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British Columbia Tribune Apr 16, 1866

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Array Vol. I.
YALE, MONDAY, APRIL 16, 1866.
No. 2
VICTORIA  CORRESPONDENCE  OF THE
'•TRIBUNE."
Victoria, 10th April, 1866.
Just   as the   great   international   boxing
match between Sayers and Heenan had many
imitators in England, the slashing combat between Baker and Eden in Vancouver Island
has developed the fighting  propensities of
certain classes in Victoria^ Th^Jaiesl^xhi-
bition was between the distinguished (?) mem-
bor for the city in the Assembly, and the unobtrusive member for Metchosin district.   It
has beon noticed for some time past that the
former has been " blue moulding for want of
n beating."   His extremely offensive conduct
in his place in the House to the members
generally, by calling one a M liar," another a
" coward," and so on as it suited his overbearing temper, has given every one the idea
that the man has either become insane or is
naturally a " rowdy" in disposition.   I must
say that Tarn inclined to take the charitable
view of the case and attribute his cbulitions
of vulgarity  to the first of these   causes.
Never very strong minded at the best, De-
Cosmos cannot bear   with equanimity anything like reverses.   He has had enough of
these latterly.   In politics, from being " dictator"  of the Assembly he has seen   his
power diminish day by day until he finds
himself among an inglorious minority.    The
state of his private affairs cannot help preying
upon his mind also.   Equally with other real
estate holders, DeCosmos has suffered heavily
by the depression in the value of property ;
but tho saddest and severest blow to him of all
is the rapid  decline of the British Colonist.
After years of patient labor and large outlay
he built up the paper until it not only became
a credit to its architect but reflected high
honor on the colony.    After making it a great
pecuniary, as well as  literary success, in a
moment of weakness he handed over what
was one of the finest properties in the colony
to a party wholly unfitted,  as  the sequel
shows,  to conduct it with  success.    From
being filled to repletion with advertisements,
for a long time past one single page would
more than hold all the bona fide advertisements the institution has now upon its books.
It was thought by some, who knew little of
the man, to be a bold stroke on the part of
the conductors of the  paper to revive its
fallen fortunes to employ the present editor,
but    unfortunately    the     speculation    was
wide of the mark, for in place of bringing it
back to its former pre-eminence and profit,
he has  given the   final   death-blow  to its
i.-- Seeing the way matters have gone,
it is therefore no wonder that DeCosmos'
mind has succumbed to the trials that have
overtaken him.'   A good deal of allowance
should,  therefore,  be made by his enemies
as well as his friends for his eccentricities of
conduct.    It is currently rumored here—in
fact it is in everybody's   mouth—that the
paper has gone back into the hands of De-
Cosmos.
INDIAN LIQUOR LAW.
An interesting debate took plaeo in the
House of Assembly on tho bill to amend the
Indian Liquor Law. Tho hon. Speaker gave
utterance to sentiments which I believe will
meet with the concurrence of a very large
majority of tho people of both colonies. The
Indian Liquor Law is, and ever will be, inoperative If Indians were allowed to purchase liquor, under certain restrictions,
from respectable licensed publicans, instead
of being compelled to go to the unscrupulous illicit dealer in maddening compounds,
there would be less iutoxioation amongst
savages, and I believe, far less desire would
be manifested by them than at present for
strong drink. No matter what may bo the
prohibitory statutes passed, the natives
will get liquor of some kind—and this fact
should not be ignored by professed philanthropists. As Dr. Trimble shrewdly remarked,
Indians would be as ohoice in their selection
of drinks, if they were permitted to buy
openly what they wanted, as white men. I
send you slips taken from the Chronicle of the
remarks of Drs. Ho'mcken and Trimble on this
subject which possibly you may be able to
copy into the Tribune. The discussion of
the question cannot fail to do good.
ROUS! Or ASSEMBLY, V. I.
"Council Hill to amend the Indian Liquor
Act, 1860, was taken up. The bill providos
for the infliction of corporeal punishment, in
addition to imprisonment and fine for whisky
selling to Indians.
" Dr. Helmcken opposed the bill. Indians
must first be convinced that whisky drinking
is wrong, a thing that many white men would
not acknowledge. The country was put to
great expense by enforcing the present law,
and the money thus got rid of would be better
applied in teaching the Indians. Be would
throw tho sale of liquor open from one end
of the coast to the other, but he would not
let any but licensed dealers sell it. Tho only
difference would be that the Indians would
got good grog, instead of the villainous stuff
they now drank. [Laughter.] The stuff sold
to Indians under tho name of liquor had a
most deletorious effect upon them.    If the
Indians had such grog as they ought to get, the
effect would be different to what it is now.
He was opposed to flogging anybody for selling liquor to Indians. Why not flog a man
for selling liquor to a white man ? It was abhorrent to flog a man for selling a glass of
grog to an Indian. The man flogged would
seek revenge for such treatment and would
be ready for the commission of any crime
against society, lie would move that Clause
I., repealing the Indian Liquor Act, 1860, be
passed, and the remainder .of the bill be
stricken but.
" Dr. Trimble behoved that Indians had a
right to drink brandy, beer, gin—anything
they liked. If the House wanted to stop the
drinking of liquor, don't let any of it come
into the colony. Indians wero very particular
what they drank. They preferred Bunster to
brandy, but Old Tom gin was their weakness.
Would tho House believe it ?—they wouldn't
buy a bottle of gin if it had not a picture of
an old Tom Cat on it."
ELECTION.
The politicians have unseated Selim Franklin and a new election is about to take place.
A more ungracious proceeding never was enacted by honorable men than that of turning
Franklin out of his seat at a time when he is
exerting all his energies for the good of the
colony where he can be of signal service to it.
But what do bur selfish politicians care, so
long as they can hope to get a supporter.
Who will be elected is a mystery. I cannot
understand why Mr. Franklin is not brought
forward again ?
mo iikni).
Nearly every one here who can make a
raise is about trying his luck in the new mines.
You may therefore look for a large immigration of Victorians.
TUB DIRECT STBAMERS.
The people here await tho arrival of the
California with considerable interest. When
the Labouchere will bo ready to sail from San
Francisc*,'is not known yet. The coutracts
w t'i both - steamboat companies must have
been very loosely made by our respective Governments.
WATER 8UPrLT FOR THE CITY.
The Spring Ridge Water Works Company
are trying to get at Act passed by the Legislature granting them the monopoly of the
water supply of this city for five years.   I regret to say the citizens have so far taken no
action towards defeating a scheme that will,
if successful, be most injurious to the community.    There is nothing so vitally important to the inhabitants of a town as a good
supply of pure and wholesome water at rates
which will be moderate and fair.   Under tho
new bill the public havo not the least chance
of getting anything like a proper supply, and
the schedule of rates is so exhorbitunt as to
almost prohibit poor people from getting water
at all.    Tho time has gone by, in my opinion,
when & monopoly of supplying either water
or gas should bo granted, as invariably the
public aro the sufferers thereby.   We see the
effects hero of legislation of this sort, in the
outrageous price wo havo to pay for gas under
a monopoly.    I think this should deter the
Legislature from granting any more privileges
of the' samo sort.    As tho press of this city
has quietly avoided any   referenco   to tho
new bill, will you allow me to draw attention
to some of its more glaring anomalies.   In
tho first clause tho " exclusive right, liborty
and privilege of selling water in the city of
Victoria" is granted.   The third clause makes
the monthly rates "payable in adoance"   A
modest request certainly!    Tho fourth gives
the exclusive right to the company to lay
the pipes from the mains to tho houses of
parties wanting the water.    Is this not an invasion of tho rights of tho inhabitants as well
as of individual tradesmen, which should be
frowued  down?   The ninth  gives the com
pany power to claim damages for the nonpayment of water tax to ihe extent of " ten
times tho amount of the monies due, with their
itist costs." Shame upon such avarice ! The
twelfth clause confers the right on the company " to take and hold such lands as they
may requite," with the consent of the Corporation. Now, suppose the principal members of the Corporation to be members of the
Water "Works Company, people's property
could easily be taken from them witho 5 their
sanction. The fourteenth clause imposes a
fine of $100 on "every corporation or person
selling water in the city during a period of
five years from tho passage of this act." The
wording of this clause is rather ambiguous
certainly. I would invite public attention to
the schedule of charges for water. They are
frightfully exorbitant, and should under no
circumstances be allowed. For dwelling
houses, street sprinkling and livery stables the
rates are frightfully high. There is not one
word in the bill as to the placo from whence
the water supply is to como. The company
may take it out of James' Bay or any mud
pool in tho vicinity of the city, as it suits
themselves. They bind the public down
pretty stiffly in the bill, but omit any referenco to what they aro to do themselves. The
people of Victoria little dream of the chains
that will be fastened around their neeks for
the next five years, if this bill passes into law.
I would hope, however, that they would examine the measure before it be too late, and
take steps to have all the obnoxious clauses
expunged. There can be no harm in allowing tho company the privilege of laying down
pipes, etc., in the city and giving them due
protection, but away with monopoly, let us
havo ro more of it. Victoria.
OPPENHEIMER & CO.,
FORWARDING  AND  COMMISSION
MERCHANTS,
Yale, British Columbia,
AT THE
tatS of Steam Navigation
ON
FRASER   RiVER.
British  Columbia  Tribuue.
WEEKLY   PAPER.
OFFICE— YALE.
GEORGE WALLACE, Proprietor & Editor.
T. DE NOUVION,
WHOLESALE    MERCHANT
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS,
LIQUORS,
Dry Goods, Clothing, &c,
LYTTON, B. C. 1
OPPENHEIMER & CO. beg to intimate that
they are prepared to receive, store and forward to any part of British Columbia everv
deseription of merchandise, on the lowest
possible terms.
A Fare-Proof Brick Warehouse
For STORING GOODS, has been erected, nnd
Consignors may rely upon the snfc and expeditious transportation of goods to their
destination.
ALWAYS  ON   HAND
A LARGE STOCK OF
Groceries, Provisions,
LIQUORS,   CIGARS,   TOBACCO,
DRY   GOODS,  CLOTHING,
BOOTS AND SHOES,   HARDWARE, MINING
TOOLS, Etc., Etc.
Which we arc receiving by every arrival from
San Francisco and Victoria, and which wo
oiler for sale at reasonable rates,
COLONIAL   BAKERY,
FRONT   STREET
WHOLESALE   AND  RETAIL.
OITENnEIMER &
Y.ilo,TI. C, April,1866.
CO.
EXPRESS LINE STAGES!
YALE, B. C.
Bread, Pies and Cakes,
CONSTANTLY OF HAND.
A. McLABDY,
TIIF. FINK
STEAMER "LILLOOET,"
win. if.ixti
NEW WESTMINSTER FOR YALE
—OS—
Wednesdays and Saturdays,
THE COACHES of this
ulrtrly
line will now ran reg-
louviag Yalo, H. C., on
MONDAYS,
WEDNESDAYS
and FRIDAYS
AT 7 O'CLOCK, A. M.,
FOR   CACHE   CREEK
(Hii; lletvl  Rrnitr), tWHI (he completion of the rou<l,
when thuy will i;o to Bawina'fl F.irrv.
Thu Oouob for 0AU1B00 will luave Vale nn Monday.
1 V. J.HAKNAKD.
LIVERY   STABLES!
Tho Stabloa formerly known a"
J. IM    BLACK'
AT YALE, B. C,
S
RHUHRMGI i-'ilOM
YALE TO NEW WESTMINSTER
-ox—
Mondays and Fridays.
Save rcooutly been iwrehiwml by me, fhiifoutfhly renovated and placed In tho bauds of a DrtVouiaa OroorB.
Tim st<ib!'"-', will bo ."o oonduoted rs to allow of
Hoi-""" Ii |:il; !,;t on Livery, or parties may take obargfl
of theirown.
Ample oorndl room for Trains ol' Animals is provided.
Hay,Grain, two1 Feed of all kinds nnd of tho best
quality only, will bo kept on-hand.
i >f, .i. mr.NAitn
(a —ssjjjsssjsjsji ——B ua
■kSJHBBMHHVKBSMSfjUBBMSJHBBBJPjnnB
Agents for he British Columbia Tribune,
S ivana'i Ferry Barnard's Express
Bsymour City  do
Frouch (ii e-k, Big Bend      do
Junction  do
.Soda Creek  do
Quesnolmouth  do
\.in Winkle  do
Williams Creak  do
New Westminster Clarksnn k Co.
Mllooet F. W. Foster.
Victoria IJeDry Lyne.
Sm Francisco W. Fisher.
BltlTISH COLUMBIA TRIBUNE.
YALE, MONDAY,   APRIL  16,  1866.
THE PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE.
After experiencing a long period of depression, that has bocn keenly felt by every class
in these colonies, the clouds of adversity have
begun to disperse and the dawn of a brighter
future is beginning to peep through the horizon.   There is no doubt that the difficulties
und trials which  most of our business men
havo encounterod will teach them to avoid
the  shoals and  quicksands  upon  which  so
many have seen their grandest hopes scattered
to the winds.     It is tho custom when any
great crisis in a country's affairs arrives, like
that from which we are now struggling to disengage ourselves,  to attribute the failure of
every enterprise to any but the right cause.
Men are slow to blamo themselves when a
want of success  attend thoir speculations,
but in nine cases ouk of ten they are  the
authors of thoir own misfortunes.  How often
have wc heard the merchants of both colonies
blame the government, the bank, the country for most of the evils that have come upon
them.   Never a word of self-reproach is suffered to escape  their lips for tho reckless
trading, ruinous credit sy6tem, and unprofitable competition they practised, and that are
the true causes of the financial convulsion that
has overspread the country.    However unpleasant and unpalatable it may be to many
to hear these truths, it is ourbounden duty to
proclaim them, that men may bo warned by
the errors of tho past so as to avoid them in
the future.    Tlie present Administration has,
we admit, dono much to retard the country's
progress and improvament; but all the mistakes they have made would have fallen comparatively harmless bad commercial men been
more circumspect and guarded in business.
Among tho population that will be attracted
to our new mines tho coming summer, merchants will have a wide field for trading, and
If they adopt a legitimate and safe system of
doing business they will be able to recover
most of the losses sustained in the past.   It
was only by cash payments in the mines of
Idaho and Montana that the merchants in
those territories havo been successful, and it
la by the enforcement of the same principlo in
this country that commerce can be conducted
with safety and profit to all concerned.    The
want of population is another of the evils
under which this colony has groaned for some
time.   Almost exclusively a mining country,
vast in its extent and most difficult to penetrate,
lothing but a large population can open and
half the rate  they can be procured in the
mining territories across the borders.   And
finally, how does the taxation of this country
compare with our neighbors ?   Even in this
respect we havo a most decided advantage, as
our taxation is not half that levied under the
" stars and stripes." How is it, then, that with
all the advantages we possess over the adjoining territories, our population is so small and
theirs so large and so steadily increasing?
The  cause  is with ourselves.   ,We have put
forth  no efforts in the race for population.
Nay,  rather,  we  have been, .striving to dis-
I courage men from-coming amongst us.   It is
not too late to learn something from our more
enterprising " cousins," and to stretch out our
arms in a manly attempt to save our sinking
ship.   Without population we are powerless
for good.   With population, we can overcome
almost every obstacle.   We have an abiding
faith in the immense resources of this country.
Her mines  of gold,  silver and copper only
await the efforts of man to open and convert
them into profit.    Her fertile valleys and rich
pastures, which lie nntilled and unused, are
sufficient to meet all the exigencies of a population larger than will ever be collected together in  the country.     There are a large
number of people in both colonies who think
that Union and the eradication of many of
the abuses of the Government that will follow
its consummation, will work out the regeneration of the country !   Vain thought.   Union
will undoubtedly confer advantages,  but it
won't bring population.   We can only hope
for real prosperity when wo have a large and
busy population employed in our midst; and
towards the attainment of that object all our
efforts should be directed.    By avoiding the
errors of the past, doing all in our power in
the present to stimulate   immigration,   the
future prospects of this country will be as en-
couragiug un any of us can desire.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
OWNER   WANTED!
A   SMALL  BROWN HORSE with a Star in
his forehead,strayed into Nelson's corrall in Yalo.
The owner can havo him by proving property nnd pay-
BH535
ing chargeg.
Yale, 14th April, 1866
NEISON A CO.
FOR   SALE,
THREE SLATE BED
BILLIARD   TABLES!
ALSO,
One Fine Wooden Bed,
" Suitable for packing to BIG BEND.
2        Apply to W. R. SUTTON, Yalo.
URIAH NELSON & CO.,
Wholesale, Forwarding,
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
YALE, BRITISH COLUMBIA,
AT THE
|,wia«wvu    • .iu  ujirll  Hill
develop the hidden riches which British Col
unibia il known to contain. Two or three
thousand men dispersed over such a country
as this is can effect very little for us, and our
progress will be limited indeed, until, wc have
twenty or thirty thousand men engaged in
our mines. How does it come that Washington Territory, Idaho and Montana, situated
almost at our very doors, can number their
inhabitants by tens of thousands, whilst this
colony is almost deserted ? Is the climate of
those territories more genial than ours ? No;
for the extremes of heat and cold aro not so
intense here as in either Idaho or Montana,
lias this colony not provod as rich in minerali
wealth, so far as it has been prospectod, at
any of the territories wo have mentioned"
Wo have tho declarations of some of the best |
aud most experienced miners on tho ooast that
her mineral resources aro suporior to those
contained in the adjacent territories. Arc provisions higher in the interior of the country
than across the Hue? No; for with our splendid cordon of waggon roads and steamboat
communication throughout tho colony, almost
nil kinds of the necessaries us well as tho lux-
uriufl of life enn ho laid down in our mines for
i
Montana Minks.—The Idaho correspondent of the Sacramento Union expresses the
following opinions about these mines, which
are attracting thousands from both East and
West this spring:
'I am almost afraid to ask you the publication of my opinion of Blackfoot. It would
not differ a great deal with my published cor-
espondence in your paper of Cour d'Alene
last spring.    It is another " steamboat," and
if the Oregon Steam Navigation Company can
make anything by it, let them do it amongst
their own population—no one will regret that;
but if Californians will leave their homes to go
there, don't send them by the Columbia rivor,
because they will be farther off from Black-
foot than if they had stayed at home.   Their
route is direct to Salt Lake from California—
after that let them choose for themselves.
They must not come this way if they expect
to get there before 1867.   We are losing all
our floating population for that new country,
said to excel California, but it is a class that
we are glad to get rid of, with but few exceptions, and the steady and industrious man who
remains in our territory will thank his stars
that he did not go to Blackfoot.   It may do
awhile for gamblers and Jews, but it is really
an old settled country, older than Idaho, and
the excitement, for it is nothing elso, is calculated to ruin thousands who leave fair and
even profitable labor for a country that bears
no comparison with the Pacific slopo.   I can
assuie  you from positive   information  that
although  it may be a favorable country, a
large portion of the population for the past
two years have been glad to leave and come
this way to make a living, leaving Blackfoot
to be filled up with fools from California, because there is no " Fool Killer" there.    However, as I told young Pike the other day,
whose name is Pain, that he also should be
careful on his road, or " old Pain Killer" himself might come along and take him off."
Tm Civil Rights Bill.—This bill, which
tho Lower House of Congress has passed by
a two-thirds voto over. President Johnson's
veto, was introduced by Trumbull, one of the
strongest radicals in the House, as a set off
to the Freedracn's Bureau Bill. The conflict
betweon the Executive and Congress is beginning to assume a form that must seriously affect the well-being of the country and retard
the marked progress that was taking place in
tho pacification of tho Southern States. We
cannot help thinking that the prcsont state of
things is groatly to be deplored. All our
sympathies are with the conservative President in his reconstruction policy, and we
earnestly hope that the country will sustain
him in opposition to hil enemios.
Eukopkan War.—It will be seen by our telegraphic reports that a war between Austria
and Prussia is imminent. The casus belli is
the appropriation of Scllleswig  Holstein  by
A.   C.   WELLS,
Saddle and Harness Maker,
YALE, B. C.
JSP A complete assortment of Stock constantly on hand. 2
STOVES!   STOVES!
J. S. DEAS,
FRONT  STREET,  YALE,  B. C,
Keeps constantly on hand a Largo Assortment of
Parlor, Cooking and Saloon
STOVES,   .
Imported direct from San Francisco, together
with a general assortment of
TINWARE!
Manufactured on the premises, which enables
him to sell at the lowest possible rates.
JOBBING and REPAIRING
DONE AT THE SHORTEST NOTICE.
jpg" Orders from  tho   country   promptly
attended to. 2
HEAD OF NAVIGATION ON FRASER RIVER,
URIAH NELSON & Co. have on hand an
immense Stock of Goods, imported direct
from San Francisco and Victoria, comprising:
Groceries, Provisions,
Liquors, Cigars, Tobacco,
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING,
BOOTS,   SHOES,   HARDWARF,   MINING
TOOLS, ETC., ETC.,
Which will be sold to Traders and Packers
ON THE MOST REASONABLE TERMS.
We  are  forwarding  well  equipped   Trains
almost daily to
BIG    BEND!
AND OARIBOO MINES.
Freight consigned to us will be forwarded nt
the Lowest Rates and with tho utmost expedition,
STORAGE AND FORWARDING.
FIRE-PROOF    WAREHOUSE !
PARTIES Desirous of Shipping Freight WITH
DISPATCH will find ii to thoir advantage by
giving us a call beforo engaging olsowhero.
,8ES-Having oUr own Teams, wc aro prepared to Contract to carry from 1000 to 200,000 lbs. for BIO
BEND or Caiiboo.
aLWAY & BAILEY.
Tale, April 10th, 1866.
URIAH NELSON & CO.
Yale, April, 1866.
the hitter,
In the matter of the Estate of Seligman
Elsasser, who has made an assignment for
the benefit of his Creditors.
NOTICE is hereby given that all persona having
-->.-i.in.--, agitfttt tho above Estate, aro requested to
'idM'Md a WAtoasOt of the sumo (duly voriflud) to
tho undersigned on or  beforo tho 20th day of Muy
noxt, or thoy may bo deprived of tho first dividend'.
Dated at Victoria, the 6th of April, 1866.
JOHN WILKIE,
F. WKISSKNBURGER,
1 Assignees.
THE FINE
STEAMER "LILLOOET,"
WILL LtUVI
NEW WESTMINSTER FOR YALB
—OH—
Wednesdays and Saturdays,
nimiuwo from
YALE TO NEW WESTMINSTER
—ox—
Mondays and Fridays.
W.   H.   SUTTON,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALER IN
WINES,    LIQUORS
AND    CIGARS,
Coal 011 and Coal 011 Lamps, &c.
SOLE AGENT FOR
ZTON & CO.'S CELEBRATED
CALIFORNIA   ALE!
IN nm.9. AND HALF BBLS.
YaI«7April,1866. 1
DR. J. E. BROTJSE,
PHYSICIAN, SURGEON, &c,
CANADIAN  LICENTIATE,
GRADUATE   OF  McGILL  UNIVERSITY,
MONTREAL, O. E.,
Can be consulted daily at his offico in Yale,,
next to Oppenheimar & Co.'s itore.
DRUGS   AND   TATENT   MEDICINES
FOR   SALE.' t
J BRITISH COLUMBIA TRIBUNE.
YALE, MONDAY,  APRIL  16, 1806.
A New Judge 1—Our contemporary at New
Westminster in referring to the escape of the
Indian lately at Quesnelmouth, calls upon the
Government to appoint a second juSge, so
that Courts of Assize may be held more
frequently  than heretofore  throughout  the
colony. We are of opinion, and we have
little doubt the public agrees with us, that
there is no more necessity for a second judge
in the colony at present than for a second
nose to a man's face. Thanks to Judge Beg-
bic, who is a terror to evil doers, the state of
the country a§ regards crime is highly satisfactory. With respect to the escape of the
Indian at Quesnelmouth, we would remind
our contemporary that it is no uncommon
occurrence for a prisoner to eseape from the
model prison at the capital. If the Government require Assizes more frequently held in
future than has been the practice, it is an easy
matter to issue a special commission for the
trial of prisoners in any particular district.
The finances of the country will not warrant
the imposition of any more burdens than it
has at present. And it would be highly injudicious on the part of the Government, with
Union inimmediate prospect of being carried
into effect, to make any appointments that
can be avoided.
Improving.—Mr. Hunt, the obliging purser
of the Upper Fraser steamer Enterprise, waB
suddenly attacked with a dangerous illness at
the Junction about three weeks since. Dr.
Black was immediately summoned by telegraph to visit him. After a fortnight's at
tendance on the patient, the latter, we are
happy to state, was able to return here by
stage, in company with the doctor, on Saturday morning, en route to New Westminster,
Mr. Hunt is still very weak, but his state of
health now is not such as to occasion any un
easiness to his friends.
Latest News from Big Bend.
Telegraphic News from the Interior ol' Britisa Columbia,
[SPECIAL   DISPATCHES   TO   TnB   TRIHUSE.]
LATER FROM OARIBOO.
Quesnelmouth, April 15.—-The Indian who
escaped from the jail here  has been seen
within  the  last two days at the Soda Creek
Rancherie on the hill.   A &arge wmatoeA^n;^^., nny dn Monday la's^ found
one ot the chambers of his revolver, and he
declared his intention of killing the first
white man he got a chance at. The Government ought to take prompt steps for his recapture.
Everything is very dull on Williams Creek.
The Grouse Creek strike is further confirmed,
but there is a great scarcity of water for mining purposes. On Monday night and Tuesday morning last twenty-four inches of snow
fell on the creek, but it is expected to go off at
once. Weather here very fine. River clear
of ice.
Junction, April 15.—Season opening up
finely. Farmers have their land plowed and
have commenced sowini?. Roads from Yale
to Junction in fine condition. From Junction
up the snow is rapidly disappearing. Scott's
pack train passed through yesterday for Williams Creek.
From Mr." Wheak, who arrived here on
Friday last, we have the following intelligence
from our new mines. Mr. Wheak, who is a
member of the "Hit or Miss" claim on Williams Creek, left Cariboo, like hundreds of
others, to try'his luck in Big Bend.   Arriving
The Columbia District.—The Hon. P. O'Reilly, Gold Commissioner for the Columbia
District, arrived here on Thursday last and
immediately proceeded on his journey to the
Columbia River via Savana's Ferry. Mr.
O'Reilly will be assisted in his new district,
which embraces Kootenay and Osoyoos,' by
Messrs. Gaggin vand Haynes, Assistant Commissioners.
Thk Jail.—Thero are three persons at present in the jail here. They have been sum-
mnrily convicted before the magistrate—one
for giving lkuiorla IndianB^amLtoaior. stealing. The Chief Commissioner of Works and
Mr. O'Reilly inspected the jail on Thursday
last, and they expressed themselves weil
pleased with the building and internal arrangements.
Goods for Bio Bend.—Nearly all our
merchants have been sending large supplies
of goods during the past week to Savana's
Ferry, en route to Big Bend. Messrs. Oppen-
heinicr, Nelson & Co., Barlow, and the Hudson's Bay Company are among the chief forwarders of teams. Freight averages 7 cents
per lb. to the Ferry.
A Good Thing vor Bio Bbnd Mines.—The
Hudson's Bay Company are about to establish immediately depots for goods for tho Big
Bend mines at Savana's Ferry and Seymour
City. It is probable that they will open a
store in some central position in the mines
during the summer.
Cache Creek Road.—The Chief Commissioner of Works passed through Yale on
Thursday last on his wsy to inspect and take
over, if approved, the road made by Mr. G.
Bi Wright from Cache Creek to Savana's
Ferry. A gentleman who arrived hero a few
days since stated that tho road had been completed by the contractor.
Goiko to Bio Bend.—A largo number of
miners passed through Yale during the past
week on their way to the Big Bend.   They
all entertained high hopes of the prospects
before them in the new El Dorado, and we
heartily wish that all their anticipations of
reaping a golden harvest may be fully realized.
Freiqht to Cariboo.—Paokers are asking
nineteen  cents a pound, clear of road tolls,
for freighting to Williams Creek. Merchants
are not disposed to give more than sixteen
cunts. So far very little goods have been forwarded to Cariboo this season.
Latest Telegraphic Dispatches.
[special dispatches to thk tribune.]
ENGLISH NEWS.
Halifax, April 9.—Steamer England, from
Liverpool March 28th, arrived this morning
with 1320 passengers. Fifty had died of
cholera. There were sixty cases on board.
No communication from the shoro allowed
with the steamer. The steamer was ordered
oft' by Government, but owing to rapid spread
of the disease and danger to the sick, found
it impossible to proceed. She lies below the
light-house. A number of the passengers
will be placed in the hospital ships. Three
doctors are on board. The crew of the ship
numbers one hundred. Passengers mostly
Germans and Irish. The Captain thinks the
epidemic was brought on board by the Germans.
Portland, Maine, April 10. —Steamship
Belgian, Liverpool 29th, Londonderry 30th,
arrived at 6 a. m. London Times says, there
is much reason to fear that peaco in Europe
is about being broken at a time when it is
least necessary.
AUSTRIA AND PRUSSIA.
Probability of war between Austria and
Prussia increasing.
UNITED STATES NEWS.
San Francisco, April 11.—Salute of 200
guns waB fired to-day—100 in honor of the
Union victory in Connecticut, and 100 in
honor of the Union victory in Congress over
the President by passing the Civil Rights Bill
British bark Sir George Grey, from Valparaiso for Sydney, wrecked about 20th Ecbru
ary on Gockburn's Island, 100 miles east of
Tahiti, where she was sold by auction for 100
dollars. •
Gold in New York on the 9th, 127j and 188,
Legal Tenders, 79| and 80.
Tribune's special nays, it is generally cxpoc
ted that the President in a few days will ro-
lease Jeff. Davis and C. C. Clay on parole.
Steamer New York arrived from Aspinwall
with California mails and treasure. Fifteen
negroes attempted an insurrection at Panama
on March 24th. They were surroundod by
troops and shot down like sheep.
Civil Rights Bill passed the House by 145
against 18 over veto.
New York, April 10.—Dispatches from St.
Domingo of March 25th, gives particulars of
a great fire at Port au Prince on the 19th.
33 blocks, 1000 houses burned.
FROM NEW WESTMINSTER.
April 15.—The C. S. N. steam propeller
California arrived at 5:80 P. m. yesterday,
with 156 passengers, of whom 50 were from
Victoria, and 174 tons of freight, a large portion of which is for Yale and up country.
Sho brought 75 passengers and 147 tons
freight to Victoria. Sho encountered heavy
northwestern gales four hours out of San
Francisco which lasted 48 hours.
The cable for Victoria had been all wound
on the reol on Friday, and it was expocted
would be laid immediately.
The Labouchcro was advertised to leave
San Francisco yosterday (Saturday) at 10 a. m.
that the upper lake (Shuswop) was not open,
so he came down here to spend a week and
then return. The day before our informant
left the Ferry, a Frenchman stopping there
received a letter from a miner on French
Creek that gave a most glowing account of
the prospects obtained for several miles Up
the creek. Tlie utmost confidence is felt by
every one that the reports of the extent ami
richness of the new diggings are not exaggerated. About five hundred men were
camping at Kaniloops waiting for the ice to
break up, to get on to tho new El Dorado.
Hour was $1 25 per lb.; bacon, $2 per lb.
at Seymour; nnd flour was 24 cents per lb.
at Savana's Forry. Bill Moore was about
to leave Kaniloops on his first trip with
his barge with goods for Seymour. A large
fleet of boats aro on the lakos ready to take
freight across when navigation is practicable.
The work on the steamer Marten was progressing rapidly.
NEWS FROM CARIBOO.
Large Contract for Big Bend.—The Hudson's Bay Company have made a contract
with Messrs. Dodge fit Co.. who are about to
transfer their teams and trains to this route,
for freighting 100,000 lbs. of goods to the
Big Bend mines.
The Waggon Road.—The grand trunk road
from Yale to the Green  Timber is described
by parties who arrived here yesterday as in
fine order Above the latter point there is
still considerable snow on the ground.
The Weather.—Wc  have had  alternate
sunshine  and rain during  tho past week in
Yale. As tho season for fine weather has
fully arrived, wo anticipate a pleasant change
to bright sunshine during the present week
Thk Steamer Martkn.—Mr. MolTu, lute of
Fort Simpson, and Mr. Suffren, of Seattle, W.
T., havo been respectively appointed Captain
and Engineer of the Hudson's Bay Company's steamer Marten.
Next San Francisco Steamer.—The steamer Del Norte, Captain Johnson, will be the
next steamer for Victoria and New Westminster.   Sho vill sail on the 18th inst.
Our Issue.—The regular issue of the Tri-
huse will be every Monday morning, in time
for the up and down country mails.
jgy~ The up river steamers left New Westminster yesterday morning at eight o'clock
for Yale. They had not arrived when we
went to press. There are 200 passengers on
board.
d£gT Yale toll road receipts for week ending 11th April, $1200 83.
We have received the following news from
Mr. Wheak, who arrived here on Friday last
from Cariboo via Savana's Ferry.  Mr. Wheak
left Williams Creek only two weeks since:
Williams Creek.
Several claims above Barkervillc, including
the Cornish, have been paying more than
wages during the winter. The Foatcr Campbell had got down their shaft but had not
struck pay. Neither the Barker, Sheepskin,
Bald Head, Hibernian, Welch, Hit or Miss,
Cariboo" or Grizzly companies were at work.
The claims were all full of water, and there
was very little hope of any of them
being opened until tho Bedrock drain is completed. The Australian Company have done
very well during the winter. They have
made from 100 oz. to 200 oz. per week. The
Wakc-up-Jakc Company wero about to sink a
new shaft on the upper part of their claim.
The Aurora Company had finished their tunnel and were waiting for water to commence
washing. The Watson Company were also
waiting for water to wash. The Caledonia
Company had commenced workiug and were
taking out a little pay. Tho Tunnel Company, behind the Bank of British Columbia,
were working, hut had not struck pay. The
Cameron and Dead Broke Companies were
washing under ground and doing well. They
had a law suit about water, which was decided
in favor of the latter. Tho Nevada Tunnel
Company were at work, but had not got into
pay. "
Stout's Gulch.
A  number  of claims on this gulch have
been yielding  good pay during the winter.
Oonklin Gulch.
Only  one  company—the  Hood—wero  at
work.   They wcre running in a tunnel.
Grouse Creek.
Mr. Wheak did not hear anything of tho
strike reported to havo taken place on this
creek. A miner from Grouse Creek who
came down with our informant to Savana's
Ferry on his way to Big Bond, stated that
small wages had been made by some meu who
wintered on this creek.
Bed-rock Flume, Williams Creek.
The work was being carried on vigorously.
From thirty to forty white men wero cm-
ployed on it at $5 pur day, (in scrip) aud the
flume is completed up to the lower part of
Richfield.
The Bed-rock Drain
Had been finished to a point about the centre
of the Caledonia claim. The work was getting on very slowly, and it will be far on in
the summer before the drain is fiuished up to
Barkervillc.
General Observations.
Mr. Wheak, who is a member of the Hit or
Miss Company, and has passed two winters in
Cariboo, states that times on the creek sinco
last fall have been unprecedcutcdly dull. No
money in circulation, and very little work
doing. About 200 meu bad left the crock for
Big Bond, and it was probable that many
mqrc would follow, as there will be very little
work done for three months at the least,
until the bed-rock drain is carried up the
creek to drain tho claims. Thero were about
three feet of snow remaining on the ground ;
the weather was fine and very mild. Flour
was selling at from 30c to 32c per lb.; bacon,
75c and beef 25c per lb. Mr. Cox, J. P.,
wintered on the creek, and was in the enjoyment of good health when our informunt [aft,
LIVERY   STABLES!
The Sullies formerly known as
JIM    BLAC K'S,
AT YALE, B. C,
Have neenlly bem purchased by me, thoroughly renovated an.i placed in the aoads. or a Qrat-olottt Qroom;
'I'll,'  Stabler!   will   bO   Be   coiiilnelofl   a* tfl allow   of
Horses being left on Livery, or pwtioa may lake aaange
ol' their own.
Ample coituM room tor Trains of Anima's is provided.
Ila>*. tire.ln, :ind Wed of all  kinds  and  ot the best
quality only', will be kept on hand.
1 V. .1. liAlWAM).
COLONIAL   BAKERY,
FRONT   STREET
VALE, B. C.
Bread, Pies and Cakes,
CONSTANTLY OF HAND.
A. Mel.A III) Y.
J. F. BARRY'S SALOON,
FRONT   STR E ET,
YALE, B. C.
ALES, WINES AND
LIQUORS,
Of the best description that cau be imported*
CIGARS!
OF THE CHOICEST BRANDS.
The P
opriofr will bo liapp
him a will on thee
'o havf Hid friend* j;ivc
y to Big Bead.       1
PORT   YALE   HOTEL
AND   RESTAURANT,
KW1XT STHKET, YAl.K, II. 11.
rpillo IICUSE U.T011I:: BxctllOBI  AcLuiMiioda-
_|_ tiou for truvulurs.
GOOD BEDS, EXCELLENT FARE,
CHOICE   LIQUORS   AT   THE   BAR.
STABLING FOR ANIMALS.   HA* AND OATS
AT THE LOWEST BATES.
I KKI.I.KY II I,AXi:, l'r. 1 re tors.
1
!i
i
L BRITISH COLUMBIA TRIBUNE.
YALE, MONDAY, APRIL  16, 1866.
THE "TRIBUNE."
' [From our lirst number.]
In presenting   tho   first number of this
journal to the  public, it will be unnecessary
lor us to enter into any elaborate exposition
of our views regarding the many important
questions which agitate men's minds in this
country.   It is now twelve months since we
first became connected with the press of this
colony, and during that time we have taken
part in the discussion of every political topic
interesting to the people or that had any bearing upon the material interests of the community.   When launching our first newspaper
enterprise in the colony we laid down in un
mistakable language the principles which we
were determined to support.   Since then we
have not changed one single article of our
political creed.   It is with unalloyed satisfaction that we find nearly every measure of
public policy which we advocated in the first
number of the Cariboo Sentinel cither adopted
by the country, or in immediate prospect of
being carried into effect by tho   Imperial
Government.    Union of these colonies,
which we have   been a strenuous advocate,
has  now been  decided upon hy the home
authorities, and probably before another year
will elapse a law will bo passed by the Imperial Parliament  to effect this object.    Until
the principles of the measure with which Her
Majesty's Government is charged are made
known to ua, it would be premature on our
part to offer any observations as to its details,
but we may state in  passing, that  unless
some  real power over tho finances of the
country is placed in the hands of the people
through representatives elected on a proper
franchise, there will be neither satisfaction
nor contentment in this portion of the British
empire.   The repeal of the Gold Export Tax
was a wise and proper concession to " the
well understood wishes of the community,"
and will tend to promote the development of the
resources of the country by restoring among
the mining class that confidonce in the justice
and equity of the Government of this colony,
which had been forfeited by the imposition
of a tax  that pressed so heavily upon the
"bone and sinew"   of tho   country.    The
measure passed in the late session  of the
Legislative Council to tax all classes of miners
alike will compel the Chinese throughout the
colony to bear their fair portion of the burdens
of the country.    With respeot to the abolition of the road tolls, another of the measures
which we advocated, we hope that tho present
year is the last they will be permitted to act
as' a barrier to the progress of the colony.
In the  meantime  we highly approve of the
course which the Executive has adopted in
easing the trade to our new mines by removing the toll-gate from Lytton City to the
Junctiou.   Retrenchment in the public service
wc do not look for until Union is effected and
the people have power placed in their own
hands to deal with the question in a satisfactory manner.   We hope tho time is not far
distant when the taxation of this country will
not be one  half what it is at present, and
when the burdens thut now weigh down the
commerce and industries of the land will be
removed, that thero may be   no   obstacles
in the way of the country's development and
progress.    The discovery of the new mining
region of Big Bend will undoubtedly again
induce a large population to come amongst
us.   It will be the bounden duty of tho Government to do all in its power to retain those
who come, as it is only by tho presence of a
vast population that the riches of so extensive a country as this is can be developed.
It is our opinion, based on information derived
from experienced miners who have traversed
in pursuit of mineral wealth over all the territories of the United States on the Pacific
coast,    that   British    Columbia   equals,  if
not  surpasses,   my   of   them   as  a  mineral   country.     We  confidently   anticipate
that the result of this year's prospecting will
provo tho soundness of our opinion, and that
instead of there  being only two or  three
thousand men in the country, like last year—
with tho Gold Tax in operation—there will be
more   than   ten   thousand    active   miners
spread over the country before the fall.   It is
our determination to devote all our energies
this season to tlie collection of accurate mining
intelligence in the new mines for publication
in tho Tribune, believing that it is only by
means of tho diffusion of correct information
concerning thorn that we may hope to sue-
ceod in attracting population to our borders and
thereby insuring the prosperity of the country.
In furtherance of this purpose it is our intention to proceed at an early date to Big Bend,
from which place we will communicate regularly  with the Tkihunk, makiug use, when
necessary, of the telegraph, which is com
pleted to Cache Creek, the nearest point to
the mines.   We need scarcely say that our
present enterprise will involve heav,y expense
upon us. Considering the objects we have in
view, and tho signal advantage that must accrue to the country by our undertaking properly carried out, do we ask too much from
the business people of both these colonics,
when we say ; strengthen our hands by giving
to the Tribune a cordial and substantial
support ? 	
THE
HUDSON'S  BAY
COMPANY
SETTING ASIDE A VERDICT.
To the Editor of tbk " Tribune."
Sir,—I observe that your colonial contemporary has worked himself into a violent rage
and spewed dut his long pent up venom in
unmeasured terms upon the judge of the
Supreme Court, for setting aside the verdict
of a jury in a case lately tried before the
Court.   Af.er first commenting on premises
which were erroneous, the journal in question
had to "amend its plea" in the last issue and
acknowledge its error in reference  to the
reasons it had given for the granting of a non
suit. Now, sir, I am not going to enter into the
merits of the casein question, as I know nothing about them, but I think if the journal referred to had been desirous of doing what was fair
by all parties—judge, jury, litigants and eounsel
of|—it would have given a proper report of the
case and allowed the public to form correct
opinions as to the justice or injustice that has
been done by the setting aside of the verdict.
Instead of giving, as the Columbian has done,
a garbled aud one-sided view of the case, had
an unbiased report been published, the public
would then have been in a position to act as
"a high court of appeal."   As to the fact of
the judge setting aside the verdict of the jury,
there is nothing in that to call for the strictures which your contemporary, to gratify his
own private malice, has passed upon his lordship.   In the Courts of  the  United  Kingdom, in the Colonies and in the United States,
the judges have the power, and very frequently use it, of doing the very same thing that
the judge of this  colony has lately done
Notwithstanding that your learned contom
temporary has laid it down that a jury is to
be the judge of " law us well as facts," yet in
no civilized country in the world that I am
acquainted with is such a rule recognized.   I
have always understood that the judge, and
he   alone, is   to decide  the   law  as   well
as  what   is    evidence   and   what  is  not.
It  would   be   nonsense  to  suppose  anything   else.     In   referring  to the   defendant   in   the   late   case   as    " the  judge's
client,"   your   contemporary   outrages   the
license which belongs to the press.   Why the
judge should favor Mr. O'Reilly more than
Mr. Eddy, I am at a loss to understand.   Will
your contemporary give the reason ?   I have
yet to learn that a British judge has so far disregarded tho solemn injunctions of the oath
he has taken is to favor one man more than
another in an action beforo him.    In conclusion, I would  warn the public  against
giving any credonco to hearsay reports of
what takes place in tho Courts of the colony,
as in ninety-nine cases out of one hundred
they are downrightly false. Justice.
Invite attention to their large and well assorted Stock of
Messrs. Culler & Parsons
Havo now roiidy at
SAVANA'S  FERRY,
A BOAT OF
TWENTY TONS BURDEN,
NEW    GOODS!!
AT YALE, B. C,
JUST RECEIVED PER "PRINCESS ROYAL"
FROM LONDON,
And consisting in part of the following, viz.:
Dry Goods,
Clothing,
Provisions,
Hardware,
MINING    TOOLS,
WINES   AND  SPIRITS
F
IN WOOD AND BOTTLE, Etc.," Etc.
These Goods are offered to the
MERCHANTS, TRADERS AND PACKERS
or British Columbia
IN   LOTS   TO   SUIT,
And on the most reasonable terms.
jg^~ Every description of Country Produce
Bought, or taken In Exchange for Goods.
Yale, B.C., April, 1868. 1
And are proparod to
CONVEY FREIGHT OR TASSENGERS
To the head of
SHUSWAP   LAKE.
Storage and a person to take cliargo at Savana's.
For freight or posBugo apply t<>
BUIE BROTHERS, Lytton.
Or the Proprietors.
Sivana's Ferry, Feb. 23d, 1866. 1
Livery and Sale Stables.
W. H. SUTTON,
TALK, B. C,
THE BANK OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Incorporated by Royal Charter.
Capital,  .  .T. $1,250,000
IN 12.500 SHARES, OF $100 EACH,
With Power to Increase.
BRANCHES AND AGENTS:
IN VANCOUVER ISLAND,
VICTORIA—Bank of British Columbia.
NANAIMO—Bank or British Columbia.
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
NEW WESTMINSTER—Bank of British Columbia.
YALE—Bank of British Columbia.
MOUTH QUE8NEL—B.mk of British Columbia.
CARIBOO—Bank of British Columbia.
IN THE UNITED STATES,
?AN FRANCISCO—Bunk of B-ltlsh Columbia.
PORTLAND, OREGON—Bank of British Columbia.
IN CANADA,
BANK   OF   MONTREAL,
BRANCHES & AGENCIES:
Moatroal, Toronto, Quobec, Hamilton, London, Kingston, Cobourg, Belleville, Brunilord, Brock
vllle, Whitby, Peterboro, Ottawa, Guelph,
(iodcrich, Stratford, Picton, Porth,
gimcoe, St. Catherines.
IN ENGLAND,
LONDON-~Bank of British Columbia—80 Lombard St.
CURRENT ACCOUNTS oponed for any amount not
less than One Hundred Dollars.
Bills Discounted and Collected; nnd Bills of Exchange
on Great Britain, San Francisco, and New York purchased.
Drafts issued on all tho Branches and Agendo*.
Government and other Securities received for safo
custody; Intercuts and Dividends collected.
FOR BIG BEND AND CA1UB00!
A.  BARLOW,
Merchant and Forwarding Agent,
Is now prepared to
SHIP GOODS TO BIG BEND & CARIBOO
ON THE MOST REASONABLE TERMS.
Yale, B. C, April 10th, 1866. ]
WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH.
REDUCED RATES.
HAVING THE BEST AND MOST CON-
vmiient Siable»'«*»-Yfde, Is prepared to.accomino-
dnto the Traveling Pub'Ic.Teamstoreand Packers, with
Stabling or Corral! room. HAY and GRAIN of nil
kinds In quantities to suit.
Buggy and Saddle Horses at a moment's notice.
Horses Bought and Sold on Commission.
Yulo, April 10, 1866.
FORT   YALE IlOTEL
AND   RESTAURANT,
FRONT STREET, YALE, B. C.
THIS HOUSE afford* Excellent Accommodation for travelers.
GOOD BEDS, EXCELLENT FARE,
—AlfD—
CHOICE  LIQUORS  AT THE BAR.
STABLING FOR ANIMALS. HAY AND OATS
AT THE LOWEST RATES.
1 KELLEY ft LANE, Proprietors.
Gold Dust and Bars Purchased,
Received on Deposit, or Advances made upon them.
AS3AY~OFFICE.
Gold Dust Melted and Assayod, and returns mado
witbin 24 hours.
Ores of every description carefully Assayed.       1
Yale, April, 1866.
THE BANK OF
BRITISH NORTH AMERICA.
e8tadli8ukd in 1856.    incorporated bt
Rotal Charter.
Paid up Capital,
Undivided Net Profits,
155,000,000
600,000
ON and after the First of April the following
rates will be cbargod for transmission of mes-
MkgM!
Now Westminster to Qiicsncl 10 words....$6 00
" to Soda Creek....       "     .... ft 00
" toClinton       '•     .... 3 00
" to Cook's Ferry..      •'     ....2 60
" to Yale        "     .... 1 fiO
'« toHopo       ■•     .... l 00
" toMiitaquI        '•     ....     60
Ono half the above rates will he charged on cvory
additional Ave words.
EI). CONWAY,
1 Assist. Engineer.
Western Union Telegraph Coty
MEN WANTED AT QUESNELMOUTH.
THE Telegraph Company will commence work
at Qtiosuel on tho 1st of May. Conditions can be
awcertained nt any of the Company's offices In British
Columbia.
EDWARD CONWAY,
Assistant Engineer.
April 01,1866. 1
J. P. BARRY'S SALOON,
FRONT   STREET,
YALE, D. C.
ALES,   WINES   AND
LIQUORS,
Of the best description that can be imported.
CIGARS!
OF THE CHOICEST BRANDS.
The Proprietor will be happy to have his friends give
him a call on their way to Big Herd.        1
Head Office: 7, St. Helen's Place, London.
ESTABLISHMENTS:
SAN FRANCISCO—F. H. Grain A W. S. Sutherland,.
Agonts.
NEW YORK—Walter Watson & James Smith, Agents.
Montreal,      Qucbeo, Toronto,      Hamilton,
Kingston,     London,0.W., Brantford,   Hilifax.N.S,
St. Johns, N. B.,   Victoria, V. I.   Cariboo, B.C.
AGENTS:
SCOTLAND—National Bunk of Scotland.
IRELAND—Provincial Bank of Ireland.
FKANCK—Marcuard. Andre 4 Clo, Paris.
AUSTRALIA—Union Bank of Australia.
INDIA, CHINA ft JAl'AN-Charterod Mercantile Bank
of India, London & China.
DRAFTS ISSUED on London, Now York, San Francisco, Ciui.uii, Now Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and on all
tho Brnnchos of tho National Bank of Scotland audi
Provincial Bank of Ireland.
Bills of Exchange and Cold Purchased.
Interest on Spocial Deposits of Money allowed at tho
rate of a quartor of one per cent, pur month.
|57"Thc! Bmk recolves Gold Dust and Bars for safo
keeping without charge; undertakes tho purchai" tnd
sal* "f Stock; tho Collection of Bills and other money
business In tho United States and British Provinoes.
ASSAY~OFFICE.
Gold Dust Molted and Assayed, and returns made*
within 24 hours in Coin or Bars.
Ores of ovcry description carefully Assayed.
N. B.—Any instructions ns to the dfcposiil of tho
proceeds of Gold Dust forwarded to tho office in Victoria for Assay will be carefully attended to.
J. C. SHEPHERD, Man.iger.
Victoria, V.I. 1

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