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The July Retailer Jul 31, 1927

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Array THE JULY
BRITISH COLUMBIA, ALBERTA, YUKON
VOL XIX, No. 11
VANCOUVER, B.C.
JULY, 1927
iff I**
■ i.
-Vm*£-
v-\ .*■      *vcr*~~    vtr->-"
^
AN INVITATION
and—     a GIFT of
One HALF-POUND TIN of
IMPERIAL MIXTURE
"Canada's Most Famous Tobacco"
"Co all Retail
Merchants
visiting
Vancouver
during Exhibition Week*    Call at our Office and
register in our Visitors' Book*
^xxi^Bm\^* Sat} (Emttpattg
INCORPORATED 2nd MAY,  1670
WHOLESALE
Groceries   ::   Tobaccos
AND
Hudson's Bay "Point" Blankets
325 WATER ST.        VANCOUVER, B.C
Nineteenth Year.
lOe per copy; $1.00 per year
BUYERS' WEEK NUMBER WE MANUFACTURE AND SELL THE FOLLOWING
PAPER BAGS
"STANDARD"   "MANILLA"
"BUCKSKIN"     "LIGHT KRAFT"
"HEAVY KRAFT"
THEY ARE
Actually Stronger, Tougher
More Pliable, Most Economical
Most Satisfactory
Be Sure to Use the Best—They Cost No More
Paper Mills:
Lachute A St. Jereme,
Que.
Manufacturers since  1870
J. C. WILSON, LIMITED
Manufacturers of
PAPER BA08.     WRAPPING, TIB8UE AND TOILET PAPERS
for   Wholesalers and Retailers.
1068 HOMER STREET, VANCOUVER. B. C
Phone: 8eyroonr 781
The New
Concentrated
SOAP
A Million Bubbles
In Every
Package
BfctfrfcPL*^^ Jb2AriL&&
HI    M »<<#n
I.I M4> *fl
7    A
' *.J --
Sml
(3?
'02
(>
(ffcrffy)
Caaaaia* laaa* **moat    -1'
- 24 -
Large Packages
to the Case
8ingle Cases $4.80 per case
5 Case Lots $4.75 per case
10 Case Lots $4.65 per case
25 Case LoU $4.55 per case
May be Purchased with other
Royal Crown lines to make up
quantity prices.
A BRITISH COLUMBIA PRODUCT
i
ROYAL CROWN SOAPS,
DISTRIBUTORS FOR B. 0. July. 1927
THE    RETAILER
imiTIRII 0OI.UMT1IA-ALBKRTA-YUK0N
3
BE CAREFUL TO ALWAYS SPECIFY THE B. C. BRANDS
Paper Bags
AN 100% B. C. PRODUCT.
•'PACIFIC"-LlKhi   Kraft  Qualitv.
"WESTERN"—Manilla Quality.
"COAST"—Heavy  Kraft   Quality.   9	
"MITONE"—Whlif Sulphite Quality.        Htavy Kraft
Manufactured in British Columbia by
Bartaram Paper Pirodlisjicfts Ca Ltd
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Sols Agents for British Columbia:
Tla© Norfolk Paper €©<*, Lftdl
136 WATER STRUT Phone Seymour 7868 and 7869
Broad Strip*
WMt* Sulphlta
Ug*t Manila
VANCOUVER, B. 0.
BRUNSWICK
BRAND
SARDINES
SALES!
i
(Judge the popularity of Brunswick Brand
Sardines by their sales—15.000,000 tins
each year!
No other brand of sardines on the market
offers grocers sueh quick sales, such a
rapid and constant turnover.
They arc the most popular sardines in
Canada. Profit by their popularity.
Feature them in your window and on your
counter.
CONNORS BROS., LIMITED
BLACK'S HARBOUR, N.B.
Largest sardine packers in the British
Empire. ' B
I N THE   R ET A1LKR
nntTI8H C»LUIIBIA-AI*BKmTA-TUKON
•lillv, l!t
it*)-
BARNES SCALE
During the Fair
We want to meet you face to face,
To make it worth your while to call w« sre going to i»ut on
a sale for the first time in fifteen years of fifty brand *ii--u
slightly Used rebuilt and second-hand machines, all mai;* .
Cylinder Scales from $68.50 to $171.00, Values up to 1285,00
Meat She rs from $lh.l*l to $180.00. Values up to $386.00
Fanllial Scales from $31.60 to $108.60, Values up to $28600
Electric Choppers snd Mills. *H\m to $296.00.
Cash Registers from $40.60 to $112.60. Values up to $850,00
Computing Candy Stabs from Dfti.tMi tn $48.60.   Values up to
$90.00.
Drug Scales from $18.00 to $26.00.   Vslnw up to *7'»o*i
Coffee Mills from $8.50 t<» *$u-Sf»*Ht   Values up to $80.00,
Common Scabs from 17 50 to $10.60    Values up to $32.00
Cheese Cutters from $8 "iti to iimni.   Values up to $66,00
If you cannot possibly come in. irHte us for a Ust, with
pricea, etc.
Genuine White Porcelain, everlasting, n.» cracks or comer, height to fit
counter, charts to fit your priees, rust proof, shock-proof, foolproof
and dirt-proof.
Will blend with any store and make it loo», more attractive,
Wo want you to see them.
TO FILL THE DEMANDS FOR A REAL REOISTER that counts money
without frills or fummididdlss.
One piece mahogany dust-proof cabinet, one key control, press-down key
total adder, roomy cash drawer, many vizi*, highest standard in
accuracy, convenience, economy, speed mid nttraefiveii***-*
Keep UPiO-date.   See it.
FEDERAL CASH REGISTER
First Improvement in Msat-slietr construction In
many years.
A.— Meat support keeps meat square to tlo kuilV.
Makes it possible to slice small orders with
out using clamp.
IV - No erncks or corner i.   No places to oil above
. tho meat.
C—Safley.guard   Meat in sight. Knife guarded.
D.o-Stone and steel sharpener.
K.—Kasy to clean by tipping carriage up.
See the latest slicer.
CANADA SLICER
THE SCALE SHOP LTD.
366 Cordova St. West. Vanoouver, B.C.
Telephone Seymour 2881 u y,
lll'JT
THE    RETAILER
BRITISH CT)I,U\nUA-ALBBRTA-YUKON
&&&&''
Saves you time when customers ask for "Fresh Roasted
Coffee." That's exactly what Nabob is. The vacuum tin
keeps the flavor in-you sell it "fresh from the roaster."
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
IaboB
DoUCLAS o.(
vancouw p
T*rT~**&
WILSON BROTHERS
Wholesale Grocers
VICTORIA, B.C.
British Columbia Agents for
BLUE  GRASS  BELLE  CIDER  VINEGAR
BARRELS
65c Gallon
32 OZ. BOTTLES
$3.20 Dos.
16 OZ. BOTTLES
$1,90 Dosen
No Charge for Original Contc ners.   Why not stock the best in Vinegar?  Send in your Mail Order.
SHAMROCK BRAND
HAM, BACON. BUTTER, LARD, SAUSAGE, etc.
First Quality packing bouse products put up by P. Burns A Co.,
Limited, which means they sre the highest grade, always reliable,
snd without equal on this market.
YOU CAN RECOMMEND SHAMROCK BRAND.
P. Burns & Company, Limited
VANCOUVER
OALOARV
EDMONTON 6
THE   RETAILER
BRITISH OOLUIIBIA—ALBWITA—YUKON
•July |t|'i
OLDER THAN
CONFEDERATION!
BENSON'S PREPARED CORN
is the pure reliable Corn Starch that
never deviates from a standard of
quality that won the confidence of
consumers many years ago.
For over 68 years BENSON'S Corn
Starch has faithfully served the
Canadian housewife — it is to-day
Canada's leading Corn Starch—in
the original yellow package. Display
it prominently for increased summer
sales.
MAZOLA
THE SALAD AND COOKING OIL
is also a big Summer Seller
BENSON
PREPARED CORN
THE CANADA STARCH CO., LIMITED - MONTREAL in y
l!>*J7
THE   RETA]LER
BRITISH 00LU1CBIA-ALBBRTA-TUK0N
Rltaillr
With which It Incorporate-*! tht B   C. TRADE REVIEW.
Published ROth of every month.
NIXKTRKNTII YTSAR
ORNDRAI. MHRCIIANDISB.
0R0CBRW8, DIIYQOODS,
HARDWARE. FOOTWEAR,
OFFICIAL OROAN OF B.C. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest of Retsil Merchandising and the Development of Commerce iu Western Canada.
SUINSCRIPTION RATE: One Hollar Per Year, payable In advance.
Advertising Rate* oo Application
When space reserved final forms dost- 12th of month.
Publishtra: PROGRESS PUBLISHING CO. LTD.
Suit* 101-2 Merehanta' Exchange Building
VANCOUVER. B. C.
Telephone ley, SSSl Cable Address-Shipping— All Codes
-Cdltor. 3 B. Morrison W. N. Code, Husiness Manager
F TstlsrssU, Advt. Manager
Entered at Ottawa aa Second clasa matter
Tht following raprttent W. M. A. Bra nch ta
In tht Provinct of Britiah Columbia:—
•*H^Hii-r^Mr«r*ffjp«''MHBnMrfMP*ff«rf^HBr*jH-nM«ta^H*
Armstrong A. Smith, Pres.
Cranbrook II. R. Hlnton, Sec.
Fernle  - Norman Suddaby,
Pres.
Kamloops A. C. Taylor, Pres.
Lytton B. Rebagllatl, See.
Nanaimo N. Wright, Sec.
New Westminster	
and FraaerValley...D. Stuart, Sec.
Revelstoke F. G. Dews, Sec.
Vancouver G. F, Matthews, Sec.
Vol  XIX. No   II
—•-■•"ITS ass-ass—„,;-"
VANCOl'VKR, It. c.
July, 1927
Retailing an Accommodation to the Retailer
Exception Taken by the R M. A. to Statements Made by T. B. Loblaw as Reported by "Canadian Grocer."
In nn Interview by tne "Canadian Grocer" recently. T. It Loblaw, president «>f the Loblaw Groceterias
Limited, after the suggestion was made that hi* com*
puny ahould affiliate with tin* Canadian Fair Trade
league, stated that
"If I mire to become a member of the Canadian Pair
Trade league, «>r the Retail Merchants' Association, it
would have t<> be on the basis of serving first tho inter*
csts of the public, because it is only by giving the pub*
lie whnt it wants that we can be successful in any kind
■of business,   Tho Interests of the public must not bo
*      t * • **
endangered by the operation of any association, for, if
it is, it only reacts against that association and the
men that im to make it up."
This was the reply given in an interview with Canadian Groeer by T. P. Loblaw, president of Loblaw
'Jmepterias, Ltd., to the suggest-Son of Prof, Morrow
that an organisation such ns the ('anadian Fair Trade
League should have the leadership and prestige of men
like Loblaw,
Urges a Ket Prot on Every Line.
Continuing, Mr. Loblaw said that, while he was opposed to the principle of any merchant using any one
particular line sh a football to get people into the
store and then to charge them too high prices on othor
goods, he was at the same time strongly opposed to the
principle of priee maintenance as laid down by the
Leap-lie.
"I believe in getting a margin of profit on every
article sold In any store," he said, "but I do not be.
lievc in the policy of any store taking such a line as
Campbell's soup and selling it at 10t\ a tin, because
that is less than the actual cost of laying the goods
down in the store. When a merchant makes a football out of such an article, be is not only injuring him.
self, but everyone else. I believe in every man getting his margin of profit, but I also believe in him selling nt whatever price he likes, providing it gives a margin above his cost, and by eost I mean his laid-down
cost plus his overhead expense."
Mr. Loblaw also told "Canadian Grocer" that he
was interested in the promotion of business on strictly business principles. He maintained that an association to do effective work should teach its members
the fundamental principles of good business rather
than to complain about others who, by adopting certain policies, were able to get goods to the general
public at lower prices then they. "Just because I, or
anyone else, ean sell goods at lower prices than a mem-
ber of any association is no reason why the prices
should be based on thc other fellow's cost of doing
business." be said. "If you, or anyone else, can go
into business and sell at lower priees to the public
than I, and make a profit, you arc justified in doing it,
and the public is justified in supporting you. Business
should be done on the basis of the survival of the
fittest."
A memorandum prepared by tbe Retail Merchants'
Association of Canada in reference to thc reported
statements of Mr. Loblaw, after pointing out and enumerating the countless instances where the R. M. A. has 8
THE    KKTAILKR
BRITISH COLUMBIA—ALBBRTA   YUKON
July, l!'J7
performed wry real service to the trading community
of the country, takes exception to his remarks in that
they do not cover the story of merchandising. Mr,
Loblaw's statement that 'If you or anyone else can go
into business, and sell at lower prices to the public
than I, and make a profit, you are justified in doing it.
and the public is justified in supporting you," the
memorandum replies:—
"This statement is certainly very incomplete. The
merchants must wonder what the public of Canada
would do if they all were to adopt this business policy
of the Loblaw Stores. Where would the farmer get
bis supplies during the summer time when he requires
credit; Where would the laborer get his food when he
is out of work. Where would tbe the good housewife
get her groceries when she is unable to go to the Rtorel
Do the public appreciate these services? Are tliey a
necessity? Are the public fair to the clothier «>r the
boot and .shoe dealer when they get credit, and Mr.
Loblaw makes these same people pay the cash? Wh.it
would happen if all other merchants were to demand
cash before delivery of the goods even when these
goods were an absolute necessity to remove want and
suffering?
In an assertion worthy of tbe "Mlghteous of the
Mighty" Mr. Loblaw is reported as follows: "Husiness
should be done on the basis of the survival of the fit
test."
The golden rule "Do unto others as you would that
they should do unto you" i.s not a part of this pul
"Givome; let me get what I can; pay mo; ink.- *,
goods away; I am here for business; docs not m,
like any principle established by this "golden rule
over two thousand merehanta fell by the wm,
through financial difficulties last year with 121,01
worth ol losses. Their businesses were wrecked I
outlook on life destroyed, and their homes broken
Did the other merehants march ou with bam
furled to thc wind in glorious victory that at least ••
had been cciii(|!iered, that they had succeeded in
ting a few competitors out of the way, that the)
were the fittest have survived, or did they reach oi
helping hand and either personally or through n
ganlsatlon or association which is trying to in,;
conditions for one and all try to assist those who
in trouble    Arc lhe merchants today who are aiding to try to help those who are indifficnlties thai
may be belter able to serve, or will the prim-ip!,
the "survival of the fittest" be Instituted, and
unfortunates be forced still deeper into the mire?
Mr. Loblaw's experiences in merchandising wu
be a valuable asset t.» the Hetail .Merehants m ol
parts of Canada and their association, and his sup;
ami recommendations would be welcome, provided i
he would take a broader outlook on the dlstribm
prolcms of thin country and consider them fr«*i <
point of view of the "Ureal est  good to th.* grefi
number."
x	
I   ,'
or
nil
OPENING OF RETAIL STORES BY MAIL ORDER
HOUSES REFLECTS CHANGED CONDITIONS
Reports from Eastern Canada that a large Canad.
iaii Mail Order enterprise plans to open a number of
retail stores, call attention to a condition that has arisen
in retail merchandising in this country, which is of
particular interest to merchants located outside the
larger centres of population.
Trading habits of the populace have been revolutionized iu all sections of the country as a remit of
the universal use of the motor by all sections of lociety,
and the consequent rapidity and ease with which in.
dividuals can visit points, previously beyond reach.
What does this mean to the retailer located in the
live town or eity? It means that the motor car is
actually bringing business to his store instead of hurting bis business by absorbing a large amount of his
cut outers' incomes. It means that his store is iu a bet.
tor position now than ever before to do business, and
if the rumor that the mail order house in question is
to open retail stores is true, it means that the mail
order houses recognise the advantages under which
the individual retailer is operating and  is going to
adopt his method if distribution.
Tbe news of the opening of the retail stores is epoch-
makiug: it not only presages a new era lu mcrchandis
in if but it indicates that this new era has actually arrived. The retailer's method of doing business through
having a store located where his customers can visit
it; of stocking this slore with the merchandise that bis
experience tolls him hi*< customers want; ami of giving
personal, individual service to bis customers has been
proven to be (he bos! method of distribution, The individual retailer bas come into his own [conditions favor
him to the exclusion of other forms of merchandising;
and it depends entire!) In himself whether he bem
from Ihis or not
If it means anything, thin means thai th«* onl) ■*•
that will benefit from the changed trading habits
people are those that have a good supply of attract
goods to show    Thc merehanl who trios to run
With a skeleton stoek. showing jttst a little of llu-*
none of that   no variety to convince customers '
the stole has what they want will bem lit little
any. from the faet that the motor ear is bringing '»"'
llal customers t,» his door.
BUYERS WEEK.
Succaaa of Movement Oependa on Cooperation of AH
Br.-inchti of Distribution In Enttnding Welcome to
Visiting  Retailer*.
If this movement, whieh for thi past four j 'ars ■
created a very favorable impression with visiting in-'1
chants from British Columbia and Alberts is lo b
made a  permanent   success,   it   is   essential   lhal  •'
branches   »f distribution, manufacturers, wholcsali
and jobbers, are included
In 1924, Buyers' Week" was inaugurated in Van
COUVCr,  and  tin   wholesale  tfi'oeerv  houses  were  tl'
prime Instigators, Mainly owing io their efforts, t*
first Buyers' Week" in this city was put across, nn
proved successful beyond the expectations of its spin
sors, Now, claiming for apparently good and uin
lent reasons (the principal Otto being 'intense eompe"
lion, and decreasing margins in this particular bran1
of distribution!   wholesale   grocery   bouses,   allhoilg
nssurlng the committee nf their full sympathy, hav-
disassociated themselves,
It is evident that anv lack of cohesion In n mov<
ment of Ihis description is likely to menace its nieces' I92'i
THK    RE
lililTIKII COLUMBIA.
T A I L E U
ALBERTA   YUKON
9
iJ(| ss'v would suggest that when Buyers' Week" comes
.iiui'l iu 1028, every effort should be made to include
Mi:r friends the wholesale grocers in this token of good
iVlloWship towards the retail trade,
Buyers' Wink" i snot, nor has it ever been, a period
, j,, tv prolit making primarily enters into proceedings,
liluiugh friendly rivalry predominates, ami if the
,.|,|Mtitiinily of expressing a feeling of good fellowship
Inwards Visiting merchants is taken advantage of by
mimic and not by others, the movement cannot attain
tl, success it merits,
From thc above it must not be concluded that in
previous years the effort made to pilot this movement
has ben successful We consider Ho- principle of
|,iim is' Week" a good one, and many of our subscribers have taken advantage of the liberal pun-has-
in*.: terms, and there are many who have diverted tlnir
sehcduled holiday trips to Vancouver in order to participate, but wc should like to sit an unanimous wel
come, and the co-operation of all distributors and man-
ufacturers.
Merchant owners and department managers are
onee again invited to attend Vancouver's "Buyers'
Week," and provided that their purchases amount to
the sum of $750 (Alberta $1,000), their railway fares
Will be refunded on the basis of the excursion vales
applying at that time. Should the visitor desire to
come by motor in h'is own car, a refund equivalent to
excursion railway fare will be made. There are exceptions on the list, items which do not entitle the pur-
chaser to include tbem in the amount for purchases
made Groceries, nails, and barbed wire are exempt
from merchandise included to make up the required
minimum purchase. Registration takes place immocV
lately upon arrival, at "Buyers' Week" headquarters,
Vancouver Board of Trade, 800 Pender Street West,
Vancouver, where tickets may be obtained entitling
visitors to all entertainment features ,ond every convenience has been arranged for the comfort of the visiters.
India's Tea Industry
By William H. Ukers, MA, Editor of the Tea and Coffee Journal.
,iin
Sixty per eent, of the tea consumed in Kngland.
I, indeed, half the world's supply, are exported from
India, whieh is the largest pfoduecr, With tin* possible
exception of China, The capital of joint stock companies invested in tea in India i*. 1150,000,000, and the
-reagc is 7i»7.7«h» producing over 360,000,000 lbs. per
annum.
The marcst tea gardens to Calcutta are in tho Tertii
m South Sylhet, :MMl miles away, It is a -IS hour railway journey to Dlbrugarh, the premier tea district of
Wsam, 7imi miles from Calcutta.
Although the tea plant is indigenous to Assam, in
northern India, the possibilities of its cultivation were
long overlooked, and in the latter half of the ISth century tea shipments from China constituted the bulk of
• lit* r.ast i in Ha Company's trade.
The lirst attempts at tea cultivation in India were
"wide with seeds and plants brought from China, and
Chinese labor was employed at the governments experimental station is Assam. Not until 1862 was it
established thai Indian tea could compete commercially with China tea, but progress was rapid Unre
al !.-r.
India Tea Characteristics.
Darjeeling tea is grown on the slopes of the Ilium-
layn Mountains, the great northern buttress of India,
Kiluated between 26 degrees and 50 degrees north of
the Equator, whose highest point. Mt Kvorost, reaches
lo 20,000 feet, The quality and flavor of tins tea arc
distinctive, the peculiar aroma being muscatel or black
currant, Soft water greatly helps to bring out the
llavor,
In Ihe Assam district is grown the largest amount
"•* tea in India, the carrier growths producing very
'•ne Pckoc flavors of a pUUgonl character, and price;
realising up to 5s, a pound, notably those from the
i'ubboan estates.   These arc good-keeping tee*, but »
Ifli'ge quantity of the commoner growths is also pro*
ilueed.
Ihmars, lying south of lhe Darjeeling district, and
nearer to it than Assam, is noted for teas of smoother
and thicker grades. The autumn or cold-weather flavor has the llarjeeling character. They are largely in
demand by blenders.
Sylhet and Cachar together produce thc second
largest supply in India. The teas are mostly common
to medium, and are very useful, the Sylhet particu.
hiily for thickness, and in giving a tippy appearance
at a medium price.
Travancore tea comes next, grown south in the
same lattitudc as Ceylon. As in Ceylon, the tea grows
all the year round, the bulk of it being of a thick and
soft character, some, however, being just like Ceylon
tea.
Neilgherry high-grown teas can be distinguished
from some flavory Ceylons only by the expert.
lu Kangra Valley the finest grades have a distinctive flavor,
lu Dchra Dun the flavor of the tea grown is a
cress between Kangra and Darjeeling.
Cultivation and Manufacture.
The tea plant is not raised in India from cuttings
but from seed, and the bushes, which are about three
feel high, are iu full bearing by tbe sixth or eighth
year. A good woman pluekcr can bring in 60 to 70
pounds of leaf a day, and is paid accordingly. This,
however, does not mean that ber work will produce 70
pounds of tea, Tbe green leaf is full of moisture, and
a till pound basket will not produce more than 15
pounds for commercial use.
Kvery year more and more attention is being directed to care in th© manufacture of India tea. It
has become generally recognized that "quality teas"
will always find favor with buyers for blending purposes.
Making Blaek Tea.
Prom the weighing-in sheds, to which the pluckers
bring their tilled baskets, the leaf is moved to withering floors, where it is spread on traps, fanned by a 10
TII E   R E T A I L E R
imiTISII OOLUMBIA- At.HKIlTA   YTKON
July,  \'M]
Lake of the Woods
Milling: Company
LIMITED
Makers of
FIVE ROSES
♦
FLOUR
The World's Best
Daily Capacity 14,200 Bbls.
B. 0. Offices and Warehouses:
1300 Richards Street 1614 Store Street
VANOOUVER VICTORIA
SELL THAT
LIQUID
Don't pour it down the drain. Ity
using Scalrigbt Containers you can
dispone of tbe liquid when selling
pickles, Oysters and I/up lid Foods.
These containers arc 1(H) per cent
lcakproof, spill-proof ami crush proof
and will mon* than sav*' you their
cost.
Ask our Traveller for Samples and
Prices.
Smith, Davidson 4 Wright, Ud.
MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALE
PAPER DEALERS
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
NATIONAL SENTIMENT
has been turned to Canadian Products
by Confederation Celebrations. It's the
Season and the opportunity to sell more
Clark's Prepared
Food
Pork and Beans—Soups—Sandwich Meats
Canadian Boiled Dinner, etc., etc
W. CLARK Limited, Montreal
Establishments at
Montreal, P. Q,        n   ^v
8t   Remi, PQ.
nnd Harrow, Ont
^
Peter Rabbit Peanut Butter
Co$t$ No More But Sells Faster
THE TOY PAIL DELIGHTS THE CHILDREN
DISPLAY A CASE.   IT  WILL  SELL  ITSELF.
Kelly Confection Co. Ltd.
1100 Mainland Strttt
VANCOUVER, B. C. July, 1997
THE   UK
IIIUTISII COLUMBI/V-
T A I L E R
-Al.ltKltTA-YUKON
11
i,,.. current of air and allowed In wither for 111 to 24
! nil im according to elimatie conditions,
I'rom ihe tolling machine, the loaf, still green and
pulpy, is taken to the fermenting home, when* sunlight
\s excluded, but a free current of air is maintained,
Spread upon glass, tile or cement or on mats, to oxid*
i ,•, or ferment, tho tes presently assumes a copper
c(dur ami a pungent aroma. At a point determined
l»\ experience, the fermentation process is stopped by
i Acs first of two firings customarily given to the black
li us of India.
Kirst.fliing is accomplished in a tea-drying machine
with win bottomed trays, on whieh the leaf is spread
diid subjected to a continuous current of dry hot air
from an adjoining furnace, forced by a mechanically
driven fan, This process takes from 20 minutes to
half an hour, during whieh the tea assumes the black
appe.irauee familiar to tin- general public,
In sccond'ftring, llu* loaf is spread oil perforated
Iryas whieh are passed through a machine where a
riirrent of hot air from 180 degrees to 220 degrees V
\n forced through them, When the final stage of fir*
iii}! is com pi ted, thi tea, thus far in an unassorted condition, .* sifted into different grades according to the
•ust.uns of each estate flenerally speaking, an astatc
i infine* grading to;
Broken Orange Pekoe the small leaf containing
tips Broken Pckoc the rather larger leaf than thc
inliji (.range (fkoe, with tips, Orange •Pekoe—
th«* twisted, long, thin, wiry leaf. Pekoe the large
hvhtietl blaek leaf Pekoe Souchong the very bold,
•'lack leaf. Panning** the grainy, very small leaf,
host   whob is practically tea in powder form.
Some estates <veu iiinke fancy teas, sueh as Gvldcil
Tips, Klowery Orange Pekoe, and Flowery Pekoe, but
tlu->«* are not in sueh general us«  as the recognised
standard grades
As is generally known by those iu the l<-n trade,
blaek icas ami green arc made from tlo leaf *i. thc
panic bush; the difference being wholly that of manu*
no-tun
Making Orcen Tea.
(•reen tea. of whieb but a small quantity is manu.
fnclured in India, consists of the freshly plucked green
leaf, steamed as soon as possible after plucking, in
preparation for the rolling process, In green tea manufacture, every precaution is taken to prevent -for
•neutalion. whieb iu the ease of blaek tea is allowed
to a slight extent, in order to introduce flavor and
strcnirth,
The greater part of the production of green lea in
India is retained for local consumption,
8hinmcnt and Marketing.
Tea auctions are held wccklv at Calcutta during
lb" tea sea* on, All trail* aet ions being tinder the rules
and regulations of the Calcutta Tea Dealers' Associa-
Hon, an importanl body representative of buyers, sellers nml brokers.
The unit of sale is uniformly the pound ci.f for
liondon, and f.o.b. for America The unit of shipment
i* the cheat, varying In weight from 80 to 120 pounds
net, according to thc fineness or eonrrenosa of the qunl*
Ity pa eked.
In ii norm id year tbeprineinal months for shipments
'i'''1 from July to Deeember. inclusive, but appreciable
(Continued on page $5)
tf.****
WHV THEV
*     GO LIKE
HOT-CAKES!
64% tO 184%
GROSS PROFIT
Some time aeo we mad* tn investigation throughout tht Dominion to And out how often rotalltro tumid
their stock! of Palmolivs. Wt found that tht avtr-
agt number of turnovtr* waa tight Tht amalltat wt
found was four. In othtr wordt. rttalltrt aold o-.it
their atocka of Palmolive and bought again on an avtr*
agt eight tlmea a year.
Retailers who told their atocka of Palmolive at 3
for 2Sc made on tach turn of stock a gross profit of
16',. And slnct tht avcrape lu.'i of stock It tight, tht
yea ly gross profit on this Item Is t x 16';, or 181%.
it was found however that tht average rttallar stlla
half his stock at tht single cakt price of 10c. and tht
balanct at 3 for Mc, or In multiples of 3 cakes. On
this basis such a retailer makes a gross profit of 23*;
each time he turns hia stock of Palmollvt, or S x 23*,
—184    gross profit In a ytar.
Supposing tht rttalltr showed an equally gross profit
on all items In his stock!
How it is done
Palmolive Soap Is undoubtedly the most widely adver.
tleed toilet soap In the world. Whtrtvtr you look you
set advertisements on Palmollvt Soap—on bill boards.
In m*gailnee—In newspapers.
This advertlalnn creates a demand for Palmollvt with
tht public—your customers.
Tht rttalltr can makt all this advtrtlsing work for
him. by pasting up In his window • reproduction of a
Palmollvt ad., or by putting In a Palmollvt window dis*
play, or bv puttng a atack of Palmollvt In tht window
with a prlca card.
Beautiful window display material and counter dlaplay
material may be had for tht asking. Write to tht
nearest Palmollvt salts offlct.
THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY Of CANADA,
MONTREAL
Mmle tn Canada.
LIMITED
TORONTO
WINNIPEG
8B12-C* 12
THE   KKTAILKR
BRITISH COLl!MlilA-Al*BBIlTA~YUKON
•lulv, 1D2|
£
a^Mmtft-
Shut your cyct and put one of those Sun*
Mali Nectara between your lips man,
you Imagine you're off in u vineyard gobbling down luscious full-ripe HctHlInu •gropes'
The flavor's the same; even thc In* dm nee Is!
No wonder you court trouble every time
you try to slip a woman some other kind of
carton seediest.
Chloride of Lime
New Style Waterproof Package
Supplied by All Wholesalers
in British Columbia.
Manufactured by
CANADA COLORS AND CHEMICALS UMITCD
Toronto
Winnipeg
Agents:
STARK *% STERLING
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Vaneouvtr
To the Eklitor, "RttaJJa?."
Dear sir.—in the June Issue ol u contemporari tnaguj  >
appeared  ait  srtlelt   ■» tit i •In  Hitoultiritlxuiluii  oi   tin   ,,   ,
groetrj t»n- m--- ■> to tin- manufacturers u advocated   i mn
not concerned with iiitit.-* iit> vIiuh on others, bui mi '
desire hi Hiininltiti" laitrest tn thi* Rtosi tiui-ortnui phn
groeer) retalltag   Among suggestions in tb* article i r<-f-.i
tu in thnl  tht' Ittovfiuvnt  toward*. lUindtrdtMllon  iboutd  >
Instituted by the retailers themselves, sad it It chief!) -wiii
thlx BUggtitlon ihtit I ninnot concur
riu- advent ni Msai 'Production demands It ski Dlatrthui  -..
litj.artMHiit and CllSla Stores, BUM* «ir ItSS, fulfill llil- emu!
Hon. Not no tin1 overwhelming large number ol leaser um
Which Spill dhmbiition bv nn ctcr growing nuntb't ol  ima
centres with * imomunnt increase la distribution sad •■
It  \i  Inconceivable that  any of It •  rU|m' fiu Mi'i  flu
would sacrtdet ihemaelvaa ol Iheir own rollllon to •- bi<
oiin ra to eonfonti tn nbo-n*- it"-* economic imperative
11v virtue of tht intense competitive ehsract»t  i
retail grocery butin.-xn the miml of tun »»\* r.*«.* merclm
dtrongl) individualistic    Any suggestion ol co-operaiion run
ir.i: from -»Itlitn hln own Clstl in tnok«-d ti|>on »i'i» ho***! I!
suspicion, even with fear The rttsllert esanoi pull then
selves out of ibt mire b) pulling on ibelr own t>•,»,,, *t »i
Thej seem onablt IQ voluntarily band iorimIht lor *nl\n
to lanitAtt butineet bj  conforming  basinets method* *■•
changed eondflloai
The only power thai ean aeeomplieh litis nto Ihe wha
inters themselves  nol singly but t»>  concerted actioi
such speeifli parpost   Their own toltresli art- Insepai-abta
from those of the reiaJls-fs
To ensure Un grsatast potslblt incceai wiih ihe u i
d-flny., the lessl ofcostt) mistakes lhe selection of tb	
picked for survival ante! bt bamilad In a woti dtcisioria
manner by tht wholossltrs, snd ss eat eompreaenalvt i h<
Ths contide.*ttion determining Ibt  sdmisalon  Inu
new ii King organisation should bt
'ri." Bimtogfto ioeatlon of « slore
Tin- number nf population to-m-d
Tho ability and integrity of las merehanl
Tht willingness lo co<opartts
The members ol ii»«« new telling orgsnlssllon aiasi
tueh distribution Volume nn lo b«- enabled to r.-rrlvt «	
nt n price lhat makes it postlblt lo meet the corapeiltiot
tht* i hain  nnd dtparimtnl  ntoren
Tht !»**■*■ m-ning orgsnlialion to iboroughlj snd dm
ally   ,«nini>  their  credit   polity.   OollfCllOO  Ol  till  OUUt*1
Ing accounts io lhtm through « central organisation
roUeetivn sdverttsing nnd collectlva educational camiMii-ti
io ihi- jiubiir nnd imm* more iir>mn io Im- Included In
organisation na demanded t»*< thi combined Inte.etts ol **'• *''
solera arid retailers,
Ont of tbt wholetslt Bmu in organising lhe Rod •■
wiiit.- store Byttem in iiritt-'ii Columbia
Should thin venture prove i Boccees, thrn tin* olhei who1
in tort wm p.obsbly follow huh, nnd esch oat orgsnlw |!"
trwn hand-picked isttllittt, nmi •»■ should wltnoss i groui'
«»r Ead nmi Whllt, n group of iiiu«- nml Oreto, w group
i'cllOW nnd IH.uk BlortS, nil tnndly ftuhilnK tmlt Other I"*1
svsrjp one •'!««• besides, with the mosl dsplojmblQ eonssquew
to themselvei nnd lo tht wholcnnlcn'
Or nliould Ihe \Ut\ ami White system, »») vlrtuo of n'ta-l
from without nml lln own Inherent WSSJl poUUI f»H ,,,,,n ullN
rcnitfiniitH io organist i vonturt ol a eollwtivt ntiui
would find iueb vtnturt slresdy discredited nnd iht merehanl
exhausted.
Up to comparative reeenl Umst the fonetloni of « whol''
nnU-r eould bt lllttltod tO tha buying nml is I ling »f goods, bin
trend «»f deveiopmeni makii it a necessity Insi whni'-'1'1,
snd retniii-r co-operslt personsly together to the bsnefli "
both,
a rtvttuv,.
qi nsborottghj n, ■ lulv, 1927
THE   RETAILER
ItltlTISII COLUMBIA   AI.HKUTA   YUKON
W
GROCERIES & PROVISIONS
Grocery Market Report
Vancouver, .luly J>, 1927.
Notwithstanding tlie advent ol summer school luli-
lii) , ihe retail grocery situatit n in the eity of Van*
uiiver ami district lias been Cor the paal l*• .v weeks
\<-vi dingiy good, owing in part, uo doubt, to lhe
l.envj influx t'f visitors from the U.S. and Eastern
Canada,   Retailers generally report collections ns he.
ing fnirly goud nnd nre optimistic united tor good full
lm  ins*    Thi*-. applies not only to the more settle!
• "'lions, but to lhe country districts ns well.   Busines'*)
nii<liti.»iiH in the fruit growing districts are consider*
eil very fair, although the erop estimates would lend
us io believe that iiiiiny lines of stone ami berry fruit
\<>ill not lie as heavy a erop an last year.   On tihe other
linttd, the prices obtained will In- better.
Sugar—nn .luly 5th. all prices of granulated sugar
wi i. reduced lOe per 100*lb,, making liie present basis
lur 100*lb sacks hulk. |6.85. The market on raw
sugar is not strong, although the heavy consuming de*
mnnd during the preserving period may possibly keep
prices from declining further. We do not advocate
iieavy buying of sugar at the present lime, luit do believe that every merchant should carry sufficient
(docks to take eare of an increased demand for pre-
ervitig requirements,
Fruit Jan.—.Wholesalers report the business done
nlready on frn-lt jars exceeds by quite an extent th*'
blislness which was done for the same period Init year
The prices have been on approximately the same level
its last yegr, although jar manufacturers have put inti'
'•ffcet two advances .each of B0G pCT gross, during tho
past three weeks, whieh means that replneeiuent st.ieks
now in transit will be at least $1 per gross higher than
Present levels,    The retailers bave also experienced n
Heavy demsnd for preserving jar aceoisories, such n*
'ids, caps ami rings, Merehants should arrange to see
thnt their requirement! of those lines are well taken
"are of so as to avoid a shortage a little later on in thfl
■'itsnn.
Jam, 1M7 Pack.-.lain manufacturers are offering
tie retail trade contracts On 1027 paek pure jitms. It
•s interesting tu note thnt this yenr prices being quoted
by manufacturers arc not subject to large discounts
"s in former years. The manufacturers have made
'Iter prices pn n very low level and the only discount
thev ar,. offering is 30f on the completion of contracts, This means thnt thfl small merchant is enabled
In huv his Inm requirements on nnproximntcly th" same
level as the large, dealer? Incldcntallv ,the net lam
prices quotod this yenr nre considerably lower than
I hose prevailing lust year, not withstanding tbe faet that
manufacturers are paying slightly more tor some lines
of berries.
The strawberry paek in It. C has not been up to
expectations. The Eastern Canadian pack is also considerably below normal. In fact, one large jam manufacturer has already sobl two ears of frozen 11. C. berries for .shipment to Ontario at a priee which brings
him better returns than strawberry jam in 4-lb. tins,
indicating a serious shortage in Ontario. This condition would further indicate that present priees are bus.
e<l entirely too low, ami that advances on jam may be
expected.
Sardines.—Maritime packers announce an advance
<>f fiitc per ease in the price of Itrunswick and -Jutland
Sar<lines. Wholesalers selling ou the old basis will
have no alt amative but to put this advance into effect
in lhe very near future, The retailers should arrange
to secure additional supplies before the new prices become effective.
Lobsters.-—New paek Eagle Brand Lobsters is due
t>» arrive about July 20th to 25th. Priees are approximately the Mime as last year, being $2.85 per dozen
for I |S-, and $5.0(1 per dozen for Vi»s-
Canned Shrimps. — (in the other hand, canned
Shrimps are a very short paek. Reports recently ro*
ccived from the Gulf of Mexico indicate that we mn/
look for an advance of approximately 10 per cent, in
canned shrimp prices.
Matches.—New prices on matches became effective
on July 2nd. The new prices represent the reduet'lon of
25 per cent, iu the excise lax from 00c to $1,41 per
ca*-e. These reductions in priees should enable the retail merchant to get a little* better margin on matches
Chat-uu Cheese.—Chateau Cheese has just been in-
treduced to the retail trade in B.C. This is manufac*
lured by the Chateau Choose Co. of Ottawa, Onl. It
il'lffcrs from the ordinary run of eream cheese in 5-lb,
loaves, ami also packages, inasmuch as it has that nippy
creamy, cheese flavor found and appreciated by connoisseurs in wcll-ripcucd Canadian Cheese. Those
who It tve had thc privilege of sampling Chateau cheese
predict that it will be one of the most popular ihc-HC
s, In r«*.
Lemon Cup—Orange Gup.-—The Season -is hero when
Ihis line should be prominently displayed for increased
sales, though a steady sale throughout the year is re.
ported by Pome merchants. Made from the famous Mes.
sina lemons and Seville oranges solely, just evaporated
and suger iidde•*. The attractive 8-nointeil label bearing the Royal Coat of Anns, in the exclusive flute 1
bottle packed in quarts only, one dozen to the ease,
■•ml casts $7 50 the ease Adequate slocks are avail
■>bl njtntn •"•; a lntW shiivneo* \v*-\ ins» arrived A
f!» i* & niaekwell product. 52 51 Powell Street, Vancouver. 14
THE   RETAILER
BRITISH COLUMBIA-AUDBRTA-TUKOH
July, Hi.!?
IT STIMULATES YOUR
SUMMER TRADE!
Refreshing Salads and Mayonnaise made with MAZOLA—that's what the
housewife likes to serve in the summer time.
So help her by having a good supply of this famous Salad and Cooking Oil.
It's one of your easiest sellers.   Repeat orders prove it!
MAZOLA
%e SALAD and COOKING OIL
ii
MANUFACTURED IY
The CANADA STARCH CO. Limited
MONTREAL July, 1027
THE    RE
liltlTlHii COLUMBIA-
TAILER
-AhBKUTA-YUKON
15
CANNED FOOD8.
There is no question hut what the output of can
ned Foods thin year will he materially curtailed and it
i, equally Hue that a mountain of merchandise has
!„rii moved into retail channels. Some of the surplus
,li unsold is still to he marketed as it is held by can-
M •(•> ot* by whole .ah* grocers. Stocks in eaniiers' hands
(ire often t»• -1 • t iu li-u of duplicating the same kind of
! | tins season. Many prominent canners will no*
njtck a ease of iheir usual assortments; others have cut
ilown their anticipated outputs, and still others have
positively announced that they will accept future bus.
inwo* up lo a certain date and amount and will then
pack accordingly.  They are through with speculating
,,1! the market by creating a surplus whieh they have
lo sacrifice later at heavy losses. Many of the smaller
dinners Kill bo idle Ihis season because they arc unable
i.» finance thoinaelvea. Canners are convinced thnt they
can hurry the stabilisation of the industry by drastic*
idly limiting their operations, in order to give the
markel a ehanee to right ilsdf and to eliminate the
j.nssil.iHty of dumping more stock on jobbing centres
lhan the trade ean nb«.»rl> tit prices which show a pro*
IU io the producer. It is needless to mention the ef*
feels of weather conditions oil growing crops. The
hi nsott is late and has not been favorable for large production. Whal is more, early frosts are a haxnrd of
more than usual significance. The weather has tended
i i reduce the canned food oul put as much as other fac.
I.irs emit rolled l»v canners and distributers.
TEA.
Hut few Ceylon teas of good quality are available
on the apot, while Pormosas arc nol plentiful. Thci •
will be no important arrivals of China green leas for
-i\ weeks to two months, and while the opening range
it llu- China opening was at prices rang'ing from l-'j*'
to "iiie for the lowest to the thi* -it grades it is generally believed thai by the time these teas gel here they
will bring good prices Altogether it is fell that the
Irade is much better placed to prepare for a marked
expansion in volume than at any time for the past aix
weeks',
The general level of prices fur India-Ceylon varieties has held decidedly lirm. and the same is true with
respect to s|mt prices. Stimulated l>y the extensive advertising campaigns being run in their favor, Indian
teas are entering a bigger way than in some time past.
Other kinds of teas are also in popular demand for
summer drink purposes It will be recalled that open*
ing priecH for teas in the Par East this season showed
quite a bit of irregularity. The opening at China wns
al an advance of 15 per cent over a year ago, nnd
Japan waa about 8c to 4c under a year ago, wiide ror*
moan market stood at 210, or about unchanged from a
year ago. No worth-while changes have occurred since
this opening.
APPLE CROP.
A light erop is expected ill Eastern Cnited Slates
'•nd only a fair crop in the West, which means that
not so much fruit will be available for export. Can*
"da's commercial production was rather limited In
1026, but ii 25 per cent, increase is expected this sea.
miii, or a total of 11,767,400 barrels. Nova Scotia
appears to be leading, with an estimated commercial
crop of 1,500,000 barrels, or 62 par cent, more than in
1926, Ontario expects more than 1,000,000 barrels,
which would be an increase of 80 per cent, for that pro*
ylnce. In Hritish Columbia a reduction of 20 per cent,
is anticipated, so that the eoniercial apple crop there
may be equivalent to only 1,050,000 barrels, all of
which indicates that Canadian apples probably will
he a more important factor the coming season. English
fruit prospects are better than two months ago. Damage from April freeze differs according to locality and
variety of apples. One of the principal cooking varieties suffered greatest damage, and several of the important dissert varieties will not yield a heavy crop.
Other kinds of market apples, however, suffered but
little injury. Altogether the English crop is in better
condition than last year. Germany expects a good
crop, and so does France. Some damage occurred from
frost and other unfavorable wvather conditions in the
upper Danube Valley.
W. Z. WATTS, MANAGER, CROSSE St BLACKWELL
When Crosse & Hlaekwell opened their Vancouver
office in April last. W. Z. Watts was chosen as local
mamiger. >lr. Watts, who has all his life b(M»n asso.
elated with the grocery business, was born in Ontario,
and gained the title of "Candy" Watts at an early age,
w
Z. Watts. British Columbia Manner for Cross* A
Blackwell, Canada, Ltd.
a convincing evidence that a considerable portion of
his time must have been devoted to that branch of the
Inisincss S'nce his appointment in Vancouver, sales
have each month shown a gradual increase, and there
is no question that with the efficient staff of workers
under him Mr. Watts will find it no difficult task to
continue his record of advancement,
When time permits. Mr. Watts enjoys a good game
of baseball, and is an ardent follower of the national
pastime, but for the present is more interested in new
lines which his company are introducing in Canada.
Soekeye salmon (selected only) in blue, white and gold
is one of the latest additions, and the famous Crosse
and Hlaekwell sauce is now being distributed in square
8-flu id ounce bottles.
•   V
Si
I 16
THE   ftETAlLEft
BRITISH COLUMBIA-AI.RBftTA -YUKON
July, MM i
"NO MERCHANT CAN AFFORD TO BE
WITHOUT THE NEW READING DEVICE
))
THE Toledo device which prevents mistakes due to
reading the scale from the wrong angle is the crowning achievement of scale invention, insuring that the
Toledo Scale's accurate automatic indication of weight
and value will be correctly read. The hard porcelain
Toledo finish—a glistening white surface, easy to clean
and iUinless — appetisingly ahowa off the meata as they
are weighed out to the euatomer. The Toledo protecta
and attracts.
Toledo men will be pleased to show the new Toledo
to any one interested.
CANADIAN TOLEDO SCALE CO., UNITED, WlMIOI, ONT.
Manufacturers of Automatic Scales for Kvery Purpose.
Salesrooms and Ssrvico Stations Throughout tho Dominion.
VANCOUVER OFtflCBs   508 SMYTHE STKKKT
TOLEDO
llendemhot  Ss   Mill.
Hamilton. Ontario.
HpcrnitN'i- I nth. 112(3
CANADIAN TOLKIK) BCAUE CO.
UMITKH.
Windsor. Oitui (0
Oeoilenen*
Vot the post sll )i*»m v<* have Ih«-h utlns
three of your old style &*l Hold Dealt*
which w«* thought wt*tt* the Cnem that oooltl
lOMlbly Ik* purchased ThOSf »«*aW *.*.*• •
won&vful iiatisfartlon and wt* felt perfect!)
satlaSrd until your repr.sentailvt- c«m«
Into our market aid n*** u* » demonntM
tion of on* of your new style portelttl*'
scales.
Alter your r«'pr«*s-*ntatlvi- |N>it)tid out tin
nilvantajo'tt derived from the UM of the new
readltiff devle* (which fealti **, In our wtim
allon, no merchant cai afford tu In* With
oul. Inasmuch as It safeKuardi* him Ifltittsl
loss through mi» reading of thfl eomptiM: i*
rhart) and also tho advantage of the led*
Kirueilbl** iHtrt-vlaln  Snlsh and man*  Other
attractive features, we realised the value <>:
the*-* Realm and placed our order fur flit*'
\\> wish to lake this oppo.tunity to loll
you that w* at* lidwd writ pl-caw-it Willi
our new Ton-don
Yours very truly,
HKMIKHSHUT  0   MIl.l.KK
IVr Win. Ja*   MiH.r
»**wo,^**»«"SS
i^J^aaj^t ls*zr*
•r****,' ***out$ffr°* •*-**,
'"tohitt**     hf*>   Chi   Stl**»**l
''•«*. ij -*t SEL*w* ,„
NO     SPRINGS
SCALES
HONEST 'W BIG NT ,111
v. 1927
T 11 V*    P tr T A l I, R R
BRITISH COI.UMntA-ALBERTA-YUKON
It
ROYAL YEAST CAKESl
MAKE PERFtCT bRCAD
Protect ^yourself
against variation in
quality. Stick, to the
products whose quality Is uniformly high
grade* with never a
bad lot to injure
your store's
reputation*
rAWM »* lose your
-customers*
w     - ■
I 1 }
MPANV   l I M11 L D
A QuaBty Product!
Irq^eD
Oa ^^mmm.mmmm
OBNUDNB
Wholewheat
FLOUR
A FAIR FIXED PROFIT
FOR LARGE AND SMALL
IS THE POLICY OF
The Dr. Middletofl's rood Products
Coinpsny Limited
Vancouver, B. C.
Visiting Merchants—Welcome!
PICKED IN
CEYLON
PRICE
MAINTAINtD
"ft STANDARD OF QUALITY"
Wholesale Distributors:
DICKSON IMPORTING CO., LTD.
Established 1897
317-321 Columbia Ave. Vaneouvtr, B.G.
Just Pure Fruit and Sugar!
EMPRESS
STRAWBERRY
JAM
Will Pay You Better
And Give You Greater Turnover
EMPRESS NFO. CO. LTO,
VANOOUVER
BRITISH COLUMBIA 18
THE    RETAILER
BRITISH OOLUMDIA-AUIBnTA-TUKON
July, 1927
Heres a winner
for you!
And health for your customers
A DELICIOUS product torn tho
famous Kellogg Kitchens, A
ready-to-eat cereal with valuable food dements of wheat and the
laxative value of bran.
Kellogg's PEP has a flavor that
pleases so well that one taste makes
a permanent customer. A flavor
good enough to sell any cereal by itself.
And PEP brings health. That's a
combination you can't beat.
Newspapers and magazines right
across Canada are cany ing the Kellogg message of PEP aud health, and
this intensive advertising is being
backed up by the most energetic sales
and promotion work ever placed behind a food product.
"Say PEP to ytrnt Jobber"
Make sure of having a stock on band.
Display PEP in your window aud ou
the counter.
Window and counter displays will be supplied on
request from Kellog* Company of Canada, Lim
lied, London, Ontario.
the peppy cereal food
IF YOU USE SACKS
be sure to uu sacks to
meet your requirements
In small papar bags, tht right grade,
quality and weight of paper is important; yet over or under within
eertain limits may get by. But when
you eome to sacks whieh must stand up
under severe and exacting work, it ii
most wasteful and extravagant to use
a saek not exactly right
COlfTlKBNTAL, out of its tremendous experience, has developed a line
of sacks that meet the specific requirements of specific jobs.
The Continental Paper Products
LlMlTIO
OTTAWA MONTREAL
Representatives;
SMITH, DAVIDSON * WRIGHT, LTD.
Vunoouoor. Victoria, EJmontoti, Calgary alar. W*
THE   RETAILER
BRITISH OOLUIfBIA-AXiBKRTA-TUKON
19
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
Tho fettering art prleea quoted for pclnelpel Unto of leading wholoaale firms.  Prlcaa quoted are neeeeearlly
oubjoct te market fluctuation*
I. W. OILLBTT CO. LTO.
Royal VtaoV- Par tarn
l dot. pkf*. In caae   SIS
i»ur» Flake Lye—
4 doa. In caae .....    I.M
&   caaea -  M*
10 caaea, « doa In caee          I.U
Mt,ic aaklnf Peweei—
t oa  t Soa MS
I rn. 4 doa LM
l oa 4 doa. - -— t.t»
11 oa  4 doa. , —  -M.M
jittt*.   I   doa  ******* »•**
t lb.. H Ot**   -. •-  =-•*• %H
1% I caae Iota.
Mafic Soda. Caaa Ne. 1—
I caae (Mlb   packagea) *«
I caeee or mora   ******
gi.Carbonate ef Bade—
111 lb. ket*. per kef LIS
400 lb.  barrela. por berrol    -.. JI.M
Cauctic Sada (Ocanuleted)- Tor Ib.
It lb. Canlattr (If) Iba. In caao) ...    11%
100 Iba. Iron drama *****— -~~  *M**
Craam ef Tartar-- ^   per doa.
H lb. peper pkga   (•doa. la caae) - MS
% lb paper pkga (4 doa In caaa)      170
5 lb. caaa with acrew covera (4 doa
tn   caaa)    . »»l
I lb cana acrew covera (I doa. In
caae —— *•**
I Ib. equare eanlatera. H doa in
caaa)   ....... ..... • -   •••
10 Ib. wooden ceaoa  « .—-   **-
H lb. wooden palla ,      ——   -t*
I0S lb. lined kafe —   -   •>•
IM Ib. lined barrala — — .   M
KILLV, DOUGLAS * O.. LTO.
NateS Preduete.
Allaplre. Ne. I. tlna doa * ••
Halting I'owder. 41 II oa doa ' 5S
Hakim  I'owder.  10 oa — Ml
Raking I'owder. 13 IHe. dot. ... ■  .     * 1*
Making Vowder. « **•*. doa. ....14.11
Boraa. Ho. doa   ******** •**
Htack Pepper. Una, doa -M
Olery Hall, glaaa. doa   .. . ••
Nabob Coffee, amall Una earh       *•
Coffee, la tb. ..... ~ -   M
Coffee, le Nabob lb. — JJ
Cuetard Powder, doa —mm -—  ■••
Quick Tapioca,  doa   ...... - **-*-**  ••*
Chocolate Pudding,  doa  ** » *******  •••
'1»tlt Powder, amall. doa . W
• Innamnn. I oa Una, doa -   •°
•'ayenne Pappar, I tlna. doa M
ciovee, amall. doa *°
Oarrj Powder, 4 oo. glaaa. doa  LIS
©reaai of Tarter. 1. »...~~-~^..»....—***** *•**
Craam of Tarter. Ha, Una .... • w
•Qraaai of Tartar Ho. m*********** ******** *>**
Otnger. amall, doa - ,0
Kxtracta. m oo. doa. ********** ■ -l0
Kttracia.  I oa.  doa   - - * ?l
Hxtratie,  4 oa.  doa * M
Ritracto. I oa. doa  - — »-,°
Batracte. II oa. doa » -»*M
Vace. email, Soa ****** M
Nutmeg.  amaS.  doa.   M
raprtka, amall, doi. .... - ••
Paelry Spice, 3 tlna, doa. 90
Poultry Dreaalng, Sage, Savory, Thyme,
Tumeric, Una, doi _.....,. 90
I'lckllng Spice, doa. No. 2   00
Marjoram, Mint,  Paraley 90
White Pepper, Una, doa - 90
Caator OH, I oa dot. *** *** Ml
Caalor Oil. 4 oa. dot *  1.10
Kpeom Halle.  Ha. doa.    *   .10
Fruit Colore. I oa. dot  2.25
It-Inge (hocolate, Roae. Pink. Lemon
Vanila. White. Almond. Orange) dot.   1.11
j«*Uv Powder, doa ***** 70
I.emonare Powder, doa.    . — l.ll
Muetard,   la doa   ..—  LM
Muatard.   Ha,  doa.   — — 4.M
Muatard. Ha doa. ... — MO
Muetard.  H  «<>■ » -•• MO
Kulphur, Sto. doa.       ***
Tea. Green Ubel. Ha. per lb «
Tea. Green Ubel. la per Ib —   .«
I lb.  tlna -•   ••'
le tb.  packagea  ~   •••
I Ib. packagea .... -   •••
Teo. de I.uie, Aflernoon. 1 Ib.  - .   .71
Tea d« Luie. Aftornoon Ha par lb. .-   .10
Tea de Luie, Ha per Ib      .   ••!
Tea or Coffee,  not  Aaet..  100 Iba.  lota,  le
Iter lb   leaa.
Tea and Coffee Aaet  500 Ib. lota, 2c par tb.
team.
Vinegar,   tlna    J**°
p. BURNS 4 CO. LTD.
Shamrock Preduete.
A> rehire. Itotled ehoutdere, per lb 23
Bacon, Shamrock, •*• P*r ,b 4J
Baked Ham, with dreaalng. i»e>* lb.       ■•*]
Shamrock, Handy r«t* i »> cartotis   41
Che****  Canadian. i««*k*'. P« »* JJ
Choeea. Canadian, twin, ihm- »» »^
Hhortenlng Carnation. No. 5. » *****   ■«*
Shortening Ctmatlon, No. ». 20 caaea   .17
«*.H.k*-ii Ham. Shamrook, i»«'i lb JJ
Dominion llama. IM«lb*.         JJ
iHimlnlon Paeon. IS Iba. P*r Ib «
Dominion Bacon. 12.14 tba. per b. ****    J»
|>omlnlon ehouklera. boned and rolled    n
Dripping. D0«(, 4»h brk-ka »
llame.  BhamtWk,  per H> -     *   •»
Katun, bonod and rollwl. per lt» *«
HMd Cheeee. l-lh tlna aach —   •■
jellle.1 Tongue*. |>er lln. « »«. ««PProx.   .3*>
i.a-,1. No, I «2 to caao •    • J
UTd,  No. 8. 9* tO cue- •"»
Urd.   carlone.   16  H».
Urd. NO,  I. carlona. 30 »»* -• 'JJ
Mincemeat, klta.  M-lb.  not.  par Ib .ISH
Meat  Ix»af.  per Ib "
I'ork plet".  per doa *r '
Pork, nmat leg« with dreaalng. per lb. .«
Hetectetl fowl, per »»  tr«*ti killed •*
Selected Chicken, par Ih. freah froaen 38
THI BOVAL CBOWN SOAPS LTO.
vaneouvtr Prlea Lltt-F.O.i. Vaneouvtr.
or Ntw Wtttmlntttr.
Ttrmt Nttl SI Oapa.
Crown Oaimaal. U la boa of 144 MJ
Klondyke (wrapped), boa of IS **** •>»
Klondyke  tunwrappad).  boa  of  M       S.M
Kngtlah Blue Mottlad. boa o   10 S.JJ
Linen  (unwrappad). boa of 100 ***,**. I.W
Liquid Ammonia. I dot. ate., box of 14   4.M
Mechanlc'a Pine Tar, box of 100 S 41
Mechanlc'a Plna Tar, box of M 2.76
Olive Caatlle, cakea, box of 200 4II
I'rlmroae (wrapped), box or 25  4.70
Itoj-f.l Grown Lye, box of 41 - III
I'endray'e Powdered Amonta, box 24.... 1.11
-Special pricea on 6, 10, 26 and 100 boxea
I'endray'e Water Qlaaa, Egg Preserver—
Caaea, 24 tone per caae   4.10
Royal Uundry Flakea, In bbla 11
(Special price on contract)
Royal Crown Soap, 6a 144a S.4I
Itoyal Crown Powder, box 24 only  t.Vi
Royal Crown Powder, lib. box of BO.... 4.M
Royal Crown Cleanaer, 41 alfter tlna .... 1.70
Royal Crown Powdered Ammonia, 1 Ib MS
Whlto Wonder, box of 100 4.M
White Swan Soap. 100  4.00
Whlto Swan Naptha,  box of 100 «.M
White Swan Waahlng Powder, box 24 ISO
•Mir Suda In a Jiffy, box of 24. 4.M
Floating  Caatlle.   26a   _ 1.71
Wonder Uundry Flakea, 25 lb 1.75
O. P. 4 J. OALT LIMITED
•LUI RIBBON OOOOS
Coffee (Vacuum Pack)—
1 lb. Tlna. per Ib  *.  .11
Tea (Red Ltbel)-
1 Ib. peckagea, per lb. m.************* .11
H lb. packagea, per Ib.  ,,„„„.,*„*..„*, .0*
2H lb. packagea, per lb. ._~~ * M
5 Ib. packagea, per Ib *».,****»*.** .17
Tea (Japan)—
I Ib. packagea, per Ib ********  .SS
H lb. packagea, per Ib. ***** *  .11
2H lb. packagea, per lb. *.**.**,,*.*.  .11
Baking Powdtr—
12 ot. Tint. 4 dot. caae  10.M
II oa Tina, 4 doa. caae ........—...11,10
I Ib. Tint, 1 doa caaa — 7.41
I lb. Tint. 1 doa caae ..~.- ....11.90
t
I *
THI CANADA BTARCH CO. LTD.
Laundry Starehee—
Canada Uundry Btarch. M-lb.
White Qloaa. Mb. pkga.
Acme Oloea. Mb. pkga. .
No. 1 White, lM-lb. kega
Kdwardeburg Sliver Qloaa, 1-lb.
40-lb
pkga.
•»••.••••«•••*••••*•i
Kdwardeburg Silver Qloaa t/%*
fancy tin eanlatera.  41-iba.
Bdwardtburg Silver Qloaa, lM-lb.
kega
• aet • • am* mamma at
Celluloid Starch (boxea of 41-pkga
per  caee)   ................—*..	
.HH
19H
.* 4.11
Culinary Starehee—
Baaoon'a Celebrated Prepared Corn
40-lb. boxea. per lb.
.11
Canada Corn Starch M-lb. boxee. per
lb.      •»
Challenge Corn Starch 4l*lb boxea
PAP    ID*    MiMimeiaetaaeoM uiianaaaaiaatmateitTttiTntt     • *y *%
Caaco Potato Flour 40-lb. boxee, lb.   .11
Maiola Oil—
Maaote Oil, la
St
..    4i
.. ..    ta
Corn Byrupe—
Crown le, M to caee
la, 11 to caaa
10a I to eaae
Me, I to caaa
.....•......«».•••«..•»•«•••»•..••,„,   I'Tj
■ ■■...mi.iniii  rm,i...I.....■—.ir.   T.ta
JIM
AIM
.aammaamaaaaamaa*
Lily te. 14 to caaa ..
to, 11 to caaa
10a. I to eaae
Karo. le 14 to caat
la. II to eaae .
10a. I to caaa
*••«••••••••••
it«.>*Wi«tl«M*MMM«HM«MI«MIINlH|l
fill
.4.11
.ITI
IN
|4M
4.M
4M
I.M
4.11
•.tS
a
•iM 20
THK    RKTAILER
BRITISH COLUMBIA--ALBKBTA-YUKON
July, I'.l'JT
ALL
m
**T •***
4
The Following Wholesalers and MaiJ
BARBER-ELLIS LIMITED.
1208 Homer Street.
Envelope* Fine Stationery, Christ nuts Pspsllist,
and Printers' Supplies.
Phone Sey. 8160.
CANADA ROOF PRODUCTS LIMITED.
2S27 Arbutut StreeL
RooAIng, Building Papers and Shootings, Asphalt
Shingles', Coatings, Stains, etc.
Phone Bay. 6010
CANADIAN GOODRICH CO. LTD.
234 Camble StreeL
Goodrich Tires. Goodrich Hi-Press Rubber Foot
wear.
Phone Soy. 2917 and 4031
CASSIDY'S LIMITED.
1178 Hamilton Street.
Wholoaale Crockery,  Glaas   Sllverwa.o.   Wear
Ever  Aluminum   etc.   Columbia  Gramophone*
and Records, A. C. Dayton Radloa.   Dolls, Toys,
and Fancy Goods.
CONSOLIDATED GARMENTS LTD.
. .448 Rlcharde Street.
Cloaks and Suits for Women.   Fur Coats.
Phone Soy. 8941.
DAMER LUM8DEN CO.
123 Pander Street Weat.
Boots and Shoes, Rubber Footwear,
Phone Sey. 2407
THE DAVIS WHITE CO.
324 Water Street.
Holla,   ToyiH  Cniraa,  (lilltVt*  Hooks,   Carnival
Goods.  Fancy  Goods,  Brasswaro,  Lampshades
Novell les.
Phone Sev. 3854
DOMINION  RUBBER COMPANY  (PACIFIC)
13S Water Street
Regular Hubb»»r ami  PleetfOBi   PeOtWBSf,
Inlon   Tlrra    Merhanlral   Hubber   QOOttl
|)ruRKl»t  Sundries
Phone Sey. 7212
LTO
iHlili
ind
F. E. HARRISON
30C Water Street.
fi »p«*d«ira.    Carters.    Armbarde,    Nerk»'«-ar.
Hosiery.   Helta.   Handkerchief*    Muffler*.   I'm
bre||»*.   Wool   Glove*,   Jewelry   Noveltle*.   OU
Phone Seymour 8088
F. 4 F. HENDERSON LTO.
422 Cordova Street Weat
Wholesale Hoots and Shoes
and TonnIn Shot's.
Phone Soy
I«ifebuo>  Itubbci •
J   LECKIE CO.. LTO.
220 Cambe Street.
UeJtll Goodyear Welted Fin** and Sporting
Stroea, Work Shoes. Minnie* Skooklim Work
Shoes. Miner Rubber and Tennis Footwear
Phone Sey. 8820. _^___
MACKAY,
SMITH. BLAIR 4
CO.  LTD.
2C6 Camble Street.
Genera!  Hry Goods
wares,   Waterproof*
faeturers of Hhlrt*.
Inaw clothing.
Maa'i
and
Pant a
i  Furnlaliings.
(HI   Clothing
Overalls and
Phone Sey
Small
Manu
Mmk
.   11S1
MARSHALL WELLS BC. LTD.
S73 Carrall Street.
General   Hardware,   Auto   Acroeaorlo*.  Otttlsiy,
Sporting Goo<ls.  Siovta   Ship Chandlery.   Mill
and Mine Supllea. Wire Rope.
  Phone Say. 7200
MILNE 4 MIDLETON, LTD.
347 Water Street.
Bmallwaras, i> > Oood* Infanti' Wear. Hosiery.
Underwesr,  Toys.   Fancy  Goods.  Gents.'   Fur"
(sitings, etc.
Phone Soy. 182
"PAY US A VISIT DURINO BUYERS   AND EXHIBITION WEEK '
Bring this List with you when ; uly, mi
THK    RETAILER
BRITISH COLUMBIA—ALBERTA-YUKON
21
IOARD/
-*t
tT***"*.
m
7
'ancouvt
icturers Welcome You to Vancouver
ALEXANDER MURRAY 4 CO.. LTD
7 Alexander Street.
Fiotr  CoverinRH.  Carpela   Hoofing   Materials,
Huilding Paper. 3 pl>  Kir Veneer and Ijnmatco
Phone Sey. 840.
THE NORFOLK PAPER CO. LTD.
ISS Water Street.
Wrapping   Papers,   Paper   Ham*.  Toilet   Pspe.t,
Tissue Paper*. Twliu*. IC« Cream CsrlonS, etc,
Phone Sey. 78S8
PRIOE OF THE WEST KNITTING MILLS LTD.
7S8 Beatty Street
Knitted Urease*, Sweaters.  Ilallilng BlUta, H<»-
lery.
Phont Sty. 8494
RADIO SPECIALTIES  LTD.
178 Pender Street WtiL
RADIOS
Wholoaale Radio Suppliet and Specialties.
Phonea Sey. 2998 and 897
RENWICK 4 CUNLIFFE LTD.
388 Wattr Street.
Glassware, China  Cutlery. Braaa, Antimony
Phone Sty. 5*27
RESTMORE  MANUFACTUBINO CO. LTO.
1000 Parker Street.
Steel  Beds,  Mattresses and  Furniture.
Phont H'gh. 23
SMITH,  DAVIDSON 4 WRIGHT. LTD.
Homer and Davie.
Wholesale  Stationery.  Printer*'  Papi-rs.   Wrap
ping Paper. Paper Bags. Twines, etc.
Phono Se«. 9*89
J
A. TEEPOORTEN,
LIMITED.
308 Water St root.
Iiruns.  Patent M
i-dicine*.
Druggists'
Sundries
Phone Sey.
4035
THE  THOS.  DAVID80N   MANUFACTURING CO
LTD.
123 Powell Street
Knam.'llod Wa;e, Tinware, Kllchenware, Stoves
and lliinge*. Range Hollers, Refrigerators.
Phone 8ey. 4858	
CHARLES 8. THOMPSON 4 SONS, LTD.
1150 Hamilton Street.
Wholetale Specialtiea
Cutlery (Pocket. Table and General), Community Silver, Westciox, Safety Rasors and Blades,
etc., Kitchen Hardware. Ac.      Phone Say. 4385
JAS. THOMSON 4 80NS LTD.
353 Water Street.
All classes Drygoods, Knit Goods and Hosiery.
Smallwares.   Fancy   Goods   Men's   Furnishings.
Twin    Bute   Shirts,    Pants,    Overcoats    and
Macklnaws. Phono Seymour 8114
VANCOUVER MILLING 4 GRAIN CO.. LTD.
236 Smytht Street.
Itoyal Standard Flour  Wild Rose Pastry Flour.
Koyul Standard Poultry P.-oducts, Seeds, etc.
Phone Sey. 8210
JOHN WAT80N LIMITED.
127 Stcond Avenue Eaat
Leather Cloves   Mitts and Gauntlets.
Phone Fair. 3988
WESTERN  WHOLE8ALE JEWELERS.
301 Watt Cordova Street.
Jewelry. Watches. Clocks, Silverware, Diamonds
nnd Noxeltles.
Phone Sey. 2768
•PAY US A VISIT D01KH0 BUYERS   AND EXHIBITION WEEK"
visit Vancouver, August 13-20
*
m 22
THE    RETAILER
BRITISH COLUMBIA-ALBBRTA-YUKON
July, 182
ALL ABOARD!
For
V
A
N
C
0
u
V
E
R
"WATER STREET" WILL WELCOME YOU
Daring BUYERS' and EXHIBITION WEEK, August 13-20
CHESS BROS. LIMITED
WHOLESALE
Fruit and Vegetables
"Quality and Service" Our Motto.
Vancouver,       Prince   Rupert,        Kamloopt.   B.C.
SUPPORT   VOUR   PROVINCE'S   INDUSTRIES
When ordering Wrapping Paper. Tissue Paper
and Toilet Ttaaue. we would ask you to hear
_ In mind all grade* of theae commodities are
Mi* manufactured In Hrttlah Columbia n(
British Columbia raw material.
Sold by
The Norfolk Paper Co.
ISS WATER  STREET
V.ANC0UVER CREAMERY 00. LTD.
Your Welcome will be just aa great at
ONE BLOCK EAST OP WATER STREET.
23 Alexander Street.
"Vancouver  Creamery  Butter  la Good."
OSCAR BROWN * 00. LIMITED
WHOLESALE PRUITS
178 Water Street
THE CLARK FRUIT AND PRODUCE CO.
We specialise In Shipping Business.
Our Motto:   "Quality and Service."
188 Water Street
ROBERT EFPORD 00. LTD.
WHOLESALE FRUIT, PRODUCE AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
181.181 Water Street
We Cordially Invite Visiting Merchants
To Inspect Our Sample Room
BUYERS'WEEK
AU0U8T 13*20th.
324 WATER STREET
VANCOUVER. B.C.
SPECIAL
BUYERS'WEEK
DISPLAY.
THE DAVISWHITE COMPANY
XMAS TOYS AND DOLLS
**'.**
-:-
FANCY GOODS July, 1.927
THE   RETAILER
BRITISH COLUMBIA-ALBERTA-YUKON
Wholesalers and Retailers Co-operate to
Hold Trenches, Despite New Forms
of Merchandising
Address by Roy L. Davidson, President of National Wholesale Orocers' Association at Omaha Convention
It is profoundly sound that those two elements of
ih, most essential industry of thr world should eon*
\»ui- together.
As wholesalers, we fully recognise timt the struc
ture of our success depends upon the stability and eg*
itressiveneBS of ihe independent retsil grocer snd that
our problems are mutual.
Much has been and in being said about tlo- difficulties of the grocery business, I say to you the grocery
business is not doomed, Vour business aud ours, my
friends, still functions to the «-xi«*ut of 88 per cent, of
tin- delivery of foods to the American table. Hut we
cannot get anywhere on the «»**» we consumed yesterday.   We iiiuhI barn how to keep that distribution
power today.
A.h distributors we must In- atert to the changing
conditions, to the fluctuations of tlo- demands on the
i»art of the spending puhlie, if wc ate to hold ami increase our position of tin* public's spending dollar The
• liain store in lure to stay, but the Independent re-
taller, who ha*-*, more to give in merchandise ami service
for tin* dollar expended than any system yel developed,
can continue to be the latest factor in distribution,
Many Merchants or Feu*.
The manufacturer recognises the wholesaler's and
independent retailer's value more today than we are
wont to think. Many manufacturers recognise more
today than before thnt the volume order of a thousand
stores of a ehiiin, spread over given territory is not
representative of the total business he secures from the
independent merehants of thnt same given section.
Many business institutions admit that they would
rather have a thousand Customers for their product
than one with a thousand outlets Fallacies regard*
ing ths potential wiles power of certain distributive
elements have caused many producers to g{v*e special
allowance** nf one form or another until the spread
between the commodity price to the chain slid that of
the imbpemt-nt retailer is misleading to the trade and
consumers,
A way to change this situation must be found by
the manufacturer, for he is endsngcrlng his business
every day he delays. Sueh policies sre defeating their
purpose nnd that must he recognized.
Three Layers of Retailers.
There are* thiVc classes or strata oC business men.
Irrespective of their line of endeavor.   Applying this
bi the retail grocery business, we lind the top layer
represents the highclnss.  fullservice.  chai'gl'-account
type, whoso atore is nice, in a good location, selling
the best the market affords, is progressive in his buying
"•ml selling in alert with sales energy, This type has
littkc to worry about, hut it is the iptiekest to seek ideas
for further development.
The next layer is what we might call the centre.
It represents the rank and tile of oommunlty stores. It;.
owner is a hard worker and conscientious, willing to
improvte, but who has little time for study and plan-
niug.
The lower layer of this strata consists of store-
koepers, not merchants; ill kept and poorly stocked
stores. While this class is in the minority, yet 'it in
sufficiently large iu number to be given consideration.
Need for Constructive Work
It is these two latter elements that the national associations of retail and wholesale grocers and manufac.
turors must five thought toward improving their condition. The department of instruction for retail development of tho National Association of Retail (jroeers is very commendable and is doing great good,
The sales promotion department of the National
Wholesale Grocers' Association is bending every effort
in conjunction with other elements of the trade toward belter retailing.
We are all prone to criticize this, that and thc
other element of the system of which we nre a part.
But that method arrives nowheiv. It is time, and I
believe it has arrived, that constructive assistance on
the part of nil elements of the industry is ready to
bring about better understanding of the problems and
the further development of the industry as a whole.
The day is past when the wholesaler is going to sue-
ceed by the more sales talk to you, Mr. Retailer, that
you should iret in before thc market advances, etc. He
must tie up the article he is trying to sell with a real
sales idea of how it ean be sold by you: placing not
only the item in your store but the constructive sales
punch that will move it on to the consumer at that
time,
Helping Canned Food.
At this time, may I reeomend to wholesaler and
retailer alike that wc leave nothing undone to promote
the greatest Canned Foods Week this fall that has ever
been known? No greater opportunity was ever pre.
sented than this year for a tremendous Canned Foods
Week Sale.
Over-production exists in most lines and because of
that, priees are extremely low—many below eost of
production. There was never a better time for quantity sales to thc advantage of the consumer. Jobbers
ami retailers should meet in every market and plan
Well their work toward a givat National Canned Foods
Week.
Association work is vital to any industry today.
Unfortunately the work done cannot be placed on the
scale We get so accustomed to using the benefits of
association work that they become commonplace.
The National Wholesale Oncers' Association backs
up its statements in as practical and definite a manner
as possible, and avoids statements whieh offer opportunities for talk and argument, from which reasonable
possibilities of beneficial results may not be anticipated,
(Continued on page 37) 24
THE    RETAILER
BKITIBH 0OLUMBIA-AI.BBRTA-YUKON
July, l!»;
44
EASYKUT" CANDIED PEEL
Buy it by the Brand
CANDIED PEELS
10 lb. and 50 lb. boxes
1 lb. Cartons.
CUT PEELS
25 lb. and 60 lb. boxes
for Bakery trade
CUT MIXED PEEL
Jumble Pack-1 lb. and Vi lb. Cartons
Individual Pack   1 lb. Cartons
Glace
Cherries
ALSO I'ACKKKK oKflH^flH
Olace Ground        Almond
Pineapple        Almonds        Paste
rr-v
••rt*)
Order now from your jobber for Fall deliver}' and ousurc prompt shijuiuuit,
WILLIAM   ROBINSON   LIMITED
«BHi   VANOOUVER, B.       IS^HH^H^BHS
It all boils down to this*
l**k%men,more than ever before are
insisting cm the brands they .know
AND DEL MONTE
brings you their business
Here arc just a few of many reasons:
1. Highest quality fruit—the best of each variety.
2. Beyond question, the best known line of canned
fruits on the market.
3. One brand name for a wide list of foods.
4. Both in Canadian and U.S. magazines, a strong,
persistent advertising campaign to further build
their sale.
CONCENTRATE ON DEL MONTE-AND PLAN POR THE
BIGGEST YEAR YOU HAVE EVER HAD ON CANNED
FRUITS.
DEL MONTE
peaches
C^feo* Sliced Peaches
81ioed Pineapple
Crushed Pineapple
Apricots, Pears,
Plums, Berries,
Fruits for Salad
Cherries, etc. il IV
1927
THE    RETAILER
BRITISH <,OU7MniA~ALBBRTA--YUK-
BRHTA-YUKON
25
JAM AND PICKLE INDUSTRIES.
Thc Natural Resources Intelligence Branch of the
Department of the Interior at Ottawa ha.s issued u
bulletin entitled "Natural Resources of Canada in He-
lallon to the Jam. Pickle and Allied Industries."
The bulletin is in tin- nature of an analysis
of the conditions in Canada from thc point of
\->w of a hritish or foreign Hrm looking for a
new field for expansion in the Industries named,
nnd deals in detail with the questions relating to
tli n- stic and foreign demand, sttppHes of fruit, sugar,
rontniners, fuel, power and lahor and with freight
ales, protective tariffs, taxation and Government re;**
i lotions applicable to manufacturing methods.
The enmmeroal output of jams, jellies ami fruit
■winiM in Canada is ahout  $1 "oO.OOO,    A  three-year
•        ■ s »
nverage of in ports of jams and jellies is $".'2f>.n(H) In
1926 Great Britain supplied (»:■• per cent. France 21
i rr cent, and the C  S A   10 p,»r Cent.    No jjUms were
exported, but Britain took 90 per eent  of 1383,260
worth ttf fruit juices and syrups shipped, Kxports of
raspberry and strawberry fruit pulp from British Col*
nmhin are considered possible on fair scab* to the C.K..
I>*il instead of being sent in frozen condition, should ba
paced in airtight paekayes Several consignments
have already been sent,And "this business promises to
develop.'1   Drums of a Urge si/e, holding 72 lbs. or
even III lbs are advoeatt d.
Tlo- output of pickles snd WIIICCS in Canada 'in 10'JU
v.as about |6.000,000, Among imports Britain supplied
•'I p«r cent,. V S A :*JO per cent., ami Japan and Chins
12 per cent The Canadian export trsde was $1134,548,
l.ritaln taking 04 per cent.
FKOORES3 FORECA8T FROM OMAHA
CONVENTION.
The thirtieth annual convention of the Kationnl
>h intioit of detail Urocers, held at Omaha, will go
down in history as an epoch -making ptheriiig of the
grocery clans of tlo country, The attendance was large
and from thirty three states.    The awakening of senti-
ment among the retailers for s higher degree of edit.
eai'iOii and efficiency, which has been noticeable In ro*
eeni years, was emphasised, and there is a determination to equip themselves and become "master grocers."
John Coode, of Nashville. TCUU., was chosen presi-
•leu*  I'lngeim S.  hitthiaumc of Superior, Wis,, vice
prsident; John l\ Weldenmann, treasurer-. J. Walter
'Iyer, SaeraiiM-nto. ami Richard Jepson, Omaha, dircc.
tors: wl/.le New Orleans got the next convention, The
Joint meeting with the National Whole .ale (Jroeers' As-
Mocintlon will be continued for next yenr. The entertainment provided was of the best character ami without interference with convention proceedings. Prom
'bis point of view the Omaha groeCTS exceeded every
expectation in the way of hospitality.
The resolutions adopted were not of a drastic na.
'ure. ami largely of a constructive nature, though one
or two nre rather questionable as to their value. The
outstanding feature was the determination of tho re
tnilers, however, to light for their rights, and with the
Ptirt that Iws been made, plus tbe co oneration expect*
e<l from allied Intercuts concerned with the welfare
snd mninlo'i'iuee of lhe grocer as a distributing factor, new achievements are looked for during the coming yenr.
* *l
li
A BUSINESS TRAGEDY,
Directors of Carnation Milk discover a discontented cow.
INDIA'S TEA INDUSTRY.
(Continued from page It)
quantities also go forward in June, January and February.
The Tea Cess Act of 1903 was passed at the request
of the India Tea Association to provide a fund for advertising India tea and extending its use. A cess of \\
pie il 24 cent.) per pound is imposed for this
purpose, and, after being collected by the government,
is turned over to a non-official committee to admin*
istcr. The funds thus received have bivn well applied
in opening up markets for India tea, and thanks to
domestic propaganda there is now a large consumption of tea in India itself.
IMPERIAL TOBACCO.
The Hudson's Bay Company takes pride in recording the fact that during the two hundred and fifty
years of trading in this country their sales of tobacco
have steadily increased, until today "Imperial Mix
ture" enjoys a large sale, not only in Canada and the
United States, hut in many other parts of the world.
In looking over the company's archives in London,
there is a record to be wen of tobacco trading as early
a i 1707, thirty-seven years after thc charter was grant-
cl to tic company by King James, and when smoking,
as a habit, was not favourably l<*. iko-l upon The company has nlwavs utilized \b>- finest Virginia leaf in the
manufaetuvc °f their tobaccos, and hv earnestly emleav
ouring to improve the product have placed it where it
stand; todav, one of the most popular smoking' tobaccos
on the market. 26
THE    RETAIL E li
BRITISH COLUMBIA—ALBRRTA- YUKON
•luly, 192*1
AMENDMENTS TO THE FOOD ACT.
Ottawa advices record a number of amendments to
thc Food and Drug Act of 1920 of special interest to
the grocery trade. One of these refers to the correct-
11068 of the labels on package goods, Paragraphs (f),
(g) and (h) of section 5 of the Aet are repealed ami
the following arc substituted for thcui:-
"(f) If in package form, sealed by or put up
by thc manufacturer or producer, and bearing his
name and address, tho contents of each package
are not conspicuously and correctly stated within limits of variability to be fixed by regulations
as in this Act provided, iu terms of weight, measure or number, upon the outside of the package;
provided that this sub-section shall not apply to
packages the weight id* whieh including the package and contents is Under two ounces; provided
also that nothing in I Iris section shall be taken
to require the statement of weight, measure or
number upon containers or packages of standard
si/e as provided by orders of the floVCMOr in
Council under The Meat and fanned Foods Act;
"(g) if it is not labelled in accordance with the
requirements of this Act;
"(h) if thc package containing it .or the label
on the package, bears any statement, design or
device regarding the ingredients or the substances
contained therein, which statement, dewign or device is false or misleading in any particular; or if
the package is deceptive with respect  to design,
const ruction or fill; or ... . "
"Western Made for Western Trade"
Buy Books Made In Vancouver
MERCHANTS can now buy local made Count-
er Hales Hooks of highest quality at price**
thnt compare favorably with price* for book*
manufactured elsewhere, nnd bet-mien receive
prompt service, Our plant ts equipped with the
latest Sales Hook machinery for lhe manufacture
of siandH.d sizes and styles or Carbon Lear and
Automatic Hooks and nil orders will receive th"
careful supervision of our experienced stafr.
Sallsfaeliuii guaranteed.
Western Sales Book Co. Ltd.
Factory:   1176   Homer  Stroot       Vancouver,   B.C.
Another amendment deals with lln- BCJSUrc ol -goutls
and reads as follows;—
"Whenever any article of food or any drug is ••
ported by a Dominion analyst as being adulterated or
mishranded within the meaning of this Aet, tln> ll'-ji'ir!
ment may order such article, and all other arti* I* . ,,-
the same kind which were in the same place ut lln
time tin* article analysed was obtained, t<» be Beifceil In
an inspector and detained by him until an nnaljsis »■;
the sample of the whole is made, ami thereafter until
the inspector has given an order for its disposal "
DUMPING DUTV AS APPLIED TO VARIOUS VEGETABLES
Word baa bees received from ihe CoumtsstoBcv x>i Gw
lotus thnt tlo- following dumping duth-jt *«p- applicable tu
VQfetablSl as under: —
Cabbage l%e t*x ib net, June i&th  Jnnuno Bin
'"iniliflower   2Sc |x>r Ib  QUI, June  I'th    Nuvt'MiIki SOU)
Carols, Ityc \**x u» net, June lot- K«bru«i> nth
lUetn   |e   per Ih   io'i, June  1st    February  iSth
I'eujt.  ax   per   Ib   net.  June   ial    Hepd-mbo.'  801 il
Mu»iu* looie, S0« per lb eel  Alt year
Apricola, IV"   per lb  net. June I.Mh   Augu»t If.iIi
Celery, «•   ptr lb set. Jui> ttl—Dectiub-er lie)
Tow-lion'*, .',(• jut Ib  io-!, Jul*   Iml    HOYUtUOUt 3*Mli
Pepper*, Te  i*-r n» net  Juh  int   November toth
Peaches, Ic per lb net Jui> Will  October list
Petri, fnnrv.  3>»r prr  Ib   nol;  Choice   J\r   pat *l>   tltii
VllifllHl  Ini    m«n>mber 31 (t«
Plnmi and Pronea te per lb net, Jui> ir»tb  October Hit
Caatelonpee, nod Huslnnolons, &r prr lb net. Juh .'i**
lH*.<*<'mlM'r 1l«ii
Th«» above  minimum   rslQOI   nhall  be   app-irabb--  fo  ihtp
menu trhen told *• 'be point of produi tion Where goodi »;•
mid fob  Intennedlste distributing points, fall irsnaporu
Hon eom*, InclUdlni tint bSUl rhitrg«*>t» ref.lgerittlon. hmtlr-.K
•Ie from |K»ini of production to dl*(rlbuiing point lhal! t"*
added
3,071,495
18 THE TOTAL CIRCULATION OP THE
PAPERS PUBLISHING BORDEN AD8
DT1027.
This stupendous advert sing eneuree a
constant consumer demand being directed to the retell etoroe of tbe Dominion
for Eagle Brand Condensed Milk end
Borden's St. Charles Milk.
Cash in on it by featuring these Brands.
B
VANCOUVIR,  0.C
*      ■•T.J»|.. July, i»27
THE   RETAILER
BRITISH OOLUMBIA-AL-BERTA-YUKON
VI
WHY RETAIL FOOD DEALERS 8HOULD STOCK
READ TO SERVE BOATS
By John C. Cutting, Director, Department of
Merchandising, Institute of America Ment Pae
Rctsil
ackers
The retail meat dealer ur combination store
proprietor who handles meat food products must be
prepared to handle ready-to-serve meats, the demand
for which has been steadily increasing each year.
When fresh meat sales begin to decline during the
warm weather, the dealer must find new ways to maintain his volume of trade. Some dealera complain about
the loss of volume over thc weekends in thc summer
time. Many families formerly purchased a good-vised
roast snd stsyed st home over the weekend; now they
buy nothing snd motor out of the city, eating in small
towns they reach st mealtime. The eating places
they find sometimes sre crowded, high-priced or undesirable. It frequently is difficult to find parking
apace for their ears, and their luggage is not protected from theivcry.
How much easier it would be to sell a family ready,
t > serve meats, which would make it possible for them
to stop by the roadside wherever and whenever they
desired. Then ,the whole outdoors would be their
parking place.
Ready-to-serve mests are not restricted to use over
the week-end. They are delicious meats for any home
at any time of the year. They are delicious appetizers.
For children's school lunches, ready-to serve meats
make it possible to have substantial meat products
away from their own home. If the big meal, as it i*
sometimes called, is at evening, ready-to-serve meats
are welcome at noon time; and vice versa. For mid-
afternoon repasts snd late evening snacks, when guests
arep resent, readytoserve meats are indispensable to
the hostess in the preparation of something light, but
testy and nutritious.
Why should a dcsler stock ready-to-serve meats!
To meet the growing demand among She public for
these meats.
To offset any loss in volume of sales because of a
falling off in the demand for other meats.
To give customers meats whieh sre not only wholesome, nutritious, appetizing, and ready-to-serve, but
also economical, because they are relatively low in
price and practically without waste.
Just a suggestion, now, on a few of the ready-to*
serve meats which sre available i Cooked ham. minced
luncheon specialty, coarse luncheon specialty, pressed
tongue, jellied tongue, cervelat, salami, etc.
The dealer who sells ready-to-serve meats has no
trimming scraps to throw in the fat barrel. Likewise,
the housewife enjoys the samee conomy in her kitchen
The dealer ahould recognise the competition of
other food products for the housewife's dollar. Ssles
resistsnee to ready-to-serve meats will be battered
down when the dealer is able to demonstrate to house*
wives the economy of ready-to-serve meats for her table
snd budget.
The trend ia toward readytoserve foods. The re-
tnil ment denier should take advantage of this trend by
pushing these readyto*serve ment products. They nre
tempting to look nt, espeeinlly when properly displayed. They nre equnlly nutritious nnd sustnining when
eaten.
Ready-to-serve meats will keep at a higher temperature than fresh meats. Many varieties of ready-to-
serve meats have kept absolutely fresh for a week at
a temperature iu thc case of 50 degrees.
Ready-to-serve meats must be displayed to be sold
in any volume. Customers are not going to ask the
butcher for meat products they cannot use. Delicatessen store owners don't hide their meat products. They
find space for them at the risk of their personal inconvenience.
How can the average retail meat dealer and combination store proprietor be prepared to get some of
the demand for readytoserve products?
Here'8 the answer:
Put in a suitable refrigerated display case in your
store and stock it with an adequate variety of the
readytoserve meats. Keep the temperatures of the
case right and the stock full. Keep the meats rt*faced,
so customers can see what the products look like. Wrap
the ready-to-serve products in waxed paper, and separately from fresh meats. Ready-to-serve meats will
keep at temperatures from 42 to 48 degrees.
Don't he afraid to sell quarter pounds. Wool-
worth made millions and he sold fifteen screws for a
nickel .
If you want more profit from your business, try
stocking and displaying ready-to-serve meats. There
is a satisfactory margin for you.
Hut—if you stock these ready-to-serve meats, you
must also display them where the customer can see
them. If you hide them in your bigbox, os pointed
out previously, how is the customer to see them and
thus be influenced to buy t Don't expect to keep these
readytoserve meats on a marble counter in the sum*
mer. They need refrigeration. There are scores of
well-built and properly insulated cases for displaying
these meats temptingly. These cases will keep the
meats sweet and sanitary and free of moisture.
Readytoserve meats are splendid appetisers. There
arc sufficient varieties of ready-to-serve meats to form
the basis of the main dish of any meal and to appeal to
any appetite. Ready-to-serve meats also are emergency meats for unexpected guests. They are indispensable at picnics and roadside meals.
Be prepared to be one of the first in your neighborhood to specialize in these meats. But, remember, unless you're going to display them properly, you're going to lose much of the benefit of the growing demand
for these food products.
Your slogan should be:
Serve snd Satisfy thc Customer 1
P08TUM TO ABSORB WALTER BAKER COMPANY
The rumors which have been floating about for some time
to the effect thnt the Postum Co. waa negotiating for tbe
purchase of Walter linker & Co. Ltd.. the famous 150-year old
cocoa and chocolate manufacturers of Dorchester, Mass.,
hsve nt last taken tangible shape In a meeting held by the dl-
deetors of the Dorchester concern recently, at which the
Postum offer was definitely considered.
The proposition, as stated by tbe linker directors In a
statement, was to tbe effect that the Postum Co., Inc., p.o-
poses tn purchase the entire business and assets of alter
linker ft Co. Md, on liquidation to obtain one and one-half
share* nf Postum stock or $160 in cash for each share of
Walter Baker stock held by them. 28
T H B   R E T A 1 L E R
lUUTISII COLUMBIA--AI.BKKTA*  YUKON
July, 1021
BUYERS' WEEK, Aug. 13-20, Inclusive
Held at VANCOUVER, B. C.
TO ALL* BUYERS visiting the city during this week, and espoeially t»» those from far away districts,
we extend a very cordial invitation t.» visit our warehouse
We are very proud of our plant, and will cot eeni it a favour to idlOW you through, also we
can assure you of a courteous reception.
We are currying one of the largest slocks of Cleneral Dry floods, Men's furnishings and House
Furnishings in the West, We also manufacture and tfatribulo the Ce'ebratcd CARIBOU BRAND of
Overalls and Shirts
We offer y.u quick effieient service at competitive prices, and We kn.iw that you will tike mir
business methods.
"II PAYS   TO BUY ON THE COAST.''
GAULT BROTHERS LIM ITED
VANCOUVER, B C
Members of Vancouver Buyen' Week Association.
THE NOVELTY
Wholesale House
iwm
mn
:\r
Chic Garters Flowers
Smart Silk Underwear
Brilliant Trimmings Buckles, etc.
Gilt, Vai and Guipure Laces
Children's Crepe de Chene Dresses
MILNE s MlDDLETON, LIMITED
Smallwares   Dry Goods, Infants' Wear,
Hcolery, Underwear, Toys, Fancy Goads,
Gents' Furnishings, etc.
J47 WATER 8TREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Wc wl le aauinmm VaSsc totals
"PRIDE OF THE WEST"
Lumber Jack Shirts
Large Variety Fancy Plaids In Soft Wool
Flannels, and Heavy Mackinaws for
Immediate Delivery.
Made hy
today Smith, Hair & Co., Limited
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Wholesale Dry Goods, Man's Furnishings
Notions. Iv. I !*-'*!?
THE    RETAILER
BRITISH 0OLUHB1A--ALUtillTA-YUKON
29
r~"
Drygoods and Footwear
"Broadtail" Name of New Heavy-Weight
Cloth Developed for the Trade
Flat, Lustroua Ztbtl.ne Weave Leads FaHl Stlye Trend in Black, Tans, Browns and Oreys
'll.i- smooth surfaced lustrous finish coating on the
ripple ami twill Kiln-lint*-* effeel is the outstanding fabric
for the in w heavy weight season in high grade worn*
en's wear, it in declared by leading fine goods factors,
n hu sn\ that this in vv  theme ha. pleased tin- garment
trade, whloh ss been seeking "something new" for
M-veral seasons. Theae new "Broadtail" coatings, as
ihe) are named, arc creating n new market in women'a apparel, supplanting tn -style appeal the older boi*
ivs and suede weaves, according to authorities*
It 'is listed without reserve that black is tin* lead-
nn,' fall eolor in fine coatings for stylish apparel. Then
folio's mode and beige tans, rich deep browns on thr
.irder of cocoa or chocolate and dark grays. The color
trend is becoming mon* pronounced each day as aalea
increase ami shad** designations ar<- dened hy thr man
n faelurera, Preferred tones may change during tho
season, bul it is felt thai black will maintain superior*
ii) right through tlo* year because of its effectiveness
in tin- dressy "Broadtail" coatings,
iirt-at confidence is expressed in tho return of tbe
woollen and worsted cloth dress this season, relying on
two salient |M..i»t*H* l-'irst. the extremely light weight
(fi to 5! \ ounce) fabric developed from fine yarns, and.
*•>■ eninl. the featuring of a full range of light silk colors, so much iu demand in silky textures. It is for"*
east that these two feature-* will help line goods to sup
plant unite a sizable yardage of broad&llks in dresses
Oris fall and winter,
Style and Practicability.
Officials of the new goods mills stress the fact that
'he cloth and apparel trades are rapidly adjusting their
positions to meet transitional conditions. The retail*
ers1 conservative buying la heing mo! by cautious production ami supplemental styles- and tho roady»to-
wear trade is working in much closer harmony with the
i el ail and cloth trades. The woollen trade is offering
warmer fabrics, more attractive styles ami improve!
qualities at reasonable pricea, it is pointed out, "The
garment trade must offer style coupled with practicability at moderate prices." it is asserted.
Cotton an Uncertain Factor.
Cotton has become an uncertain factor for the lunger future due tO the steady rise in price and the appro*
hension thai conditions may force still higher prices.
The cotton industry has heen conspicuously active since
low*prlced cotton became possible, standing out in
f'linrp contrast with conditions in silk and wool goods
lines   An increased consumption stimulated by tho
mice has led to a very large production. For tho time
being lhe orders iu hand are excellent In volume, if not
In profit, and it remains to bo seen whether "in the light,
of better information through association activities the
nulls and merchants will be able to regulate their output and stabilize their prices in a sound way. The first
test will e.mie in the last quarter of this year.
Rayon is a growing factor in textiles and bids fair
to have a more substantial effect upon merchandising
iu dress goods and silks. Already it is enabling producers of fancy goods to make inroads into the silk
trade and their effect may be permanent. Hayon
prices are held on a comparatively low level in dom*
estie sales channels and pressure to send in foreign
yarns is constantly increasing.
Situation in Linen.
Linen manufacturers are coming up against the
end of their supplies of cheap flax and arc beginning
to feel the effects of the great rise in prices earlier
in tho year. linen stocks the world over are not cumbersome, but the competition with other textiles will
be increased if merchants are finally forced to abandon
again the benefits that came from being able to meet
substitute fibers on a fair basis. The cost of linen pro
dtietion since the war has been high and will continue
so for some time. Add to lhat the manipulation of
flax prices through Soviet and other regulations end
the problems before flax weavers and spinners grow
harder.
CHEAP BUG VOGUE HAS REACHED PEAK,
YARN MEN STATE.
Spinners of worsted carpet yarns and manufacturers of such lines believe the trend toward anv-priced
lines has reached its peak and point to sueh occurrences as reduction during the last three months in
woollen yarns with worsted tynes unchanged, the Textile World says iu a review of thc rug and carpet situation in Philadelphia.
"They believe the cycle of popularity of cheap rugs
and carpets has been of sufficient duration to prove
to consumers, irrespective of this modern demand for
frequent atle changes in all possible lines, that particularly 1* w-priced floor coverings are more expensive
in the long run. retailers, for example, having reported
complaints from consumers that wear has been more
than usually conspicuous inside of a period of two
years. In other words the swing to low priced lines
has. they believe, reached a point where the price consideration will soon react in the favor of the higher
quality goods of which the worsteds make up a sizable
proposition."
The Textile World finds the question is widely dis 30
T11 E    B E T A 1 L E H
BRITISH COLUMBIA   Al.UKUTA -YUKON
.III)
y, Im
puted but points to the fact that worsted carpet yarn
spinners, while not busy, have no expectation of changing their equipment over to woollen spinning to take
advantage of the demand that has been apparent during the recent season.
While the price is ustialV named as the chief reason for the swing to lower priced goods, the opinion
of one manufacturer that the entrance of style has
been an important element is quoted. "This development in the public psychology has radically changed
many textile policies, such as the manufacture of hosiery and dress goods," the article states.
"Style has not only changed manufacturing of
these lines but also has had a distinct effect upon that
of carpet and rugs. Thc middle classes were formerly Ihe largest purchasers of worsted carpets ami rugs,
these being, geeurally speaking, midway as for as
prices are concerned, between best rugs. Orientate for
example, aud lowest priced, woollen lines. This situation has been changed materially, ami not only have
worsted carpet aud rug manufacturers felt the effects
of it but dealers in highest priced lines also."
BRITISH WOOLLEN TRADE OPPOSITION TO
CANADIAN TARIFF REVISION
With the resumption of the Canadian Tariff Advisory Hoard June loth last, the bearing of evidence
on the application of the Canadian Woollen and Knit
Goods manufacturers for an increase of duties on wool
textiles imported into this country, there was presented an official statement in opposition from tin* West
Hiding Chamber of Commerce, England.
Extracts from this statement, giving the British
firms' view, are given herewith:
Very serious consideration should be gives, la the later
ests of Canada's own prosperity, to any proposal that would
tead to restrict Canada's purchases from her bent customer,
The British Government, through tho Km pi re Marketing
Board, has provided a considerable sum of money (or tht*
losie.tiig of the Kale of Km pi re products la Oreat Britain,
and this money han to be provided hy lhe- Itritisli taxpayer,
The most important Industry in the United Kingdom* agriculture—-bai been in a very depressed eondition for some
years, largely owing lo Imports from Caniu'.i of wheat, ate.
II Canada refuses to buy Hrltlsh textiles, the United King*
dom must necessarily be In » less favorable position fo.- buy-
lug foodstuffs and other commodities Irom Canada.
Tbe depression whieh, according to lhe applicants' mate
ment now prevails in ihe Canadian wool textile Industry Ih
not, In our opinion, attributable to Increased Imports of yarns
and tissues from the United Kingdom, because—
(a) Exports of woollen and worsted yarns and ilssuei
from Ilm United Kingdom to Canada are less than thev
were befo.e the war In spite of the faet (hat Canada's
resources and population have Increased
iio similar depressed conditions hare prevailed iu
lha v.ool textile Industry Ol Ireo trade Kngland ami »|,",
iii the hlghl) protected Industry or ihe Untied Stan-
where imports srs *»-*•> nnall,
The wide-spread under-employmeai of machinery in ti
wool textile Industries oi most countries (oxcept Frame mui
itai)   winie currency depreciation has been at work) in
hern  dile In general eailftea, SUCl) US  the  reduced  propOilluii
ol ihe domestic budgets spent oa clothing; direct ami mdlrei
eiiecta ot im|<'ni,shiii» nt following tin- war, excessive im*
lUallOnS ill lhe priee ol wool, the uupreri dented ledmtloii iv
the qUSnllt)  ol  wool ClOtttlng n> ladies' Wear, kv
it thc statements made ii> the applicants were accepted
in nui, the domestic Canadian industry, owing to tin- dmn
erne iii wage-levels, could not possibly compete with thr
inited Kingdom. Consequent)} Imports of woollen ami wow
ed tissues should Im1 much (urge, than before the War (0Willi!
to the larger population)  and the Canadian liuUisirv  should
have dwindled to ver) small proportion! as a mstier oi
(am. however, as alreadj stated, tin- nuansuies oi yarns m l
tissues tent from  the  United  Kingdom  to Canada to.- I. • ■
than the> were before the war. whilst lhe Canadian *: -tu-ij
Ih lager than it was before the war    The number ol loan
in Canada is appreciably larger, ami there has been a verj
large expansion or the spinning Industry sodiof ihe hosier;
ami knit goods Industry,   Tin- quantity  ol wool retained
shows a substantial Increase
Tin- applicants ihsiilptlon of Ihe present state nt the
Canadian tmhistn WOUld appl> almost word (or word to "<
condition of the ii. itish wooMoxtlle indusir>    it ts commo'i
knowledge that since the- III fated boom of 1*81940 the British
imiustr) has suffered from chronic under employment, the
extinction oi mnii) old established concerns, reduction in th-
personnel of tlie Industry  ami p-er*l«t«»nt unprofitable WorSlnu
Whilst nol attempting to den) that .'anadian wages ar*
higher than Hrltlsh wages we SUggMt that they are not h-*
onlv factor and that there are errors tn the figures quoted >
the applicants' case It i, mated, (or instance, that llu Bfll
Ish Ministry of Labour "QsSCtte" for June. ISSS, gives si
average wsgs i»i T* for lbs woollen, worsted, hotter; ..'■'
carpet Industries This Is Incorrect; no such flgur«' is given
The Mlnltlr >of labour "(laic tie" give* separate figures '"•
la) woollen nnd worsted; ibi hosier-). ami (c» carpel Indus
tries    The applicants  have  siatpb   averaged  these  A-miti"
entirely Ignoring the fact thai the woollen and urortHed it
ditstry  (which has the highest rate of wages) employ* far
more  workers th:m  the othe.- two  Industries    The  eorrerl
average, taking into account the number of worker* In -ti"
industries concerned is 31/14 Moreover, the sppHcanii fan
to mention lhal those rates are lor a **-**''.. of less lhan ti
hours; nnd on « full tract of I* hours the earnings would '•
brought up to It I (as against the figU.f given b> the appll
cants of "17 A
In any case tin* llriilsh figure* do not Include the high!)
paid section of comsniaalon dyers and finishers; and ita
imimie -i disproportionate number or workpeople engaged h
the preliminary branches of lhe trade (due to the SSpori
trade in tops and >ams)  which lowers the average  WSS*1
The e Ih also a good deal ol variation in rates as le tw i
different nertion* of manufacturing, some of which cuter lot
the low lass roods exported lo undeveloped markets, and n '
for the highelnss goods such ss nre made and consumed '!
anada    We would  also polnl  out   thai   In  addition  la 111
We extend a cordial invitation to visiting merchants to call at our Sample Room and
Warehouse daring BUYERS' aad EXHIBITION WEEK at 307 Cotdoea St. West
and inspect our Complete Stock of SHOES and RUBBERS
ANDERSON & MACDONALD
307 Wc3t Cordova Street
Phone Seymour 4418
Vancouver, B.C. iv, 1027
THK   RETAILER
lUllTIHII COLUMBIA—ALBERT A—YUKON
31
rtual wages paid  the employer In this country Is compelled
", Ina|(,, contributions for health and unemployment losur
A Ac    In connection With  his employees,
The statement closes with statistics ghowillg that
i)Ui exports «»f yams ami ol tissues from the United
Kingdom to Canada in recent years have been percept*
his Ii-hx than in the flvo years immediately preceding
lie
Will'.
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)(.
X
Jt
K
*,
,i ss u a •<•*a k)WX***-*i**'W
™      A« Secnn By
Jearciette s
ta
l.nu.xxn**t»*i*m^^
Mi re prettlness or ch-ic winch will you have' This
ih i lie n licit ion every woman who is ul all interested
in her appearance musl ask herself, for tlie day of
fluffy rutflies ami the bcribboned and curled young
thing is pant and there is in. place for the tousled bob
and negligent dress in the world of fashion. The
smart woman of today has an air of well-gr* omed,
sleek eompacineas from the top of ber small, well,
kepi head to the toes of her simple, w.-lieut shoes. She
wears carefully selected jewelery. and eaeh piece is a
telling note In her ensemble,
This is all heartening news to the woman who has
passed the Hist  flush of V'oUtll. for elite kllOWS HO BgC,
youthful prill iness often gives way t.» nature charms
when one is wisely dressed.   I am not recommending
the bisare stives adopted by afew who always seem to
select the ultra modes-in everything, bul I am greatly
in favor of the present ..lay simplicity and careful
grooming for women of every age; a simplicity that is
mor* difficult to attain in warm days when the lighl
fabrics of summer tempt one to many frivolities in
the way of flounces and frills thai are meaningless anil
smother the wearer's own individuality.
In millinery a well as in frocks must one lie careful
in the selection, for even the smart large hat that
arrives as stirelv as summer itself has this year the
simplicity that la-peaks chic The straws are the pop.
ular horsehair, leghorn and Bangkok and. though
Home flowers nre seen decorating them, they are use.l
with restraint and there is no suggestion of the gar.
den hat" of other vears about then.    Buckles, ribbon
nml not Infrequently velvet forms the decoration n
most eases,    Kveu if it  is summer the fell and HlDrte
list is ever «o popular; csm -iallv so is the new    gOU*
•„■!,.,!■■ or batlked felt.   Th.- foil hai thai Is actually
l.mlt on the head is the verv latest, ami it is «" inter*
eating experience to sit before tin morror while tne
milliner ents. sttins. nlaits and lueka a shapeless rei
Hat into hat which brings out one's best points ami
follows the bend and hair lines exactly.
Vacation Days.
It is a poor summer that does notp rlmlso some sort
of an OUting to every woman, and even if there is no
definite plan in view one should be prepared with a
piettv frock or two should the opportunity of taking
» little trip arise. One of the tovs of living in those
gaV, informal .lavs is tbe universal adaptability ot
Btvleg and with all the fashion talk, the general simplicity of a Htnnrt wardrobe.   So the woman who is
planning to go vacationing need not make any very
elaborate preparations. She may tuck a few pretty
light frocks in a bag, don something plain and suitable
for travelling and be on her way.
The trip by auto requires little in the way of extra
apparel, but for that very reason each frock packed
in the small bai; should have a special use.
A aimple, well-made frock of light-weight jersey
will be most practical for any but the warmest daytf
when travelling. When it may not be worn a tub sill:
or. better still, thefashioiiable Shantung pongee will
be ideal.   These silks come in every shade, from the
light or evening tints to the practical dark blue and
black. The silks do not muss or wrinkle unduly and
a sudsy rinse ami a warm iron will make them look
fresh as new again in no time. These are the materials
1 would advise for the two trim designs intended for
the larger woman if she goes at ravelling. She will
like the designs equally well fnr stay-at-home frocks
wlon they are made up in the very lovely prints that
are so much seen this summer. These are simple frocks
that may be put together quickly aud without much
troubles
While not many dresses need be packed in the travelling bag. accessories occupy a very important place
iu the scheme of things. There are bathing togs, if
one frequents a resort near the water. The almost uni.
versa! costume when one is young 'is the knitted-wool
out lit; it is covered bv a beach caat, which is quite as
important as the bathing suit itself. 32
T11 E    R E
IIKITIKII COLUMBIA-
T A 1 L E R
-AI.HKKTA -YUKON
July, l!
THE FIRST SALE OF BLANKETS RECORDED IN
CANADA.
Interesting Features in thc Manufacture of the Famous
Hudson's Bay "Point" Blankets.
Tho earliest reference to thj*0 sale of blankets in
Canada has been found in a search of the minutes of
the Governor and Company of Adventurers of England,
trading into Hudson's Hay, dated December 22, 1779.
In that year an order for one hundred pairs of each of
five sorts of pointed blankets is recorded.
Owing to the vastness of the territory in whieb it
wns trading, the company found it necessary to supply
a blanket that would meet tbe particular needs of tin-
trader, the trapper, the prospector, tho Indian, and
others who had occasion to travel in tbe outdoors of
the flre.it North Land.
Colour was on important consideration, and white
was no doubt adopted for USc when the snow was on
the ground for the same reason that nature provides
the polar bear with a white coat and rabbits, ermine,
etc., with white coats in winter, so that they are difli-
cult to distinguish from the landscape. The hunter or
trapper, in white blanket oat, is able to approch much
closer to bis prey than would otherwise be tho case.
For summertime use, the green, red and multi-
stripes worn adopted chiefly on account of the natives'
love of bright colours, grey and khaki having been Introduced more recently iu response to the heavy tie.
mnnd for these colours among the ordinary population.
As a distinguishing mark whieh would be easily re*
cognized by the natives and others, a wide Indigo blue
band was woven across each end of the blankets This
band varies from two to five and a half inches in width,
according to the size of the blanket.
The "points" are 1. H' ** 211;. *• :H1» ami 4. in
white only. Coloured blankets are 3, 3^ ami 4 point
The standard for a pair of one-point blankets u 2 ft. H
ins. in width, 8 feet in length, weight 1 lb. 1 OS., while
a pair of fourpoint blankets is f> feet iu width, 13 feet
in length, weight 12 lb., the -intermediate sizes having
their proportionate widths, lengths and weights.
Numerous makers, dealers aud traders in the American continent have tried to pass on to the public blankets and eonts with names sounding as similar as por
s'ible to the registered trade mark name, Hudson's Hav
"Point" blankets. Thia became so persistent that in
order to protect thc public against im it at ions, it was
necessary to have thc name registered, and now al!
Hudson's Bay "Point" blankets bear the trade marked
label, the guarantee by which all may know that it is
the geiurine article.
Thc first process in tho manufacture of these blankets is blending the wool, a process of mixing in proper
proportions the necessary amount of various kinds of
wool. The proportions blended come from all parts of
the world, including some from far away India, all
these varieties being necessary to produce the particu-
lar combinations required.
The wools are then subjected to powerful air blow*
ers to ensure a thorough and uniform mixing, then
placed in long troughs and thoroughly scoured in soap
and water to remove all fat, burrs and other foreign
matter. The material is then dried in hot-air chambers
ready for the dyeing process.
i   l:
An interesting feature is thai tho width of blaul
when woven is tift.v per cent greater than i.s requii
in the finished article. Por instance, a fourpoint Hi
Cl in its original state is 122 inches wide, ami is 1..
reduced by milling, or shrinking, to 72 inches. This h
done by doubling up the blanket and passing it tlirmi
a narrow trough, Bttd literally pounding it with Im
wooden mallets.
Thc huge roll is then divided into pairs of blank.
after which the "points" or lines denoting size m
deftly put in by hand and the familiar red ami win
labels attached.
Hudson's Hay "Point" blankets wen- primarily .!•
signed for outdoor use, but have pfOYed equally U-a
for household purposes.   They are also ideal as motor
rugs, and for sports clothing, ami are daily beenmine
mote universally used for theae purposes,
OUTWEAR ASSOCIATION CH008E8 SIXTEEN
COLORS FOR FALL.
The color committee of the National Knitted Outer
wear Association ill eo operation with the Textile Color
Card Association bas recently selected sixteen colom *
be featured during the fall ami winter months     The
colors have been chosen from the flos* edit on of lln
1927 fall season card, issued by the Text le Color Ci
Association and the fall 198? woollen card, also [mur i
by this association.
Prominent among the 16 selected colors ar.- "An
liimn Glory," a reddish copper lint ; "Crimson Maple
a dark searb-t and "Napoleon Blue," a bright hid *
The remaining th rtecn colors, chosen from th.  I"'.
foil   woollen  card  include   past.il  shades  suitable   foi
sport wear such as "Muskinelon," a pale yellow  m
angCj "Flash." a medium orange red; ami "Havana
Roie," a light brick red; "Araby." a pale terra roll
and "Hippie (.recti," a bluish pastel green
Other shades appropriate for autumn an* "Hor*
chest nut." a deep mahogany , "Arabian Hrown," n in ■
shade; "Mayfatr Tan," a eafe atl lait eolor and "Ore)
Dawn," a silver slate gray BlttCfi comprise "Holland
Hltie," of old Flemish tapestries and "Continental
Blue," an extremely dark navy. Two greens are " Vat:
bond fireeii." a bluish jade gr* en ami "Pitehpin-
soft grayish yellow green.   Two other colors rt '
mended are Cloud flrny on the spring 1927 woollen ,n
Monkey Skin on the fall 1927 floss card,
EXTENO WELCOME TO VISITING BUVERS.
The following WBOlsSSls dimrubiitln*  bOftSSI and mm*
f&ciorer* for ihe fourth luceeeslvc yesr extend » |,M(I
Invitation to merchants »n.t department managed to tome i
Vancouver rViring "lliiyer-*' Week." AUgttlt IMO,
Barber kiiih. i.m,; iiritinh America Paint Co., Ud.: D<
Leaiher * Finding* Ud : Canada Hoof Products, Ud
Canadian Goodrich, I.M ; Cam.l.iy'1. U.I; Columbia I'm*-
CO., tM, Coneolldalc.l Garment*. IM,', Damer, l.tmwle
CO.,; The ThOS. lM.vl.lHon Mfg Co Ltd.! The Davl»-White
Co.; D, M. Doherty, Ltd.; Dominion Rubber t». (PseWri
Umlted; Heck Brotberi Umlted; Ctebrke'a Umlted; Ore«
ory Tire « Hublv r Co, (l»2«). Limited;   F  K. llarrlwia.  t
* v. Henderson; Fred Henderson * Hon; Jsatsen Knlttm
Mill of I'ann.lH, hUS; J. Lsekls Oo„ Ltd ; Walter M, t-Cfmev
Co., Ltd.; The MrClarv Mfg Co; Markav Hmllh. Hlalr *
Co. Ud..; Mackenzie While and Dunamulr. Ltd.; Hol-aaasn.
MeFerly & Co., Ltd.'; Marahall Wal'S B.C, Ltd ; Wine *
Middleton, Md ; Alexander Murray * Co. Ltd: fted
Mynr-.. Ltd.; Nel'onat Drug « Chemlral Co. of Canada Ltd .
Norfolk Paper Co. Ltd,; John W. IVk A Co. Ltd.; Pride oi l.ilv, 1927
Til K    \i KTA I LER
IIIUTISH OOLUMBIA-ALBBK'i'A-YUKON
33
„  Went KnltlitK MHIh. Ltd ;  K. C   I'rior k Co. Ltd. Llabll-
iy;  1'iullo SpOClslUeS Ltd.;   Itenwlck k  1'uiilllte Ud |   Kent-
nre Mfg, to.. Ltd.; The Sloei  M» tai ProdUOU Oo, of Can-
It. Ud ; Simpson, itaikwin k Oo. Lid ,  Btnaanom Ltd ;
ttnith, Davldion A Wight Ltd ; Standard silk Co.; Storey k
Campbell, Ltd.; W. J. Taafe & Son Ltd.; Taylor-Forbes Co.,
Ltd.; J. A. Tepoorten Ltd,; Chan. S. Thompson & Sons, Ltd.;
Jiih. Thomson A Sons. Ltd.; Universal Knitting .Co.; Vancouver Drens Co, Ltd.; Vancouver Milling & Grain Co. Ltd.; John
Watson Ltd.; Western Wholesale Jewelers.
"Write 'em Off, or Collect 'em"
Says the Credit Manager of Shct win Williams as Reported by Norman Beisley
"The ,i-naieSt people to sell are the people whose
ercdil lias been drained. New retailers especially should
remember that Also, it is a very good thing for old
retailers to keep in mind."
Walter II. Gort-vdl, credit manager for thc Sherwin*
Williams Company, was discussing the problem
of retail credits and their relationship to the
entire structure of manufacturing.     The Sherwin.
Williams concern, which manufactures paints and var.
niahes and BUCh, carries more than 35,000 monthly bai*
aiices, deals with more than 100,000 selling contracts,
nil for one purpose   to make money.
If n business cannot make n profit, obviously, it
cannot he successful.
"It is it mistnls*-. of course, tu think that any luisi-
neas was created for the benefil of the ercdil depart*
iM-iit," Mr, Oorrell continued "Hill it i*-- n mi-take,
too, t' think that a business enn succeed without pro.
p t attention to eredlla, Not long ngo I read sn arti
■ I' in which the author urged thai lhe credit depart*
men! be eliminated, lie wont "n the theory thai if a
eoneern doubled its sn! s, it eonld itfford to accept
'..'renter losses because .if tin- increased profits. Not
titlty was he loose in his thinking but he did not consider the facts.
"One faet thnt !»•• overlooked is mighty important.
li is impossible for every concern to double its sales'
It is impossible became there is only so much business
and tliere isn't any more If otv.- concern doubles its
ales, it is reasonable to think there have heen consequent Josses in oilier directions With other concerns, I
mean. Then. too. the idea of going Into business and
neknnwledging, beforehand, thai there arc going to be
ercdil losses, is wrong. Tlie weakness in that thought
is that it tends to make credits a gamble.
"It just isn't sound business to extend credit if you
feel, when extending it. that yon are taking a ehanee.
A business man. before giving credit, ought to be eer*
tnln in bis own mind that ho is going to be pnid. It is
woll f.ir him to roaliae thnl he is going to sustain some
losses; luit there is no good reason why he should sell
goods with that thought in mind. By Bnfegttftrding
himself, beforehand, be ean CUl his losses to a minimum and protect bis own profits nnd his own business.
"Had eivdita swell losses, bul moilS Important than
that, they restrict business. When a eoneern sends ft
monthly'statement, the little document represents a
bill that is expected to bo paid. It is a debt. It ought
In be paid, quickly. Our experience with hundreds \if
thousands of bills proves this;
"One--When a statement, sixty days past due. re
mains unpaid the ehlimvs for a collection are very
good.
"Two When a statement, ninety days past due, remains unpaid, the chances for collection run iboUt
ninety per cent.
"Three—When a statement, one hundred and twenty days past due. remains unpaid, chances for collection nre about eighty per eent.
"Four—When a statement, six months past due, remains unpaid the chances for collection arc about fifty
per cent.
"Here, 1 think, is a proper procedure with monthly
statements:
"Om- Thirty days past due, consider in active
stage of collection.
"Two—Sixty days past due, increase thc pressure
and change the tone.
"Three Ninety days pust due, consider carefully
the prospects for collection and apply pressure accord.
Ingly.
"To bo successful, business must be permanent.
There are a lot of enterprises that are in trouble now
ami don't know it. They don't know it because they
don't give proper proportion to thc facts. Either the
owners arc unwilling to sec thc facts accurately, or,
they aren't informed. Too many merchants sre afraid
to apply pressure for the collection of debts properly
contracted.
Let us consider what is likely to happen in past-
due bills, tlohn Smith is a clothing merchant. His customer, John Brown, runs up a bill of two hundred dollars. The following month Brown finds himself a lit*
tie pinched for ready cash and he lets the account mn
into the second month. Then comes another money-
pinch, aud the debt goes over to the third month.
Brown needs something else in the clothing line. Does
he patronize Smith? He does not. He goes to another clothier .epulis another account, or pays cash for
what he needs.
"Smith is still waiting for his money and, in addition, he has lost business on which he would have made
a prolit.   Had credits restrict business.
"No one ever thinks of going to a public utilities
corporation and saying:
"I can't pay my electric light bill this month be*
cause l am short of cash.   I'll just pay it next month."
"Kvery body knows that it is the rule of a public
serviee corporation to collect in full every month. Yet,
does anyone think the less of electric lighting com-
pany. the gas company or tho telephone company for
the enforcement of this rule?
"Customers are human beings and they will always
stretch their credit where it is easiest to stretch. Tho
customer knows, through experience, just how far he
can stretch his credit with each concern.
"The remedy for his own credit difficulties is in the
hands of the business man himself. Not in the hands of
his customers, The merchant ought to set up hia rules
ami make them inflexible—considering, of course, tho
entire picture and all the circumstances.
"Whieh brings to mind one of our own experiences. 34
THK    BETA ILER
HltlTISII COLUMBIA—ALBBRTA   YUKON
July, 1927
Not long ago, in the routine of things, we b'gnn suit
against a man who wns a silent partner in a store. Being a partner he was responsible for the bills contract,
ed; and when our bill remained unpaid for a reason,
able length of time, the matter was given to an 9ttor<
ney. Thc attorney began suit without notifying us,
"A few days later we received a letter irom this
silent partner. He told us that he had bevii in busi-
ness for more than thirty years, was wealthy—which
We knew—and this was thc first time that he had ever
been taken to court for the collection of a bill. He
thought wc had been unfair in not notifying him of
the circumstances, beforehand.
"He was right; and so were wc.
"Wc were right because we had furnished the mer.
chandise and had not been paid for it. He was right
because hti ought to have been warned that a suit
would be instituted unless thc bill was paid. He was
negligent, of course, in not knowing that the concern
iu which he had his investment was not paying its bills,
but instead of pressing the stt'.t we withdrew it and are
now clearing, or trying to clear, the records of the mercantile agencies of a report of the lawsuit. Whatever
blame then.' was existed in the office of the attorney
for his failure of notification.
"So, I say, the grantor of credit ought to weigh all
the circumstances before he attempts enforced collection. The sales and tbe eiv.lit departments ought to
work together. In opening a new account each department ought to consider these factors:
"One—What are the prospects of distribution?
"Two—What are the prospects of the account failing? If it does fail, there ought to have been a prior
searching for a larger distribution with prompt pay.
"This is another way in whieh the credit department can be of great assistance to the sales department.
If distribution increases and the cash comes in promptly, an enterprise must prosper. Our own department's
analysis on credit fits right into the sales problem.
"Husiness men sometimes go wrong when, for their
collection work, they depend on inexperienced help.
No concern can succeed without proper attention to
each of its two doors, the baek door and tbe front door.
It is through the front door that sales come in; it is
through the baek door that deliveries go out. There
must be a capable man watching ench door. Kvery
member, and every employee of the eoneern lose when
sales go out and collections don't come in. Inexpcr.
ienec never can manage collections.
"A few weeks ngo one of our branches appointed a
im
new credit manager. Thep roper papers were genl
me for ratification; but I notified the branch manager
that he would have to gel an experienced man in In,
credit department. 1 wns willing to admit that th;
young man he had appointed to till the position had pru-
mising capabilities; but I was convinced ,thr nigh ,v
poricuco, that tho change would not be beneficial Tli
answered I received Irom the district manager wiih
worded BOinctlltlJg lige this:
" *1 know that Blank lacks experience, But he U
promising, ln addition, I will help him My assistant
also will help him. Willi all three watching the credits
of this branch there should be no difficulties such as
you fear.'
"I replied tO him in these words:
" 'You are busy running the branch. Yonr ass-Niam
is busy doing the job In- was lured to do. Unless you
have experience in the credit department the gilualion
will be out of your control without your knowledge
and then it will be too late. The change must be
made.'
"The job of collections, and tin* extension of credit,
cannot be handled by a clerk who has something elw
to .|o nor by anyone who has not had experience I*
is a job all by itself It is an important job because on
the efficiency of the credit department depends, to Ml
appreciable extent, the success of lhe business
"The salesman who is twenty per cent succeswful
is a goo.l salesman If be sells one man out of every
four he visits h<- is considered capable Hut the ercdil
man's record must range from ninety -nine to one hundred per cent. He cannot afford, if be is to keep Ins
job, to let the losses run more than a fraction of oiti
per eent,
"It is inaccurate to think that momy outstanding
on credits is only n loss of six p. r cent. It is much
more than lhal. It finds representation in l"-s of time,
stationery .stamps, the attention of those responsible
for its collection. All thev- factors mass themselves
into a loss of something like twelve or fifteen per cent
"Write them off or collect them!"
TO ATTEND DOMINION CONVENTION R M A
Delegates attending the Dominion Convention ul
the Hetail Merchants' Association at St  John. \ M
are Dominion Councillor Daryl Kent, president "i "
Kent I'iaiio t'ompany. Vancouver, nnd Oeorge P   Mnl
ll.Wf.   provincial   -lei-clary     OonVI lit ion   dates   ur
•luly 25   'Jh inelu-mc.
The Man with the Umbrella
is hoping to shake you by the hand during the
 VANCOUVER BUYERS' WEEK	
Do Not Disappoint Him.
CANADA ROOF PRODUCTS, LTD.
"The Bast of Everything for a Roof."
1OTT ARBUTUS STREET Bayview 6010 VANOOUVER, B.C. July. 1027
THE   RETAILER
BRITISH COLUMBIA-  Al.ltKl'TA -YUKON
35
HARDWARE. OIL and PAINTS
RAPID INCREASE IN PATENT ROOFING SALES.
Must the power of advertising be held responsible
for the spectacular increase in the sales ol substitute
roofing material? Kor the pa it many years, citizens
nf this country have been so accustomed to the wooden
shingle as being the right and proper roof, that no par*
titular thought has been given to the growing use oi
material other than shingles
Statistics, however, show that patent roofing*) have
re glittered an immense increase of 329 per cent in
manufacture between 1919 snd 1920, and during the
rame period wooden shingles have declined 54 per cent.
Thc difference in the cost of thc two material's li
mil sufficient to cause this in crow in the one, ami it
is logical to conclude thai the substitute or patent roof.
un.' hss other qualifications beyond lhe simplicity of
application to commend -it to tin- building public,
We hold n» brief for either of these materials,
knowing both t.» be giving satisfaction to the contract*
on Utilising them, but vvc are convinced that the sal"
"i" roofing material, other than shingles, by the retail
hardware dealer, has been a StfOIIg naset to Iii' bust-
m-nt in the past, ami as the recognised distributor, he
should renew his efforts lo regain a line which is gradually being usurped by retail lumber yards and others.
Nails, and interior titling'*, ftvtiin s, paint, varnish, nnd
countless other lines arc no mort the legitimate sine1;
of the retail hardware merchant than is patent roofing
material, and strenuous efforts should be msde to t*«■■
tain litis profitable line
HARDWARE MARKETS AT A GLANCE
Wholesale Distributors Report Collections Improving.
General Demand Moderate.
Collections are improving in thc wind'sale hardware market Practically all the local distributors report better collections   Demand for staple and sen*
KOIinble lines nre moderate at the present time. Build*
itlg Is active and employment generally seems satisfae-
lory.   Prices generally are firm.
Qarre Traps.-•Manufacturers hnve nttnotinced pric*
es which will apply on game traps throughout the re.
mniuder of the year.
Wrenches—rail is fair with ample stocks; prices
show no change,
8crcen Doors snd Windows-Call Is fair with possibilities of increased demand Stocks are heing kept
Up well {prices have not changed.
Pyrex Wart.—There is a seasonal volume of sales
nnd prices are unchanged,
A new iced tea sel bas been added to the line ami
Is proving popular,
Nails. Prices are being well maintained, and there
is ii fairly active demand.
Snaths.—Sales are steady and fairly good. Priees
have not changed.
Automobile Tires and Accessories.—Jobbers report
a satisfactory Volume of tire business, although the volume is not quite as heavy as a year ago. Stoves, cots,
and other touring equipment have commenced to move.
Wire Cloth.—Sales are very good. Stoeks are being drawn on heavily, and prices are steady and Hrm.
Sash Cord and Weights.—Call is steady and fairly
good. Building of homes is progressing in fair vol*
tunc.   Prices have not changed.
Registers.—Sales are steady with ample stoeks on
blind.   Prices have not changed.
Poultry Netting.-There is a steady and god demand for netting. Poultry raising is increasing in this
part of the country.   Prices have not changed.
Axes.—The demand has picked up considerably the
past week or two.   Sales are mostly for fall delivery.
Binder Twine.— Considerable business is coming
from retailers who did not buy early.
Gnrat*e Hardware.—There is a sustained demand
for garage hardware.   Prices are reported as firm.
Steel Sheets.—Demand is fairly good with stocks
well filled.   There is no indication of a change iu priee.
Lawn Mowers.—The demand continues to be exceptionally good.
Baseball Goods.— The heavy seasonable demand
continues with an active increase in sales.
Builders' Hardware.—There is a fairly good demand and prices nre very lirm.
Glass and Putty.—There is a steady demand for both
glass and putty to till builders requirements.
Garden Hoee and Lawn Sprinklers.—The weather
continues too cold and wet for good sales.
Paints and White Lead.—Dealers are having a fair
call for paints ami finishing supplies. Painting has
heen prevented to some extend by frequent rains.
Stocks nre ample for the demand with priees firm.
Oil Heaters.—Demand is steady with a good volume.   Prices are unchanged.
Ice Cream Prcesers.—Call is light awaiting the hotter weather of summer. Stoeks are ready for the demand; priees hove not changed.
Brads. — Demand is steady with prices unchanged.
Batteries.—The demand is dather slow. Priees have
not changed.
Wire.—I'Yncc wire is still moving actively. Stocks
are well tilled with priees unchanged.
Rope—Prices are firm and sales are very satisfactory. 36
T H E    R E T A I L E R
BRITISH -COLUMBIA-ALBBnTA-TUKON
July. 1*127
• * *m   I
R. M. A. NOTES.
Changes in R. ML A. Executive
Owing to his organization work ill connect ion with
the Western (Jroeers chain store system, .lames Harkness, president of the Provincial Board KM A., has
requested tt) be relieved of his official tint ies in connection with the Association, finding his time too fully OC
eitpied to give personal attention to the many problems
James Harkntm, Retiring Preeldent, Brit eh Columbia Board,
n. M. A.
facing the provincial executive. -I. M. Wataon, who
for some time bas been guiding the destinies of the
Vancouver branch K.M.A., has been temporarily appointed tO fill the position of provincial president, until
final decision k mode at the forthcoming Provincial
Convention.
New Provincial Secretary.
Cyril Dallas, who for the past six months has been
holding the position of provincial secretary, to which
Gtorge F. Matthews, Acting Provincial Secretary, R. M   A.
post he was anointed ou approbation, ban been replaced by Oeorge K. Matthews, who has been associated
with thc association for some considerable time.     Mr.
Mathews was for three years an executive officer nf
Ihe provincial hoard of Alberta, resigning his post i■,
become a Dominion Councillor, and he also ropreseni i
Alberta in connection with the Canadian C.iir Trad.
League,   A former merchant of Olelchcn, Alberta, Mi
.Matthews has lir-it hand knowledge of the conditio
peculiar to the retail Irade. which in conjunction with
liis association with tha If. ML A. will enable hint to I
a position, which not only calls for sccretsrlnl (lulie-*,
but also the handling in a business like manner ol '
provincial of lice of the association,
This is what the "Cleieh.-n Call" has to say nbiu *
Mr. Matthews, who recently paid a visit \n his old
town;
" Ml who know him will readily admit lhal
he is certainly well qualified fat the work of orgatii?.;i
Hon, which his efforts in Gleichcn alone, proved be
vond doubt    In fact it is very doubtful if Alberta tin**.
another num so gifted ai Mr, Matthews in organissth n
work    Here in Olt'lehen in thb connection mighi
mentioned the re -organisation of the Otoiehen District
Agricultural Association, which he took hold of win
it was all but dofunct, and made it no SUCC saful ill I
a year's payment on the fair ground ,it advance a is
pieced to the association's credit ill the bank
One other instance mav be r-cited is the wsv   m
tf * •
president of the Glelchen Board of Trade, he kepi
going successfully for several years, and In orgarrii
the programme for the visit of the Imperial Press nt
(lleicheii, carried every detail through s»i sucecaaftilly,
that C   P. K. officials and others complimented hint ii
no uncertain terms.
Now that In* is going to make organisation Work bin
chief business, the "Call" predicts for bun great sn,
cess, nml  believes lhat  lieirgc  Mitttlow-*.'  name will,
at no late date, be heard far and wide     We join Id*
friends in wishing him every RUCCCSS in his tin-it t'
* • *
mg.
It   Is   BOdtrStOOd   Hint   Itlltrlier   k   t'omiwnt>,   BtMii-
Ni w \Ve-4tmin-4ter ,»re discontinuing
Qeorgs ki»Iit hw« told out hin K.oeeo buiineae In Vancouver,
K. A. AUStia, Vi.iorln. linn aol.l out BlSUlt)   A\••tn>*- I"'
SCSI to William Simng.
The HolSUm I'oililcM, I.linlle.l, Vlclorlii In now RIIQ-ftl
n«  llolfiiiii  PackiDI I oui|inn>.  Ltd,   nance niul  plcklfl •■•-''■
faeturers,
a m.hUkIi him commenced » general ntore at Jsffrs)
wi ilium Rssoo bsi commenced ■ baker) buslaesi t» v»
eouver.
Malcolm McNeill hu relinquished Mi int.rent in tin* Hoii:
LosVll Orectry, Dsvil Street. Vancouver
Mrs  M. Hooper han commenced « confectionery IiiimIi*.'
in Vancouver.
Iltiah Miller Iihh (oiumenceil a g.ocrry Ininltunn In Van
eouver.
Jantrcn KnittiiiK Minn «»r Caaads Limited, Vancouver
have beau granted Canadian charter,
it la reported thst the sixth -Vveaus Grocery has chsngo<i
hantia in Vancouver,
('. tt, WariH'i* Iiiim oommimeed S grocery In Vanroiiver.
A. I.. Henri lem aold oul  hia general  atore imalnean n'
Kokallali to r, A and It V. Itoitner.
J. C. Murray luin commenced i grocery business In Van
eouver.
Small * Boys, manufacturers' Sgentl, In Vancouver Iiiin'
Incorporated, July, IM
THE   RETAILER
UIIITI8H OTIUJWBIA-AI.BKRTA-YUKON
Bruises       Sores
Rheumatism
Sooth* the aoro muaelea or llga-
monia by rubbing In Mlnard's Llnl*
ment It eonetratee, rollevaa and
heale. It oaoea inflammation and
roatoroa tho Injured part to health.
•glendid for cute and eorea.   It
atorlltioa and heala quickly.
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES DRUGISTS' SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
308 Water St
Vancouver, B. C.
Ctist-OtaMgai Tetephete Stmce
It ia now possible to talk to auch pointa aa
Armstrong, Enderby, Kelowna, Penticton,
Summcrland, and Vernon from mainland
coast and Vancouver Island telephonea.
MITISN COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
.ok-
Grocery Store Manager eaye:
"•Km  llir |NtM  thirx- )«wm."  wrtHM. Ml    Hlo-llUHl
eiman, H'wrltr |*-*rk. N*w J«m«'>. "I h**vp HUffiu-ml from
• onmitiNitoii Attn tabic* nil miiiH of ireatmeaie, h
tx\*n,\ of mln« riH-<Hnnti>n.t<>il KlrliMlimioir.'* »w»i aad ll
lm*. «urr,| m*.
"N«w. i hiRhiv rsoommmd Flalaohmann'i Twai lp Ml
»o i-uMom-fm ami tiwy htVa «*«»•)«• **** enn t»i« »>♦•
»»f ilm wiimirrfiii r-Muiiti ii hoi brought them.'
Vou eun lirlnir Y.H'll edStOOiera Intel. Io YOt'lt Blor*
by tfi-umiitvndina fleleehmann'a Veen '»■ Health  Ano
'•••'J will IwN-utnr rr-fiiUr .'UitotltPW with limit hy "l'l»«-
Ut."»~wh« n*f»«l nml huy morn of yotn- groceries.
The neuchmann Company
YEAST SERVICE
Stewan'H (Jrocery. Vancouver, haa been aold out.'
Hie WanliliiKton Bilk Company have commenced buaineaa
lu Vancouver.
A. union k MclnioHh have sold, out their general atore at
Alert Hay to A. M. Holmau.
WiIIIh k I'ateraon have commenced a geuta. IuiiiIsIiIiikh
buaineaa at Cranbrook.
I'-aatiuan Kodakl have taken over the buaineaa on Granville Struct Vancouver, formerly operated under the atyle of
Camera & Aria. Limited.
Fletcher Ilroa., Ltd., Granville Street, Vancouver, la to be
wound up voluntarily; J. 8. Porayth ap|tolnled liquidator;
• rctliora clalma called.
Parsons k Pereival have diaaolved partnerahip and buai
neea on llaatiiiga Street Weat, Vancouver, haa been dlacon-
tiliueil
\V. Woo.ls hait Hold out hia grocery buaineaa in Vancouver to W. II. Smith.
WHOLESALERS AND RETAILERS COOPERATE
TO HOLD TRENCHES.
(t'ant ilined from page 23)
Instalment Buying.
I recommend that all organizations present give
real thought to the growth of instalment buying. At
tin- rapid pace it has been developing, 'it ia well that
nil business In- not uuuiiudftr of possible results if it
is carried beyond safe and sound limits. Just four items
of household usage arc not purchasable on thc instsl.
incut basis today; namely food, medicine, gasoline and
postage stamps.
This hypothecating of future earning power, this
mortgaging of the future for today's pleasure cannot
go on indefinitely without serious results to this industry ns well ns others.
Loose credits endanger alike thc buyer and seller.
It teaches the buyer extravagance and Improvidence
It ties up the seller's enpital in questionable accounts
that may easily freeze'into uncollectibility.
I am finding, as 1 go over the country, more efficiency in the grocery business, more study is being
given, more knowledge acquired, more elertness demon-
stinted.   The grocery business is a great business.
We think out business difficult. Would you trsde
your position today for the hair not business, which
over night found that style and fashion had about
made il useless' When Duco Ik'cnme a fact as a sub-
stitute for pnint, how would you like io have been in
the pnint business? Think of ihe silk industry and
whnt niyoit did to it. How would you like to be the
iceman sine- the discovery of iceless ivr-igcration?
So our lot is not so bad when we look about us. We
must not hope to be mowers nnd to gather the ripe
golden enrs unless wc have first been sowers nnd watered the furrows with tears.
In closing, may I leave this one thought with you?
To operate our business in nn unmerchantable like manner is unsound. No greater contribution to our industry, individually and ns a whole, eould be made
than for each one of us to study his business nnd eliminate every practice which we know is unsound Thia
is an individual mutter—not nn association interference in your business any more than you want government interference. Thc association can call attention
to the unsound practices but they can be eliminated
only by individual action on the part of each whole-
Kale groeer for his own business. Using the Texas
slogan—for it says it sll in a line—I urge you to give
more than passing thought to this—
•NOT A BHidKR HIT A BETTER BUSINESS." 38
JUST TRY
WESTERN GLASS
FOR COMPLETE SATISFACTION
"New  Cuetomore  will   appreciate
the degree of dependability and
service.*
POLISHED PLATE GLASS
MIRRORS    ::    WINDOW GLASS
Wastem Glass Co. Ltd.
ISS Cordova St Weat, Vancouver
SEY. 6687
Scalea, Slicere, Cuttere and Cabin*
sts—New, Rebuilt and Second Hand.
Caah or Terms.
The Scale Shop Ltd.
Soy. 2SS1
369 Cordova St W„ facing Homer.
BULLETINS
PRICE LISTS
SPECIAL SALE
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Multigraphod, Mimeographed
Addreeood. Mailed.
Mail Campaigns Handled Efficiently
Wrigley Directories, Ud.
1W W. Hastings.   Phono Soy. 1006
VANART
FOR FLAVORING
CAKES CUSTARDS
LIKL VA* III A ONLY'NICER
W. A. JAMESON COFFEE CO.
Victoria—Vancouver
f. D. STARK
F. W. STERLING
Telephone
Soy. SS87
■TABS * STBBUMO
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS
1180 Hamilton Street
VANCOUVER, S. C.
"A CANDY THAT AIM DIGESTION"
(Mode tn France)
Ay 7~ J
"A ProStsble Line to Handle."
Sampl-M end Price* furnlthed all loooon
Telephone Seymour 71S1
D'mlnloa Sales Company
4IS  RICHARDS  St.,     VANCOUVER
(Oox.d M'e-Se. "Ad" earde supplied)
THE    RETAILER
BRITISH OOLUMBIA-ALBORTA-TUKON
Phonoi High.
IDEAL CONE COMPANY
Manufscturere of
ICE CREAM CONES
Pureet Msde    Coot Loeo
616 PRINCESS AVE.
Vancouver.
SERVIOE TO OUT OF TOWN
SUBSCRIBERS.
"The Retailer" will bo pleased to
furnish subscribers ths nsmoe end
addroseee of repressntotivss or
agents of Eastern manufscturere In
Vancouver. We will also odvise
where tholr commodltlee can bo
purchased.
Manufacturers9 Agents
(Vancouver, unleee otherwleo elated).
(lasertlona under tbla heading sre
charged at tho rate of 11.SO s line,
for all month*, payable In advance).
DRYGOODS
Atlantic Underwear Ltd.. Moncton.
ND-E H. Walsh k Co. Ltd. SH
Homer Street   Sey. 6587.
Chlpman-Holton Knitting Co. Ltd..
Hamilton, Ont.-R II. Walsh k Co.
Ltd.. SIS Homer Street.   Sey. SSI7.
The Oall Knitting Co. Ltd.. dall.
Ont—J. J. MscKsy. SOI Dower Bldg
Sey. 3091.
The Kay Manufacturing Co. Montreal.— Tho*. Conlan. SIS Homer St.
Bey. 1977.
Monarch Knitting Co. Ud.. SIS
Homer Street*—8. D. Stewart k Co.
Ltd   Phone Sey. 76SS.
Penmane Ltd., Parle, Onl—J. J.
Thompaon. 615 Haatinga Weat   Sey.
7S77.
Rock laland Overall Co., Rock I*
land, Que.—R. A. Slme, SIS Homer 81.
C. Turnbull Co. Ltd.. Oslt. Ont.—
8. D. Stewsrt k Co. Ltd, til Homer
8treet.   Bey. 76S6.
GROCERIES.
The Borden Co.. Ltd.—Montrc.il,
Que.—Local office, SSS Water Street.
Bey. 6381   James Wood, Msnsger.
Canada Meruit Co., Ltd., London,
Ont. Local office, 1150 Hamilton Bt.
Bey. 3412. Chas A. Tinsman, Msnsger.
July. 1927
GROCERIES—Continued.
Csnsds Colors sod Chemicals Ltd,,
Toronto—Stark k Sterling, 1160 Hum
I iron Street.   Beyv 8367.
Canada Slsrch Co. Ltd., Montreal
—E. H. Rowntree, 207 Hastings VV.
Bey. 59.
Canadian Postum Cereal Co. I.M
Toronto.— McNeeley'a Ltd.. 525 Bey-
mour Street.   Bey. 9S37.
Carnation Milk Products Co. Ltd.—
Oppenhelmer Broa, Ltd., 134 Abbott
Street.   Phono Bey. 3390.
W. Clark Ltd.. Montreal, Que ~c
P. Stark. 42S Hamilton Bt.   Bey 2040
K. W. Qlllett Mfg., Co. Ltd-L
McParlane, 500 Bostty 8t. Hey. 1399
Kellogg Co. of Canada Ltd, London.
OnL—L P. Mason k Co. 510 Rait-
lng« Weat.   Bey. 3903.
Use of tho Woods Milling Co Ltd
—1300 Rlchsrds Street.    Bey. 28:6
W. II   ITArcy, Jr. msnsger.
Palmolive Company of Csnsds Ltd.
Toronlo, Onl.—Dean Armstrong. 1831
Urrh Street.   Bsy. 601L
The Quaker Oats Company.—Ix>c»l
office. 525. 510 Hastings Weat. O 8
Thompaon, Ssles Msnsger.
Rowntree k Co. (Csnsds) Ltd, T-*
onto. W. R. llestly k Co. Ltd. \M
Howe Street, Vsncouver.
STORE EQUIPMENT 4 SUPPLIES.
Bartram Psper Products Co.. Ltd.,
1U0 Homer Streel-Norfolk Psper
Co. Ltd.. ISS Wster Street. Sey 7868
snd 7SS9.
Csnsdlsn Toledo Scslee Co  ltd
Wlndnor. Ont-B. S. Chamber*. Wl
Bmythe Street.   Bey. 3911.
Continental Paper Products. Md.
Ottawa. Ont -Smith. Davidson *
Wright.   Bey. 9S66.
International Business MachlBM
Co. Ltd.. Toronto.-Locsl office. 6M
Seymour St.   Bey. SSS.
Pacific Waaed Paper Co.-Counfr
Bales Book* snd Wsied Psper.-31"
Davie Street.   Boy. 3S8S.   T. !> La*'"
The Scale Shop Ltd.. for Scalp
Ment Slicers. Chopper*. Cssh Rsgi"
ters, Coffee Mills. Cheese Cutter*. 0U
Isrge stock new snd u*ed; WS saw
logue. Terma-365 Cordova Weil
Sey. 2891. 	
am*"**m *••'* i i ouaammmUamaaaatturna •ase ■"• -** -**■»•*■*"*■•"'
J. C. Wilaon, Lid, Laehutc, Que-
Ix>cal office, 10S0 Homer St *■*!
781.   W. T. Rao. Msnsger. THK TIIWI.I. LINKS -illustrated arc all pop*
* r.lar numbers, snd are just a few of our
ninny lines.
We would esteem it a pleasure tn show you
over «t r eomplete range, whieh is one ot th'*
Inrueal in Ctiwtda, during BUYERS' WEEK.
ItK SI'KK AND VISIT oil! SHOWROOMS.
Western Wholesale
Jewelers
3?1 Cordova St. West.
Vancouver. B.C.
i
When Do We Eat?
will be the foremost question in the minds
of all picnickers when they know that the
lunch basket contains a generous supply of
SWIFTS
Premium Frankfurt Style Sausage
Tssty-Easily Prepared-Economical.
SWIFT CANADIAN COMPANY
LIMITED \-  -
/T'-'m1
BUSTER BROWN sales arc really
profitable sales —because Buster
Brown Stockings have the features which
make for "repeat" sales. They're "Three-
Thread Knit"—knit from three threads
instead of one heavy thread—which gives
them longer wear, lessens mothers1
mending labors, adds to their appearance.
And they sell at a reasonable price.
Stock Buster Brown Stockings for steady,
year-round sales. One of the dependable
"Sunshine Hosiery" styles. Your wholesaler has them.
Chipman, Hohon Knitting Company, Limited,
Hamilton, Ontario

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