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British Columbia Tribune Jul 9, 1866

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Array Vol. I.
YALE, MONDAY, JULY 9, 1866.
No. 14
A VISIT TO TENNYSON.
A correspondent of the Home Journal thus
describes a visit to Tennyson, the poet:
The Poet's Home.
Mr. Tennyson's residence at Farringford
House, Isle of Wight, is at once spacious, unpretending and elegant. It has a wide front,
all clustered over with the trailing ivy leaves;
to the right of which runs a picturesque
porch, completely festooned with wood-bines,
and, at thc left side, appears a pleasant conservatory filled with choice plants. I was
charmed with the broad paths as I approached
the house, which were sheltered irregularly,
on each side, with ancient oaks which threw
their spreading branches completely over
them. Then the wide level lawns extended
on each side to shaded allees in which I loved
to think the poet wandered, weaving sweet
fancies that should charm the world.
A butler, in plain clothes, ushered me into
a cabinet until he could inform the poet ol
my arrival. Perhaps no better index to the
tastes of Tennyson could be found than this
collection (gathered mostly by himself,) of
minerals and fossils, curious Crustacea, shells
and chrystals, all labelled and arranged- carefully. In a few moments I was shown into
the drawing-room, where I saw Mrs. Tennyson
and tho poet's maiden sister. The former is
a lady of perhaps 45 years of age, with dark
hair, large brown eyes and a mouth of exceeding sweetness. Her voice is rich and
very musical, and, indeed, she reminded me
very much of the pictures of Beatrice Porii
nuri. The i-ister of Mr. Tennyson was—well,
very homely, and were it not that the grace
which ever surrounds a well-bred English
lady enveloped her, I should have wondered
sf.ill more if th s could have been Arthur Hal
lam's fiance; yet, I remembered that the
poet had still another sister married to Judge
Kerr, in Jamaica, so I ceased my speculations.
Tlie hidic entertained me by showing me
somf exquisite photographic albums, and »
packet ot photographs of Mr. Carlyle, and a
few other notable gentlemen of the literati,
which had that morning arrived from Loudon,
aud Mrs. Tennyson proudly exhibited to me
the fine p >rtraiis of her two little sous (lo
and 12 years old, respectively) which had
been sent home from the painters.
How Tennyson Looks.
As I was examining them Mr. Tennyson
came in from his study. How can I describe
him io you?
He is, perhaps, five feet nine inches in
height, but he stoops much as he walks and
thus looks shorter, lie does not s-em to be
above 50 years of ago, yet his gait is feeble,
and the wearing of glasses adds to tha impression of his being older- His dress is extremely old-fashioned—indeed, ha looked
more like an old picture stepping out of a
Irani? than a gentleman of the ninete* nth
century.- His coat, short in the waist, was ot
a sort of linsey-woolsey material of a grey
mixed color, and fitted him very light; vest
and trousers of the same material. Around
his ample shirt-collar a black cravat was
loosely tied. But nothing could detract from
the power of his massive forehead, high and
broad, and nothing could he more picturesque
than the long black hair, fine as .-ilk, (but
plentifully mixed with grey,) which fell over
his tine head, down even to his shoulders.
His eyes are dark gray, I think, and have the
peculiar appearance abiut tne lids common
to all students, and especially night-readers,
which is very clearly perceired and defined in
photographs of the poet. His mouth is constantly smiling, but his eyes seem to be absent
while he is speaking, searching everywhere
for something that is not present—that
strange speculative look that is not easy to
convey by description, and must be comprehended rather than clearly defined. His voice
is rich and sonorous, but he chooses his words
slowly, aud, I s'lould think by this, betrays
that, in his composition, lie is equally careful
and slow. A son of dreamy, ruminating
Voice, that has spoken, yet is far beyond the
voice in thought.
His Poor Opinion of America.
Our conversation turned upon the beauties
of the Isle oi Wight, England generally, my
own stay in it, and pradmlly upon America
He had many questions to ask me of Boston
friends—the sudden death of Mr. Ticknor (of
Ticknor k Fields) and finally asked me if I
knew Henry T. Tueki rman. I said I had not
that pleasure, and I understood him to praise
that gentleman. At last I expressed a hope
that, some day not far distant, we should have
the honor of a visit from him, so that the
thousands of lovers of his songs in America
could welcome him. He interrupted me by a
firm "No! I think not."
" Why ? may I ask."
" Ah ! you are too violent over there for
me."   (Referring to our civil war.)
" But now that we are at peace," I advanced,
*' and slavery is at an end"	
He interrupted quickly.
" Ah ! but your press," he said, it is positively outrageous and violent."
I tried to prove that some he named, ultra-
political papers, were exceptions, and that our
moderate, high-toned journals would com
pare favorably with those of England, but I
soon gathered from the laureate that he, in
common with the governing class in England,
had but little sympathy with the peaceful
settlement of our late rebellion, and I was
much pained by the reflection that, though
our deeds were " writ in iron," we should not
have this " shadowy honor" upon their tombs.
However, on all icsthetical subjects we clasped
hands, and thc moments fled all too quickly
in converse with that pure soul. So, with
tender memories, I left Farringford House,
carrying away with me some sweet souvenirs
of pictures, flowers and autographs.
PRODUCTIVENESS OF CALIFORNIA.
Mr. Richardson, tbe correspondent of thc
New York Tribune, in one of his interesting
letters, mentions the following particulars
about the great productiveness of California:
" Small grain is the most natural crop. Ol
the entire agricultural product, barley reaches
39 per cent.—a larger production than in any
other part of the world; wheat, 34 per cent.;
oats, 10; potatoes, 10, and corn only 4.
Sixty bushels of barley to the acre are not
uncommon, and in 1853, in the valley of Pa-
jaro, J. B. Hill raised 14,900 bushels from 100
acres, a sing e acre producing 149 bushels.
Canning says, with a good di al of truth, that
nothing in the world is so fallacious as facts,
except figures; but this statement is on the
authority of a careful and trustworthy writer,
John S. Hittell, whose "Resources of California" is peculiarly valuable and exhaustive.
He believes that many larger crops of barley
hive been produced in the State.
The root vegetables thrive wonderfully and
grow to enormous size. According to the
•ame author, vegetables have been exhibited
at the Agricultural Fairs weighing as follows:
an onion, 11 ou< ces avoirdupois, 21 inches in
uircurn erence ; a white turnip, 26 pounds; a
tomato, 26 inches in circumference ; cabbage-
heads weighing 43 to 63 pounds; a water-
in Ion, 65 pounds; a red beer, 118 pounds,
five feet long by one foot in diameter; a
squash, 265 pounds. Hittell's stories, like his
cabbages and squashes, must stand on their
own bottoms; both are surely large enough
to do so without toppling. But Fred. McCrel-
lish of the Aha has given me a little of } tbe
ocular proof,' in the shape of a beet weighing
fifty-five pounds, which he avers may do for
exhibition in the East, bat is not much of a
vegetable for California! This, by way of
preparing the reader for something about
California fruit, altogether beating the beets
It' incredulous, let him season his admiration
for a while un'il he hears the legend of the
x'onoma grapes and the story of the Sacra
men to pears "
Messrs. Culler & Parsons
Have now ready at
SAVANA'S  FERRY,
A BOAT OP
TWENTY TONS BURDEN,
And are prepared to
CONVEY FREIGHT OR PASSENGERS
To the head of
SHUSWAP   LAKE.
Storage and a person to take charge at Savana's.
For freight or passage apply to
BU1E BROTHEBS, Lytton.
23.1,1308. 1
Storage and Forwarding,
YALE, B.  C.
PARTIES SHIPPING BY TIIE
YALE-LYTTON ROUTE,
Are advised that
KIMBALL & GLADWIN
Hive ereclel an extenshe
STOREHOUSE   AND   DOCK
At Vale, B. 0., and are prepared to
Receive, Store & Forward Goods.
Or the Proprietors.
Savana's Ferry, Feb
Livery and Sale  Stables.
W. H.  SUTTON,
YALE, B. C,
HAVING THE BEST AND MOST OON-
v-me t Mib.es in Yu.-, is prupamu io acebmtno.
i.no the TraviTmg Public, T auist Tiand Paokwj, wilb
Stabling or Corrall room. HAY and GRAIN of all
Itiuds iu quantities to suit.
Buggy and Saddle Horses at a moment's notice.
Horses Bought and Sold on Commission.
Yale, April 10, 1668.
PETER   CLAIR,
YALE, B. C,
Wholesale and -Retail Merchant in
Groceries and Provisions,
DRY    GOODS,   CLOTHING,
BOOTS AND SnOES, ETC.
BA KERY !
Pine Fresh Bread always on hand.
GOLDEN   GATE   FLOUR
Direct from San Francisco sold on commission. 13
The capacity of the Building is about 400 tons, and it
is perfectly isolated, offering security from Fire
soldora mot with in intoiior towns.
LARGE  STOCK  OF
Groceries,   Provisions,  &c,
On laud, which will be sold ou reasonable terms.
GOOPS RE-PACKED A\D FHE'GHTS ENGAGED AT
THE LOWEST RATES.
Parties shipping Goods through us, will mark lo tho
caro of
KIMBALL & GLADWIN.
Yale, B. C, 88th May, 1866. 12
HO!   FOR   BIG   BEND.
CACHE CREEK HOUSE.
THIS HOUSE ia situated two miles from Bona«
parte ana twenty irom Savana's Ferry,*ud has
been flttod up for the accommodation of travellers
to the
BIG    BEND   MINES.
PEED !     PEED !     PEED !
REECE   &  CO.,
Oiler to tho Trade
Oat-Hay, Barley, Oats and Wheat,
All Colonial Growth, from their Ranch at the Chlla-
whaclc.
CORRALL   ROOM   FREE   OF   CHARGE.
Apply at the BUTCHER SHOP,
13 Front street, Yale.
It affords the best accommodation for man and beast.
The BAR is furnished with the best of
Wines, Liquors and Cigars,
And tho TABLE Is supplied with the best of vegetables, grown on this celebrated raneb. Tbo services of
a first-rate cook have been secured.
Good Saddle Horses for Hire
AT THE STABLES.
The STABLES are furnished with tho best or hay,
barley and ours, and •'Boston," tho well-known proprietor, is always on hand to receive his guests.
W W. H SANFORD.
THE  ASHCROFT HOUSE.
MESSRS. CORNWALL'S.
AT THIS WELL KNOWN HOUSE, 104 miles
above Yalu anil mi .way b twuiu SpeiiOe'S Bridge
auu Sivuua's Ferry, travelers will find Rood acen"-mo-
dution, the beet of liviug, of LIQUORS and of WINES.
Fresh Butter, Milk and Vegetables.
GOOD STABLING AND CHEAP FEED. 13
JOB   PRINTING!
Cards, Bill Heads, etc., etc.,
Executed at the Tiubu.nb Office at
MODERATE RATES.
THE   FERRY   HOTEL,
SAVANA, B. 0.
Proprietors,
-   Messrs. Kay tt Chapperon.
Good Table, Fresh Butter, Eggs and Milk.
Clean Beds. Stabling Accommodations, with
Outs, Hay and Barley. 10
BIG  BENDERS!
,.„„ ,„       BONAPARTE HOUSB AT
the Junction ut' th* Cariboo ana Big Bend roads ■
SRMLIK k PARK,
11 Fre»rM*rs.
pOME_ TO. THE,
DR. J. E. BROUSE,
PHYSICIAN, SURGEON, 4c.,
CANADIAN. LICENTIATE *
GRADUATE  OF McGILL UNIVERSITY,
MONTREAL, O. B.,
Can be consulted daily at his office in Tale,
next to Oppenheiuier k Co.'s a:ore.
DRUGS  AND  PATENT   MEDICINES
FOR  SALE.
13
GRELLEY & PITERRE,
Importers and Wholesale Dealers in
WINES,   SPIRITS,   &c,
4 Wharf street, opposite the Royal Hotel,
VICTORIA, V. Ii,
INVITE attention to their large nnd well as*
sol ltd stock o'" ktiglisb, French uud American ftua
WINE- and LIQUORS.
.'gents for Vatic -uvcr Island and British Columbia
far
Napolron's Cabinet Champagne,
Jules Mumm k Co.'s       do
Bouche Fils k Co.'i        do
Eugene Clicquot do
Boker's Bitters,
Bancroft's Cider,
Sainsevsin's Wines and Wine Bitters,
HosteUer's Bitters, etc.
To dealers purchasing in large quantities a liberal
discount, wiil be made for cash.
ORELLSY k FI1ERRE,
12 No. 4 *Wharl street, Victoria, V. 1.
HAUTIER'S HOTEL,
LYTTON CITY, B. C.
THIS HOTEL will he found Clean and Comfortable tor travellers. The Coolciug is of the
best, and tit Tablu is supplied with everything in
season. There is a well stocked Bar with prime
Liquors.
BEDS! BEDS!! BEDS!!!
LIVRRY   STABLES.
11 HAUTIER k CO., Prept's.
ALEXANDER COUTLEE,
BOSTON BAR, B. C,
Wholesale and Retail Merchant in
Groceries and Provisions,
LIQUORS,
DRY  GOODS, CLOTHING,
Arc. kc. It. \\
I Agents for tho British Columbia Tribune.
S .ivatia'a Ferry	
Seymour Citv .'.,.,
Frcncu.Creek, Big Bend
.Itinction	
Soda Creek .".'.".!!.'
Quesnelmouth ..
Van Winkle	
WllltaraS Crock ..
Now Westraiustor
...Barnard's Express
do
do
do
(In
do
do
(lo
Clarlyson k en.
 ...v. UIUI'JYSUIJ  t\   V '
Mllooet V. W. Foster
victoria Henry Lyne.
S.tn Frauoisoo W. Fisher.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TRIBUNE.
YALE, MONDAY, JULY 9, 1866.
SELF GOVERNMENT.
It is a characteristic of thc American people that when they go forth to settle on the
outskirts of their vast domain they carry along
with  them an ardent love for their political
and  municipal institutions.     When two or
three houses arc built in the wilderness, they
denominate the place a city, and proceed to
elect a mayor and officers for its supervision,
and soon after hold conventions and caucuses
to inaugurate a territorial government on the
principle taught them by the Constitution of
their country.    What a contrast to this is the
conduct of Englishmen when they go abroad
to build up the colonial empire of their country.    One would think, from the apathy they
display in regard to free institutions and self
government, that they had been educated in
some land  where these  blessings were unknown.    The early history of these colonies,
will spring those higher political institutions
that Britains, desire but will exert themselves
so little to attain. The condition of this town,
without any municipal government whatever,
is a striking example of the apathy to which
we seek to draw attention as prevailing
throughout the country. Situated at the head
of navigation, and holding, as it does, the
key to tbe traffic of the interior, it must advance in proportion to the progresa made by
the country in population and wealth. Unlike
an ephemeral place such as New Westminister,
which has seen its best day, Yale will go on
increasing year after year until it has no rival
in either colony. With municipal institutions
of a liberal kind, the change that would be
wrought in a short time would be very great.
Taxation for local improvements levied on
real estate would compel those absentee proprietors who extract so large an income from
tbe place and retard its advancement, to contribute at least to its local improvement and
progress. Why are the inhabitants so dead
to their own interests as not to apply for a
charter, which even the present Government
could not refuse to grant?
The Big Bend Mines.
From Savana's Ferry to Seymour.
Tho undersigned has his fine
SCHOONER "MONITOR,"
50 Tons Burthen, and
SLOOP   "HENRY,"
12 Tons Burthen,
Making regular trips from Savana's Ferry to Soy mour.]
Both vessels have excellent acenmmodation, and have
provod themselves fast sailors. Passengers and freight
carried at REDUCED RATES.
14 WILLIAM MCORK.
W.    H.   SUTTON,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DKALIB IN
CAUTION.
MINISTERIAL CRISIS.
The latest telegraphic dispatches state that
Ministerial crisis had occurred in England,.
which means that the Government had beenJF 0 R T
beaten in the House ot Commons—we presume on the Reform Bill.   It was surmised
_,«, gotlating, buying, or in any way dealing with
any Promissory Notes or Bills of Exchange drawn by
any person or persons in favor of E. T. Dodgo k Co.,
late of Port Douglas, or of Edwin T. Dodge and George
C. Bent, individually, or with any oreithbr their property, stock and effects.
DRAKE k JACKSON,
New Westminster,
13 Solicitors.
WINES,   LIQUORS!
AND    CIGARS,
Coal Oil and Coal Oil Lamps, Acj
SOLE AGENT FOR
LYON k CO.'S CELEBRATED
CALIFORNIA  ALE!
IN BBLS. ANDNHALF BBLS.
Yale, April, 1868. \ 13
YALE  HOTEL
AND   RESTAURANT,
FRONT STREET, YALE, B. C
and in fact of all our colonies  nr«7« SZIS^ *nd maJest7 of the emW* in the face of
that the Ministry would resign, but such is the
tenacity for office of the Whigs that if there i
is any other alternative they will most asiur-!rTIHIS HOUSE affords Excellent A „ommoda
edly accept it in preference to the abandon-!-*- ti°a for travelers,
ment of office.    We sincerely hope tbe result
of the crisis will be to drive the party from
office that has done so much to lower the dig
FOR BIG BEND AN\CARIBOO!
A.  BARLO
Merchant and Forwarding Agent,
Ii now prepared t«
SHIP GOODS TO BIG BEND k CARIBOoj
ON THE MOST REASONABLE TERMS.
Yale, B.C., April 10th, 1896. 13
most anomalous  feature in the character of
our countrymen.     Why men who, at home,
were  accustomed  to exercise all the rights
tnd privileges accorded by the liberal institutions of their free country, cau be content to
denude themselves of all they hold dear and
cherish  beyond  expression  when they plant
their feet upon colonial soil, we arc at a loss
io  understind?   For years Britains in  the
colonics are satisfied to live under governments over which they have no control, and
patiently  submit  to have the country's progress retarded by mismanagement and profligate waste of the public funds at the hands
of  despotic rulers.     It is no fault of the
mother country that local self government is
not extended  to every part—even tbe most
distant—of her dependencies.    Thc aim  of
the Imperial  power bow is to make the colonies  self-supporting,  and the statesmen of
the present day know right well that thc only
sure road to reach that goal is to grant the
most liberal form of Constitution  to every
young colony that desires it.   But it is Dot the
custom with the Home authorities to grant
free institutions without they are demanded
by thc people for whose benefit they are designed.    No, they must be asked for, and the
importunities of the colonists pressed home
upon the Minister with an energy and eagerness that will prove to him the people are
in earnest and will not be thwarted in their
just demands.     It is painful to behold the
apathy and indifference that reigns throughout these colonies at the present time on the
very  eve  of great constitutional changes in
their government.  Men seem to be indifferent
as  to  whether they are to be ruled in the
future  by «n irresponsible oligarchy, or have
the power placed in their own hands to stem
thc prodigal expenditure of thc public finances
that has been going on, nnd thereby to arrest
the decay which bad government lias brought
upon   the  country.     If the very men who
here fold their arms and wait with listlessness
I'or coming events, with a stoical indifference
that is painful to notice, wcre at home, they
would  be actively engaged in every public
movement having for its object the advancement and  prosperity of their   aative land.
Why they should not feel equally interested
here in laying the foundation upon which a
prosperous country can alone be built up is a
mystery.    If the inhabitants of these colonies
have an interest in seeing the country pro-
gref s —and there are hundreds who have large
interests at stake—they should not only identify tliem«ol"»» -.:»!•
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
ALWAY & BAILEY,
Auctioneers & Commission
Merchants,
Salesroom, Fire-Proof Stone Building,
FRONT STREET, YALE, B. C,
Stores and Forwards Goods
AT   MODERATE   RATES.
14
GOOD BEDS, EXCELLENT FARE,
—AKD—
CHOICE   LIQUORS   AT  THE   BAR.
STABLING FOR ANIMALS.  HAY AND OATS
AT THE LOWEST RATES.
13 KELLEY k LANK, Proprietors.
REMOVAL.
THE BUSINESS OF
THOMAS  WILSON & CO.
Has been Removed to their
New Store In Masonic Hall,
GOVERNMENT STREET, VICTORIA, V. I.,
Opposito tho Bank of British Columbia.
SILKS, SHAWLS, PRINTED CAMBRICS and
DruSH Materials of every descripiio..; Long Cloths,
Sheetings and Quilts; Velvets, Tweeds, Lice Curtains,
Damasks, Reps, Chintzes;  Gents', Ladies' and Cbil
dren's Hosiery und Gloves; Trimmings, etc. 14
J. P. BARRY'S SALOON,
FRONT   STREET,
YALE, B. C.
ALES,   WINES   AND
LIQUORS,
Of the best description that can be imported
CIGARS!
OF THE OHOIOEST BRANDS.
The Proprietor will bo happy to have his friends give
him a call on their way to Big Bend.      13
T. DE NOUVION,
WHOLESALE   MERCHANT
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS,
LIQUORS,
Dry Goods, Clothing, &c.,
LYTTON, B. C. 13
PIONEER HOTEL,
SEYMOUR CITY,
At the Head of Navigation.
rpHE undersigned beg to intimate to the travel-
JL >ng public that they have opened the above hul.il,
wuere everything will bo supplied of tho best description. There is a good Cook engaged, and the best th ■
market affords wnl be served up daily.
The bar is stocked with the Choicest
NOTICE.
IN consequence of Mr. S. Baxter being about to
remove, our Power of Attorney formerly held by
him has been transferred to MR. WALTER B. GLADWIN, who is authorised to close up all Outstanding
business, and transact lurther transactions on our account in Yale
It is requested that all accounts due us will be settled
with Mr. Gladwin without delay.
14 LENEVEU & CO.
Opposition Line of Stages
—TO—
SAVANA'S   PERRY!
STAGES will leave Yale on the arrival of the
steamers for Savauu's F<rry, carrying Passengers
and Express Freight at REDUCED RATES.
11 JACOB DAVIS, Proprietor
WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
13
ROBINSON k BRAXTON,
, Proprietors.
REMOVAL.
LENEVEU &  CO.,
GRAIN AND PRODUCE DEALERS,
HAVE   REMOVED  to  the   Two-Story Fireproof building, Melds Block, opposite tho Post
uuice, Wharf street, Victoria, V. I. 14
Fellows, Roscoe & Co.
Desire to inform the inhabitants of the upper
country that they have opened a
D JOBBING
Kfwo~»ii^^ auu hardware Store,
alltWl ;„„..•......-„   .   ....    _*« louaai AT  YALE, B. C,
NEW    GOODS!
J.   M ITCHELL,
YALE, B. 0.,
HAS to inform the Public that he has just received a large and well selected slock of spleu-
nut new goods, comprising
Ladies' Dresses,
In great variety and latest fashions.
Gentlemen's  Clothing,
HOSIERY, BLANKETS, BOOTS k SHOES.
GROCERIES, kc. 10
COLONIAL   BAKERY,
FRONT   STREET,
YALE, B. C.
Bread, Pies and Cakes,
CONSTANTLY OF HAND.
13 A. McLARDY.
SB^iS&KSM&w* «"»™ Iron and Hard*
tomex?t^di^^ the ,and- The «t»b-
iJnf««i     raun|cip»I institutes we regard
SiSSft" lmP°rUnc« «'«» political, inas-
2&-mi? "0t 0n]y Promote local improve-
ments wh.ch otherwise would not be carried
ntc effect, but thPT forrn tht & from gj
And will keep on hand a full stock of Iron,
bteel, Blacksmiths' Materials, Tools, etc. and
a good assortment of General Hardware.
TEEMS INVARIABLY OASH.
M.iy28tb,l««8. ]2
N OTIC E.
Steamer "ENTERPRISE."
On and after May 28th, 1866, the steamer will leave
SODA   CREEK
MONDAY AND THURSDAY  MORNINGS,
AT    DAYLIGHT.
WILL MAVB
QUESNELMOUTH
WEDNESDAY k SATURDAY MORNINGS,
AT  SIX   O'CLOCK.
Freight from Soda Creek to Quesnelmouth, 1 '»<-. per lb.
Steamer Enterprise, M.-iy 17,1808. 13
FOREST   HOUSE.
36 Mile Post,
BETWEEN YALE AND LYTTON, B C.
TRAVELLERS  will   find   every   accommodation at this Hotel.    Excellent Cooking.   GOOD
BEOS.
STABLING FOR HORSES.
HAY and OATS At Lowest Rates.
I^OOTHROYD BROS,
11 1 Proprietors.
STABLING FOR HORSES.
WILLIAM~McWHA,
LYTTON CITY, B. C,
Begs to inform the public generally that he has
Stable  Accommodation
On his premises for upwards of Two Hundred Hones.
Hay and Oats for Sale cheap.
GOOD SADDLE HORSES FOR HIRE.
TERMS MODERATE M BRITISH COLUMBIA TRIBUNE.
YALE, MONDAY, JULY 9, 1866.
UNION.
Advices have been received by the last
mail from England, from the most reliable
sources, intimating that Union of these
colonies will be carried into effect immediately
and that the question of fixing tbe capital at
Victoria was under consideration. Mr. Card-
well, we learn, is strongly in favor of Victoria,
but Mr. Seymour and Colonel Moodj are
vigorously urging the claims of New Westminster. Should the Secretary of State be
induced to give heed to the representations
of two gentlemen who are in no sense of the
word representatives of tbe people of this
oountry, be will create more discontent and
dissatisfaction throughout both colonies than
he has any conception of. If it were not for
the severity of the winter and the stoppage
of traffic for a considerable portion of that
season of the year in this colony, the claims
of the interior to hare the capital could not
be resisted, but the natural barriers of snow
and frost present obstacles which cannot be
got over. It therefore remains to choese the
position for the capital that will give the
greatest amount of satisfaction to the inhabitants of both coloaies. We have reason to
know that the people of this country—with
the exception of the lot owners at New Westminster—would prefer to have Victoria as the
seat ot Government. Accessible at all seasons
of the year, its geographical position gives it
advautagei which cannot be overlooked and
places it far in advance of any other part of
either colony. Besides, we must have an attractive place in the country for miners to reside in during the winter, or they will push on
to San Francisco and there spend the money
they realize here in the summer. We need
scarcely say that the miners could not be got
to remain at New Westminster under any
circumstances, and if that place is selected
for thc capital, the only advantage it can reap
is from the few officials that will be located
there. In the present state of the colonies
we cannot build up two rival cities, and we
have no hesitation in saying that no amount
of adventitious bolstering up will ever convert the present capital into a place of note
or make it a pleasant place for people to
settle (.own in. It is just as well that the
public should speak out plainly on this subject, there is no benefit to be derived from
concealment of opinions or trifling on the
subject. The sooner Union and the capital is
definitely set at rest, the sooner will there be
an improvement iu the condition nf the
country. The capital at Victoria and Yale
made a port of entry, the commerce of the
country will receive a new impetus trat will
convert the present lethargy into activity and
new life.
CELEBRATION OF THE 90th ANNIVERSARY OF THE INDEPENDENCE OF THE
UNITED STATES.
Wednesday last, the 4th inst., being the
anniversary of the independence of the United
States,  was celebrated by all classes of the
citizens of Yale, without distinction, with thc
utmost hilarity and good feeling.   The day
was ushered in by a salute of artillery at three
o'clock, a.m., and from that hour to midnight
there was an uninterrupted flow of amusements and general rejoicing.   For some time
previous to the 4th, arrangements were in
progress to have everything in readiness to
make the day one of general amusement and
pleasure, and the result more than realized
the anticipations of the promoters.   Flags of
all nations were hoisted throughout the town,
the most conspicuous being the British Ensign
and the Stars and Stripes. During the day there
were boat races, trotting matches and horse
races, which wcre well contested and excited
the most lively interest.   A most amusing
feature of the day's proceedings was  the
parading of tbe "Original Fenian Bull," a
real live animal, gaily painted and decorated
with  ribbons for   the occasion.    A figure
dressed up to represet a Fenian was strapped
on his baek.    A native drove   the   beast
through the town, and he was accompanied
by a crowd of Siwashes who seemed to enjoy
the sport with uncommon zest.   If there were
any Fenians present they would not feel complimented by the ridicule cast upon them by
the exhibition.    At two d'cloek, p. m., there
was a cold   dinner served at Mr. Sutton's
saloon, liberally provided by the proprietor,
and to which ample justice was done by those
present.   In the evening there were several
balloon ascents, after which a grand pyrotechnic display took place which gave delight
and satisfaction to a vast concourse of people.
The fireworks, which were of the most varied
description, were brought from San Francisco,
and, under the management of gentlemen belonging to Yale, were exhibited with great success.   A national salute wound up the proceedings, which were conducted with great
good humor and the most cordial friendship
throughout.   The weather was not very propitious, tbe high wind which prevailed during
the day raised clouds of dust which somewhat marred the out-of-door celebrations.
*
ft■   ■ i ' i ' BBSS
From the Big Bend Mines.
Wc have news from these mines to the 26th
ultimo.   At that time there were about five
hundred men scattered over the country—
some prospecting and others waiting for the
high   water to  subside.    On French Creek
there were a number of companies at work.
The Discovery Company  were taking out a
little gold, not as much as wages.   Shep.
Bailey Company were making from $12 to $14
a day to thc hand.   The Munro Company had
not got their flume completed.     "Judge"
Perrier's Company had commenced washing,
with what result our informant did not learn.
Thc Dupuy Company had struck some prospects.   The Half-breed Company were sinking.   The Cottonwood Smith Company had
to stop work on account of too much water;
they were about to construct more powerful
machinery than they had in use.    The water
had fallen somewhat in the creek, but it is
supposed that the late warm weather would
increase  the flood again.   A good deal of
building was going on, and at latest dates
Romano was reported to   have sold $6000
worth of timber—on credit. On McCullough's
Creek there was very little work goinjr on,
and on Carne's Creek  there  was only one
company at work.   On the creeks between
the Columbia river and Seymour a number of
men were prospecting, but the snow was still
too deep to allow them to make much progress.   Our informant,  who is a California
miner, states that be has met with very fine
looking quartz, showing excellent indications
of silver, and he thinks the great mining interest of that section of country, from Lake
Shuswap to Big Bend, will be quartz leads.
Provisions bad arrived on French Creek by
pack trains from Seymour, and prices were
getting more moderate.   Major Downie and
a party were prospecting around the lakes for
quartz.
New Oreek.
A report wae in circulation that a new
creek which falls into the South Arm of Lake
Shuswap had been discovered, and that prospects equal to an ounce a day to the hand
were found. What reliance can be placed in
the rumor remains to be determined.
CARIBOO MINING NEWS.
Once a Week.—It is reported that the
Hudson Bay Company intend running a
steamer from Victoria to New Westminster
only once a week during the summer on account of there being so little freight. If it
were not that we consider the colony has no
claim upon tbe company for the least consideration, after the manner in which our
Government has treated them in subsidising
a foreign steamer to drive the Enterprise off,
we would urge the company to take into consideration the great inconvenience that will
arise to the public by having only one mail a
week from Victoria. The people of Yale and
the interior irho gave no countenance to the
scheme of the New Westminster clique in
squandering the public money on the steam
subsidy, will be the real sufferers, if the contemplated arrangement of one sailing a week
is carried into effect. This fact might perhaps
be taken into consideration by the company.
A Goon Suggestion.—We extract the following from the Cariboo Sentinel of a late
date. Tbe suggestion is worthy of the best
consideration, and we hope that it will be
carried into practical effect during the present
summer:
11 Many who have lately returned from Big
Bend nivc it as their firm belief that rich and
extensive diggings exist in that portion of
country lying between the Columbia and Seymour, from 25 to 30 miles in extent; the
creeks and gulches are numerous and easily
prospected, and possess good fall and plenty
of water; the benches thereon, and even the
hill tops, are covered with a heavy wash of
gravel and quartz boulders. But, strange to
say, in the haste of all to push forward to the
new El Dorado on the other side of the
Columbia, this wide section of country has
been overlooked, not even a prospect hole
has been sunk on any part of it. We would
therefore counsel those who are now recklessly rushing off from that country to pause
and prospect; the experiment can easily be
tried by those who have provisions and tools,
and the result might prove to be both beneficial to themselves and the whole colony."
The Fraser River.—The warm weather of
the past week has had the effect of melting
the snow on the mountains and increasing the
flow of water into the Fraser to a degree that
has swollen the river to nearly its former
great height in the spring. The Indians col
lected in the vicinity of Yale for salmon fishing, and who had commenced before the rise,
bare been obliged to suspend operations until
the water subsides.
Fabminq Prospects.—From all parts of the
country we receive tbe most cheering accounts
of the growing crops. There has never been
so large an area of ground under cultivation
in this colony any previous season, and if
tbe present crop turns out as well as it
promises, it will stimulate farmers to increased
exertions hereafter. Around Kamloops
especially, the grain and root crops leok remarkably well. There is every indication of
an early harvest.
Williams Oreek.
The Sentinel of the 2d inst. states that for
the previous week the Aurora Company
washed up 693 ounces, and the Davis Company 387 ounces, making 1085 ounces to be
divided between the two companies. The
Camp Company washed up 55 ounces; the
Never Sweat Company, $800; Last Chance,
50 ounces; California Company, 40 ounces
tor the week each; the Cameron Company
washed up 70 ounces for four days' work.
Lowhee Oreek.
The Vaughan-Sweeny Company took out
$7000 for the month of June; the Plumbago
Company  are doing well; the Kelly-Patch
Company are making wages.
Grouse Creek.
Times are getting lively on this croek. The
Short Bend Company washed 111 ounces from
half a set of timbers. Tho Diseovery Company are making 3 to 4 ounces a day to the
hand. The French Compauy are making
wages. The Ne'er-do-Well Company's first
washing amounted to 33 ounces. Several
companies have found excellent prospects and
great hopes are indulged in respect to the
success ot the diggings.
Telegraphic Summary.
EUROPEAN.
New York, July 2.—The latest dates received from Europe are to the 24th ultimo.
Prussia on tbe 18th formally declared War
against Austria. Italy also the same day declared war. The entrance of the Prussians
into Saxony was preceded by a formal declaration of war against that kingdom. The
King of Saxony responded by a proclamation
to bis faithful people, and left Dresden to join
the army in Bohemia.
It is rumored that the Saxons have effected
a junction with the Austrians aud the Prussians occupied Dresden and over-run the entire kingdom, rushing to Bohemia. Austria
has made demonstrations on Silesian frontier,
near Neisse, and the entry of Austrians was
hourly expected. The King of Hanover had
joined the army at Gottingen.
The Italian army crossed the Mincio on the
2.Ul and entered unopposed. The Prussians
left a small garrison in Dresden and marched
into Bohemia without resistance. A slight
collision had occurred between the Austrian*
and Prussians in Silesia, when the former retreated. Tho Prussians haw: entered Austrian
Silesia.
St. Petersburg advices deny that there has
been any movement of the Russian troops,
and says non-intervention continues to be the
policy of Russia.
Nothing authentic has been made known of
the communication by France to Austria ; but
the Vienna press says France denies having
made any agreement with Prussia, and if
Austria does not menace the existing kingdom
of Italy, and if luccessful, and does not advance beyond Milan, France will not interfere, but will assist in the conclusion of a
peace, and further definitely propose to Italy
to pay indemnity for Austrian expenses for
the war.
Victor Emanuel had issued a stirring manifesto to Italians. He recapitulates the effects
ef the last war on Italy ; reiterates that for
supreme reasons, the noble province of Venetia was then allowed to remain in the hands
of the Austrians, but the favorable opportunity had now arrived to accomplish the independence of Venetia from the Austrian
rule. The manifesto concludes with a patriotic declaration of assurance that Italy has
thc sympathy of Europe, and he hands over
the government of the State to the Prince of
Gaeta (Garibaldi).
EASTERN STATES.
Levenworth,  July 2.—Senator James II.
Lane shot himself through the head last evening, in this city, and died to-day.
Washington, July 2.—In the House Mr.
Banks introduced a bill establishing the conditions for thc admission of Nova Scotia, New
Brunswick, Canada East and Canada West
into the Union as States, and for organization
of the territories of Selkirk, Saskatchewan
and Columbia by proclamation of the President, whenever a notice is deposited iu thc
Department of State that the Governments of
Great Britain and the Provinces hive accepted the propositions made in the second section, which are to assume the Provincial debt,
including $10,000,000 to Hudson Bay Company.
DIED.
The Steamer Fortt-Nink.—This vessel
still continues her trips up the Colombia
river to the Big Bend mines. She generally
brings a small quantity of freight. We understand that " broken" men must cut four cords
of wood each for a passage down to Colville.
This is the only terms on which Capt. White
will give them a passage.
The Weather.—During the past week we
have experienced, in Yale, the most intense
heat which the " oldest inhabitant" remembers at this season of the year. Tbe warmest
day was Monday last, the 2d inst., when the
thermometer registered, at 2 p.m., 108 deg.
in the shade.	
Excursion.—Capt. Irving will make an excursion to Hope and back, on Tuesday, July
17 th The steamer Onward will leave Yale at
10 a. m., and returning at 6 p. ra. The Captain extends a cordial invitation to the inhabitants of Yalo and viciuity to join him in a
day's pleasure.
New Paper.—A new evening paper has
been started at Victoria. Its principal con-
ductor is the ex editor of the defunct Colonist.
At tho residence of his er.n, Victoria, V. I., on the
1st inst., Mr. Benjamin Uurr, aged S7 years.
Victoria Collegiate School.—The annual
distribution of premiums at this highly successful and well conducted school took place
on the 38th ultimo. There was a large attendance of the ladies and gentlemen of Vic
toria on the occasion, and great interest manifested in the result of thc examinations. The
Bishop of the diocese presented the prizes in
the following order:
Harrison—Governor's Prize, form IV.
Cohen—Bishop's Prize, form VI.
Agassis—Governor's Prize, form V.
Agassis—Bishop's Prize, form V.
Allatt—Governor's Prize, form IV.
Fell—Bishop's Prize, form IV.
Devereux—Governor's Prize, form III.
Devereux—Bishop's Prize, form III.
Ray mur—First Prize, form II.
Nathan—Bishop's Prize, form II.
Munro—First Prize, form I.
Harrison—First Prize, divinity.
Fell—Second Prize, divinity.
Raymur—Third Prize, divinity.
Rifle Match.—We understand that it is
contemplated to get up a rifle shooting match
in this town shortly and that the prizes will
be open to all comers.
The Next Steamer.—The steamer Sierra
Nevada left San Fiancisco on Saturday last,
at four o'clock, for Victoria and New Westminster.
BOSTON   BAR
INTERNATIONAL HOTEL.
THIS WELL KNOWN HOUSE is now open
lor travellers. The Table Is tuppliod a.« formerly
with the host tin; market aflbrrts,, and the Cooking can-
not bo excelled. The Bar \p slocked with the finest
Liquors aud Cigars.   GOOD BED*
ALEXANDER COUTLEE,
11 Proprietor.
Notice from Scowlitch.
i
HE undersigned,  having sold out tho Milk.
Pump, and Duok Eta business to Fritz, from
Lillooet, will continue tne management of the Scow-
llteh Runche at Harrison Moo Hi, ;i n I Ims fir sale, cheap,
FIFTY TONS OF SUPERIOR HAY,
TWENTY TONS
AMI
OF NO.
1
POTATOES,
And having a splendid rango for Stuck, would BOlli it
tho patronago of Packers and oiheis.
10 JAMES DON\ALLY
SPORBORG & RUEFF,
Commission Merchants,
Wholesale Dealers in
Groceries and Provisions,
Wharf street, Victoria, V. I. 11
1 BRITISH COLUMBIA TRIBUNE.
YALE, MONDAyTjULY 9, 18G6.
Paris Barbers and their Trade.—The
female head has become a sort of museum for
gold bands, cameos, butterflies and pendulous
wreaths which hang under the chin. On the
forehead of thc fair one may be seen a num.
i!r uf 8ma11 curls with a comic twist. while
the back  of the head displays an enormous
lump of hair, which, instead of being kept
together by the cabbage net of three or four
months ago, is now allowed to assume a more
wild and picturesque aspect.    On the crown
or the head,  and between the two distinct
compartments of the hair-dresser's built-up
creation, a small dab of a something, which
is Still called a bonnet, makes a frantic "get-
up   exquisitely eccentric.     The importation
ot blonde hair from 0 -many and black locks
from the regions of tl     sunny South, is now
one of the most active branches of the commerce oi France, and the barber has become
v a person who gives himself all the airs of a
minister of state.    He grants his audiences
anc accords his counsels upon the same principle that M. Drouyn deLhuys receives the
diplomatic world.   Before a Parisian barber
oi tame nnd name will receive a fashionable
lady, she must solicit the honor by placinc
her name upon his list for a certain hour and
oay.    He will then not ask what particular
hard toilet she desires to adopt, but, with the
•lecisive voice of a great general, he will tell
ner how her hair is to be dressed—an edict
rom which there is no appeal.    The domestic
orusli and comb, the cosmetics of ordinary
times, he neglected in the dark drawers of
bedroom furniture     We have got to such an
elaborate mode of hair-dressing that no ladv
at empts to design and execute what mav be
called the landscape gardening of the capillary shrubbery of the head.     Humble dress-
maker girls, and those who used to be called
prisettes in more primitive times, now spend
.SSk 2 80U,S *? havil,« the'r hair dressed and
somebody else's hair stuck on the nape of
their neck. For their locks must now be
roiled in many a curious fret."—rPaiis correspondence of the London Post.
URIAH NELSON & CO.,
Wholesale, Forwarding,
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
YALE, BRITISH COLUMBIA,
AT THE
HEAD OF NAVIGATION ON FRASER RIVBR.
■ THE BANK OF
BRITISH NORTH AMERICA.
Established in 1886.    Incorporated bt
Royal Charter.
Paid np Oapital,
Undivided Net Profits,
$5,000,000
600,000
URIAH NELSON k Co. have on hand an
immense Stock of Goods, imported direct
from San Francisco and Victoria, comprising :
Groceries, Provisions,
Liquors, Cigars, Tobacco,
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING,
Head Office: 7, St. Helen's Place, London.
DRAFTS ISSUED on London, New York, Sin Fran-
Cisco, Canada,New Brunswick,Nova Scotia, und on all
tho Brunches of the National Bank of Scotland and
Provincial Bank ol Ireland.
Bills of Exchange and Gold Purchased.
Interest on Spoclnl Deposits of Mcney allowed at tho
rot■» of ii quarter of ono per cent. p"r month
ISPl'liti Bank receives Gold Dust und Bars for safe
keeping without charge; undertakes tho purchuse and
sale of Slock; the Collection of Bills and other money
busmen in tho United States and British Provinces.
ASSAY~OFF|CE.
Gold Dust Molted and Assayed, and returns made
within -24 hours in Coin or Bars.
Ores of every description carefully Assayed.
N. B.—Any instructions as to Iho d fposal of the
proceeds of Gold Dust forwarded to tho otllco in Victoria for Aftay will be carefully attended to.
J. G. SHEPHERD, Manager.
Victoria, V. I. 1
Consolation. — The Melbourne Argus,
speaking of the recent elections in Victoria,
indirectly exposes the ill effects of a degraded
franchise. It says: Many of the new members are quite unsuited for Parliamentary
duties, being without education or experience,
and some of them not exactly the kind ol
persons whom the electors would have chosen
to transact for them any important piece o;
private business.
BOOTS,   SHOES,   HARDWARE,   MINING
TOOLS, ETC., ETC.,
Which will be sold to Traders and Packer*
ON THE MOST REASONABLE TERMS.
We  aro  forwarding  well  equipped  Trains
almost daily to
BIG    BEND!
AND CARIBOO MINES.
Freight consigned to us will be forwarded at
the Lowest Rates and with the utmost expedition.
URIAH NELSON k CO.
OPPENHEIMER & CO.,
FORWARDING AND  C0MMSSI0N
MERCHANTS,
Yale, British Columbia,
AT TBI
Head or Steam Navigation
on
FRASER   RIVER.
Yale, April, 1800.
THE
Forwarding & Commission HUDSON'S   BAY
Business,
SEYMOUR   CITY, COMPANY
Head of Navigation on Lake Shuswap.
J.  A.~MARA,
BEGS to inform hii friends and the public that
he will attend to any Forwarding, Commission oi
uther business in connection with iho mines that may
bu entrusted to him.
COLLECTIONS   MADE.
Seymour, 5th May, 1866.
BOSTON   BAR
INTERNATIONAL HOTEL.
THIS WELL KNOWN HOUSE ii now open
for travellers. Thc Table is supplied as formerly
with the best tho market affords, and th* Cooking cannot bo excelled. Tho Bir is stocked with the finest
Liquors and Cigars,   GOOD BEDS.
ALEXANDER COUTLEE,
II Proprietor.
Notice from Scowlitch.
rT HE undersigned, having sold out the Milk,
I   Pump, und Duck Egg business to Fritz, from
Lillooet, will continue the management of tbe Scow
inch Rancheat Harrison Mouth, an I has for sale, cheap,
FIFTY T0NS 0F snPBRiOR HAY,
AND
TWENTY TONS OF NO. 1 POTATOES,
And having a splendid range for Stock, would solicit
I be pui ronagv of Packers und olberi.
10 JAMES DONNALLY.
FOR   SALE,
A flRST CLASS
BILLIARD    TABLE!
WITH   SLATE   BED,
Made by Droillard of San Francisco,
WITH BALLS AND CUES COMPLETE.
Apply to        MR. BISSETT,
Hndion Bay Company's Store,
• SEYMOUR.
Invite attention to their large and veil assorted Stock of
NEW    GOODS!!
AT YALE, B. C,
JUST RECEIVED PER 'TROTOESS ROYAL"
FROM LONDON,
And consisting in part of the following, viz.:
Dry Goods,
Clothing,
Provisions,
Hardware,
MINING    TOOLS.
WINES  AND SPIRITS
IN WOOD AND BOTTLE, Etc., Etc
These Goods are offered to the
MERCHANTS, TRADERS AND PACKERS
OP BRITISH COLUMBIA
IN   LOTS   TO   SUIT,
And on the most reasonable terms.
J3P" Every description of Country Produce
Bought, or taken in Exchange for Goods.
Yale. B. C.April, llW. 1
OPPENHEIMER 4 CO. beg to intimate that
they are prepared to receive, store and forward to any part of British Columbia even
description of merchandise, on the lowest
possible terms.
A Fire-Proof Brick Warehouse
For STORING GOODS, has been erected, and
Consignors may rely upon the safe and expeditious transportation of goods to their
destination.
ALWAYS ON   HAND
A LARGE STOCK OP
Groceries, Provisions,. __
LIQUORS,   CIGARS,   TOBACCO,
DRY  GOODS, CLOTHING,
BOOTS AND SHOES, HARDWARE, MINING
TOOLS, Etc., Etc.
Which we are receiving by every arrival from
San Frnncfcco and Victoria, and which we
offer for sale at reasonable rates,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
9 OPPENHEIMER k CO.
THE BANK OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Incorporated by Royal Charter.
Paid up Capital, . $1,562,500
With Power to Increase.
DRAFTS   ISSUED   ON THE  BANE'S
BRANCHES:
IN VANCOUVER ISLAND,
VICTORIA and NANAIMO.
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
NEW WESTMINSTER,    YALE,    MOLTH QUE8NEL
and CARIBOO.
IN THE UNITED STATES,
SAN FRANCSCO und PORTLAND, OREGON.
ON THE BANK OF MONTREAL IN
CANADA,
Montreal, Toronto, Qiebec, Himilton, London, Kingston, Cobourg, Belleville, Bnntforil  B ork
ville, Wliitby, F.'t-rboio. O lawn, Gu;lpb,
Godeiieh. Stratford, Pick n, Poi'th,
Simcoe, St. Catherines.
ON NEW YORK,
Messrs. BELL k GUXDRY, fARents for Hie Bank of
Montreal ]
ON SCOTLAND,
The British Linen Company's Bank.
ON IRELAND,
Tho Union Bank of Ireland.
ON ENGLAND,
The Bank of British Columbia—Hsad Office, Lombard
Street, London.
CURRENT ATOUNTS opened for any amount not
less than 0 e H un'r *" D 'liars.
Bll's Di=count!d and Collected; and Bil'sof Exchango
on Great Britain, San Francisco, and New York pur-
chised.
Government and othT Securities received for safe
custody; Interests and Dividends collected.
Gold Dust and Bars Purchased,
Received on D 'pniit, or Advances made upon ih m.
Yale, April, 1866. 1
THE   COLONIAL   HOTEL
AND
RESTAURANT,
Government Street,   Victoria, V. I.
THIS Firct-OlaM Hotel and Restaurant is con-
Uuctel  in  the most approved Btji • o:i lb • P cillc
'•oast.   Attached to ii an- tbe Conv-r.a.tion, Pining and
Billiard Rooms of tbe " VAN' OUVER CLUB."
10 S. DRIARD. P./'prietor.
N O T I C E .
Steamer "ENTERPRISE."
On and after M iy 28th, 1866, the steamer will leavo
SODA   CREEK
MONDAY AND THURSDAY  MORNINGS,
AT    DAYLIGHT.
WILL   LEAVE
QUESNELMOUTH
WEDNESDAY k SATURDAY MORNINGS,
AT   SIX   O'CLOCK.
Freight from Soda Creek to Qie=n 'Imouth, l^c per lb.
Steamer Enterprise, M y IT. 1866. 12
NEW    GU)ODS!
J.   MITCHELL,
YALE, B. C,
HAS to inform the Public that he hat just received a large and well selected bloc* ol  kjjIcu-
uiu uew goods, comprising
Ladies' Dresses,
In ere it variety and latest fashious.
Gentlemen's  Clothing,
HOSIERY, BLANKETS, BOOTS k SHOES,
GROCERIES, &c. 10
THE FINE
STEAMER "LILLOOET,
WILL LEAVH
NEW WESTMINSTER FOR YALE
—ox-
Wednesdays and Saturdays,
wrruRXLVG from
YALE TO NEW WESTMINSTER
—ox—
Mondays and Fridays.
»
SPORBORG & RUEFF,
Commission Merchants,
Wholesale Dealers in
Groceries and Provisions,
Wbarf street, Victoria, V. I.        II
THE STEAMER
RELIANCE   or  ONWARD,
WILL LEAVE
NEW WESTMINSTER FOR YALE
On Wednesdays and Saturdays,
RETURNING FROM
YALE TO NEW WESTMINSTER
On  Mondays and  Fridays.
  5
British  Columbia  Tribune.
WEEXLY~P APER.
PUBLISHED EVERY MONDAY.
OFFICE—YALE,   i
GEORGE WALLACE, Proprietor k Editor

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