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British Columbia Tribune Apr 10, 1866

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Array Vol. I.
YALE, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 1866.
no. i
VICTORIA  CORRESPONDENCE  OP  THE
" TRIBUNE."
Victoria, 6th April, 18G6.
BUSINESS.
Business in tins city has not been so dull at
this time of year since 1858 as it is at present, however every one seems inspired with
hope in tlie future. Only let Big Bend turn
out half ns good as reported and there will be
a revival iu tho trade of this place that will
raise tho drooping spirits of property hold'
ors and stop the grumbling of merchants and
traders. There is no doubt that the terrible
financial crisis from which the mercantile
community here are now emerging will have a
salutary effect in the future in preventing reckless trading and placing on a firmer and more
{satisfactory basis the business of both colonics.
Had trading in the mining districts in these colonies been carried on upon the principle adopted in Idaho and tho other mining territories
in tho neighboring republic there would have
been no depression now in business circles
amongst us. The principle to which I refer
is that of short credits. I am informed by a
member of one of the leading wholesale firms
in Idaho that credit in the minos there and
in Montana is never given for a longer period
than a week. If the miner cannot foot up his
bill on Sunday—the settling day—his account
is closed and no more credit is given him.
If the same system had been carried out in
the mines of British Columbia, neither the
merchants of that colony, nor of this, would
now be in difficulties. Men get wisdom by
experience; and I am confident the lesson
that' has been learned by our merchants will
not bo without a good effect in the future. A
great many blame tlie bank for much of
the trouble that has come upon us. There
is, no doubt, much truth in this; for the
facilities which traders had of getting advances on goods they had not paid for, led to
reckless trading in the mines; but the great
evil, iu my opinion, was the unlimited and indiscriminate credit given by merchants in the
various mining districts. Iriatflh,d of th»
miner being the prospector of a claim, the
merchant was tho party who ran all the risk,
without having the chance of winning the
prise when it did turn up. Unless such a
system be abandoned in future, and " specie
payments" take the place of "promises to
pay," there can be no progress or prosperity
in these colonies. 	
POLITICS.
The House of Assembly has not had much
to do lately, and the only noteworthy incident
iu connection with that body is the defection
of several members of tho "Club" from the
McClure ranks, by which the radical junior
member for tho city is now in the minority—
being only ablo to count DeOosmos and Dr.
Dickson among his disciples. The "little
brief authority" with which the " Head Centre" was clothed made him arrogant and presumptuous to his followers, which led to the
disruption that has occurred. I cannot
help thinking it is a fortunate circumstance
for Victoria that McClureism is to bo ignored,
for if Union is to be made acceptable to the
people of British Columbia, the less such politicians as the junior member h.iTe to do with
the affairs of the country the better. There
is no question that the return of McClure
for the city was one of those accidents which
will occur in any country at a time of intense
political excitement. That the citizens of
Victoria would have returned a man of his
political antecedents in a moment of calmness
and reason is utterly impossible His conduct in attempting to palm himself off in
London as the delegate of Vancouver Island
and his labors thoro to have thi* colonics
placed under separato Governors, as well ns
his infamous calumnies against the administration of the late Governor to get him removed, were not, and never will be, forgotton
by tho electors of Victoria. But tho cry for
protection, ond the difficulty at the time to
get a proper collcaguo for DcCosmos left no
alternative but to accept the bogus delegate
as tho representative of protectionism. It
was a bitter pill to swallow for many who
espoused the cause of protection at tho time;
but I am persuaded that there arc few who
voted for him who do not now bitterly lament
their having done so. It hits been a matter
of sincere regret to nearly every one to see
such men ns DcCosmos, Trimble, Dickson and
others following the lead of McClure in the
present session, by which he had a majority
to   carry   every   radical   whim   which   he
laid before them. It is, however, a sign of
returning consciousness to find his followers
falling off by degrees until ho can only count
upon DeCosmos and Dickson to answer to his
"whip." .That these men will long respond
to his call I do not believe. If they havo any
respect for themselves, or feel any real interest
in the country, ■ they will soon leave their
" leader" to lead himself into the obscurity
from which he was never fitted to emerge.
DcCosmos and Dickson havo not much real
sympathy with the radical views of tho so-
called delegate, and one can scarcely reconcile thc#position which the latter—who is the
author of the petition to the Home Government,.oji the retirement of Governor Douglas,
not two years ago—now holds in tho House to
tho junior member for the city. I have been
told by ireveral influential men from British
Columbia that one of their greatest objections
to a union of the colonios is the fear that such
politicians as McClure would havo control
over public affairs when union would be consummated. I would hope that when the people of British Columbia find how fast power
i3 falling from the hands of the politicians,
and the upPkelihood of McClure ever again
receiving > .tf* suffrage of a majority of the
electors of any constituency in Vancouver Island they will cease to havo any apprehensions
of having the infliction of his presence
as a representative amongst them.
DIRECT STEAM COMMUNICATION.
Nothing can be worse than the arrangements respecting the sailing of the direct
steamers between San Francisco and these
colonies. The fact is, we aro worse off now
than before the subsidy was granted by the
respective colonies. In six weeks wc will only
have two steamers, and that in the season of
the year when there should be one steamer a
week. It was an unfortunate e'reumstance
that both the steam companies were not bound
to time; and no break in the trips should have
been allowed. It would have been an easy
matter to have put on another steamer while
the Laboucherc was laid up for repairs. Had
this been done, by this time we would have hau
a largo immigration. The bad arrangements
made will seriously injure our prospects, more
especially as there is such a keon opposition to
Portland and such cheap fares to that placo.
Wc are always behind. Pity that it is so now
when everything had begun to] look bright
for us.
British  Columbia  Tribune.
WEEKLY   PAPER.
OFFICE—YALK.
GEORGE WALLACE, Proprietor & Editor.
URIAH NELSON & CO.,
Wholesale, Forwarding,
and
-EUROPEAN NEWS,-
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
YALE, BRITISH COLUMBIA,
AT THE
HEAD OF NAVIGATION ON PRASER RIVER.
URIAH NELSON & Co. have on hand an
immense Stock of Goods, imported direct
from Sun Francisco and Victoria, comprising:
Groceries, Provisions,
Liquors, Cigars, Tobacco,
DRY  GOODS, CLOTHING,
TOOLS, ETC., ETC.,
Which will be sold to Traders and Packers
ON THE MOST REASONABLE TERMS.
[Fram the BritiBh Columbian.]
New York, April 2.—The stoamer City of
Faris from Liverpool, March 21st, via Queens
town 22d, arrived this morning.
In tho House of Commons, Earl Grosvcnor
gave notic'r that on the second reading of the
Reform Bill he would make an amendment
declaring it inexpedient to discuss the bill
until the House has before it the entire reform
scheme contemplated by the Government.
Sir Hight also gave notice of an amendment
to prevent the Bill taking effect till provision
shall be made for a redistribution of Beats
The Times says Lord Stanley will second
Grosvcnor's amendment. He predicts that it
will reccivo independent support, and hopes it
is not too late for the Government to bring
forward a better Bill. The Morning PoBt
believes an amendment to the Bill will prove
a death blow to the ministry. The News and
Star regard it as an insidious movement,
nothing but opposition to reform, and say the
Conservatives dare not move a direct negative to the measure.
The Corps Legislatif, after rejoining another
proposed amendment relative to the press laws,
finally odopted the entire address.
Nkw Yokk, April 2.—German advices continue to represent the relations of Austria and
Frussia as very threatening. It is even assorted that Austria had ordered the assembling of 100,000 troops on the Bohemian
frontier, and that she has sent a circular note
to European Powers disclaiming any responsibility for the consequences of any conflict
which may arise.
The London Times directs attention to the
critical state of affairs in Germany, and says
Bismarck has drawn off his mask and the
Duchies are to bo annexed to Paussia.
Preparations for war arc progressing on
both sides. In both capitals military councils
have been held, and plans of the campaign
discussed.
The funds wcre depressed in various European towns by those disquieting rumors.
The Russian Ambassador ban quit Rome.
Wo  arc
forwarding
almost
well  equipped   Trains
daily to
BIG    BEND!
AND CARIBOO MINES.
Freight consigned to us will bo forwarded at
tho Lowest Rates and with tho utmost ox
pedition.
URIAH NELSON & CO.
Vale, April, 1S0C.
WESTERN UNION TELEUUAl'Sl.
REDUCED  RATES,
0'
N and after tho First of April tho following
ratoH win be charged fo r transmission of messages:
Now Westminster to QnosnH 10 words.
*< to Soila Creek.... "
" to Clinton  "
" to Cook's Ferry.. "
" to Yale  "
" lollop!  "     .
" to Uatsa.nl  '•    .
Ono. hall tho abovo ratci will he charged on every
additional Ave wordB.
ED. CONWAY,
l AssUt. Engineer.
OPPENHEIMEft & CO.,
FOltWAKDING  AND C0MMSSION
MERCHANTS,
Yale, British Columbia*
At THE
Head of steam Navigation
ox
FRASER   RIVER.
OrPENIIEIMER & CO. bog to intimate that
they ure prepared to receive, store and forward to any part of British Columbia everv
description of merchandise, on the lowest
possible terms.
A Fireproof Brick Warehouse
For STORING GOODS, has been erected, and
Consignors may rely upon the Rnfe and expeditious transportation of goods to their
destination.
ALWAYS  ON   HAND
A LARGE STOCK OF
Groceries, Provisions,
liquors; cigars, roiuooo,
DRY   GOODS,  CLOTHING,
BOOTS AND SHOES,   HARDWARE, MINING-
TOOLS, Etc., Etc.
Which wc arc receiving by every arrival from
San Francisco and Victoria, and wliieh wc
offer for sale at reasonable rates,
WHOLESALE  AND RETAIL.
OPFENIIEIMER ,v CO.
Yalo.n. Q., April, I860';
EXPRESS LINE STAGES!
,|fl (HI
. ft 00
. :i no
. '1 f.o
. 1 so
. l no
. 60
Western Union Telegraph Co'y.
MEN WANTED AT (JUESNELMOUTU.
11HE Tele n.ph Company will commence worn
atQitosnitlqutbolBtof Hay.  Condition! nan be
ascertained iitnny of the Company's olllecs iu Uritlt»l»
Columbia.
KDWAHM CONWAY,
Assistant Engineer.
March 27.1M50, '
rilHE OOAOHES of thin line will now run rcc-
_L marly, leaving Yale, it. c, on
MONDAYS,
WEDNESDAYS
and        FRIDAYS,
AT. 7. O'CLOCK, A.M.,
FOR   CACHE   CREEK,
(Rig Uawl R<>utc), until tho completion of Uio road,
wh'Mi tltoy will gn tnStvana's Ferry.
Tho Coach lor CARIBOO will leave Yale on Monday
1 • F.J. BARNARD.
LIVERY   STABLES!
The Stable! fornnly known a.'S
JIM'   BLACK'S,
AT YALE, P. C,
Havo recently bean purchased hy mo, thoroughly renovated ami pined In the hands 0? a lirst class Qrootn.
The  Sttlil'n will  he   Kn conducted   ns to allow of
iiarses hoinglofton Liivory,'of parties may take charge
of their own.
Ample aortal! room for TMlns ol animals Is pro
vid.,1.
Hay Grain, and Ford of all kinds and of the b«M
qnallty only, will he kept on bund.
1 F.J, bATiNARD
■   :  1
, j
Agents for he British Columbia Tribune.
Bavana's Ferry Barnard's Kxpi**s
Saymour City."  do
French Creek, Big Bend  do
.Tnnotioii  do
S«da Creek  do-
Quesnelmoutb  no
Van Winkle  do
Williams Ci-e-.'k  do
New Westminster Chirksou * Co.
Llllooet....- F. W. Foster.
Victoria -". Henry Lyue.
San Franolsoo ■•. - VT. Fisher.
Tmrrisir"T]Oit]iimt"TramtNK.
YALE, TUESDAY. APRIL  10,  1866.
THE "TRIBUNE.
provo the soundness of our opinion, and that
instead of there being only two or three
thousand men in the country, like last year—
with the Gold Tax in operation—there will bo
more than ten thousand activo miners
spread over the country before the fall. It is
our determination to devote all our energies
this season to tho collection of accurate mining
intelligence in the new mines for publication
in the Tribune, believing that it is only by
means of the diffusion of correct information
concerning thorn that we may hope to sue-
ceed in attracting population to our borders and
thereby insuring the prosperity of the country.
In furtherance of this purpose it is our inten-
tion to proceed at an early-date-to Dig Bend,
In presenting tho first number of this
journal to the public, it will be unnecessary
for us to cntor into any elaborate exposition
of our views regarding tho many important
questions which agitato men's minds in this
country. It is now twelve months sinco we
first became connected with the press of this
colony,, and during that time we have taken
part in the discussion of every political topic
interesting to the people or that had any bearing upon the material interests of tho community. When launching our first newspaper
enterprise in the- colony wo laid down in unmistakable language the principles which wc
wore determined to support. Sinco thon we
have not changed one singlo article of our
political creed. It is with unalloyed satisfaction that wo find nearly every measure of
public policy which wa advocatod in the first
number of the Cariboo Sentinel either adopted
by the country, or in immediate prospeot of
being carried into' effect by tho Imperial
Government. Union of these colonies, of
which wo have been a strenuous advocate,
has now been decided upon by the home
authorities* and probably before another year
will clapso a law will bo passod by the Imperial Parliament to effoct this object. Until
tho principles of tho measure with which Her
Majesty's Government is charged arc made
known to us, it would be premature on our
l>art 10 UHUl" O"^ vwu" fstwuiia 1*13   wv it,D   ucvailB,
but wo may state in   passing, that   unless
some real power over tho finances of the
country is placed- in the hands of the people
through representatives elected on n, proper
franchise, there will be' neither satisfaction
nor eontentment in this portion of the British
empire.   The repeal of the Gold Export Tax
was a wiso and proper concession to " the
well understood wishes of the eommunity,"
and will tend to promote the development of the
resources of the country by restoring among
the mining class that confidence in the justico
and equity of the Government of this colony,
which had been forfeited by tho imposition
of a tax  that pressed so- heavily upon the
"bone and sinew"  «f the  country.    The
measure passed in the late session of the
Legislative Council to tax all classes of miners
aliko will compel the Chinese throughout the
colony to bear their fair portion of the burdens
of tho country.    With respect to the abolition of tho road tolls, another of the measures
which we advocated, we hope that the present
year is tho last they will be permitted to act
as a barrior to the progress of the colony.
In the meantime wo highly approve of the
ootirso which tho Executive has adopted in
easing the trade to our new mines by removing tho toll-gate from Lytton City to the
Junction.    Retrenchment hi the public service
wo do not look for until Union is effected and
the peoplo havo power placed in their own
hands to deal with the question in a satisfac'
tory manner.    We hope the timo is not far
distant whon tho taxation of this country will
not bo ono   half what it is at present, and
■when the burdens that now weigh down the
commerce and industries of the land will bo
removed,  that thero  may be   no   obstacles
in tho way »f the country's development and
progress.     The discovery of the new mining
region of Big Bend will undoubtedly again
induce a large population to como amongst
us.    It will be the bounden duty of tho Government to do all in its power to retain those
who come, as it is only by the presence of a
vast population that tho riches of so extensive a country as this is can be developed.
It is our opinion, based on information derived
from cxporiencod minors who have traversed
in pursuit of mineral wealth over all the territories of the United States on the Pacific
coast,    that    British    Columbia    equals,
not   surpasses,   nny
end   country.     We
from which place we will communicate regularly with tho Tribune, making use, when
nocessary, of tho telegraph, which is com-
ploted to Cache Creek, tho nearest point to
the mines. Wo noed scarcely say that our
present enterprise will involve heavy expense
upon us. Considering the objocts we havo in
view, and the signal advantage that must accrue to the country by our undertaking properly carried out, do we nsk too much from
the business peoplo of both theso colonies,
when we say: strengthen our hands by giving
to the Tribune a cordial and substantial
support ?
Official Changes.—We learn on good
authority that P. O'Reilly, Esq., has resigned tho office of High Sheriff of the
colony. This will afford tho Government the
opportunity of dividing the colony into counties and appointing a responsible man resident in each district to tho office of High
Sheriff. Heretofore the public havo suffered
great inconvenience, and in many cases considerable loss, by there boing only one High
Sheriff for the Colony. Cariboo the whole of
last summer was without a Sheriff in consequence of the difficulty of communicating
with Mr. O'Reilly at Kootenay.   The practice
of appointing Deputy Sheriffs to do the duty
on half feet is open to the greatest objection.
The amount which the deputies make out of
tho offico is so small that respectable men will
not give their time and attention to the proper
performance of tho dutios. Besides, it is unjust to require a man to perform duties often
disagreeable and hazardous, and when he has
dono so to havo to hand over half his legiti-
part of tho colony who is paid besides a
salary for doing nothing. Tho time has como
when retrenchment must be the order of the
day and sinecures must be abolished. The
duties of High Sheriff could be performed in
each district by tho Chief Constable of Police
and the full fees should be given him for his
remuneration. The $1000 voted by the Legislature could therefore be saved to the colony
and tho duties of Sheriff more efficiently performed than heretofore. We hopo the Officer
administering the Government will show by
his acts in reference to this matter that his
profession of economy in the public service is
no empty boast. The tax-payers of the col
ony will watch with keen interest the course
the Government will take in reference to tho
filling up of the vacancy made by Mr. O'Reilly's resignation. We sincerely hope that the
action taken will be such as to inspire the
community with confidence in the intentions
of the Government to aot for the benefit of
the country, regardless of any claims which
their political followers may have upon their
consideration.
The Lakes.—It will be seen by an article
which we copy from the Victoria Chronicle
that Mr. Jerome Harper is endeavoring to get
a trail out by the Government, at an expense
of several thousand dollars, along Shuswap
Lake for the purpose of taking in his cattle
from Kamloops to Big Bend. We do not behove that the Government will consent to expend tho public money for any such purpose.
If a trail is made for Mr. Harper's accommodation, every speculator in the country will
bo applying to tho Executive to have a road
made for his especial uso. Tho Government
have already euoouraged, in fact induced, the
building of a steamer on the lakes to meet
tho traffic to the mines. If a road were built
for Mr. Harper at the cost of the public, tho
Government would bo acting in bad faith
with those who have expended a largo sum in
an. enterprise that was undertaken to benefit
the country. The Chroniclo has been misled
as to the time the steamer Marten will be running. If the work be only carried out with
the vigor with which it has been pursued up
to the present time—and wc have no doubt
Latest Telegraphic Dispatches.
[SPECIAL niSPATCHES TO THE TRIBUNE.]
ENGLISH NEWS.
In the House of Commons, on tho 21st
March, the Bill abolishing certain restrictions
on dissenters at Oxford University was debated, and carriod to a second reading by a
large majority. The Daily News regards this
discussion as the best criterion yet presented
of the strength of parties in the new Parliament. The chances of tho Reform Bill continued to be canvassed by the journals; some
opposed, contending that the Earl Grosvenor'i
amendment will seal the doom orHhe-Brlh;
W.    H.   SUTTON
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALER IN
WINES,    LIQUORS
AND    CIGARS
while the other side anticipate little or no
danger from it unless thero is a severe defection in the ranks of the liberals. A London
letter says Earl Grosvcnor's amendment was
drawn up by Disraeli. If it should obtain a
majority, it will be followed immediately by
the resignation of the Government or a dissolution of the House, but most probably by
a dissolution.
Steamer Cuba arrived at New York from
Liverpool, via Queenstown 25th ult., has arrived. Fenian affairs had received some attention in Parliament. The Attorney General
of Ireland said with respect to parties under
arrest who had oome from America, he was
ready to givo favorable consideration to their
applications for pardon, provided they leave
Ireland.
Gladstone announced that the Government
intended to proceed with the Reform Bill, regardless of suggestions and proposed amend
ments; they would resist Grosveno^ amendment, as it implied a want of cdmjk.cnce in
the Government. The House adjourned to
the 9th of April for the Easter holidays.
The stock of the Anglo American Telegraph
Company (£600,000) is all subscribed and the
books closed.    Cable progressed at the rato
of nineteen nautical miles per day.
FRANCE.
Napoleon received the address of the Corps
Legislatiff, and made a speech respecting the
vote of the great majority as a continued endorsement of his policy. He also spoko in
favor of an extension of liberty calculated to
strengthen the Government, not such liberty
as may become an arm to undermine and
subvert.
The Ex-Queen of the French, widow  of
Louis Phillipe, died at Claremont on the 23d.
AUSTRIA AND PRUSSIA.
*uo statements In regard to Austria anu
Prussia are conflicting. The German firms in
London have uniformly ridiculed the idea of
hostilities, and the latest telegrams are of an
assuring character. But still the German press
oontinues dealing in warlike rumors.
Rec-uiting of Austrian volunteers for Mexico wat about to commence.
CHINA.
Shanghai advices of Feb. 21st, represent
that the Nienfe rebels were threatning the
northern parts, where they had occasioned
great alarm. Vigorous preparation had been
made for resisting them. The French consul at Shanghai had been imprisoned for refu
sing to give up certain documents.   '■
Coal Oil and Coal Oil Lamps, &c.
. SOLE AGENT FOR
LYON & CO.'S CELEBRATED
CALIFORNIA   ALE!
IN BUT*. AND HALF BW.S.
Yale, April, 1866. . l
In the mattor of the Estate of Scligman
Elsasser, who has made an assignment for
the benefit of his Creditors.
NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
cluims against the above Estate, aro requested to-
lorward a statement of tho same (duly verlflodUo
tho undersigned on or heforo tho 20th day of May
next or thoy may ho deprived of tho (lrst dividend.
Datod at Victoria, tho 6th of April, 1806.
JOHN WILKIE,
F. WKISSENBURGER,
j Assignees.
T. DE NOUVION,
WHOLESALE   MERCHANT
IN
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS,
LIQUORS,
Dry Goods. Clothing, &c,
LYTTON, B. C. 1
If it will—the Marten will be making trips early
of   them   as   a   min-iinMay.   In tho meantime there are plenty of
confidently   anticipate I barges on the lakes to take Mr. Harper's cat-
that tho result of this year's prospecting will'tie across if he is anxious to get them in early.
Telegraphic News from the Interior of British Columbia.
[srKCUI,   BISriTCBKS   TO   THE   TRIBFHI.)
LATER FROM OARIBOO.
Qdmhilhocth, April 10th.—Mr. Shaw,
who has just arrived from Williams Croek,
states that there is some excitement there on
account of a rich strike lately made on Grouso
Creek. It appears Mr. Peter McArthur, a
well known Caribooite, in company with some
others, have been engaged during the winter
in prospecting an abandoned claim on the
above creek, and for some- time past have
been taking ont pay. They lately took out
three thousand five hundred dollars in three
days. They have been keeping the thing
quiet to give their friends time to arrivo from
below, but one of the parties getting dissatisfied, gave information concerning their prospects, and numbers have consequently gone
over from Williams Creek and staked off
claims for some distance. Othor parties from
the creek confirm this report. The snow has
almost disappeared entirely from the roads,
which are now very bad in some places.
The ioe commenced breaking up hero ihis
afternoon and made quite an opening ia the
middle of the river.
Hopr, April *Jth.—An Indian arrived yesterday from Similkamoen with an Express. He
reports traveling over tho mountains very
good. In the valley tho snow had all disappeared ; everything bore tho oppearance of
spring. Stock had wintered well on the Sim-
ilkameon ; horses and cattle are in good condition. He brings no news i'rem Bie; Bend or
Kootenay. OrsiuioB.
DR. J. E. BROUSE,
PHYSICIAN, SURGEON, £c,
CANADIAN  LICENTIATE,
GRADUATE  OF McGILL UNIVERSITY,
MONTREAL,  C. E,
Can be consulted daily at his office in Yale,
next to Oppenheimer & Co.'s store.
DRUGS  AND  PATENT   MEDICINES
FOR  SALE. 1
COLONIAL   BAKERY,
FRONT   STREET,
YALE, B. C.
Bread, Pies and Cakes,-
CONSTANTLY OF BAND.
I
A. KoLARDY.
THK FINE
STEAMER "LILLOOET,"
WILL LKAVI
NEW WESTMINSTER FOR YALE
—01—
Wednesdays and Saturdays,
RBTUimiNU FROM
YALE TO NEW WESTMINSTER
-ON—
Mondays and Fridays, IBM
■* II 1.111 II
BRITISH COLUMBIA TRIBUNE. Ho!  for Big Bend Mines!
YALE, TUESDAY, APRIL  10, 18(16.
YALE.
Situated at the head of navigation of the
Fraser, and at tho terminus of tho grand trunk
road of the Colony, this place is destined to
become one of the most prosperous and busy
cities in British Columbia. If tho Big Bend
mines are as extensive and rich as they are
generally believed to bc> the trade that will be
done with Yalo will
soon assume a magnitude
and proportion that will force the town into an
linportanco it did not even attain in the early
days of the Fraser River exeitement. Here
miners going to the mines of the interior
must stop at least ono night, and on their return journey they are roquired to do the
same. All the goods intended for the interior
must pass into the stores of our merchants,
and to this point all the pack trains and teams
employed in their transportation inland must
take up their freights. A kind of central
depot for the whole colony, Yale possesses
advantages which are Unequalled and that can
never bo wrested from her so long as the great
natural barrier cf the canons impede the
navigation of the Fraser above tho city. The
time will no doubt come when goods shipped
at Victoria will not be transhipped until they
aro landed at Yale. The direct communication by telegraph with San Francisco and tho
interior of British Columbia affords merchants
great facilities for carrying on their business.
The completion of the telegraph line to Victoria will also prove highly advantageous to
our mercantile community. Yale possesses at
present a branch of the Bank of British CoW
umbia, has two good hotels, several handsome
saloons, and the merchants1 stores are substantial buildings. It has a public library,
a public school, well attended and efficiently
conducted, and a large number of newspapers
are circulated in the town. Improvements have
been going on steadily in building. Mr. M.
Oppenheimer and Mr. Barlow have lately
completed handsome dwellings, and Mr.
Sutton and other residents contemplate building fine houses the ensuing summer. With
the crowds of miners passing through every
day to Big Bend, and the constant dispatching of merchandise by teams and pack trains
to the same destination, everything looks
cheerful in Yale, and we are not going too far
when we say that there is not another town
in either colony that has such a business
appearance at present. We cannot but look
upon the future of. this city with the most
sanguine anticipations of its future greatness.
Thk County Courts.—We confess we are at
a loss to fully comprehend the opposition—
except on the part of the lawyers—that has
been raised to the extension of the jurisdic
tion of the County Courts. It has heretofore
been almost out of the power of creditors in
the interior to recover sums exceeding $260,
from the infrequency of tho holding of the
Supremo Court., Besides, the heavy costs
which are required to be paid to lawyers in
the Superior Courts have almost acted as a
barrier to persons going into them for the
purpose of recovering debts up to $500. It
has often been the ease with persons in this
colony that rather than take proceedings in
tho Supreme "Court for sums between $250
and $500, the amount above the former sum
was dropped and action taken in the County
Court for the full extent of its jurisdiction
only. Instead of so much vilification being
cast upon the magistrates for promoting the
ordinanco lately passed, wo think—and so far
as we havo heard opinions expressed on the
subject tho public agrees with us-i-that the
authors of tho Act aro entitled to credit for
their oxortions in getting it passed. It is no
argument whatever against the measure that
the County Court judges are not lawyers. In
England very few of the judges of the
County Courts aro barristers, and yet there is
no outcry made against! them. If we
are not misinformed, the experience'!' and
learned judge of the colony is not opposed
to tho extention of the powers lately granted
to tho magistrates of the country in civil suits.
It must not be forgotten—although it has
been concealed by the opponents of the Act—
that suitors in the County Courts are entitled
to have a jury to try their cases if either
plaintiff or defendant makes application for it.
RICH BANK DIGGINGS STRUCK!
From a reliable miner who arrived here
last night from Lytton City we learn that
rich Bank Diggings havo been struck on
Carrie's Croak, Big Bend. The prospeots obtained wore so rich as to create great excitement. The discoverer of the diggings immediately proceeded to Lytton City whore he
recorded eighteen claims, and ho sold Siztetn
Ounces of course gold, which he had taken
out, to Messrs. Buie Bros., merchants. Some
prospecting was done In the bed of Game's
Creek last fall by a company of old Cariboo-
ites, of which Bob Nobles was a member.
They found the diggings wcre deep and that
they could not get down to bed roek before
the winter set in, and being short of provisions, they were obliged to leave until
spring. The bank diggings were unknown
last fall, and their discovery cannot fail to be
a valuable addition to the previous discoveries
made in the Big Bend country. Lakes Kam-
loops and Shuawap were not open one week
since, but it is the opinion of those who have
returned from Savana's Ferry that they will
be navigable by this time. A great number
of men have already proceeded to the mines
from all quarters, and there is but ono opinion
regarding their great richness and extent.
During the present week six pack trains with
goods have left Yale for the new mines, and
Barnard's stages aro running three times a
week with passengers. Great progress has
been made with the building of the Hudson's
Bay Company's steamer. The machinery
left here to-day, and it is anticipated that
about the first of May the Marten will bo in
running order.
FURTHER.
We learn from the resident magistrate here
that he has received a letter from tho Recording Officer at Lytton City confirming the news
of a miner having como there to record
eighteen bank claims on Carne's Creek, Big
Bend, and also that he had a considerable
quantity of gold dust in his possession.
Latest from Big Bend.
From Mr. Thomas Spenee, who has just arrived from Cornwall's Ranch on the waggon
road, wc learn that Jim May, an old and well
known Cariboo miner, had struck a very rich
claim on French Creek, four or five miles
further up the stream than any prospecting
had been done last fall. The lucky Jim immediately r.ornmiriiicntod with his old Cariboo
chums and a number, including Jim Sellers,
forthwith rushed off to join their former
companion and share in his good luck. They
have since recorded nine full claims, and the
interest excited amongst the miners is very
great. Jim May is one of the pioneer prospectors of Cariboo, and he has traversed as
much of that mountain region in pursuit of
geld as any man who has ever ventured into
the upper country. He left Soda Creek about
the 1st November last year for the Big Bend
and has wintered there..
The waggon road to the lakes has been
completed, and nearly all Wright's men hate
been discharged. Waggons hato passed over
tho new road already. The ice on the lakes
has broken up and the navigation is now open.
Inconvenient.—The merchants and traders
of Yale complain of the short time the river
steamers stop here in the beginning of the
week. On Sunday evening last the Cariboo express arrived almost simultaneously
with the Reliance from the capital. With
letters coming in - from both quarters at tho
same timo merchants and business people
generally were Obliged to' be up nearly all
night to have their correspondence ready for
the mails the following morning. As the Enterprise does nOt leave New Westminster before Wednesday the steamers from tbis would
have ample time to make the connection by
leaving Yale on Tuesday morning. We
feel suro tho captains of tho steamers only
requiro to be made aware Of tho incoveniefnee
their supporters labour under to aoecde to
their wishes by stopping over Monday at this
place. 	
Stiameb Marten.—The work on this tesscl
is described by parties who bare returned
from the lakes as in a very forward state.
The utmost dispatch is exercised to have her
ready for the machinery when it arrives. A
number of waggons left Yalo to-day with tho
boilers and machinery, and as tho roads are
in excellent order at present, no delay is
anticipated to take place in getting these
necessary adjuncts of the vessel to their destination.
Population of Bio Benr.—According to
the latest and most reliable intelligence which
wo could collect, from fifteen hundred to two
thousand men have already proceeded to the
Big Bend mines.
New Road.—The road to Savana's Ferry,
undertaken by Mr. G. B. Wright, has been
completed by him within the time allowed by
Government. Waggons havo already passed
ovor it, and teamsters declare that the work
is creditable to the contractor. The Chief
Commissioner of Works will proceed immediately to inspect the road, and if it meets
with his approval, it will bo taken over by the
Government:
Trail to Big Bud Mines.—Mr. Moberlv,
Assistant Surveyor General, and a party of
men passed through Yalo about a Week since
on their way tb the head of Shiiswap Lake,
where they will bo employed for some time in
Improving the existing trail to the Columbia
River. They ate also directed to construct a
trail to the centre of the mining districts.
Thanks.—Wo have to tender our thanks to
Capt. Fleming of the steamer Lillooet for his
generous kindness in bringing all the material
of the Tridunb office free of expense fFoTii
New Westminster to this place, as well an for
othor courtesies extended to ourselves and
staff. To Mr. Sutton we are deeply indebted
for many kind ollices since our arrival.
Pack Trains jor Bio Bend.—During tho
past woek a large number of pack trains and
teams have been dispatched to Big Bend with
goods. Messrs. Uriah Nelson & Co., Oppenheimer & Co., and tho Hudson's Bay Company were the ohief forwarders.
The Fraser River.—The water in the river
is higher at present than it is remembered to
have been at the samo season for several
years past. Tho Lillooet and Reliance havo
no difficulty in making their regular trips with
hoavy freights on board.
Ecclesiastical.—The Rev. Mr. Robson,
(Wesleyan minister of New Westminster) and
Rev. Father Harris, {Roman Catholic) conducted Divine Service in their respective
places of worship in Yale last Sunday.
Forwarding—Messrs. Oppenheimer's teams
arrived to-day.   The animals wintered well
and arc in splendid condition.    The firm is
prepared to forward any quantity of goods
to the interior with promptness and dispatch.
To Advertisers.—Our friends in Victoria,
New Westminster and elsewhere will oblige
us by for warding their advertisements without
delay.   Terms moderate.
FBKionT to Big Bekd.—Goods arc being
freighted from Yale to Savana's Ferry at from
6£ to 8 cents per B>.
To Suiiscribers.—The weekly subscription
to the Triuunk is 25 cents, payable to the
carrier.
RORN.
At Yalo, on tho 2d inst., tho wife of Mr. Godfrey
Opponhcimer of a ion.
MARRIED.
At Yalo, on tho loth Inst., by tha Rev. Fathor
Harrix, Mr. Edward Hnley to Miss 1!. Gilhrldo.
NOTICE.
CHERRY   CREEK   GOLD   AND   SILVER
MINING  COMPANY.
A GENERAL MEETING of the. Stockholders
of tho Cherry Crook Gold and Silver II In in i: Company will ho nold hi. Yale, where tho office has boon
reinorod to, on Thursday, April 12th.
By order of tho Trustor?.
gko. biro;
Socrotary, 0. 0. G. A S. M. Co.
STORAGE AND FORWARDING.
FIRE-PROOF    WAREHOUSE !
1 PARTIES Desirous of Shippinc Freight WITH
dispatch win iind ii to their advantage by
giving us i' call before engaging elsowhsro,
jajrllnviiiK our own Items, we are prepared to Opn
tract to enrry from 1000 lo 200,000 lbs. for BIO
BEND or Cailhoo.
aI.WAY k BAILEY.
Yule, April lOtli, 1800.
THE
HUDSON'S   BAY
COMPANY    •
Invite attention to their large and well assorted Stock of
NEW    GOODS!!
AT YALE, B. C,
JUST RECEIVED PER "PRINCESS ROYAL'
FROM LONDON,
And consulting in part of the following, viz.
Dry Goods,
Clothing*
Provisions,
Hardware,
MlNiNG    TOOLS,
WINES   AND  SPIRITS
IN WOOD AND BOTTLE, Etc., Etc.
These Goods are offered to the
MERCHANTS, TRADERS AND PACKERS
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
IN   LOTS   TO   SUIT,
And on the most reasonable terms.
Every description of Country Produce
Bought, or taken in Exchange for Goods.
Yale, B.C., April, 1806. 1
Livery and Sale  Stables.
W. H.  SUTTON,
YALE, B. C,
Having The best and most con-
vonient Studies in Yale, is prepared to nccoinino-
ilato tho Traveling Public,Tesmstorsand Packers, with
Stabling or Oorrall room. HAY and GRAIN of all
kindFtirnuantttfts to Suit.
Buggy and Saddle Horses at a moment's notice.
Horses Bought and Sold on Commission.
Yalo, April 10, 1800.
PORT   YALE  HOTEL
AND   RESTAURANT,
FRONT STREET, YALE, B. C.
11HIS HOUSE affords Excellont  Accommodation for travelers.
GOOD BEDS, EXCELLENT FARE,
—IKIl—
CHOICE  LIQUORS   AT   THE   BAR.
STABLING FOR ANIMALS.   HAY AND OATS'
AT THE LOWEST RATES.
KSLLEY L lank, Proprietors.
i
FOR BIG BEND ANI) CAM BOO!
A.  BARLOW,
Merchant and Forwarding Agent,
Ih now propnred to
SHIP GOODS TO BIG BEND & CARIBOO
ON THE MOST REASONABLE TERMS.
Yalo, it. 0 .April 10th, 1869. 1
J. P. BARRY'S SALOON,
FRONT   STREET,
YALE, B. C.
ALES, WINES AND
LIQUORS,
Of the best description that can bo imported"
CIGARS!
OF THE CHOICEST BRANDS.
Tlio Proprietor will be happy to havo big friends gf-Zor
lit in it cull on their wiiy to Bio' H'-'iil.        > n
■jEntw.w.x-.w.-JtWiwsTT»j^
1
I
MMSH COLUMBIA TRIBUNE.
YALE, TUESDAY, APRIL  10, 1806.
CORRESPONDENCE   FROM   SAN   FRANCISCO.
A quieter timo for business 1ms never
boon experienced in the Bay City than the
past winter, but the spring trade has now set
in and bids fair to equal that of any former
season. The vast rush of miners to Montana
lias stimulated the merchants here to forward
immense quantities of goods, nnd every
.steamer leaving for Portland is filled to repletion with freight. It is an extraordinary
siglvtrto witness tho approaches to the wharf
the day before the steamers sail—for a mile
and a half from tlie steamboat landing the
street is lined with drays bearing freight, and
it often happens that many have to return to
the warehouses with the goods after remaining on the street a day and night, unable to
get the freight on board. Considerable
rivalry exists regarding the best route to Montana from San Francisco. Some maintain
that via Portland is less expensive and shorter
than that by Sacramento and then overland.
.1 am inclined to believe, from information I
have received from miners who have been
over both routes, that Portland is tho best
and cheapest way at present to forward goods.
"Whether San Francisco will bo able to compete with St. Louis is problematical at present;
however, the question will bo settled this
season. I regret to say that your colonies do
not occupy so much of men's thoughts here
as I think they aro entitled to. Much of this
is, no doubt, owing to 'he bad reports circulated by skedaddlcrs and others of that ilk
who arrive in our midst, and who never cease
to speak disparagingly of the country. Notwithstanding such influences, howevor, Big
Bend will draw a fair emigration, the opinions
keeps an editor at Washington most of the
time, and his business is to watch the weathercock on the Capitol, and telegraph the state
of tho wind to San Francisco.   Just now both
these papers arc backing and filling, and for
want of sailing orders from the East, scarcely
know what course to steer.   Tho consequence
is that they are placed in the anomalous position of belonging to no party, at a time when
the national mind is more excited upon vital
questions than it has been for years; and
naturally enough theso journals which HAVE
hoisted their colors are beginning to blaze
away from all sides upon tho hesitating flagships.    Speaking of "Hags" reminds mo of
the paper so named, the editor of which, Mc
Carthy, has got himself into what our American cousins call  •' a tight place," through
charging the State Legislature with bribery
when he .was not in a position to prove the
truth of his allegations.   Ho is now in prison
at Sacramento and favors his readers daily
with a "Howl from the Dungeon," compared
to which the plaints of your contemporary at
New   Westminster,   under   similar   circumstances, were but as the wailings of an infant
to the hollowing of a sick whale.    Mr. McCarthy played a bold stroke for popularity,
but it was more bold than prudent.    He is
now enduring the martyrdom of St. Laurence
—aud certainly no martyr was ever better
roasted.   Of papers which do not call themselves independent, the Examiner, a Democrat paper, is perhaps the best conducted of
any, and there can be no doubt that the Democratic party is rapidly gaining strength in
California.    Opinions aro freely uttered now
which twelvo months ago would have brought
on an attack of "hempen bronchitis," and
thero is a growing desire to repress the " irrepressible nigger."   There are periodicals published in this city of San Francisco which
would have been a disgrace to Holywell street
in its worst times.   Papers which flaunt before
Messrs. Culler & Parsons
Havo now ready at
miitt.!^MMXimtXBtitta&Msnimw»iaM&al&Jiii
BIG BEND GOLD MINES,
BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
SAVANA'S  FERRY
A BOAT OF
TWENTY TONS BURDEN,
And aro prepared to
CONVEY FREIGHT OR TASSENGERS
To tho head of
SHUSWAP   LAKE.
Storage and a poison to take charge al Savana's.
For freight or passage apply to
TJUIE BROTHERS, Lytton.
Or tho Proprietors.
Savana's Ferry, Feb. 23il, 1860. 1
THE BANK OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Incorporated by Royal Charter.
Capital,   .   .T. $1,250,000
IN 12,fi00 SHARES, OF $100 KACn,
With Power to Increase.
BRANCHES  AND AGENTS:
IN VANCOUVER ISLAND,
VICTORIA—Bauk of British Columbia.
NANAIMO—Dank of British Columbia.
mflB   Safest,   the Shortest,  and the  Cheapest
|   route, to tliesu extraordinary Placer Mines is by
way of
VICTORIA, VANCOUVER ISLAND.
Passengers going tins way have not to cross the dan-
geroua Columbia River Hir, mul tho distance is over
ONE THIRD (or '270 miles) SHORTER by way of Victoria, than by way of Portland.
Tho Governments of Vancouver Maud and British
Columbia have subsidized tho following powerful
stoimers to parry minors from San Francisco to Victoria and New 'Westminster direct:
The H. B. Oo.'s steamer Labouchcre, Capt, Mount;
The C. S. N. Co.'s steamer Active, Oapt. Thorn.
These, or other first-class steamers, will run on this
route regularly, and will connect at Victoria with swift
River steamers carrying passengers to Yalo, n distance of 175 miles. From Yale to Savuim Ferry, a
distance of 138mllos, there is ;i splendid Government
Wagon Bead and Cuiiif<H4a4>lt>-Wtiy#id«-HmiHos ovory -
f.w miles; bvor this road travelers can easily walk, or
they can ride in Barnard's Fast Four-Horse Stages.
From Sivaiui Forr.v, tbo Hudson Bay Co.'i now and
BWltt STEAMER MARTEN will run to Ogden City,
upper ond of Shuswap Like, a. distanco of 111 miles.
From Ogden City to the Columbia River, a distance of
34 miles, tliorc is nil excellent Government Pack Trail.
J)
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
formed regarding the new mines being ex- the eyes of tho public the most disgusting re
tromoly favorable. With oheap fares to Fort- j presentations of a tasto vitiated beyond all
land and bad arrangements in tlie sailing of bopc of recovery.   Tapers which, without one
spark of wit to atone for their revolting
ribaldry, appeal to all that is earthly, sensual
and devilish in human nature—appeal oponly,
undisguisedly and plainly—and yet sell.
Caustic.
the steamers to Victoria, you will not reap
all the advantages that vou should do from
the emigration. Direct steam communication
is a step in the right direction, and if continued cannot fail to beneiit both colonies immensely. If fares arc kept low on tho steamers during tho summer, a great many will be
induced to visit Victoria and British Columbia
who have never been in the colonies before,
and much good will result from such intercourse. There is a vast amount of capital
lyin
BILLS  PASSED   DURING  THE   LATE
SESSION.
Tho following is tho list of tho maasures
passed during the session of the Legislature
idle   in San  Francisco,  noino of which [of British. Columbia just dosed:
might, bo profitably invested in opening up
and developing tho copper, coal, mid quartz
mines in the colonies. Polities occupy all tho
leisure unemployed by stocks, feet, ladies and
dissipation. m And this craving for political
food is administered to by something like a
dozen journals, of every shade and denomination, from the pure white Democrat, through
tho dingy Copperhead, down to the unmistakable downright black friends of the " gentlemen of neutral tint," or Freedmon, us tho
" man and brother" is indifferently styled.
But throughout the press of this flourishing and
beautiful State there exist certain peculiarities
which aro not to be found in the analagous institutions of older countries. No matter
what the party war-cry may be, whether for
Confirmatory Ordinance,
Trustee's Relief do,
Union Telegraph Extension do,
Trades Licenses do,
Joint Stock Co.'s do,
Ferry Regulation do,
Intestate Estates do,
Supply Bill do,
Williams Creek Bed-rock Flume do,
Pilotage do,
Sinking Fund do,
County Courts Amendment do,
Gold Tax Repeal do,
Supplemental Supply do,
Currency Adjustment do,
Pre-emption Amendment do,
NEW WESTMINSTER—Bank of British Columbia.
YAl.E—Ilauk of British Columbia.
MOUTH QuESNEL—Bank or British Columbia.
CARIBOO— Hank of British Columbia.
IN TEE UNITED STATES,
SAN FRANCISCO—Bank of British CbVumtila,
PORTLAND, OREGON—Bank of British Columbia.
IN CANADA,
BANK   OF   MONTREAL,
BRANCHES & AGENCIES:
Montreal, Toronto, Quebec, Hamilton, London, King-
molt, Cobourg, Belleville, Brentford, Brock
vllle, Whitby, Potarboro, Ottawa, Guelph,
(ioderich, Stratford, Picton, Perth,
Blmcoe, St. Cntherinos,
IN ENGLAND,
LONDON—Bank of British Columbia—SO Lombard St.
CURRENT ACCOUNTS opened for any amount not
less th in One Hundred Dollars.
Bills Discounted and Collected; aud Bills of Exchange
on Gre.it Britain, San Francisco, and New York pur-
chased.
Drafts Issued on all tho Blanche* and Agencies.
Government and other Securities received for safe
custody; Interests aud Dividends collected.
ttohl Dust and Bars Purchased,
Received on Deposit, or Advances made upon thcrar
ASSAY~OFFICE.
0 ild Dust Melted and Assayed, nnd returns niado
within 'J i hours.
Ores of every description carefully Assayed.       1
Yule. April, 1860.
MINERS GOING TO THE RICH MINES OF'
Bridge River  or Cariboo!!
Can do so by the Government Wagon Road from Yalo,
over which it is easy to walk, or travelers can rido iu
Fast Stages.
The steamers running from Sun Francisco for tho
conveyance, of passengers, by the way of Victoria and
the'Fraser River, being under contract to tho British
Colonial Governments, the Rates of Fare charged aro
very low, ami passengers aro expeditiously, comfortably and cheaply conveyed from Victoria to tho mines.
Mineia going from Sin Francisco to tho British
Columbia Gold Mines will derive another great advantage by visiting tho
FREE FORT OF VICTORIA.
In Victoria, Minors can supply themselves with every
article they require, froo of duty, and 25 to 50 per
cent, cheaper than they can buy similar goods iu California or Oregon,
Distanco from Victoria, Vancouver 1  „„- .„.,
Island, to Big Bend Mines J 473 Miles,
Distance from Astoria, via Portland 1  „,„ „..,
to Big Bend Mines .... J 752 Milcs-
TABULAR STATEMENT OF DISTANCES, COMHLED
FROM OFFICIAL AUTHuRITlESr
FROM   VICTORIA,  VANCOUVER  ISLAND.
To New Westminster, by steamer  80 Mile'*.
Tiienco to Yale, by steamer  9ft «•
Thence to Savana's Ferry, by stage. 133 "
Thanes to Head of Bhuswap Lake, by stm'r-lll <<
Thence to Columbia River, at a point 80 miles
abovo ihe supposed hum) of navigation, by
Government trail  34 <c
Tlieucu to Gold Creek, by boat  30 "
473 Miles.
KROM  ASTORIA,  VIA  PORTLAND.
To Portland  qg Miles
Thence to'the- Dalles no   <<
Thence to Walla Walla .!.'.!.".ioo   •<
Thonoj to Colvillu ...210   "
Tuonqp to a point whuru thu trail from Sl'fQ-—'—
swap Lake strikes the Columbia River. ..216    •<
Tlioncu to Gold Creek  „      20    "
County Courts Jurisdiction do.
the abolition of Jeff. Davis, or the rccoMtnic-jTHK FOll0wiNG measures werk thrown out.
tion or reov.vtruction ol the south, or the do- TT . _...
Homestead Dill,
Cattle Import Bill.
position of Andrew Johnson, or nny of the
thousand nnd one ho.wls which are daily raised
throughout every city, village and mining
camp from San Francisco to the Rocky Mountains—the object, meaning, intent and aim of 1., , ,
•1 1     ' 1 • j      1.1   .1 swap lakes are very low and a cood trail cx-
all may be expressed 111 one word, and thnt'-,,„„.„,„ ,, , „.   '"    ..      ,    P "     '      7*
1 •     ,\rr    1    r  . ii   t' • 1 . t «• ilsts WOUg the shores ot each sheet of water
word Is—Ofuoe I   Let tho Union go—let Jeff. \tn „ „„i„'J _»_-.!,   n «• .     1     -\
'to a point or reeky bluff Home twenty mi es
Davis go-abuse the noble Johnson-make! ,,;' J     „," ,   ~£   "" ' ™"    l \UI ^   t
A,     11     ,      is, Din  .1     i    •    r    this enle of the head of the lamest lake. Thi
the Froedmens Bureau Bill the basis of a m_» <-..„„, »i— .u.tT.1 _. , • . •. •:
Tup. Lakes—Necessity you a TiiAiL.-~.In
the winter season the waters of the two Shu-
THE BANK OF    ' '
BRITISH NORTH AMERICA.
Established in 1856.    Incorporated iiy
Rotal Charter.
Paid up Capital,
Undivided Met Profits, -
$5,000,000
000,000
Head Office: 7, St. Helen's Place, London.
ESTABLISHMENTS:
SAN niANClSCO-F. H. Grain & W. S. Sutherland,
Agents.
NEW YORK—Walter Watson k James Smith, Agents.
Montreal,     Quoboo,_ Toronto,      Hamilton,
.8.
.„op
"Icountry that the government of the colony
searches, or ho must possess a brain considc- V" , ';. "'" . " ' £ ,'",,, U1 1UH,1 Vu "">
rablv over the average weight. It may per- gS" iSS'u^Sl!S Ojandandbridffe
Imp interest some of your readers Vr^^^-S^^J^^f^^.^
tempt a synopsis of the stvle in which lame fcf "L1« *fff '»»»«>'«.yth beef and goods
of the San Pranoisoo papers fulfil their mission of public instructiors. In the first rank,
pre-eminent by the head and shoulders, rise
tho livening Bulletin and the Alta California.
These papers aro called "independent" in
their politics. And tho moaning of this term
appears to be, that they never espouse nny
wide until they are quite Burc that it is the
htrongest. At the commencement of the
Civil War they both came out slightly in favor
of the South, but seeing that they had made
a mistake, put their helms down .simultaneously, nnd Hew round to the Federal side.
The Bulletin itl reality is the leading paper,
and tho Alta watches its course, und invari-
ut as early a day as possible.    It is conceded
that the steamboat Marten will not bo ready
to run until the end of May, und a good trail
might be cut in ono week and at an expense I   Interest on Special Deposits of Money allowed at the
of  a few   thousand   dollars.     Mr. Jerome! rfti!4i£.,l.l.','ian.T of ".no P!»oent.por month
FRANCE—Uarouard, Andre k cin, p.rris
AUSTRALIA—Union Bank of Australia.
INDIA, CHINA k JAl'AN—Chartered Mercantile Dank
>>f India, London & China.
DRAFTS ISSUED on Loudon. New York, Sin Fran-
OISCO, Canada,New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, nnd on all
the Branches of the National Bank of Scotland and
Provincial Hank of Ireland.
Bills of Exchango and Gold Purchased.
Harper, who has ono thousand head of cattle
in the country, has subscribed ij5i)0 to effect
the purpose, and other firms will give proportionate suras. It is thcrcforo hoped that
no time will be lost in commeueing tho work,
as a scarcity of provisions at tho mines at
this unio would result most disastrously to
the interests of tho two colonies.—[Victoria
Chronicle.
The Legislative Council of this colonv VMS
ably follows close i:i its wake    The Bulletin j prorogued on Friday last.
BfTThp Hmk receives Gold Dust and lt»rs fer safe
Keeping without ohargoj undertakes the purchase and
sale of Stuck; tho Collection of Dills and other money
business In the United Statog and British" Provinces,
ASSAY~OFFICE.
Gold dust Melted and Assayed, and returns made
vvii.iiin 24 hours in Coin or Hars.
On s or every description oarefully Assayed.
N. II.—Any Instructions us to the disposal or the
proceeds of Gold Dust forwarded to (lie olllee in Victoria for Assay will be carefully attended to
Victoria, V, I.
0. SHEPHERD, Man-a.
1
752 Miles.
Showing that the distance to Up nig Bert .Mine.' is
279 Miles loss  by  way of Victoria than by way of
portlauu.
The. following  statistics, respecting tho  probable
TIME and hXPENSE of TKAViiLING from
VICTORIA   TO   BIG   BEND
Have been rompileil hy Mr. F.,I. Darnard, tho well-
known British Columbia Express Agout and Stairo Proprietor:
Class 1—By Stagk over the Wagon Eoad,
and Including Meals and Bed Tunouaii.
Distance. Time1. Dale. Mfals, etc
Victoria to Yalo 175
Vale to Kamtoops Like. 188
(her the Lakes 120
Head of Lake to Columbia Diver  35     i8hrs     — 0 00
Total nnmbor of hours traveling, 81.
Total cost, $78.
Class 2—On Foot from Yalr.to Kamloots,
taking Meals and Beds at wayside houses.
Distance. Timo. Kilo. Meals, etc
\ Iclorla to Yalo 175
Vale lo Katnlbopi Lake. 133
Over Like 121)
Head of Lake to Columbia Bivor  3.1
•24 hrs
$4
$0 00
•24 hrs
40
S 00
15 hrs
10
4 00
24 hrs
?4
$rt 00
5 dys
—
20 00
1 day
10
4 00
Total tine, 0 days.
Total cost, $08,
2 dye
0 00
Class ."—Men FcnNisiiiNG own Food on
Steamers, Traveling on Foot j-rom Y..'.lk
to Lake Kamloovs and Buying their own
Provisions on the way, or Tacking it
with t1ikm.
Distanco. Timo. IMo, Meals, etc
Victoria to Yale 175    24 lug    $4       $1 00
Yale to Kamloops Lako.188      6 dys    — 5 00
Over Lake 120     1 day    10       1 50
Head of Lake to Columbia Jtiver  35       2dys     — 0 00
Total time, 9 davs.
Total cost, $20 50.
Published by authority of the
VICTORIA, V. I., CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.
Victoria. Vancouver J.;. laud, rm. x

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