in one case. Death
benefits, $26,150. Sick benefits. $24.-
608.48.    Donations   to  other   unions,
���
ELECTION ECHOES.
Now that the federal elections, both
in Canada and the United States, are
over, a few figures in connection therewith will doubtless be of Interest to
clarion readers who are so far removed from the scat of war that they
were unable lo obtain any details of
a reliable nature. The Socialist Party
of Canada had eight candidates lu tbe
field In eight districts, la four of
these districts it was the first attempt
of the, Socialist party to nominate candidates, and the second in tbe remaining four. The number of votes
polled was 8257, or 15 per ceut. of the
total vote or nearly double the vote of
four years ago. As an evidence of the
almighty cinch the workers have wheu
once they get next to themselves, the
vote In some of the towns and polling
stations in British Columbia aud Alberta sre given herewith:
Town or Polling 8ta.   Con.   Lib.   Soc
Fernie    126     129     155
McGuigan        3 2       12
Whitewater   14   ���    13       17
Coal Creek    22       27      105
Silver Cup Mine     5       13       80
Ymir     15       12       18
Salmo     17       12       17
.Michel     23       22       90
West Fernie    2        7       18
Moyie     60       63       85
Phoenix     81     101       88
Bellevue   36       28       64
HUlcrest     32 8       83
Coleman No.  1 53       51       66
Coleman  No.  2 55       30       87
Cobble Hill   17        7       19
Ladysmlth    116     129     186
Nanalmo    262     370     715
Northfield        9       15       78
The total vote ln the United States
increased about 50 per cent, over four
years ago, and while the increase in
the large cities was small, the vote in
some of the smaller towns and polling
stations was remarkable. Here are a
few samples:
Town or Polling Sta.   Rep.   Dam. Soc
Sharon, W. Va. 392     465     506
Munhall, Pa.   64       27       89
Lead, S. D  57       21       65
Mucla. Colo 23       69       99
Detroit. Minn.     0 1       16
Whittaker. Pa.   64       27       89
Watervllle. Minn 122       55     126
Somerton, Arts.     1 1       12
Hiteman. Iowa    153     134     234
Nuda,  Colo  23       46       99
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION.
Judging from the row being kicked
up hi Germany becauae of the last out-
verbosity upon the part of
Bill,** It looks as though brlc-
collectors might noon have en
opportunity of getting a second hand
emperor at a reasonable figure.    .^:,,
Typographical Union (June 1. 1907,
to May 31, 1908).���Charters Issued, 51;
surendered, 8. Increases in wages secured, through new scales in 83 cities.
Strike benefits and special assistance
to locals. $567,775.97. Death benefits.
$38,650. Donations to other unions.
$1,075. In March. 1905, the eight-hour
day prevailed ln the Jurisdiction of
only 79 unions. As a result of the general strike which wee inaugurated ln
August, 1905. the eight-hour day la now
in the Jurisdiction of 565 lo-
THE TRUTH.
(But He Dossnt Know It!)
Speaking of business and sentiment,
the Herald would call the attention of
tbe individual voter in the Kooienafe
und Yale-Cariboo to the tact that In
all matters political, corporations are
governed ln their actions entirely by
business. This is the case In the
United States, snd this is the case in
Canada. Then why should the laboring man, who has himself to look after,
not have the same privilege without
fear of criticism or comment. That is
why ethe Individual voter of the
Kootenay and Yale-Cariboo should
stop and consider before he casts his
vote on the 12th of thla month. The
corporations will cast their votes, or
rather their influence, for their own
interests and those Interests alone.
The sooner that the laboring man does
the same, the sooner will he be better
off.���Cranbrook Herald.
8HALL UNION MEN BE FINED AND
IMPRISONED  FOR  TELLING
THE TRUTHT
The Butterlck Publishing Company
Is endeavoring to have the New York
Supreme Court fine and Imprison the
officers of Typographical Union No. 6
because they have told the truth about
the unfair stand of that concern toward organised labor. No. 6 has not
at any time asked, snd never will ssk,
you to boycott Butterlck products; but
Big 6 pointed out the fact that on
November 24, 1905, this firm locked
out their union employees snd have
ever since employed non-union men at
low wages and for long hours. No. 6
Is a law-abiding body and Insists that
It had legal and moral right to tel you
that you do not have to purchase goods
made by non-unionists. Furthermore,
no judge can compel you, by Injunction
or otherwise, to give It. When the law
is invoked to aid this concern in a
purely business disagreement with its
employees It Is a sure indication that
organised labor is exercising Its in-
slienable right to spend the wages
earned under union conditions with
those dealers who fsvor union conditions.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO. 6.
New York. October 1. 1908.
According to Bradstreets the number of business failure ln the United
States for the nine months ending
September 30, was 12,691, with liabilities of $244,835,494. This is an Increase of 55 per cent, in number and
110 per cent, in the amount of liabilities over the corresponding period of
1907. At least the bankruptcy business is showing a marked and healthy
increase, even though other lines may
he experiencing a dull season.
WhenPatr
_4ftv  ��� m        ____ ___���    _��� ��� _^___a m __ft       m
"If yen git knocked out of one plan,
you want to git yerself another right
quick, before yer spenite has a chance
to fall-
sinful to fuse."
The Ovsfer Sav
Restaurant
FOR OYSTERS
IN SEASON
Cor.  of Carrsll & Cordova Sts.
P. L. Cancallen,
Tel. 798 Proprietor
THE  AWAKENING.
Down through the weary centuries
A bitter lot they've borne.
The past was one long night to them,
A night without a morn.
But see. the blsck sky turns to grey,
The welcome dawn appears.
Our class wakes from the fitful sleep
It's slept five thousand years.
They wake, they rise, the wide world
o'er.
By common int'rest stirred;
By common hope  their   hearts   are
moved.
Their swelling shout is heard
In fear by master, pope and czar.
Who dared the end of night,���
As loathsome things in darkness bred
Shrink from the growing light.
Clsss rule's long night Is soon to end.
Our day Is breaking fast ���
The day ln which Joys shall replace
The mis'ries of the pasL
Hail to the light of liberty,
Hail to the Coming Day,
Hail.   Sun   of   Hope,   before   whose
beams
The sorrows flee away.
WILFRID QUIBBLE.
EXPRE88ED  IN  DOLLARS.
The A. F. of L. reports shows the
following benefits paid to members
during the past year:
Death benefits  .$1,257,244.89
Death   benefits   to    members' wives         31.390.00
Sick benefits      593,541.34
Traveling benefits        51,093.86
Tool insurance          5,871.63
Unemployed benefits     205,254.31
Total    ..$2,144,375.43
.���'*��
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roccr for it.
	
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THE   B.   C.  TRADES UNIONIST. VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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.
ORGANIZED LABOR
ENTERS PROTEST
Roysl City Union Men Object to City
Council   Dealing   with   Henderson
Directory Publishers.
A strong protest was made on Fii-
day evening, November 30, by thr
Trades and Labor Council of Now
Westminster against the proposed
granting of a contract for a city directory to the Henderson Directory
Company by the cily council.
The following resolution was passed
unanimously: ".Moved by R. A.
Stoney, seconded by Walter Dodd:
Whereas it appears from reports In
the press that city council of New
Westminster is In negotiation with the
publishers of the Henderson Directory,
ln connection with the proposed publication of a directory of New Westminster; be it resolved: That this
Trades and Labor Council hereby respectfully protests against the city
council entering into any agreement
with said Henderson directory publishers, for the reason that said publishers
are regarded as 'unfair' by the Typographical Union, and also that their
printing for use within this province
is sent outside the province to be performed at less than the union rates of
wages prevailing here; also that a
copy of this resolution be forwarded to
the mayor and council of New Westminster."
Another  Protest.
The chairman of the executive committee of the local Typographical union forwarded the following letter to
the city council, protesting along the
same lines against the city having
dealings with the Henderson directory
people:
To His Worship the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of New Westminster:
Gentlemen: The executive committee of the New Westminster Typographical union having considered the
reports In the press indicating that
your honorable body have been ln negotiation with representatives of the
Henderson company with respect to
the publication of a directory of New
Westminster and the numbering of
this city in connection with that undertaking, have directed me to communicate with you on the subject,
transmitting the protest of the local.
Typographical Union.
I am directed to state that in the
opinion of this union the Henderson
Directory Company are opposed to paying a fair price for the labor called for
in connection with their undertakings,
and also to call your attention to the
fact that in all likelihood the printing
in connection with the proposed directory will be doue in Winnipeg, at an
office leclarcd by the Typographical
Union to be unfair and opposed to the
interests of labor.
Also thut there Is expended in wages
by the publishing firms of this city
about Eight ' Hundred Dollars per
week, for the most part distributed
amongst the business houses of the
city; and that we respectfully suggest
that it would he in the interests of the
city to encourage local industry rather
than to negotiate with the Henderson
Directory Company.
Trusting that you will be so kind as
to give consideration to the views of
the executive of the Union on this subject, I remain,
Your obedient Servant, ,
R.  STONEY,
Chairman  Executive Com.
Conditions  Improve.
The delegates fro mthe various unions reported that busines conditions
in their separate linos were improving.
The need of a hall ln which to meet
was discussed and admitted. It would
be used not only for the Trades and
Labor Council, but for the Individuals
unions. The matter was finally left to
a committee to make enquiries and report. A suggestion was made to endeavor to obtain the old Salvation
Army barracks, but some one thought
that the rent would be too steep.
A resolution was unanimously passed instructing the secretary to send a
letter of condolence to Ross Jamieson
on the death of his brother, the late
Ralph Jamieson, killed in the Interur-
ban  accident recently.
The secretary    was    instructed    to
s
By Insisting Upon cPurchasing
Union Stamp Shoes
You help better Shoemaking conditions.
You get better Shoes for the money.
You help your own Labor Position.
You abolish Child Labor.
Do not he misled
By Retailers who say : " This shoe does not bear the stamp,
but is made under Union Conditions."
- This is False.��� No shoe is Union made unless it bears the
Onion Stamp. '
���NT AM SHOE WORKERS' UNION, 141 lUNMr St, Bastoi, Matt.
JOHN F. Tobin, Pres. CHAS. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas.
Largest
Stock of
Men's
$15 Suits
to pick
from in
the City
We are now showing the largest and best assorted
Stock of $15 Suits for men in the City. Every garment
is made under sanitary conditions, in clean, well-lighted
workrooms, by skilled tailors. DesBrisay Brand Suits
represent the very pick of the clothing world. Tne patterns are new, the styles absolutely correct, the tailoring
first class and the prices low These $15 suits are the best
value ever offered in this city.   Come in snd see them.
The DesBrisay Wardrobe
613 Granville Street
write theacting deputy minister of labor at Ottawa with reference to the
appointment of a correspondent to the
Labor Gazette.
The chair was occupied by the president J. J. Randolph.
AND   LABOR  "GOT   IT.'
Anxious to secure what they knew
to be vital, fearing that "Socialism is
too far in the future," the labor men
in the United States (and Canada, too)
rallied, to Dryan that they might get
"something now.' They got it. Their
vote was split between the two old
parties and the labor men bad the
humiliation of feeling that the man
who bad been backed by their highest
officials has been swept to defeat.
Labor proved that hereafter It must
be Its own friend. It found out that
always a strong enemy receives more
consideration, at least more respect,
than a weak friend.
The panic, too, did Its work In thorough fashion. Thousands who felt Its
pangs and were thus forced to do some
hard thinking were also forced ln their
search for the elusive Job to lose their
franchise, because they changed their
residence. Those whom the panic hit
hardest it also eliminated from political life.���The Call.
EVERETT TYP08. AFTER  NEW
8CALE.
The organizer for the district, F. A.
Rust, Seattle, was summoned to
Everett last Wednesday to assist ln
adjusting Everett union's new scale.
The Everett employers have been
served with a copy of No. 202'b new
scale.
Banks are usually the friends of
scab labor and not favorable to a high
rate of wages. They carry this principle Into their own business and pay
salaries,to some of their clerks that
will scarcely furnish them with cigarettes, neckties and perfumery. If It
were not for the social distinction that
goes with a job In a hank few young
men could be Induced to accept inch
DAVIDSON  MAKES GOOD RUN.
Socialist    Party    Vote    in    Kootenay
Riding Doubled in Four Years.
Goodeve Curtis Davidson
Cranbrook       538 405 131
Columbia        194 155 16
Fernie        291 238 379
Kaslo        225 159 63
Nelson       380 236 167
Revelstoke        396 240 lit
Rossland        396 240 114
Slocan        170 77 115
Ymlr        467 245 163
2920
1979       1260
CIGARMAKERS' UNION.
The Cigarmakers' International
union makes the following showing to
the federation for the year 1908: Charters Issued, 8; surrendered. 11. Gain
In membership, 200. Number of
strikes, 68; final reporta have been received ln but 36; won, 22; compromised, 5; lost, 9. Number of persons
Involved, 3,426; benefited, 1,055; not
benefited, 170. Thirteen strikes were
against reductions in wages, 6 were
successful, 1 compromised and 1 lost.
Death benefits, $203,500; sick benefits,
$173,605.67; traveling benefits. $50.-
063.86; unemployed benefits, 860,000.
As result of the Improvement in the
conditions of the members brought
about by the organisation, death rate
from tuberculosis has been reduced 16
per cent, and length of life increased
6 per cent, in males and 8 per cent, in
wives of members.
MUSICIANS   UNION.
Y
The musicians' report to the A. F.
of L. is as follows: Charters issued,
50; surrendered, 10. Marked improvement in conditions of members In the
past ten years.
.
employment.���Greenwood Ledge.
���   ������ ������'   -'"..���_.    - _ _���       j_
en"
Demand Uliis Label
���
On AN Printed Matter
��� i
Forget to M ; ���
************
*******W*iW***a^^
������    ' ���.'    "   ���
I"
THE   B.   C.   TRADE8 UNIONIST, VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA,
.
I
The Trades Unionist
Issued by the Vancouver Trades and
Labor Council.
Published first week ln every month.
Published first week In every  month.
Subscription  Price, $1.00  per annum;
35 cents to unions subscribing in a
body.
Mailing list, news and correspondence columns ln charge of Vancouver
Trades and Labor Council, to whom all
correspondence should be addressed,
Labor Hall.   Telephone 1380.
Advertising patronage the  property
of S. J. Gothard.     Advertising   rates
will be supplied upon application.    P.'
O. Drawer 1239.    Telephone 2258.
mam**m*maa*m*am*****mm*m*ummamam*mw.t.t��*nt**'**m*m ��� ��� in���w��ii ��������� ��� .���m.mm*m**m*mmm
Contributions are solicited from
correspondents, elected by their respective unions, to whom they must be
held responsible for contents.
VANCOUVER, B. C., DEC, 1908.
Tbe British Columbia legislature
will meet In January next. It will be
the duty of the British Columbia executive committee of the Trades and
Labor Congress of Canada to wait
upon the government executive at Victoria and present the demands of labor
for this province. Similar congress
committees will do likewise In every
province in tbe Dominion. The British Columbia committee, as elected at
the Halifax convention of the congress
last September, Is: R. P. Pettipiece,
vice-president, 2138 Westminster avenue, Vancouver, B. C; Christian Slv-
ertx, Box 302, Victoria, B. C; R. A.
Stoney, Columbian office, New Westminster. B. C; W. H. Gibson. 2646
Douglas street, Victoria, B. C. Central
bodies, or unions, having any measures they desire placed before the
government, should st once address
any of the above committee. At last
session the matter of free text books
and the retention of the eight-hour
clause in the factories' act were successfully urged and the former at least
partially adopted by the government.
The abolition of the election deposit,
in compliance with a resolution passed
at the Halifax convention, will be one
of the matters presented In January.
Rev. Billy Sunday Is credited with
saying lots of good things. At a big
meeting at Bloomlngton recently he
gave some of the old hard shells In
tbe congregation a pointer that will
hold them for a while. Here Is whst
he said: "Real religion ought to make
a man smile. Why, I am almost afraid
to say anything for fear I will make
some eld deacon's features crack, I will
be arrested for wanton destruction of
rare end antique bric-a-brac God
likes to DATe a little fun. That is attested by the fact that God made the
parrot, the monkey���and tome of yon
.��.'.���-���      'V. ���    .   '-
���������immm*i    i  :	
folks. Some good folks hsve faces bo
long they could eat oatmeal out of a
churn. That Isn't religion; that's
cramp colic. Shine up your faces; 'tis
good for what ails you!"
There is at least one virtue in the
political policy enunciated by Samuel
Gompers. It has caused President
Roosevelt to omit his name from an
"identity-of-lnterests" annual blow-out
at the White House. If it will but
result in a cessation of all such rot
in future, then some good has been
accomplished. Other labor '"leaders"
who scabbed It on President Gompers
by attending the function ought to
be ashamed to look a decent wage-
earner In the face.
Folks that do things are the only
ones entitled to the room they take
up on this terrestlal plane and perhaps a little bit more. All the rest
should be gently Oslerized actuated by
motives of utility and with sorrowing
hearts having the consciousness that
it hurts us more than It does them.
We have a theory that a "dead one"
takes up a good deal of valuable space
that may be as well utilized by a live
one.���To-morrow.
"Good times have returned!" So
tbe workers are assured by one of the
Calgary dally papers; one, by the way,
which must know the untruthfulness
of the statement by experience. The
same Calgary papers that prate about
prosperity are jumping sideways to
pay for power and gas to make possible the publicity of this "whistling to
keep their courage up."
Thomas Carlyle believed that a
man's conditions have much to do with
his morality, that hunger oft hampers
honesty. He said: "Many a man
thinks that It Is his goodness which
keeps him from crime, when it is only
his full stomach. On half allowance
he would be as ugly and knavish as
anybody. Don't mistake potatoes for
principles.���Ex.
"The next time people are cross, unjust or disagreeable I'm not going to
waste time to ascertain what is the
matter with them, but will find out
what is the matter with myself, and
perhaps get at the solution of the
trouble."
Wage-earners who do not know how
to vote, will not know where to fight.
The working class, once It Is animated
by Socialist knowledge, will become a
giant Instead of the weakling it is today.
Most of the really great men ln
America have warmed their bare feet
frosty mornings on the spot where
the cows have lain down.
The old saw, "man wants but little
here below," has been revised to read,
"The workman gets but little and
stays below."
TRADE8 COUNCIL AND
THE TRADE8 UNIONIST
The present arrangement between
the Trades and Labor Council and S. J.
Gothard with regard to the Trades
Unionist, has been the subject of considerable discussion in the council
lately. As the agreement was entered into by previous officers and
Council and some of the present delegates are not familiar with the text
of the agreement, it is herewith reproduced:
Memorandum of Agreement made
and entered into this 6th day of June
in the year of Our Lord One Thousand
Nine Hundred and Seven, between
Samuel J. Gothard of the City of Vancouver, British Columbia, and The
Vancouver Trades and .Labor Council.
Whereas the said Samuel J. Gothard
is the owner of a monthly paper called the Trades Unionist, published ln
the City of Vancouver, which paper
is devoted to the Interests represented by the Trades and Labor Council,
and whereas tbe parties hereto have
agreed as hereinafter apepars.
Now This Agreement WJtnesseth
that in consideration of the agreement
to be observed and performed by the
respective parties hereto, It Is hereby
agreed  as  hereinafter appears.
1. The said Samuel J. Gothard shall
continue to publish the said newspaper
for the space of three years from the
date hereof in substantially the same
manner as the same Is now published.
2. The Vancouver Trades and Labor Council shall furnish all editorial,
news and other matter (save and except advertisements) to appear therein before the 25th of the month preceding publication, so as to permit
of the publication thereof with convenience. The said Vancouver Trades
and Labor Council shall, during the
said term of three years, do all ln its
power to further and promote the circulation of the said paper and to obtain
bona fide subscribers therefor, and
shall attend to the delivery of such
papers to the subscribers thereto, and
for so doing shall be entitled to collect and receive for Its own uses all
moneys payable ln respect of subscriptions to the said paper. The said
Samuel Gothard shall attend to the
printing and publication of such newspaper and shall deliver to the said
Trades and Labor Council as many
copies thereof as they shall require for
the purposes aforesaid and shall be
entitled to publish in such newspaper
such advertisements not inconsistent
with the Interests of the Trades and
Labor Council as he may deem advisable, and shall be entitled to receive
and retain to his own use all moneys
paid for such advertisements.
This agreement shall not be deemed
or construed to limit or affect the absolute ownership of the said psper by
the said Samuel J. Gothard.
In Witness Whereof the said Samuel
J. Gothard has signed and sealed this
agreement and the said Vancouver
Trades and Labor Council has caused'
TRADES UNION DIRECTORY
Officers���Where they meet, when they
meet.        > s
Secretaries *are  requested to   notify
Press Committee of change* of
Officers and Addresses.
Union Cards inserted for $1. per month.
GOUMGLL���Meet* lat and 3rd Thura-
day In Labor Hall. Pros.. R. Parm
Pettipiece; Vlce-Prea., J. A. Aicken;
Oen. Bee., H. Cowan, Labor Hall; Sec.-
Treas.. A. R. Burns, Labor Hall;
Statistician. H. Sellars; Sergent-at-
arnu, 8. Kernighan;. Trustees, W. W
Sayer, J. J. Corcoran,   P. W, Dowler.
YIOTOmiA
COUMCIL��� Meets 1st and 3rd Wednesday each month. Officers: Wm. McKay, Pres, Box 507; W. H. Gibson,
Vlce-Pres., 2664 Douglas St.; L. Sl-
vertx, Secy.. Box 302; A A. Argyle.
Tress., Box 303: A. Herbey, Sergent
nt-arnm. Chamber* St Executive
Committee: Pres. McKay, Secy. Sl-
\ert-j. J. Fraser. W. H. Gibson, J.
Dugall.
BES\ U >ca: ery Friday
night at 8:30 o'clock Chas. Davis,
Secretary and Business Agent, 166
Hastings St E. Hall for rent suitable
for socials, danced and societies.
ITOMUJATOMA*WTWBM^
ELBGTMIGAL WySTSSB, LOCAL
VMIOW MO. 813��� Meets 2nd snd 4th
Tuesdays. Labor Hall, 8 p.m. H. W.
Abercrombio, Pres., 148 Gore ave; Geo.
Jenkins, Rec.-Sec, Epworth. P.O.. B.
C: H. H. Free, Fin.-Sec. 8810 West-
minster ave.
TAIOOVTIB
UMXOM HO. 886���Meets In Labor Hall
last Sunday of each month at 8 p.m.
Pres., H W. Hunt; Vlce-Pres., R P.
Pettipiece: Sec.-Treas., H. C. Benson,
box 66. (Hours at headquarters, La-
bor Hall, 4 to 6 p.m. Monday: 4 to 5
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday. Executive committee: J.
G. Qulnn, J. W. Ellis. J. G. Hunt W.
Jeffry.
WOOD, WIM AMD MCBTAL WOBXSM
LATMBBS', LOCAL 807���Meets 2nd
and 4 th Wednesday. Labor Hall,
Homer St.; C. H. Lewis, Pres.; Frank
Mahoney, Sec., 314 Cordova St W.
EtXBT,       WAIST      AMD      LAUMDST
VOUIII1 XMTBBMA TXOMAL
UMIOM, LOCAL MO. 105���Pres., J. A.
Scott; Sec., W. Roberts. Meets Labor
Hall, 2nd and 4th Thursday st 8:00
p.m. each month.
ilTBISBM'
LEAGUE MO. 676���Meets Labor Hall.
Every 1st and 3rd Sunday at 3 p.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Pres. C. J. Ryan; Fin-
Sec., Geo. W. Curnock, P.O. Box 424,
Phone 639.
YAMCOOTTEB     CO
TXADBB PEPABTMEMT, AJT. OT L.
���Meets every Monday night room 8.
Ingleslde Rooms, 818 Cambie St.
Frank Little, Pres.. 520 Richards St.:
J. J. Corcoran, Sec.-Treas., P.O. Box
Geo. Williams, Secy, S41 Robson St;
600
Union Cards $1 per Month.
Its corporat seal to be hereto affixed.
M. A. BEACH.
President T. A L. Council.
ALBERT G. PERRY.
General Secretary
8. J. GOTHARD,
Signed and Sealed ln the presence of
L.  M.  McKIVOR.
The seal of the Vancouver Trades
and Labor Council wag hereunto affix*
ed In the presence of
K. T. KINQSLKY.
no Our Advertizers Pont' Forqet to Mention the Trades Unionist
*
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i      in i>n�� .iT.Bii  a      ii     l i><��l
���
THE   B.   C.  TRADES UNIONIST. VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA.
tyenJ
Ot yon wait lo save big
money? Do you know
that Page is going to move
to 47 Hastings St. W.
very soon ? He must dispose of his entire stock of
Clothing and Furnishings, and has cut prices
to the core���you can get
an $18.00 Suit for $11.75;
a $13.50 Raincoat for $8.-
50; a $i.50 Shirt for 95c,
and so on all through the
store. Come and see how
be can help you make
money���this month.
7l/m.  JPaye
Clothier aad fmrmhoer
156 and 158 Cordova St
THE BATTLE OF THE BALLOT8.
The battle of the ballots has been
fought and King Capital sits upon the
throne wielding the sceptre of supremacy. It did not matter that
6,000,000 people were Jobless ln the
land of the free and the home of the
brave, and It did not matter that every
large city of the country swarmed with
idle hungry men.
The sophistry of quack politicians
won the day, and the logic of reason
and common sense was consigned to
the junk heap.
The working class of America are
yearning for more injunctions and
love to hear the crack of the policeman's club, as It conies in contact
with the cupola of the proletariat.
Soup houses and bread lines are
more preferable than "square meals"
In respectable dining rooms. Cotton
and rags are more priceless than
broadcloth and silk, and the laboring
people of America, by their ballots
cast on the 3rd of November, have
earned the lasting gratitude of a master class, who for the next four years
will mock with jeers and derision the
walls and moans of the starving and
oppressed.
The panic and Industrial depression
that have swept over the country,
caused the most afflicted to think but
little, and millions of men enduring
a lingering death confiscated their
.right of suffrage to further perpetuate
the system that converts human beings into sHvea. It seems that labor
has not yet been tendered a sufficient
number of bull pens. Labor has not
groaned enough beneath the yoke of
bondage to rise ln Its might and break
the fetters that hold ln subjugation,
tho multitude in order that Indolent
may continue to glut their
Insatiable appetites on profit. The
brutal lash of poverty must cut deeper
and the wall of hunger must grow
louder, ere the great mass of people
can be expected to break the spell
that holds them ln the trance of lethargy. Though the candidate of the
Republican party during all his official life made a record that received
the unqualified approval of shylocks
and Industrial pirates, and though he
stabbed labor whenever the slightest
opportunity presented Itself, yet labor
joined hands with the ParryB, the
Posts and the Van Cleaves and crowned Injunction Bill as the emperor of
the White House.
Little else could have been expected. The labor movement of America
Is honey-combed with unscrupulous
politicians. The interests of the
working class sre trampled under foot,
that personal interest may be subserved and that "labor leaders" who love
revenue and graft more than honor
and loyalty, may secure some petty
berths as a reward for the dirty political service rendered to the class of
privilege, who knowing the treason of
"labor leaders" must exclaim as they
think of their deluded dupes: "What
fools these mortals he!" The recent
campaign will relegate for all time
the "peerless one,"* whose policies
smack of the days of the ox-cart and
the stage coach. The Democratic
party has lost Its strength, and Is now
disintegrating. Its disintegration ln
the future will be rapid, and It Is only
a question of a few years until the
burial services will be performed at
its grave.
A time Is coming at no distant day
when the real issue cannot be clouded.
The future presages a great battle
that must be fought, and that battle
will be fought by the Socialist party
whose principles stand for the economic freedom of man and the Republican party, whose principles stand
for the reign of capitalism.���Miners'
Magazine.
THE SATISFIED MULE.
TRUSTEE8 DE8IRE TO
IGNORE COUNCIL
This is Aim of Resolution  Passed st
Convention of School Trustees
in Revelstoke.
"That the board of school trustees
in any city or rural municipality may
be given full power to handle all the
school funds, submit bylaws and generally administer school affairs Independently of the council and In the
same manner as the ordinary business
of the city or rural municipality is administered by the council."
A  GEORGIAN  LYRIC.
Sing a song of sixpence,
Pockets full of rye;
Nothing In the barrooms���
That's tho reason why.
*
	
i t i   I, ii ,k
Whan Pstironlzlng Our Aitvwtizert
mWk * -
t   -at
I haf s mule mlt great  big ears.
He lives to me next door,
For dere I haf a stable built
Against my grocery store.
I glf him oats, I glf him corn,
Und all vat mules can eat;
1 haf a blanket for his back,
Und shoes brotect his feet.
His saddle fits him all around,
Like paper on the wall,
I take It off venefer he eats
Inside  hla whitewashed stall.
His bed Is made of stubble straw,
So ln winter he don't freeze.
In summer he looks the winder oudt
Und enjoys de efening breeze.
1 brotect him tight, mit lock und key,
De door he cannot pass;
Uf I did not, dot foolish mule
Would get oud on the grass.
He works from morning till in night,
I do not let him stop;
So long as he behaves dls way
He never lose his chob.
*-   , '     a*
I didn't hear him grumble once,   *
He minds me as I like;
"Brotection" makes him satisfied,    ������
He doesn't want to "strike." j
Vot fer do I brotect dot mule,
Und glf him dings vot's goot?
Vy stroke his ears and pat his head,
Vlch looks like gratltoot?
I tell you vy, If you keep still,
Und don't say it oud of school,
I glf "brotection" efery time,
Because I ride dot mule.
It was so in de Faderland,
I finds  it yed  dis day,
He who brotecls gets hold the reins,
Und makes de mule obey.
My mule is like some worklngman
Who gets a- chob to pull,
Or has a saddle on his back,
So his "dinner pail" gits full.
Who voes de ticket efery time,
Whose heart If full of charity
For all the loafers riding him,
W,ho brag of "our Prosperity."
If my old mule had half de sense
Vot workmen dink dey've got,
He'd lift his legs und take good aim,
Und kick my dam brains oud.
"Vy don't he kick?" some people say,
"Und get oud on the grass?"
My mule don't know how to help himself,
His fader was an Ass.
���Exchange.
The two most noted rat publications
ln the country, the Delineator and the
Saturday Evening Poet, are making
great bids for patronage just at this
time through flooding the country
with advertisements of the holiday
numbers of the magazines, and are
seeking to Increase their subscription
lists for the new year by various
schemes. The union" men and their
sympathisers should bear ln mind, and
impress upon the women of their families, that these publications are print*
ed under non-union conditions, and
that their printers were forced upon
strike for the eight-hour dsy three
years ago. Patronize union-made
products ln preference to all others.
8TEREOTYPER8    AND     ELECTRO-
TYPER8' UNION.
The sterotypers and electrotypers
make the following report to the A. F.
of L. for the past year: Charters
issued, 5; surrendered, 2. Oaln ln
membership, 378. In Clnnatl an effort
has been pending since 1905 to establish the eight-hour-day for the electrotypers, and this year it finally went
Into general effect ln that city. The
electrotypers of New York have been
on strike for the eight-hour day. All
members of this branch now employed
are working on this basis, and but few
members are out of employment. Cost
of strikes, $5,265.34. Death benefits,
$1,740. Continual improvement ln
wages and conditions.
A row Is on ln the Trades council at
Hamilton, Ont., because one evening
$100 was donated to the Labor party
for campaign purposes. The old par-
tyists didn't like It and have started
a fuss.
Mi
Mention the Trades Unionist.
���
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SB
S9BB W&*T?*Wk
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is*
t. ���
TNI  a  C.  TRADE8 UNIONIST, VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA.
*:'1 vJfl
Padmore's Cigar Store
Where everything a Smoker Wants Can be ||n��    1 0  O    1 r aaiIa    V onPflllUOr
h/^*"Had. - -   Union Cigars a Specialty *****'   * �� ��M WUWC,   fdllliUUfCl
McVETY   DEFEND8  HI8  ACTION.
Strike    Leader   Explains   Thst   Best
Terms   Possible   Were   Accented
on Behslf of Mechanics.
The following statement has boon
obtained from J. H. McVety, one of the
six members of the executive board
of the allied mechanics' organizations
who arranged the recent settlement of
the C. P. R. strike:
The settlement of the Canadian Pacific Railway strike has received a
great deal of publicity and newspapers, unable to find space for a single
article during the trouble, now devote
whole columns to the vilification of
some of the men responsible for calling It off, and ln the publication of circulars written at least four weeks before falling Into the hands of the newspapers.
This policy has been detrimental ln
many ways; the public have been led
to believe that conditions are a great
deal worse than they really are; officials of the company have been unnecessarily antagonized and the men
have been misled by a set of self-appointed demagogues anxious to appear
as the champions of the cause sf
labor.
���
The Blue Label is on the
"Wry Best"
"Vancr. BeMe"
Cigars
Havana hand-made Cigars.
Ask for them at all bars and
cigar stores.   Made by
J*
14 Cordova W.
ii       i     ���
���.
'.���
When Patronizing
The general impression is that
Hard and McVety exercised an autocratic rule to the exclusion of the representatives of other trades and that
the full power of calling a cessation
of hostilities was assumed by them.
A more incorrect impression could
not be conceived; the committee who
negotiated the settlement in Winnipeg
was composed of six men instead of
two, and thoroughly representative of
the larger organizations and was continually in touch with another committee similarly composed with headquarters In Montreal.
Many different opinions have been
expressed regarding the condition of
the company's power at the time of
the settlement, the majority believing'
that speedy capitulation was absolutely necessary If the company were to
maintain an effective train service.
The published statements of the number of strikers re-employed in eastern
Canada would, however, lead one to
believe the officials preferred the
strikebreakers to the old employees,
and had they been In such dire distress surely the oportunity of securing
their old and tried employees would
quickly been taken advantage of.
The ability of the men to continue
the strike Indefinitely Is another
point about which many have expressed opinions snd but few knew
anything about, for the strikers were
spread over such a vast territory that
even the strikers themselves were
familiar with their own districts only,
the executive committee being the
only people In close touch with all
points and then only through correspondence.
The real financial situation has
never ben properly understood even
by the membership, who seem unable
to grasp the immensity of a problem
Involving the maintenance of 8,000
men.
Approximately 1400 of these were
. .      j     &
cared for by their International organizations, the' other Internationals
defaulting payment and leaving tho
committee to provide for 6600 from
funds contributed by organized labor
generally, the total amount received
from this source aggregating $9,000, or
about $1.30 for each striker.
The solidarity of the men during the
two months of the strike was unparalleled, but the reader can be safely
allowed to determine how long this
stand could be maintained by men
who receive an average of $2.50 per
day when employed and who worked
an average of 17 days per month for
the greater part of the year preceding
the strike.
The spirit may be strong, but the
flesh is weak and it was a physical
impossibility for the men to have remained solid for any considerable
period longer, ln fact, two weeks before the settlement the men at a
number of points threatened to return
to work unless money was immediately forthcoming and from then on
the committee was besieged with
therats of a like nature.
Many will pledge themselves to
stand solid forever, when enthused
by some eloquent speaker; but this
feeling Is of short duration when the
pinch of hunger Is felt and lnvarlab-
*
JAS. H. McVETY
ly the men who talk the loudest now
were the ones most Insistent and
threatening during the strike.
The financial situation, together
with the daily eviction of the men
from their homes on account of their
inability to pay their rent, refusal of
further credit by grocers snd butchers, the rigors of an approaching winter, coupled with the apparent ability
of the company to fill the shops and
operate their train service all were
Instrumental ln assisting the committee to decide on the necessity of any
settlement that would quickly return
the men to their work.
Hsvlng these conditions always before us, every offer ot mediation was
accepted gratefully and when the last
offer was presented we considered it
very carefully from every standpoint,
together with the assurance which accompanied it, one being that 80 per
cent, of the men would be reinstated
within 10 days and the balance very
shortly after, it being also stated that
Sir Thomas Shaughnessy had said,
"We will make a good job of It and
take them all back."
Many times the question has been
asked, "Why did you not submit the
proposition to the membership?" and
it may bo well to state here that the
offer just referred to had to be rejected or accepted the same after*
noon, as the company had told the
mediators that they had a large number of men engaged ln England and
they had either to be shipper or dismissed at once.
During  the  time  the   negotiations .
were being carried on, the membership had been buoyed up by the hopes
of a settlement and we feared the re- j
action If the negotiations were declar- <<
od off and not having time to submit
the question to the men (It would have"
taken three days), we decided it would
be better to accept the terms offered
and get the men hack to their work*
recognising that the assumption of tbe
responsibility would leave us open to
the criticism that would assuredly follow a settlement arranged by politicians, tho other side naturally using
every known means to belittle   the
benefits derived by those successful In
arranging the settlement.
Our expectations at far as the criticism Is concerned have been fully
realised, hut as time rolls on we feel
confident our position will be better
understood by the membership and the
public generally, and while the matter
might have been left to the membership and the responsibility transferred
to their shoulders, we feel it would
have been a cowardly action to rlsk;^
the employment of the men merely
to save our own reputations, and bitter
as the denunciations have been, I personally would act in the same way .
again If the circumstances surrounding
the case were the same, in the belief
that a good general should know when
he Is defeated and prepare to save as
many of the rank and file as possible.
In conclusion, I desire on behalf of
the membership to thank the World
for the active support given to the
cause of the men and to assure i
proprietors that the support given
as deeply appreciated all over the
country as here ln this city.
:
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4
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���
At Calgary, Alta., tbe Trades
Labor council provides for the right to
assess Its affiliated membership, with
splendid results. It compels the rank'
and file to interest themselves la the
central lodge's work���probsbly because they hare to pay for It. The)
plan might be adopted in Vancouver
the men
Forget to Mention th
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THE   B.   C.   TRADES UNIONIST. VANCOUVER, BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
.' si
9
7?fen.'
Ot yos watt te save big
Mltyf Do you know
that Page is going to move
to 47 Hastings St. W.
very soon ? He must dispose of his entire stock of
Clothing and Furnishings, and has cut prices
to the core���you can get
an $18.00 Suit for $11.75;
a $13.50 Raincoat for $8.-
80; a $i.50 Shirt for 15c,
and so on all through the
store. Come and see how
be can help you make
money���this month.
tyJm.  mPaye
Oothlsf __Md |"sjfSaiBsr
156 and 158 Cordova SL
THI BATTLE OF THE BALLOTS.
The battle of the ballots has been
fought and King Capital sits upon the
throne wielding the sceptre of supremacy. It did not matter that
6,000,000 people were Jobless ln the
land of the free and the home of the
brave, and It did not matter that every
large city of the country swarmed with
idle hungry men.
The sophistry of quack politicians
won the day, and the logic of reason
and common sense was consigned to
the junk heap.
The working class of America sre
yearning for more injunctions snd
love to hear the crack of the policeman's club, as It comes in contact
with the cupola of the proletariat.
Soup houses and bread lines are
more preferable than "square meals"
In respectable dining rooms. Cotton
and rags are more priceless than
broadcloth and silk, and the laboring
people of America, by their ballots
cast on the 3rd of November, have
earned the lasting gratitude of a master class, who for the next four years
will mock with jeers and derision the
walls and moans of the starving and
oppressed.
The panic and industrial depression
that have swept over the country,
caused the moat afflicted to think but
little, and millions of men enduring
a lingering death confiscated their
right of suffrage to further perpetuate
the system that converts human beings Into slaves. It seems that labor
has not yet been tendered a sufficient
number of boll pens. Labor has not
groaned enough beneath the yoke of
bondage to rise In Its might and break
the fetters that hold In subjugation.
the multitude ln order that Indolent
patricians may continue to glut their
insatiable appetites on profit. The
brutal lash of poverty must cut deeper
and the wail of hunger must grow
louder, ere the great mass of people
can be expected to break the spell
that holds them In the trance of lethargy. Though the candidate of the
Republican party during all his official life made a record that received
the unqualified approval of shylocks
and Industrial pirates, and though he
stabbed labor whenever the slightest
opportunity presented Itself, yet labor
joined hands with the Parrys, the
Posts and the Van Cleaves and crowned Injunction BUI as the emperor of
the White House.
Little else could have been expected. Tbe labor movement of America
Is honey-combed with unscrupulous
politicians. The Interests of the
working class are trampled under foot,
that personal Interest may be subserved and that "labor leaders" who love
revenue and graft more than honor
and loyalty, may secure some petty
berths as a reward for the dirty political service rendered to the class of
privilege, who knowing the treason of
"labor leaders" must exclaim as they
think of their deluded dupes: "What
fools these mortals be!" The recent
campaign will relegate for all time
the "peerless one," whose policies
smack of the days of the ox-cart and
the stage coach. The Democratic
party has lost Its strength, and Is now
disintegrating. Its disintegration ln
the future will be rapid, and It Is only
a question of a few years until the
burial services will be performed at
Its grave.
A time Is coming at no distant day
when the real Issue cannot be clouded.
The future presages a great battle
that must be fought, and that battle
will be fought by the Socialist party
whose principles stand for the economic freedom of man and the Republican party, whose principles stand
for the reign of capitalism.���Miners'
Magazine.
THE 8ATI8FIED MULE.
TRU8TEE8 DE8IRE TO
IGNORE COUNCIL
This is Aim of Resolution Passed st
Convsntion of School Trustees
In Revelstoke.
"That the board of school trustees
In any city or rural municipality may
be given full power to handle all the
school funds, submit bylaws and generally administer school affairs Independently of the council and in the
same manner as the ordinary business
of the city or rural municipality is administered by the council."
A GEORGIAN  LYRIC.
Sing a song of sixpence,
Pockets full of rye;
Nothing ln the
x naii s vuc rvasvu wuy ���
- j-
I haf a mule rait great big ears.
He lives to me next door.
For dere I haf a stable built
Against my grocery store.
I glf him oats, I glf him corn,
Und all vat mules can eat;
I haf a blanket for his back,
Und shoes brotect his feet.
His saddle fits him all around.
Like paper on the wall,
I take It off venefer he eats
Inside his whitewashed stall.
His bed Is made of stubble straw,
So In winter he don't freeze.
In summer he looks the winder oudt
Und enjoys de efenlng breeze.
I brotect him tight, mit lock und key.
De door he cannot pass;
Uf I did not, dot foolish -mule
Would get oud on the grass.
He works rrom morning till ln night,
I do not let him stop;
So long as he behaves dis way
He never lose his chob.
I didn't hear him grumble once,   -   :
He minds me as I like;
"Brotection" makes him satisfied,   \-
He doesn't want to "strike." _
Vot fer do I brotect dot mule,
Und glf him dings vot's goot?
Vy stroke his ears and pat his head,
Vlch looks like gratltoot?
I tell you vy. If you keep still,
Und don't Bay It oud of school,
I glf "brotection" efery time.
Because I ride dot mule.
It was so In de Paderland,
I finds  it yed dis day,
He who brotects gets hold the reins,
Und makes de mule obey.
My mule Is like some worklngman
Who gets a chob to pull.
Or has a saddle on his back,
So his "dinner pail" gits full.
Who voes de ticket efery time,
Whose heart If full of charity
For all the loafers riding him,
Who brsg of "our Prosperity."
If my old mule had half de aense
Vot workmen dink dey've got.
He'd lift his legs und take good aim,
Und kick my dam brains oud.
"Vy don't he kick?" some people say,
"Und get oud on the grass?"
My mule don't know how to help himself.
His fader was an Ass.
���Exchange.
The two most noted rat publications
in the country, the Delineator and the
Saturday Evening Post, are making
great bids for patronage just at this
time through flooding the country
with advertisements of the holiday
numbers of the magazines, and are
seeking to increase their subscription
lists for the new year by various
schemes. The union men and their
sympathisers should bear in mind, and
impress upon the women of their families, that these publications are print*
ed under non-union conditions, and
that their printers were forced upon
strike for the eight-hour day three
years ago. Patronise union-made
products ln preference to all others.
STEREOTYPER8    AND    ELECTRO*
TYPER8' UNION.
The sterotypers and electrotypers
make the following report to the A. F.
of L. for the past year: Charters
Issued, 5; surrendered, 2. Gain ln
membership, 378. In Clnnatl an effort
has been pending since 1905 to establish the eight-hour-day for the electrotypers, and this year It finally went
Into general effect ln that city. The
electrotypers of New York have been
on strike for the eight-hour day. All
members of this branch now employed
are working on this basis, and but few
members are out of employment. Cost
of strikes, $5,265.34. Death benefits,
$1,740. Continual Improvement in
wages and conditions.
A row Is on ln the Trades council at
Hamilton, Out., because one evening
$100 wss donated to the Labor party
for campaign purposes. The old par-
tyists didn't like it and have started
a fuss.
jisk Your Grocer for Jersey
Cream Yeast (makes and take % no
other. They are the .Best Hade.
Ebery Package Guaranteed.
;m
a
'���  '���
win mivswuAvie t#yii i vutyvi w hivjiuuii iiio iiauvo ifiiiviiioi*
i
��� THE  B.  C.  TRADES UNIONIST. VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA
11
P. O. Box 1SSS
Telephone-1404
Pacific Coast Pipe Company, Ltd.,
Vancouver, aB. C.
Manufacturers of
Water Pipe
Systems of Water Works Installed for
Domestic Supply,     Power Development,
Irrigation Plans.
Estimates Furnished
A local Industry using local m terlal and   employing   white   labor
exclusively.
LET US BUY A8 WE MARCH.
With this cstchy title, the Shoe
Workers' Journal calls upon organized
workers to remember the union label.
We have heard much good advico
about "voting as we march," and let
us take the hint of a shoe worker and
buy as we march. When we demand
the union label of all crafts, we
strengthen the union fabric. This
point Is conceded by all, but another
feature, and to our mind, the most Important, Is overlooked ln label agitation, and that Is the moral effect on
outsiders of a strong and Insistent
union label demand. There Is nothing,
save the ballot, more powerful or more
effective  ln   cementing  the   workers.
- Label agitation means solidarity, and
when united action is once more se-
' cured, It can be uaxid on the economic
field. The label as an educator, is invaluable.
makers, tie game enough to say: "I
won't buy If the label is not on the
box."
C0WARD8.
������. v
i -
The International Association of
Plasterers at Its recent convention at
New Orleans determined to affiliate
with the American Federation of
Labor.
The Canadian textile workers have
decided that the weekly contributionr
ahould be Increased from 8 to 25 cents.
Br- ���
I. ���
The United Brewery Workers of
America number about 40,'UtO. The
International union was organized in
1888.
Three million dollars Is a mighty big
sum of money, but that Is lust what
lsed labor spends In Vancouver
year.   It should be spent exclusively for union products.
To one who is at all familiar with
ruling class characteristics It Is by no
means surprising that all sorts of low
tricks and cotemptlble methods will
be resorted to In order to thwart the
workers ln any attempt they may
make to lighten the burden of their
slavery, or get rid of their chains.
When It comes down to a political contest between slaves and masters, It Is
a foregone conclusion that the latter
will use every power at their command
to prevent the former from gaining
any point of vantage whatever. Bribery, corruption and brazen rascality
will be resorted to with the utmost
nonchalance and sang, froid and every
precept of honor and decency will be
outraged with an abandon that would
put a burglar to the blush, or a harlot
to shame. This sort of thing will be
winked at by all of that eminently
respectable gang of hypocrites who
prate most loudly on behalf of "law
and order," morals, ethics and religion. This sort of thing Is to be expected from those whose chief mission
ln life is to apollglze for and defend a
civilization, the foundations of which
are laid in the enslavement of labor
and whose superstructure Is built from
the sweat and blood of Its victims.
Nothing better could reasonably be
expected from the hungry horde which
draws Its sustenance from the rich
plunder wrung from an enslaved working class.
All the vile schemes concocted by
the agents and defenders of ruling
clsss rascality would, however, fail of
their purpose were it not for the un-
sufferable and contemptible cowardice
The Southern Alberta Labor Bulletin, a strictly non-partisan labor paper,
is hAMa published at I^ethbridge next
���HRlff111 ** * nreeplunin. four-    prevalent In the ranks fit the enslaved
page fortnightly publication,  at the
start   It is under the ownership and
-
editorship of J. B. Kelsey, "lino" on
the Dally Herald.
Whenever
elgar you
a union label
union clgar-
BSl I i
class.  Steeped thou.
in Ignorance,   this
mountable obstacU
come by persistei
by those who
ot even a stoat
un
Patronizing Our Advertiz
the workers are
s not an insur-
It can be over-
hammering away
become
of knowledge and
But there are thou
sands of slaves, who, though having
seen the light, are such arrant cowards, such spineless wretches, as to
be utterly Incapable of even assuming
the attitude of men. Not only are they
too cowardly to take part ln the movement that makes for the emancipation
of the workers, between elections, but
upon polling day their cowardice becomes so monumental and overmastering that they stay away from the polls
and thus make It possible for the dirty
tricksters of the ruling class to successfully work their vile schemes ln
the Interest of their masters.
It Is reported to this office that
enough of such cowards Inhabit a certain district not a thousand miles from
Ladysmlth, B. C, to have elected Comrade Hawthornthwaite to the Dominion house, Instead of the notorious
Ralph Smith, at the late elections, had
these worthies been men. Instead of
Jellyfish. As one mine manager has
aptly said, "such creatures are no
good." They are a nuisance to themselves and a curse to their class.
Just what such spineless cowards
expect to gain by their cowardice Is a
mystery. If they wish to hide from
their bosses the fact that they have
been forced to entertain certain convictions contrary to their master's Interests, the worst thing they could
possibly do would be to stay away
from the polls voluntarily. The bosses
should require no further evidence to
prove them guilty of entertaining Ideas
treasonable to their employers. Had
they gone to the polls like men there
would at least be grounds to suppose
that they went as good loyal Liberals
or Conservatives. As It Is there Is
���very warrant for their discharge from
employment for political reasons.
ThlB would, perhaps, be done were It
not for the very reasonable expectation
that such spineless creatures are not
particularly liable to develop any backbone worth mentioning ln the future.
The time has come ln British Columbia when it would no longer be possible to discriminate against workmen
on account of political convictions,
were It not for the existence of this
cowardly element. By virtue of Its existence those who do take an active
part in the Socialist movement can
still safely be crucified. This spineless element offers anything but a safeguard against such persecutions.
. We are satisfied that in the case of
employees of most of the larger employing concerns In this province this
cowardice is unwarranted. There is
little or nothing to justify it. It may
be that petty bosses here and there
drop hints of possible discharge ln
case of certain events, but these are
dropped without warrant from the
head otn>,'*>li.. snd *tu*% thr*������N *" M
not be carried out even if these petty
boosters so desired. Such petty
threats could strike terror only to the
fevered Imagination of creatures devoid of spines.
The. splendid heritage of Ignorance
has come down to the modern
���sis through the centuries of
to Mention the Trades
ruling clsss rapine and robbery, should
bring joy and satisfaction to the heart
of the capitalist tyrant of Unlay. That
Inherited cowardice that converts even
an Intelligent slave Into a harmless
jellyfish, should raise present day
rulers to the "seventh heaven of delight." A plentiful supply of such
cowards Insures the perpetuity of their
rule.���Western Clarion.
It's about time writers ln the labor
press quit giving veiled hints as to
what the workers must do to solve
the problems confronting them.
���Assume your political duty;" "assert your political rights; "we must
have clean men;" "we must fight for
right and justice;" "stand by your
friends and defat your enemies;" "we
must use Independent political action;" "get together���what we need Is
unity."
These and a thousand more such
vague expressions are somewhat significant, but ln the last analysis mere
twaddle.
Under such headings a wage-earner
can do any fool thing���and then howl
"unity," "come over Into my camp
and let's have unity!"
Such empty expressions of advice
to workers mean little, but is at least
an indication that the mind of Labor
is in a ferment, unconsciously or
otherwise, seeking s wsy out of the
dllema in which It finds itself. This
Is a hopeful phenomena. It Is fast
compelling labor "leaders" to reconsider their old slogan of "no politics."
But the issue must be met squarely.
Society cannot be change ? ehlnd Its
back.
If in Socialism there is a remedy���
and this wage-earners rarely dispute
t���butdo not vote for���then let "dreaming" cease and concentrated action
along those lines begin.
Samuel Compels has been put on
the "unfair" list at the White House.
He hasn't the Roosevelt label.���Leth-
bridge Herald.
-MM
M. Langtry
Satisfaction or Money Refunded
Up-to-Date
Tailor
Largest Stock of Imported Goods
in Vancouver
Suits Made to Order
$20 Up
322 Hastings SL W.
Vancouver, B. C.
1 ���- ������'" '"��� ������ '  "i' .
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TNI 9.  C.  TRADES UNIONIST. VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA.
I
xsx
I
Horseshoe Hotel
F. McELROY, Proprietor
Nicely furnished rooms and
first-class dining room in connection.
Cor. Hastings    and    Columbia
Phone 622      Vancouver, B. C.
A REPLY TO BRUCE.
���
Editor Saturday Sunset:���
Sir: In your Issue ot August 22nd.
"Bruce" gives the "deluded followers
of the shibboleth of Socialism" rather
a scathing touch. It seems to me,
however, that he treats the subject
rather unfairly and very superficially.
As a general rule, the figures given us
ln Socialist newspapers are pretty
near to being correct, and the men
that publish them. are not utter ignoramuses. Be thst how It may, we
know that throughout the civilized
world today vast fortunes are being
amassed by capitalists, and we know
that these fortunes are the product of
exploited labor. We know that the
worker produces everything except
the raw material in its natural state.
We know that everything tbe worker
produces Is a source of profit to his
employer, whether that profit be one
per cent, or fifty per cent. We know
that tne worker gives us light, heat,
power; that he makes and operates
railways and steamship lines and distributes his products all over the
world; and from the worker, for each
and all of these operations, this toll,
called profit, is exacted. Profit, literally speaking, is something for nothing, which means that the other end
of the deal is nothing for something.
Morally speaking, it is theft
Just as Bruce states, the manufacturing concerns, out of their profits
pay a small dividend to the shareholders and devote the balance to increasing the size of their plant, "to
make more wheels turn snd employ
mora hands." He might go right on
with the story, "to employ more
hands, to make more profits, to build
more factories, to make more profits,"
and so on ad Infinitum.
The Socialist has come into being,
or evolved from these "hands" which
Bruce alludes to. These "hands" are
men and women, also children. The
"wheels" which turn to employ more
hands, unfortunately have the reverse
effect. They do the work Instead of
the "hands." At tha present time
fifty per cent, of the world's civilised
worken are out of employment all
the time at the result of the introduction into our factories of modern
machinery, which, instesd of laving
r, freeies the laborer ont of hla
Tbe result Is that the entire
burden of providing for the unemployed, half of their own class, as well ss
for the parasites who exploit them
and themselves, falls on the fifty per
cent, who are In employment. Now,
If modern machinery has got us Into
this condition, and science snd invention still continues to Improve machinery, I would ask Bruce what is to
be the outcome in say 25 years from
now? But there is another viewpoint
to this condition also. The population
of the civilised world Is at the present time about 87 per cent, of the
working class. This being a large
percentage, It Is only natural to suppose thst they sre the majority of the
consumers. If we freeze them out of
their employment by means of machinery, which does the work on a collosal
scale, how are they going to get
money to buy the necessaries of life;
If they cannot do so, where Is the capitalist going to get hla market? Perchance, science will have perfected
some means of successful sky travel,
and the moon or planets will furnish
a market. Otherwise the worker,
having been wiped out of existence,
the capitalist must sell to his own
machine.
No, friend "Bruce;" It Is not buncombe, neither Is Socialism a shibboleth. It Is the only cure for the conditions above mentioned, and is the
child of education, springing, as it
does, from the awakened mind of a
class who otherwise would be driven
off the earth's face���the workers.
Trusting, Mr. Editor, that I have not
encroached too much on your valuable
space, "C R."
A  REMINISCENCE.
"Every man for himself." There
was a time when the doctrine was applied literally to education, and when
those children were taught whose parents were able to buy teaching for
them (at a high price), and all other
children grew up ln the darkness of
Ignorance.
Now we hold It the first duty of the
state to provide for every child within
its borders a full and competent education.
The change of thought ln regard to
old age that Is Indicated by these pension laws is no greater than the
change of thought in regard to children, nor can any proposal of old age
pensions seem now as strange to the
conservative majority as a proposal of
free and universal education would
have seemed two centuries ago.
The world moves.
It Is a beautiful Idea, that having
begun to recognise Its duty toward
those at the outset of life, the world
should now glimpse something of Its
duty toward the course.
It is also a memorable Illustration
of the fact that whether we like it or
not. men are drawing more closely together and every day finds a wider
recognition ot the great community of
Interest, obligation, doty and welfare.
���Charles Edward Russell.
By Jack Wood.
Not more than three hundred yards
away were the great gates opening
into one of London's great cemeteries,
where sleep thousands of London's
dead. Well-kept beds of flowers, trees
In plenty, acacias, lilacs, hawthorn,
beech, elm, oak, willow and the laburnum, with Its long racemes of golden
blossom. The mausoleums ot the
rich; the potter's field of the poor.
Names and no-names; the world and
the unknown; all equal ln the arms
of Mother Earth; some remembered,
some forgotten.
There rest so-called "nobility," actors, painters, editors and circus-
riders of renown. In the long spring
and summer months thousands of
Londoners wend their way to this
suburban graveyard to visit the resting-places of their friends, and to
look upon the mnouments of the great
and mighty, who were.
Long ago when I was wearing my
first pair of knickerbockers (with
pockets), when I plunged my hands Into those side-pockets, lo and behold, I
found a shilling (25c) ln one pocket
and a sixpenny piece (12c) ln the
other���put there by "Mother." And
"after life's fitful fever, she sleeps
well," fevered to death by the worry
and strain of running a superior rooming-house, decorated with big bills,
"Apartments to Let"���often emptier
than full, and the tale of "kept home
from school to work" tells Itself.
Housemaid, nurse, cook���a boy! And
I was taught "to do my duty ln that
sphere of life, ln which It had pleased
an upside-down-sort of society to pitch
me." And I did, and I've been kicking
ever since.
On that knckerbocker Sunday, of
long ago, I was walking around the
great cemetery grounds, admiring the
flowers and reading the inscriptions
of the dead, and to my wonder and
delight there stood before me the
pedestal and bust of "Tom Hood."
and Inscribed around . It were the
word, "And he wrote the "Song of the
8hlrt.'" He wrote of the seamstress,
who
"Was  sewing  with  a double  thread
A shroud as well as a shirt."
Tom Hood died ln 1845. His "Song
of the Shirt" marked an epoch. His
keen sympathy bred an Insight Into
the condition of the working class; he
worked In company, as It were, with
Charles Klngsley, who told of the
Chartist struggle In "Alton Locke" ln
1850; Ebenezer Elliott (the Corn Law
Rhymer); Carlyle, with his "Sartor
Ressrtus" In 1833, followed by "Past
and Present," and Dickens, who started his bombardment of conventionalities and shams in 1836, and Hogarth,
who, in his wonderful caricatures of
the "Harlot's 'Progress," 1884, the
"Rake's Progress." 1886, probed deeply Into the masks of respectability and
orthodoxy; Ernest Jones, who In prose
and poem scathed the upholders of
falre; MaailnL who waa caus
ing uneasiness by pleading tor
elation" versus individualism. "We
must strive to make of humanity one
single family." All of these, and Tom
Hood not least, were precursors of the
advent and reception of the teachings
of Karl Marx by the people of England. As Sidney Webb says of Carlyle ln the "Fabian Essays," so we
say of this coterie: "Though not Socialists, they made big dints in the
snield of individualism."
And twenty years later brings me
again to "three hundred yards away
were the great gates." Sunday morning, on a vacant lot where the gas
workers most did congregate at Ken-
sal Green, a Socialist meeting was going on. On the rough platform stood
a tall, wuu-looklng man, yet intellectual, withal, with a fine flow of language, easy to understand and carrying conviction to his hearers. The
brogue was rich Irish, and though he
dealt out Marxian economics ail the
time, his native wit and humor ao
tinged his illustrations that he never
wearied the listening crowd.
It was a misty, half-foggy morning,
snd the rain compelled the audience
to seek the protecting shelter of an adjacent wall. With the fervor of a missionary, the speaker stood pat. Buttoning his jscket up to the chin���he
was bareheaded���he continued his discourse, though the rain made his
clothes get closer to him. That's seventeen or eighteen years agone. I remember the points of the speech to
this day.
The speaker was Jim Connell of the
Social Democratic Federation, and
author of "The Red Flag." Wherever
labor and Socialism are marching to
victory���at the meetings, ln the parka,
in the halls, at elections, all during
Stitt Wilson's phenomenal crusade
meetings in Yorkshire and other
places���"The Red Flag" la. the song
of the present and of the future, Inspiring all to action ln deadly earnest and fidelity to death. It's a poena,
and an inspiration.
And Jim is still on the firing line I
A man who will not contribute to
maintain an organisation, political or
industrial, cannot be relied upon to
support the principles underlying
working class emancipation.
11
\
$1.60 per day and up
Special Rates by the week
American Plan
66 Outside Bright, Airy Rooms
j
Clarendon Hotel   ,
HARTNEY A McDADE. Prona.
HARTNEY * McDADE, Props.
r, a a
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14
THI   B.   C.   TRADEt UNIONIST. VANCOUVIR. BRITISH OOLUMBlA.
���THE  PROOF OF THE  PUDDING."
Many there are ln the ranks of agitators, spokesmen snd writers for the
cause of labor ln Its efforts to break
the chains of capitalist bondage, who
scoff at the Idea that It Is necessary
to arrive at a thorough understanding
of the present system of production It
effective blows are to be struck for
its overthrow and abolition. The mastery of economics Is, to them, too great
a task and of too little consequence to
waste valuable time upon. They often argue that the workingmen cannot
be Interested ln the discussion of such
a dry subject They'must be served
with more piquant sauce, something
more interesting and entertaining,
something more palatable and tasty
than the dry husks of scientific truth.
Hence, these worthy ones go forth
with voice and pen to do valiant deeds
on behalf ot the lethargic labor giant.
By the application of fine spun sentiments, funny stories and a string of
bald assertions they often succeed in
arousing the enthusiasm of the workers to a white heat, presaging, from
their optimistic point of view, the
speedy attainment of labor's victory
and the complete rout and discomfiture of Its enemies. But alas! their
erstwhile optimism becomes transformed into a pessimism most woeful
and depressing once the election returns come ln showing that this enthusiasm did not crystallise Into the
wished for results. The triumph of
the working class over its constitutional enemy, the capitalist class, will not
be accomplished by a wave of enthusiasm stirred up by gllb-tongued
orators and facile pen pushers appealing to the sentiment, the passion, the
prejudice of the mob. It will rather
be impelled by the cold and calculating conviction arising from searching
analysis and careful Inquiry into the
nature of the task In hand and the
characteristics and habits of the brute
beast of Capital, that monster that
must be laid low If labor Is to attain
its own.
To the mentally lazy the mastery of
the economics of capitalist production
Is a task so heavy It would fain be
shunned. Without this knowledge,
however, the would-be apostle of freedom Is more than apt to prove a false
prophet and the movement for emau-
���
Robi Porter �� Sons
FAMILY BUTCHERS
Wholesale & Retail Otilsrs
of ail Weds.
-
SHIPPING IS OUR SPECIALTY
136 Cordova St
r
Tel. 684
VANCOUVER. B. C.
���ma~
".*���...'
clpatlon drift like a rudderless ship
upon an angry sea.
No matter how disagreeable the task
may appear, it is absolutely necessary
that the workers arrive at something
at least approaching to an understanding of capitalist production if they are
to become reliable recruits for the
army of emancipation. They must be
taught the significance of capital and
how It lives and thrives at the expense of their blood and sweat. They
must be made familiar with process
and method whereby the products of
their unpaid toll are transformed into
still further means for their enslavement and exploitation. Just how their
bone and sinew la translated into surplus value to serve ss a still further
accretion to the hideous bulk of the
beast Capital, that has Its fangs buried
in their quivering flesh should and
must be made clear to them. Neither
speaker nor writer should leave an opportunity untouched to explain and
analyse and then explain again. Like
the old, old love story. It will bear
repetition times without number and
still never grow stale. In fact, nothing will so appeal to the reasoning faculties of men at the present time ss
the lucid setting forth of the cold and
unvarnished facts relating to the social and industrial life of the race.
From an understanding of capitalist
production and Its consequences to
the working class and through It to
all society as well, arises an enthusiasm for the cause that makes for Its
overthrow that never lessens even In
the face of the most serious obstacles
and apparent setbacks. It flares forth
with a steady persistency thst can
neither be mistaken for the sun glare
of optimism, or turned into the murky
gloom of a morbid pessimism. It is
the enthusiasm of the scientist who
having discovered truth zealously
obeys her mandate by championing her
cause in the interest of knowledge
and human uplift. It Is an enthusiasm
that is unconquerable and all conquering.
The Socialist comrades of Canada
may well feel satisfied with the result
of the recent elections. In the eight
districts in which candidates of the
Socialist party were run, 15 per cent,
of the total vote polled was cast for
those candidates. In four of these districts this wss the first time the party
had ever put up candidates for a federal election. In the other four districts candidates were run at the previous election. This is a showing that
at least cannot be duplicated upon
this western continent. If it can anywhere else in the world.
There is a reason for this. From
Its very Inception the Socialist Party
of Canada has been a revolutionary
organization. Its platform is essentially and frankly a revolutionary
declaration. The props gs ads of the
party has been based solely upon the
Marxian analysis of capitalist production and the materialist le romnnotkm
of history. ���
Uncoaiamlaared by reform,   petch-
��� !    ���>.
I   ���
work and palliative ideas. It has hewn
strictly to the line of the class struggle and thus escaped the taint ot opportunism and the poison of reaction.
It haa catered to no faction or factions
of the working class, either trade
union or otherwise. It has voiced the
interests ot the working clsss as a
whole and refused at all times to take
sides in any ot the petty squabbles
that Inevitably spring up within the
ranks of that class as a result of the
fact that the labor market Is merely
a slave pen ln which is sold the flesh,
the blood, the bone, the sinew and the
Uvea of the workers, to the tune of
all the low-down, higgling, bickering,
lying, cheating and quarreling that It Is
possible for such a noxious sink hole
to engender.
In spite of the fact that the Socialist Party of Canada has refused to
cater to trade union Ideas and prejudices we make bold to state that ln
no part of this western continent can
a larger percentage of the members
of the unions be found ln the Socialist ranks and supporting its program
and ticket, than in the province of
British Columbia, where the Socialist
Party of Canada first came Into existence. At no point on this continent
hss it been made more Impossible to
bring a "Labor Party" Into existence
than here.
For the benefit of those hoop-la
Claqueurs who fancy the walls of capitalist Jericho can be shaken down by
loud noise or undermined by waves of
sudden enthusiasm, we beg leave to
suggest that the battering ram effects.
of sound education of the workers
along economic lines will bring quicker and more certain results. The proof
of the pudding lies ln the eating, so
it Is said. The proof of the efficiency
of sound propaganda as the basis of effective political work along class lines
is seen in the movement in Canada
and the progress made by the Socialist
party during the less than six years of
Its existence in the Dominion.
At the forthcoming elections in
British Columbia a further lesson will
be given along the same lines.
Socialists of Canada have sent a request to the International Socialist
bureau at Brussels that the workers of
all countries be notified that industrial conditions in Canada are very
bad at present and that immigrants
cannot hope to improve their lot by
coming Into the Dominion. Foreign
steamship agencies are charged with
having placarded Europe with glowing
pictures of wealth and independence
in Canada In order to bleed the people
for passage money and also furnish
capitalists with cheap. Impoverished
labor. The Salvation Army is also
meeting with general denunciation for
making Canada a dumping ground for
England's poorest workera.
���   ���   ���
When having tonsorlal work done���
do yon seek tor the union barber shop
card?   Do you?
Thousands Wear
*
Fit-Reform
Clothes
WHY NOT YOU?
333 Hastings St.
.1 m
>
> ���
���
Seattle's central body Is dissatisfied
with  the  organisation  service  given .
them by the A. F. of L.,    claiming
thst Organiser C. O. Young has other
.    m    ���
territory to cover than Oregon, which
should be sttended to. Some months .
ago Vancouver Trades and Labor
council made a similar protest to tbe
A. F. of L.. as British Columbia Is also
in C. O. Young's jurisdiction; though
he has never done any work ln this
province. An organiser for British
Columbia and Washington seems now
in order if results are sought.
��� ���   ���
Judging   by   the   District   Ledger, 11
Fernie, the Trades council in the coal
city has been revived.    It    held    Ita
charter from the Dominion Trades and
Labor congress.
��� ���    ���
The recommendations of the parliamentary committee relating to civic
elections, at Thursday evening's
Trades and Labor council meeting,,
promises to be full of Interest to wage-
earners. The committee consists of
P. W. Bowler, 2848 Scott; W. Sayer.
847 Homer; E. C. Knight, 1333 Keefer;
F. Heays, 1836 Triumph; O. Payne, 168
Lansdowne avenue; A. Fen ton, 67? M
Grove avenue; S. Thompson, 346 Bar*
nard; E. W. King, 695 Cambie; J. H.
Ley, 569 Hornby. Every delegate 4
should be present. If the central body
Is not all that It should be the fault
lies with Its units���the delegates; delegates, too, who are frequently Inclined
to stay away from meetings and voice
their opinions in the wrong place.
	
Dr. Schaffe, formerly minister of
commerce of the Austrian Empire, estimates the initial cost of a gen
European war would be $4,000,000,000
and the subsequent coat of carrying It
on would be fully $10,000,000 per day.
The glorious business possibilities that
such an event would open up la enough
to make the mouth of every capitalist
water most profusely.
 1 .���
The nomination, election and installation of officers of Typo. Union, No.
326, will take place at Labor Hall on
December 27th.
The Horseshoers' union is the latest,
local to take out a charter and apply
for affiliation with the Tradea council. ���.-Wm-^
-
THI   B.  C.  TBABIB UNIONIST. VANCOUVIR, BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Wm.
Dick
has taken over the business heretofore known ss WRAY A
DICK. The same high grade
of
Union Suspenders
Union Pants
Union Overalls
Union Hats
and a general line of Union Merchandise will be always on
hand.
Xmas Presents a specialty. Give
us a call and you will be satisfied.
li/illiam flick
21 Hastings St. W.
J
A  KNOTTY  PROBLEM.
. Never wss the power of labor to
produce wealth so great as now.
Never was It such a simple and easy
matter to provide enough food, clothing, shelter and other needful things
to satisfy the legitimate requirements
of human kind as at present Never
waa poverty, misery and degradation    has been worked to the limit.
capital. The resources of the earth
and the machinery of production are
held as the property of a small percentage of the entire population.
These owners constitute what 1s termed the capitalist class. By this ownership the capitalists are in complete
command of Industry and Its operation
cannot be carried on without their consent. Being in command of the resources of the earth and the means
of converting those resources Into
sustenance for human kind, the capitalists are in a position to command
the services of the workers and appropriate the wealth they bring forth
by their labor. As the workers must
have access to the means of production in order to live, they must, perforce, submit to such terms ss Imposed by the owners, the capitalists.
The only alternative is starvation.
Although the consent of the owners is necessary in order that the
worker may be sble to obtain his sustenance, that consent generally speaking, cannot be arbitrarily given or
withheld. It Is determined by circumstances over which the capitalists
themselves have no control. It new
marketa are available, or old ones capable ot further expansion, industry
will be carried on at a lively rate and
many workmen will find employment.
When all available markets have become fully supplied, production must
be slackened. This entails the discharge of workmen and the consequent distress that follows In the
wake of unemployment The capitalists are as powerless to prevent It as
the workmen themselves.
American and European capital has
spread Its tentacles to the uttermost
parts of the earth. Every land has
been Invaded by the surplus sweated
from the slaves of British. German.
French and American capitalists.
These great commercial countries
have developed such enormous productive powers that unless a constantly expanding market abroad can
be obtained, these powers cannot be
used and industrial, stagnation and decay must ensue.   The market abroad
The
more widespread throughout the
world than today. Millions of workmen and their families are even now
at the point of starvation, owing to
lack of employment or an insufficient
wage when in employment   In spite
Oriental races which have hitherto
absorbed a large volume of the plunder wrung from European and American slaves, are now rapidly rising to
modern industrial stature. Instead of
continuing as heavy purchasers of for-
of ail vociferation to   the   contrary    eign goods; they are now beginning to
these conditions are becoming more    pour their wares into the world's mar-
these conditions are becoming more
acute and unbearable each day.
Though optimistically inclined persons
eagerly scan the social and industrial
horlson for promise ot relief, there is
none in eight There la ample evidence to warrant the prophecy that
capitalist society le now floundering In
an industrial depression from which
It can never recover, and that the ln-
etinct Of self-preservation will compel
the human race to parte Itself of capital and Its baneful rule by the meat
sweeping and drastic revolution ever
recorded in history- 1
The entire world Is now ruled by
pour their wares into the world's market in competition with the products
ot the slaves of Christian lands. In
this struggle between an Oriental capitalism in command of millions of
docile and tireless slaves, accustomed
to frugal living, and an Occidental cap-
Itallsm whose slaves have not been
need to the aasae
low standard of living. It requires no
prophet to foresee the result Under
such circumstances the "fittest to
viva" will net be
foreign  marketa   undergoing
*****
threatening to become totally lost, the
situation In Europe and America becomes each day more acute. The
great commercial countries are already plastered with capitalist investments at every available point. The
United States alone has a productive
and carrying power, which. If used to
anything like its full extent could
supply the reasonable needs ot half
the population of the globe and Britain, France and Germany are not far
behind. This huge power of production cannot be used In either of these
countries because the products could
not be disposed of in conformity with
the code of ethics peculiar to capitalist civilization. That is. they could
not be so disposed of ss to increase
the capital, and consequently the power of the modern ruling class. Hence,
production must suffer curtailment
and millions of workmen be forced
Into starvation in order that capital
may continue to rule. Just because
the tools of production have become
so highly developed that they have
multiplied the productive power of
labor beyond the point where It Is possible for capital to dispose of the
product, huge masses of workmen
must be doomed to unemployment
with all that retinue of horrors that
such a condition entails.
It is up to the capitalists and their
henchmen to figure out a solution for
the difficulty. If they do not figure
It ouc and that right speedily, the
working clsss will be compelled to
do It ln Its own behalf.
It Is a knotty problem, but It must
be solved. Its solution will wipe out
the rule ot capital and remove ita
baneful sway from the pathway ot
civilising influences.
As the problem can only be solved
by the abolition of capital and Its
rule, It Is evident that the solution
will not be applied by capitalists and
their henchmen. The problem is too
knotty for that sort of a bunch.
IN8TANCE8 OF ECONOMIC DETERMINISM.
By Will R. Shier.
Chattel slavery supplanted cannibalism because It was found more profitable to make prisoners of war work
than to kill them
��� *   ���
According to revelations made In
the memoirs of General Kuropatkin,
the Russo-Japanese war was occasioned not by national antagonisms, but by
the speculations of certain highly
placed personages, Including the Russian royal family, in Important timber concessions in Korea,
��� ���   ���
The introduction ot capitalism Into
Turkey. Persia aad China has usees
sltated  recent political    changes    In
meat ot eeaetitntt-onel government to
the needs ot the rising bourgeois
Notwithstanding the halo ot sentiment which encircled the American
civil war and the popular opinion that
the emancipation ot the negro waa effected upon purely humanitarian
grounds, the conflict waa really one
between two types ot civilisation, the
one based on chattel slavery, the other
on contract labor. Now. though It la
apparent to everybody that the
South's opposition arose out of the
material Interests ot Its master class.
It Is not so apparent that the Norths
Interference was not entirely disinterested. But such the shrewd student
of history knows to be the case. The
manufacturers of the North supported
the war because they realised, son* *
of them consciously, some only by instinct that freeing the slaves in the
Confederate states would re-act upon
the labor market In their own part
of the country, provide them with a
plentltude of wage laborers for their
factories, and thereby render it possible for them to cut down wages by
Increasing the army of the unemployed and lower the standard of living
among the whites by importing negro
labor from south of the Mason and
Dixon's line.
There Is no disguise about the commercial character of the American
revolution. The mercantile and manufacturing class of England, through
their committee, the British government sought to monopolise colonial
trade for themselves by various duties
snd pieces of legislation calculated to
cripple the enterprise of the New England bourgeoisie, which, of course, the
latter resented, with the result that
rather than submit to the restraints
imposed upon them by the mother
country, they declared for independence.
Why should organised labor continue begging the old parties to do
"something" for labor. The something that the old parties do for labor
is to "do" it Gompers' policy of begging shows to what degradation labor
has come under his generalship. No
intelligent worklngman will longer follow such a program: he will Instead
cast his ballot with the uncompromising aggressive movement of the revolutionary working class.
PHONE 1266.
Fancy Groceries and Provisions.
S. T. WALLACE
FURNITURE
Carpets,   Linoleums,   Curtains,
Blinds, Stoves, Go-carts,   Baby
Buggies, ate. It pot cent oft
fOr cash oa Furniture.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
ImM fjWaWmWMWm^aW
��� ji
-J
(
-
When Patronizing Our Advertizers Don! Forget to Mention the Trades Unionist
.
1
. ���
��� Y{
\r
.."'.
.
THK   B.   C   TRADtS UNIONIST, VANCOUVIR, BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LATFORM
/ ���
Socialist Party of Canada
m*. the Socialist Party of Canada, ln convention assembled,
affirm our allegiance to, and support ot the principles and programme of the revolutionary working class.
Labor produces all wealth, and to the producers it should belong. The present economic system is based upon capitalist ownership of the means of production, consequently all the products ot
labor belong to the capitalist class. The capitalist Is therefore
master; the worker a slave.
Bo long as the capitalist class remains in possession of the
reins of government all the powers of the State will be used to
protect and defend their property rights ln the means of wealth
production and their control of tho product of labor.
The capitalist system gives to the capitalist an ever-swelling
stream of profits, and to the worker an ever Increasing measure
of misery and degradation.
The Interest ot the working class lies ln the direction of setting
Itself free from capitalist exploitation by the abolition of the wage
system, under which Is cloaked the robbery of the working-class
at the point of production. To accomplish this necessitates the
transformation of capitalist property ln the means of wealth production into collective or working-class property.
The Irrepressible conflict of Interests between the capitalist
and the worker Is rapidly culminating in a struggle for possession
of the power of government���the capitalist to hold, the worker to
secure It by political action. This Is the class struggle.
Therefore, we call upon all workers to organise under the
banner of the Socialist Party of Canada with the object of conquering the public powers for the purpose of setting up and enforcing the economic programme of the working class, as follows:
1. The transformation, as rapidly as possible, of capitalist
property In the means ot wealth production (natural resources,
factories, mills, railroads etc.,) into the collective property of the
working class.
S. The democratic organisation and management ot Industry
by the workers.
3.   The establishment, as speedily as possible, of production for
nee Instead of production for profit
The Socialist Party, when ln office, shall always and everywhere until the present system is abolished, make the answer to
thla question Its guiding rule of conduct: Will this legislation advance the Interests of the working class and aid the workers in
their class struggle against capitalism? If It will the Socialist
Party is for it; If It will not the Socialist Party 'is absolutely
opposed to It
In accordance with this principle the Socialist Party pledges
Itself to conduct all the public affairs placed ln Its.hands in such
a manner as to promote the Interests of the working class alone.
OCFtRREO ELECTIONS IN
UP-COUNTRY DISTRICTS
I
I .
The election for members of the
Dominion Parliament was held ln
Kootenay and Tale-Cariboo districts
on Thursday, November 18th. The
Conservative candidate in each district waa elected by a heavy plurality.
Our candidates, "Bin" Davidson in
Kootenay and Charles Bunting in
Tale-Cariboo, received 1S7S and 416
votes respectively. This was ln the
former case about 10 per cent and ln
the latter about 10 per cent of the
total vote east
These two districts are each of
enormous area aad the population la
in a large part widely scattered and
therefore difficult to reach with our
propaganda. In spite of this, however, the showing is an excellent one
and shows, upon the whole, a persistent growth of the movement that is
most gratifying.
The Increase in the vote In the
Kootenay district over that of four
years ago is fully 100 per cenU In
a number of places, such as Iuichel,
Coal Creek, Fernie, Moyie, Silver Cup
Mine, etc., the vote for Davidson waa
greater {nan the combined vote of the
two capitalist candidates. These
cases afford excellent Illustrations of
the over whelm Ing power In the hands
get sense enough In their heads to nee
It ln their own behalf.
The showing made in the Yale-Car-
iboo, while not SO good as In the
Kootenay. wag a most excellent one
under the circumstances. The district around the Boundary, i.e., Phoenix, Grand Forks and Greenwood, has
been more completely shot to pieces
ss a result ot the Industrial depression than probably any other part of
the province. The metalliferous mines
and the smelters were either entirely
shut down, or their working force
greatly reduced during last fall and
winter. Many have not yet fully regained their normal activity. Large
numbers of men were compelled to
lesve the district and search for employment elsewhere, and many who
came ln later on were not ln time to
get on the voters' list. Then again,
the discrimination against workmen
snd their discharge for political reasons hss evidently been carried to a
further extent ln the Boundary district during recent months than ln
sy other part of the province. Taking
into consideration these facts and
remembering that a considerable portion of Yale-Cariboo Is agricultural,
therefore rather Inclined toward Conservatism, the showing made Is a very
creditable one and in every way calculated to urge the comrades there to
push forward with renewed energy
ln order to be fully prepared for the
next turn of the political wheel.
If there Is one thing that has been
satisfactorily emphasized by the result of these deferred elections, it is
the complete discrediting of those
vociferous Liberal mountebanks who
took pains to lay special strees upon
their exceeding great love for the
worklngman. The blatant Mclnnls
here in Vancouver received such a
turning down at the hands of those
he "loved" that It will prove a miracle
if his political pipe has not been extinguished forever, so far as any elective office Is concerned. The malodorous Ralph Smith ot Vancouver Island
Infame was repudiated by an overwhelming majority of the workmen
-
���
_
��
ot the north end of his district where
he waa well known, and hie battered
political hide waa only saved by the
extreme southern end of the district
where he was least known, and even
then at the expense of methods that
would scarce bear the light of invest.*
gation. Bo thoroughly detested Is he
by the workingmen of his home town.
Nanalmo, that he barely escaped being
mobbed at their hands oa election
night It la even said upon good
authority that no self-respecting dog
n Nanalmo will longer deign to bark
at him, or extend other canine courtesies, for fear of losing caste with his
brethren. Then to round out this repudiation of labor-loving Liberal decoys and skates, the fulsomely affectionate political old woman. Smith
Curtis, got what waa coming to her
In the Kootenay. Thrown Into the
political discard, she can now give
way to a similar brand of anguish to
that which wrung the heart ot Venus
where Adonis failed to respond to her
wooing.
But while we are overjoyed to
know that the wooing of Labor by the
political wenches of the Liberal party
has been in vain as far as British Columbia is concerned, we are wondering It the reason Adonis spurned the
proffered love of Venus was because
she wss a scrawny old political Jade
of battered appearance and with a
bad breath? Though we do not believe she was that sort, the fact still
remains that Labor In the' Kootenay
district spurned the wooing ot Smith
Curtis, no matter what the reason
therefor. Comrades of Kootenay and
Tale-Cariboo, you did well. Gird up
your loins for the next round.
Tenement Tessle���And' de novel
says de heroine had a willowy form,
used to pine for her lover and would
spruce up when she seen him coming
froo de gate.'
Shanty Sue���Gee, where did she
work���ln a sawmill?���Chicago Dally
News.
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When
TO HOUSEKEEPERS
CJ If you would like to spend less time in your kitchen
and woodshed, and have much more time for outdoor
life, recreation and pleasure, look into the question of
doing your cooking with a Gas Range.
Telephone your address to our office snd we will send a man
te measure your premises and give you an estimate of cost of
1 ..stalling the gae pipes,
Vancouver Gas Company, Limited.
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THE  B,   C.  TRASH UNIONIST. VANCOUVIR, SRITISH COLUMIIA.
'    .   >'
PLATFORM
Party of Canada
We, the Socialist Party ot Canada, In convention assembled,
affirm our allegiance to, and support of the principles and programme of the revolutionary working class.
Labor produces all wealth, and to the producers It should belong. The present economic system Is based upon capitalist ownership of the means of production, consequently all the products of
labor belong to the capitalist class. The capitalist Is /therefore
master; the worker a slave.
So long as the capitalist class remains ln possession ot the
reins ot government all the powers of the State will be used to
protect and defend their property rights in the means of wealth
production and their control of the product of labor.
The capitalist system gives to the capitalist an ever-swelling
stream of profits, and to the worker an ever Increasing measure
of misery and degradation.
The Interest of the working class lies ln the direction of setting
Itself tree from capitalist exploitation by the abolition of the Wage
system, under which Is cloaked the robbery of the working-class
at the point ef production. To accomplish this necessitates the
transformation of capitalist property ln thn means of wealth production into collective or working-class property.
The Irrepressible conflict of Interests between the capitalist
and the worker Is rapidly culminating ln a struggle for possession
of the power of government���the capitalist to hold, the worker to
secure It by political action. This Is the class struggle.
Therefore, we call upon all workers to organise under the
banner of the Socialist Party of Canada with the object of conquering the public powers for the purpose ot setting up and enforcing the economic programme of the working class, as follows:
1. The transformation, as rapidly as possible, of capitalist
property ln the means ot wealth production (natural resources,
factories, mills, railroads etc.,) Into the collective property of the
working class.
S. The democratic organisation and management of Industry
by the workers.
S.   The establishment, as speedily as possible, of production for
nee Instead of production for profit.
The Socialist Party, when in office, shall always and everywhere uutll the present system Is abolished, make the answer to
this question its guiding rule of conduct: Will this legislation advance the Interests of the working class and aid the workers ln
their class struggle against capitalism? If It will the Socialist
Party la for it; If It will not, the Socialist Party is absolutely
opposed to It
In accordance with this principle the Socialist Party pledges
Itself to conduct all the public affairs placed In Its hands ln such
a manner as to promote the interests of the working class alone.
DEFERRED ELECTIONS IN
UP-COUNIRY DISTRICTS
;��'.
therefore difficult to reach with our
propaganda. In spite of this, however, the showing is an excellent one
and shows, upon the whole, a persistent growth ot the movement thst Is
most gratifying.
The increase in the vote   in    the
Kootensjr district over that of four
years ago is fully 100 per cent. In
a number of places, such as Michel,
Coal Creek, Fernie, Moyle, Silver Cup
Mine, etc., the vote for Davidson was
greater (nan the combined vote ot the
two capitalist candidates. These
cases afford excellent Illustrations of
area and the population Is the overwhelming power In the hands
ln a large part widely scattered aad    of the working class once its units
The election for members of the
Dominion Parliament was held in
Kootenay and Tale-Cariboo districts
on. Thursday, November 12th. The
Conservative candidate in each district wag elected by a heavy plurality.
Our candidates, "Bill" Davidson ln
Kootenay and Charles Bunting In
Tale-Cariboo, received 1S7S and 416
votes respectively. This waa In the
former ease about SO per cent and In
the latter about 10 per cent of the
total vote east
These two districts are each   ot
get sense enough in their heads to use
It in their own behalf.
. The showing made In the Tale-Cariboo, while not so good as lp the
Kootenay, was a most excellent one
under the circumstances. The district around the Boundary, i.e., Phoenix, Grand Forks and Greenwood, has
been more completely shot to pieces
as a result of the Industrial depression than probably any other part of
the province. The metalliferous mines
and the smelters were either entirely
shut down, or their working force
greatly reduced during last fall and
winter. Many have not yet fully regained their normal activity. Large
numbers of men were compelled to
leave the district and search for employment elsewhere, and many who
came ln later on were not in time to
get on the voters' list. Then again,
the discrimination against workmen
snd their discharge for political reasons has evidently been carried to a
further extent In the Boundary district during recent months than ln
ay other part of the province. Taking
Into consideration these facts and
remembering that a considerable portion of Yale-Cariboo Is agricultural,
therefore rather inclined toward Conservatism, the showing made is a very
creditable one and ln every way calculated to urge the comrades there to
push forward with renewed energy
ln order to be fully prepared for the
next turn of the political wheel.
If there is one thing that has been
satisfactorily emphasized by the result of these deferred elections, it is
the complete discrediting of those
vociferous Liberal mountebanks who
took pains to lay special strees upon
their exceeding great love for the
worklngman. The blatant Mclnnis
here in Vancouver received such a
turning down st the hands of those
he "loved" that it will prove a miracle
if his political pipe has not been extinguished forever, bo fsr as any elective office is concerned. The malodorous Ralph Smith of Vancouver Island
lnfame was repudiated by an overwhelming  majority  ot  the  workmen
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=
ot the north end ot hla district where
he waa well known, and his battered
political hide was only saved by the
extreme southern end of the district
where he was least known, and even
then at the expense ot methods thst
would scarce bear the light of invest!*
gatlon. So thoroughly detested Is he
by the workingmen ot his home town,
Nanalmo, that he barely escaped being
mobbed at their hands on election
night It is even said upon good
authority thst no self-respecting dog
n Nanalmo will longer deign to bark
at him, or extend other canine courtesies, for fear ot losing caste with his
brethren. Then to round out this repudiation of labor-loving Liberal decoys and skates, the fulsomely affectionate political old woman, Smith
Curtis, got what was coming to her
in the Kootenay. Thrown into the
political discard, she can now give
way to a similar brand of anguish to
that which wrung the heart of Venus
where Adonis failed to respond to her
wooing.
But while we are overjoyed to
know that the wooing of Labor by the
political wenches of the Liberal party
has been in vain as far as British Columbia is concerned, we are wondering if the reason Adonis spurned the
proffered love of Venus wss because
she was a scrawny old political Jade
of battered appearance and with a
bad breath? Though we do not believe she was that sort, the fact still
remains that Labor in the Kootenay
district spurned the wooing ot Smith
Curtis, no matter what the reason
therefor. Comrades of Kootenay and
Yale-Cariboo, you did well. Gird up
your loins for the next round.
Tenement Tessle���And de novel
says de heroine had a willowy form,
used to pine for her lover and would
spruce up when she seen him coming
froo de gate.
Shanty Sue���Gee, where did she
work���In a sawmill?���Chicago Daily
News.
TO HOUSEKEEPERS
*\ If you would like to spend less time in your kitchen
and woodshed, and have much more time for outdoor
life, recreation and pleasure, look into the question of
doing your cooking with a Gas Range.
Telephone your address to our office snd we will send a man
to measure your premises and give you an estimate of cost of
i .ntailing the gac pipes,
���sssss,
Vancouver Gas Company,
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THI   ���.   t%  THAOBft UNIONIST. VANCOUVIR, IRITISH COLUMBIA.
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TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
Officers, Committees, Delegates���Who They Are, When They Meet,
and Their Addresses.
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OFFIOBR8    OF    TRADES    AND
LABOR   COUNCIL.
Meets  1st and 3rd    Thursdays    In
Labor Ball at 8 p. m.
President.
R. P. Pettipiece.2138 WestmlnBter Av.
Phone 2507.
Vice-President,
J. A. Aicken 346 Barnard
General Secretary.
Harry Cowan 880 Homer St.
Secretary-Treasurer.
A. R. Burns Labor Hall
Statistician.
H. Sellers 1790 Albert St.
(Phone B1965.)
Sergeant-At-Arms.
8. Kernighan....820 Twelfth Ave. E.
Executive Committee.
Above* officers and W. W. Sayer, 847
Homer; P. W. Dowler, 2428 Scott; J.
Geo. W. Williams 541 Robson 8t.
Executive meets  evening   preceding Trades and Labor Council meeting ln Labor Hall, at 8 p. m.
Organization Committee.
J. A. Aiken 346 Barnard
J. H. Ley 569 Hornby
R. Craig 116 Georgia
Parliamentary   Committee.
P. W. Bowler 2848 Scott
W. Sayer 847 Homer
E. C. Knight 1333 Keefer
F. Heays 1836 Triumph St!
G. Payne 159 Lansdowne Ave.
A. renton 557 Grove Ave.
S. Thompson 346 Barnard
B. W. King 695 Cambie
J. H. Ley 569 Hornby
Meets second and fourth  Thursdays in Labor Hall.
DELEGATES TO TRADES COUNCIL
Bricklayers and Masons.
W. W. Sayer 687 Homer St
C. Clayton 1286 Hornby
V. B. Gordon	
Geo. Rothney 911 Richards
J. Campbell	
Brotherhood ot Carpenters.
& Kernighan . .820 Twelfth Ave. E.
P. W, Dowler 2428 Scott 8t
R. J. McRae 242 Dufferln St. E.
J. W. Schurman  23S0 Cornwall
G. W. Williams 541 Robson
Hy. Davis... Waverley Hptel
Jas. Edwards. Agent.... .Hotel Qulnte
G. W. Cumnock...... Qulnto Hotel
H. Leyfleld QlaagOW Hotel
Q.Mo%att ...515 Dunlevy St.
-���-.���_
Whnn
Barbers.
C. E. Hewitt Grotto, Granville St.
Caas. Lear Atlantic
J. B. Cameron, Metropole Barber Shop
Geo. Debalt ._,	
Builders' Laborers.
H. Sellars 1790 Albert St.
G. Payne 159 Lansdowne Ave.
(Phone A1214.)
John Sully 1885 Eighth Ave. W.
R. A. Stalker 976 Hastings E.
R. Forrest 309 Westminster Ave.
Building Trades Alliance.
J. G. Smith	
J. Duncanson 629 Westminster Av.
Brewery Workers.
T. A. Bell 228, 9th Ave. E.
Cigarmakers.
A. Blee Mainland Cigar Factory
R. Craig 116 Georgia St.
W. Jardine Mainland Cigar Factory
Civic Employees.
R. Morrison 320 Georgia
J. Clarke 1009 Burrard
E. W. King 695 Cambie
Cooks and Waiters.
H.  Harder 150  Hastings  .St
C. Davis 150 Hastings E.
A. J. Arnason 150 Hastings E.
H. Perkins 150 Hastings E.
J. Forshee 150 Hastings E.
Commercial Telegraphers.
Phillips P.O. Box 432
W
J.
H.
H
J.
B. C. Knight 1333 Keefer St
M. Harger  Hotel Delmonlco
Geo. Jenkins  Epworth P O.
Iron Moulders.
John Base	
L. Hlldebrand �����
M. B. Curtis 891 Princess St
Leather Workers.
W. G. Ward 209 Prior
Laundry Workera,
W. Roberts. Cascade Laundry
J. Scott Pioneer Laundry
Mrs. Powell Pioneer Laundry
Machinists.
J .H. McVety . .1744 Ninth Ave. W.
S. W. C. Coen 848 Seymour
C. Matteson 832 Helmcken St
A. Fenton 557 Grove 8t
A. Beasley 564 Sixth Ave. E.
Musicians.
T. Turner	
Printing
.......���>.���>.
G. Johnson
I. McWhinnie  ....622  Princess St
JL H. Cleary     COS Drake
Street Railway Employees.
8. Thompson   346 Barnard
J. Briggs 	
J. A. Aicken 346 Barnard St.
F. A. Hoover.. 613 Westminster Ave.
G. Lenpesty 232 Lansdowne Ave.
Structural   Iron Workers.
A. Foote P.O. Box 1196
Stone Cutters.
J. Bateman Epworth, P. O.
W. Mills 648 Granville St.
Typographical.
R. P. Pettipiece. .2138 Westm'r. Ave.
A. R. Burns Labor Hall
J. C. Wilton Evans A Hastings
H. Cowan 880 Homer St.
H. Neelands 603 Thurlow St.
Tailors.
J. H. Ley   569 Hornby
F. Perry
A
W. A. Mclnnis 790 Granville
Garment Workers.
Mrs. Walker..W.J. McMaster A Son
Nicholson    Scotland Woolen Mills
No. 1 Branch Amalgamated Carpenters���Alternate Tuesday.
Builders' Laborers���Alternate Tuesday.
Electric Picture Operators���Every
Tuesday morning.
Quarrymen���First Wednesday.
Barbers���First and third Wednesday.
Bricklayers and Masons���First and
Third Wednesdays.
Plasterers���First and Third Wednesday.
Stereotypers���Second Wednesday.
Lathers���Second  and   Fourth   Wednesday.
United Bro. Carpenters���Second and
fourtn Wednesday.
Electrical Wire  Workers���No.
213
meets 2nd. and 4th. Tuesdays. No.
621 meets 2nd. and 4th. Wednesdays.
Paterson  .. ..............     Leather Workers���First Thursday.
Trades snd Labor Council���First and
third Thursday.
Pile Drivers���First and third Thursday.
Garment Workers���Second Thursday.
*.
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Shields      J-
Electrical Wire Workers.
Blacksmiths.
T. Hanafln  326 Hastings E.
B. Watts 	
J. Outhett   260 1-2 Barnard
Boilermakers.
Frank Heays 1836 Triumph St.
Angus Fraser 1157 Howe St.
.    Theatrical   Stage   Employees.
A. N. Harrington 401 Harris St.
Percy	
Electric Picture Operators.
A. Bard	
UNIONS MEETING  AT
HALL AND DATE
MEETING.
LABOR
OP
Cigar Workers���Second Thursday.
Laundry    Workers ��� Second    and
Fourth Thursdays. '
Tailors���Fourth Thursday.
Parliamentary Committee ��� Second
and fourth Thursdays.
Bridge and Structural Iron Workers
���First and third Fridays.
Pressmen���First Friday.
Civic Employees���Second and fourth
Fridays.
Pattern Makers���Third Friday.
Granite Cutters���Third Friday.
Iron Moulders���Fourth Friday.
Letter Carriers���Second Saturday.
Bakers���Second and   fourth   Saturdays.
Bartenders���First Sunday afternoon
and third Sunday evening.
Commercial Telegraphers ��� Second
Sunday morning.
Theatrical Stage Employees���Second
Sunday afternoon.
UNIONS THAT DO NOT MEET AT
LABOR HALL.
Typographical���Last Sunday.
Boilermakers���First and third Monday.
Bro. Railway Carmen���First and
third Monday.
Sheet Metal Workers���First and
third Monday.
Allied Printing Trades-Council���Second Monday.
Blacksmiths ��� Second and fourth
Monday.
Machinists Second and fourth Monday.
Stonecutters     (Soft) ��� Second     and
fourth Tuesday.
Bookbinders��� First Tuesday.
Federal Union No. SS���Third Tuesday-
Maintenance   of   Waymen ��� Third
Tuesday.
uon i Forget to Mention tne Trades unionist.
Painters���Plumbers' Hall, SIS Gamble St. Every Tuesday.
Plumbers���313   Gamble   St.   Every
Wednesday.
Cooks, Waiters and Waitresses   150.
Hastings St. B. Every Friday.
Street Railway Employees���Odd Fellows' Hall, Second and Fourth Wednesdays.
Musicians���Corner Robson and Gran-
viiie, Second Sunday.
No. S Branch    amalgams ted   Car*
penters��� Meets alternate Mondays
at 56S Granville.
No. 3   Branch
penters���Meets alternate Mondays
At corner ot Seventh avenue and
Granville St
m
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